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Sample records for manganese redox chemistry

  1. Possible roles of manganese redox chemistry in the sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are very potent MnO2 reducers by virtue of their sulfide production: H2S reacts rapidly with MnO2 to yield Mn(2), elemental sulfur, and water. In manganese rich zones, Mn cycles rapidly if sulfate is present to drive the reduction and the MnO2 precipitates and sinks into anaerobic zones. The production of sulfide (by organisms requiring organic carbon compounds) to reduce manganese oxides might act to couple the carbon and sulfur cycles in water bodies in which the two cycles are physically separated. Iron has been proposed for this provision of reducing power by (Jorgensen, 1983), but since MnS is soluble and FeS is very insoluble in water, it is equally likely that manganese rather than iron provides the electrons to the more oxidized surface layers.

  2. Non-aqueous manganese acetylacetonate electrolyte for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleightholme, Alice E. S.; Shinkle, Aaron A.; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Yongdan; Monroe, Charles W.; Thompson, Levi T.

    A single-metal redox flow battery employing manganese(III) acetylacetonate in tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate and acetonitrile has been investigated. Cyclic voltammetry was used to evaluate electrode kinetics and reaction thermodynamics. The Mn II/Mn III and Mn III/Mn IV redox couples appeared to be quasi-reversible. A cell potential of 1.1 V was measured for the one-electron disproportionation of the neutral Mn III complex. The diffusion coefficient for manganese acetylacetonate in the supporting electrolyte solution was estimated to be in the range of 3-5 × 10 -6 cm 2 s -1 at room temperature. The charge-discharge characteristics of this system were evaluated in an H-type glass cell. Coulombic efficiencies increased with cycling suggesting an irreversible side reaction. Energy efficiencies for this unoptimized system were ∼21%, likely due to the high cell-component overpotentials.

  3. A redox-assisted supramolecular assembly of manganese oxide nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    Tao Li; Sun Chenggao; Fan Meilian; Huang Caijuan; Wu Hailong; Chao Zisheng . E-mail: zschao@yahoo.com; Zhai Hesheng . E-mail: hszhai@xmu.edu.cn

    2006-11-09

    In this paper, we report the hydrothermal synthesis of manganese oxide nanotube from an aqueous medium of pH 7, using KMnO{sub 4} and MnCl{sub 2} as inorganic precursors, polyoxyethylene (10) nonyl phenyl ether (TX-10) a surfactant and acetaldehyde an additive. The characterization of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and N{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K (BET) reveals that the synthesized manganese oxide nanotube has a mesopore size of ca. 3.65 nm and a wall thickness of ca. 12 nm, with the wall being composed of microporous crystals of monoclinic manganite. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) result demonstrates a decrease of the binding energy of the Mn{sup 3+} in the manganese oxide nanotube, which may be related to both the nanotubular morphology and the crystalline pore wall. A mechanism of a redox-assisted supramolecular assembly, regulated by acetaldehyde, is postulated.

  4. The Chemistry of Redox-Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Noack, Jens; Roznyatovskaya, Nataliya; Herr, Tatjana; Fischer, Peter

    2015-08-17

    The development of various redox-flow batteries for the storage of fluctuating renewable energy has intensified in recent years because of their peculiar ability to be scaled separately in terms of energy and power, and therefore potentially to reduce the costs of energy storage. This has resulted in a considerable increase in the number of publications on redox-flow batteries. This was a motivation to present a comprehensive and critical overview of the features of this type of batteries, focusing mainly on the chemistry of electrolytes and introducing a thorough systematic classification to reveal their potential for future development.

  5. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling.

    PubMed

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-09-22

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn(2+) provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn(3+) species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn(3+/4+) oxides. Formation of reactive Mn(3+) species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn(3+)-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn(3+) species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant-soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates.

  6. Long-term litter decomposition controlled by manganese redox cycling

    PubMed Central

    Keiluweit, Marco; Nico, Peter; Harmon, Mark E.; Mao, Jingdong; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Kleber, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition is a keystone ecosystem process impacting nutrient cycling and productivity, soil properties, and the terrestrial carbon (C) balance, but the factors regulating decomposition rate are still poorly understood. Traditional models assume that the rate is controlled by litter quality, relying on parameters such as lignin content as predictors. However, a strong correlation has been observed between the manganese (Mn) content of litter and decomposition rates across a variety of forest ecosystems. Here, we show that long-term litter decomposition in forest ecosystems is tightly coupled to Mn redox cycling. Over 7 years of litter decomposition, microbial transformation of litter was paralleled by variations in Mn oxidation state and concentration. A detailed chemical imaging analysis of the litter revealed that fungi recruit and redistribute unreactive Mn2+ provided by fresh plant litter to produce oxidative Mn3+ species at sites of active decay, with Mn eventually accumulating as insoluble Mn3+/4+ oxides. Formation of reactive Mn3+ species coincided with the generation of aromatic oxidation products, providing direct proof of the previously posited role of Mn3+-based oxidizers in the breakdown of litter. Our results suggest that the litter-decomposing machinery at our coniferous forest site depends on the ability of plants and microbes to supply, accumulate, and regenerate short-lived Mn3+ species in the litter layer. This observation indicates that biogeochemical constraints on bioavailability, mobility, and reactivity of Mn in the plant–soil system may have a profound impact on litter decomposition rates. PMID:26372954

  7. Photosynthetic water oxidation: insights from manganese model chemistry.

    PubMed

    Young, Karin J; Brennan, Bradley J; Tagore, Ranitendranath; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-03-17

    Catalysts for light-driven water oxidation are a critical component for development of solar fuels technology. The multielectron redox chemistry required for this process has been successfully deployed on a global scale in natural photosynthesis by green plants and cyanobacteria using photosystem II (PSII). PSII employs a conserved, cuboidal Mn4CaOX cluster called the O2-evolving complex (OEC) that offers inspiration for artificial O2-evolution catalysts. In this Account, we describe our work on manganese model chemistry relevant to PSII, particularly the functional model [Mn(III/IV)2(terpy)2(μ-O)2(OH2)2](NO3)3 complex (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine), a mixed-valent di-μ-oxo Mn dimer with two terminal aqua ligands. In the presence of oxo-donor oxidants such as HSO5(-), this complex evolves O2 by two pathways, one of which incorporates solvent water in an O-O bond-forming reaction. Deactivation pathways of this catalyst include comproportionation to form an inactive Mn(IV)Mn(IV) dimer and also degradation to MnO2, a consequence of ligand loss when the oxidation state of the complex is reduced to labile Mn(II) upon release of O2. The catalyst's versatility has been shown by its continued catalytic activity after direct binding to the semiconductor titanium dioxide. In addition, after binding to the surface of TiO2 via a chromophoric linker, the catalyst can be oxidized by a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism, mimicking the natural PSII process. Model oxomanganese complexes have also aided in interpreting biophysical and computational studies on PSII. In particular, the μ-oxo exchange rates of the Mn-terpy dimer have been instrumental in establishing that the time scale for μ-oxo exchange of high-valent oxomanganese complexes with terminal water ligands is slower than O2 evolution in the natural photosynthetic system. Furthermore, computational studies on the Mn-terpy dimer and the OEC point to similar Mn(IV)-oxyl intermediates in the O-O bond

  8. Tuning the redox properties of manganese(II) and its implications to the electrochemistry of manganese and iron superoxide dismutases.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Martin; Gätjens, Jessica; Tabares, Leandro C; Thuéry, Pierre; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Un, Sun

    2008-04-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) catalyze the disproportionation of superoxide to dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The active metal sites of iron and manganese superoxide dismutases are structurally indistinguishable from each other. Despite the structural homology, these enzymes exhibit a high degree of metal selective activity suggesting subtle redox tuning of the active site. The redox tuning model, however, up to now has been challenged by the existence of so-called cambialistic SODs that function with either metal ion. We have prepared and investigated two sets of manganese complexes in which groups of varying electron-withdrawing character, as measured by their Hammett constants sigma Para, have been introduced into the ligands. We observed that the Mn(III)/Mn(II) reduction potential for the series based on 4'-X-terpyridine ligands together with the corresponding values for the iron-substituted 4'-X-terpyridine complexes changed linearly with sigma Para. The redox potential of the iron and manganese complexes could be varied by as much as 600 mV by the 4'-substitution with the manganese complexes being slightly more sensitive to the substitution than iron. The difference was such that in the case where the 4'-substituent was a pyrrolidine group both the manganese and the iron complex were thermodynamically competent to catalytically disproportionate superoxide, making this particular ligand "cambialistic". Taking our data and those available from the literature together, it was found that in addition to the electron-withdrawing capacity of the 4'-substituents the overall charge of the Mn(II) complexes plays a major role in tuning the redox potential, about 600 mV per charge unit. The ion selectivity in Mn and FeSODs and the occurrence of cambialistic SODs are discussed in view of these results. We conclude that the more distant electrostatic contributions may be the source of metal specific enzymatic activity. PMID:18271528

  9. Iron Analysis by Redox Titration. A General Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Samuel; DeVoe, Howard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simplified redox method for total iron analysis suitable for execution in a three-hour laboratory period by general chemistry students. Discusses materials, procedures, analyses, and student performance. (CW)

  10. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  11. Rapidly reversible redox transformation in nanophase manganese oxides at room temperature triggered by changes in hydration

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase manganese oxide surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Surface reduction of bixbyite (Mn2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs in nanoparticles under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Additionally, transformation does not occur on nanosurfaces passivated by at least 2% coverage of what is likely an amorphous manganese oxide layer. The transformation is due to thermodynamic control arising from differences in surface energies of the two phases (Mn2O3 and Mn3O4) under wet and dry conditions. Such reversible and rapid transformation near room temperature may affect the behavior of manganese oxides in technological applications and in geologic and environmental settings. PMID:24733903

  12. Rapidly reversible redox transformation in nanophase manganese oxides at room temperature triggered by changes in hydration.

    PubMed

    Birkner, Nancy; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-04-29

    Chemisorption of water onto anhydrous nanophase manganese oxide surfaces promotes rapidly reversible redox phase changes as confirmed by calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and titration for manganese average oxidation state. Surface reduction of bixbyite (Mn2O3) to hausmannite (Mn3O4) occurs in nanoparticles under conditions where no such reactions are seen or expected on grounds of bulk thermodynamics in coarse-grained materials. Additionally, transformation does not occur on nanosurfaces passivated by at least 2% coverage of what is likely an amorphous manganese oxide layer. The transformation is due to thermodynamic control arising from differences in surface energies of the two phases (Mn2O3 and Mn3O4) under wet and dry conditions. Such reversible and rapid transformation near room temperature may affect the behavior of manganese oxides in technological applications and in geologic and environmental settings.

  13. Synthesis, and characterization of low- and high-spin manganese(II) complexes of polyfunctional adipoyldihydrazone: Effect of coordination of N-donor ligands on stereo-redox chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basumatary, Debajani; Lal, Ram Ashray; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-07-01

    Manganese(II) complexes [MnII(npahH2)] (1), [MnII(npahH2)(A)2] and [MnII(npahH2)(NN)] (where A = pyridine, (2); 2-picoline, (3); 3-picoline, (4); 4-picoline, (5) and NN = 2,2‧ bipyridine, (6); 1,10-phenanthroline, (7)) have been synthesized from bis(2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde)adipoyldihydrazone (npahH4) in methanol. The composition of metal complexes has been established by elemental analyses. Complexes (1) and (3) have been characterized by mass spectral data also. Structural assessments of the complexes have been based on data obtained from molar conductance, magnetic moment, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectral studies. Conductivity measurements in DMSO suggest that they are non-electrolyte. Electronic spectral studies suggest a six-coordinate octahedral geometry around the manganese center in complexes (2) to (7) and square-planar geometry in complex (1). IR spectral studies reveal that the dihydrazone coordinates to the metal in keto form with an anti-cis configuration. Magnetic moment, and EPR studies suggest manganese in +2 oxidation state in all complexes with high-spin distorted octahedral stereochemistry in complexes (2-7) while low-spin square-planar stereochemistry is involved with significant metal-metal interactions in the solid state in complex (1). Cyclic voltammetric studies reveal that the metal center cycles among the MnII → MnI → Mn0 in complexes (2) to (7) and among MnII → MnI oxidation states in complex (1).

  14. Battles with iron: manganese in oxidative stress protection.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C

    2012-04-20

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron.

  15. Thiol chemistry and specificity in redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2008-09-01

    Exposure of cells to sublethal oxidative stress results in the modulation of various signaling pathways. Oxidants can activate and inactivate transcription factors, membrane channels, and metabolic enzymes, and regulate calcium-dependent and phosphorylation signaling pathways. Oxidation and reduction of thiol proteins are thought to be the major mechanisms by which reactive oxidants integrate into cellular signal transduction pathways. This review focuses on mechanisms for sensing and transmitting redox signals, from the perspective of their chemical reactivity with specific oxidants. We discuss substrate preferences for different oxidants and how the kinetics of these reactions determines how each oxidant will react in a cell. This kinetic approach helps to identify initial oxidant-sensitive targets and elucidate mechanisms involved in transmission of redox signals. It indicates that only those proteins with very high reactivity, such as peroxiredoxins, are likely to be direct targets for hydrogen peroxide. Other more modestly reactive thiol proteins such as protein tyrosine phosphatases are more likely to become oxidized by an indirect mechanism. The review also examines oxidative changes observed during receptor-mediated signaling, the strengths and limitations of detection methods for reactive oxidant production, and the evidence for hydrogen peroxide acting as the second messenger. We discuss areas where observations in cell systems can be rationalized with the reactivity of specific oxidants and where further work is needed to understand the mechanisms involved.

  16. Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Sampson, Jacqueline M.; Atlas, Zachary

    2014-10-01

    The element phosphorus (P) controls growth in many ecosystems as the limiting nutrient, where it is broadly considered to reside as pentavalent P in phosphate minerals and organic esters. Exceptions to pentavalent P include phosphine-PH3-a trace atmospheric gas, and phosphite and hypophosphite, P anions that have been detected recently in lightning strikes, eutrophic lakes, geothermal springs, and termite hindguts. Reduced oxidation state P compounds include the phosphonates, characterized by C-P bonds, which bear up to 25% of total organic dissolved phosphorus. Reduced P compounds have been considered to be rare; however, the microbial ability to use reduced P compounds as sole P sources is ubiquitous. Here we show that between 10% and 20% of dissolved P bears a redox state of less than +5 in water samples from central Florida, on average, with some samples bearing almost as much reduced P as phosphate. If the quantity of reduced P observed in the water samples from Florida studied here is broadly characteristic of similar environments on the global scale, it accounts well for the concentration of atmospheric phosphine and provides a rationale for the ubiquity of phosphite utilization genes in nature. Phosphine is generated at a quantity consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium established by the disproportionation reaction of reduced P species. Comprising 10-20% of the total dissolved P inventory in Florida environments, reduced P compounds could hence be a critical part of the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and in turn may impact global carbon cycling and methanogenesis.

  17. Redox chemistry in the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Matthew A; Sampson, Jacqueline M; Atlas, Zachary

    2014-10-28

    The element phosphorus (P) controls growth in many ecosystems as the limiting nutrient, where it is broadly considered to reside as pentavalent P in phosphate minerals and organic esters. Exceptions to pentavalent P include phosphine--PH3--a trace atmospheric gas, and phosphite and hypophosphite, P anions that have been detected recently in lightning strikes, eutrophic lakes, geothermal springs, and termite hindguts. Reduced oxidation state P compounds include the phosphonates, characterized by C-P bonds, which bear up to 25% of total organic dissolved phosphorus. Reduced P compounds have been considered to be rare; however, the microbial ability to use reduced P compounds as sole P sources is ubiquitous. Here we show that between 10% and 20% of dissolved P bears a redox state of less than +5 in water samples from central Florida, on average, with some samples bearing almost as much reduced P as phosphate. If the quantity of reduced P observed in the water samples from Florida studied here is broadly characteristic of similar environments on the global scale, it accounts well for the concentration of atmospheric phosphine and provides a rationale for the ubiquity of phosphite utilization genes in nature. Phosphine is generated at a quantity consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium established by the disproportionation reaction of reduced P species. Comprising 10-20% of the total dissolved P inventory in Florida environments, reduced P compounds could hence be a critical part of the phosphorus biogeochemical cycle, and in turn may impact global carbon cycling and methanogenesis. PMID:25313061

  18. Redox reactions involving chromium, plutonium, and manganese in soils. Final report, 1 July 1978-30 September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Amacher, M C; Baker, D E

    1982-06-01

    Although particulate movement through wind and water erosion is the most important mechanism of dispersion of Pu at the Nevada Test Site, dispersion of water-soluble species may also be occurring. However, because Pu is toxic, usually insoluble, not uniformly distributed in the soil, and can exist in four oxidation states in the environment, it is very difficult to study. Therefore, Cr reactions in soil were investigated as a possible general model for Pu reactions in soil, since it was postulated that the redox chemistries of the two elements should be similar. Chemical fractionation methods were used to determine the redox states of Pu in a Nevada Test Site soil and the amounts of Pu associated with various soil components in order to deduce possible reactions between the various Pu species and soil components so that weathering and dispersion by chemical mechanisms can be predicted. Chemical fractionation and kinetics experiments were performed to study reactions of Cr with soil, manganese oxides, and fulvic acids in order to provide information to eventually develop a qualitative, predictive model for Pu behavior in soil.

  19. Astroelectrochemistry: the role of redox reactions in cosmic dust chemistry.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Daren J; Holt, Katherine B

    2010-04-01

    We propose that redox reactions on the surface of interstellar dust grains contribute to the synthesis of some polyatomic species that have been identified by spectroscopic signatures. Most of the dust is found in clouds along with a rich abundance of molecular and atomic species, creating a thermodynamically distinct region in the interstellar medium (ISM) where chemistry can be supported. Using knowledge of redox process at the solid/liquid interface, a hypothesis is presented for processing mechanisms involving electron transfer between surface adsorbed species and the solid dust grains found in the ISM. The hypothesis is based on the interaction of dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and plumes of ionised gas, which electrostatically charge dust grains leading to an adjustment of the Fermi energy of electrons on the surface of individual grains. This process is equivalent to applying an external electrochemical potential to an electrode, to drive redox chemistry on an electrode surface in electrolysis or dynamic electrochemistry. Here the individual grains act as 'single electrode' electrochemical reactors in the gas phase. In this paper we highlight a gap in understanding of redox reactions at the solid/gas interface, which is potentially a very fruitful and interesting area of research. PMID:20237693

  20. Astroelectrochemistry: the role of redox reactions in cosmic dust chemistry.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Daren J; Holt, Katherine B

    2010-04-01

    We propose that redox reactions on the surface of interstellar dust grains contribute to the synthesis of some polyatomic species that have been identified by spectroscopic signatures. Most of the dust is found in clouds along with a rich abundance of molecular and atomic species, creating a thermodynamically distinct region in the interstellar medium (ISM) where chemistry can be supported. Using knowledge of redox process at the solid/liquid interface, a hypothesis is presented for processing mechanisms involving electron transfer between surface adsorbed species and the solid dust grains found in the ISM. The hypothesis is based on the interaction of dust grains with electromagnetic radiation and plumes of ionised gas, which electrostatically charge dust grains leading to an adjustment of the Fermi energy of electrons on the surface of individual grains. This process is equivalent to applying an external electrochemical potential to an electrode, to drive redox chemistry on an electrode surface in electrolysis or dynamic electrochemistry. Here the individual grains act as 'single electrode' electrochemical reactors in the gas phase. In this paper we highlight a gap in understanding of redox reactions at the solid/gas interface, which is potentially a very fruitful and interesting area of research.

  1. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    PubMed

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  2. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Regulates a Redox Cycle Within the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kalen, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a nuclear-encoded and mitochondria-matrix-localized oxidation-reduction (redox) enzyme that regulates cellular redox homeostasis. Cellular redox processes are known to regulate proliferative and quiescent growth states. Therefore, MnSOD and mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be critical regulators of quiescent cells' entry into the cell cycle and exit from the proliferative cycle back to the quiescent state. Recent Advances/Critical Issues: Recent evidence suggests that the intracellular redox environment fluctuates during the cell cycle, shifting toward a more oxidized status during mitosis. MnSOD activity is higher in G0/G1 cells compared with S, G2 and M phases. After cell division, MnSOD activity increases in the G1 phase of the daughter generation. The periodic fluctuation in MnSOD activity during the cell cycle inversely correlates with cellular superoxide levels as well as glucose and oxygen consumption. Based on an inverse correlation between MnSOD activity and glucose consumption during the cell cycle, it is proposed that MnSOD is a central molecular player for the “Warburg effect.” Future Directions: In general, loss of MnSOD activity results in aberrant proliferation. A better understanding of the MnSOD and mitochondrial ROS-dependent cell cycle processes may lead to novel approaches to overcome aberrant proliferation. Since ROS have both deleterious (pathological) and beneficial (physiological) effects, it is proposed that “eustress” should be used when discussing ROS processes that regulate normal physiological functions, while “oxidative stress” should be used to discuss the deleterious effects of ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1618–1627. PMID:23590434

  3. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  4. Manganese-oxide-coated redox bars as an indicator of reducing conditions in soils.

    PubMed

    Dorau, Kristof; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2015-03-01

    Identification of reducing conditions in soils is of concern not only for pedogenesis but also for nutrient and pollutant dynamics. We manufactured manganese (Mn)-oxide-coated polyvinyl chloride bars and proved their suitability for the identification of reducing soil conditions. Birnessite was synthesized and coated onto white polyvinyl chloride bars. The dark brown coatings were homogenous and durable. As revealed by microcosm devices with adjusted redox potentials (E), under oxidizing conditions (E ∼450 mV at pH 7) there was no Mn-oxide removal. Reductive dissolution of Mn-oxides, which is expressed by the removal of the coatings, started under weakly reducing conditions (E ∼175 mV) and was more intensive under moderately reducing conditions (∼80 mV). According to thermodynamics, the removal of Mn-oxide coatings (225 mm d) exceeded the removal of iron (Fe)-oxide coatings (118 mm d) in soil column experiments. This was confirmed in a soil with a shallow and strongly fluctuating water table where both types of redox bars were inserted. Consequently, it was possible to identify reducing conditions in soils using Mn-oxide-coated bars. We recommend this methodology for short-term monitoring because tri- and tetravalent Mn is the preferred electron acceptor compared with trivalent Fe, and this additionally offers the possibility of distinguishing between weakly and moderately reducing conditions. If dissolved Fe is abundant in soils, the possibility of nonenzymatic reduction of Mn has to be taken into account.

  5. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking manganese by mouth in combination with calcium, zinc, and copper seems to help reduce spinal bone ... Vitrum osteomag) containing manganese, calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, zinc, copper, and boron for one year seems to ...

  6. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  7. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers.

  8. Complexation and redox interactions between aqueous plutonium and manganese oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.; Nitsche, Heino; Booth, Corwin H.; Shuh, David K.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Wilson, Richard E.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2001-11-01

    The sorption of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) onto manganite (MnOOH) and Hausmannite (Mn3O4) was studied at pH 5. Manganite sorbed 21-24% from a 1x10-4 M plutonium solution and the hausmannite removed between 43-66% of the plutonium. The increased sorption by hausmannite results from its larger surface area (about twice that of manganite) plus a larger number of active surface sites. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra taken at the Pu LIII edge were compared to standard spectra of plutonium in single oxidation states. Based on these spectra, it appears that both manganite and hausmannite reduce the higher valent plutonium species to Pu(IV). Between 53-59% of the plutonium was present as Pu(IV) in the manganite samples while 55-61% of the plutonium complexed to the hausmannite had also been reduced to Pu(IV). The exact mechanism behind this redox interaction between the plutonium and the manganese needs to be identified.

  9. Problems in Teaching the Topic of Redox Reactions: Actions and Conceptions of Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Onno; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents a case study of problems that can occur when teaching the topic of redox reactions to grade-11 students. Concludes that the teachers' scientific expertise is an important source of difficulties when teaching redox reactions. Discusses implications for improvement of current chemistry classroom practice and content-related teacher…

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of a Layered Manganese Oxide: Materials Chemistry for the Inorganic or Instrumental Methods Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Stanton; Neupane, Ram P.; Gray, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    A three-week laboratory project involving synthesis and characterization of a layered manganese oxide provides an excellent vehicle for teaching important concepts of inorganic chemistry and instrumental methods related to non-molecular systems. Na-birnessite is an easily prepared manganese oxide with a 7 A interlayer spacing and Na[superscript +]…

  11. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  12. Simulation, planning, and optimization of redox processes involving the catalytic disproportionation of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ by manganese(II) complexes with glycine

    SciTech Connect

    Batyr, D.G.; Isak, V.G.; Kil'mininov, S.V.; Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.

    1987-11-01

    The applicability of the use of a method for the simulation, planning, and optimization of chemical processes has been demonstrated in the example case of the manganese(II)-glycine-hydrogen peroxide redox system. Theoretical calculations based on experimental data have made it possible to present a mechanism for the catalase-mediated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of coordination compounds of manganese(II) with glycine.

  13. Principles in redox signaling: from chemistry to functional significance.

    PubMed

    Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2013-05-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are currently considered not only harmful byproducts of aerobic respiration but also critical mediators of redox signaling. The molecules and the chemical principles sustaining the network of cellular redox regulated processes are described. Special emphasis is placed on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), now considered as acting as a second messenger, and on sulfhydryl groups, which are the direct targets of the oxidant signal. Cysteine residues of some proteins, therefore, act as sensors of redox conditions and are oxidized in a reversible reaction. In particular, the formation of sulfenic acid and disulfide, the initial steps of thiol oxidation, are described in detail. The many cell pathways involved in reactive oxygen species formation are reported. Central to redox signaling processes are the glutathione and thioredoxin systems controlling H(2)O(2) levels and, hence, the thiol/disulfide balance. Lastly, some of the most important redox-regulated processes involving specific enzymes and organelles are described. The redox signaling area of research is rapidly expanding, and future work will examine new pathways and clarify their importance in cellular pathophysiology.

  14. Unusual Mn coordination and redox chemistry in the high capacity borate cathode Li7Mn(BO3)3.

    PubMed

    Roos, Julian; Eames, Christopher; Wood, Stephen M; Whiteside, Alexander; Islam, M Saiful

    2015-09-14

    The recently discovered lithium-rich cathode material Li7Mn(BO3)3 has a high theoretical capacity and an unusual tetrahedral Mn(2+) coordination. Atomistic simulation and density functional theory (DFT) techniques are employed to provide insights into the defect and redox chemistry, the structural changes upon lithium extraction and the mechanisms of lithium ion diffusion. The most favourable intrinsic defects are Li/Mn anti-site pairs, where Li and Mn ions occupy interchanged positions, and Li Frenkel defects. DFT calculations reproduce the experimental cell voltage and confirm the presence of the unusually high Mn(V) redox state, which corresponds to a theoretical capacity of nearly 288 mA h g(-1). The ability to reach the high manganese oxidation state is related to both the initial tetrahedral coordination of Mn and the observed distortion/tilting of the BO3 units to accommodate the contraction of the Mn-O bonds upon oxidation. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate fast three-dimensional lithium diffusion in line with the good rate performance observed.

  15. PEGylated Nanoceria as Radical Scavenger with Tunable Redox Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Karakoti, Ajay S.; Singh, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Malinska, M.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Wozniak, K.; Self, William; Seal, Sudipta

    2009-10-14

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have shown tremendous potential in various applications such as water gas shift catalysis, chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), solar cells4 and high temperature oxidation protection coatings1. Recently, CNPs have been demonstrated to protect biological tissues against radiation induced damage, scavenging of superoxide anions, prevention of laser induced retinal damage, reduction of spinal injury in a tissue culture model, prevention of cardiovascular myopathy, pH dependent antioxidant properties, as a tool for immunoassays as well as other inflammatory diseases2. In most biomedical applications it is speculated that nanoceria is a regenerative radical scavenger with the ability to regenerate its active 3+ oxidation state for radical scavenging. Thus far there are no reports to control the regeneration of Ce3+ oxidation state which is the most important parameter in the application of CNPs as a reliable and regenerative radical scavenger. Thus, there is an imminent need to increase the potency of CNPs to achieve higher degree of protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), to increase the residence time of CNPs in body and to control the regeneration of 3+ oxidation state. PEG has been reported to increase the residence time of nanoparticles and proteins inside cells and provide biocompatibility3. PEGylated counterparts of the SOD enzymes have shown improved performance over non-PEGylated enzymes. Herein, we report our efforts to synthesize CNPs directly in polyethylene glycol (mol wt 600) solution and determine the effect of increasing concentration of PEG (PEG vol % as 5, 10, 20, 40, 60 and 80) on the SOD mimetic properties exhibited by nanoceria. We also report how the active Ce3+ oxidation state can be regenerated or further tuned to regenerate at faster rate. We further demonstrate the role of PEG on the redox chemistry of CNPs catalyzed by hydrogen peroxide. Several complexes of PEGs

  16. Redox Models in Chemistry Textbooks for the Upper Secondary School: Friend or Foe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterlund, Lise-Lotte; Berg, Anders; Ekborg, Margareta

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated how chemistry textbooks use models of redox reactions in different subject areas, how they change models between and within the topics, and how they deal with specific learning difficulties identified in the literature. The textbooks examined were published for use in the natural science programme in Swedish upper secondary…

  17. Manganese dioxide nanosheets-based redox/pH-responsive drug delivery system for cancer theranostic application

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Bingxiang; Li, Dong; Meng, Dehui; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct redox- and pH-responsive degradable manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanosheets for cancer theranostic application. The small MnO2 nanosheets were synthesized, and then functionalized by hyaluronic acid (HA), demonstrating excellent stability and tumor-targeting ability. Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [CDDP]) was absorbed by the nanosheets through a physical action, which was designed as MnO2/HA/CDDP. The prepared MnO2/HA/CDDP formulation was able to efficiently deliver CDDP to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, resulting in improved therapeutic efficiency. Subsequently, they were triggered by lower pH and higher level of reduced glutathione to generate Mn2+, enabling magnetic resonance imaging. The smart multifunctional system combining efficient magnetic resonance imaging and chemotherapy has the potential to be used as a tumor-targeting theranostic nanomedicine. PMID:27199556

  18. Manganese dioxide nanosheets-based redox/pH-responsive drug delivery system for cancer theranostic application.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Bingxiang; Li, Dong; Meng, Dehui; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct redox- and pH-responsive degradable manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanosheets for cancer theranostic application. The small MnO2 nanosheets were synthesized, and then functionalized by hyaluronic acid (HA), demonstrating excellent stability and tumor-targeting ability. Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [CDDP]) was absorbed by the nanosheets through a physical action, which was designed as MnO2/HA/CDDP. The prepared MnO2/HA/CDDP formulation was able to efficiently deliver CDDP to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, resulting in improved therapeutic efficiency. Subsequently, they were triggered by lower pH and higher level of reduced glutathione to generate Mn(2+), enabling magnetic resonance imaging. The smart multifunctional system combining efficient magnetic resonance imaging and chemotherapy has the potential to be used as a tumor-targeting theranostic nanomedicine. PMID:27199556

  19. Limitations in determining redox chemistry in basalt groundwaters at the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.A.; Jones, T.E.; Marcy, A.D.; West, M.H.

    1986-03-01

    The oxidation-reduction (redox) chemistry of the basalt groundwater system will be an important factor governing both the design and performance of a high-level nuclear waste repository in basalt. Although the redox state of the basalt groundwater system is inherently difficult to measure, there are a number of types of measurements that provide valuable information on this subject. These measurements include concentrations of dissolved sulfide, ferrous iron, electrode redox potential, and groundwater reducing capacity. These measurements have been made on a limited basis in a number of different repository test horizons. Taken collectively, the results of these measurements suggest that both sulfide and ferrous iron play an important role in the establishment of the basalt groundwater redox condition. Thermodynamic calculations of redox potential (E/sub h/) based on these measurements are indicative of an E/sub h/ of -0.4 V. Additional measurements are proposed that will provide a more complete understanding of basalt groundwater redox conditions. The proposed measurements include a more in-depth analysis of redox active species as well as quantification of dissolved gas species such as oxygen and methane.

  20. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed. PMID:26265165

  1. A chemistry and material perspective on lithium redox flow batteries towards high-density electrical energy storage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Li, Yutao; Peng, Lele; Byon, Hye Ryung; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2015-11-21

    Electrical energy storage system such as secondary batteries is the principle power source for portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage. As an emerging battery technology, Li-redox flow batteries inherit the advantageous features of modular design of conventional redox flow batteries and high voltage and energy efficiency of Li-ion batteries, showing great promise as efficient electrical energy storage system in transportation, commercial, and residential applications. The chemistry of lithium redox flow batteries with aqueous or non-aqueous electrolyte enables widened electrochemical potential window thus may provide much greater energy density and efficiency than conventional redox flow batteries based on proton chemistry. This Review summarizes the design rationale, fundamentals and characterization of Li-redox flow batteries from a chemistry and material perspective, with particular emphasis on the new chemistries and materials. The latest advances and associated challenges/opportunities are comprehensively discussed.

  2. Binding stoichiometry and affinity of the manganese-stabilizing protein affects redox reactions on the oxidizing side of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Roose, Johnna L; Yocum, Charles F; Popelkova, Hana

    2011-07-12

    It has been reported previously that the two subunits of PsbO, the photosystem II (PSII) manganese stabilizing protein, have unique functions in relation to the Mn, Ca(2+), and Cl(-) cofactors in eukaryotic PSII [Popelkova; (2008) Biochemistry 47, 12593]. The experiments reported here utilize a set of N-terminal truncation mutants of PsbO, which exhibit altered subunit binding to PSII, to further characterize its role in establishing efficient O(2) evolution activity. The effects of PsbO binding stoichiometry, affinity, and specificity on Q(A)(-) reoxidation kinetics after a single turnover flash, S-state transitions, and O(2) release time have been examined. The data presented here show that weak rebinding of a single PsbO subunit to PsbO-depleted PSII repairs many of the defects in PSII resulting from the removal of the protein, but many of these are not sustainable, as indicated by low steady-state activities of the reconstituted samples [Popelkova; (2003) Biochemistry 42 , 6193]. High affinity binding of PsbO to PSII is required to produce more stable and efficient cycling of the water oxidation reaction. Reconstitution of the second PsbO subunit is needed to further optimize redox reactions on the PSII oxidizing side. Native PsbO and recombinant wild-type PsbO from spinach facilitate PSII redox reactions in a very similar manner, and nonspecific binding of PsbO to PSII has no significance in these reactions.

  3. Photochemically driven redox chemistry induces protocell membrane pearling and division.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ting F; Adamala, Katarzyna; Zhang, Na; Szostak, Jack W

    2012-06-19

    Prior to the evolution of complex biochemical machinery, the growth and division of simple primitive cells (protocells) must have been driven by environmental factors. We have previously demonstrated two pathways for fatty acid vesicle growth in which initially spherical vesicles grow into long filamentous vesicles; division is then mediated by fluid shear forces. Here we describe a different pathway for division that is independent of external mechanical forces. We show that the illumination of filamentous fatty acid vesicles containing either a fluorescent dye in the encapsulated aqueous phase, or hydroxypyrene in the membrane, rapidly induces pearling and subsequent division in the presence of thiols. The mechanism of this photochemically driven pathway most likely involves the generation of reactive oxygen species, which oxidize thiols to disulfide-containing compounds that associate with fatty acid membranes, inducing a change in surface tension and causing pearling and subsequent division. This vesicle division pathway provides an alternative route for the emergence of early self-replicating cell-like structures, particularly in thiol-rich surface environments where UV-absorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could have facilitated protocell division. The subsequent evolution of cellular metabolic processes controlling the thiol:disulfide redox state would have enabled autonomous cellular control of the timing of cell division, a major step in the origin of cellular life. PMID:22665773

  4. 1: Redox chemistry of bimetallic fulvalene complexes; 2: Oligocyclopentadienyl complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. S.

    1993-11-01

    The electrochemistry of the heterobimetallic complexes (fulvalene)WFe(CO){sub 5} (30) and (fulvalene)WRu(CO){sub 5} (31) has been investigated. Compound 30 is reduced in two one-electron processes, and this behavior was exploited synthetically to prepare a tetranuclear dimer by selective metal reduction. Complex 31 displayed a distinction between the metals upon reoxidation of the dianion, allowing the formation of a dimer by selective metal anion oxidation. The redox behavior of 30 led to an investigation of the use of electrocatalysis to effect metal-specific ligand substitution. It was found that reduction of 30 with a catalytic amount of CpFe(C{sub 6}Me{sub 6}) (97) in the presence of excess P(OMe){sub 3} or PMe{sub 3} led to the formation of the zwitterions (fulvalene)[W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}][Fe(CO)PR{sub 3}{sup +}] (107, R = P(OMe){sub 3}; 108, R = PMe{sub 3}). Compound 31 also displayed unique behavior with different reducing agents, as the monosubstituted zwitterion (fulvalene)[W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}][Ru(CO){sub 2}(PMe{sub 3}){sup +}] was obtained when 97 was used while the disubstituted complex (fulvalene) [W(CO){sub 3}{sup {minus}}] [Ru(CO)(PMe{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup +}] was produced when Cp*Fe(C{sub 6}Me{sub 6}) was the catalyst. Potential synthetic routes to quatercyclopentadienyl complexes were also explored. Various attempts to couple heterobimetallic fulvalene compounds proved to be unsuccessful. 138 refs.

  5. ROSICS: CHEMISTRY AND PROTEOMICS OF CYSTEINE MODIFICATIONS IN REDOX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1–2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, “ROSics,” for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:184–208, 2015. PMID:24916017

  6. ROSics: chemistry and proteomics of cysteine modifications in redox biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1-2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, "ROSics," for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels.

  7. A Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M.; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-05-29

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal–oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)–oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)–oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc3+ ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C–H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal–oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  8. Coprecipitation and redox reactions of manganese oxides with copper and nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.; Lind, Carol J.; Roberson, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Open-system, continuous-titration experiments have been done in which a slow flux of ???0.02 molar solution of Mn2+ chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate with Cu2+ or Ni2+ in lesser concentrations was introduced into an aerated reactor solution held at constant temperature and at constant pH by a pH-stat titrator that added dilute NaOH. The resulting mixtures of metal oxyhydroxides and their native solutions were aged for periods as long as 2 1/2 years. Fresh and aged precipitates were characterized by chemical analysis, oxidation state determinations, X-ray and electron diffraction, and electron microscopy. The precipitates can be described as mixtures of oxide and oxyhydroxide species, using concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical thermodynamics. The metal-ion content of the aged precipitates in systems that contained copper is distributed among three principal components. One of these is a mixed oxide Cu2Mn3O8 in which all Mn is in the 4+ oxidation state. A major component in all precipitates is feitknechtite, ??MnOOH. These forms are supplemented by CuO or by birnessite or ramsdellite forms of MnO2 where stoichiometry and thermodynamic calculations predict them. In systems that contained nickel and manganese, identifiable components included ??MnOOH, Ni(OH)2, and the same two forms of MnO2. The oxidation number of the precipitated manganese increased during aging, and the pH of the supernatant solution decreased. The maximum Mn oxidation number observed was 3.55 in an Mn + Cu precipitate aged for 18 months. Concentrations of Cu2+ and Ni2+ generally decreased to values substantially below those predicted by oxide or hydroxide equilibrium. Scavenging effects of this type are common in natural aqueous systems. ?? 1989.

  9. Coprecipitation and redox reactions of manganese oxides with copper and nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hem, J. D.; Lind, C. J.; Roberson, C. E.

    1989-11-01

    Open-system, continuous-titration experiments have been done in which a slow flux of ˜0.02 molar solution of Mn 2+ chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate with Cu 2+ or Ni 2+ in lesser concentrations was introduced into an aerated reactor solution held at constant temperature and at constant pH by a pH-stat titrator that added dilute NaOH. The resulting mixtures of metal oxyhydroxides and their native solutions were aged for periods as long as 2 1/2 years. Fresh and aged precipitates were characterized by chemical analysis, oxidation state determinations, X-ray and electron diffraction, and electron microscopy. The precipitates can be described as mixtures of oxide and oxyhydroxide species, using concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium chemical thermodynamics. The metal-ion content of the aged precipitates in systems that contained copper is distributed among three principal components. One of these is a mixed oxide Cu 2Mn 3O 8 in which all Mn is in the 4+ oxidation state. A major component in all precipitates is feitknechtite, βMnOOH. These forms are supplemented by CuO or by birnessite or ramsdellite forms of MnO 2 where stoichiometry and thermodynamic calculations predict them. In systems that contained nickel and manganese, identifiable components included βMnOOH, Ni(OH) 2, and the same two forms of MnO 2. The oxidation number of the precipitated manganese increased during aging, and the pH of the supernatant solution decreased. The maximum Mn oxidation number observed was 3.55 in an Mn + Cu precipitate aged for 18 months. Concentrations of Cu 2+ and Ni 2+ generally decreased to values substantially below those predicted by oxide or hydroxide equilibrium. Scavenging effects of this type are common in natural aqueous systems.

  10. Reactive iron and manganese in estuarine sediments of the Baltic Sea: Impacts of flocculation and redox shuttling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilbert, Tom; Tiihonen, Rosa; Myllykangas, Jukka-Pekka; Asmala, Eero; Hietanen, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) play important roles in sedimentary carbon cycling in both freshwater and marine systems. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe and Mn oxides is known to be a major pathway of suboxic organic matter remineralization in surface sediments, while recent studies have shown that Fe and Mn oxides may be involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane deeper in the sediment column (e.g., Egger et al., 2015). Estuaries are transitional environments, characterized by gradients of salinity and redox conditions which impact on the mobility of Fe and Mn. In turn, the distribution of Fe and Mn in estuarine sediments, and the role of the two metals in carbon cycling, is expected to be spatially heterogeneous. However, few studies have attempted to describe the sedimentary distribution of Fe and Mn in the context of processes occurring in the estuarine water column. In particular, salinity-driven flocculation and redox shuttling are two key processes whose relative impacts on sedimentary Fe and Mn have not been clearly demonstrated. In this study we investigated the coupled water column and sedimentary cycling of Fe and Mn along a 60km non-tidal estuarine transect in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. We show that riverine Fe entering the estuary as colloidal oxides associated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) is quickly flocculated and sedimented within 5 km of the river mouth, despite the shallow lateral salinity gradient. Sediments within this range are enriched in Fe (up to twice the regional average), principally in the form of crystalline Fe oxides as determined by sequential extractions. The high crystallinity implies relative maturity of the oxide mineralogy, likely due to sustained oxic conditions and long residence time in the river catchment. Despite the reducing conditions below the sediment-water interface, Fe is largely retained in the sediments close to the river mouth. In contrast, sedimentary Mn concentrations are highest in a deep silled

  11. Redox processes at surfaces of manganese oxide and their effects on aqueous metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Mn oxides precipitated from aerated solutions of Mn2+ by raising the pH are reported in various publications to have the approximate composition Mn3O4 or MnOOH. These oxyhydroxides in turn can disproportionate to Mn2+ and MnO2 resulting in a substantial decrease in equilibrium Mn solubility. The disproportionation can catalyze the oxidation of Mn2+ and other metals by facilitating electron-transfer processes. Diversion of some electron transfers from Mn species to other metal ions can greatly decrease the equilibrium solubility of Co, Pb, Ni and some other elements in the presence of mixed-valence Mn oxides. Some scavenging and coprecipitation effects involving Mn oxides may be attributable to redox processes. Equilibrium solubilities for Mn, Co and Pb are summarized in four graphs. ?? 1978.

  12. Chromium Mobilization by Microbially-Driven Iron and Manganese Redox Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Arredondo, M.; Hausladen, D.; Ying, S.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Chromium, a naturally occurring contaminant, poses a significant threat to California groundwater quality when ultramafic rocks weather leaving Cr-enriched serpentine soils. Benign and of limited solubility, Cr(III) can oxidize into soluble and carcinogenic Cr(VI). Under most environmental conditions, Mn-oxides are the principal oxidant of Cr(III). Here we investigate Cr(III) oxidation by both abiotically synthesized birnessite and biogenically produced Mn-oxides. Further, we explore chromium dynamics within artificial soil aggregates composed of Cr(OH)3- and Cr0.25Fe0.75(OH)3-coated quartz grains surrounded by aerated solute flow. Abiotic aggregates contained synthetic birnessite, while biotic aggregates were inoculated with Leptothrix cholodnii, a manganese-oxidizing bacterium, and Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-reducing bacterium. Results show aqueous Cr(VI) concentrations scaling with Cr-mineral solubility. When Leptothrix sp.-inoculated Cr(III),Fe(III)-aggregates are supplied with aqueous Mn(II), Mn-oxides precipitate in the aerobic aggregate. Cr(VI) production occurs similar to that via synthetic birnessite. With the addition of Shewanella sp., coupled biotic and abiotic processes occur causing the reduction, and subsequent immobilization, of chromium by microbial metabolites (e.g., Fe(II)). This study shows the importance of microbial community composition on chromium dynamics within diffusion-limited zones, and suggests the potential for biological immobilization of Cr even in the presence of Mn-oxidizing bacteria.

  13. Controlled Redox Chemistry at Cerium within a Tripodal Nitroxide Ligand Framework.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lippincott, Connor A; Carroll, Patrick J; Booth, Corwin H; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Ligand reorganization has been shown to have a profound effect on the outcome of cerium redox chemistry. Through the use of a tethered, tripodal, trianionic nitroxide ligand, [((2-tBuNOH)C6 H4 CH2 )3 N](3-) (TriNOx (3-) ), controlled redox chemistry at cerium was accomplished, and typically reactive complexes of tetravalent cerium were isolated. These included rare cationic complexes [Ce(TriNOx )thf][BAr(F) 4 ], in which Ar(F) =3,5-(CF3 )2 -C6 H3 , and [Ce(TriNOx )py][OTf]. A rare complete Ce-halide series, Ce(TriNOx )X, in which X=F(-) , Cl(-) , Br(-) , I(-) , was also synthesized. The solution chemistry of these complexes was explored through detailed solution-phase electrochemistry and (1) H NMR experiments and showed a unique shift in the ratio of species with inner- and outer-sphere anions with size of the anionic X(-) group. DFT calculations on the series of calculations corroborated the experimental findings.

  14. Influence of oxygenation on chromium redox reactions with manganese sulfide (MnS(s)).

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Amar R; Livi, Kenneth J; Stone, Alan T; Bouwer, Edward J

    2015-03-17

    Manganese sulfide (MnS(s)) minerals exist in sulfidic environments and can have unique reactive abilities because of sulfide, which is a known reductant, and Mn, the oxyhydroxides of which are known oxidants. This study elucidated the role of MnS(s) in controlling Cr speciation with implications on its fate and toxicity in the natural environment, specifically sulfidic sediments that undergo biogeochemical changes due to sediment resuspension during dredging, bioturbation, and flood events. In continuously mixed batch reaction experiments, aqueous CrVI reduction under anaerobic conditions occurred primarily on the surface of MnS(s) displaying a biphasic behavior- the initial rapid removal of CrVI from solution was followed by a slow decline due to surface passivation by reaction products, mainly sorbed or precipitated CrIII. The reaction progress increased with MnS(s) surface area loading but decreased on increasing CrVI concentration and pH, suggesting that surface site regeneration through product desorption was the rate-controlling mechanism. Below circum-neutral pH, higher solubility of MnS(s) resulted in additional CrVI reduction by reduced sulfur species in solution, whereas increased CrIII solubility lowered surface passivation allowing for more reactive sites to participate in the reaction. Aeration of MnS(s) at pH≥7 caused the formation of a heterogeneous MnIII(hydr)oxide that was composed of hausmanite and manganite. CrVI reoccurrence was observed on aeration of CrVI-spiked MnS(s) from the oxidation of product CrIII. The reoccurrence at pH≥7 was attributed to the oxidation of product CrIII by MnIII(hydr)oxide, whereas the reoccurrence at pH<7 was hypothesized from the oxidation of product CrIII by intermediate aqueous MnIII and/or sulfur species. Just as with Cr, MnS(s) may play an important role in speciation, fate, and transport of other environmental contaminants.

  15. Iron-Manganese Redox Reactions in Endeavour Crater Rim Apron Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Peretyazhko, T.; Clark, B. C.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Farrand, W. H.; Grant, J. A., III; Jolliff, B. L.; Parker, T. J.; Schroder, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been exploring Noachian age rocks and outcrops on the rim of the 22 km diameter Endeavour crater since August 2011. The Cape York area is a low-lying rim of Endeavour that contains 3 distinct lithologies: 1) the stratigraphically lowest Matijevic fm of pre-impact lithology, 2) Shoemaker fm of impact breccias, and 3) the stratigraphically highest rim lithology Grasberg fm of post-impact sediments that drape the lower slopes of the rim. The sulfate-rich sediment of the Burns fm lies unconformably over the Grasberg fm. Ca-sulfate veins were discovered in Grasberg fm sediments; the sulfates precipitated from aqueous fluids flowing upward through these materials. Opportunity investigated the chemistry and morphology of outcrops in the Matijevic fm that have Fe(sup 3+)-rich smectite detected by orbital signatures returned by CRISM on MRO. Matijevic fm also contains "boxwork" fractures with chemistry consistent with an Al-rich smectite and veins that appear to be rich in Ca-sulfate. More recently on Cape Tribulation, Opportunity has characterized two S-, Mg- and Mn-rich rich rocks overturned and fractured by the rover's wheels on Cook Haven. Those rocks have been dubbed "Pinnacle Island" and "Stuart Island" and will be referred to as the "Island" rocks. The objectives of this study are to characterize the Fe and Mn contents in the Cape York materials, including the two Island rocks, and to provide a model for Mn mobilization and precipitation. Detailed geochemistry of Endeavour rim rocks is presented in a companion paper. Geochemical trends and elemental associations were obtained from data returned by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on Opportunity.

  16. Accumulation of manganese superoxide dismutase under metal-depleted conditions: proposed role for zinc ions in cellular redox balance.

    PubMed Central

    Otsu, Kaoru; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Fujii, Junichi

    2004-01-01

    A diet low in copper results in increased levels of MnSOD (manganese superoxide dismutase), a critical antioxidative enzyme conferring protection against oxidative stress, in rat liver mitochondria. The mechanism for this was investigated using cultured HepG2 cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma-derived line. MnSOD activity increased 5-7-fold during incubation in a medium supplemented with metal-depleted fetal bovine serum, with a corresponding elevation of its mRNA levels. Metal depletion also decreased CuZnSOD and glutathione peroxidase levels to approx. 70-80% of baseline. When zinc ions were added to the medium at micromolar levels, MnSOD accumulation was suppressed; however, copper ions had essentially no effect on MnSOD expression. Since the intracellular redox status was shifted to a more oxidized state by metal depletion, we examined the DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB (nuclear factor-kappaB), an oxidative stress-sensitive transactivating factor that plays a primary role in MnSOD induction. A gel shift assay indicated that the DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB was increased in cells maintained in metal-depleted culture, suggesting the involvement of the transactivating function of NF-kappaB in this induction. This was further supported by the observation that curcumin suppressed both the DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB and the induction of MnSOD mRNA in cells cultivated under metal-depleted conditions. These results suggest that the level of zinc, rather than copper, is a critical regulatory factor in MnSOD expression. It is possible that a deficiency of zinc in the low-copper diet may be primarily involved in MnSOD induction. PMID:14531733

  17. Thioredoxin Activates MKK4-NFκB Pathway in a Redox-dependent Manner to Control Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Subramani, Jaganathan; Das, Kumuda C

    2015-07-10

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK4) is activated via phosphorylation of Ser-257 and Thr-261 by upstream MAP3Ks and activates JNK and p38 MAPKs in response to cellular stress. We show that thioredoxin (Trx), a cellular redox protein, activates MKK4 via Cys-246 and Cys-266 residues as mutation of these residues renders MKK4 insensitive to phosphorylation by MAP3Ks, TNFα, or Trx. MKK4 is activated in vitro by reduced Trx but not oxidized Trx in the absence of an upstream kinase, suggesting that autophosphorylation of this protein occurs due to reduction of Cys-246 and Cys-266 by Trx. Additionally, mutation of Cys-246 and Cys-266 resulted in loss of kinase activity suggesting that the redox state of Cys-246 and Cys-266 is a critical determinant of MKK4 activation. Trx induces manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene transcription by activating MKK4 via redox control of Cys-246 and Cys-266, as mutation of these residues abrogates MKK4 activation and MnSOD expression. We further show that MKK4 activates NFκB for its binding to the MnSOD promoter, which leads to AP-1 dissociation followed by MnSOD transcription. Taken together, our studies show that the redox status of Cys-246 and Cys-266 in MKK4 controls its activities independent of MAP3K, demonstrating integration of the endothelial redox environment to MAPK signaling.

  18. Impact of radical versus non-radical pathway in the Fenton chemistry on the iron redox cycle in clouds.

    PubMed

    Deguillaume, Laurent; Leriche, Maud; Chaumerliac, Nadine

    2005-07-01

    Modeling studies have shown that the Fenton reaction of iron(II) with H2O2 can contribute, in a significant amount, to OH radicals production in cloud droplets. However, the destruction mechanism of hydrogen peroxide by iron(II) is still uncertain. Two reaction pathways for the first step of Fenton chemistry have been advanced: a radical pathway which considers an OH radical production and a non-radical pathway considering ferryl ion production. The aim of this work is to evaluate the impact of these two possible reaction pathways for Fenton chemistry on the iron redox cycle in cloud droplets. For this purpose, the numerical model of multiphase chemistry M2C2 has been applied to a rural chemical scenario representative of continental conditions. This study highlights that the iron redox cycling is driven by Fenton reaction whatever Fenton mechanism is considered. The ferryl ion chemistry becomes significant in the iron redox cycling when this species is considered as an active intermediate in Fenton chemistry and under night time conditions the iron redox chemistry is controlled by the ferryl ion reactivity. The partitioning of iron between its two main oxidation states (+II and +III) in cloud droplets, which is the indicator of the iron oxido-reduction potential, does not change significantly between the two cases. However, for the non-radical case, the ferryl ion concentration is up to four orders of magnitude higher than the OH concentration highlighting its potential role in oxidative capacity of cloud droplets.

  19. Chemistry of manganese precipitation in Pinal Creek, Arizona, USA: A laboratory study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.; Lind, Carol J.

    1994-01-01

    Groundwater underlying the valley of Pinal Creek downstream from Globe, Arizona, has been contaminated by low-pH metal-enriched wastewater from copper mining and ore processing at Miami, Arizona. At present, the acidity and most of the dissolved metal content, except for Mn, of the wastewater is removed by reactions with carbonate and other solids in the alluvial aquifer before the neutralized contaminated water enters the creek channel and becomes surface flow. Where flow in the creek is perennial, Mn-bearing precipitates are formed in the stream bed and in some places in the subsurface. As an aid to understanding the processes involved and explaining the mineralogy of the precipitates, closely controlled laboratory redox titration experiments were performed on samples of surface flow and groundwater taken near the head of perennial flow in the creek. The high content of dissolved Ca, Mg, Mn and COP2 species in the neutralized contaminated groundwater caused precipitation of some of the Mn as kutnahorite, (Mn, Mg)Ca(CO3)2, when the experimental system was held between pH 8.5 and 9.0 while CO2-free air was bubbled into the solution. Hausmannite and manganite also were precipitated, in somewhat lower amounts. When the concentrations of dissolved CO2 species in the groundwater sample were decreased before the experiment was started, the Mn precipitated was predominantly in the oxides hausmannite and manganite. In some of the experimental titrations clinoenstatite, (MgSiO3), was precipitated. After titrations were stopped the solutions and precipitates were allowed to stand, with limited access to the atmosphere, for several months. During this aging period the degree of oxidation of the precipitated Mn increased and in one precipitate from an experimental solution the Ca + Mn4+ oxides todorokite and takanelite were identified. These oxides also have been identified in streambed precipitates. Some of these precipitates also gave X-ray diffraction reflections for

  20. 4D sequential actuation: combining ionoprinting and redox chemistry in hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Anna B.; Wass, Duncan F.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-10-01

    The programmable sequential actuation of two-dimensional hydrogel membranes into three-dimensional folded architectures has been achieved by combining ionoprinting and redox chemistry; this methodology permits the programmed evolution of complex architectures triggered through localized out-of-plane deformations. In our study we describe a soft actuator which utilizes ionoprinting of iron and vanadium, with the selective reduction of iron through a mild reducing agent, to achieve chemically controlled sequential folding. Through the optimization of solvent polarity and ionoprinting variables (voltage, duration and anode composition), we have shown how the actuation pathways, rate-of-movement and magnitude of angular rotation can be controlled for the design of a 4D sequential actuator.

  1. The Basics of Thiols and Cysteines in Redox Biology and Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Leslie B.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the least abundant amino acids, yet it is frequently found as a highly conserved residue within functional (regulatory, catalytic or binding) sites in proteins. It is the unique chemistry of the thiol or thiolate group of cysteine that imparts functional sites with their specialized properties (e.g., nucleophilicity, high affinity metal binding, and/or ability to form disulfide bonds). Highlighted in this review are some of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of cysteine groups and the equations that apply to them, particularly with respect to pKa and redox potential. Also summarized are the types of low molecular weight thiols present in high concentrations in most cells, as well as the ways in which modifications of cysteinyl residues can impart or regulate molecular functions important to cellular processes including signal transduction. PMID:25433365

  2. Redox chemistry of molybdenum in natural waters and its involvement in biological evolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Deli

    2012-01-01

    The transition element molybdenum (Mo) possesses diverse valances (+II to +VI), and is involved in forming cofactors in more than 60 enzymes in biology. Redox switching of the element in these enzymes catalyzes a series of metabolic reactions in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and the element therefore plays a fundamental role in the global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycling. In the present oxygenated waters, oxidized Mo(VI) predominates thermodynamically, whilst reduced Mo species are mainly confined within specific niches including cytoplasm. Only recently has the reduced Mo(V) been separated from Mo(VI) in sulfidic mats and even in some reducing waters. Given the presence of reduced Mo(V) in contemporary anaerobic habitats, it seems that reduced Mo species were present in the ancient reducing ocean (probably under both ferruginous and sulfidic conditions), prompting the involvement of Mo in enzymes including nitrogenase and nitrate reductase. During the global transition to oxic conditions, reduced Mo species were constrained to specific anaerobic habitats, and efficient uptake systems of oxidized Mo(VI) became a selective advantage for current prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Some prokaryotes are still able to directly utilize reduced Mo if any exists in ambient environments. In total, this mini-review describes the redox chemistry and biogeochemistry of Mo over the Earth’s history. PMID:23267355

  3. Gas-phase ion/ion reactions of peptides and proteins: acid/base, redox, and covalent chemistries.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-02-01

    Gas-phase ion/ion reactions are emerging as useful and flexible means for the manipulation and characterization of peptide and protein biopolymers. Acid/base-like chemical reactions (i.e., proton transfer reactions) and reduction/oxidation (redox) reactions (i.e., electron transfer reactions) represent relatively mature classes of gas-phase chemical reactions. Even so, especially in regards to redox chemistry, the widespread utility of these two types of chemistries is undergoing rapid growth and development. Additionally, a relatively new class of gas-phase ion/ion transformations is emerging which involves the selective formation of functional-group-specific covalent bonds. This feature details our current work and perspective on the developments and current capabilities of these three areas of ion/ion chemistry with an eye towards possible future directions of the field.

  4. Redox chemistry in Minnesota streams during episodes of increased methylmercury discharge.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Steven J; Nollet, Yabing H; Swain, Edward B

    2004-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) are flushed from watersheds during hydrological events, contaminating downstream surface waters and resident fish populations. We monitored total mercury (THg), MeHg, and ancillary water chemistry parameters in two streams (Cedar Creek and Trott Brook) in east-central Minnesota on a weekly or semiweekly basis from April through October 2003. Heavy precipitation in late June resulted in discrete episodes of high concentrations (>1.2 ng/L) of MeHg in both streams in early July. The MeHg/THg ratio increased from 0.15 to 0.36 in Cedar Creek and from 0.13 to 0.46 in Trott Brook during the event. The high MeHg concentrations were accompanied by low dissolved oxygen concentrations and increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, Mn, Fe, and orthophosphate. A prolonged absence of precipitation during August and early September brought stream levels back to baseflow values, and MeHg concentrations decreased to less than 0.1 ng/L. These results suggest that warm-weather, high-discharge events are the primary route of export of MeHg from these watersheds, and baseflow contributes much less MeHg to downstream waters. The redox water chemistry during the,events sampled here suggests that MeHg in these streams is discharged from wetland areas where anoxic/anaerobic conditions prevail.

  5. Comparative analysis for various redox flow batteries chemistries using a cost performance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Alasdair; Viswanathan, Vilayanur; Stephenson, David; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Reed, David; Li, Bin; Balducci, Patrick; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    The total energy storage system cost is determined by means of a robust performance-based cost model for multiple flow battery chemistries. Systems aspects such as shunt current losses, pumping losses and various flow patterns through electrodes are accounted for. The system cost minimizing objective function determines stack design by optimizing the state of charge operating range, along with current density and current-normalized flow. The model cost estimates are validated using 2-kW stack performance data for the same size electrodes and operating conditions. Using our validated tool, it has been demonstrated that an optimized all-vanadium system has an estimated system cost of < 350 kWh-1 for 4-h application. With an anticipated decrease in component costs facilitated by economies of scale from larger production volumes, coupled with performance improvements enabled by technology development, the system cost is expected to decrease to 160 kWh-1 for a 4-h application, and to 100 kWh-1 for a 10-h application. This tool has been shared with the redox flow battery community to enable cost estimation using their stack data and guide future direction.

  6. On the Way Toward Understanding Solution Chemistry of Lithium Polysulfides for High Energy Li-S Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Huilin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Henderson, Wesley A.; Shao, Yuyan; Chen, Junzheng; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Xiao, Jie; Liu, Jun

    2015-04-27

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) redox flow battery (RFB) is a promising candidate for high energy large-scale energy storage application due to good solubility of long-chain polysulfide species and low cost of sulfur. In this report, recent progress and new concepts for Li-S redox flow batteries are discussed with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding and control of lithium polysulfide chemistry to enable the development of liquid phase Li-S redox flow prototype cells. These differ significantly from conventional static Li-S batteries targeting for vehicle electrification. A high solubility of the different lithium polysulfides generated at different depths of discharge and states of charge is required for a flow battery in order to take full advantage of the multiple electron transitions between elemental sulfur and Li2S. A new DMSO-based electrolyte is proposed for Li-S redox flow batteries, which not only enables the high solubility of lithium polysulfide species, especially for the short-chain species, but also results in excellent cycling with a high Coulombic efficiency. The challenges and opportunities for the Li-S redox flow concept have also been discussed in depth.

  7. Electrochemical studies of iron meteorites: phosphorus redox chemistry on the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, David E.; Greenfield, David; Walshaw, Richard D.; Evans, Suzanne M.; Nimmo, Alexander E.; Smith, Caroline L.; Wang, Liming; Pasek, Matthew A.; Kee, Terence P.

    2009-01-01

    The mineral schreibersite, (Fe,Ni)3P, a ubiquitous component of iron meteorites, is known to undergo anoxic hydrolytic modification to afford a range of phosphorus oxyacids. H-phosphonic acid (H3PO3) is the principal hydrolytic product under hydrothermal conditions, as confirmed here by 31P-NMR spectroscopic studies on shavings of the Seymchan pallasite (Magadan, Russia, 1967), but in the presence of photochemical irradiation a more reduced derivative, H-phosphinic (H3PO2) acid, dominates. The significance of such lower oxidation state oxyacids of phosphorus to prebiotic chemistry upon the early Earth lies with the facts that such forms of phosphorus are considerably more soluble and chemically reactive than orthophosphate, the commonly found form of phosphorus on Earth, thus allowing nature a mechanism to circumvent the so-called Phosphate Problem. This paper describes the Galvanic corrosion of Fe3P, a hydrolytic modification pathway for schreibersite, leading again to H-phosphinic acid as the key P-containing product. We envisage this pathway to be highly significant within a meteoritic context as iron meteorites are polymetallic composites in which dissimilar metals, with different electrochemical potentials, are connected by an electrically conducting matrix. In the presence of a suitable electrolyte medium, i.e., salt water, galvanic corrosion can take place. In addition to model electrochemical studies, we also report the first application of the Kelvin technique to map surface potentials of a meteorite sample that allows the electrochemical differentiation of schreibersite inclusions within an Fe:Ni matrix. Such experiments, coupled with thermodynamic calculations, may allow us to better understand the chemical redox behaviour of meteoritic components with early Earth environments.

  8. ROLE OF MANGANESE REDUCTION/OXIDATION (REDOX) ON FOAMING AND MELT RATE IN HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) MELTERS (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C; Michael Stone, M

    2007-03-30

    High-level nuclear waste is being immobilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by vitrification into borosilicate glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Control of the Reduction/Oxidation (REDOX) equilibrium in the DWPF melter is critical for processing high level liquid wastes. Foaming, cold cap roll-overs, and off-gas surges all have an impact on pouring and melt rate during processing of high-level waste (HLW) glass. All of these phenomena can impact waste throughput and attainment in Joule heated melters such as the DWPF. These phenomena are caused by gas-glass disequilibrium when components in the melter feeds convert to glass and liberate gases such as H{sub 2}O vapor (steam), CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and/or N{sub 2}. During the feed-to-glass conversion in the DWPF melter, multiple types of reactions occur in the cold cap and in the melt pool that release gaseous products. The various gaseous products can cause foaming at the melt pool surface. Foaming should be avoided as much as possible because an insulative layer of foam on the melt surface retards heat transfer to the cold cap and results in low melt rates. Uncontrolled foaming can also result in a blockage of critical melter or melter off-gas components. Foaming can also increase the potential for melter pressure surges, which would then make it difficult to maintain a constant pressure differential between the DWPF melter and the pour spout. Pressure surges can cause erratic pour streams and possible pluggage of the bellows as well. For these reasons, the DWPF uses a REDOX strategy and controls the melt REDOX between 0.09 {le} Fe{sup 2+}/{summation}Fe {le} 0.33. Controlling the DWPF melter at an equilibrium of Fe{sup +2}/{summation}Fe {le} 0.33 prevents metallic and sulfide rich species from forming nodules that can accumulate on the floor of the melter. Control of foaming, due to deoxygenation of manganic species, is achieved by converting oxidized MnO{sub 2} or Mn

  9. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  10. Manganese-Substituted Polyoxometalate as an Effective Shuttle Redox Mediator in Z-Scheme Water Splitting under Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kohei; Tomita, Osamu; Higashi, Masanobu; Abe, Ryu

    2016-08-23

    In the present study, a polyoxometalate is for the first time applied as a shuttle redox in two-step (Z-Scheme) photocatalytic water splitting. Photocatalytic H2 evolution using a Mn-substituted polyoxometalate [SiW11 O39 Mn(II) (H2 O)](6-) as an electron donor proceeded over a Ru-loaded SrTiO3 :Rh photocatalyst under visible light with relatively high selectivity, accompanied by the stoichiometric production of its oxidized form [SiW11 O39 Mn(III) (H2 O)](5-) . Photocatalytic O2 evolution using the oxidized [SiW11 O39 Mn(III) (H2 O)](5-) as an electron acceptor proceeded over PtOx -loaded WO3 photocatalyst under visible light with relatively high quantum efficiency and selectivity, whereas the loading of effective PtOx cocatalyst was necessary to facilitate the reduction of polyoxometalate. Finally, a two-step water splitting into H2 and O2 was demonstrated under visible light using the couple of Mn-substituted polyoxometalate as shuttle redox between Ru/SrTiO3 :Rh and PtOx /WO3 photocatalysts, under mildly acidic conditions with pH≈4.5.

  11. Electronic Structure of Manganese Complexes of the Redox-Non-innocent Tetrazene Ligand and Evidence for the Metal-Azide/Imido Cycloaddition Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Vaddypally, Shivaiah; McKendry, Ian G; Tomlinson, Warren; Hooper, Joseph P; Zdilla, Michael J

    2016-07-18

    The first synthetic manganese tetrazene complexes are described as a redox pair comprising anionic [Mn(N4 Ad2 )2 ](-) (1) and neutral Mn(N4 Ad2 )2 (2) complexes (N4 Ad2 =[Ad-N-N=N-N-Ad](2-) ). Compound 1 is obtained in two forms as lithium salts, one as a cationic Li2 Mn cluster, and one as a Mn-Li 1D ionic polymer. Compound 1 is electronically described as a Mn(III) center with two [N4 Ad2 ](2-) ligands. The one-electron oxidized 2 is crystalized in two morphologies, one as pure 2 and one as an acetonitrile adduct. Despite similar composition, the behavior of 2 differs in the two morphologies. Compound 2-MeCN is relatively air and temperature stable. Crystalline 2, on the other hand, exhibits a compositional, dynamic disorder wherein the tetrazene metallacycle ring-opens into a metal imide/azide complex detectable by X-ray crystallography and FTIR spectroscopy. Electronic structure of 2 was examined by EPR and XPS spectroscopies and DFT calculations, which indicate 2 is best described as a Mn(III) ion with an anion radical delocalized across the two ligands through spin-polarization effects.

  12. Electronic Structure of Manganese Complexes of the Redox-Non-innocent Tetrazene Ligand and Evidence for the Metal-Azide/Imido Cycloaddition Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Vaddypally, Shivaiah; McKendry, Ian G; Tomlinson, Warren; Hooper, Joseph P; Zdilla, Michael J

    2016-07-18

    The first synthetic manganese tetrazene complexes are described as a redox pair comprising anionic [Mn(N4 Ad2 )2 ](-) (1) and neutral Mn(N4 Ad2 )2 (2) complexes (N4 Ad2 =[Ad-N-N=N-N-Ad](2-) ). Compound 1 is obtained in two forms as lithium salts, one as a cationic Li2 Mn cluster, and one as a Mn-Li 1D ionic polymer. Compound 1 is electronically described as a Mn(III) center with two [N4 Ad2 ](2-) ligands. The one-electron oxidized 2 is crystalized in two morphologies, one as pure 2 and one as an acetonitrile adduct. Despite similar composition, the behavior of 2 differs in the two morphologies. Compound 2-MeCN is relatively air and temperature stable. Crystalline 2, on the other hand, exhibits a compositional, dynamic disorder wherein the tetrazene metallacycle ring-opens into a metal imide/azide complex detectable by X-ray crystallography and FTIR spectroscopy. Electronic structure of 2 was examined by EPR and XPS spectroscopies and DFT calculations, which indicate 2 is best described as a Mn(III) ion with an anion radical delocalized across the two ligands through spin-polarization effects. PMID:27339316

  13. Versatile redox chemistry complicates antioxidant capacity assessment: flavonoids as milieu-dependent anti- and pro-oxidants.

    PubMed

    Chobot, Vladimir; Kubicova, Lenka; Bachmann, Gert; Hadacek, Franz

    2013-06-04

    Some antioxidants have been shown to possess additional pro-oxidant effects. Diverse methodologies exist for studying redox properties of synthetic and natural chemicals. The latter are substantial components of our diet. Exploration of their contribution to life-extending or -compromising effects is mandatory. Among reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most damaging species. Due to its short half-life, the assay has to contain a specific generation system. Plants synthesize flavonoids, phenolic compounds recognized as counter-agents to coronary heart disease. Their antioxidant activities are affected by their hydroxylation patterns. Moreover, in the plant, they mainly occur as glycosides. We chose three derivatives, quercetin, luteolin, and rutin, in attempts to explore their redox chemistry in contrasting hydrogen peroxide environments. Initial addition of hydrogen peroxide in high concentration or gradual development constituted a main factor affecting their redox chemical properties, especially in case of quercetin. Our study exemplifies that a combination of a chemical assay (deoxyribose degradation) with an electrochemical method (square-wave voltammetry) provides insightful data. The ambiguity of the tested flavonoids to act either as anti- or pro-oxidant may complicate categorization, but probably contributed to their evolution as components of a successful metabolic system that benefits both producer and consumer.

  14. A high-energy-density redox flow battery based on zinc/polyhalide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Lai, Qinzhi; Zhang, Jianlu; Zhang, Huamin

    2012-05-01

    Zn and the Art of Battery Development: A zinc/polyhalide redox flow battery employs Br(-) /ClBr(2-) and Zn/Zn(2+) redox couples in its positive and negative half-cells, respectively. The performance of the battery is evaluated by charge-discharge cycling tests and reveals a high energy efficiency of 81%, based on a Coulombic efficiency of 96% and voltage efficiency of 84%. The new battery technology can provide high performance and energy density at an acceptable cost.

  15. Elucidation of the Biological Redox Chemistry of Purines Using Electrochemical Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryhurst, Glenn; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical studies can give insights into the chemical aspects of enzymatic and in vivo redox reactions of naturally occurring organic compounds. This is illustrated by studies of the electrochemical oxidation of the purinem uric acid. The discussion is limited to information at pH 7 or greater. (JN)

  16. Investigation of the redox chemistry of anthraquinone derivatives using density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Jonathan E; Curtiss, Larry A; Assary, Rajeev S

    2014-09-25

    Application of density functional calculations to compute electrochemical properties such as redox windows, effect of substitution by electron donating and electron withdrawing groups on redox windows, and solvation free energies for ∼50 anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives are presented because of their potential as anolytes in all-organic redox flow batteries. Computations suggest that lithium ions can increase (by ∼0.4 V) the reduction potential of anthraquinone due to the lithium ion pairing by forming a Lewis base-Lewis acid complex. To design new redox active species, the substitution by electron donating groups is essential to improve the reduction window of AQ with adequate oxidative stability. For instance, a complete methylation of AQ can improve its reduction window by ∼0.4 V. The quantum chemical studies of the ∼50 AQ derivatives are used to derive a relationship that connects the computed LUMO energy and the reduction potential that can be applied as a descriptor for screening thousands of AQ derivatives. Our computations also suggest that incorporating oxy-methyl dioxolane substituents in the AQ framework can increase its interaction with nonaqueous solvent and improve its solubility. Thermochemical calculations for likely bond breaking decomposition reactions of unsubstituted AQ anions suggest that the dianions are relatively stable in the solution. These studies provide an ideal platform to perform further combined experimental and theoretical studies to understand the electrochemical reversibility and solubility of new quinone molecules as energy storage materials.

  17. Thermal chemistry of Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10} during deposition of thin manganese films on silicon oxide and on copper surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Qin Xiangdong; Sun Huaxing; Zaera, Francisco

    2012-01-15

    The surface chemistry of dimanganese decacarbonyl on the native oxide of Si(100) wafers was characterized with the aid of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Initial experiments in a small stainless-steel reactor identified a narrow range of temperatures, between approximately 445 and 465 K, in which the deposition of manganese could be achieved in a self-limiting fashion, as is desirable for atomic layer deposition. Deposition at higher temperatures leads to multilayer growth, but the extent of this Mn deposition reverses at even higher temperatures (about 625 K), and also ifhydrogen is added to the reaction mixture. Extensive decarbonylation takes place below room temperature, but limited C-O bond dissociation and carbon deposition are still seen after high exposures at 625 K. The films deposited at low ({approx}450 K) temperatures are mostly in the form of MnO, but at 625 K that converts to a manganese silicate, and upon higher doses a manganese silicide forms at the SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) interface as well. No metallic manganese could be deposited with this precursor on either silicon dioxide or copper surfaces.

  18. Comparative analysis for various redox flow batteries chemistries using a cost performance model

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Aladsair J.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Stephenson, David E.; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Reed, David M.; Li, Bin; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2015-10-20

    A robust performance-based cost model is developed for all-vanadium, iron-vanadium and iron chromium redox flow batteries. Systems aspects such as shunt current losses, pumping losses and thermal management are accounted for. The objective function, set to minimize system cost, allows determination of stack design and operating parameters such as current density, flow rate and depth of discharge (DOD). Component costs obtained from vendors are used to calculate system costs for various time frames. A 2 kW stack data was used to estimate unit energy costs and compared with model estimates for the same size electrodes. The tool has been shared with the redox flow battery community to both validate their stack data and guide future direction.

  19. Storm-associated hydrodynamics drive transient solute and redox chemistry within the floodplain aquifer and hyporheic zone of a piedmont stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, A. H.; Kaplan, L. A.; Lazareva, O.; Michael, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Riparian and hyporheic zones are dynamic settings where fluctuations in pore water flow influence redox-sensitive biogeochemical processes and solute transport. We instrumented a riparian-hyporheic zone transect with pressure transducers, redox probes, and pore water samplers to measure hydrology, redox potential, and water chemistry before, during and after Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. The transect spanned opposing, topographically distinct floodplains, consisting of a broad, flat western side and narrow, steep eastern side. The water table on both sides of the stream rose rapidly with rising stage and promoted continuous groundwater discharge to the stream throughout the storm hydrograph. Soil moisture and oxygen isotope data suggest that preferential recharge through macropores drove the rapid water table response. Macropore flow was also implicated in the delivery of oxygenated, carbon-rich water from the land surface into the floodplain aquifer, driving a shift in redox conditions at depth. Groundwater chemistry changed dramatically: DOC concentrations increased while nitrate and metal concentrations decreased. Greater shifts in groundwater chemistry occurred on the steep eastern side and required more time to reestablish after the storm. The eastern floodplain aquifer also drained more rapidly. Topographic variations across the floodplain transect influenced fluid flow paths and residence times that ultimately controlled the spatial and temporal dynamics of groundwater biogeochemistry. Use of paired sensors such as redox and pressure sensors can improve our understanding of hydrobiogeochemical dynamics during storms.

  20. First-Principles Density Functional Theory Modeling Study on the Redox Chemistry of Graphene Oxides Affected by Placement Geometry of Oxygen Functional Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghee; Kim, Ki Chul; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Seung Soon

    2015-03-01

    To date, lithium-ion batteries have been extensively gained attention due to their promising potential in the industry. Despite their promising properties, improving their poor power density is still needed for practical applications. In addition, sustaining the high redox potential in the lithium-ion batteries is prerequisite for exhibiting the high energy and power densities. Recently, layered carbon materials including graphenes and carbon nanotubes have been paid special attention as promising electrode candidates with high power densities due to their exceptionally high surface area and active oxygen functional groups on their surfaces. However, the lack of reliable information on the redox chemistry of the candidates is the obstacle to be uncovered for practical applications. In this study, we investigated the redox chemistry of graphene oxides cluster models with well-controlled hydroxyl functional groups at the edge. First-principles density functional theory approach was employed to understand the geometric effect of the incorporated hydroxyl functional groups on the redox chemistry. Our study will provide an insight on the strategy for improving the redox potentials of graphene-based electrode candidates.

  1. Redox chemistry of green tea polyphenols: therapeutic benefits in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Hügel, H M; Jackson, N

    2012-05-01

    Evidence for the medicinal and health benefits of polyphenols in green tea for the prevention of chronic diseases such as heart disease, various types of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases is advancing. Their in vivo effectiveness and molecular mechanisms are difficult to elucidate and remain a challenging task. We review the redox responsiveness and amyloid protein perturbation biophysical properties of the major green tea polyphenol constituent (-)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG].

  2. Early mitochondrial dysfunction leads to altered redox chemistry underlying pathogenesis of TPI deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hrizo, Stacy L.; Fisher, Isaac J.; Long, Daniel R.; Hutton, Joshua A.; Liu, Zhaohui; Palladino, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) is responsible for the interconversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate in glycolysis. Point mutations in this gene are associated with a glycolytic enzymopathy called TPI deficiency. This study utilizes a Drosophila melanogaster model of TPI deficiency; TPIsugarkill is a mutant allele with a missense mutation (M80T) that causes phenotypes similar to human TPI deficiency. In this study, the redox status of TPIsugarkill flies was examined and manipulated to provide insight into the pathogenesis of this disease. Our data show that TPIsugarkill animals exhibit higher levels of the oxidized forms of NAD+, NADP+ and glutathione in an age-dependent manner. Additionally, we demonstrate that mitochondrial redox state is significantly more oxidized in TPIsugarkill animals. We hypothesized that TPIsugarkill animals may be more sensitive to oxidative stress and that this may underlie the progressive nature of disease pathogenesis. The effect of oxidizing and reducing stressors on behavioral phenotypes of the TPIsugarkill animals was tested. As predicted, oxidative stress worsened these phenotypes. Importantly, we discovered that reducing stress improved the behavioral and longevity phenotypes of the mutant organism without having an effect on TPIsugarkill protein levels. Overall, these data suggest that reduced activity of TPI leads to an oxidized redox state in these mutants and that the alleviation of this stress using reducing compounds can improve the mutant phenotypes. PMID:23318931

  3. Intermediate honeycomb ordering to trigger oxygen redox chemistry in layered battery electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortemard de Boisse, Benoit; Liu, Guandong; Ma, Jiangtao; Nishimura, Shin-Ichi; Chung, Sai-Cheong; Kiuchi, Hisao; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kikkawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okubo, Masashi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-04-01

    Sodium-ion batteries are attractive energy storage media owing to the abundance of sodium, but the low capacities of available cathode materials make them impractical. Sodium-excess metal oxides Na2MO3 (M: transition metal) are appealing cathode materials that may realize large capacities through additional oxygen redox reaction. However, the general strategies for enhancing the capacity of Na2MO3 are poorly established. Here using two polymorphs of Na2RuO3, we demonstrate the critical role of honeycomb-type cation ordering in Na2MO3. Ordered Na2RuO3 with honeycomb-ordered [Na1/3Ru2/3]O2 slabs delivers a capacity of 180 mAh g-1 (1.3-electron reaction), whereas disordered Na2RuO3 only delivers 135 mAh g-1 (1.0-electron reaction). We clarify that the large extra capacity of ordered Na2RuO3 is enabled by a spontaneously ordered intermediate Na1RuO3 phase with ilmenite O1 structure, which induces frontier orbital reorganization to trigger the oxygen redox reaction, unveiling a general requisite for the stable oxygen redox reaction in high-capacity Na2MO3 cathodes.

  4. Redox Energy and Sulfur Chemistry in Prebiotic Polymer Synthesis and Replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1997-01-01

    In the past year we have made significant progress in three research areas: (1) Most importantly, we discovered a new pathway of prebiotic amino acid synthesis in which formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose reaction) react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine in the presence of thiol catalysts. This thiol-dependent synthesis of amino acids undoubtedly occurs via amino acid thioester intermediates capable of forming peptides. This 'one-pot' reaction system operates under mild aqueous conditions, and like modern amino acid biosynthesis, uses sugar intermediates which are converted to amino acids by energy-yielding redox disproportionation. (2) Finally, in preparation for the analysis of Martian meteorite samples, we upgraded our HPLC system and developed an improved method capable of detecting a I femtomole of amino acid enantiomers. (3) We completed our analysis of the energetics of metabolism that revealed that life depends on biosynthetic processes driven by chemical energy made available by the redox disproportionation of carbon groups of sugars. We established that the favorable energy of redox disproportionation is based on the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups. We concluded that it is hard to imagine any other organic molecule besides sugars (formaldehyde oligomers) having the energy and reactivity needed to drive either modem biosynthesis or the chemical processes behind its origin.

  5. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

    2009-02-11

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

  6. Intermediate honeycomb ordering to trigger oxygen redox chemistry in layered battery electrode

    PubMed Central

    Mortemard de Boisse, Benoit; Liu, Guandong; Ma, Jiangtao; Nishimura, Shin-ichi; Chung, Sai-Cheong; Kiuchi, Hisao; Harada, Yoshihisa; Kikkawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Okubo, Masashi; Yamada, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-ion batteries are attractive energy storage media owing to the abundance of sodium, but the low capacities of available cathode materials make them impractical. Sodium-excess metal oxides Na2MO3 (M: transition metal) are appealing cathode materials that may realize large capacities through additional oxygen redox reaction. However, the general strategies for enhancing the capacity of Na2MO3 are poorly established. Here using two polymorphs of Na2RuO3, we demonstrate the critical role of honeycomb-type cation ordering in Na2MO3. Ordered Na2RuO3 with honeycomb-ordered [Na1/3Ru2/3]O2 slabs delivers a capacity of 180 mAh g−1 (1.3-electron reaction), whereas disordered Na2RuO3 only delivers 135 mAh g−1 (1.0-electron reaction). We clarify that the large extra capacity of ordered Na2RuO3 is enabled by a spontaneously ordered intermediate Na1RuO3 phase with ilmenite O1 structure, which induces frontier orbital reorganization to trigger the oxygen redox reaction, unveiling a general requisite for the stable oxygen redox reaction in high-capacity Na2MO3 cathodes. PMID:27088834

  7. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    WANG,YIFENG; PAPENGUTH,HANS W.

    2000-05-04

    Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.

  8. The influence of EI-21 redox ion-exchange resins on the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of vehicular nuclear power installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskvin, L. N.; Rakov, V. T.

    2015-06-01

    The results obtained from testing the secondary-coolant circuit water chemistry of full-scale land-based prototype bench models of vehicular nuclear power installations equipped with water-cooled water-moderated and liquid-metal reactor plants are presented. The influence of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins intended for chemically deoxygenating steam condensate on the working fluid circulation loop's water chemistry is determined. The influence of redox ion-exchange resins on the water chemistry is evaluated by generalizing an array of data obtained in the course of extended monitoring using the methods relating to physicochemical analysis of the quality of condensate-feedwater path media and the methods relating to metallographic analysis of the state of a faulty steam generator's tube system surfaces. The deoxygenating effectiveness of the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system is experimentally determined. The refusal from applying redox ion-exchange resins in the condensate polishing ion-exchange filters is formulated based on the obtained data on the adverse effect of copper-containing redox ionexchange resins on the condensate-feedwater path water chemistry and based on the data testifying a sufficient effect from using the normal state turbine condensate vacuum deaeration system. Data on long-term operation of the prototype bench model of a vehicular nuclear power installation without subjecting the turbine condensate to chemical deoxygenation are presented.

  9. Review about the manganese speciation project related to neurodegeneration: An analytical chemistry approach to increase the knowledge about manganese related parkinsonian symptoms.

    PubMed

    Michalke, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases get a growing relevance for societies. But yet the complex multi-factorial mechanisms of these diseases are not fully understood, although it is well accepted that metal ions may play a crucial role. Manganese (Mn) is a transition metal which has essential biochemical functions but from occupational exposure scenarios it appeared that Mn can cause severe neurological damage. This "two-faces"-nature of manganese initiated us to start a project on Mn-speciation, since different element species are known to exhibit different impacts on health. A summary about the step-wise developments and findings from our working group was presented during the annual conference of the German trace element society in 2015. This paper summarizes now the contribution to this conference. It is intended to provide a complete picture of the so far evolved puzzle from our studies regarding manganese, manganese speciation and metabolomics as well as Mn-related mechanisms of neural damage. Doing so, the results of the single studies are now summarized in a connected way and thus their interrelationships are demonstrated. In short terms, we found that Mn-exposure leads to an increase of low molecular weight Mn compounds, above all Mn-citrate complex, which gets even enriched across neural barriers (NB). At a Mn serum concentration between 1.5 and 1.9μg/L a carrier switch from Mn-transferrin to Mn-citrate was observed. We concluded that the Mn-citrate complex is that important Mn-carrier to NB which can be found also beyond NB in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or brain of exposed rats. In brain of Mn-exposed rats manganese leads to a decreased iron (Fe) concentration, to a shift from Fe(III) to Fe(II) after long term exposure and thus to a shift toward oxidative stress. This was additionally supported by an increase of markers for oxidative stress, inflammation or lipid peroxidation at increased Mn concentration in brain extracts. Furthermore, glutamate and

  10. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Papenguth, H W

    2001-02-01

    Microbial reactions play an important role in regulating pore water chemistry as well as secondary mineral distribution in many subsurface systems and, therefore, may directly impact radionuclide migration in those systems. This paper presents a general modeling approach to couple microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide transport in a subsurface environment. To account for the likely achievement of quasi-steady state biomass accumulations in subsurface environments, a modification to the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation is proposed. The conditions for using biogeochemical models with or without an explicit representation of biomass growth are clarified. Based on the general approach proposed in this paper, the couplings of uranium reactions with biogeochemical processes are incorporated into computer code BIORXNTRN Version 2.0. The code is then used to simulate a subsurface contaminant migration scenario, in which a water flow containing both uranium and a complexing organic ligand is recharged into an oxic carbonate aquifer. The model simulation shows that Mn and Fe oxyhydroxides may vary significantly along a flow path. The simulation also shows that uranium(VI) can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.

  11. Water oxidation chemistry of a synthetic dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koji; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2014-04-21

    We investigated theoretically the catalytic mechanism of electrochemical water oxidation in aqueous solution by a dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands, [Ru2(X)(Y)(3,6-tBu2Q)2(btpyan)](m+) [X, Y = H2O, OH, O, O2; 3,6-tBu2Q = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone; btpyan =1,8-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene] (m = 2, 3, 4) (1). The reaction involves a series of electron and proton transfers to achieve redox leveling, with intervening chemical transformations in a mesh scheme, and the entire molecular structure and motion of the catalyst 1 work together to drive the catalytic cycle for water oxidation. Two substrate water molecules can bind to 1 with simultaneous loss of one or two proton(s), which allows pH-dependent variability in the proportion of substrate-bound structures and following pathways for oxidative activation of the aqua/hydroxo ligands at low thermodynamic and kinetic costs. The resulting bis-oxo intermediates then undergo endothermic O-O radical coupling between two Ru(III)-O(•) units in an anti-coplanar conformation leading to bridged μ-peroxo or μ-superoxo intermediates. The μ-superoxo species can liberate oxygen with the necessity for the preceding binding of a water molecule, which is possible only after four-electron oxidation is completed. The magnitude of catalytic current would be limited by the inherent sluggishness of the hinge-like bending motion of the bridged μ-superoxo complex that opens up the compact, hydrophobic active site of the catalyst and thereby allows water entry under dynamic conditions. On the basis of a newly proposed mechanism, we rationalize the experimentally observed behavior of electrode kinetics with respect to potential and discuss what causes a high overpotential for water oxidation by 1.

  12. JUPITER-II Molten Salt Flibe Research: An Update On Tritium, Mobilization and Redox Chemistry Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Petti; D. A. Petti; G. R. Smolik; Michael F. Simpson; John P. Sharpe; R. A. Anderl; S. Fukada; Y. Hatano; Masanori Hara; Y. Oya; T. Terai; D.-K. Sze; S. Tanaka

    2005-05-01

    The second Japan/US Program on Irradiation Tests for Fusion Research (JUPITER-II) began on April 1, 2001. Part of the collaborative research centers on studies of the molten salt 2LiF2–BeF2 (also known as Flibe) for fusion applications. Flibe has been proposed as a self-cooled breeder in both magnetic and inertial fusion power plant designs over the last 25 years. The key feasibility issues associated with the use of Flibe are the corrosion of structural material by the molten salt, tritium behavior and control in the molten salt blanket system, and safe handling practices and releases from Flibe during an accidental spill. These issues are all being addressed under the JUPITER-II program at the Idaho National Laboratory in the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility. In this paper, we review the program to date in the area of tritium/deuterium behavior, Flibe mobilization under accident conditions and testing of Be as a redox agent to control corrosion. Future activities planned through the end of the collaboration are also presented.

  13. 40Ar/39Ar age and chemistry of manganese mineralization in the Moab and Lisbon fault systems, southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Marjorie A.; Parry, William T.; Petersen, Erich U.; Hall, Chris M.

    2001-04-01

    Diagenetic iron and manganese mineralization is associated with the Moab and Lisbon faults and is an important indicator of fluid flow in Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of southeastern Utah. Reducing brines originating from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation (with or without hydrocarbons) mobilized disseminated iron and manganese in the Jurassic sandstones and mixed with shallow, oxygenated groundwater to precipitate both iron and manganese mineralization. Mineralization consists of colliform and concretionary hematite, pyrolusite, and cryptomelane-hollandite that contains 1.33 2.12 wt% K. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of vacuum-encapsulated cryptomelane yields age estimates of 25 20 Ma, indicating mineralization coincident with either a Colorado Plateau uplift episode or La Sal Mountains volcanism.

  14. Soil Redox Chemistry Limitation of Selenium Concentration in Carex Species Sedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce J. Mincher; John Mionczynski; Patrick A. Hnilicka

    2007-09-01

    The trace element selenium (Se) is required in the production of enzymes that protect mammalian cells from oxidative damage due to the byproducts of aerobic respiration. Its deficiency in livestock results in the nutritional muscular dystrophy called white muscle disease. This especially affects juveniles in the preweaning period. Symptoms have also been reported in wild herbivores on low-Se forage, and their appearance may be episodic, suggesting temporal variations in Se uptake by plants. Here, we report variations in selenium concentrations in Carex spp. sedges used as forage by bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) on summer range in the Wyoming, Wind River Mountains, and correlate those variations with soil conditions that affect the bioavailability of selenium. Variations in available Se are explained based upon the known oxidation/reduction chemistry of the element. It is concluded that water-saturated, alpine soils provide conditions suitable for the reduction of Se to the unavailable, elemental form, limiting its concentration in forage plants.

  15. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  16. Electrochemical evidence that pyranopterin redox chemistry controls the catalysis of YedY, a mononuclear Mo enzyme.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Hope; Simonov, Alexandr N; Kierzek, Michelina; Rothery, Richard A; Weiner, Joel H; Bond, Alan M; Parkin, Alison

    2015-11-24

    A long-standing contradiction in the field of mononuclear Mo enzyme research is that small-molecule chemistry on active-site mimic compounds predicts ligand participation in the electron transfer reactions, but biochemical measurements only suggest metal-centered catalytic electron transfer. With the simultaneous measurement of substrate turnover and reversible electron transfer that is provided by Fourier-transformed alternating-current voltammetry, we show that Escherichia coli YedY is a mononuclear Mo enzyme that reconciles this conflict. In YedY, addition of three protons and three electrons to the well-characterized "as-isolated" Mo(V) oxidation state is needed to initiate the catalytic reduction of either dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide. Based on comparison with earlier studies and our UV-vis redox titration data, we assign the reversible one-proton and one-electron reduction process centered around +174 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7 to a Mo(V)-to-Mo(IV) conversion but ascribe the two-proton and two-electron transition occurring at negative potential to the organic pyranopterin ligand system. We predict that a dihydro-to-tetrahydro transition is needed to generate the catalytically active state of the enzyme. This is a previously unidentified mechanism, suggested by the structural simplicity of YedY, a protein in which Mo is the only metal site.

  17. Topotactic redox chemistry of NaFeAs in water and air and superconducting behavior with stoichiometry change.

    SciTech Connect

    Todorov, I.; Chung, D. Y.; Claus, H.; Malliakas, C. D.; Douvalis, A. P.; Bakas, T.; He, J.; Dravid, V. P.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.; Univ. of Ioannina

    2010-07-13

    We report experimental evidence that shows superconductivity in NaFeAs occurs when it is Na deficient. The oxidation of NaFeAs progresses differently in water and in air. In water the material oxidizes slowly and slightly retaining the original anti-PbFCl structure. In air NaFeAs oxidizes topotactically quickly and extensively transforming to the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure type. Water acts as a mild oxidizing agent on the FeAs layer by extracting electrons and Na{sup +} cations from the structure, while oxidation in air is more extensive and leads to change in structure type from NaFeAs to NaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The superconducting transition temperature moves dramatically during the oxidation process. Exposed to water for an extended time period NaFeAs shows a substantial increase in T{sub c} up to 25 K with contraction of unit cell volume. NaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, the air oxidized product, shows T{sub c} of 12 K. We report detailed characterization of the redox chemistry and transformation of NaFeAs in water and air using single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, magnetization studies, transmission electron microscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, pOH and elemental analysis.

  18. Electrochemical evidence that pyranopterin redox chemistry controls the catalysis of YedY, a mononuclear Mo enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Hope; Simonov, Alexandr N.; Kierzek, Michelina; Rothery, Richard A.; Weiner, Joel H.; Bond, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    A long-standing contradiction in the field of mononuclear Mo enzyme research is that small-molecule chemistry on active-site mimic compounds predicts ligand participation in the electron transfer reactions, but biochemical measurements only suggest metal-centered catalytic electron transfer. With the simultaneous measurement of substrate turnover and reversible electron transfer that is provided by Fourier-transformed alternating-current voltammetry, we show that Escherichia coli YedY is a mononuclear Mo enzyme that reconciles this conflict. In YedY, addition of three protons and three electrons to the well-characterized “as-isolated” Mo(V) oxidation state is needed to initiate the catalytic reduction of either dimethyl sulfoxide or trimethylamine N-oxide. Based on comparison with earlier studies and our UV-vis redox titration data, we assign the reversible one-proton and one-electron reduction process centered around +174 mV vs. standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7 to a Mo(V)-to-Mo(IV) conversion but ascribe the two-proton and two-electron transition occurring at negative potential to the organic pyranopterin ligand system. We predict that a dihydro-to-tetrahydro transition is needed to generate the catalytically active state of the enzyme. This is a previously unidentified mechanism, suggested by the structural simplicity of YedY, a protein in which Mo is the only metal site. PMID:26561582

  19. Computational chemistry insights in the REDOX Behaviour of Cr and W Fischer carbene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Marile; Conradie, Jeanet; van Rooyen, Petrus H.

    2015-09-01

    An electrochemical study of a series of Fischer carbene complexes containing a hetero-aryl group showed that Cr and W carbenes exhibit different electrochemical behaviour. The Cr carbenes are oxidized in two one electron oxidation processes, namely Cr(0) to Cr(I) and Cr(I) to Cr(II). On the contrary, Fischer carbene complexes of tungsten are directly oxidized from W(0) to W(II). The first reduction process observed for both W- and Cr- carbenes, is a one electron process. A density functional theory (DFT) computational chemistry study of the electronic structure of the Cr- and W-carbenes, showed that the oxidation is metal based and the reduction is located on the carbene ligand. The DFT calculations further showed that the Cr(II) species is a triplet and the W(II) species a closed shell singlet. The DFT calculated energies of the HOMO and LUMO of the neutral carbenes relate linearly to the experimental oxidation and reduction potential, respectively. These mathematical relationships obtained can be used to predict experimentally measured potentials of related Fischer carbene complexes.

  20. Redox chemistry and metal-insulator transitions intertwined in a nano-porous material.

    PubMed

    Maximoff, Sergey N; Smit, Berend

    2014-06-06

    Metal-organic frameworks are nano-porous adsorbents of relevance to gas separation and catalysis, and separation of oxygen from air is essential to diverse industrial applications. The ferrous salt of 2,5-dihydroxy-terephthalic acid, a metal-organic framework of the MOF74 family, can selectively adsorb oxygen in a manner that defies the classical picture: adsorption sites either do or do not share electrons over a long range. Here we propose, and then justify phenomenologically and computationally, a mechanism. Charge-transfer-mediated adsorption of electron acceptor oxygen molecules in the metal-organic framework, which is a quasi-one-dimensional electron-donor semiconductor, drives and is driven by quasi-one-dimensional metal-insulator-metal transitions that localize or delocalize the quasi-one-dimensional electrons. This mechanism agrees with the empirical evidence, and predicts a class of nano-porous semiconductors or metals and potential adsorbents and catalysts in which chemistry and metal-insulator-metal transitions intertwine.

  1. FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system and its oxidoreductase-like chemistry in the iron-sulfur world.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Bin; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Wenhui

    2011-06-01

    The iron-sulfur world (ISW) theory is an intriguing prediction regarding the origin of life on early Earth. It hypothesizes that life arose as a geochemical process from inorganic starting materials on the surface of sulfide minerals in the vicinity of deep-sea hot springs. During the last two decades, many experimental studies have been carried out on this topic, and some interesting results have been achieved. Among them, however, the processes of carbon/nitrogen fixation and biomolecular assembly on the mineral surface have received an inordinate amount of attention. To the present, an abiotic model for the oxidation-reduction of intermediates participating in metabolic pathways has been ignored. We examined the oxidation-reduction effect of a prebiotic FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system on the interconversion between several pairs of α-hydroxy acids and α-keto acids (i.e., lactate/pyruvate, malate/oxaloacetate, and glycolate/glyoxylate). We found that, in the absence of FeS, elemental sulfur (S) oxidized α-hydroxy acids to form corresponding keto acids only at a temperature higher than its melting point (113°C); in the presence of FeS, such reactions occurred more efficiently through a coupled reaction mechanism, even at a temperature below the phase transition point of S. On the other hand, FeS was shown to have the capacity to reversibly reduce the keto acids. Such an oxidoreductase-like chemistry of the FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system suggests that it can determine the redox homeostasis of metabolic intermediates in the early evolutionary phase of life. The results provide a possible pathway for the development of primordial redox biochemistry in the iron-sulfur world. Key Words: Iron-sulfur world-FeS/S/FeS(2) redox system-Oxidoreductase-like chemistry. Astrobiology 11, 471-476.

  2. In Situ Synthesis of Antimicrobial Silver Nanoparticles within Antifouling Zwitterionic Hydrogels by Catecholic Redox Chemistry for Wound Healing Application.

    PubMed

    GhavamiNejad, Amin; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2016-03-14

    A multifunctional hydrogel that combines the dual functionality of both antifouling and antimicrobial capacities holds great potential for many bioapplications. Many approaches and different materials have been employed to synthesize such a material. However, a systematic study, including in vitro and in vivo evaluation, on such a material as wound dressings is highly scarce at present. Herein, we report on a new strategy that uses catecholic chemistry to synthesize antimicrobial silver nanoparticles impregnated into antifouling zwitterionic hydrogels. For this purpose, hydrophobic dopamine methacrylamide monomer (DMA) was mixed in an aqueous solution of sodium tetraborate decahydrate and DMA monomer became soluble after increasing pH to 9 due to the complexation between catechol groups and boron. Then, cross-linking polymerization of zwitterionic monomer was carried out with the solution of the protected dopamine monomer to produce a new hydrogel. When this new hydrogel comes in contact with a silver nitrate solution, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are formed in its structure as a result of the redox property of the catechol groups and in the absence of any other external reducing agent. The results obtained from TEM and XRD measurements indicate that AgNPs with diameters of around 20 nm had formed within the networks. FESEM images confirmed that the silver nanoparticles were homogeneously incorporated throughout the hydrogel network, and FTIR spectroscopy demonstrated that the catechol moiety in the polymeric backbone of the hydrogel is responsible for the reduction of silver ions into the AgNPs. Finally, the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggest that these mussel-inspired, antifouling, antibacterial hydrogels have great potential for use in wound healing applications.

  3. Anticorrelation between surface and subsurface point defects and the impact on the redox chemistry of TiO2(110).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Du, Yingge; Garcia, Juan C; Zhu, Zihua; Wang, Zhi-Tao; Petrik, Nikolay G; Kimmel, Gregory A; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Henderson, Michael A; Rousseau, Roger; Deskins, N Aaron; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory (DFT), and secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), we explored the interplay and relative impact of surface versus subsurface defects on the surface chemistry of rutile TiO2 . STM results show that surface O vacancies (VO ) are virtually absent in the vicinity of positively charged subsurface point defects. This observation is consistent with DFT calculations of the impact of subsurface defect proximity on VO formation energy. To monitor the influence of such lateral anticorrelation on surface redox chemistry, a test reaction of the dissociative adsorption of O2 was employed and was observed to be suppressed around them. DFT results attribute this to a perceived absence of intrinsic (Ti), and likely extrinsic interstitials in the nearest subsurface layer beneath inhibited areas. We also postulate that the entire nearest subsurface region could be devoid of any charged point defects, whereas prevalent surface defects (VO ) are largely responsible for mediation of the redox chemistry at the reduced TiO2 (110).

  4. Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the Impact on the Redox Chemistry of TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Du, Yingge; Garcia, Juan C.; Zhu, Zihua; Wang, Zhitao; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2015-02-02

    Using combination of STM, DFT and SIMS, we explored the interplay and relative impact of surface vs. subsurface defects on the surface chemistry of rutile TiO2. STM results show that surface O vacancies (VO’s) are virtually absent in the vicinity of positively-charged subsurface point-defects. This observation is consistent with DFT calculations of impact of subsurface defect proximity on VO formation energy. To monitor the influence of such lateral anticorrelation on surface redox chemistry, a test reaction of the dissociative adsorption of O2 is employed, which is observed to be suppressed around them. DFT results attribute this to a perceived absence of the intrinsic (Ti) (and likely extrinsic) interstitials in the nearest subsurface layer beneath “inhibited” areas. We also postulate that the entire nearest subsurface region could be voided of any charged point-defects, whereas prevalent VO’s are largely responsible for mediation of the redox chemistry at reduced TiO2(110) surface.

  5. Redox chemistry of copper-amyloid-beta: the generation of hydroxyl radical in the presence of ascorbate is linked to redox-potentials and aggregation state.

    PubMed

    Guilloreau, Luc; Combalbert, Sarah; Sournia-Saquet, Alix; Mazarguil, Honoré; Faller, Peter

    2007-07-23

    Aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) to amyloid plaques is a key event in Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid-cascade hypothesis, Abeta aggregates are toxic to neurons through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Copper ions play an important role, because they are able to bind to Abeta and influence its aggregation properties. Moreover, Cu-Abeta is supposed to be directly involved in ROS production. To get a better understanding of these reactions, we measured the production of HO(.) and the redox potential of Cu-Abeta. The results were compared to other biological copper-peptide complexes in order to get an insight into the biological relevance. Cu-Abeta produced more HO(.) than the complex of copper with Asp-Ala-His-Lys (Cu-DAHK), but less than with Gly-His-Lys (Cu-GHK). Cyclic voltammetry revealed that the order for reduction potential is Cu-GHK>Cu-Abeta>Cu-DAHK, but for the oxidation potential the order is reversed. Thus, easier copper redox cycling correlated to higher HO(.) production. The copper complex of the form Abeta1-42 showed a HO(.) production five-times higher than that of the form Abeta1-40. Time-dependence and aggregation studies suggest that an aggregation intermediate is responsible for this increased HO(.) production. PMID:17577900

  6. Environmental Controls of Biological Manganese Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, A. P.; Ahn, C. C.; Nealson, K. H.

    2001-12-01

    Biological catalysis of manganese oxidation represents an important contribution to global manganese cycling; biological oxidation rates are several orders of magnitude higher than those of abiotic processes. Despite recent genetics advances, ongoing behavioral studies, and a large pool of knowledge regarding manganese chemistry, the links between biology and environmental chemistry remain unresolved. We have performed experiments on batch cultures of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 to explore the physiology of biological manganese oxidation. We have further conducted spectroscopic and microscopic studies of the mechanism as manganese proceeds from the soluble Mn2+ species to the insoluble Mn(III) and Mn(IV) phases. These investigations suggest roles for aqueous chemistry, mineralogy, and microbial physiology in controlling manganese fluxes in metal-rich environments.

  7. FeS/S/FeS2 Redox System and Its Oxidoreductase-like Chemistry in the Iron-Sulfur World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Bin; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Xiaoyang; Su, Wenhui

    2011-06-01

    The iron-sulfur world (ISW) theory is an intriguing prediction regarding the origin of life on early Earth. It hypothesizes that life arose as a geochemical process from inorganic starting materials on the surface of sulfide minerals in the vicinity of deep-sea hot springs. During the last two decades, many experimental studies have been carried out on this topic, and some interesting results have been achieved. Among them, however, the processes of carbon/nitrogen fixation and biomolecular assembly on the mineral surface have received an inordinate amount of attention. To the present, an abiotic model for the oxidation-reduction of intermediates participating in metabolic pathways has been ignored. We examined the oxidation-reduction effect of a prebiotic FeS/S/FeS2 redox system on the interconversion between several pairs of ±-hydroxy acids and ±-keto acids (i.e., lactate/pyruvate, malate/oxaloacetate, and glycolate/glyoxylate). We found that, in the absence of FeS, elemental sulfur (S) oxidized ±-hydroxy acids to form corresponding keto acids only at a temperature higher than its melting point (113°C); in the presence of FeS, such reactions occurred more efficiently through a coupled reaction mechanism, even at a temperature below the phase transition point of S. On the other hand, FeS was shown to have the capacity to reversibly reduce the keto acids. Such an oxidoreductase-like chemistry of the FeS/S/FeS2 redox system suggests that it can determine the redox homeostasis of metabolic intermediates in the early evolutionary phase of life. The results provide a possible pathway for the development of primordial redox biochemistry in the iron-sulfur world.

  8. Improvements to the strength and corrosion resistance of aluminum-magnesium-manganese alloys of near-AA5083 chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Mark Christopher

    Aluminum alloys of the 5000 series (AI-Mg-Mn) are extremely popular in a wide range of applications that call for a balance of moderately high strength, good corrosion resistance, and light weight, all at a moderate cost. One of the most popular 5000 series alloys is designated A1-5083, containing, in addition to aluminum, approximately 4 wt% magnesium and 0.7 wt% manganese. In order to increase the range of versatility of this particular alloy, a number of modifications have been examined that will potentially improve the strength and corrosion resistance characteristics while maintaining a chemical composition that is very close to the proven 5083 alloy. The strength of the 5083-based alloys under study are investigated with two goals in mind---to maximize the potential strength characteristics in a "standard" 5083 form through changes in minor processing parameters or through minor alloying additions. Increasing the standard alloy's potential is possible through improved efficiency of "preprocessing" heat treatments that maximize the homogeneous dispersion of secondary manganese-based particles. For the modified alloy study, additions of scandium and zirconium are shown to improve strength not only by forming secondary particles in the alloy, but also through substitutional solid solution strengthening, even when added at very small levels. Corrosion resistance of these 5083-based alloys is investigated once again through minor alloying additions; specifically zinc, copper, and silver. Zinc is particularly effective in that it changes the corrosion-susceptible binary aluminum-magnesium phase that would otherwise form on grain boundaries following exposure to moderately elevated temperatures for extended periods of time to a ternary aluminum-magnesium-zinc phase. This chemical composition of this ternary phase that forms following zinc additions can be further altered through minor additions of copper and silver. By determining threshold levels for these

  9. Combined Quantum Chemistry and Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure and Reduction Potentials of Rubredoxin Redox Site Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Wang, Xue B.; Nichols, J. A.; Wang, Lai S.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2003-04-24

    Iron-sulfur proteins are an important class of electron carriers in a wide variety of biological reactions. Determining the intrinsic contribution of the metal site to the redox potential is crucial in understanding how the protein environment influences the overall redox properties of the Fe-S proteins. Here we combine density functional theory and coupled cluster methods with photodetachment spectroscopy to study the electronic structures and gas-phase redox potentials of the [Fe(SCH3)(4)](2-/-/0) and [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-/0) analogues of the rubredoxin redox site. The calculations show that oxidations of [Fe(SCH3)(4)](2-) and [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-) involve mainly the Fe 3d and S 3p orbitals, respectively. The calculated adiabatic and vertical detachment energies are in good agreement with the experiment for [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-) and [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-). The current results further confirm the "inverted level scheme" for the high-spin [1Fe] systems. The redox couple, [Fe(SCH3)(4)](- /2), which is the one found in rubredoxin, but cannot be accessed experimentally in the gas phase, was investigated using a thermodynamic cycle that relates it to the [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-/0) couple and the ligand association reaction, [Fe(SCH3)(3)](0/-) + SCH3- --> [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-/2-). The calculated reduction energy of [Fe(SCH3)(4)](-) (1.7 eV) compares well with the value (1.6 eV) estimated from the calculated bond energies and the experimental detachment energy of [Fe(SCH3)(3)](-). Thus, this thermodynamic cycle method can be used to estimate metal-ligand bonding energies and determine intrinsic reduction potentials from photodetachment experiments when the reduced forms are not stable in the gas phase.

  10. Manganese Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Charles H.; Pasi, Aurelio

    1975-01-01

    We have reported two cases of chronic manganese poisoning. Case 1 followed exposure to manganese fumes in cutting and burning manganese steel. Case 2 resulted from exposure to dusts of manganese dioxide, an ingredient used in glazing of ceramics. There were initial difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis. Prominent clinical features were severe and persistent chronic depressive psychosis (Case 1), transient acute brain syndrome (Case 2) and the presence of various extrapyramidal symptoms in both cases. Manganese intoxication has not previously been reported as occurring in California. With increasing use of the metal, the disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurologic and psychiatric disease. Our observations were made in the period 1964 through 1968. Recently the prognosis of victims of manganese poisoning has been improved dramatically by the introduction of levodopa as a therapeutic agent. PMID:1179714

  11. Manganese cluster in photosynthesis: Where plants oxidize water to dioxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P.; Sauer, K. |

    1996-11-01

    The essential involvement of manganese in photosynthetic water oxidation was implicit in the observation by Pirson in 1937 that plants and algae deprived of Mn in their growth medium lost the ability to evolve O{sub 2}. Addition of this essential element to the growth medium resulted in the restoration of water oxidation within 30 min. There is increased interest in the study of Mn in biological chemistry and dioxygen metabolism in the last two decades with the discovery of several Mn redox enzymes. The list of enzymes where Mn is required for redox activity includes a Mn superoxide dismutase, a binuclear Mn-containing catalase, a binuclear Mn-containing ribonucleotide reductase, a proposed binuclear Mn site in thiosulfate oxidase, a Mn peroxidase that is capable of oxidative degradation of lignin, and perhaps the most complex and important, the tetranuclear Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (Mn-OEC). Mn is well suited for the redox role with accessible oxidation states of II, III, and IV, and possibly V: oxidation states that have all been proposed to explain the mechanisms of the Mn redox enzymes.

  12. Kinetic and redox properties of MnP II, a major manganese peroxidase isoenzyme from Panus tigrinus CBS 577.79.

    PubMed

    Petruccioli, Maurizio; Frasconi, Marco; Quaratino, Daniele; Covino, Stefano; Favero, Gabriele; Mazzei, Franco; Federici, Federico; D'Annibale, Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    A manganese peroxidase (MnP) isoenzyme from Panus tigrinus CBS 577.79 was produced in a benchtop stirred-tank reactor and purified to apparent homogeneity. The purification scheme involving ultrafiltration, affinity chromatography on concanavalin-A Sepharose, and gel filtration led to a purified MnP, termed "MnP II," with a specific activity of 288 IU mg(-1) protein and a final yield of 22%. The enzyme turned out to be a monomeric protein with molecular mass of 50.5 kDa, pI of 4.07, and an extent of N-glycosylation of about 5.3% of the high-mannose type. The temperature and pH optima for the formation of malonate manganic chelates were 45 degrees C and 5.5, respectively. MnP II proved to be poorly thermostable at 50 and 60 degrees C, with half-lives of 11 min and 105 s, respectively. K (m) values for H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+) were 16 and 124 microM, respectively. Although MnP II was able to oxidize veratryl alcohol and to catalyze the Mn(2+)-independent oxidation of several phenols, it cannot be assigned to the versatile peroxidase family. As opposed to versatile peroxidase oxidation, veratryl alcohol oxidation required the simultaneous presence of H(2)O(2) and Mn(2+); in addition, low turnover numbers and K (m) values higher than 300 microM characterized the Mn(2+)-independent oxidation of substituted phenols. Kinetic properties and the substrate specificity of the enzyme markedly differed from those reported for MnP isoenzymes produced by the reference strain P. tigrinus 8/18. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time a thorough electrochemical characterization of a MnP from this fungus. PMID:19578878

  13. Layered-to-Tunnel Structure Transformation and Oxygen Redox Chemistry in LiRhO2 upon Li Extraction and Insertion.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Daria; Karakulina, Olesia M; Batuk, Dmitry; Hadermann, Joke; Abakumov, Artem M; Herklotz, Markus; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Oswald, Steffen; Giebeler, Lars; Schmidt, Marcus; Eckert, Jürgen; Knapp, Michael; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-07-18

    Layered Li(M,Li)O2 (where M is a transition metal) ordered rock-salt-type structures are used in advanced metal-ion batteries as one of the best hosts for the reversible intercalation of Li ions. Besides the conventional redox reaction involving oxidation/reduction of the M cation upon Li extraction/insertion, creating oxygen-located holes because of the partial oxygen oxidation increases capacity while maintaining the oxidized oxygen species in the lattice through high covalency of the M-O bonding. Typical degradation mechanism of the Li(M,Li)O2 electrodes involves partially irreversible M cation migration toward the Li positions, resulting in gradual capacity/voltage fade. Here, using LiRhO2 as a model system (isostructural and isoelectronic to LiCoO2), for the first time, we demonstrate an intimate coupling between the oxygen redox and M cation migration. A formation of the oxidized oxygen species upon electrochemical Li extraction coincides with transformation of the layered Li1-xRhO2 structure into the γ-MnO2-type rutile-ramsdellite intergrowth LiyRh3O6 structure with rutile-like [1 × 1] channels along with bigger ramsdellite-like [2 × 1] tunnels through massive and concerted Rh migration toward the empty positions in the Li layers. The oxidized oxygen dimers with the O-O distances as short as 2.26 Å are stabilized in this structure via the local Rh-O configuration reminiscent to that in the μ-peroxo-μ-hydroxo Rh complexes. The LiyRh3O6 structure is remarkably stable upon electrochemical cycling illustrating that proper structural implementation of the oxidized oxygen species can open a pathway toward deliberate employment of the anion redox chemistry in high-capacity/high-voltage positive electrodes for metal-ion batteries.

  14. Layered-to-Tunnel Structure Transformation and Oxygen Redox Chemistry in LiRhO2 upon Li Extraction and Insertion.

    PubMed

    Mikhailova, Daria; Karakulina, Olesia M; Batuk, Dmitry; Hadermann, Joke; Abakumov, Artem M; Herklotz, Markus; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Oswald, Steffen; Giebeler, Lars; Schmidt, Marcus; Eckert, Jürgen; Knapp, Michael; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2016-07-18

    Layered Li(M,Li)O2 (where M is a transition metal) ordered rock-salt-type structures are used in advanced metal-ion batteries as one of the best hosts for the reversible intercalation of Li ions. Besides the conventional redox reaction involving oxidation/reduction of the M cation upon Li extraction/insertion, creating oxygen-located holes because of the partial oxygen oxidation increases capacity while maintaining the oxidized oxygen species in the lattice through high covalency of the M-O bonding. Typical degradation mechanism of the Li(M,Li)O2 electrodes involves partially irreversible M cation migration toward the Li positions, resulting in gradual capacity/voltage fade. Here, using LiRhO2 as a model system (isostructural and isoelectronic to LiCoO2), for the first time, we demonstrate an intimate coupling between the oxygen redox and M cation migration. A formation of the oxidized oxygen species upon electrochemical Li extraction coincides with transformation of the layered Li1-xRhO2 structure into the γ-MnO2-type rutile-ramsdellite intergrowth LiyRh3O6 structure with rutile-like [1 × 1] channels along with bigger ramsdellite-like [2 × 1] tunnels through massive and concerted Rh migration toward the empty positions in the Li layers. The oxidized oxygen dimers with the O-O distances as short as 2.26 Å are stabilized in this structure via the local Rh-O configuration reminiscent to that in the μ-peroxo-μ-hydroxo Rh complexes. The LiyRh3O6 structure is remarkably stable upon electrochemical cycling illustrating that proper structural implementation of the oxidized oxygen species can open a pathway toward deliberate employment of the anion redox chemistry in high-capacity/high-voltage positive electrodes for metal-ion batteries. PMID:27367435

  15. Why did Nature choose manganese to make oxygen?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Fraser A

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the suitability of manganese for its function in catalysing the formation of molecular oxygen from water. Manganese is an abundant element. In terms of its inherent properties, Mn has a particularly rich redox chemistry compared with other d-block elements, with several oxidizing states accessible. The most stable-state Mn2+ behaves like a Group 2 element—it is mobile, weakly complexing, easily taken up by cells and redox-inactive in simple aqueous media. Only in the presence of suitable ligands does Mn2+ become oxidized, so it provides an uncomplicated building unit for the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC). The intermediate oxidation states Mn(III) and Mn(IV) are strongly complexed by O2− and form robust mixed-valence poly-oxo clusters in which the Mn(IV)/Mn(III) ratio can be elevated, one electron at a time, accumulating oxidizing potential and capacity. The OEC is a Mn4CaOx cluster that undergoes sequential oxidations by P680+ at potentials above 1 V, ultimately to a super-oxidized level that includes one Mn(V) or a Mn(IV)-oxyl radical. The latter is powerfully oxidizing and provides the crucial ‘power stroke’ necessary to generate an O–O bond. This leaves a centre still rich in Mn(IV), ensuring a rapid follow-through to O2. PMID:17971329

  16. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  18. Utility of a redox-active pyridine(diimine) chelate in facilitating two electron oxidative addition chemistry at uranium.

    PubMed

    Kiernicki, John J; Fanwick, Phillip E; Bart, Suzanne C

    2014-08-01

    Exposure of the uranium(IV) complex, Cp(P)U((Mes)PDI(Me)) (1) ((Mes)PDI(Me) = 2,6-((Mes)N=CMe)2–C5H3N; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl; Cp(P) = 1-(7,7-dimethylbenzyl)cyclopentadienyl), which contains a [(Mes)PDI(Me)](3−) chelate, to I2, Cl2, PhSeCl, and PhEEPh (E = S, Se, Te) results in oxidative addition to form the uranium(IV) family, Cp(P)U(XX′)((Mes)PDI(Me)) (X = X′ = I, Cl, EPh; X = SePh, X′ = Cl). Spectroscopic and structural studies support products with [(Mes)PDI(Me)](1−), indicating the reducing equivalents derive from this redox-active chelate.

  19. A high-resolution record of Holocene millennial-scale oscillations of surface water, foraminiferal paleoecology and sediment redox chemistry in the SE Brazilian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, B. B.; Barbosa, C. F.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Piotrowski, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    . The 8.2kyr climatic event is reported here for the first time in South American coastal sediment records as high productivity conditions and a rapid change in porewater redox chemistry.

  20. Linking Groundwater Age and Chemistry Data to Determine Redox Reaction Rates and Trends in Nitrate Concentrations in Agricultural Areas. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesoriero, A. J.; Puckett, L.

    2009-12-01

    Use of industrially fixed nitrogen (N) fertilizer for agricultural purposes has increased dramatically, both in the United States (U.S.) and globally, since 1945. As a result, there has been growing concern about the consequences of increases in the amounts of anthropogenic N circulating in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. The U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water-Quality Assessment Program has collected groundwater samples along flow paths in more than 20 agricultural areas covering a range in hydrogeologic settings to evaluate the trends and transformations of agricultural chemicals. Historical trends in nitrogen fluxes to groundwater were evaluated by relating the recharge dates of groundwater samples, estimated using tracer (e.g., chlorofluorocarbon) concentrations, with concentrations of nitrate at the time of recharge, estimated by summing the molar concentrations of the parent compound (nitrate) and its transformation product (excess N2) in the age-dated sample. Results from this analysis indicate that median nitrate (NO3-) concentrations in recharge have increased markedly over the last 50 years: increasing from 4 mg/L (as N) in samples that recharged prior to 1983 to 7.5 mg/L (as N) in samples that recharged since 1983. Trends in nitrate concentrations in recharging groundwater were related to increases in the amount of fertilizer applied. Estimates of the portion of applied N reaching the water table ranged from 4 to 49% among the sites, with a median value of 14%. The fate of NO3- and many other groundwater contaminants is dependent on aquifer redox conditions. The reduction of oxygen is the most energetically favorable reaction that microorganisms use to oxidize organic material or other electron donors (e.g., pyrite). As a result, other reduction reactions (e.g., denitrification) affecting contaminant transport typically do not occur until most dissolved oxygen (DO) has been consumed. To improve assessments of contaminant transformations

  1. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K M; Ridgwell, A; Payne, J L

    2016-05-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quantified, preventing any detailed exploration of how changes in the biological pump over geological time may have shaped long-term shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure. Here, we use a 3-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantitatively explore the effects of the biological pump on marine chemistry. We find that when respiration of sinking organic matter is efficient, due to slower sinking or higher respiration rates, anoxia tends to be more prevalent and to occur in shallower waters. Consequently, the Phanerozoic trend toward less bottom-water anoxia in continental shelf settings can potentially be explained by a change in the spatial dynamics of nutrient cycling rather than by any change in the ocean phosphate inventory. The model results further suggest that the Phanerozoic decline in the prevalence ocean anoxia is, in part, a consequence of the evolution of larger phytoplankton, many of which produce mineralized tests. We hypothesize that the Phanerozoic trend toward greater animal abundance and metabolic demand was driven more by increased oxygen concentrations in shelf environments than by greater food (nutrient) availability. In fact, a lower-than-modern ocean phosphate inventory in our closed system model is unable to account for the Paleozoic prevalence of bottom-water anoxia. Overall, these model simulations suggest that the changing spatial distribution of photosynthesis and respiration in the oceans has

  2. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, K M; Ridgwell, A; Payne, J L

    2016-05-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quantified, preventing any detailed exploration of how changes in the biological pump over geological time may have shaped long-term shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure. Here, we use a 3-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantitatively explore the effects of the biological pump on marine chemistry. We find that when respiration of sinking organic matter is efficient, due to slower sinking or higher respiration rates, anoxia tends to be more prevalent and to occur in shallower waters. Consequently, the Phanerozoic trend toward less bottom-water anoxia in continental shelf settings can potentially be explained by a change in the spatial dynamics of nutrient cycling rather than by any change in the ocean phosphate inventory. The model results further suggest that the Phanerozoic decline in the prevalence ocean anoxia is, in part, a consequence of the evolution of larger phytoplankton, many of which produce mineralized tests. We hypothesize that the Phanerozoic trend toward greater animal abundance and metabolic demand was driven more by increased oxygen concentrations in shelf environments than by greater food (nutrient) availability. In fact, a lower-than-modern ocean phosphate inventory in our closed system model is unable to account for the Paleozoic prevalence of bottom-water anoxia. Overall, these model simulations suggest that the changing spatial distribution of photosynthesis and respiration in the oceans has

  3. Driving Curie temperature towards room temperature in the half-metallic ferromagnet K2Cr8O16 by soft redox chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pirrotta, I; Fernández-Sanjulián, J; Moran, E; Alario-Franco, M A; Gonzalo, E; Kuhn, A; García-Alvarado, F

    2012-02-14

    The half-metallic ferromagnet K(2)Cr(8)O(16) with the hollandite structure has been chemically modified using soft chemistry methods to increase the average oxidation state of chromium. The synthesis of the parent material has been performed under high pressure/high temperature conditions. Following this, different redox reactions have been carried out on K(2)Cr(8)O(16). Oxidation to obtain potassium-de-inserted derivatives, K(2-x)Cr(8)O(16) (0 ≤x≤ 1), has been investigated with electrochemical methods, while the synthesis of sizeable amounts was achieved chemically by using nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate as a highly oxidizing agent. The maximum amount of extracted K ions corresponds to x = 0.8. Upon oxidation the hollandite structure is maintained and the products keep high crystallinity. The de-insertion of potassium changes the Cr(3+)/Cr(4+) ratio, and therefore the magnetic properties. Interestingly, the Curie temperature increases from ca. 175 K to 250 K, getting therefore closer to room temperature.

  4. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  6. Manganese-oxide minerals in fractures of the Crater Flat Tuff in drill core USW G-4, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, B.A.; Bish, D.L.; Chipera, S.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Crater Flat Tuff is almost entirely below the water table in drill hole USW G-4 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Manganese-oxide minerals from the Crater Flat Tuff in USW G-4 were studied using optical, scanning electron microscopic, electron microprobe, and x-ray powder diffraction methods to determine their distribution, mineralogy, and chemistry. Manganese-oxide minerals coat fractures in all three members of the Crater Flat Tuff (Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram), but they are most abundant in fractures in the densely welded devitrified intervals of these members. The coatings are mostly of the cryptomelane/hollandite mineral group, but the chemistry of these coatings varies considerably. Some of the chemical variations, particularly the presence of calcium, sodium, and strontium, can be explained by admixture with todorokite, seen in some x-ray powder diffraction patterns. Other chemical variations, particularly between Ba and Pb, demonstrate that considerable substitution of Pb for Ba occurs in hollandite. Manganese-oxide coatings are common in the 10-m interval that produced 75% of the water pumped from USW G-4 in a flow survey in 1983. Their presence in water-producing zones suggests that manganese oxides may exert a significant chemical effect on groundwater beneath Yucca Mountain. In particular, the ability of the manganese oxides found at Yucca Mountain to be easily reduced suggests that they may affect the redox conditions of the groundwater and may oxidize dissolved or suspended species. Although the Mn oxides at Yucca Mountain have low exchange capacities, these minerals may retard the migration of some radionuclides, particularly the actinides, through scavenging and coprecipitation. 23 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  8. Differential coordination demands in Fe vs Mn water-soluble cationic metalloporphyrins translates into remarkably different aqueous redox chemistry and biology

    PubMed Central

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Weitner, Tin; Sheng, Huaxin; Lu, MiaoMiao; Rajic, Zrinka; Warner, David S.; Spasojevic, Ivan; Reboucas, Julio S.; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2013-01-01

    The different biological behavior of cationic Fe and Mn pyridylporphyrins in Escherichia coli and mouse studies prompted us to revisit and compare their chemistry. For that purpose the series of ortho and meta isomers of Fe(III) meso-tetrakis-N-alkylpyridylporphyrins, alkyl being methyl to n-octyl, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV/vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, lipophilicity, protonation equilibria of axial waters, metal-centered reduction potential, E1/2 for MIIIP/MIIP redox couple (M = Fe, Mn, P=porphyrin), kcat for the catalysis of O2•− dismutation, stability towards peroxide-driven porphyrin oxidative degradation (produced in the catalysis of ascorbate oxidation by MP), ability to affect growth of SOD-deficient E. coli and toxicity to mice. Electron-deficiency of the metal site is modulated by the porphyrin ligand, which renders Fe(III) porphyrins ≥ 5 orders of magnitude more acidic than the analogous Mn(III) porphyrins, as revealed by the pKa1 of axially coordinated waters. The 5 log units difference in the acidity between the Mn and Fe sites in porphyrin translates into the predominance of tetracationic (OH)(H2O)FeP complexes relative to pentacationic (H2O)2MnP species at pH ~7.8. This is evidenced in large differences in the thermodynamic parameters - pKa of axial waters and E1/2 of MIII/MII redox couple. The presence of hydroxo ligand labilizes trans-axial water which results in higher reactivity of Fe- relative to Mn center. The differences in the catalysis of O2•− dismutation (log kcat) between Fe and Mn porphyrins is modest, 2.5-5-fold, due to predominantly outer-sphere, with partial inner-sphere character of two reaction steps. However, the rate constant for the inner-sphere H2O2-based porphyrin oxidative degradation is 18-fold larger for (OH)(H2O)FeP than for (H2O)2MnP. The in vivo consequences of the differences between the Fe- and Mn porphyrins were best demonstrated in SOD-deficient E. coli growth. Based

  9. Reversible Redox Chemistry and Catalytic C(sp(3))-H Amination Reactivity of a Paramagnetic Pd Complex Bearing a Redox-Active o-Aminophenol-Derived NNO Pincer Ligand.

    PubMed

    Broere, Daniël L J; van Leest, Nicolaas P; de Bruin, Bas; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis, spectroelectrochemical characterization (ultraviolet-visible and nuclear magnetic resonance), solid state structures, and computational metric parameters of three isostructural PdCl(NNO) complexes 1 [PdCl(NNO(ISQ))], 2 {[PdCl(NNO(AP))](-)}, and 5 {[PdCl(NNO(IBQ))](+)} (NNO = o-aminophenol-derived redox-active ligand with a pendant pyridine) with different NNO oxidation states are described. The reduced diamagnetic complex 2 readily reacts with halogenated solvents, including lattice solvent from crystalline pure material, as supported by spectroscopic data and density functional theory calculations. Thorough removal of chlorinated impurities allows for modest catalytic turnover in the conversion of 4-phenylbutyl azide into N-protected 2-phenylpyrrolidine, which is the first example of a palladium-catalyzed radical-type transformation facilitated by a redox-active ligand as well as the first C-H amination mediated by ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer. PMID:27525360

  10. Heterogeneous redox conditions, arsenic mobility, and groundwater flow in a fractured-rock aquifer near a waste repository site in New Hampshire, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Philip T.; Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hoffman, Andrew; Révész, Kinga M.; Belaval, Marcel; Lamb, Steven; Böhlke, J. K.

    2012-09-01

    Anthropogenic sources of carbon from landfill or waste leachate can promote reductive dissolution of in situ arsenic (As) and enhance the mobility of As in groundwater. Groundwater from residential-supply wells in a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer adjacent to a Superfund site in Raymond, New Hampshire, USA, showed evidence of locally enhanced As mobilization in relatively reducing (mixed oxic-anoxic to anoxic) conditions as determined by redox classification and other lines of evidence. Redox classification was determined from geochemical indicators based on threshold concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO{3/-}), iron (Fe2+), manganese (Mn2+), and sulfate (SO{4/2-}). Redox conditions were evaluated also based on methane (CH4), excess nitrogen gas (N2) from denitrification, the oxidation state of dissolved As speciation (As(III) and As(V)), and several stable isotope ratios. Samples from the residential-supply wells primarily exhibit mixed redox conditions, as most have long open boreholes (typically 50-100 m) that receive water from multiple discrete fractures with contrasting groundwater chemistry and redox conditions. The methods employed in this study can be used at other sites to gauge redox conditions and the potential for As mobilization in complex fractured crystalline-rock aquifers where multiple lines of evidence are likely needed to understand As occurrence, mobility, and transport.

  11. Heterogeneous redox conditions, arsenic mobility, and groundwater flow in a fractured-rock aquifer near a waste repository site in New Hampshire, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Ayotte, Joseph D.; Hoffman, Andrew; Revesz, Kinga M.; Belaval, Marcel; Lamb, Steven; Böhlke, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic sources of carbon from landfill or waste leachate can promote reductive dissolution of in situ arsenic (As) and enhance the mobility of As in groundwater. Groundwater from residential-supply wells in a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer adjacent to a Superfund site in Raymond, New Hampshire, USA, showed evidence of locally enhanced As mobilization in relatively reducing (mixed oxic-anoxic to anoxic) conditions as determined by redox classification and other lines of evidence. Redox classification was determined from geochemical indicators based on threshold concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO), nitrate (NO3-), iron (Fe2+), manganese (Mn2+), and sulfate (SO42-). Redox conditions were evaluated also based on methane (CH4), excess nitrogen gas (N2) from denitrification, the oxidation state of dissolved As speciation (As(III) and As(V)), and several stable isotope ratios. Samples from the residential-supply wells primarily exhibit mixed redox conditions, as most have long open boreholes (typically 50–100 m) that receive water from multiple discrete fractures with contrasting groundwater chemistry and redox conditions. The methods employed in this study can be used at other sites to gauge redox conditions and the potential for As mobilization in complex fractured crystalline-rock aquifers where multiple lines of evidence are likely needed to understand As occurrence, mobility, and transport.

  12. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  13. OXIDATION OF ALKANES WITH AIR USING IRON AND MANGANESE CATALYSTS. AN OVERALL GREEN CHEMISTRY APPROACH INCLUDING THE USE OF ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selective oxidation of alkanes is an industrially important process that is often plagued by low conversions and the formation of unwanted by-products. Research being conducted at the USEPA, implements a Green chemistry approach which is utilized to improve these difficult o...

  14. Redox compartmentalization in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse functions of eukaryotic cells are optimized by organization of compatible chemistries into distinct compartments defined by the structures of lipid-containing membranes, multiprotein complexes and oligomeric structures of saccharides and nucleic acids. This structural and chemical organization is coordinated, in part, through cysteine residues of proteins which undergo reversible oxidation-reduction and serve as chemical/structural transducing elements. The central thiol/disulfide redox couples, thioredoxin-1, thioredoxin-2, GSH/GSSG and cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS), are not in equilibrium with each other and are maintained at distinct, non-equilibrium potentials in mitochondria, nuclei, the secretory pathway and the extracellular space. Mitochondria contain the most reducing compartment, have the highest rates of electron transfer and are highly sensitive to oxidation. Nuclei also have more reduced redox potentials but are relatively resistant to oxidation. The secretory pathway contains oxidative systems which introduce disulfides into proteins for export. The cytoplasm contains few metabolic oxidases and this maintains an environment for redox signaling dependent upon NADPH oxidases and NO synthases. Extracellular compartments are maintained at stable oxidizing potentials. Controlled changes in cytoplasmic GSH/GSSG redox potential are associated with functional state, varying with proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Variation in extracellular Cys/CySS redox potential is also associated with proliferation, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Thus, cellular redox biology is inseparable from redox compartmentalization. Further elucidation of the redox control networks within compartments will improve the mechanistic understanding of cell functions and their disruption in disease. PMID:18267127

  15. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Wojciech; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper-manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  16. Metalloradical Complexes of Manganese and Chromium Featuring an Oxidatively Rearranged Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Çelenligil-Çetin, Remle; Paraskevopoulou, Patrina; Lalioti, Nikolia; Sanakis, Yiannis; Staples, Richard J.; Rath, Nigam P.; Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2009-01-01

    Redox events involving both metal and ligand sites are receiving increased attention since a number of biological processes direct redox equivalents toward functional residues. Metalloradical synthetic analogs remain scarce and require better definition of their mode of formation and subsequent operation. The trisamido-amine ligand [(RNC6H4)3N]3−, where R is the electron-rich 4-t-BuPh, is employed in this study to generate redox active residues in manganese and chromium complexes. Solutions of [(L1)Mn(II)–THF]− in THF are oxidized by dioxygen to afford [(L1re–1)Mn(III)–(O)2–Mn(III)(L1re–1)]2− as the major product. The rare dinuclear manganese (III,III) core is stabilized by a rearranged ligand that has undergone an one-electron oxidative transformation, followed by retention of the oxidation equivalent as a π radical in an o-diiminobenzosemiquinonate moiety. Magnetic studies indicate that the ligand-centered radical is stabilized by means of extended antiferromagnetic coupling between the S = ½ radical and the adjacent S = 2 Mn(III) site, as well as between the two Mn(III) centers via the dioxo bridge. Electrochemical and EPR data suggest that this system can store higher levels of oxidation potency. Entry to the corresponding Cr(III) chemistry is achieved by employing CrCl3 to access both [(L1)Cr(III)–THF] and [(L1re–1)Cr(III)–THF(Cl)], featuring the intact and the oxidatively rearranged ligands, respectively. The latter is generated by ligand-centered oxidation of the former compound. The rearranged ligand is perceived to be the product of an one-electron oxidation of the intact ligand to afford a metal-bound aminyl radical that subsequently mediates a radical 1,4-(N-to-N) aryl migration. PMID:18937446

  17. Green chemistry methods in sulfur dyeing: application of various reducing D-sugars and analysis of the importance of optimum redox potential.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Richard S; Harvey, Anna

    2004-07-15

    The importance of sulfur dyeing of cellulosic fibers, particularly cotton, is realized economically throughout the dyeing industry. At the present time, dyeing with sulfur dyes requires the use of various auxiliaries, many of which have adverse effects on the environment. The most damaging of these is the reducing agent sodium sulfide, required to reduce the dye molecules to a water-soluble leuco form to enable adsorption and diffusion into the fiber. In this study, attempts have been made to replace the sodium sulfide used within the sulfur dyeing process with a variety of environmentally friendly reducing sugars. The redox potential of various hexose and pentose monosaccharides and reducing disaccharides was recorded and compared. Subsequently, cotton was dyed with the world's most important sulfur dye, C. I. Sulfur Black 1, using the reducing sugars under alkaline conditions, and compared to dyeings secured by employing commercial sulfide reducing agents. It was observed that reducing sugars gave comparable, and in many cases superior, color strength and wash fastness results, with respect to the commercial sulfide-based reducing agents, which still account for the vast majority of sulfur dyeing processes and that pose significant environmental concern. Employment of reducing sugars in sulfur dyeing could provide a sustainable, nontoxic, biodegradable, cost-effective alternative to sodium polysulfide and sodium hydrogen sulfide. Comparison of the redox potential of reducing sugars against the color strength of the dyeings secured demonstrated that there was an optimum redox potential of around -650 mV for maximum color strength achieved. The same redox potential also conferred the lowest color loss upon washing. These observations were attributed to reduction of the polymeric dye molecules to an optimum size for fiber affinity and diffusion into the fiber, but which would also confer maximum wash fastness upon oxidation. PMID:15298216

  18. Chronic manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chu, N.S.; Lu, C.S.; Wang, J.D.; Tsai, J.L.; Tzeng, J.L.; Wolters, E.C.; Calne, D.B. )

    1989-10-01

    We report six cases of chronic manganese intoxication in workers at a ferromanganese factory in Taiwan. Diagnosis was confirmed by assessing increased manganese concentrations in the blood, scalp, and pubic hair. In addition, increased manganese levels in the environmental air were established. The patients showed a bradykinetic-rigid syndrome indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease that responded to treatment with levodopa.

  19. Formation of manganese oxides by bacterially generated superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Voelker, B. M.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A. I.; Hansel, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    Manganese oxide minerals are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in the environment. The formation of these minerals controls the fate of contaminants, the degradation of recalcitrant carbon, the cycling of nutrients and the activity of anaerobic-based metabolisms. Oxidation of soluble manganese(II) ions to manganese(III/IV) oxides has been primarily attributed to direct enzymatic oxidation by microorganisms. However, the physiological reason for this process remains unknown. Here we assess the ability of a common species of marine bacteria-Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b-to oxidize manganese(II) in the presence of chemical and biological inhibitors. We show that Roseobacter AzwK-3b oxidizes manganese(II) by producing the strong and versatile redox reactant superoxide. The oxidation of manganese(II), and concomitant production of manganese oxides, was inhibited in both the light and dark in the presence of enzymes and metals that scavenge superoxide. Oxidation was also inhibited by various proteases, enzymes that break down bacterial proteins, confirming that the superoxide was bacterially generated. We conclude that bacteria can oxidize manganese(II) indirectly, through the enzymatic generation of extracellular superoxide radicals. We suggest that dark bacterial production of superoxide may be a driving force in metal cycling and mineralization in the environment.

  20. Surfactant manganese complexes as models for the oxidation of water

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, R.; Otvos, J.W.; Calvin, M.

    1984-02-01

    Surfactant manganese complexes have been studied spectroscopically and electrochemically as models for the catalysts involved in the photooxidation of water to produce oxygen. Evidence has been obtained for the participation of the suggested redox cycle Mn/sup II/ to Mn/sup III/ to Mn/sup IV/ and back to Mn/sup II/ with the evolution of oxygen.

  1. Redox Redone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, John T.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an extension of the change in oxidation number method that is used for balancing skeletal redox reactions in aqueous solutions. Retains most of the simplicity of the change in oxidation number method but provides the additional step-by-step process necessary for the beginner to balance an equation. (JRH)

  2. High manganese concentrations in rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanza, Nina L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Wiens, Roger C.; Grotzinger, John; Ollila, Ann M.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Mangold, Nicolas; Maurice, Sylvestre; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Nachon, Marion; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Clegg, Samuel M.; Forni, Olivier; Hardgrove, Craig; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Sautter, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    The surface of Mars has long been considered a relatively oxidizing environment, an idea supported by the abundance of ferric iron phases observed there. However, compared to iron, manganese is sensitive only to high redox potential oxidants, and when concentrated in rocks, it provides a more specific redox indicator of aqueous environments. Observations from the ChemCam instrument on the Curiosity rover indicate abundances of manganese in and on some rock targets that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than previously observed on Mars, suggesting the presence of an as-yet unidentified manganese-rich phase. These results show that the Martian surface has at some point in time hosted much more highly oxidizing conditions than has previously been recognized.

  3. The molecular biogeochemistry of manganese(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Geszvain, Kati; Butterfield, Cristina; Davis, Richard E; Madison, Andrew S; Lee, Sung-Woo; Parker, Dorothy L; Soldatova, Alexandra; Spiro, Thomas G; Luther, George W; Tebo, Bradley M

    2012-12-01

    Micro-organisms capable of oxidizing the redox-active transition metal manganese play an important role in the biogeochemical cycle of manganese. In the present mini-review, we focus specifically on Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The mechanisms by which bacteria oxidize Mn(II) include a two-electron oxidation reaction catalysed by a novel multicopper oxidase that produces Mn(IV) oxides as the primary product. Bacteria also produce organic ligands, such as siderophores, that bind to and stabilize Mn(III). The realization that this stabilized Mn(III) is present in many environments and can affect the redox cycles of other elements such as sulfur has made it clear that manganese and the bacteria that oxidize it profoundly affect the Earth's biogeochemistry. PMID:23176462

  4. Analysis of numerical simulations and influencing factors of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Xilai; Chen, Lei; Wei, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal manganese pollution has become an increasingly pressing water quality issue for water supply reservoirs in recent years. Manganese is a redox-sensitive element and is released from sediment under anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface during summer and autumn, when water temperature stratification occurs. The reservoir water temperature and water dynamic conditions directly influence the formation of manganese pollution. Numerical models are useful tools to quantitatively evaluate manganese pollution and its influencing factors. This paper presents a reservoir manganese pollution model by adding a manganese biogeochemical module to a water quality model-CE-QUAL-W2. The model is applied to the Wangjuan reservoir (Qingdao, China), which experiences manganese pollution during summer and autumn. Field data are used to verify the model, and the results show that the model can reproduce the main features of the thermal stratification and manganese distribution. The model is used to evaluate the manganese pollution process and its four influencing factors, including air temperature, water level, wind speed, and wind directions, through different simulation scenarios. The results show that all four factors can influence manganese pollution. High air temperature, high water level, and low wind speed aggravate manganese pollution, while low air temperature, low water level, and high wind speed reduce manganese pollution. Wind that travels in the opposite direction of the flow aggravates manganese pollution, while wind in the same direction as the flow reduces manganese pollution. This study provides useful information to improve our understanding of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs, which is important for reservoir manganese pollution warnings and control.

  5. Analysis of numerical simulations and influencing factors of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Xilai; Chen, Lei; Wei, Yang

    2016-07-01

    Seasonal manganese pollution has become an increasingly pressing water quality issue for water supply reservoirs in recent years. Manganese is a redox-sensitive element and is released from sediment under anoxic conditions near the sediment-water interface during summer and autumn, when water temperature stratification occurs. The reservoir water temperature and water dynamic conditions directly influence the formation of manganese pollution. Numerical models are useful tools to quantitatively evaluate manganese pollution and its influencing factors. This paper presents a reservoir manganese pollution model by adding a manganese biogeochemical module to a water quality model-CE-QUAL-W2. The model is applied to the Wangjuan reservoir (Qingdao, China), which experiences manganese pollution during summer and autumn. Field data are used to verify the model, and the results show that the model can reproduce the main features of the thermal stratification and manganese distribution. The model is used to evaluate the manganese pollution process and its four influencing factors, including air temperature, water level, wind speed, and wind directions, through different simulation scenarios. The results show that all four factors can influence manganese pollution. High air temperature, high water level, and low wind speed aggravate manganese pollution, while low air temperature, low water level, and high wind speed reduce manganese pollution. Wind that travels in the opposite direction of the flow aggravates manganese pollution, while wind in the same direction as the flow reduces manganese pollution. This study provides useful information to improve our understanding of seasonal manganese pollution in reservoirs, which is important for reservoir manganese pollution warnings and control. PMID:27068892

  6. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-28

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation.

  7. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  8. Manganese carbonates as possible biogenic relics in Archean settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón-Tomás, Blanca; Khonsari, Bahar; Mühlen, Dominik; Wickbold, Christian; Schäfer, Nadine; Hause-Reitner, Dorothea; Hoppert, Michael; Reitner, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate minerals such as dolomite, kutnahorite or rhodochrosite are frequently, but not exclusively generated by microbial processes. In recent anoxic sediments, Mn(II)carbonate minerals (e.g. rhodochrosite, kutnahorite) derive mainly from the reduction of Mn(IV) compounds by anaerobic respiration. The formation of huge manganese-rich (carbonate) deposits requires effective manganese redox cycling in an oxygenated atmosphere. However, putative anaerobic pathways such as microbial nitrate-dependent manganese oxidation, anoxygenic photosynthesis and oxidation in ultraviolet light may facilitate manganese cycling even in an early Archean environment, without the availability of oxygen. In addition, manganese carbonates precipitate by microbially induced processes without change of the oxidation state, e.g. by pH shift. Hence, there are several ways how these minerals could have been formed biogenically and deposited in Precambrian sediments. We will summarize microbially induced manganese carbonate deposition in the presence and absence of atmospheric oxygen and we will make some considerations about the biogenic deposition of manganese carbonates in early Archean settings.

  9. Metallation and mismetallation of iron and manganese proteins in vitro and in vivo: the class I ribonucleotide reductases as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2012-01-01

    How cells ensure correct metallation of a given protein and whether a degree of promiscuity in metal binding has evolved are largely unanswered questions. In a classic case, iron- and manganese-dependent superoxide dismutases (SODs) catalyze the disproportionation of superoxide using highly similar protein scaffolds and nearly identical active sites. However, most of these enzymes are active with only one metal, although both metals can bind in vitro and in vivo. Iron(II) and manganese(II) bind weakly to most proteins and possess similar coordination preferences. Their distinct redox properties suggest that they are unlikely to be interchangeable in biological systems except when they function in Lewis acid catalytic roles, yet recent work suggests this is not always the case. This review summarizes the diversity of ways in which iron and manganese are substituted in similar or identical protein frameworks. As models, we discuss (1) enzymes, such as epimerases, thought to use FeII as a Lewis acid under normal growth conditions but which switch to MnII under oxidative stress; (2) extradiol dioxygenases, which have been found to use both FeII and MnII, the redox role of which in catalysis remains to be elucidated; (3) SODs, which use redox chemistry and are generally metal-specific; and (4) the class I ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs), which have evolved unique biosynthetic pathways to control metallation. The primary focus is the class Ib RNRs, which can catalyze formation of a stable radical on a tyrosine residue in their β2 subunits using either a di-iron or a recently characterized dimanganese cofactor. The physiological roles of enzymes that can switch between iron and manganese cofactors are discussed, as are insights obtained from the studies of many groups regarding iron and manganese homeostasis and the divergent and convergent strategies organisms use for control of protein metallation. We propose that, in many of the systems discussed,

  10. The Redox Chemistry and Chemical Biology of H2S, Hydropersulfides and Derived Species: Implications to Their Possible Biological Activity and Utility

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Katsuhiko; Akaike, Takaake; Sawa, Tomohiro; Kumagai, Yoshito; Wink, David A.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Hobbs, Adrian J.; Nagy, Peter; Xian, Ming; Lin, Joseph; Fukuto, Jon M.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously generated and putative signaling/effector molecule. In spite of its numerous reported functions, the chemistry by which it elicits its functions is not understood. Moreover, recent studies allude to the existence of other sulfur species besides H2S that may play critical physiological roles. Herein, the basic chemical biology of H2S as well as other related or derived species is discussed and reviewed. A particular focus of this review are the per- and poly-sulfides which are likely in equilibrium with free H2S and which may be important biological effectors themselves. PMID:25229186

  11. Green polymer chemistry: investigating the mechanism of radical ring-opening redox polymerization (R3P) of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (DODT).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Q; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of the new Radical Ring-opening Redox Polymerization (R3P) of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (DODT) by triethylamine (TEA) and dilute H2O2 was investigated. Scouting studies showed that the formation of high molecular weight polymers required a 1:2 molar ratio of DODT to TEA and of DODT to H2O2. Further investigation into the chemical composition of the organic and aqueous phases by 1H-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry demonstrated that DODT is ionized by two TEA molecules (one for each thiol group) and thus transferred into the aqueous phase. The organic phase was found to have cyclic disulfide dimers, trimers and tetramers. Dissolving DODT and TEA in water before the addition of H2O2 yielded a polymer with Mn = 55,000 g/mol, in comparison with Mn = 92,000 g/mol when aqueous H2O2 was added to a DODT/TEA mixture. After polymer removal, MALDI-ToF MS analysis of the residual reaction mixtures showed only cyclic oligomers remaining. Below the LCST for TEA in water, 18.7 °C, the system yielded a stable emulsion, and only cyclic oligomers were found. Below DODT/TEA and H2O2 1:2 molar ratio mostly linear oligomers were formed, with <20% cyclic oligomers. The findings support the proposed mechanism of R3P. PMID:25871370

  12. Green polymer chemistry: investigating the mechanism of radical ring-opening redox polymerization (R3P) of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (DODT).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal-Kim, Emily Q; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-04-13

    The mechanism of the new Radical Ring-opening Redox Polymerization (R3P) of 3,6-dioxa-1,8-octanedithiol (DODT) by triethylamine (TEA) and dilute H2O2 was investigated. Scouting studies showed that the formation of high molecular weight polymers required a 1:2 molar ratio of DODT to TEA and of DODT to H2O2. Further investigation into the chemical composition of the organic and aqueous phases by 1H-NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry demonstrated that DODT is ionized by two TEA molecules (one for each thiol group) and thus transferred into the aqueous phase. The organic phase was found to have cyclic disulfide dimers, trimers and tetramers. Dissolving DODT and TEA in water before the addition of H2O2 yielded a polymer with Mn = 55,000 g/mol, in comparison with Mn = 92,000 g/mol when aqueous H2O2 was added to a DODT/TEA mixture. After polymer removal, MALDI-ToF MS analysis of the residual reaction mixtures showed only cyclic oligomers remaining. Below the LCST for TEA in water, 18.7 °C, the system yielded a stable emulsion, and only cyclic oligomers were found. Below DODT/TEA and H2O2 1:2 molar ratio mostly linear oligomers were formed, with <20% cyclic oligomers. The findings support the proposed mechanism of R3P.

  13. Manganese enzymes with binuclear active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to review the recent literature dealing with the mechanisms of catalysis by binuclear manganese enzymes. Second, to summarize and illustrate the general principles of catalysis which distinguish binuclear metalloenzymes from monometallic centers. This review covers primarily the published literature from 1991 up to May 1996. A summary of the major structurally characterized dimanganese enzymes is given. These perform various reaction types including several redox reactions, (de)hydrations, isomerizations, (de)phosphorylation, and phosphoryl transfer. 114 refs.

  14. Redox Pioneer: Professor Helmut Sies

    PubMed Central

    Radi, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Professor Helmut Sies Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2459–2468. The joy of exploring the unknown and finding something novel and noteworthy: what a privilege! —Prof. Helmut Sies PMID:25178739

  15. Comparison of control of Listeria by nitric oxide redox chemistry from murine macrophages and NO donors: insights into listeriocidal activity of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, R; Pacelli, R; Espey, M G; Miranda, K M; Friedman, N; Kim, S M; Cox, G; Mitchell, J B; Wink, D A; Russo, A

    2001-02-01

    The physiological function of nitric oxide (NO) in the defense against pathogens is multifaceted. The exact chemistry by which NO combats intracellular pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes is yet unresolved. We examined the effects of NO exposure, either delivered by NO donors or generated in situ within ANA-1 murine macrophages, on L. monocytogenes growth. Production of NO by the two NONOate compounds PAPA/NO (NH2(C3H6)(N[N(O)NO]C3H7) and DEA/NO (Na(C2H5)2N[N(O)NO]) resulted in L. monocytogenes cytostasis with minimal cytotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species generated from xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine were neither bactericidal nor cytostatic and did not alter the action of NO. L. monocytogenes growth was also suppressed upon internalization into ANA-1 murine macrophages primed with interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) + tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha or INF-gamma + lipid polysaccharide (LPS). Growth suppression correlated with nitrite formation and nitrosation of 2,3-diaminonaphthalene elicited by stimulated murine macrophages. This nitrosative chemistry was not dependent upon nor mediated by interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS), but resulted solely from NO and intermediates related to nitrosative stress. The role of nitrosation in controlling L. monocytogenes was further examined by monitoring the effects of exposure to NO on an important virulence factor, Listeriolysin O, which was inhibited under nitrosative conditions. These results suggest that nitrosative stress mediated by macrophages is an important component of the immunological arsenal in controlling L. monocytogenes infections. PMID:11165873

  16. Quantifying manganese and nitrogen cycle coupling in manganese-rich, organic carbon-starved marine sediments: Examples from the Clarion-Clipperton fracture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogollón, José M.; Mewes, Konstantin; Kasten, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Extensive deep-sea sedimentary areas are characterized by low organic carbon contents and thus harbor suboxic sedimentary environments where secondary (autotrophic) redox cycling becomes important for microbial metabolic processes. Simulation results for three stations in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific with low organic carbon content (<0.5 dry wt %) and low sedimentation rates (10-1-100 mm ky-1) show that ammonium generated during organic matter degradation may act as a reducing agent for manganese oxides below the oxic zone. Likewise, at these sedimentary depths, dissolved reduced manganese may act as a reducing agent for oxidized nitrogen species. These manganese-coupled transformations provide a suboxic conversion pathway of ammonium and nitrate to dinitrogen. These manganese-nitrogen interactions further explain the presence and production of dissolved reduced manganese (up to tens of μM concentration) in sediments with high nitrate (>20 μM) concentrations.

  17. Impact of nonadiabatic charge transfer on the rate of redox chemistry of carbon oxides on rutile TiO2 (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Wang, Yanggang; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra

    2015-03-06

    We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) within the LDA+U approximation on large models of partially reduced TiO2 (110) rutile surface to investigate the nature of charge transfer and the role of non-adiabatic effects on three prototypical redox reactions: (i) O2 adsorption (ii) CO oxidation and (iii) CO2 reduction. Charge-constrained DFT (cDFT) is used to estimate kinetic parameters for a Marcus theory rate law that accounts for adiabatic coupling effects on reaction rates. We find that for O2 adsorption, the coupling between adiabatic states is strong, leading to fast charge transfer rates. The lowest energy structures at high coverage consist of two chemisorbed O2-, one adsorbed at a VO site and the other adsorbed at an adjacent Ti5C site. For CO oxidation, however, all reactions are kinetically hindered on the ground state due to the weak adiabatic coupling at the state crossing, such that one has to overcome two kinetically unfavorable charge transfer events to drive the process (non-adiabatically) on the thermal ground state. The process can be driven by photochemical means but would result in an adsorbed radical [OCOO-] intermediate species. Similarly, CO2 reduction also proceeds via a non-adiabatic charge transfer to form an adsorbed CO2- species followed by a second non-adiabatic charge transfer to produce CO. Our analysis provides important computational guidelines for modeling these types of processes. We thank Z. Dohnalek, M. Hendersen, G. Kimmel, H. Metieu, and N. Petrik for invaluable discussions. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences and performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the

  18. Effects of sequence, connectivity, and counter ions in new amide-linked Ru(tpy)2-Re(bpy) chromophores on redox chemistry and photophysics.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jan; Thorenz, Ute; Förster, Christoph; Heinze, Katja

    2013-02-01

    New cationic metallo ligands L1-L3 based on bis(terpyridine) ruthenium(II) complexes decorated with differently substituted 2,2'-bipyridines attached via amide groups (5-NHCO-bpy, 4-CONH-bpy, 5-CONH-bpy) were prepared. Coordination of Re(I)Cl(CO)(3) fragments to the bpy unit gives the corresponding bimetallic Ru~Re complexes 1-3. Hydrogen bonds of the bridging amide groups to [PF(6)](-) counterions or to water molecules are observed both in the solid state and in solution. The impact of the amide orientation, the connecting site, and the coordination of counterions on redox and photophysical properties is explored. Both the metallo ligands L1-L3 and the bimetallic complexes 1-3 are emissive at room temperature in fluid solution. The emission originates from (3)MLCT(Ru) states in all cases. Accordingly, the first oxidation of L1-L3 and 1-3 to [L1](+)-[L3](+) and [1](+)-[3](+) is assigned to the Ru(II/III) couple, while the first reduction to [L1](-)-[L3](-) and [1](-)-[3](-) occurs at the tpy-CO ligand as shown by UV/vis, IR, and EPR spectroscopy of the chemically generated radicals. Under rapid freezing conditions, radicals [2](-) and [3](-) are stabilized as different valence isomers with the odd electron localized at the [bpy-CO](•) bridging unit instead of the [tpy-CO](•). Furthermore, in radical [3](-) this valence equilibrium is shifted from [bpy-CO](•) to [tpy-CO](•) by coordination of [PF(6)](-) counterions to the bridging amide unit and back by replacing the [PF(6)](-) counterion with [BPh(4)](-). Photoinduced electron transfer (λ(exc) = 500 nm) to L1-L3 and to 1-3 is successful using triethanolamine (TEOA) as a reducing agent. Photocatalytic reduction of CO(2) by TEOA and 1-3 is hampered by the wrong site of electron localization in the one-electron reduced species [1](-)-[3](-).

  19. Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chin Yik; Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2011-03-15

    A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH){sub 3} and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe{sup 2+} stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

  20. Beginning Chemistry Can Be Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, James F.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews ways of applying laboratory work in general and analytical chemistry to supermarket products. Describes ways water and air pollution analysis can illustrate acid-base reactions, redox reactions, precipitimetry, and colorimetry. (PR)

  1. Microbiology, Redox and Contaminat Fate in the Grindsted Landfill Leachate Plume - A Summary of 25 Years of work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, T. H.

    2001-05-01

    The contamination by leachate of the upper aquifer at the Grindsted Landfill (Denmark) stretches about 300 m downgradient from the landfill. The plume has been described with respect to water chemistry, sediment chemistry, pollutant distribution, microbial counts, PLFA and redox rates determined by unamended bioassays. This presentation summaries the findings and discusses unanswered questions. The landfill was active from 1930 to the mid 1970 and has no engineered leachate collection system. Leachate from municipal as well as from industrial waste has entered the aquifer for more than thirty years. The redox conditions change from strongly anaerobic (methanogenic, sulfate reducing, iron reducing) close to the landfill over manganese reduction and denitrification to aerobic conditions in the outskirts of the plume The redox conditions were determined from groundwater sample composition, hydrogen concentrations and sediment chemistry. The plume showed strong attenuation of aromatic compounds within the first 100 m downgradient of the landfill. Degradation experiments (batch, in-situ testers, long term field injection experiments) could not fully document degradation of all the compounds. MPN-measurements of methanogens, sulfate-reducers, iron-reducers, manganese-reducers and denitrifiers showed abundance of all groups with a slight trend with the redox conditions. PLFA measurements did not provide much insight into the microbial populations of the plume, but confirmed some previous observations. Bioassays gave estimates of the rates of the various redox processes, but showed for some samples more simultaneous redox processes. More than 25 years of work has been put into the Grindsted Landfill leachate plume. References Bjerg, P.L., Rugge, K., Cortsen, J., Nielsen, P.H. & Christensen, T.H. (1999): Degradation of aromatic and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in the anaerobic part of the Grindsted Landfill leachate plume: In situ microcosm and laboratory batch

  2. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  3. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  4. Redox pioneer: professor Helmut Sies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dean P; Radi, Rafael

    2014-12-20

    Dr. Helmut Sies (MD, 1967) is recognized as a Redox Pioneer, because he authored five articles on oxidative stress, lycopene, and glutathione, each of which has been cited more than 1000 times, and coauthored an article on hydroperoxide metabolism in mammalian systems cited more than 5000 times (Google Scholar). He obtained preclinical education at the University of Tübingen and the University of Munich, clinical training at Munich (MD, 1967) and Paris, and completed Habilitation at Munich (Physiological Chemistry and Physical Biochemistry, 1972). In early research, he first identified hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a normal aerobic metabolite and devised a method to quantify H2O2 concentration and turnover in cells. He quantified central redox systems for energy metabolism (NAD, NADP systems) and antioxidant GSH in subcellular compartments. He first described ebselen, a selenoorganic compound, as a glutathione peroxidase mimic. He contributed a fundamental discovery to the physiology of GSH, selenium nutrition, singlet oxygen biochemistry, and health benefits of dietary lycopene and cocoa flavonoids. He has published more than 600 articles, 134 of which are cited at least 100 times, and edited 28 books. His h-index is 115. During the last quarter of the 20th century and well into the 21st, he has served as a scout, trailblazer, and pioneer in redox biology. His formulation of the concept of oxidative stress stimulated and guided research in oxidants and antioxidants; his pioneering research on carotenoids and flavonoids informed nutritional strategies against cancer, cardiovascular disease, and aging; and his quantitative approach to redox biochemistry provides a foundation for modern redox systems biology. Helmut Sies is a true Redox Pioneer. PMID:25178739

  5. The Expanding Landscape of the Thiol Redox Proteome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Carroll, Kate S; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine occupies a unique place in protein chemistry. The nucleophilic thiol group allows cysteine to undergo a broad range of redox modifications beyond classical thiol-disulfide redox equilibria, including S-sulfenylation (-SOH), S-sulfinylation (-SO(2)H), S-sulfonylation (-SO(3)H), S-nitrosylation (-SNO), S-sulfhydration (-SSH), S-glutathionylation (-SSG), and others. Emerging evidence suggests that these post-translational modifications (PTM) are important in cellular redox regulation and protection against oxidative damage. Identification of protein targets of thiol redox modifications is crucial to understanding their roles in biology and disease. However, analysis of these highly labile and dynamic modifications poses challenges. Recent advances in the design of probes for thiol redox forms, together with innovative mass spectrometry based chemoproteomics methods make it possible to perform global, site-specific, and quantitative analyses of thiol redox modifications in complex proteomes. Here, we review chemical proteomic strategies used to expand the landscape of thiol redox modifications.

  6. Dissociation of diglycolamide complexes of Ln3+ (Ln = La-Lu) and An3+ (An = Pu, Am, Cm): redox chemistry of 4f and 5f elements in the gas phase parallels solution behavior.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Gibson, John K

    2014-11-17

    Tripositive lanthanide and actinide ions, Ln(3+) (Ln = La-Lu) and An(3+) (An = Pu, Am, Cm), were transferred from solution to gas by electrospray ionization as Ln(L)3(3+) and An(L)3(3+) complexes, where L = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide (TMOGA). The fragmentation chemistry of the complexes was examined by collision-induced and electron transfer dissociation (CID and ETD). Protonated TMOGA, HL(+), and Ln(L)(L-H)(2+) are the major products upon CID of La(L)3(3+), Ce(L)3(3+), and Pr(L)3(3+), while Ln(L)2(3+) is increasingly pronounced beyond Pr. A C-Oether bond cleavage product appears upon CID of all Ln(L)3(3+); only for Eu(L)3(3+) is the divalent complex, Eu(L)2(2+), dominant. The CID patterns of Pu(L)3(3+), Am(L)3(3+), and Cm(L)3(3+) are similar to those of the Ln(L)3(3+) for the late Ln. A striking exception is the appearance of Pu(IV) products upon CID of Pu(L)3(3+), in accord with the relatively low Pu(IV)/Pu(III) reduction potential in solution. Minor divalent Ln(L)2(2+) and An(L)2(2+) were produced for all Ln and An; with the exception of Eu(L)2(2+) these complexes form adducts with O2, presumably producing superoxides in which the trivalent oxidation state is recovered. ETD of Ln(L)3(3+) and An(L)3(3+) reveals behavior which parallels that of the Ln(3+) and An(3+) ions in solution. A C-Oether bond cleavage product, in which the trivalent oxidation state is preserved, appeared for all complexes; charge reduction products, Ln(L)2(2+) and Ln(L)3(2+), appear only for Sm, Eu, and Yb, which have stable divalent oxidation states. Both CID and ETD reveal chemistry that reflects the condensed-phase redox behavior of the 4f and 5f elements.

  7. [Function and disease in manganese].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized. PMID:27455810

  8. High energy density redox flow device

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Carter, W. Craig; Ho, Bryan Y; Duduta, Mihai; Limthongkul, Pimpa

    2014-05-13

    Redox flow devices are described in which at least one of the positive electrode or negative electrode-active materials is a semi-solid or is a condensed ion-storing electroactive material, and in which at least one of the electrode-active materials is transported to and from an assembly at which the electrochemical reaction occurs, producing electrical energy. The electronic conductivity of the semi-solid is increased by the addition of conductive particles to suspensions and/or via the surface modification of the solid in semi-solids (e.g., by coating the solid with a more electron conductive coating material to increase the power of the device). High energy density and high power redox flow devices are disclosed. The redox flow devices described herein can also include one or more inventive design features. In addition, inventive chemistries for use in redox flow devices are also described.

  9. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    PubMed

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-05-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups.

  10. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  11. The Redox Code

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The redox code is a set of principles that defines the positioning of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, NADP) and thiol/disulfide and other redox systems as well as the thiol redox proteome in space and time in biological systems. The code is richly elaborated in an oxygen-dependent life, where activation/deactivation cycles involving O2 and H2O2 contribute to spatiotemporal organization for differentiation, development, and adaptation to the environment. Disruption of this organizational structure during oxidative stress represents a fundamental mechanism in system failure and disease. Recent Advances: Methodology in assessing components of the redox code under physiological conditions has progressed, permitting insight into spatiotemporal organization and allowing for identification of redox partners in redox proteomics and redox metabolomics. Critical Issues: Complexity of redox networks and redox regulation is being revealed step by step, yet much still needs to be learned. Future Directions: Detailed knowledge of the molecular patterns generated from the principles of the redox code under defined physiological or pathological conditions in cells and organs will contribute to understanding the redox component in health and disease. Ultimately, there will be a scientific basis to a modern redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 734–746. PMID:25891126

  12. Manganese in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-02-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [ 1 1 2¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  13. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Minjoon; Ryu, Jaechan; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-10-01

    Vanadium redox reactions have been considered as a key factor affecting the energy efficiency of the all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). This redox reaction determines the reaction kinetics of whole cells. However, poor kinetic reversibility and catalytic activity towards the V(2+)/V(3+) and VO(2+)/VO2(+) redox couples on the commonly used carbon substrate limit broader applications of VRFBs. Consequently, modified carbon substrates have been extensively investigated to improve vanadium redox reactions. In this Focus Review, recent progress on metal- and carbon-based nanomaterials as an electrocatalyst for VRFBs is discussed in detail, without the intention to provide a comprehensive review on the whole components of the system. Instead, the focus is mainly placed on the redox chemistry of vanadium ions at a surface of various metals, different dimensional carbons, nitrogen-doped carbon nanostructures, and metal-carbon composites.

  14. The redox switch/redox coupling hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, Sebastián; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Sierra, Alejandra; Benito, Marina; Fonseca, Luis L; Fonseca, Carla P; García-Martín, María L

    2006-01-01

    We provide an integrative interpretation of neuroglial metabolic coupling including the presence of subcellular compartmentation of pyruvate and monocarboxylate recycling through the plasma membrane of both neurons and glial cells. The subcellular compartmentation of pyruvate allows neurons and astrocytes to select between glucose and lactate as alternative substrates, depending on their relative extracellular concentration and the operation of a redox switch. This mechanism is based on the inhibition of glycolysis at the level of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by NAD(+) limitation, under sufficiently reduced cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH redox conditions. Lactate and pyruvate recycling through the plasma membrane allows the return to the extracellular medium of cytosolic monocarboxylates enabling their transcellular, reversible, exchange between neurons and astrocytes. Together, intracellular pyruvate compartmentation and monocarboxylate recycling result in an effective transcellular coupling between the cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH redox states of both neurons and glial cells. Following glutamatergic neurotransmission, increased glutamate uptake by the astrocytes is proposed to augment glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, balancing to a reduced cytosolic NAD(+)/NADH in the glia. Reducing equivalents are transferred then to the neuron resulting in a reduced neuronal NAD(+)/NADH redox state. This may eventually switch off neuronal glycolysis, favoring the oxidation of extracellular lactate in the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) equilibrium and in the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycles. Finally, pyruvate derived from neuronal lactate oxidation, may return to the extracellular space and to the astrocyte, restoring the basal redox state and beginning a new loop of the lactate/pyruvate transcellular coupling cycle. Transcellular redox coupling operates through the plasma membrane transporters of monocarboxylates, similarly to the intracellular redox shuttles

  15. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  19. Electrosynthesis of Biomimetic Manganese-Calcium Oxides for Water Oxidation Catalysis--Atomic Structure and Functionality.

    PubMed

    González-Flores, Diego; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Heidkamp, Jonathan; Chernev, Petko; Martínez-Moreno, Elías; Pasquini, Chiara; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Klingan, Katharina; Gernet, Ulrich; Fischer, Anna; Dau, Holger

    2016-02-19

    Water-oxidizing calcium-manganese oxides, which mimic the inorganic core of the biological catalyst, were synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the manganese and calcium K edges. The amorphous, birnesite-type oxides are obtained through a simple protocol that involves electrodeposition followed by active-site creation through annealing at moderate temperatures. Calcium ions are inessential, but tune the electrocatalytic properties. For increasing calcium/manganese molar ratios, both Tafel slopes and exchange current densities decrease gradually, resulting in optimal catalytic performance at calcium/manganese molar ratios of close to 10 %. Tracking UV/Vis absorption changes during electrochemical operation suggests that inactive oxides reach their highest, all-Mn(IV) oxidation state at comparably low electrode potentials. The ability to undergo redox transitions and the presence of a minor fraction of Mn(III) ions at catalytic potentials is identified as a prerequisite for catalytic activity. PMID:26692571

  20. Manganese deposits in northeastern European Russia and the Urals: Isotope geochemistry, genesis, and evolution of ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshov, V. N.; Brusnitsyn, A. I.; Starikova, E. V.

    2014-09-01

    Based on new data on the lithology, mineralogy, chemistry, and isotopic composition of manganese carbonate ores and rocks at the deposits and occurrences in the Novaya Zemlya Archipelago, the Pai-Khoi, and the Urals, as well as using data from the literature, the main Phanerozoic basins of manganese deposition have been established in the geological history of Laurasia, Pangea, and Siberian paleocontinents. The formation conditions of manganese ore gradually changed from hydrothermal-sedimentary in the Middle Paleozoic to sedimentary-diagenetic in Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The ore was also formed under catagenetic conditions. Carbon of oxidized organic matter plays a substantial role in the formation of manganese carbonates.

  1. Bimetallic redox synergy in oxidative palladium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Powers, David C; Ritter, Tobias

    2012-06-19

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which are embedded in the active sites of many metalloenzymes, are responsible for effecting a diverse array of oxidation reactions in nature. The range of chemical transformations remains unparalleled in the laboratory. With few noteworthy exceptions, chemists have primarily focused on mononuclear transition metal complexes in developing homogeneous catalysis. Our group is interested in the development of carbon-heteroatom bond-forming reactions, with a particular focus on identifying reactions that can be applied to the synthesis of complex molecules. In this context, we have hypothesized that bimetallic redox chemistry, in which two metals participate synergistically, may lower the activation barriers to redox transformations relevant to catalysis. In this Account, we discuss redox chemistry of binuclear Pd complexes and examine the role of binuclear intermediates in Pd-catalyzed oxidation reactions. Stoichiometric organometallic studies of the oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes to binuclear Pd(III) complexes and subsequent C-X reductive elimination from the resulting binuclear Pd(III) complexes have confirmed the viability of C-X bond-forming reactions mediated by binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Metal-metal bond formation, which proceeds concurrently with oxidation of binuclear Pd(II) complexes, can lower the activation barrier for oxidation. We also discuss experimental and theoretical work that suggests that C-X reductive elimination is also facilitated by redox cooperation of both metals during reductive elimination. The effect of ligand modification on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes will be presented in light of the impact that ligand structure can exert on the structure and reactivity of binuclear Pd(III) complexes. Historically, oxidation reactions similar to those discussed here have been proposed to proceed via mononuclear Pd(IV) intermediates, and the hypothesis of mononuclear Pd

  2. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a pink... manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  5. An overview of mechanisms of redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Henry Jay; Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde

    2014-01-01

    A principal characteristic of redox signaling is that it involves an oxidation-reduction reaction or covalent adduct formation between the sensor signaling protein and second messenger. Non-redox signaling may involve alteration of the second messenger as in hydrolysis of GTP by G proteins, modification of the signaling protein as in farnesylation, or simple non-covalent binding of an agonist or second messenger. The chemistry of redox signaling is reviewed here. Specifically we have described how among the so-called reactive oxygen species, only hydroperoxides clearly fit the role of a second messenger. Consideration of reaction kinetics and cellular location strongly suggests that for hydroperoxides, particular protein cysteines are the targets and that the requirements for redox signaling is that these cysteines are in microenvironments in which the cysteine is ionized to the thiolate, and a proton can be donated to form a leaving group. The chemistry described here is the same as occurs in the cysteine and selenocysteine peroxidases that are generally considered the primary defense against oxidative stress. But, these same enzymes can also act as the sensors and transducer for signaling. Conditions that would allow specific signaling by peroxynitrite and superoxide are also defined. Signaling by other electrophiles, which includes lipid peroxidation products, quinones formed from polyphenols and other metabolites also involves reaction with specific protein thiolates. Again, kinetics and location are the primary determinants that provide specificity required for physiological signaling although enzymatic catalysis is not likely involved. PMID:24512843

  6. Redox Conditions in Selected Principal Aquifers of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Cowdery, T.K.; Chapelle, F.H.; Jurgens, B.C.

    2009-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) processes affect the quality of groundwater in all aquifer systems. Redox processes can alternately mobilize or immobilize potentially toxic metals associated with naturally occurring aquifer materials, contribute to the degradation or preservation of anthropogenic contami-nants, and generate undesirable byproducts, such as dissolved manganese (Mn2+), ferrous iron (Fe2+), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Determining the kinds of redox processes that occur in an aquifer system, documenting their spatial distribution, and understanding how they affect concentrations of natural or anthropogenic contaminants are central to assessing and predicting the chemical quality of groundwater. This Fact Sheet extends the analysis of U.S. Geological Survey authors to additional principal aquifer systems by applying a framework developed by the USGS to a larger set of water-quality data from the USGS national water databases. For a detailed explanation, see the 'Introduction' in the Fact Sheet.

  7. Anion Redox Chemistry in the Cobalt Free 3d Transition Metal Oxide Intercalation Electrode Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Roberts, Matthew R; Guerrini, Niccoló; Tapia-Ruiz, Nuria; Hao, Rong; Massel, Felix; Pickup, David M; Ramos, Silvia; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Chadwick, Alan V; Duda, Laurent C; Bruce, Peter G

    2016-09-01

    Conventional intercalation cathodes for lithium batteries store charge in redox reactions associated with the transition metal cations, e.g., Mn(3+/4+) in LiMn2O4, and this limits the energy storage of Li-ion batteries. Compounds such as Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 exhibit a capacity to store charge in excess of the transition metal redox reactions. The additional capacity occurs at and above 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li. The capacity at 4.5 V is dominated by oxidation of the O(2-) anions accounting for ∼0.43 e(-)/formula unit, with an additional 0.06 e(-)/formula unit being associated with O loss from the lattice. In contrast, the capacity above 4.5 V is mainly O loss, ∼0.08 e(-)/formula. The O redox reaction involves the formation of localized hole states on O during charge, which are located on O coordinated by (Mn(4+)/Li(+)). The results have been obtained by combining operando electrochemical mass spec on (18)O labeled Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 with XANES, soft X-ray spectroscopy, resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Finally the general features of O redox are described with discussion about the role of comparatively ionic (less covalent) 3d metal-oxygen interaction on anion redox in lithium rich cathode materials. PMID:27498756

  8. Anion Redox Chemistry in the Cobalt Free 3d Transition Metal Oxide Intercalation Electrode Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Roberts, Matthew R; Guerrini, Niccoló; Tapia-Ruiz, Nuria; Hao, Rong; Massel, Felix; Pickup, David M; Ramos, Silvia; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Guo, Jinghua; Chadwick, Alan V; Duda, Laurent C; Bruce, Peter G

    2016-09-01

    Conventional intercalation cathodes for lithium batteries store charge in redox reactions associated with the transition metal cations, e.g., Mn(3+/4+) in LiMn2O4, and this limits the energy storage of Li-ion batteries. Compounds such as Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 exhibit a capacity to store charge in excess of the transition metal redox reactions. The additional capacity occurs at and above 4.5 V versus Li(+)/Li. The capacity at 4.5 V is dominated by oxidation of the O(2-) anions accounting for ∼0.43 e(-)/formula unit, with an additional 0.06 e(-)/formula unit being associated with O loss from the lattice. In contrast, the capacity above 4.5 V is mainly O loss, ∼0.08 e(-)/formula. The O redox reaction involves the formation of localized hole states on O during charge, which are located on O coordinated by (Mn(4+)/Li(+)). The results have been obtained by combining operando electrochemical mass spec on (18)O labeled Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 with XANES, soft X-ray spectroscopy, resonant inelastic X-ray spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Finally the general features of O redox are described with discussion about the role of comparatively ionic (less covalent) 3d metal-oxygen interaction on anion redox in lithium rich cathode materials.

  9. Tripyrrindione as a Redox-Active Ligand: Palladium(II) Coordination in Three Redox States.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ritika; Loughrey, Jonathan J; Astashkin, Andrei V; Shearer, Jason; Tomat, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    The tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of urinary pigment uroerythrin coordinates divalent palladium as a planar tridentate ligand. Spectroscopic, structural and computational investigations reveal that the tripyrrindione ligand binds as a dianionic radical, and the resulting complex is stable at room temperature. One-electron oxidation and reduction reactions do not alter the planar coordination sphere of palladium(II) and lead to the isolation of two additional complexes presenting different redox states of the ligand framework. Unaffected by stability problems common to tripyrrolic fragments, the tripyrrindione ligand offers a robust platform for ligand-based redox chemistry.

  10. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  11. Method for dehydrating manganese dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marincic, N.; Fuksa, R.

    1987-05-05

    A method is described for preparing a water-free lithium-manganese dioxide battery comprising: assembling the battery comprising lithium anode, a cathode comprising carbon and manganese dioxide, and a cell container; adding to the cell container a fluid containing a dehydrating agent which reacts with water bound to the manganese dioxide to form a reaction product that is extractable from the manganese dioxide; removing the fluid from the cell container; hermetically sealing and connecting the container to a vacuum source; establishing a vacuum within the compartment to pull off any remaining amount of the fluid and any volatile reaction product from the manganese dioxide; releasing the vacuum; and adding anhydrous electrolyte and hermetically sealing the cell.

  12. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  13. An overview of mechanisms of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Forman, Henry Jay; Ursini, Fulvio; Maiorino, Matilde

    2014-08-01

    A principal characteristic of redox signaling is that it involves an oxidation-reduction reaction or covalent adduct formation between the sensor signaling protein and second messenger. Non-redox signaling may involve alteration of the second messenger as in hydrolysis of GTP by G proteins, modification of the signaling protein as in farnesylation, or simple non-covalent binding of an agonist or second messenger. The chemistry of redox signaling is reviewed here. Specifically we have described how among the so-called reactive oxygen species, only hydroperoxides clearly fit the role of a second messenger. Consideration of reaction kinetics and cellular location strongly suggests that for hydroperoxides, particular protein cysteines are the targets and that the requirements for redox signaling is that these cysteines are in microenvironments in which the cysteine is ionized to the thiolate, and a proton can be donated to form a leaving group. The chemistry described here is the same as occurs in the cysteine and selenocysteine peroxidases that are generally considered the primary defense against oxidative stress. But, these same enzymes can also act as the sensors and transducer for signaling. Conditions that would allow specific signaling by peroxynitrite and superoxide are also defined. Signaling by other electrophiles, which includes lipid peroxidation products, quinones formed from polyphenols and other metabolites also involves reaction with specific protein thiolates. Again, kinetics and location are the primary determinants that provide specificity required for physiological signaling although enzymatic catalysis is not likely involved. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Redox Signalling in the Cardiovascular System".

  14. Redox processes and water quality of selected principal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Chapelle, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions in 15 principal aquifer (PA) systems of the United States, and their impact on several water quality issues, were assessed from a large data base collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the USGS. The logic of these assessments was based on the observed ecological succession of electron acceptors such as dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate and threshold concentrations of these substrates needed to support active microbial metabolism. Similarly, the utilization of solid-phase electron acceptors such as Mn(IV) and Fe(III) is indicated by the production of dissolved manganese and iron. An internally consistent set of threshold concentration criteria was developed and applied to a large data set of 1692 water samples from the PAs to assess ambient redox conditions. The indicated redox conditions then were related to the occurrence of selected natural (arsenic) and anthropogenic (nitrate and volatile organic compounds) contaminants in ground water. For the natural and anthropogenic contaminants assessed in this study, considering redox conditions as defined by this framework of redox indicator species and threshold concentrations explained many water quality trends observed at a regional scale. An important finding of this study was that samples indicating mixed redox processes provide information on redox heterogeneity that is useful for assessing common water quality issues. Given the interpretive power of the redox framework and given that it is relatively inexpensive and easy to measure the chemical parameters included in the framework, those parameters should be included in routine water quality monitoring programs whenever possible.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  19. Manganese porphyrin-double stranded DNA complex guided in situ deposition of polyaniline for electrochemical thrombin detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shunbi; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-07-11

    In this work, we proposed a novel electrochemical strategy for sensitive detection of thrombin (TB) based on in situ generation of polyaniline (PANI) as a redox mediator by using a manganese porphyrin-double stranded DNA (MnTMPyP-dsDNA) peroxidase-like artificial enzyme mimic as a powerful catalyst and template.

  20. An Excel Workbook for Identifying Redox Processes in Ground Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) condition of ground water affects the concentration, transport, and fate of many anthropogenic and natural contaminants. The redox state of a ground-water sample is defined by the dominant type of reduction/oxidation reaction, or redox process, occurring in the sample, as inferred from water-quality data. However, because of the difficulty in defining and applying a systematic redox framework to samples from diverse hydrogeologic settings, many regional water-quality investigations do not attempt to determine the predominant redox process in ground water. Recently, McMahon and Chapelle (2008) devised a redox framework that was applied to a large number of samples from 15 principal aquifer systems in the United States to examine the effect of redox processes on water quality. This framework was expanded by Chapelle and others (in press) to use measured sulfide data to differentiate between iron(III)- and sulfate-reducing conditions. These investigations showed that a systematic approach to characterize redox conditions in ground water could be applied to datasets from diverse hydrogeologic settings using water-quality data routinely collected in regional water-quality investigations. This report describes the Microsoft Excel workbook, RedoxAssignment_McMahon&Chapelle.xls, that assigns the predominant redox process to samples using the framework created by McMahon and Chapelle (2008) and expanded by Chapelle and others (in press). Assignment of redox conditions is based on concentrations of dissolved oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3-), manganese (Mn2+), iron (Fe2+), sulfate (SO42-), and sulfide (sum of dihydrogen sulfide [aqueous H2S], hydrogen sulfide [HS-], and sulfide [S2-]). The logical arguments for assigning the predominant redox process to each sample are performed by a program written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The program is called from buttons on the main worksheet. The number of samples that can be analyzed

  1. A Multistep Equilibria-Redox-Complexation Demonstration to Illustrate Le Chatelier's Principle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Tomas G.; Mellon, Edward K.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a process that can be used to illustrate a number of chemical principles including Le Chatelier's principle, redox chemistry, equilibria versus steady state situations, and solubility of species. (JRH)

  2. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  3. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  4. Manganese status, gut endogenous losses of manganese, and antioxidant enzyme activity in rats fed varying levels of manganese and fat.

    PubMed

    Malecki, E A; Huttner, D L; Greger, J L

    1994-07-01

    We hypothesized that manganese deficient animals fed high vs moderate levels of polyunsaturated fat would either manifest evidence of increased oxidative stress or would experience compensatory changes in antioxidant enzymes and/or shifts in manganese utilization that result in decreased endogenous gut manganese losses. Rats (females in Study 1, males in Study 2, n = 8/treatment) were fed diets that contained 5 or 20% corn oil by weight and either 0.01 or 1.5 mumol manganese/g diet. In study 2, 54Mn complexed to albumin was injected into the portal vein to assess gut endogenous losses of manganese. The manganese deficient rats: 1. Had 30-50% lower liver, tibia, kidney, spleen, and pancreas manganese concentrations than manganese adequate rats; 2. Conserved manganese through approximately 70-fold reductions in endogenous fecal losses of manganese; 3. Had lower heart manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity; and 4. Experienced only two minor compensatory changes in the activity of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase. Gut endogenous losses of manganese tended to account for a smaller proportion of absorbed manganese in rats fed high-fat diets; otherwise fat intake had few effects on tissue manganese concentrations. PMID:7986658

  5. Manganese oxidation model for rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Kim, Byung R.; Roberts, Philip J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the low pH conditions, or their combinations.

  6. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested. PMID:26593894

  7. Redox Species of Redox Flow Batteries: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-18

    Due to the capricious nature of renewable energy resources, such as wind and solar, large-scale energy storage devices are increasingly required to make the best use of the renewable power. The redox flow battery is considered suitable for large-scale applications due to its modular design, good scalability and flexible operation. The biggest challenge of the redox flow battery is the low energy density. The redox active species is the most important component in redox flow batteries, and the redox potential and solubility of redox species dictate the system energy density. This review is focused on the recent development of redox species. Different categories of redox species, including simple inorganic ions, metal complexes, metal-free organic compounds, polysulfide/sulfur and lithium storage active materials, are reviewed. The future development of redox species towards higher energy density is also suggested.

  8. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Woodward W.; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E.

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet—it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn2+, and ultimately water.

  9. Manganese and the Evolution of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Woodward W; Hemp, James; Johnson, Jena E

    2015-09-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the most important bioenergetic event in the history of our planet-it evolved once within the Cyanobacteria, and remained largely unchanged as it was transferred to algae and plants via endosymbiosis. Manganese plays a fundamental role in this history because it lends the critical redox behavior of the water-oxidizing complex of photosystem II. Constraints from the photoassembly of the Mn-bearing water-oxidizing complex fuel the hypothesis that Mn(II) once played a key role as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis prior to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Here we review the growing body of geological and geochemical evidence from the Archean and Paleoproterozoic sedimentary records that supports this idea and demonstrates that the oxidative branch of the Mn cycle switched on prior to the rise of oxygen. This Mn-oxidizing phototrophy hypothesis also receives support from the biological record of extant phototrophs, and can be made more explicit by leveraging constraints from structural biology and biochemistry of photosystem II in Cyanobacteria. These observations highlight that water-splitting in photosystem II evolved independently from a homodimeric ancestral type II reaction center capable of high potential photosynthesis and Mn(II) oxidation, which is required by the presence of homologous redox-active tyrosines in the modern heterodimer. The ancestral homodimer reaction center also evolved a C-terminal extension that sterically precluded standard phototrophic electron donors like cytochrome c, cupredoxins, or high-potential iron-sulfur proteins, and could only complete direct oxidation of small molecules like Mn(2+), and ultimately water.

  10. Chemical Principles Revisited. Redox Reactions and the Electropotential Axis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella, Alfred J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper suggests a nontraditional pedagogic approach to the subject of redox reactions and electrode potentials suitable for freshman chemistry. Presented is a method for the representation of galvanic cells without the introduction of the symbology and notation of conventional cell diagrams. (CW)

  11. Successes and Techniques Associated with Teaching the Chemistry of Radioactive Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donald H.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a chemistry course that is built around the topic of radioactive waste and encompasses a large number of chemistry concepts including redox, equilibrium, kinetics, nuclear energy, and the periodic chart. (JRH)

  12. Manganese exposure, essentiality & toxicity.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, A B

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element present in all living organisms and is naturally present in rocks, soil, water, and food. Exposure to high oral, parenteral, or ambient air concentrations of Mn can result in elevations in Mn tissue levels and neurological effects. However, current understanding of the impact of Mn exposure on the nervous system leads to the hypothesis that there should be no adverse effects at low exposures, because Mn is an essential element; therefore, there should be some threshold for exposure above which adverse effects may occur and adverse effects may increase in frequency with higher exposures beyond that threshold. Data gaps regarding Mn neurotoxicity include what the clinical significance is of the neurobehavioural, neuropsychological, or neurological endpoints measured in many of the occupational studies that have evaluated cohorts exposed to relatively low levels of Mn. Specific early biomarkers of effect, such as subclinical neurobehavioural or neurological changes or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes have not been established or validated for Mn, although some studies have attempted to correlate biomarkers with neurological effects. Experimental studies with rodents and monkeys provide valuable information about the absorption, bioavailability, and tissue distribution of various Mn compounds with different solubilities and oxidation states in different age groups. Studies have shown that rodents and primates maintain stable tissue manganese levels as a result of homeostatic mechanisms that tightly regulate absorption and excretion. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are being developed to provide for the ability to conduct route-to-route extrapolations, evaluate nasal uptake to the CNS, and evaluate lifestage differences in Mn pharmacokinetics. Such models will facilitate more rigorous quantitative analysis of the available pharmacokinetic data for Mn and will be used to identify situations

  13. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Partin, Camille A.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5–0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth’s oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8–0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ∼30–40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ∼1–10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo–N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth’s history. PMID:23515332

  14. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Robbins, Leslie J; Partin, Camille A; Gill, Benjamin C; Lalonde, Stefan V; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O; Lyons, Timothy W

    2013-04-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5-0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth's oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8-0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ∼30-40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ∼1-10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo-N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth's history.

  15. General Chemoselective and Redox-Responsive Ligation and Release Strategy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a switchable redox click and cleave reaction strategy for conjugating and releasing a range of molecules on demand. This chemoselective redox-responsive ligation (CRRL) and release strategy is based on a redox switchable oxime linkage that is controlled by mild chemical or electrochemical redox signals and can be performed at physiological conditions without the use of a catalyst. Both conjugation and release reactions are kinetically well behaved and quantitative. The CRRL strategy is synthetically modular and easily monitored and characterized by routine analytical techniques. We demonstrate how the CRRL strategy can be used for the dynamic generation of cyclic peptides and the ligation of two different peptides that are stable but can be selectively cleaved upon changes in the redox environment. We also demonstrate a new redox based delivery of cargoes to live cells strategy via the CRRL methodology by synthesizing a FRET redox-responsive probe that is selectively activated within a cellular environment. We believe the ease of the CRRL strategy should find wide use in a range of applications in biology, tissue engineering, nanoscience, synthetic chemistry, and material science and will expand the suite of current conjugation and release strategies. PMID:24559434

  16. Modeling Studies on Microbial Effects on Groundwater Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikatsu Tochigi; Hideki Yoshikawa; Mikazu Yui

    2007-07-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop a model to predict microbial effects on the performance of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. As a first step, the effects of microbes on groundwater chemistry have been evaluated with the numerical code 'MINT', using data collected from the borehole HDB-6 in the Horonobe underground research laboratory (URL) in Japan. The MINT code models biochemistry and geochemical equilibrium, with consideration of transport of solute and microbial activity. The MINT code simulates the activities of six major groups of microbes, classified by their metabolism as 'aerobic', 'denitrifying', 'manganese reducing', 'iron reducing', 'sulfate reducing' and 'methanogenic'. The specific activity of each of these groups will depend on the redox potential (Eh) of the groundwater. Sensitivity analyses were performed to investigate the consequences of changes in groundwater composition on the effects of microbial activity. This indicates that the activities of Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) and methanogens are relatively high. The concentration of dissolved methane produced by such microbial activity is seen to be influenced by sulfate concentration. Based on the observed data from Horonobe URL, the concentration in oxygen is relatively high and the activity of denitrifying bacteria is the highest of the major six groups of microbes. This can, however, be attributable to chemical / microbial contamination of the groundwater during sampling. The modeling results indicate that the concentration of dissolved oxygen and nitrate ion should be quickly reduced by microbial metabolism, reducing the redox potential to a level low enough for active methano-genesis to commence. Such assessment can be important to evaluate the reliability of sampling and measurement techniques for sensitive geochemical parameters in general - and microbiology in particular. (authors)

  17. A carbon-free lithium-ion solid dispersion redox couple with low viscosity for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxiang; Koenig, Gary M.

    2016-08-01

    A new type of non-aqueous redox couple without carbon additives for flow batteries is proposed and the target anolyte chemistry is demonstrated. The so-called "Solid Dispersion Redox Couple" incorporates solid electroactive materials dispersed in organic lithium-ion battery electrolyte as its flowing suspension. In this work, a unique and systematic characterization approach has been used to study the flow battery redox couple in half cell demonstrations relative to a lithium electrode. An electrolyte laden with Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) has been characterized in multiple specially designed lithium half cell configurations. The flow battery redox couple described in this report has relatively low viscosity, especially in comparison to other flow batteries with solid active materials. The lack of carbon additive allows characterization of the electrochemical properties of the electroactive material in flow without the complication of conductive additives and unambiguous observation of the electrorheological coupling in these dispersed particle systems.

  18. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  19. Improving the Thermochemical Energy Storage Performance of the Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 Redox Couple by the Incorporation of Iron.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Alfonso J; Serrano, David P; Pizarro, Patricia; Coronado, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Redox cycles of manganese oxides (Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 ) are a promising alternative for thermochemical heat storage systems coupled to concentrated solar power plants as manganese oxides are abundant and inexpensive materials. Although their cyclability for such a purpose has been proved, sintering processes, related to the high-temperature conditions at which charge-discharge cycles are performed, generally cause a cycle-to-cycle decrease in the oxidation rate of Mn3 O4 . To guarantee proper operation, both reactions should present stable reaction rates. In this study, it has been demonstrated that the incorporation of Fe, which is also an abundant material, into the manganese oxides improves the redox performance of this system by increasing the heat storage density, narrowing the redox thermal hysteresis, and, above all, stabilizing and enhancing the oxidation rate over long-term operation, which counteracts the negative effects caused by sintering, although its presence is not avoided.

  20. Improving the Thermochemical Energy Storage Performance of the Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 Redox Couple by the Incorporation of Iron.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Alfonso J; Serrano, David P; Pizarro, Patricia; Coronado, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Redox cycles of manganese oxides (Mn2 O3 /Mn3 O4 ) are a promising alternative for thermochemical heat storage systems coupled to concentrated solar power plants as manganese oxides are abundant and inexpensive materials. Although their cyclability for such a purpose has been proved, sintering processes, related to the high-temperature conditions at which charge-discharge cycles are performed, generally cause a cycle-to-cycle decrease in the oxidation rate of Mn3 O4 . To guarantee proper operation, both reactions should present stable reaction rates. In this study, it has been demonstrated that the incorporation of Fe, which is also an abundant material, into the manganese oxides improves the redox performance of this system by increasing the heat storage density, narrowing the redox thermal hysteresis, and, above all, stabilizing and enhancing the oxidation rate over long-term operation, which counteracts the negative effects caused by sintering, although its presence is not avoided. PMID:25925817

  1. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-06-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH.

  2. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  3. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure. PMID:23089153

  4. Follow-up study on the effects on well chemistry from biological and chemical remediation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Scott, Dane; Apblett, Allen; Materer, Nicholas F

    2011-09-01

    The enduring effects of injected materials used for the remediation of chlorinated solvents were examined. Approximately two years previous to this study, four different remediation methods were tested in an area located southeast of Oklahoma City, OK. These methods included bioremediation under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions and chemical remediation using Fenton's reagent or KMnO(4). A series of water quality tests performed in this investigation revealed that the bioremediation processes did not introduce any unexpected chemistry. However, the wells that were treated anaerobically still had water with a negative oxidation-reduction potential and had no recontamination with migrating trichloroethylene as opposed to the aerobic wells that had both positive redox potentials and trichloroethylene present. Also, chemical treatment using Fenton's reagent did not result in any long-term changes in the well chemistry, with the exception of inducing a slight acidity. This is due to the facts that addition of iron into the aquifer that is already in contact with iron-rich clay soil had little long-term effects and the radical chemistry with hydrogen peroxide is short-lived due to its reactivity. KMnO(4)-based remediation results in deposition of new materials containing manganese in elevated oxidation states that may provide long-term protection against the build up of chlorinated organic compounds.

  5. Electronegativity and redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Quintana, Ramón Alain; Martínez González, Marco; Ayers, Paul W

    2016-08-10

    Using the maximum hardness principle, we show that the oxidation potential of a molecule increases as its electronegativity increases and also increases as its electronegativity in its oxidized state increases. This insight can be used to construct a linear free energy relation for the oxidation potential, which we train on a set of 31 organic redox couples and test on a set of 10 different redox reactions. Better results are obtained when the electronegativity of the oxidized/reduced reagents are adjusted to account for the reagents' interaction with their chemical environment.

  6. Mechanisms of Hop Inhibition Include the Transmembrane Redox Reaction▿

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under “highly reducing” conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and “antioxidative” hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of

  7. Mechanisms of hop inhibition include the transmembrane redox reaction.

    PubMed

    Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a novel mechanistic model of hop inhibition beyond the proton ionophore action toward (beer spoiling) bacteria was developed. Investigations were performed with model systems using cyclic voltammetry for the determination of redox processes/conditions in connection with growth challenges with hop-sensitive and -resistant Lactobacillus brevis strains in the presence of oxidants. Cyclic voltammetry identified a transmembrane redox reaction of hop compounds at low pH (common in beer) and in the presence of manganese (present in millimolar levels in lactic acid bacteria). The antibacterial action of hop compounds could be extended from the described proton ionophore activity, lowering the intracellular pH, to pronounced redox reactivity, causing cellular oxidative damage. Accordingly, a correlation between the resistance of L. brevis strains to a sole oxidant to their resistance to hop could not be expected and was not detected. However, in connection with our recent study concerning hop ionophore properties and the resistance of hop-sensitive and -tolerant L. brevis strains toward proton ionophores (J. Behr and R. F. Vogel, J. Agric. Food Chem. 57:6074-6081, 2009), we suggest that both ionophore and oxidant resistance are required for survival under hop stress conditions and confirmed this correlation according to the novel mechanistic model. In consequence, the expression of several published hop resistance mechanisms involved in manganese binding/transport and intracellular redox balance, as well as that of proteins involved in oxidative stress under "highly reducing" conditions (cf. anaerobic cultivation and "antioxidative" hop compounds in the growth medium), is now comprehensible. Accordingly, hop resistance as a multifactorial dynamic property at least implies distinct resistance levels against two different mechanisms of hop inhibition, namely, proton ionophore-induced and oxidative stress-induced mechanisms. Beyond this specific model of hop

  8. Redox Regulation of Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Handy, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Redox-dependent processes influence most cellular functions, such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Mitochondria are at the center of these processes, as mitochondria both generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that drive redox-sensitive events and respond to ROS-mediated changes in the cellular redox state. In this review, we examine the regulation of cellular ROS, their modes of production and removal, and the redox-sensitive targets that are modified by their flux. In particular, we focus on the actions of redox-sensitive targets that alter mitochondrial function and the role of these redox modifications on metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis, receptor-mediated signaling, and apoptotic pathways. We also consider the role of mitochondria in modulating these pathways, and discuss how redox-dependent events may contribute to pathobiology by altering mitochondrial function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1323–1367. PMID:22146081

  9. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  14. Biomarkers of manganese intoxication.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Fu, Sherleen X; Dydak, Ulrike; Cowan, Dallas M

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), upon absorption, is primarily sequestered in tissue and intracellular compartments. For this reason, blood Mn concentration does not always accurately reflect Mn concentration in the targeted tissue, particularly in the brain. The discrepancy between Mn concentrations in tissue or intracellular components means that blood Mn is a poor biomarker of Mn exposure or toxicity under many conditions and that other biomarkers must be established. For group comparisons of active workers, blood Mn has some utility for distinguishing exposed from unexposed subjects, although the large variability in mean values renders it insensitive for discriminating one individual from the rest of the study population. Mn exposure is known to alter iron (Fe) homeostasis. The Mn/Fe ratio (MIR) in plasma or erythrocytes reflects not only steady-state concentrations of Mn or Fe in tested individuals, but also a biological response (altered Fe homeostasis) to Mn exposure. Recent human studies support the potential value for using MIR to distinguish individuals with Mn exposure. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in combination with noninvasive assessment of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), provides convincing evidence of Mn exposure, even without clinical symptoms of Mn intoxication. For subjects with long-term, low-dose Mn exposure or for those exposed in the past but not the present, neither blood Mn nor MRI provides a confident distinction for Mn exposure or intoxication. While plasma or erythrocyte MIR is more likely a sensitive measure, the cut-off values for MIR among the general population need to be further tested and established. Considering the large accumulation of Mn in bone, developing an X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy or neutron-based spectroscopy method may create yet another novel non-invasive tool for assessing Mn exposure and toxicity. PMID:20946915

  15. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS Reg. No. 10024-66-5) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 184.1461 Section 184.1461 Food... GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...

  18. Redox regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ila; Chandhok, Des

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress, implicated in the etiology of cancer, results from an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell’s own antioxidant defenses. ROS deregulate the redox homeostasis and promote tumor formation by initiating an aberrant induction of signaling networks that cause tumorigenesis. Ultraviolet (UV) exposures, γ-radiation and other environmental carcinogens generate ROS in the cells, which can exert apoptosis in the tumors, thereby killing the malignant cells or induce the progression of the cancer growth by blocking cellular defense system. Cancer stem cells take the advantage of the aberrant redox system and spontaneously proliferate. Oxidative stress and gene-environment interactions play a significant role in the development of breast, prostate, pancreatic and colon cancer. Prolonged lifetime exposure to estrogen is associated with several kinds of DNA damage. Oxidative stress and estrogen receptor-associated proliferative changes are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. BRCA1, a tumor suppressor against hormone responsive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer, plays a significant role in inhibiting ROS and estrogen mediated DNA damage; thereby regulate the redox homeostasis of the cells. Several transcription factors and tumor suppressors are involved during stress response such as Nrf2, NFκB and BRCA1. A promising strategy for targeting redox status of the cells is to use readily available natural substances from vegetables, fruits, herbs and spices. Many of the phytochemicals have already been identified to have chemopreventive potential, capable of intervening in carcinogenesis. PMID:20716925

  19. Sol-gel synthesis and adsorption properties of mesoporous manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanets, A. I.; Kuznetsova, T. F.; Prozorovich, V. G.

    2015-03-01

    Sol-gel synthesis of mesoporous xerogels of manganese oxide with different phase compositions has been performed. The manganese oxide sols were obtained by redox reactions of potassium permanganate with hydrogen peroxide or manganese(II) chloride in aqueous solutions. The isotherms of the low-temperature adsorption-desorption of nitrogen with manganese oxide xerogels treated at 80, 200, 400, and 600°C were measured. The samples were studied by electron microscopy and thermal and XRD analysis. The phase transformation and the changes in the adsorption and capillary-condensation properties of manganese oxide were shown to depend on the sol synthesis conditions and the temperature of the thermal treatment of the gel. The X-ray amorphous samples heated at 80°C were shown to have low values of the specific surface; at higher temperatures, the xerogel crystallized into mixed phases with various compositions and its surface area increased at 200-400°C and decreased at 600°C.

  20. Arsenic behavior in river sediments under redox gradient: a review.

    PubMed

    Gorny, Josselin; Billon, Gabriel; Lesven, Ludovic; Dumoulin, David; Madé, Benoît; Noiriel, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The fate of arsenic - a redox sensitive metalloid - in surface sediments is closely linked to early diagenetic processes. The review presents the main redox mechanisms and final products of As that have been evidenced over the last years. Oxidation of organic matter and concomitant reduction of oxidants by bacterial activity result in redox transformations of As species. The evolution of the sediment reactivity will also induce secondary abiotic reactions like complexation/de-complexation, sorption, precipitation/dissolution and biotic reactions that could, for instance, lead to the detoxification of some As species. Overall, abiotic redox reactions that govern the speciation of As mostly involve manganese (hydr)-oxides and reduced sulfur species produced by the sulfate-reducing bacteria. Bacterial activity is also responsible for the inter-conversion between As(V) and As(III), as well as for the production of methylated arsenic species. In surficial sediments, sorption processes also control the fate of inorganic As(V), through the formation of inner sphere complexes with iron (hydr)-oxides, that are biologically reduced in buried sediment. Arsenic species can also be bound to organic matter, either directly to functional groups or indirectly through metal complexes. Finally, even if the role of reduced sulfur species in the cycling of arsenic in sediments has been evidenced, some of the transformations remain hypothetical and deserve further investigation.

  1. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    SciTech Connect

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  2. Oxidative stress: a concept in redox biology and medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sies, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    “Oxidative stress” as a concept in redox biology and medicine has been formulated in 1985; at the beginning of 2015, approx. 138,000 PubMed entries show for this term. This concept has its merits and its pitfalls. Among the merits is the notion, elicited by the combined two terms of (i) aerobic metabolism as a steady-state redox balance and (ii) the associated potential strains in the balance as denoted by the term, stress, evoking biological stress responses. Current research on molecular redox switches governing oxidative stress responses is in full bloom. The fundamental importance of linking redox shifts to phosphorylation/dephosphorylation signaling is being more fully appreciated, thanks to major advances in methodology. Among the pitfalls is the fact that the underlying molecular details are to be worked out in each particular case, which is bvious for a global concept, but which is sometimes overlooked. This can lead to indiscriminate use of the term, oxidative stress, without clear relation to redox chemistry. The major role in antioxidant defense is fulfilled by antioxidant enzymes, not by small-molecule antioxidant compounds. The field of oxidative stress research embraces chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology and pathophysiology, all the way to medicine and health and disease research. PMID:25588755

  3. Oxidative stress: a concept in redox biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Sies, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    "Oxidative stress" as a concept in redox biology and medicine has been formulated in 1985; at the beginning of 2015, approx. 138,000 PubMed entries show for this term. This concept has its merits and its pitfalls. Among the merits is the notion, elicited by the combined two terms of (i) aerobic metabolism as a steady-state redox balance and (ii) the associated potential strains in the balance as denoted by the term, stress, evoking biological stress responses. Current research on molecular redox switches governing oxidative stress responses is in full bloom. The fundamental importance of linking redox shifts to phosphorylation/dephosphorylation signaling is being more fully appreciated, thanks to major advances in methodology. Among the pitfalls is the fact that the underlying molecular details are to be worked out in each particular case, which is bvious for a global concept, but which is sometimes overlooked. This can lead to indiscriminate use of the term, oxidative stress, without clear relation to redox chemistry. The major role in antioxidant defense is fulfilled by antioxidant enzymes, not by small-molecule antioxidant compounds. The field of oxidative stress research embraces chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology, physiology and pathophysiology, all the way to medicine and health and disease research.

  4. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  10. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS... dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS... dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  12. SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-04-22

    The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide and central redox theory for aerobic life: A tribute to Helmut Sies: Scout, trailblazer, and redox pioneer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dean P

    2016-04-01

    When Rafael Radi and I wrote about Helmut Sies for the Redox Pioneer series, I was disappointed that the Editor restricted us to the use of "Pioneer" in the title. My view is that Helmut was always ahead of the pioneers: He was a scout discovering paths for exploration and a trailblazer developing strategies and methods for discovery. I have known him for nearly 40 years and greatly enjoyed his collegiality as well as brilliance in scientific scholarship. He made monumental contributions to 20th century physiological chemistry beginning with his first measurement of H2O2 in rat liver. While continuous H2O2 production is dogma today, the concept of H2O2 production in mammalian tissues was largely buried for half a century. He continued this leadership in research on oxidative stress, GSH, selenium, and singlet oxygen, during the timeframe when physiological chemistry and biochemistry transitioned to contemporary 21st century systems biology. His impact has been extensive in medical and health sciences, especially in nutrition, aging, toxicology and cancer. I briefly summarize my interactions with Helmut, stressing our work together on the redox code, a set of principles to link mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics, H2O2 metabolism, redox signaling and redox proteomics into central redox theory. PMID:27095208

  14. Hydrogen peroxide and central redox theory for aerobic life: A tribute to Helmut Sies: Scout, trailblazer, and redox pioneer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dean P

    2016-04-01

    When Rafael Radi and I wrote about Helmut Sies for the Redox Pioneer series, I was disappointed that the Editor restricted us to the use of "Pioneer" in the title. My view is that Helmut was always ahead of the pioneers: He was a scout discovering paths for exploration and a trailblazer developing strategies and methods for discovery. I have known him for nearly 40 years and greatly enjoyed his collegiality as well as brilliance in scientific scholarship. He made monumental contributions to 20th century physiological chemistry beginning with his first measurement of H2O2 in rat liver. While continuous H2O2 production is dogma today, the concept of H2O2 production in mammalian tissues was largely buried for half a century. He continued this leadership in research on oxidative stress, GSH, selenium, and singlet oxygen, during the timeframe when physiological chemistry and biochemistry transitioned to contemporary 21st century systems biology. His impact has been extensive in medical and health sciences, especially in nutrition, aging, toxicology and cancer. I briefly summarize my interactions with Helmut, stressing our work together on the redox code, a set of principles to link mitochondrial respiration, bioenergetics, H2O2 metabolism, redox signaling and redox proteomics into central redox theory.

  15. Recent Progress in Redox Flow Battery Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Luo, Qingtao; Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-02-20

    With the increase need to seamlessly integrate the renewable energy with the current grid which itself is evolving into a more intelligent, efficient, and capable electrical power system, it is envisioned that the energy storage system will play a more prominent role in bridging the gap between the current technology and a clean sustainable future in grid reliability and utilization. Redox flow battery technology is leading the way in this perspective in providing a well balanced approach for current challenges. Recent progress in the research and development of redox flow battery technology is reviewed here with a focus on new chemistries and systems.

  16. Sedimentary cobalt concentrations track marine redox evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Planavsky, Noah; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Jamie; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen production by photosynthesis drove the redox evolution of the atmosphere and ocean. Primary productivity by oxygenic photosynthesizers in the modern surface ocean is limited by trace nutrients such as iron, but previous studies have also observed high Co uptake associated with natural cyanobacterial populations. Constraining the size and variation of the oceanic reservoir of Co through time will help to understand the regulation of primary productivity and hence oxygenation through time. In this study, Co concentrations from iron formations (IF), shales and marine pyrites deposited over nearly 4 billion years of Earth's history are utilized to reconstruct secular changes in the mechanisms of Co removal from the oceanic reservoir. The Co reservoir prior to ~2 Ga was dominated by hydrothermal inputs and Fe(III)oxyhydroxides were likely involved in the removal of Co from the water column. Fe(II) oxidation in the water column resulted in the deposition of IF in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic, and the Co inventory of IF records a large oceanic reservoir of Co during this time. Lower Co concentrations in sediments during the Middle Proterozoic signify a decrease in the oceanic reservoir due to the expansion euxinic environments, corresponding to the results of previous studies. A transition to an oxidized deep ocean in the Phanerozoic is evidenced by correlation between Co and manganese (Mn) concentrations in hydrothermal and exhalative deposits, and in marine pyrites. This relationship between Co and Mn, signifying deposition of Co in association with Mn(IV)oxides, does not occur in the Precambrian. Mn(II) oxidation occurs at higher redox potentials than that required for Fe(II) oxidation, and the extent of Mn redox cycling prior to full ventilation of the oceans at the end of the Neoproterozoic was likely limited to spatially restricted oxic surface waters. In this regard, Co is another valuable redox proxy for tracking the growth and decline in oxygenated

  17. Influence of essential elements on manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Khandelwal, S.; Ashquin, M.; Tandon, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    With a view to explore the influence of essential metals in manganese intoxication, the effect of calcium, iron or zinc supplementation on the uptake of manganese and on the activity of manganese sensitive enzymes, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase in brain and liver of rat was investigated. The choice of the two mitochondrial enzymes was based on the fact that the mitochondria are the chief site of manganese accumulation and their activity in brain, liver and blood of rats is significantly influenced by manganese.

  18. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-01

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  1. Redox theory of aging

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. PMID:25863726

  2. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications. PMID:23712370

  3. Microfluidic redox battery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  4. Enhanced reversibility and durability of a solid oxide Fe-air redox battery by carbothermic reaction derived energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Huang, Kevin

    2014-01-18

    The recently developed solid oxide metal-air redox battery is a new technology capable of high-rate chemistry. Here we report that the performance, reversibility and stability of a solid oxide iron-air redox battery can be significantly improved by nanostructuring energy storage materials from a carbothermic reaction.

  5. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants.

  6. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  7. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  8. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Kang, J.-K.; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. Iron and manganese deposits occur in five forms: nodules, crusts, cements, mounds and sediment-hosted stratabound layers. Seafloor oxides show a wide range of compositions from nearly pure iron to nearly pure manganese end members. Fe/Mn ratios vary from about 24 000 (up to 58% elemental Fe) for hydrothermal seamount ironstones to about 0.001 (up to 52% Mn) for hydrothermal stratabound manganese oxides from active volcanic arcs. Hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts that occur on most seamounts in the ocean basins have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.7 for open-ocean seamount crusts and 1.2 for continental margin seamount crusts. Fe-Mn nodules of potential economic interest from the Clarion-Clipperton Zone have a mean Fe/Mn ratio of 0.3, whereas the mean ratio for nodules from elsewhere in the Pacific is about 0.7. Crusts are enriched in Co, Ni and Pt and nodules in Cu and Ni, and both have significant concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ba, Mo, V and other elements. In contrast, hydrothermal deposits commonly contain only minor trace metal contents, although there are many exceptions, for example, with Ni contents up to 0.66%, Cr to 1.2%, and Zn to 1.4%. Chondrite-normalized REE patterns generally show a positive Ce anomaly and abundant ??REEs for hydrogenetic and mixed hydrogenetic-diagenetic deposits, whereas the Ce anomaly is negative for hydrothermal deposits and ??REE contents are low. However, the Ce anomaly in crusts may vary from strongly positive in East Pacific crusts to slightly negative in West Pacific crusts, which may reflect

  9. The Role of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Inflammation Defense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang; Zhou, Hai-Meng

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes maintain cellular redox homeostasis. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), an enzyme located in mitochondria, is the key enzyme that protects the energy-generating mitochondria from oxidative damage. Levels of MnSOD are reduced in many diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and psoriasis. Overexpression of MnSOD in tumor cells can significantly attenuate the malignant phenotype. Past studies have reported that this enzyme has the potential to be used as an anti-inflammatory agent because of its superoxide anion scavenging ability. Superoxide anions have a proinflammatory role in many diseases. Treatment of a rat model of lung pleurisy with the MnSOD mimetic MnTBAP suppressed the inflammatory response in a dose-dependent manner. In this paper, the mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of MnSOD in inflammatory diseases are studied, and the potential applications of this enzyme and its mimetics as anti-inflammatory agents are discussed. PMID:21977313

  10. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  11. Water exchange in manganese-based water-oxidizing catalysts in photosynthetic systems: from the water-oxidizing complex in photosystem II to nano-sized manganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Eaton-Rye, Julian J; Tomo, Tatsuya; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Satoh, Kimiyuki; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-09-01

    The water-oxidizing complex (WOC), also known as the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC), of photosystem II in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms efficiently catalyzes water oxidation. It is, therefore, responsible for the presence of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The WOC is a manganese-calcium (Mn₄CaO₅(H₂O)₄) cluster housed in a protein complex. In this review, we focus on water exchange chemistry of metal hydrates and discuss the mechanisms and factors affecting this chemical process. Further, water exchange rates for both the biological cofactor and synthetic manganese water splitting are discussed. The importance of fully unveiling the water exchange mechanism to understand the chemistry of water oxidation is also emphasized here. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24685431

  12. Manganese reduction and its stabilization in the rock record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Savalia, P.; Kocar, B. D.; Webb, S. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fischer, W. W.

    2013-12-01

    Manganese oxides are abundant and highly reactive electron acceptors present within many environments. Their occurance is intimately tied to the availability of oxygen, as only O2 and oxygen-derived species such as superoxide and peroxide can oxidize reduced Mn(II). Because Mn2+ is soluble and Mn3+ and Mn4+ readily undergo hydrolysis to form insoluble precipitates, the record of manganese in sedimentary deposits can yield interesting insights into the history of atmospheric oxygen--the largest manganese deposits in Earth history (approximately 2.2 billion years ago) are associated with the rise of oxygen. From studying modern environments, we understand that manganese is concentrated in sediments by the oxidation and deposition of Mn(IV) minerals; however, our observations of the geologic record show diagenetic stabilization of only Mn(II) carbonate or mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) oxide minerals--all Mn(IV)-oxide phases in ancient samples are associated with modern weathering and oxidation processes. Reduction is a key element within the manganese cycle, yet the (bio)geochemical processes responsible for the formation of mixed Mn(II)-Mn(III) minerals have not been fully elucidated. To better understand how manganese is converted from insoluble Mn(IV) oxide to these Mn(II/III)-bearing phases, we investigated secondary mineral precipitates which form during and after Mn(IV)-oxide reduction using a well-studied metal-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. To examine changes in Mn mineralogy and oxidation state during the progression of Mn(IV) reductive dissolution/transformation by S. oneidensis, we utilized a flow through reactor system allowing for in-situ and real time x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. We also confirmed mineral phases using XRD and FTIR spectrometry. Our experiments reveal that when solution phosphate concentrations are high, a Mn(II) phosphate phase quickly forms as a secondary precipitate during complete reduction of Mn(IV) oxides

  13. Biological Superoxide In Manganese Oxide Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C.; Learman, D.; Zeiner, C.; Santelli, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants within the environment, controlling the fate and transport of numerous elements and the degradation of recalcitrant carbon. Both bacteria and fungi mediate the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III/IV) oxides but the genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible remain poorly understood. Furthermore, the physiological basis for microbial Mn(II) oxidation remains an enigma. We have recently reported that a common marine bacterium (Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b) oxidizes Mn(II) via reaction with extracellular superoxide (O2-) produced during exponential growth. Here we expand this superoxide-mediated Mn(II) oxidation pathway to fungi, introducing a surprising homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic metal redox processes. For instance, Stibella aciculosa, a common soil Ascomycete filamentous fungus, precipitates Mn oxides at the base of asexual reproductive structures (synnemata) used to support conidia (Figure 1). This distribution is a consequence of localized production of superoxide (and it's dismutation product hydrogen peroxide, H2O2), leading to abiotic oxidation of Mn(II) by superoxide. Disruption of NADPH oxidase activity using the oxidoreductase inhibitor DPI leads to diminished cell differentiation and subsequent Mn(II) oxidation inhibition. Addition of Cu(II) (an effective superoxide scavenger) leads to a concentration dependent decrease in Mn oxide formation. We predict that due to the widespread production of extracellular superoxide within the fungal and likely bacterial kingdoms, biological superoxide may be an important contributor to the cycling of Mn, as well as other metals (e.g., Hg, Fe). Current and future explorations of the genes and proteins involved in superoxide production and Mn(II) oxidation will ideally lend insight into the physiological and biochemical basis for these processes.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  15. Redox electrodes comprised of polymer-modified carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mark; Emmett, Robert; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Physics Team; Clemson Chemical Engineering Team

    2013-03-01

    A shift in how we generate and use electricity requires new energy storage materials and systems compatible with hybrid electric transportation and the integration of renewable energy sources. Supercapacitors provide a solution to these needs by combining the high power, rapid switching, and exceptional cycle life of a capacitor with the high energy density of a battery. Our research brings together nanotechnology and materials chemistry to address the limitations of electrode materials. Paper electrodes fabricated with various forms of carbon nanomaterials, such as nanotubes, are modified with redox-polymers to increase the electrode's energy density while maintaining rapid discharge rates. In these systems, the carbon nanomaterials provide the high surface area, electrical conductivity, nanoscale and porosity, while the redox polymers provide a mechanism for charge storage through Faradaic charge transfer. The design of redox polymers and their incorporation into nanomaterial electrodes will be discussed with a focus on enabling high power and high energy density electrodes.

  16. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  17. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Delcul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed.

  18. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. M.; Del Cul, G. D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D. H.

    1995-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  19. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Fission product behavior is described along with processing experience. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior, processing and recycle of the fuel components is a necessary factor if future systems are to be established.

  20. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. PMID:27151506

  1. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  3. Biochemistry of nitric oxide and its redox-activated forms.

    PubMed

    Stamler, J S; Singel, D J; Loscalzo, J

    1992-12-18

    Nitric oxide (NO.), a potentially toxic molecule, has been implicated in a wide range of biological functions. Details of its biochemistry, however, remain poorly understood. The broader chemistry of nitrogen monoxide (NO) involves a redox array of species with distinctive properties and reactivities: NO+ (nitrosonium), NO., and NO- (nitroxyl anion). The integration of this chemistry with current perspectives of NO biology illuminates many aspects of NO biochemistry, including the enzymatic mechanism of synthesis, the mode of transport and targeting in biological systems, the means by which its toxicity is mitigated, and the function-regulating interaction with target proteins.

  4. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  5. Redox-mediated reactions of vinylferrocene: toward redox auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Alan A; Zhang, Xiaolu; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Long, De-Liang; Macgregor, Stuart A; Cooke, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    Chemical redox reactions have been exploited to transform unreactive vinylferrocene into a powerful dienophile for the Diels-Alder reaction and reactive substrate for thiol addition reactions upon conversion to its ferrocenium state. We have further investigated the ability of these reactions to facilitate redox-auxiliary-like reactivity by further hydrogenolyisis of the Diels-Alder adduct to the corresponding cyclopentane derivative.

  6. Microbial fuel cell using anaerobic respiration as an anodic reaction and biomineralized manganese as a cathodic reactant.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Allison; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-06-15

    We have operated a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was oxidized by Klebsiella pneumoniae in the anodic compartment, and biomineralized manganese oxides, deposited by Leptothrix discophora, were electrochemically reduced in the cathodic compartment. In the anodic compartment, to facilitate the electron transfer from glucose to the graphite electrode, we added a redox mediator, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. We did not add any redox mediator to the cathodic compartment because the biomineralized manganese oxides were deposited on the surface of a graphite electrode and were reduced directly by electrons from the electrode. We have demonstrated that biomineralized manganese oxides are superiorto oxygen when used as cathodic reactants in microbial fuel cells. The current density delivered by using biomineralized manganese oxides as the cathodic reactant was almost 2 orders of magnitude higher than that delivered using oxygen. Several fuel cells were operated for 500 h, reaching anodic potentials of -441.5 +/- 31 mVscE and cathodic potentials of +384.5 +/- 64 mVscE. When the electrodes were connected by a 50 Ohms resistor, the fuel cell delivered the peak power density of 126.7 +/- 31.5 mW/m2.

  7. Microbial fuel cell using anaerobic respiration as an anodic reaction and biomineralized manganese as a cathodic reactant.

    PubMed

    Rhoads, Allison; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-06-15

    We have operated a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was oxidized by Klebsiella pneumoniae in the anodic compartment, and biomineralized manganese oxides, deposited by Leptothrix discophora, were electrochemically reduced in the cathodic compartment. In the anodic compartment, to facilitate the electron transfer from glucose to the graphite electrode, we added a redox mediator, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone. We did not add any redox mediator to the cathodic compartment because the biomineralized manganese oxides were deposited on the surface of a graphite electrode and were reduced directly by electrons from the electrode. We have demonstrated that biomineralized manganese oxides are superiorto oxygen when used as cathodic reactants in microbial fuel cells. The current density delivered by using biomineralized manganese oxides as the cathodic reactant was almost 2 orders of magnitude higher than that delivered using oxygen. Several fuel cells were operated for 500 h, reaching anodic potentials of -441.5 +/- 31 mVscE and cathodic potentials of +384.5 +/- 64 mVscE. When the electrodes were connected by a 50 Ohms resistor, the fuel cell delivered the peak power density of 126.7 +/- 31.5 mW/m2. PMID:16047807

  8. [Effect of technological process in bottled water production on its redox properties].

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Michał; Latour, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    The redox potential was measured in selected natural mineral and spring waters of different origin and chemical composition. To analyse the effect of the technological process the samples to be studied were collected at different stages of the bottling process: directly at the intake, at the beginning of the pipeline, after the deironing and/or demanganisation, after filtration, at the end of the pipeline and at the end of the process from the freshly filled bottles. Along with the redox potential measurements, some physico-chemical parameters of the samples studied were determined: colour, turbidity, conductivity, pH value, susceptibility to oxidation, contents of iron, manganese, antimony and arsenic. The potentiometric method applied to measure the redox potential was found suitable for the purpose of the study.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium citrate to complete the reaction. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2,...

  10. Modeling CO2 sediment-water flux variations connected with changes of redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, Evgeniy; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2013-04-01

    Changes of bottom redox conditions from oxic to hypoxic, suboxic and anoxic affect rates of sediment-water fluxes of chemical parameters, i.e. oxygen, nutrient (including carbon), redox metals. Chemosynthetic organic matter production in suboxic and anoxic conditions additionally affects transformation of carbon. This work aimed in estimation of a potential influence of changes of the bottom redox conditions on the sediment -water fluxes of carbon. We use a 1-dimensional C-N-P-Si-O-S-Mn-Fe vertical transport-reaction model describing both the sediments and bottom boundary layers coupled with biogeochemical block simulating changeable redox conditions, and the carbonate system processes block. A biogeochemical block is based on ROLM (RedOx Layer Model), that was constructed to simulate basic features of the water column biogeochemical structure changes in oxic, anoxic and changeable conditions (Yakushev et al., 2007). Organic matter formation and decay, reduction and oxidation of species of nitrogen, sulfur, manganese, iron, and the transformation of phosphorus species are parameterized in the model. The model includes blocks for phytoplankton, zooplankton, aerobic autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and anaerobic autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. In this study we additionally parameterized transformation of Si and C and forms of alkalinity. We simulate changes in the bottom boundary layer pH in different redox conditions under the same leakage scenario.

  11. [Clinical cases of occupational chronic manganese intoxication].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, T N; Lakhman, O L; Katamanova, E V; Kartapol'tseva, N V; Meshcheriagin, V A; Rusanova, D V; Andreeva, O K

    2009-01-01

    Classic symptoms of manganese intoxication are very rarely seen nowadays. Clinic in Angarsk Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology registered two cases of stage I and II chronic manganese intoxication over 10 years among electric welders. The cases were diagnosed with consideration of long length of exposure to manganese with the ambient air level exceeding the MAC 1.5 times, the disease manifestation at middle age, high manganese level in serum and urine, characteristic neurologic symptoms in association with organic psychopathologic defects and polyneuropathy of limbs.

  12. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  13. Polyacrylamide-based redox polymer for connecting redox centers of enzymes to electrodes.

    PubMed

    de Lumley-Woodyear, T; Rocca, P; Lindsay, J; Dror, Y; Freeman, A; Heller, A

    1995-04-15

    Enzyme electrodes based on complexing a water-soluble copolymer of acrylamide and vinylimidazole with [Os(dmebpy)2C1]+/2+ (dmebpy = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and cross-linking with oxidases by water-soluble cross-linkers are described. The potential of the polyacrylamide-based redox polymer is +55 mV (SCE), a typical electron diffusion coefficient (De) in the redox hydrogel that results from its cross-linking is (1.3 +/- 0.1) x 10(-9) cm2/s. The properties of the enzyme electrodes formed when this redox hydrogel "wired" horseradish peroxidase (HRP), lactate oxidase (LOx) or glucose oxidase (GOx) depended on the thickness of the hydrogel film, the chemistry of their cross-linking, and their enzyme content. At the wired HRP electrodes, H2O2 was electrocatalytically reduced to water at 0.0 V (SCE). Lactate and glucose were electrocatalytically oxidized at 0.16 V (SCE). The GOx electrodes, when made with 140 micrograms/cm2 thick polymer films, were selective for glucose in the presence of physiological concentrations of urate and ascorbate.

  14. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E

    2012-06-12

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000 °C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850 °C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na(+) into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000 °C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles.

  15. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000 °C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850 °C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na+ into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000 °C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles. PMID:22647608

  16. Redox flow batteries: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M; Meyers, Jeremy; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of RFBs with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  17. How a redox-innocent metal promotes the formal reductive elimination of biphenyl using redox-active ligands.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Daniel Charles; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    One of the most compelling strategies for utilizing redox-active ligands is to perform redox events at the ligands to avoid accessing prohibitively high energy oxidation states at the metal center. This has been demonstrated experimentally in many systems, yet there is little understanding of the fundamental electronic structures involved with these transformations or how to control them. Here, the reductive elimination of biphenyl from [M(isq)2Ph2] (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf and isq = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-tert-butyliminosemiquinone) was studied computationally. It was found that the metal remains in the +IV oxidation state and all redox chemistry was mediated by the redox-active ligands. Two types of electron-transfer mechanisms were identified, an asymmetric unpaired electron transfer (UET) and a symmetric pairwise electron transfer (PET), the former always being lower in energy. The energetic differences between these two mechanisms were explained through simple molecular orbital theory arguments. Despite the metal's redox-inactivity, it still has a marked influence on the calculated energetics of the reaction, with the Ti systems being much more reactive than the Zr/Hf systems. This primarily originates from the shorter Ti-Ph bond, which leads to a stronger filled-filled interaction between these ligands at the reactant state. This greater reactant destabilization leads to the lower activation energies.

  18. [Radiation therapy and redox imaging].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy kills cancer cells in part by flood of free radicals. Radiation ionizes and/or excites water molecules to create highly reactive species, i.e. free radicals and/or reactive oxygen species. Free radical chain reactions oxidize biologically important molecules and thereby disrupt their function. Tissue oxygen and/or redox status, which can influence the course of the free radical chain reaction, can affect the efficacy of radiation therapy. Prior observation of tissue oxygen and/or redox status is helpful for planning a safe and efficient course of radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance-based redox imaging techniques, which can estimate tissue redox status non-invasively, have been developed not only for diagnostic information but also for estimating the efficacy of treatment. Redox imaging is now spotlighted to achieve radiation theranostics. PMID:25948308

  19. [Radiation therapy and redox imaging].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy kills cancer cells in part by flood of free radicals. Radiation ionizes and/or excites water molecules to create highly reactive species, i.e. free radicals and/or reactive oxygen species. Free radical chain reactions oxidize biologically important molecules and thereby disrupt their function. Tissue oxygen and/or redox status, which can influence the course of the free radical chain reaction, can affect the efficacy of radiation therapy. Prior observation of tissue oxygen and/or redox status is helpful for planning a safe and efficient course of radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance-based redox imaging techniques, which can estimate tissue redox status non-invasively, have been developed not only for diagnostic information but also for estimating the efficacy of treatment. Redox imaging is now spotlighted to achieve radiation theranostics.

  20. Arsenic speciation and uranium concentrations in drinking water supply wells in Northern Greece: correlations with redox indicative parameters and implications for groundwater treatment.

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Ioannis A; Hug, Stephan J; Ammann, Adrian; Zikoudi, Antonia; Hatziliontos, Christodoulos

    2007-09-20

    The cities in the Aksios and Kalikratia areas in Northern Greece rely on arsenic contaminated groundwater for their municipal water supply. As remedial action strongly depends on arsenic speciation, the presence of other possible contaminants, and on the general water composition, a detailed study with samples from 21 representative locations was undertaken. Arsenic concentrations were typically 10-70 microg/L. In the groundwaters of the Aksios area with lower Eh values (87-172 mV), pH 7.5-8.2 and 4-6 mM HCO(3) alkalinity, As(III) predominated. Manganese concentrations were mostly above the EC standard of 0.05 mg/L (0.1-0.7 mg/L). In groundwaters of the Kalikratia area with higher Eh values (272-352 mV), pH 6.7-7.5 and 6-12 mM HCO(3) alkalinity, As(V) was the main species. Uranium in the groundwaters was also investigated and correlations with total arsenic concentrations and speciation were examined to understand more of the redox chemistry of the examined groundwaters. Uranium concentrations were in the range 0.01-10 microg/L, with the higher concentrations to occur in the oxidizing groundwaters of the Kalikratia area. Uranium and total arsenic concentrations showed no correlation, whereas uranium concentrations correlated strongly with As(III)/As(tot) ratios, depicting their use as a possible indicator of groundwater redox conditions. Finally, boron was found to exceed the EC drinking water standard of 1 mg/L in some wells in the Kalikratia area and its removal should also be considered in the design of a remedial action.

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  5. Colour Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  6. Manganese(III) binding to a pyoverdine siderophore produced by a manganese(II)-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Sposito, Garrison; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2004-12-01

    The possible roles of siderophores (high affinity chelators of iron(III)) in the biogeochemistry of manganese remain unknown. Here we investigate the interaction of Mn(III) with a pyoverdine-type siderophore (PVD MnB1) produced by the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1. PVD MnB1 confirmed typical pyoverdine behavior with respect to: (a) its absorption spectrum at 350-600 nm, both in the absence and presence of Fe(III), (b) the quenching of its fluorescence by Fe(III), (c) the formation of a 1:1 complex with Fe(III), and (d) the thermodynamic stability constant of its Fe(III) complex. The Mn(III) complex of PVD MnB1 had a 1:1 Mn:pvd molar ratio, showed fluorescence quenching, and exhibited a light absorption spectrum (A max = 408-410 nm) different from that of either PVD MnB1-Fe(III) or uncomplexed PVD MnB1. Mn(III) competed strongly with Fe(III) for binding by PVD MnB1 in culture filtrates (pH 8, 4°C). Equilibration with citrate, a metal-binding ligand, did not detectably release Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex at a citrate/PVD MnB1 molar ratio of 830 (pH 8, 4°C), whereas pyrophosphate under the same conditions removed 55% of the Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex. Most of the PVD MnB1-complexed Mn was released by reaction with ascorbate, a reducing agent, or with EDTA, a ligand that is also oxidized by Mn(III). Data on the competition for binding to PVD MnB1 by Fe(III) vs. Mn(III) were used to determine a thermodynamic stability constant (nominally at 4°C) for the neutral species MnHPVD MnB1 (log K = 47.5 ± 0.5, infinite dilution reference state). This value was larger than that determined for FeHPVD MnB1 (log K = 44.6 ± 0.5). This result has important implications for the metabolism, solubility, speciation, and redox cycling of manganese, as well as for the biologic uptake of iron.

  7. Thermodynamics of Manganese Oxides at Bulk and Nanoscale: Phase Formation, Transformation, Oxidation-Reduction, and Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkner, Nancy R.

    Natural manganese oxides are generally formed in surficial environments that are near ambient temperature and water-rich, and may be exposed to wet-dry cycles and a variety of adsorbate species that influence dramatically their level of hydration. Manganese oxide minerals are often poorly crystalline, nanophase, and hydrous. In the near-surface environment they are involved in processes that are important to life, such as water column oxygen cycling, biomineralization, and transport of minerals/nutrients through soils and water. These processes, often involving transformations among manganese oxide polymorphs, are governed by a complex interplay between thermodynamics and kinetics. Manganese oxides are also used in technology as catalysts, and for other applications. The major goal of this dissertation is to examine the energetics of bulk and nanophase manganese oxide phases as a function of particle size, composition, and surface hydration. Careful synthesis and characterization of manganese oxide phases with different surface areas provided samples for the study of enthalpies of formation by high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry and of the energetics of water adsorption on their surfaces. These data provide a quantitative picture of phase stability and how it changes at the nanoscale. The surface energy of the hydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 0.96 +/- 0.08 J/m2, of Mn2O3 is 1.29 +/- 0.10 J/m2, and of MnO2 is 1.64 +/- 0.10 J/m2. The surface energy of the anhydrous surface of Mn3O4 is 1.62 +/- 0.08 J/m 2, of Mn2O3 is 1.77 +/- 0.10 J/m 2, and of MnO2 is 2.05 +/- 0.10 J/m2. Supporting preliminary findings (Navrotsky et al., 2010), the spinel phase (Mn3O4) has a lower surface energy (more stabilizing) than bixbyite, while the latter has a smaller surface energy than pyrolusite. These differences significantly change the positions in oxygen fugacity---temperature space of the redox couples Mn3O4-Mn2O 3 and Mn2O3-MnO2 favoring the lower surface enthalpy phase (the

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  9. Redox regulation of photosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Guillaume; Foyer, Christine H.

    2012-01-01

    Redox chemistry and redox regulation are central to the operation of photosynthesis and respiration. However, the roles of different oxidants and antioxidants in the regulation of photosynthetic or respiratory gene expression remain poorly understood. Leaf transcriptome profiles of a range of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes that are deficient in either hydrogen peroxide processing enzymes or in low molecular weight antioxidant were therefore compared to determine how different antioxidant systems that process hydrogen peroxide influence transcripts encoding proteins targeted to the chloroplasts or mitochondria. Less than 10 per cent overlap was observed in the transcriptome patterns of leaves that are deficient in either photorespiratory (catalase (cat)2) or chloroplastic (thylakoid ascorbate peroxidase (tapx)) hydrogen peroxide processing. Transcripts encoding photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle components were lower in glutathione-deficient leaves, as were the thylakoid NAD(P)H (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate)) dehydrogenases (NDH) mRNAs. Some thylakoid NDH mRNAs were also less abundant in tAPX-deficient and ascorbate-deficient leaves. Transcripts encoding the external and internal respiratory NDHs were increased by low glutathione and low ascorbate. Regulation of transcripts encoding specific components of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains by hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate and glutathione may serve to balance non-cyclic and cyclic electron flow pathways in relation to oxidant production and reductant availability. PMID:23148274

  10. Liquid redox sulfur recovery options, costs, and environmental considerations for the natural gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Dalrymple, D.A.; Trofe, W. ); ))

    1988-01-01

    Liquid redox chemistry has been employed for sulfur removal and recovery applications since the 1950's. The first process to be used commercially was the Stretford process, which was used extensively in the United States in the 1960's as a replacement for the iron sponge process in the treatment of sour town gas. In recent years, the Stretford process has been joined in the United State' marketplace by several other liquid redox processes including the Unisulf, Sulfolin, LO-CAT, SulFerox, and Hiperion processes. This paper describes the chemistry and engineering options available with each process, as well as the environmental and cost considerations associated with these processes.

  11. Regulation of cellular manganese and manganese transport rates in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular accumulation and uptake kinetics of manganese by Chlamydomonas sp. were studied in model chelate buffer systems. Cellular manganese concentrations and uptake rates were related to the computed free manganese ion concentration and were independent of the total or chelated manganese concentration. Cellular manganese was constant at about 1 mmol liter/sup -1/ of cellular volume at free manganese ion concentrations of 10/sup -7/ /sup 6/-10/sup -6/ /sup 3/ mol liter/sup -1/ and decreased below this range. Manganese uptake rates followed saturation kinetics and V/sub max/, but not K/sub s/, varied with the free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium. V/sub max/ appeared to be under negative feedback control and increased with decreasing manganese ion concentration. Variations of up to 30-fold in this parameter seemed to be instrumental in limiting the variation in cellular manganese to a sixfold range despite a 1000-fold variation in free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium.

  12. Reactivity of biogenic manganese oxide for metal sequestration and photochemistry: Computational solid state physics study

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, K.D.; Sposito, G.

    2010-02-01

    Many microbes, including both bacteria and fungi, produce manganese (Mn) oxides by oxidizing soluble Mn(II) to form insoluble Mn(IV) oxide minerals, a kinetically much faster process than abiotic oxidation. These biogenic Mn oxides drive the Mn cycle, coupling it with diverse biogeochemical cycles and determining the bioavailability of environmental contaminants, mainly through strong adsorption and redox reactions. This mini review introduces recent findings based on quantum mechanical density functional theory that reveal the detailed mechanisms of toxic metal adsorption at Mn oxide surfaces and the remarkable role of Mn vacancies in the photochemistry of these minerals.

  13. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide.

  14. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  15. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  19. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  20. Adsorption of ribose nucleotides on manganese oxides with varied mn/o ratio: implications for chemical evolution.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Brij; Shanker, Uma; Kamaluddin

    2011-10-01

    Manganese exists in different oxidation states under different environmental conditions with respect to redox potential. Various forms of manganese oxides, namely, Manganosite (MnO), Bixbyite (Mn(2)O(3)), Hausmannite (Mn(3)O(4)) and Pyrolusite (MnO(2)) were synthesized and their possible role in chemical evolution studied. Adsorption studies of ribose nucleotides (5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP and 5'-UMP) on these manganese oxides at neutral pH, revealed a higher binding affinity to manganosite (MnO) compared to the other manganese oxides. That manganese oxides having a lower Mn-O ratio show higher binding affinity for the ribonucleotides indirectly implies that such oxides may have provided a surface onto which biomonomers could have been concentrated through selective adsorption. Purine nucleotides were adsorbed to a greater extent compared to the pyrimidine nucleotides. Adsorption data followed Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and X( m ) and K( L ) values were calculated. The nature of the interaction and mechanism was elucidated by infrared spectral studies conducted on the metal-oxide and ribonucleotide-metal-oxide adducts.

  1. Adsorption of Ribose Nucleotides on Manganese Oxides with Varied Mn/O Ratio: Implications for Chemical Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Brij; Shanker, Uma; Kamaluddin

    2011-10-01

    Manganese exists in different oxidation states under different environmental conditions with respect to redox potential. Various forms of manganese oxides, namely, Manganosite (MnO), Bixbyite (Mn2O3), Hausmannite (Mn3O4) and Pyrolusite (MnO2) were synthesized and their possible role in chemical evolution studied. Adsorption studies of ribose nucleotides (5'-AMP, 5'-GMP, 5'-CMP and 5'-UMP) on these manganese oxides at neutral pH, revealed a higher binding affinity to manganosite (MnO) compared to the other manganese oxides. That manganese oxides having a lower Mn-O ratio show higher binding affinity for the ribonucleotides indirectly implies that such oxides may have provided a surface onto which biomonomers could have been concentrated through selective adsorption. Purine nucleotides were adsorbed to a greater extent compared to the pyrimidine nucleotides. Adsorption data followed Langmuir adsorption isotherms, and X m and K L values were calculated. The nature of the interaction and mechanism was elucidated by infrared spectral studies conducted on the metal-oxide and ribonucleotide-metal-oxide adducts.

  2. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  3. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  4. Redox biomarkers in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Antoniades, Charalambos; Nicholls, Stephen J; Channon, Keith M; Figtree, Gemma A

    2015-07-01

    The central role of oxidative signalling in cardiovascular pathophysiology positions biometric measures of redox state as excellent markers for research and clinical application. However, despite this tantalizing biological plausibility, no redox biomarker is currently in widespread clinical use. Major recent insights into the mechanistic complexities of redox signalling may yet provide the opportunity to identify markers that most closely reflect the underlying pathobiology. Such redox biomarkers may, in principle, quantify the integrated effects of various known and unknown pathophysiological drivers of cardiovascular disease processes. Recent advances with the greatest potential include assays measuring post-translational oxidative modifications that have significant cellular effects. However, analytical issues, including the relative instability of redox-modified products, remain a major technical obstacle. Appreciation of these challenges may facilitate future development of user-friendly markers with prognostic value in addition to traditional risk factors, and which could be used to guide personalized cardiovascular therapies. We review both established and recently identified biomarkers of redox signalling, and provide a realistic discussion of the many challenges that remain if they are to be incorporated into clinical practice. Despite the current lack of redox biomarkers in clinical application, the integral role of reactive oxygen species in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease provides a strong incentive for continued efforts.

  5. Redox imaging using genetically encoded redox indicators in zebrafish and mice.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Wittmann, Christine; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Grabher, Clemens

    2015-05-01

    Redox signals have emerged as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology. The advent of redox imaging in vertebrate systems now provides the opportunity to dynamically visualize redox signaling during development and disease. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the generation of genetically encoded redox indicators (GERIs), introduce new redox imaging strategies, and highlight key publications in the field of vertebrate redox imaging. We also discuss the limitations and future potential of in vivo redox imaging in zebrafish and mice.

  6. RNASeq in C. elegans Following Manganese Exposure.

    PubMed

    Parmalee, Nancy L; Maqbool, Shahina B; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin, are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study.

  7. Borrelia burgdorferi, a pathogen that lacks iron, encodes manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase essential for resistance to streptonigrin.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Xu, Haijun; Yang, X Frank

    2012-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, exists in nature through a complex life cycle involving ticks of the Ixodes genus and mammalian hosts. During its life cycle, B. burgdorferi experiences fluctuations in oxygen tension and may encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS). The key metalloenzyme to degrade ROS in B. burgdorferi is SodA. Although previous work suggests that B. burgdorferi SodA is an iron-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD), later work demonstrates that B. burgdorferi is unable to transport iron and contains an extremely low intracellular concentration of iron. Consequently, the metal cofactor for SodA has been postulated to be manganese. However, experimental evidence to support this hypothesis remains lacking. In this study, we provide biochemical and genetic data showing that SodA is a manganese-dependent enzyme. First, B. burgdorferi contained SOD activity that is resistant to H(2)O(2) and NaCN, characteristics associated with Mn-SODs. Second, the addition of manganese to the Chelex-treated BSK-II enhanced SodA expression. Third, disruption of the manganese transporter gene bmtA, which significantly lowers the intracellular manganese, greatly reduced SOD activity and SodA expression, suggesting that manganese regulates the level of SodA. In addition, we show that B. burgdorferi is resistant to streptonigrin, a metal-dependent redox cycling compound that produces ROS, and that SodA plays a protective role against the streptonigrin. Taken together, our data demonstrate the Lyme disease spirochete encodes a manganese-dependent SOD that contributes to B. burgdorferi defense against intracellular superoxide.

  8. A new hybrid redox flow battery with multiple redox couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-10-01

    A redox flow battery using V4+/V5+ vs. V2+/V3+ and Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples in chloric/sulfuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions and operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency ˜80% and negligible capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previously reported Fe/V cell using only Fe2+/Fe3+ vs. V2+/V3+ redox couples.

  9. A New Hybrid Redox Flow Battery with Multiple Redox Couples

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Baowei; Luo, Qingtao; Shao, Yuyan; Wei, Xiaoliang; Chen, Feng; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-05-19

    A redox flow battery using V{sup 4+}/V{sup 5+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples in chloric/sulphuric mixed acid supporting electrolyte was investigated for potential stationary energy storage applications. The Fe/V hybrid redox flow cell using mixed reactant solutions operated within a voltage window of 0.5-1.7 V demonstrated stable cycling over 100 cycles with energy efficiency {approx}80% and no capacity fading at room temperature. A 66% improvement in the energy density of the Fe/V hybrid cell was achieved compared with the previous reported Fe/V cell using only Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} vs. V{sup 2+}/V{sup 3+} redox couples.

  10. Effect of Aptamer Binding on the Electron-Transfer Properties of Redox Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Emahi, Ismaila; Gruenke, Paige R; Baum, Dana A

    2015-12-01

    In vitro selection or SELEX has allowed for the identification of functional nucleic acids (FNAs) that can potentially mimic and replace protein enzymes. These FNAs likely interact with cofactors, just like enzymes bind cofactors in their active sites. Investigating how FNA binding affects cofactor properties is important for understanding how an active site is formed and for developing useful enzyme mimics. Oxidoreductase enzymes contain cofactors in their active sites that allow the enzymes to do redox chemistry. In certain applications, these redox cofactors act as electron-transfer shuttles that transport electrons between the enzymes' active sites and electrode surfaces. Three redox cofactors commonly found in oxidoreductases are flavin adenine dinucleotide, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). We are interested in investigating how DNA aptamers that bind these cofactors influence the cofactors' redox abilities and if these aptamer-cofactor complexes could serve as redox catalysts. We employed cyclic voltammetry and amperometry to study the electrochemical properties of NAD(+) and PQQ when bound to DNA aptamers. Our results suggest that the aptamers provide a stable environment for the cofactor to participate in redox reactions, although enhanced redox activity was not observed. This work provides a foundation for the development of new FNAs capable of redox activity.

  11. Redox-Responsive Fluorescent Probes with Different Design Strategies.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhangrong; Li, Peng; Han, Keli

    2015-05-19

    In an aerobic organism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are an inevitable metabolic byproduct. Endogenously produced ROS have a significant role in physiological processes, but excess ROS can cause oxidative stress and can damage tissue. Cells possess elaborate mechanisms to regulate their internal redox status. The intracellular redox homeostasis plays an essential role in maintaining cellular function. However, moderate alterations in redox balance can accompany major transitions in a cell's life cycle. Because of the role of ROS in physiology and in pathology, researchers need new tools to study redox chemistry in biological systems.In recent years, researchers have made remarkable progress in developing new, highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probes that respond to redox changes, and in this Account we highlight related research, primarily from our own group. We present an overview of the design, photophysical properties, and fluorescence transduction mechanisms of reported molecules that probe redox changes. We have designed and synthesized a series of fluorescent probes for redox cycles in biological systems relying on the active center of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). We have also constructed probes based on the oxidation and reduction of hydroquinone and of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy (TEMPO). Most of these probes exhibit high sensitivity and good selectivity, absorb in the near-infrared, and respond rapidly. Such probes are useful for confocal fluorescence microscopy, a dynamic imaging technique that could allow researchers to observe biologically important ROS and antioxidants in real time. This technique and these probes provide potentially useful tools for exploring the generation, transport, physiological function, and pathogenic mechanisms of ROS and antioxidants.We also describe features that could improve the properties of redox-responsive fluorescent probes: greater photostability; rapid, dynamic, cyclic and ratiometric responses; and

  12. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    1987-02-01

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture medium in which this strain had been grown previously was sensitive to heat, phosphate, Tris, NaN3, HgCl2 NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and pronase; 0.5 mol of O2 was consumed per mol of MnO2 formed. During Mn2+ oxidation, protons were liberated. With sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two protein-containing bands were detected in the spent culture medium. One band had an apparent molecular weight of 110,000 and was predominant in Mn2+-oxidizing activity. The second product (Mr 85,000) was only detected in some cases and probably represents a proteolytic breakdown moiety of the 110,000-Mr protein. The Mn2+-oxidizing factors were associated with the MnO2 aggregates that had been formed in spent culture medium. After solubilization of this MnO2 with ascorbate, Mn2+-oxidizing activity could be recovered. PMID:3804969

  13. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  14. [Redox-sensors of microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes available literature data on the existence and operation of redox sensors of microorganisms. It is partially focused on the activation by hyrdrogen peroxide OxyR protein and by superoxide anion SoxR protein in bacteria Escherichia coli and the activation by hyrdrogen peroxide and superoxide anion of Orp1-Yap1 protein system in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The similarities and peculiarities of redox signal sensing in pro- and eukaryotes have been discussed. PMID:19140447

  15. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  16. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  17. Manganese cycles in Arctic marine sediments - Climate signals or diagenesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    März, C.; Stratmann, A.; Eckert, S.; Schnetger, B.; Brumsack, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    (analysed by ICP-OES and WD-XRF) indicate that certain Mn-rich layers are currently dissolving, while others are forming. This internal Mn re-distribution, while being more pronounced in some locations than in others, also has an impact on related trace metal distributions (e.g. Co, Cu, Ni, Mo). As Mn diagenesis obviously occurs in most cores studied so far (pelagic depositional areas unaffected by turbidites), we conclude that caution has to be taken when applying Mn layers as stratigraphic tools. In addition to more sensitive analyses (acid digestions and HR-ICP-MS measurements), we will apply methods like sequential Mn extraction, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to study these Mn-rich layers. These data will be put into a broader context by comparing them to parameters like magnetic susceptibility, grain size distribution, sediment colour or porosity. Hopefully, this will result in a better understanding of Mn biogeochemistry in the Arctic Ocean, including its application as paleoenvironmental proxy. Burdige, D.J. (2006) Geochemistry of marine sediments. Princeton University Press, 609 pp. Gobeil, C., Macdonald, R.W., Sundby, B. (1997) Diagenetic separation of cadmium and manganese in suboxic continental margin sediments. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 61, 4647-4654. Jakobsson, M., Løvlie, R., Al-Hanbali, H., Arnold, E.M., Backman, J., Mörth, M. (2000) Manganese and color cycles in Artic Ocean sediments constrain Pleistocene chronology. Geology 8, 23-26. Katsev, S., Sundby, B., Mucci, A. (2006) Modeling vertical excursions of the redox boundary in sediments: Application to deep basins of the Arctic Ocean. Limnol. Oceanogr. 51, 1581-1593. Li, Y.-H., Bischoff, J. Mathieu, G. (1969) Migration of manganese in Arctic Basin sediments. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 7, 265-270. Löwemark, L., Jakobsson, M., Mörth, M., Backman, J. (2008) Arctic Ocean manganese contents and sediment colour cycles. Polar. Res. 27, 105-113.

  18. Redox effects on release kinetics of arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, and vanadium in Wax Lake Deltaic freshwater marsh soils.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Rinklebe, Jörg; Frohne, Tina; White, John R; DeLaune, Ron D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of redox potential (EH), pH, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chloride (Cl(-)), aliphatic and aromatic dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and sulfate ( [Formula: see text] ) on the release of dissolved arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), and vanadium (V) were studied in Louisiana freshwater marsh Wax Lake Delta soil (Mississippi River) using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. The experiment was conducted from reducing (-60 mV) to stepwise oxidizing (+491 mV) conditions. The initial pH was 7.4 and decreased under reducing conditions to 4.9, and remained constant during the increase of EH. Concentrations of As (1.3-120.5 μg L(-1)), V (0.9-48.6 μg L(-1)), Fe, DOC, and the specific UV absorbance increased under reducing conditions and decreased with rising EH. Release of As and V appeared to be related to changes of EH/pH, co-precipitation with Fe oxides, and the release of dissolved aromatic carbon compounds. Concentrations of soluble Cd (4.8-11.2 μg L(-1)), Mn, [Formula: see text] , and Cl(-) increased under oxidizing conditions. Release of Co (166.6-258.2 μg L(-1)) was related to the chemistry of Fe, Mn and DOC. Phospholipid fatty acids analysis indicated the potential for the microbial community to be involved in biogeochemical processes such as the formation of sulfides, oxidation and reduction of compounds, and the bio-methylation of elements such as As. Overall, we measured a release of As and V under anoxic conditions, while oxic conditions favored the release of Cd. These results outline concern on the potential risk of mobilization of toxic elements in temporary waterlogged soils for agricultural purposes in deltaic ecosystems. PMID:26746419

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  20. Effect of manganese on calcification of bone

    PubMed Central

    Tal, E.; Guggenheim, K.

    1965-01-01

    1. Young mice were maintained on a basal diet composed of meat, which is poor in both manganese and calcium. 2. The addition of small amounts (2·5–5·0mg./kg. of meat) of manganese improved weight gain and calcification of bone and decreased incorporation of injected radiocalcium into bone. 3. Prolonged treatment with larger amounts (10·0–25·0mg./kg. of meat) of manganese depressed growth, induced defective calcification of bone and increased incorporation of radiocalcium into bone. PMID:14333572

  1. Reversible redox chemistry of quinones: impact on biogeochemical cycles.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Stone, Alan T

    2009-10-01

    The role of quinone biomolecules and quinone moieties of natural organic matter (NOM) as the electron transfer mediator in essential biogeochemical processes such as iron bioreduction and contaminant degradation has received considerable interests in the past decade. Hypothesized electron shuttling mechanism must be evaluated based on the availability and stability of quinones under a given environmental setting. The goal of this review is to examine the source, reactivity, and fate of potential quinone catalysts with respect to chemical interactions (e.g., with other quinones and nucleophiles) that will inevitably occur in complex environmental media. We will first discuss natural and anthropogenic sources of quinones in aqueous environments, and fundamental transformation pathways including cross reaction, autoxidation, and addition reactions. We will then assess how the described sources (molecular structure) and transformation pathways (stability) will impact the ability of a quinone molecule to catalyze a biogeochemical process. Thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer reactions with both the electron donor (e.g., hydrogen sulfide as a bulk reductant) and the terminal electron acceptor (e.g., nitroaromatic explosives in contaminant degradation), and stability towards irreversible side reactions are the key factors determining the geochemical conditions under which the catalysis by a quinone molecule will be operative.

  2. Mars Redox Chemistry: Atacama Desert Soils as a Terrestrial Analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Taylor, C. L.; Zent, A. P.

    2003-01-01

    The motivation for this work is to perform quantitative site characterizations of soil chemical processes to allow further development and field validation of the Mars Oxidant Instrument (MOI). The MOI is an in situ survey instrument designed to establish the presence of reactive chemical species in the martian soil, dust, or atmosphere, and to provide detailed reaction model system measurements to enable comprehensive Earthbased study. Functioning as a survey instrument, MOI tests the broad range of hypotheses explaining the reactivity of the martian surface material that have been put forth since the Viking experiments. This work is currently being carried out under the NASA ASTEP funded AstroBioLab (Jeffery Bada, PI). A second objective is to use Atacama field and Viking data to perform comparative studies, with the goal of furthering the understanding of the formation mechanisms and properties of martian oxidants.

  3. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    PubMed

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  4. Redox Processes and Arsenic Release in the Streambed of a Semi-arid Losing Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, M. S.; Rau, G. C.; McCallum, A. M.; Acworth, I.

    2011-12-01

    The water quality of groundwater recharge is a function of rainfall chemistry, soil processes and land use. It is less obvious that the mechanism of groundwater recharge itself can influence the resulting groundwater quality, but it has been shown that slow infiltration into thick unsaturated zones generally lead to oxic groundwater (Appelo and Postma, 2005). This is due to the relatively long residence time in the unsaturated zone where reactive organic matter from the soil can be exhausted in the presence of excess atmospheric oxygen. On the other hand, in shallow unsaturated zones some of the reactive organic matter tends to survive the short residence time in the unsaturated zone. Upon reaching the saturated zone this organic matter will reduce the limited amount of dissolved oxygen and start reducing other dissolved or solid electron acceptors (e.g. NO3-, SO42-, Fe(OH)3(s)). Consequently, it is to be expected that recharge from streams, where no unsaturated zone is present, in general should lead to anoxic groundwater. This could be beneficial for attenuating nitrate, but could lead to problems with high levels of dissolved iron or mobility of problematic trace elements such as arsenic. To explore these processes a field investigation was done in the ephemeral Maules Creek in NSW, Australia. A transect of groundwater and streambed piezometers were installed adjacent to a losing section of the creek. Water samples were collected from surface water, streambed pore waters and groundwater piezometers and analysed for water quality parameters (DO, pH, EC), major ions, trace elements, redox sensitive species (NO3-, Fe2+, Mn2+ and H2S) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The distribution of radioisotopes and dissolved species below the stream channel delineates a zone of the streambed-aquifer continuum containing water of a recent surface water origin. Measurable concentrations of reduced species (Fe2+, Mn2+ and NH4+), elevated levels of DOC and the lack of oxygen

  5. Manganese concentrate usage in steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands. The paper describes experiments on effects of metal deoxidizer composition, component proportion, pelletizing mixture, particle size distribution of basic materials and flux on manganese recovering from oxides under direct melting.

  6. Cerium stable isotope ratios in ferromanganese deposits and their potential as a paleo-redox proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanimizu, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The cerium (Ce) anomaly observed in rare earth element (REE) patterns has been used to estimate the redox state of paleo-marine environments. Cerium is unique because it forms tetravalent cations under oxic conditions, in contrast to the other REEs that occur in a trivalent state. This characteristic leads to anomalously high or low Ce concentrations relative to neighboring REEs. However, the use of Ce anomaly as a paleo-redox proxy is not well calibrated. This study shows that coupling of the Ce anomaly and Ce stable isotope ratio (δ142Ce) is more quantitative redox proxy to distinguish suboxic and oxic redox conditions. Our results revealed a progressive enrichment in heavy Ce isotopes in consecutive formations of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) precipitate from hot spring water without any associated change in REE patterns. The δ142Ce values of Mn precipitates were approximately 0.35‰ heavier than those of the Fe precipitates, which was consistent with experiment-based predictions. The δ142Ce values of marine ferromanganese deposits with three different formation processes were hydrogenetic (+0.25‰) > diagenetic (+0.10‰) ⩾ hydrothermal (+0.05‰), which also reflects redox conditions of their formation environment. These observations suggest that the Ce stable isotope ratios yield more quantitative information regarding redox state than REE patterns alone. We thus suggest that this novel proxy can be successfully utilized to reconstruct marine redox states, particularly from slightly oxic to highly oxic conditions such as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE).

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  8. Connecting the oxidation of soot to its redox cycling abilities

    PubMed Central

    Antiñolo, María; Willis, Megan D.; Zhou, Shouming; Abbatt, Jonathan P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Although it is known that soot particles are emitted in large quantities to the atmosphere, our understanding of their environmental effects is limited by our knowledge of how their composition is subsequently altered through atmospheric processing. Here we present an on-line mass spectrometric study of the changing chemical composition of hydrocarbon soot particles as they are oxidized by gas-phase ozone, and we show that the surface-mediated loss rates of adsorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soot are directly connected to a significant increase in the particle redox cycling abilities. With redox cycling implicated as an oxidative stress mechanism that arises after inhalation of atmospheric particles, this work draws a quantitative connection between the detailed heterogeneous chemistry occurring on atmospheric particles and a potential toxic mechanism attributable to that aerosol. PMID:25873384

  9. Manganese and the limits of high potential phototrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, W. W.; Hemp, J.; Johnson, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers create high-energy electrons using light, harnessing the charge separation to simultaneously provide the cell with a strong oxidant and strong reductant. Many substrates can be used as electron donors for phototrophy, however there appears to be important energetic limits. In oxygenic photosynthesis photosystem II (PSII) provides a very strong oxidant that is capable of oxidizing water (ca. +830 mV) to molecular oxygen at the water-oxidizing complex, a redox-active tetra-manganese cluster. Anoxygenic photosystems however appear to only be able to oxidize lower potential electron donors (Fe2+, H2, S0, HS, S2O32-, NO2-, AsO33-).. Several transitional photosystems have been proposed as evolutionary intermediates between anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthesis, with electron donors of higher redox potentials such as nitrite (ca. +431 mV) or Mn2+ (ca. +780 mV) bridging the redox gap to water. While a range of observations from the geological record support a Mn2+-based transitional photosystem (Johnson et al. 2013), this proposed photochemical scheme is distinct from that observed in anoxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Mechanistically all anoxygenic reaction centers receive their electrons indirectly via soluble electron carriers such as cytochrome c, high potential iron sulfur proteins or cupredoxins. Conversely Mn2+ oxidation is only known to occur today via direct oxidation, such as during photoassembly of the water-oxidizing complex of PSII, or by two distinct, non-energy-conserving mechanisms using molecular oxygen. No natural photosystem is known to solely perform Mn2+-oxidation. The highest redox-potential accessed by known anoxygenic phototrophs oxidizes nitrite (Schott et al. 2010), but it has been unclear until now whether the reaction center is specially adapted to produce high potential oxidants, similar to that of PSII to oxidize Mn2+ and water. To constrain this we sequenced the genome of the nitrite-oxidizing phototroph

  10. Free Energies of Redox Half-Reactions from First-Principles Calculations.

    PubMed

    Tazhigulov, Ruslan N; Bravaya, Ksenia B

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative prediction of the energetics of redox half-reactions is still a challenge for modern computational chemistry. Here, we propose a simple scheme for reliable calculations of vertical ionization and attachment energies, as well as of redox potentials of solvated molecules. The approach exploits linear response approximation in the context of explicit solvent simulations with spherical boundary conditions. It is shown that both vertical ionization energies and vertical electron affinities, and, consequently redox potentials, exhibit linear dependence on the inverse radius of the solvation sphere. The explanation of the linear dependence is provided, and an extrapolation scheme is suggested. The proposed approach accounts for the specific short-range interactions within hybrid DFT and effective fragment potential approach as well as for the asymptotic system-size effects. The computed vertical ionization energies and redox potentials are in excellent agreement with the experimental values.

  11. MANGANESE DIOXIDE METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.

    1958-08-12

    A method of obtaining U/sup 233/ is described. An aqueous solution of neutriln irradiated thoriunn is treated by forming tberein a precipitate of manganese dioxide which carries and thus separates the Pa/sup 233/ from the solution. The carrier precipitate so formed is then dissolved in an acidic solution containing a reducing agent sufficiently electronegative to reduce the tetravalent manganese to the divalent state. Further purification of the Pa/sup 233/ may be obtained by forming another manganese dioxide carrier precipitate and subsequently dissolving it. Ater a sufficient number of such cycles have brought the Pa/sup 233/ to the desired purity, the solution is aged, allowing the formation ot U/sup 233/ by radioaetive decay. A manganese dioxide precipitate is then formed in the U/sup 233/ containing solution. This precipitate carries down any remaining Pa/sup 233/ thus leaving the separated U/sup 233/solution, from whieh it may be easily recovered.

  12. Cost and performance model for redox flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur; Crawford, Alasdair; Stephenson, David; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Li, Bin; Coffey, Greg; Thomsen, Ed; Graff, Gordon; Balducci, Patrick; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Sprenkle, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    A cost model is developed for all vanadium and iron-vanadium redox flow batteries. Electrochemical performance modeling is done to estimate stack performance at various power densities as a function of state of charge and operating conditions. This is supplemented with a shunt current model and a pumping loss model to estimate actual system efficiency. The operating parameters such as power density, flow rates and design parameters such as electrode aspect ratio and flow frame channel dimensions are adjusted to maximize efficiency and minimize capital costs. Detailed cost estimates are obtained from various vendors to calculate cost estimates for present, near-term and optimistic scenarios. The most cost-effective chemistries with optimum operating conditions for power or energy intensive applications are determined, providing a roadmap for battery management systems development for redox flow batteries. The main drivers for cost reduction for various chemistries are identified as a function of the energy to power ratio of the storage system. Levelized cost analysis further guide suitability of various chemistries for different applications.

  13. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  14. Rat brain endothelial cells are a target of manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marreilha dos Santos, Ana Paula; Milatovic, Dejan; Au, Catherine; Yin, Zhaobao; Batoreu, Maria Camila C.; Aschner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal, however exposure to high Mn levels can result in neurodegenerative changes resembling Parkinson´s disease (PD). Information on Mn´s effects on endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is lacking. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that BBB endothelial cells are a primary target for Mn-induced neurotoxicity. The studies were conducted in an in vitro BBB model of immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells. ROS production was determined by F2-Isoprostane (F2-IsoPs) measurement. The relationship between Mn toxicity and redox status was investigated upon intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion with diethylmaleate (DEM) or L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Mn exposure (200 or 800 µM MnCl2 or MnSO4) for 4 or 24h led to significant decrease in cell viability vs. controls. DEM or BSO pre-treatment led to further enhancement in cytotoxicity vs. exposure to Mn alone, with more pronounced cell death after 24h DEM pre-treatment. F2-IsoPs levels in cells exposed to MnCl2 (200 or 800 µM), were significantly increased after 4h and remained elevated 24h after exposure compared with controls. Consistent with the effects on cell viability and F2-IsoPs, treatment with MnCl2 (200 or 800 µM) was also associated with a significant decrease in membrane potential. This effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to DEM plus MnCl2 vs. cells exposed to Mn alone. We conclude that Mn induces direct injury to mitochondria in RBE4 cells. The ensuing impairment in energy metabolism and redox status may modify the restrictive properties of the BBB compromising its function. PMID:20170646

  15. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  16. Electrochemical analyses of redox-active iron minerals: a review of nonmediated and mediated approaches.

    PubMed

    Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Gorski, Christopher A

    2015-05-19

    Redox-active minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and are involved in numerous electron transfer reactions that significantly affect biogeochemical processes and cycles as well as pollutant dynamics. As a consequence, research in different scientific disciplines is devoted to elucidating the redox properties and reactivities of minerals. This review focuses on the characterization of mineral redox properties using electrochemical approaches from an applied (bio)geochemical and environmental analytical chemistry perspective. Establishing redox equilibria between the minerals and working electrodes is a major challenge in electrochemical measurements, which we discuss in an overview of traditional electrochemical techniques. These issues can be overcome with mediated electrochemical analyses in which dissolved redox mediators are used to increase the rate of electron transfer and to facilitate redox equilibration between working electrodes and minerals in both amperometric and potentiometric measurements. Using experimental data on an iron-bearing clay mineral, we illustrate how mediated electrochemical analyses can be employed to derive important thermodynamic and kinetic data on electron transfer to and from structural iron. We summarize anticipated methodological advancements that will further contribute to advance an improved understanding of electron transfer to and from minerals in environmentally relevant redox processes.

  17. Magnesium and Manganese Content of Halophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Médicis, Eveline De; Paquette, Jean; Gauthier, Jean-Jacques; Shapcott, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Magnesium and manganese contents were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in bacteria of several halophilic levels, in Vibrio costicola, a moderately halophilic eubacterium growing in 1 M NaCl, Halobacterium volcanii, a halophilic archaebacterium growing in 2.5 M NaCl, Halobacterium cutirubrum, an extremely halophilic archaebacterium growing in 4 M NaCl, and Escherichia coli, a nonhalophilic eubacterium growing in 0.17 M NaCl. Magnesium and manganese contents varied with the growth phase, being maximal at the early log phase. Magnesium and manganese molalities in cell water were shown to increase with the halophilic character of the logarithmically growing bacteria, from 30 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 0.37 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for E. coli to 102 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 1.6 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for H. cutirubrum. The intracellular concentrations of manganese were determined independently by a radioactive tracer technique in V. costicola and H. volcanii. The values obtained by 54Mn loading represented about 70% of the values obtained by atomic absorption. The increase of magnesium and manganese contents associated with the halophilic character of the bacteria suggests that manganese and magnesium play a role in haloadaptation. Images PMID:16347151

  18. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A.; Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  19. Development and Applications of Thallium isotopes: a new proxy tracking the extent of manganese oxide burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.; Ostrander, C.; Peterson, L. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) isotopes are a new and potential powerful paleoredox proxy with the possibility to track bottom water oxygen conditions based on the burial flux of manganese oxides. Thallium has a residence time of ~20 thousand years, which is long enough to render modern oxic seawater conservative with respect to concentration and isotopes. The isotopic signature of Tl in the global ocean is driven mainly by two outputs (1) adsorption onto manganese oxides and (2) low temperature oceanic crust alteration. Importantly, the isotopic inputs of Tl are all nearly the same value; thus, the isotopic composition and flux of the outputs almost exclusively set the seawater signature. For relatively short term redox events it is reasonable to assume that the dominant isotope fractionation process is associated with manganese oxide precipitation because low temperature alteration is controlled by long-term average ocean crust production rates. We present a broad range of modern samples that span several open ocean profiles combined with water column and sediment profiles from the permanently anoxic basins of the Black Sea and Cariaco Basins. The open ocean shows no variation in depth profiles that encompass most of the major water masses in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. The anoxic basins, however, reveal Tl isotope signatures closer to their inputs, which is likely due to basinal restriction. The authigenic fraction of organic-rich sediments from the Black Sea and Cariaco Basin capture the Tl isotope value of the overlying water column, which shows that Tl isotopes could be applied as a faithful deep time redox proxy. For the first time, we will present new data showing that Tl isotopes is tracking bottom water ocean oxygenation. We are applying this isotope system to ancient samples, testing the spatial and temporal variability of ocean oxygenation coinciding with major biogeochemical events.

  20. Engineering redox balance through cofactor systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Li, Shubo; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-01

    Redox balance plays an important role in the production of enzymes, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals. To meet the demands of industrial production, it is desirable that microbes maintain a maximal carbon flux towards target metabolites with no fluctuations in redox. This requires functional cofactor systems that support dynamic homeostasis between different redox states or functional stability in a given redox state. Redox balance can be achieved by improving the self-balance of a cofactor system, regulating the substrate balance of a cofactor system, and engineering the synthetic balance of a cofactor system. This review summarizes how cofactor systems can be manipulated to improve redox balance in microbes.

  1. Sensitivity of water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) seedlings to manganese enrichment under water-saturated conditions.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Kenneth W; Ciravolo, Thomas G

    2003-12-01

    In anaerobic soils of wetlands, Mn is highly available to plants because of the decreasing redox potential and pH of flooded soil. When growing adjacent to each another in wetland forests, water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.) had 10 times greater leaf manganese concentration than bald cypress (Taxodium distichum [L.] Richard). This interspecific difference was examined over a range of manganese-enriched soil conditions in a greenhouse experiment. Water tupelo and bald cypress seedlings were grown in fertilized potting soil enriched with 0, 40, 80, 160, 240, 320, and 400 mg Mn/L of soil and kept at saturated to slightly flooded conditions. Leaf Mn concentration was greater in water tupelo than bald cypress for all but the highest Mn addition treatment. Growth of water tupelo seedlings was adversely affected in treatments greater than 160 mg Mn/L. Total biomass of water tupelo in the highest Mn treatment was less than 50% of the control. At low levels of added Mn, bald cypress was able to restrict uptake of Mn at the roots with resulting low leaf Mn concentrations. Once that root restriction was exceeded, Mn concentration in bald cypress leaves increased greatly with treatment; that is, the highest treatment was 40 times greater than control (4,603 vs 100 microg/g, respectively), but biomass of bald cypress was unaffected by manganese additions. Bald cypress, a tree that does not naturally accumulate manganese, does so under manganese-enriched conditions and without biomass reduction in contrast to water tupelo, which is severely affected by higher soil Mn concentrations. Thus, bald cypress would be less affected by increased manganese availability in swamps receiving acidic inputs such as acid mine drainage, acid rain, or oxidization of pyritic soils.

  2. Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

  3. Toenail, Blood and Urine as Biomarkers of Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F.; Fang, Shona C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Christiani, David C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined the correlation between manganese exposure and manganese concentrations in different biomarkers. Methods Air measurement data and work histories were used to determine manganese exposure over a workshift and cumulative exposure. Toenail samples (n=49), as well as blood and urine before (n=27) and after (urine, n=26; blood, n=24) a workshift were collected. Results Toenail manganese, adjusted for age and dietary manganese, was significantly correlated with cumulative exposure in months 7-9, 10-12, and 7-12 before toenail clipping date, but not months 1-6. Manganese exposure over a work shift was not correlated with changes in blood nor urine manganese. Conclusions Toenails appeared to be a valid measure of cumulative manganese exposure 7 to 12 months earlier. Neither change in blood nor urine manganese appeared to be suitable indicators of exposure over a typical workshift. PMID:21494156

  4. Nanogold supported on manganese oxide doped alumina microspheres as a highly active and selective catalyst for CO oxidation in a H2-rich stream.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yu-Xin; Li, Wen-Cui; Sun, Qiang; Shi, Lei; He, Lei; Wang, Jing; Deng, Gao-Ming; Lu, An-Hui

    2015-12-28

    Manganese oxide-doped Al2O3 microspheres were synthesized via a redox method, and were then deposited with Au nanoparticles using a deposition-precipitation method. The obtained catalyst is not only highly active and selective for the preferential oxidation of CO in a H2-rich stream, but also shows excellent stability in the co-presence of H2O and CO2 at 80 °C.

  5. NASA Redox Project status summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Redox Project effort during Cy 1982. It was presented at the Fifth U.S. Department of Energy Battery and Electrochemical Contractors Conference, Arlington, Va., Dec. 7-9, 1982. The major development during 1982 was the shift from Redox system operation at 25 C with unmixed reactants to operation at 65 C with mixed reactants. This change has made possible a two- or three-fold increase in operating current density, to about 65 mA/sq cm, and an increase in reactant utilization from 40% to about 90%. Both of these improvements will lead to significant system cost reductions. Contract studies have indicated that Redox reactant costs also will be moderate. A new catalyst for the chromuim electrode offers all the advantages of the conventional gold-lead catalyst while being easier to apply and more forgiving in use.

  6. Redox Regulation of Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Recent Advances: Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. Critical Issues: The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. Future Directions: The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1305–1326. PMID:24180689

  7. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  8. Characterization of protein redox dynamics induced during light-to-dark transitions and nutrient limitation in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Sadler, Natalie C.; Hill, Eric A.; Lewis, Michael P.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-07-03

    Protein redox chemistry constitutes a major void in knowledge pertaining to photoautotrophic system regulation and signaling processes. We have employed a chemical biology approach to analyze redox sensitive proteins in live Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cells in both light and dark periods, and to understand how cellular redox balance is disrupted during nutrient perturbation. The present work identified several novel putative redox-sensitive proteins that are involved in the generation of reductant, macromolecule synthesis, and carbon flux through central metabolic pathways, and may be involved in cell signaling and response mechanisms. Furthermore, our research suggests that dynamic redox changes in response to specific nutrient limitations contribute to the regulatory changes driven by a shift from light to dark. Taken together, these results contribute to the high-level understanding of post-translational mechanisms regulating flux distributions and therefore present potential metabolic engineering targets for redirecting carbon towards biofuel precursors.

  9. Abundant porewater Mn(III) is a major component of the sedimentary redox system.

    PubMed

    Madison, Andrew S; Tebo, Bradley M; Mucci, Alfonso; Sundby, Bjørn; Luther, George W

    2013-08-23

    Soluble manganese(III) [Mn(III)] can potentially serve as both oxidant and reductant in one-electron-transfer reactions with other redox species. In near-surface sediment porewater, it is often overlooked as a major component of Mn cycling. Applying a spectrophotometric kinetic method to hemipelagic sediments from the Laurentian Trough (Quebec, Canada), we found that soluble Mn(III), likely stabilized by organic or inorganic ligands, accounts for up to 90% of the total dissolved Mn pool. Vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen and dissolved and solid Mn suggest that soluble Mn(III) is primarily produced via oxidation of Mn(II) diffusing upwards from anoxic sediments with lesser contributions from biotic and abiotic reductive dissolution of MnO2. The conceptual model of the sedimentary redox cycle should therefore explicitly include dissolved Mn(III).

  10. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future.

  11. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future. PMID:26062467

  12. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  13. Systems and methods for rebalancing redox flow battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Chang, On Kok

    2015-03-17

    Various methods of rebalancing electrolytes in a redox flow battery system include various systems using a catalyzed hydrogen rebalance cell configured to minimize the risk of dissolved catalyst negatively affecting flow battery performance. Some systems described herein reduce the chance of catalyst contamination of RFB electrolytes by employing a mediator solution to eliminate direct contact between the catalyzed membrane and the RFB electrolyte. Other methods use a rebalance cell chemistry that maintains the catalyzed electrode at a potential low enough to prevent the catalyst from dissolving.

  14. [Manganese neurotoxic effect and its susceptibility biomarkers of choice].

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Long-term occupational exposure to manganese might cause manganese poisoning, which would had adverse effects on nervous system of workers. The basal nucleus was damaged and dopaminergic neuron was injuried by manganese. The mechanism could be related with interfering the energy metabolism of central nerve, changing neurotransmitters, activating oxidation system and so on. Genetic factors may also plays a significant role in the neurotoxicity caused by manganese. Study the effects of manganese exposure biomarker, the neurotoxicity of biomarkers and the genetic susceptibility to early and susceptibility biomarkers will contribute to the prevention and control of manganese neurotoxicity.

  15. Study of high performance alloy electroforming. [nickel manganese and nickel cobalt manganese alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-manganese alloy electrodeposits from an electrolyte containing more manganese ion than previously used is being evaluated at two bath operating temperatures with a great variety of pulse plating conditions. Saccharine was added as a stress reducing agent for the electroforming of several of the samples with highest manganese content. All specimens for mechanical property testing have been produced but are not through the various heat treatments as yet. One of the heat treatment will be at 343 C (650 F), the temperature at which the MCC outer electroformed nickel shell is stress relieved. A number of retainer specimens from prior work have been tested for hardness before and after heat treatment. There appears to be a fairly good correlation between hardness and mechanical properties. Comparison of representative mechanical properties with hardnesses are made for nickel-manganese electrodeposits and nickel-cobalt-manganese deposits.

  16. The Role of Water Chemistry in Marine Aquarium Design: A Model System for a General Chemistry Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaffaber, Jeffrey J.; Palma, Ramiro; Williams, Kathryn R.

    2008-02-01

    Water chemistry is central to aquarium design, and it provides many potential applications for discussion in undergraduate chemistry and engineering courses. Marine aquaria and their life support systems feature many chemical processes. A life support system consists of the entire recirculation system, as well as the habitat tank and all ancillary water treatment processes. Many fundamental concepts learned in general chemistry, for example, unit conversion, solution concentrations, stoichiometry, redox reactions, and acid-base chemistry are all key to understanding the life support system. This article uses a hypothetical tank to house ocean sunfish as a model to show students the calculations and other considerations that are needed when designing a marine aquarium.

  17. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  18. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  19. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  1. Redox processes and release of organic matter after thermal treatment of a TCE-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Friis, A K; Albrechtsen, H J; Heron, G; Bjerg, P L

    2005-08-01

    Redox conditions in heated and unheated microcosm experiments were studied to evaluate the effect of thermal remediation treatment on biogeochemical processes in subsurface environments. The results were compared to field-scale observations from thermal treatments of contaminated sites. Trichloroethene-contaminated aquifer material and groundwater from Ft. Lewis, WA were incubated for 200 days at ambient temperature (i.e., 10 degrees C) or heated to 100 degrees C for 10 days and cooled slowly over a period of 150 days to mimic a thermal treatment. Increases of up to 14 mM dissolved organic carbon were observed in the aqueous phase after heating. Redox conditions did generally not change during heating in the laboratory experiment, and only minor changes occurred as an effect of heat treatment in the field. The conditions were slightly manganese/iron-reducing in two sediments and possibly sulfate-reducing in the third sediment based on production of up to 0.20 mM dissolved iron and 0.15 mM dissolved manganese and consumption of 0.08 mM sulfate. The calculated energy gain of less than -20 kJ/mol H2 for iron and sulfate reduction as well as methane production indicated that these processes were thermodynamically favorable. Sulfate reduction and methane production occurred in the unheated microcosms upon lactate amendment. Little or no reduction of the redox level was identified in heated lactate-amended microcosms, possibly because of limited microbial activity. Because the redox conditions, pH, and alkalinity remained within normal aquifer levels upon heating, bioaugmentation may be feasible for stimulating anaerobic dechlorination in heated samples or in future field applications.

  2. Redox processes in pore water of anoxic sediments with shallow gas.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Pérez, A M; de Blas, E; García-Gil, S

    2015-12-15

    The Ría de Vigo (NW Spain) has a high organic matter content and high rates of sedimentation. The microbial degradation of this organic matter has led to shallow gas accumulations of methane, currently distributed all along the ría. These peculiar characteristics favor the development of anoxic conditions that can determine the dynamics of iron and manganese. In order to study the role played by iron and manganese in the processes that take place in anoxic sediments with shallow gas, four gravity cores were retrieved in anoxic sediments of the Ría de Vigo in November 2012. Methane was present in two of them, below 90cm in the inner zone and below 200cm, in the outer zone. Pore water was collected and analyzed for vertical profiles of pH, sulfide, sulfate, iron and manganese concentrations. Sulfate concentrations decreased with depth but never reached the minimum detection limit. High sulfide concentrations were measured in all cores. The highest sulfide concentrations were found in the inner zone with methane and the lowest were in the outer zone without methane. Concentrations of iron and manganese reached maximum values in the upper layers of the sediment, decreasing with depth, except in the outer zone without gas, where iron and manganese concentration increased strongly toward the bottom of the sediment. In areas with shallow gas iron reduction, sulfate reduction and methane production processes coexist, showing that the traditional redox cascade is highly simplified and suggesting that iron may be involved in a cryptic sulfur cycle and in the oxidation of methane. PMID:26312406

  3. Cardiovascular Toxicities Upon Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueming; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism has been well documented; however, little attention has been devoted to Mn-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. This review summarizes literature data from both animal and human studies on Mn’s effect on cardiovascular function. Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) is significantly higher in Mn-exposed workers than that in the control subjects. The main types of abnormal ECG include sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinister megacardia, and ST-T changes. The accelerated heartbeat and shortened P-R interval appear to be more prominent in female exposed workers than in their male counterparts. Mn-exposed workers display a mean diastolic blood pressure that is significantly lower than that of the control subjects, especially in the young and female exposed workers. Animal studies indicate that Mn is capable of quickly accumulating in heart tissue, resulting in acute or sub-acute cardiovascular disorders, such as acute cardiodepression and hypotension. These toxic outcomes appear to be associated with Mn-induced mitochondrial damage and interaction with the calcium channel in the cardiovascular system. PMID:16382172

  4. Effect of manganese additions on the performance of aluminum air-battery anode alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.H.

    1982-05-05

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratories' (LLL) electrochemical evaluation of the experimental alloys previously cast indicated that the coulombic efficiency of an aluminum anode alloy with a nominal chemistry of 0.04% Fe, 0.04% Ga, and 0.8% Mg could be substantially improved by a 0.04% Mn addition. More recent elecrochemical testing of ingot sections performed by both Reynolds and LLL showed that the performance of an aluminum anode alloy, based on a nominal 0.04% Fe, could be improved by a high temperature homogenization. Based on these results, it was decided that the addition of manganese offered a very fruitful approach for providing improved anode performance. Thus the intent of the current work was to further investigate the effects of varying manganese/iron ratios and fabrication practices on the electro-chemical performance of an aluminum anode alloy containing a nominal 0.04% Fe. Results are presented and discussed.

  5. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  6. Exceptionally Active and Stable Spinel Nickel Manganese Oxide Electrocatalysts for Urea Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Sivakumar; Subramanian, Palaniappan; Levi, Elena; Aurbach, Doron; Gedanken, Aharon; Schechter, Alex

    2016-05-18

    Spinel nickel manganese oxides, widely used materials in the lithium ion battery high voltage cathode, were studied in urea oxidation catalysis. NiMn2O4, Ni1.5Mn1.5O4, and MnNi2O4 were synthesized by a simple template-free hydrothermal route followed by a thermal treatment in air at 800 °C. Rietveld analysis performed on nonstoichiometric nickel manganese oxide-Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 revealed the presence of three mixed phases: two spinel phases with different lattice parameters and NiO unlike the other two spinels NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4. The electroactivity of nickel manganese oxide materials toward the oxidation of urea in alkaline solution is evaluated using cyclic voltammetric measurements. Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 exhibits excellent redox characteristics and lower charge transfer resistances in comparison with other compositions of nickel manganese oxides and nickel oxide prepared under similar conditions.The Ni1.5Mn1.5O4modified electrode oxidizes urea at 0.29 V versus Ag/AgCl with a corresponding current density of 6.9 mA cm(-2). At a low catalyst loading of 50 μg cm(-2), the urea oxidation current density of Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 in alkaline solution is 7 times higher than that of nickel oxide and 4 times higher than that of NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4, respectively. PMID:27123873

  7. Exceptionally Active and Stable Spinel Nickel Manganese Oxide Electrocatalysts for Urea Oxidation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Sivakumar; Subramanian, Palaniappan; Levi, Elena; Aurbach, Doron; Gedanken, Aharon; Schechter, Alex

    2016-05-18

    Spinel nickel manganese oxides, widely used materials in the lithium ion battery high voltage cathode, were studied in urea oxidation catalysis. NiMn2O4, Ni1.5Mn1.5O4, and MnNi2O4 were synthesized by a simple template-free hydrothermal route followed by a thermal treatment in air at 800 °C. Rietveld analysis performed on nonstoichiometric nickel manganese oxide-Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 revealed the presence of three mixed phases: two spinel phases with different lattice parameters and NiO unlike the other two spinels NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4. The electroactivity of nickel manganese oxide materials toward the oxidation of urea in alkaline solution is evaluated using cyclic voltammetric measurements. Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 exhibits excellent redox characteristics and lower charge transfer resistances in comparison with other compositions of nickel manganese oxides and nickel oxide prepared under similar conditions.The Ni1.5Mn1.5O4modified electrode oxidizes urea at 0.29 V versus Ag/AgCl with a corresponding current density of 6.9 mA cm(-2). At a low catalyst loading of 50 μg cm(-2), the urea oxidation current density of Ni1.5Mn1.5O4 in alkaline solution is 7 times higher than that of nickel oxide and 4 times higher than that of NiMn2O4 and MnNi2O4, respectively.

  8. Manganese oxide minerals: Crystal structures and economic and environmental significance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Jeffrey E.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese oxide minerals have been used for thousands of years—by the ancients for pigments and to clarify glass, and today as ores of Mn metal, catalysts, and battery material. More than 30 Mn oxide minerals occur in a wide variety of geological settings. They are major components of Mn nodules that pave huge areas of the ocean floor and bottoms of many fresh-water lakes. Mn oxide minerals are ubiquitous in soils and sediments and participate in a variety of chemical reactions that affect groundwater and bulk soil composition. Their typical occurrence as fine-grained mixtures makes it difficult to study their atomic structures and crystal chemistries. In recent years, however, investigations using transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray and neutron diffraction methods have provided important new insights into the structures and properties of these materials. The crystal structures for todorokite and birnessite, two of the more common Mn oxide minerals in terrestrial deposits and ocean nodules, were determined by using powder x-ray diffraction data and the Rietveld refinement method. Because of the large tunnels in todorokite and related structures there is considerable interest in the use of these materials and synthetic analogues as catalysts and cation exchange agents. Birnessite-group minerals have layer structures and readily undergo oxidation reduction and cation-exchange reactions and play a major role in controlling groundwater chemistry. PMID:10097056

  9. Redox Processes in Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicconi, M. R.; de Ligny, D.

    2015-12-01

    Studies into the redox state of magmas provide important constrains on the formation and evolution of planetary bodies Indeed, oxygen fugacity is a key parameter in controlling the physical and chemical properties of melts and therefore it determine the possible interactions between reservoirs within the mantle and between the mantle and surface. It follows that redox mechanisms play a key role in determining the dynamics of the (inner and outer) terrestrial planets. The redox conditions that have accompanied basalt evolution on planetary bodies are known to be different, albeit with some similarities. The strongly reducing environments of the moon and meteorites have led to significant reduced mineralogical assemblages, whereas analogous terrestrial materials predominantly contain the corresponding oxidized compounds. Important geochemical elements such as Fe, Cr, V, Ce and Eu, exist in magmatic systems with different valences and coordination geometries, and the key subjects which need to be understood are: factors influencing redox mechanisms, and the effect on mineral assemblage, element partitioning, mass transfers processes and rheology of the melts. Examples on the study of Ce, Eu and Fe in silicate glasses/melts and on the parameters influencing their oxidation states will be provided.

  10. Redox Pioneer: Professor Joseph Loscalzo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Professor Joseph Loscalzo Dr. Joseph Loscalzo (M.D., 1978; Ph.D., 1977) is recognized here as a Redox Pioneer because he has published two articles in the field of antioxidant/redox biology that have been cited more than 1,000 times and 22 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. Dr. Loscalzo is known for his seminal contributions to our understanding of the vascular biology of nitric oxide. His initial discovery that the antiplatelet effects of organic nitrates are potentiated by thiols through a mechanism that involved metabolism to S-nitrosothiols was followed by the demonstration that S-nitrosothiols are formed endogenously through S-transnitrosation, stabilize nitric oxide, and facilitate the transport and transfer of nitric oxide between and within cells of the vessel wall. These properties led to the development of S-nitrosothiol–containing pharmacotherapies to treat disease states characterized by nitric oxide deficiency. Dr. Loscalzo's other scientific contributions include identifying the vascular functional consequences of genetic deficiencies of antioxidant enzymes that decrease nitric oxide bioavailability, collectively termed the “oxidative enzymopathies,” and demonstrating the role of mitochondria in modulating the disulfide subproteome, and in redox signaling in hypoxia. He has received numerous awards and honors for his scientific contributions, including election to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 1125–1132. PMID:20443733

  11. Rational design of metal nitride redox materials for solar-driven ammonia synthesis.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Ronald; Pfromm, Peter H; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-06-01

    Fixed nitrogen is an essential chemical building block for plant and animal protein, which makes ammonia (NH3) a central component of synthetic fertilizer for the global production of food and biofuels. A global project on artificial photosynthesis may foster the development of production technologies for renewable NH3 fertilizer, hydrogen carrier and combustion fuel. This article presents an alternative path for the production of NH3 from nitrogen, water and solar energy. The process is based on a thermochemical redox cycle driven by concentrated solar process heat at 700-1200°C that yields NH3 via the oxidation of a metal nitride with water. The metal nitride is recycled via solar-driven reduction of the oxidized redox material with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. We employ electronic structure theory for the rational high-throughput design of novel metal nitride redox materials and to show how transition-metal doping controls the formation and consumption of nitrogen vacancies in metal nitrides. We confirm experimentally that iron doping of manganese nitride increases the concentration of nitrogen vacancies compared with no doping. The experiments are rationalized through the average energy of the dopant d-states, a descriptor for the theory-based design of advanced metal nitride redox materials to produce sustainable solar thermochemical ammonia.

  12. Rational design of metal nitride redox materials for solar-driven ammonia synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, Ronald; Pfromm, Peter H.; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Fixed nitrogen is an essential chemical building block for plant and animal protein, which makes ammonia (NH3) a central component of synthetic fertilizer for the global production of food and biofuels. A global project on artificial photosynthesis may foster the development of production technologies for renewable NH3 fertilizer, hydrogen carrier and combustion fuel. This article presents an alternative path for the production of NH3 from nitrogen, water and solar energy. The process is based on a thermochemical redox cycle driven by concentrated solar process heat at 700–1200°C that yields NH3 via the oxidation of a metal nitride with water. The metal nitride is recycled via solar-driven reduction of the oxidized redox material with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. We employ electronic structure theory for the rational high-throughput design of novel metal nitride redox materials and to show how transition-metal doping controls the formation and consumption of nitrogen vacancies in metal nitrides. We confirm experimentally that iron doping of manganese nitride increases the concentration of nitrogen vacancies compared with no doping. The experiments are rationalized through the average energy of the dopant d-states, a descriptor for the theory-based design of advanced metal nitride redox materials to produce sustainable solar thermochemical ammonia. PMID:26052421

  13. Rational design of metal nitride redox materials for solar-driven ammonia synthesis.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Ronald; Pfromm, Peter H; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-06-01

    Fixed nitrogen is an essential chemical building block for plant and animal protein, which makes ammonia (NH3) a central component of synthetic fertilizer for the global production of food and biofuels. A global project on artificial photosynthesis may foster the development of production technologies for renewable NH3 fertilizer, hydrogen carrier and combustion fuel. This article presents an alternative path for the production of NH3 from nitrogen, water and solar energy. The process is based on a thermochemical redox cycle driven by concentrated solar process heat at 700-1200°C that yields NH3 via the oxidation of a metal nitride with water. The metal nitride is recycled via solar-driven reduction of the oxidized redox material with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. We employ electronic structure theory for the rational high-throughput design of novel metal nitride redox materials and to show how transition-metal doping controls the formation and consumption of nitrogen vacancies in metal nitrides. We confirm experimentally that iron doping of manganese nitride increases the concentration of nitrogen vacancies compared with no doping. The experiments are rationalized through the average energy of the dopant d-states, a descriptor for the theory-based design of advanced metal nitride redox materials to produce sustainable solar thermochemical ammonia. PMID:26052421

  14. Cost and Performance Model for Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Stephenson, David E.; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Li, Bin; Coffey, Greg W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Graff, Gordon L.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-02-01

    A cost model was developed for all vanadium and iron-vanadium redox flow batteries. Electrochemical performance modeling was done to estimate stack performance at various power densities as a function of state of charge. This was supplemented with a shunt current model and a pumping loss model to estimate actual system efficiency. The operating parameters such as power density, flow rates and design parameters such as electrode aspect ratio, electrolyte flow channel dimensions were adjusted to maximize efficiency and minimize capital costs. Detailed cost estimates were obtained from various vendors to calculate cost estimates for present, realistic and optimistic scenarios. The main drivers for cost reduction for various chemistries were identified as a function of the energy to power ratio of the storage system. Levelized cost analysis further guided suitability of various chemistries for different applications.

  15. Soil manganese redox cycling in suboxic zones: Effects on soil carbon stability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suboxic soil environments contain a disproportionately higher concentration of highly reactive free radicals relative to the surrounding soil matrix, which may have significant implications for soil organic matter cycling and stabilization. This study investigated how Mn-ozidizin...

  16. Redox active motifs in selenoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Lutz, Patricia B.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Bayse, Craig A.; Rozovsky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins use the rare amino acid selenocysteine (Sec) to act as the first line of defense against oxidants, which are linked to aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Many selenoproteins are oxidoreductases in which the reactive Sec is connected to a neighboring Cys and able to form a ring. These Sec-containing redox motifs govern much of the reactivity of selenoproteins. To study their fundamental properties, we have used 77Se NMR spectroscopy in concert with theoretical calculations to determine the conformational preferences and mobility of representative motifs. This use of 77Se as a probe enables the direct recording of the properties of Sec as its environment is systematically changed. We find that all motifs have several ring conformations in their oxidized state. These ring structures are most likely stabilized by weak, nonbonding interactions between the selenium and the amide carbon. To examine how the presence of selenium and ring geometric strain governs the motifs’ reactivity, we measured the redox potentials of Sec-containing motifs and their corresponding Cys-only variants. The comparisons reveal that for C-terminal motifs the redox potentials increased between 20–25 mV when the selenenylsulfide bond was changed to a disulfide bond. Changes of similar magnitude arose when we varied ring size or the motifs’ flanking residues. This suggests that the presence of Sec is not tied to unusually low redox potentials. The unique roles of selenoproteins in human health and their chemical reactivities may therefore not necessarily be explained by lower redox potentials, as has often been claimed. PMID:24769567

  17. Biliary manganese excretion in conscious rats is affected by acute and chronic manganese intake but not by dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Malecki, E A; Radzanowski, G M; Radzanowski, T J; Gallaher, D D; Greger, J L

    1996-02-01

    We hypothesized that biliary excretion of manganese would be sensitive to acute and chronic variations in manganese and fat intakes. In the acute study, we gavaged rats with solutions containing 54Mn with either 0, 0.2, 1 or 10 mg Mn as MnCl2. We collected bile from unanesthesized rats that were simultaneously reinfused with bile acids. Total manganese excretion (from 0.5 to 6.5 h after dosing) was proportional to the acute doses (approximately 3.4% of doses). In the chronic study, weanling rats were fed diets containing 5 or 20 g corn oil/g diet and 0.49 or 72 micrograms Mn/g diet for 8 wk and then deprived of food for 12 h before bile collection. Manganese-deficient animals excreted only 0.7% as much manganese in bile as manganese-replete animals, but this reduction was not sufficient to prevent 50-80% reduction of tissue manganese concentrations. Moreover, biliary manganese excretion (calculated for 24 h) by both manganese-deficient and manganese-replete rats (deprived of food for previous 12 h) accounted for only 1% of their manganese intake on the previous day. Dietary fat and manganese concentrations had few effects on excretion of total or individual bile acids. Ours is the first report of biliary excretion of orally administered manganese by conscious rats. PMID:8632223

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of bi-functional nanostructured manganese tungstate catalysts for selective oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Kröhnert, Jutta; Pfeifer, Verena; Girgsdies, Frank; Rosowski, Frank; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of C-H activation in selective oxidation reactions of short-chain alkane molecules over transition metal oxides is critically affected by the balance of acid-base and redox sites at the surface of the catalyst. Using the example of manganese tungstate we discuss how the relative abundance of these sites can be controlled via synthetic techniques. Phase-pure catalysts composed of the thermodynamic stable monoclinic MnWO4 phase have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis. Variation of the initial pH value resulted in rod-shaped nano-crystalline MnWO4 catalysts composed of particles with varying aspect ratio. The synthesis products have been analysed using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared, and photoelectron spectroscopy. In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the dissolution-re-crystallization processes occurring under hydrothermal conditions. Ethanol oxidation was applied to probe the surface functionalities in terms of acid-base and redox properties. Changes in the aspect ratio of the primary catalyst particles are reflected in the product distribution induced by altering the fraction of acid-base and redox sites exposed at the surface of the catalysts in agreement with the proposed mechanism of particle growth by re-crystallization during ageing under hydrothermal conditions. PMID:27076100

  19. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  20. Redox thermodynamics of lactoperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Bellei, Marzia; Vlasits, Jutta; Banerjee, Srijib; Furtmüller, Paul G; Sola, Marco; Obinger, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) are important constituents of the innate immune system of mammals. These heme enzymes belong to the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily and catalyze the oxidation of thiocyanate, bromide and nitrite to hypothiocyanate, hypobromous acid and nitrogen dioxide that are toxic for invading pathogens. In order to gain a better understanding of the observed differences in substrate specificity and oxidation capacity in relation to heme and protein structure, a comprehensive spectro-electrochemical investigation was performed. The reduction potential (E degrees ') of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of EPO and LPO was determined to be -126mV and -176mV, respectively (25 degrees C, pH 7.0). Variable temperature experiments show that EPO and LPO feature different reduction thermodynamics. In particular, reduction of ferric EPO is enthalpically and entropically disfavored, whereas in LPO the entropic term, which selectively stabilizes the oxidized form, prevails on the enthalpic term that favors reduction of Fe(III). The data are discussed with respect to the architecture of the heme cavity and the substrate channel. Comparison with published data for myeloperoxidase demonstrates the effect of heme to protein linkages and heme distortion on the redox chemistry of mammalian peroxidases and in consequence on the enzymatic properties of these physiologically important oxidoreductases.

  1. Transportation and Accumulation of Redox Active Species at the Buried Interfaces of Plasticized Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; De Marco, Roland; Jarolímová, Zdeňka; Pawlak, Marcin; Bakker, Eric; He, Ning; Latonen, Rose-Marie; Lindfors, Tom; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-09-29

    The transportation and accumulation of redox active species at the buried interface between glassy carbon electrodes and plasticized polymeric membranes have been studied using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Ferrocene tagged poly(vinyl chloride) [FcPVC], ferrocene (Fc), and its derivatives together with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) doped plasticized polymeric membrane electrodes have been investigated, so as to extend the study of the mechanism of this reaction chemistry to different time scales (both small and large molecules with variable diffusion coefficients) using a range of complementary electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. This study also provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the transportation and electrochemical reactivity of redox active species, regardless of the size of the electrochemically reactive molecule, at the buried interface of the substrate electrode. With all redox dopants, when CA electrolysis was performed, redox active species were undetectable (<1 wt % of signature elements or below the detection limit of SR-XPS and NEXAFS) in the outermost surface layers of the membrane, while a high concentration of redox species was located at the electrode substrate as a consequence of the deposition of the reaction product (Fc(+)-anion complex) at the buried interface between the electrode and the membrane. This reaction chemistry for redox active species within plasticized polymeric membranes may be useful in the fashioning of multilayered polymeric devices (e.g., chemical sensors, organic electronic devices, protective laminates, etc.) based on an electrochemical tunable deposition of redox molecules at the buried substrate electrode beneath

  2. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  3. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling).

  4. Thiol-Based Redox Switches and Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cysteine is notable among the universal, proteinogenic amino acids for its facile redox chemistry. Cysteine thiolates are readily modified by reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive electrophilic species (RES), and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Although thiol switches are commonly triggered by disulfide bond formation, they can also be controlled by S-thiolation, S-alkylation, or modification by RNS. Thiol-based switches are common in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and activate functions that detoxify reactive species and restore thiol homeostasis while repressing functions that would be deleterious if expressed under oxidizing conditions. Here, we provide an overview of the best-understood examples of thiol-based redox switches that affect gene expression. Intra- or intermolecular disulfide bond formation serves as a direct regulatory switch for several bacterial transcription factors (OxyR, OhrR/2-Cys, Spx, YodB, CrtJ, and CprK) and indirectly regulates others (the RsrA anti-σ factor and RegB sensory histidine kinase). In eukaryotes, thiol-based switches control the yeast Yap1p transcription factor, the Nrf2/Keap1 electrophile and oxidative stress response, and the Chlamydomonas NAB1 translational repressor. Collectively, these regulators reveal a remarkable range of chemical modifications exploited by Cys residues to effect changes in gene expression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1049—1063. PMID:20626317

  5. Numerical modeling of an all vanadium redox flow battery.

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Jonathan R.; Brunini, Victor E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Martinez, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a capability to simulate reduction-oxidation (redox) flow batteries in the Sierra Multi-Mechanics code base. Specifically, we focus on all-vanadium redox flow batteries; however, the capability is general in implementation and could be adopted to other chemistries. The electrochemical and porous flow models follow those developed in the recent publication by [28]. We review the model implemented in this work and its assumptions, and we show several verification cases including a binary electrolyte, and a battery half-cell. Then, we compare our model implementation with the experimental results shown in [28], with good agreement seen. Next, a sensitivity study is conducted for the major model parameters, which is beneficial in targeting specific features of the redox flow cell for improvement. Lastly, we simulate a three-dimensional version of the flow cell to determine the impact of plenum channels on the performance of the cell. Such channels are frequently seen in experimental designs where the current collector plates are borrowed from fuel cell designs. These designs use a serpentine channel etched into a solid collector plate.

  6. Advanced Redox Flow Batteries for Stationary Electrical Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-03-19

    This report describes the status of the advanced redox flow battery research being performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratories for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 of FY2012 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails completion of evaluation and optimization of single cell components for the two advanced redox flow battery electrolyte chemistries recently developed at the lab, the all vanadium (V) mixed acid and V-Fe mixed acid solutions. All the single cell components to be used in future kW-scale stacks have been identified and optimized in this quarter, which include solution electrolyte, membrane or separator; carbon felt electrode and bi-polar plate. Varied electrochemical, chemical and physical evaluations were carried out to assist the component screening and optimization. The mechanisms of the battery capacity fading behavior for the all vanadium redox flow and the Fe/V battery were discovered, which allowed us to optimize the related cell operation parameters and continuously operate the system for more than three months without any capacity decay.

  7. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  8. Unusual redox stability of neptunium in the ionic liquid [Hbet][Tf(2)N].

    PubMed

    Long, Kristy; Goff, George; Runde, Wolfgang

    2014-07-25

    The behavior of neptunium in the ionic liquid betaine bistriflimide, [Hbet][Tf2N], has been studied spectroscopically at room temperature and 60 °C for the first time. An unprecedented complex redox chemistry is observed, with up to three oxidation states (iv, v and vi) and up to six Np species existing simultaneously. Both redox reactions and coordination of betaine are observed for Np(iv), (v) and (vi). Elevating the temperature accelerates the coordination of Np(v) with betaine and reduction reactions slow down.

  9. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  10. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  14. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  17. Predicting groundwater redox status on a regional scale using linear discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, M. E.; Abraham, P.; Humphries, B.; Lilburne, L.; Cuthill, T.; Wilson, S.

    2016-08-01

    Reducing conditions are necessary for denitrification, thus the groundwater redox status can be used to identify subsurface zones where potentially significant nitrate reduction can occur. Groundwater chemistry in two contrasting regions of New Zealand was classified with respect to redox status and related to mappable factors, such as geology, topography and soil characteristics using discriminant analysis. Redox assignment was carried out for water sampled from 568 and 2223 wells in the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. For the Waikato region 64% of wells sampled indicated oxic conditions in the water; 18% indicated reduced conditions and 18% had attributes indicating both reducing and oxic conditions termed "mixed". In Canterbury 84% of wells indicated oxic conditions; 10% were mixed; and only 5% indicated reduced conditions. The analysis was performed over three different well depths, < 25 m, 25 to 100 and > 100 m. For both regions, the percentage of oxidised groundwater decreased with increasing well depth. Linear discriminant analysis was used to develop models to differentiate between the three redox states. Models were derived for each depth and region using 67% of the data, and then subsequently validated on the remaining 33%. The average agreement between predicted and measured redox status was 63% and 70% for the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. The models were incorporated into GIS and the prediction of redox status was extended over the whole region, excluding mountainous land. This knowledge improves spatial prediction of reduced groundwater zones, and therefore, when combined with groundwater flow paths, improves estimates of denitrification.

  18. Flowable conducting particle networks in redox-active electrolytes for grid energy storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2015-01-09

    This paper reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributionsmore » (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Additionally, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.« less

  19. Predicting groundwater redox status on a regional scale using linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Close, M E; Abraham, P; Humphries, B; Lilburne, L; Cuthill, T; Wilson, S

    2016-08-01

    Reducing conditions are necessary for denitrification, thus the groundwater redox status can be used to identify subsurface zones where potentially significant nitrate reduction can occur. Groundwater chemistry in two contrasting regions of New Zealand was classified with respect to redox status and related to mappable factors, such as geology, topography and soil characteristics using discriminant analysis. Redox assignment was carried out for water sampled from 568 and 2223 wells in the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. For the Waikato region 64% of wells sampled indicated oxic conditions in the water; 18% indicated reduced conditions and 18% had attributes indicating both reducing and oxic conditions termed "mixed". In Canterbury 84% of wells indicated oxic conditions; 10% were mixed; and only 5% indicated reduced conditions. The analysis was performed over three different well depths, <25m, 25 to 100 and >100m. For both regions, the percentage of oxidised groundwater decreased with increasing well depth. Linear discriminant analysis was used to develop models to differentiate between the three redox states. Models were derived for each depth and region using 67% of the data, and then subsequently validated on the remaining 33%. The average agreement between predicted and measured redox status was 63% and 70% for the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. The models were incorporated into GIS and the prediction of redox status was extended over the whole region, excluding mountainous land. This knowledge improves spatial prediction of reduced groundwater zones, and therefore, when combined with groundwater flow paths, improves estimates of denitrification. PMID:27182792

  20. Flowable conducting particle networks in redox-active electrolytes for grid energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2015-01-09

    This paper reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributions (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Additionally, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.

  1. Predicting groundwater redox status on a regional scale using linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Close, M E; Abraham, P; Humphries, B; Lilburne, L; Cuthill, T; Wilson, S

    2016-08-01

    Reducing conditions are necessary for denitrification, thus the groundwater redox status can be used to identify subsurface zones where potentially significant nitrate reduction can occur. Groundwater chemistry in two contrasting regions of New Zealand was classified with respect to redox status and related to mappable factors, such as geology, topography and soil characteristics using discriminant analysis. Redox assignment was carried out for water sampled from 568 and 2223 wells in the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. For the Waikato region 64% of wells sampled indicated oxic conditions in the water; 18% indicated reduced conditions and 18% had attributes indicating both reducing and oxic conditions termed "mixed". In Canterbury 84% of wells indicated oxic conditions; 10% were mixed; and only 5% indicated reduced conditions. The analysis was performed over three different well depths, <25m, 25 to 100 and >100m. For both regions, the percentage of oxidised groundwater decreased with increasing well depth. Linear discriminant analysis was used to develop models to differentiate between the three redox states. Models were derived for each depth and region using 67% of the data, and then subsequently validated on the remaining 33%. The average agreement between predicted and measured redox status was 63% and 70% for the Waikato and Canterbury regions, respectively. The models were incorporated into GIS and the prediction of redox status was extended over the whole region, excluding mountainous land. This knowledge improves spatial prediction of reduced groundwater zones, and therefore, when combined with groundwater flow paths, improves estimates of denitrification.

  2. Experienced Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Teaching Acid-Base Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drechsler, Michal; Van Driel, Jan

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of nine experienced chemistry teachers. The teachers took part in a teacher training course on students' difficulties and the use of models in teaching acid-base chemistry, electrochemistry, and redox reactions. Two years after the course, the teachers were interviewed about their PCK of (1)…

  3. Metal Uptake by Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase is an important antioxidant defense metalloenzyme that protects cells from damage by the toxic oxygen metabolite, superoxide free radical, formed as an unavoidable by-product of aerobic metabolism. Many years of research have gone into understanding how the metal cofactor interacts with small molecules in its catalytic role. In contrast, very little is presently known about how the protein acquires its metal cofactor, an important step in the maturation of the protein and one that is absolutely required for its biological function. Recent work is beginning to provide insight into the mechanisms of metal delivery to manganese superoxide dismutase in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19699328

  4. Manganese oxidation by bacteria: biogeochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sujith, P P; Bharathi, P A Loka

    2011-01-01

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next to oxygen in the aquatic environment and therefore control the fate of several elements. Mn oxidizing bacteria have a suit of enzymes that not only help to scavenge Mn but also other associated elements, thus playing a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles. This article reviews the importance of manganese and its interaction with microorganisms in the oxidative Mn cycle in aquatic realms.

  5. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  6. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  7. Cathodic current enhancement via manganese and oxygen related reactions in marine biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Matthew James

    Corrosion is a threat that has economic, and environmental impacts worldwide. Many types of corrosive attack are the subject of ongoing research. One of these areas of research is microbiologically influenced corrosion, which is the enhancement and/or initiation of corrosion events caused by microorganisms. It is well known that colonies of microorganisms can enhance cathodic currents through biofilm formation. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the role of manganese in enhancing cathodic currents in the presence of biofilms. Repeated polarizations conducted in Delaware Bay waters, on biofilm coated Cr identified potentially sustainable reduction reactions. The reduction of MnO2 and the enhancement of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were proven to be factors that influence cathodic current enhancement. The removal of ambient oxygen during polarizations resulted in a shutdown of cathodic current enhancement. These field data led to an exploration of the synergistic relationship between MnO2 and the ORR. Laboratory studies of the catalysis of peroxide disproportionation by MnO2 were monitored using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Experiments were run at an ambient sweater pH of 8 and pH 9, which simulated the near-surface conditions typical of cathodes immersed in seawater. Rapid reoxidation at the more basic pH was shown to allow manganese to behave as a persistent catalyst under the typical electrochemical surface conditions of a cathode. As a result a mechanism for ORR enhancement by manganese was proposed as a unique mechanism for cathodic current enhancement in biofilms. A separate field study of Delaware biofilms on stainless steel coupled to a sacrificial Al anode was carried out to identify the ORR enhancement mechanism and sustainable redox reactions at the cathode. Chemical treatments of glutaraldehyde and formaldoxime were applied to cathodes with biofilms to distinguish between enzymatic and MnO2 related ORR enhancement. The results ruled

  8. Redox signaling in cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Celio X.C.; Anilkumar, Narayana; Zhang, Min; Brewer, Alison C.; Shah, Ajay M.

    2011-01-01

    The heart has complex mechanisms that facilitate the maintenance of an oxygen supply–demand balance necessary for its contractile function in response to physiological fluctuations in workload as well as in response to chronic stresses such as hypoxia, ischemia, and overload. Redox-sensitive signaling pathways are centrally involved in many of these homeostatic and stress-response mechanisms. Here, we review the main redox-regulated pathways that are involved in cardiac myocyte excitation–contraction coupling, differentiation, hypertrophy, and stress responses. We discuss specific sources of endogenously generated reactive oxygen species (e.g., mitochondria and NADPH oxidases of the Nox family), the particular pathways and processes that they affect, the role of modulators such as thioredoxin, and the specific molecular mechanisms that are involved—where this knowledge is available. A better understanding of this complex regulatory system may allow the development of more specific therapeutic strategies for heart diseases. PMID:21236334

  9. Cascade redox flow battery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Craig R.; Kinoshita, Kim; Hickey, Darren B.; Sha, Jay E.; Bose, Deepak

    2014-07-22

    A reduction/oxidation ("redox") flow battery system includes a series of electrochemical cells arranged in a cascade, whereby liquid electrolyte reacts in a first electrochemical cell (or group of cells) before being directed into a second cell (or group of cells) where it reacts before being directed to subsequent cells. The cascade includes 2 to n stages, each stage having one or more electrochemical cells. During a charge reaction, electrolyte entering a first stage will have a lower state-of-charge than electrolyte entering the nth stage. In some embodiments, cell components and/or characteristics may be configured based on a state-of-charge of electrolytes expected at each cascade stage. Such engineered cascades provide redox flow battery systems with higher energy efficiency over a broader range of current density than prior art arrangements.

  10. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  11. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  12. Redox Signals in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2008-01-01

    Physical trauma represents one of the most primitive challenges that threatened survival. Healing a problem wound requires a multi-faceted comprehensive approach. First and foremost, the wound environment will have to be made receptive to therapies. Second, the appropriate therapeutic regimen needs to be identified and provided while managing systemic limitations that could secondarily limit the healing response. Unfortunately, most current solutions seem to aim at designing therapeutic regimen with little or no consideration of the specific details of the wound environment and systemic limitations. One factor that is centrally important in making the wound environment receptive is correction of wound hypoxia. Recent work have identified that oxygen is not only required to disinfect wounds and fuel healing but that oxygen-dependent redox-sensitive signaling processes represent an integral component of the healing cascade. Over a decade ago, it was proposed that in biological systems oxidants are not necessarily always the triggers for oxidative damage and that oxidants such as H2O2 could actually serve as signaling messengers and drive several aspects of cellular signaling. Today, that concept is much more developed and mature. Evidence supporting the role of oxidants such as H2O2 as signaling messenger is compelling. A complete understanding of the continuum between the classical and emergent roles of oxygen requires a thorough consideration of current concepts in redox biology. The objective of this review is to describe our current understanding of how redox-sensitive processes may drive dermal tissue repair. PMID:18249195

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  14. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  15. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  16. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  18. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  20. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal.

  1. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  2. Geology of the manganese deposits of Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Straczek, John A.

    1958-01-01

    Deposits of manganese ore have been found in five of the six provinces of Cuba and have been reported from the sixth.  Only Oriente and Pinar del Rio provinces have more than a few known deposits and only the deposits of Oriente have yielded any appreciable amount of ore.

  3. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  5. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  6. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  8. Competition for Manganese at the Host-Pathogen Interface.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, J L; Kehl-Fie, T E

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals such as manganese are essential nutrients for both pathogen and host. Vertebrates exploit this necessity to combat invading microbes by restricting access to these critical nutrients, a defense known as nutritional immunity. During infection, the host uses several mechanisms to impose manganese limitation. These include removal of manganese from the phagolysosome, sequestration of extracellular manganese, and utilization of other metals to prevent bacterial acquisition of manganese. In order to cause disease, pathogens employ a variety of mechanisms that enable them to adapt to and counter nutritional immunity. These adaptations include, but are likely not limited to, manganese-sensing regulators and high-affinity manganese transporters. Even though successful pathogens can overcome host-imposed manganese starvation, this defense inhibits manganese-dependent processes, reducing the ability of these microbes to cause disease. While the full impact of host-imposed manganese starvation on bacteria is unknown, critical bacterial virulence factors such as superoxide dismutases are inhibited. This chapter will review the factors involved in the competition for manganese at the host-pathogen interface and discuss the impact that limiting the availability of this metal has on invading bacteria. PMID:27571690

  9. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings.

  10. Redox-control of the alarmin, Interleukin-1α.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Donald A; Ranganathan, Aparna; Subbaram, Sita; Flaherty, Nicole L; Patel, Nilay; Trebak, Mohamed; Hempel, Nadine; Melendez, J Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1α (IL-1α) has recently emerged as a susceptibility marker for a wide array of inflammatory diseases associated with oxidative stress including Alzheimer's, arthritis, atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In the present study, we establish that expression and nuclear localization of IL-1α are redox-dependent. Shifts in steady-state H2O2 concentrations (SS-[H2O2]) resulting from enforced expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) drive IL-1α mRNA and protein expression. The redox-dependent expression of IL-1α is accompanied by its increased nuclear localization. Both IL-1α expression and its nuclear residency are abrogated by catalase co-expression. Sub-lethal doses of H2O2 also cause IL-1α nuclear localization. Mutagenesis revealed IL-1α nuclear localization does not involve oxidation of cysteines within its N terminal domain. Inhibition of the processing enzyme calpain prevents IL-1α nuclear localization even in the presence of H2O2. H2O2 treatment caused extracellular Ca(2+) influx suggesting oxidants may influence calpain activity indirectly through extracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Functionally, as a result of its nuclear activity, IL-1α overexpression promotes NF-kB activity, but also interacts with the histone acetyl transferase (HAT) p300. Together, these findings demonstrate a mechanism by which oxidants impact inflammation through IL-1α and suggest that antioxidant-based therapies may prove useful in limiting inflammatory disease progression. PMID:24024155

  11. Raman microscopy of lithium-manganese-rich transition metal oxide cathodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruther, Rose E.; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra K.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-11-15

    Lithium-rich and manganese-rich (LMR) layered transition metal (TM) oxide composites with general formula xLi2MnO3·(1-x)LiMO2 (M = Ni, Co, Mn) are promising cathode candidates for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Lithium-manganese-rich TM oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite layered phase whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich TM oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this paper, Raman microscopy is used tomore » investigate lithium-rich and manganese-rich TM cathodes as a function of voltage and electrochemical cycling at various temperatures. No growth of a spinel phase is observed within the cycling conditions. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. Finally, the results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.« less

  12. Raman microscopy of lithium-manganese-rich transition metal oxide cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruther, Rose E.; Callender, Andrew F.; Zhou, Hui; Martha, Surendra K.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2014-11-15

    Lithium-rich and manganese-rich (LMR) layered transition metal (TM) oxide composites with general formula xLi2MnO3·(1-x)LiMO2 (M = Ni, Co, Mn) are promising cathode candidates for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Lithium-manganese-rich TM oxides crystallize as a nanocomposite layered phase whose structure further evolves with electrochemical cycling. Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to monitor the crystal chemistry and correlate phase changes with electrochemical behavior. While several groups have reported Raman spectra of lithium rich TM oxides, the data show considerable variability in terms of both the vibrational features observed and their interpretation. In this paper, Raman microscopy is used to investigate lithium-rich and manganese-rich TM cathodes as a function of voltage and electrochemical cycling at various temperatures. No growth of a spinel phase is observed within the cycling conditions. However, analysis of the Raman spectra does indicate the structure of LMR-NMC deviates significantly from an ideal layered phase. Finally, the results also highlight the importance of using low laser power and large sample sizes to obtain consistent data sets.

  13. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  14. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    PubMed

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  15. Soil Manganese Enrichment from Industrial Inputs: A Gastropod Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V.; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems. PMID:24454856

  16. Electrochemical Rectification of Redox Mediators Using Porphyrin-Based Molecular Multilayered Films on ITO Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Civic, Marissa R; Dinolfo, Peter H

    2016-08-10

    Electrochemical charge transfer through multilayer thin films of zinc and nickel 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-ethynylphenyl) porphyrin constructed via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry was examined. Current rectification toward various outer-sphere redox probes is revealed with increasing numbers of layers, as these films possess insulating properties over the neutral potential range of the porphyrin, then become conductive upon reaching its oxidation potential. Interfacial electron transfer rates of mediator-dye interactions toward [Co(bpy)3](2+), [Co(dmb)3](2+), [Co(NO2-phen)3](2+), [Fe(bpy)3](2+), and ferrocene (Fc), all outer-sphere redox species, were measured by hydrodynamic methods. The ability to modify electroactive films' interfacial electron transfer rates, as well as current rectification toward redox species, has broad applicability in a number of devices, particularly photovoltaics and photogalvanics.

  17. Electrochemical Rectification of Redox Mediators Using Porphyrin-Based Molecular Multilayered Films on ITO Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Civic, Marissa R; Dinolfo, Peter H

    2016-08-10

    Electrochemical charge transfer through multilayer thin films of zinc and nickel 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-ethynylphenyl) porphyrin constructed via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry was examined. Current rectification toward various outer-sphere redox probes is revealed with increasing numbers of layers, as these films possess insulating properties over the neutral potential range of the porphyrin, then become conductive upon reaching its oxidation potential. Interfacial electron transfer rates of mediator-dye interactions toward [Co(bpy)3](2+), [Co(dmb)3](2+), [Co(NO2-phen)3](2+), [Fe(bpy)3](2+), and ferrocene (Fc), all outer-sphere redox species, were measured by hydrodynamic methods. The ability to modify electroactive films' interfacial electron transfer rates, as well as current rectification toward redox species, has broad applicability in a number of devices, particularly photovoltaics and photogalvanics. PMID:27410765

  18. NASA Redox system development project status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nice, A. W.

    1981-01-01

    NASA-Redox energy storage systems developed for solar power applications and utility load leveling applications are discussed. The major objective of the project is to establish the technology readiness of Redox energy storage for transfer to industry for product development and commercialization by industry. The approach is to competitively contract to design, build, and test Redox systems progressively from preprototype to prototype multi-kW and megawatt systems and conduct supporting technology advancement tasks. The Redox electrode and membrane are fully adequate for multi-kW solar related applications and the viability of the Redox system technology as demonstrated for multi-kW solar related applications. The status of the NASA Redox Storage System Project is described along with the goals and objectives of the project elements.

  19. Interplay between redox and protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Feleciano, Diogo R; Arnsburg, Kristin; Kirstein, Janine

    2016-01-01

    The subcellular compartments of eukaryotic cells are characterized by different redox environments. Whereas the cytosol, nucleus and mitochondria are more reducing, the endoplasmic reticulum represents a more oxidizing environment. As the redox level controls the formation of intra- and inter-molecular disulfide bonds, the folding of proteins is tightly linked to its environment. The proteostasis network of each compartment needs to be adapted to the compartmental redox properties. In addition to chaperones, also members of the thioredoxin superfamily can influence the folding of proteins by regulation of cysteine reduction/oxidation. This review will focus on thioredoxin superfamily members and chaperones of C. elegans, which play an important role at the interface between redox and protein homeostasis. Additionally, this review will highlight recent methodological developments on in vivo and in vitro assessment of the redox state and their application to provide insights into the high complexity of redox and proteostasis networks of C. elegans. PMID:27386166

  20. Acrylate intercalation and in situ polymerization in iron-, cobalt-, or manganese-substituted nickel hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, C; Guerlou-Demourgues, L; Duguet, E; Delmas, C

    2003-07-28

    A chimie douce route based on successive redox and exchange reactions has allowed us to prepare new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, composed of polyacrylate macromolecules intercalated into layered double hydroxides (LDHs), deriving from Ni(OH)(2). Monomer intercalation and in situ polymerization mechanisms have appeared to be strongly dependent upon the nature of the substituting cation in the slabs. In the case of iron-based LDHs, a phase containing acrylate monomeric intercalates has been isolated and identified by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Second, interslab free-radical polymerization of acrylate anions has been successfully initiated using potassium persulfate. In cobalt- or manganese-based LDHs, one-step polymerization has been observed, leading directly to a material containing polyacrylate intercalate. PMID:12870945

  1. Preparation and Characterization of a PEDOT-Manganese Oxide Composite, and Its Application to Electrochemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, A.

    2016-03-01

    Stable and transparent aqueous dispersions of a hybrid organic-inorganic composite, are prepared by electrochemically doping Manganese Oxide into Polyethylendioxythiophene (PEDOT). Films deposited from the PEDOT-MnOx dispersions, are characterized by means of electrical and optical measurements, and by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) investigations. The PEDOT-MnOx composite is then used to modify one of the gold electrodes of a simple electrochemical cell, in which Nafion is used as a solid electrolyte. The cell is characterized using time domain electrical measurements. It is found that distinguishable redox peaks arise in the current-voltage loops of the cell, as nanomolar amounts of either acetic acid and ammonia, are added to the deionized water into which the cell is immersed. The intensity of such current peaks, is linearly related to the concentration of the analytes, in the nanomolar range of concentrations.

  2. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies of circumstellar chemistry are discussed for both red-giant and protostellar winds. The generalized photochemical model is able to account for the recently discovered silicon-bearing molecules in the prototypical, C-rich, AGB star IRC + 10216. The surprising occurrence of CO in protostellar winds that are largely atomic is interpreted to be the result of the high density and the rapid decrease of the temperature with distance that is expected for such winds.

  3. Rho GTPases, oxidation, and cell redox control

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Zhou, Bingying; Cox, Adrienne D; Campbell, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies support regulation of Ras GTPases by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, the Rho subfamily has received considerably less attention. Over the last few years, increasing evidence is emerging that supports the redox sensitivity of Rho GTPases. Moreover, as Rho GTPases regulate the cellular redox state by controlling enzymes that generate and convert reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, redox feedback loops likely exist. Here, we provide an overview of cellular oxidants, Rho GTPases, and their inter-dependence. PMID:24809833

  4. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  5. Synthesis and atomic level in situ redox characterization in ceria and ceria zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruigang

    2007-12-01

    Nanocrystalline ceria-based oxides are widely used in automotive three-way catalytic converters to reduce the emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and unburned hydrocarbons. The primary function of ceria-based oxides in the catalytic process is to adjust the local oxygen partial pressure and maintain an air-to-fuel ratio near the stoichiometric value (˜14.5) required for the optimal catalyst performance for carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon oxidation, and nitrogen oxides reduction. In this dissertation, a study of the relationship between the nanoscale structure, chemistry, and the redox behavior on high surface area ceria and ceria zirconia is presented. Precipitation and spray freezing methods were used to synthesize nanocrystalline ceria and ceria zirconia solid solution powders respectively. The effect of thermal treatments in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres on the reducibility of the materials has been systematically investigated. X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the average structure and reducibility. In situ environmental transmission electron microscope was exploited to visualize the dynamic changes during redox processes at the atomic level. This resulted in the identification of the nanoscale structure and chemistry for the most active nanoparticles in these oxides. The correlation between ex situ macroscopic redox properties and in situ redox behavior of individual nanoparticles is demonstrated. The addition of zirconia to ceria clearly enhances the reducibility and thermal stability of ceria. A fundamental difference between ceria and ceria zirconia during in situ redox processes is related to oxygen vacancy ordering. Ceria showed oxygen vacancy ordering during reduction, whereas ceria zirconia did not. It is suggested that the absence of oxygen vacancy ordering might be a fundamental factor for improved redox properties of ceria zirconia compared with pure ceria. The 50% ceria-50% zirconia solid

  6. [Redox Molecular Imaging Using ReMI].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Ito, Shinji; Utsumi, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Tissue redox status is one of the most important parameters to maintain homeostasis in the living body. Numerous redox reactions are involved in metabolic processes, such as energy production in the mitochondrial electron transfer system. A variety of intracellular molecules such as reactive oxygen species, glutathione, thioredoxins, NADPH, flavins, and ascorbic acid may contribute to the overall redox status in tissues. Breakdown of redox balance may lead to oxidative stress and can induce many pathological conditions such as cancer, neurological disorders, and aging. Therefore imaging of tissue redox status and monitoring antioxidant levels in living organisms can be useful in the diagnosis of disease states and assessment of treatment response. In vivo redox molecular imaging technology such as electron spin resonance imaging (ESRI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRI (redox molecular imaging; ReMI) is emerging as a viable redox status imaging modality. This review focuses on the application of magnetic resonance technologies using MRI or DNP-MRI and redox-sensitive contrast agents.

  7. Zinc and the modulation of redox homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc, a redox inactive metal, has been long viewed as a component of the antioxidant network, and growing evidence points to its involvement in redox-regulated signaling. These actions are exerted through several mechanisms based on the unique chemical and functional properties of zinc. Overall, zinc contributes to maintain the cell redox balance through different mechanisms including: i) the regulation of oxidant production and metal-induced oxidative damage; ii) the dynamic association of zinc with sulfur in protein cysteine clusters, from which the metal can be released by nitric oxide, peroxides, oxidized glutathione and other thiol oxidant species; iii) zinc-mediated induction of the zinc-binding protein metallothionein, which releases the metal under oxidative conditions and act per se scavenging oxidants; iv) the involvement of zinc in the regulation of glutathione metabolism and of the overall protein thiol redox status; and v) a direct or indirect regulation of redox signaling. Findings of oxidative stress, altered redox signaling, and associated cell/tissue disfunction in cell and animal models of zinc deficiency, stress the relevant role of zinc in the preservation of cell redox homeostasis. However, while the participation of zinc in antioxidant protection, redox sensing, and redox-regulated signaling is accepted, the involved molecules, targets and mechanisms are still partially known and the subject of active research. PMID:22960578

  8. Manganese phytotoxicity: new light on an old problem

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Denise R.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient that is phytotoxic under certain edaphic and climatic conditions. Multiple edaphic factors regulate Mn redox status and therefore its phytoavailability, and multiple environmental factors including light intensity and temperature interact with Mn phytotoxicity. The complexity of these interactions coupled with substantial genetic variation in Mn tolerance have hampered the recognition of Mn toxcity as an important stress in many natural and agricultural systems. Scope Conflicting theories have been advanced regarding the mechanism of Mn phytotoxicity and tolerance. One line of evidence suggests that Mn toxicity ocurs in the leaf apoplast, while another suggests that toxicity occurs by disruption of photosynthetic electron flow in chloroplasts. These conflicting results may at least in part be attributed to the light regimes employed, with studies conducted under light intensities approximating natural sunlight showing evidence of photo-oxidative stress as a mechanism of toxicity. Excessive Mn competes with the transport and metabolism of other cationic metals, causing a range of induced nutrient deficiencies. Compartmentation, exclusion and detoxification mechanisms may all be involved in tolerance to excess Mn. The strong effects of light, temperature, precipitation and other climate variables on Mn phytoavailability and phytotoxicity suggest that global climate change is likely to exacerbate Mn toxicity in the future, which has largely escaped scientific attention. Conclusions Given that Mn is terrestrially ubiquitous, it is imperative that the heightened risk of Mn toxicity to both managed and natural plant ecosystems be factored into evaluation of the potential impacts of global climate change on vegetation. Large inter- and intraspecific genetic variation in tolerance to Mn toxicity suggests that increased Mn toxicity in natural ecosystems may drive changes in community composition, but that in

  9. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  10. The effect of induced anoxia and reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of organic carbon, phosphate, iron, and manganese.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Annelie C; Arias-Esquivel, Victor A

    2009-11-15

    Eutrophication causes seasonally anoxic bottom waters in coastal environments, but we lack information on effects of onset of anoxia and subsequent reoxygenation on benthic fluxes of redox-sensitive minerals and associated organic carbon (OC). As the first study, we determined the effect of inducing anoxia and subsequently restoring oxic conditions in mesocosms with surface sediment and water from a coastal environment. These concentration changes were compared with those in an oxygenated control. We determined water column concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), iron, manganese, and phosphate. Benthic fluxes of DOC, POC, and iron increased at the onset of anoxia in oxygen-depleted treatments. DOC and iron concentrations increased concomitantly towards maxima, which may have indicated reductive dissolution of FeOOH and release of associated OC. The subsequent concomitant concentration decreases may have been the result of coprecipitation of OC with iron-containing minerals. In contrast, the phosphate-concentration increase occurred several days after the onset of anoxia and the manganese concentration was not affected by the onset of anoxia. Restoring oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in DOC, POC, and phosphate concentrations, which may indicate coprecipitation of OC with phosphate-containing minerals. The high DOC fluxes at the onset of anoxia indicate that redox oscillations may be important in OC degradation. Further, our results indicate a close coupling between OC cycling and dissolution/precipitation of iron-containing minerals in intermittently anoxic sediments.

  11. Catalytic reduction of dioxygen to water with a monomeric manganese complex at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Shook, Ryan L; Peterson, Sonja M; Greaves, John; Moore, Curtis; Rheingold, Arnold L; Borovik, A S

    2011-04-20

    There have been numerous efforts to incorporate dioxygen into chemical processes because of its economic and environmental benefits. The conversion of dioxygen to water is one such example, having importance in both biology and fuel cell technology. Metals or metal complexes are usually necessary to promote this type of reaction and several systems have been reported. However, mechanistic insights into this conversion are still lacking, especially the detection of intermediates. Reported herein is the first example of a monomeric manganese(II) complex that can catalytically convert dioxygen to water. The complex contains a tripodal ligand with two urea groups and one carboxyamidopyridyl unit; this ligand creates an intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network within the secondary coordination sphere that aids in the observed chemistry. The manganese(II) complex is five-coordinate with an N(4)O primary coordination sphere; the oxygen donor comes from the deprotonated carboxyamido moiety. Two key intermediates were detected and characterized: a peroxo-manganese(III) species and a hybrid oxo/hydroxo-manganese(III) species (1). The formulation of 1 was based on spectroscopic and analytical data, including an X-ray diffraction analysis. Reactivity studies showed dioxygen was catalytically converted to water in the presence of reductants, such as diphenylhydrazine and hydrazine. Water was confirmed as a product in greater than 90% yield. A mechanism was proposed that is consistent with the spectroscopy and product distribution, in which the carboxyamido group switches between a coordinated ligand and a basic site to scavenge protons produced during the catalytic cycle. These results highlight the importance of incorporating intramolecular functional groups within the secondary coordination sphere of metal-containing catalysts.

  12. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.Z. Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-06-15

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. {yields} The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  13. Cardiovascular Redox and Ox Stress Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikas; Calamaras, Timothy Dean; Haeussler, Dagmar; Colucci, Wilson Steven; Cohen, Richard Alan; McComb, Mark Errol; Pimentel, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative post-translational modifications (OPTMs) have been demonstrated as contributing to cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. These modifications have been identified using antibodies as well as advanced proteomic methods, and the functional importance of each is beginning to be understood using transgenic and gene deletion animal models. Given that OPTMs are involved in cardiovascular pathology, the use of these modifications as biomarkers and predictors of disease has significant therapeutic potential. Adequate understanding of the chemistry of the OPTMs is necessary to determine what may occur in vivo and which modifications would best serve as biomarkers. Recent Advances: By using mass spectrometry, advanced labeling techniques, and antibody identification, OPTMs have become accessible to a larger proportion of the scientific community. Advancements in instrumentation, database search algorithms, and processing speed have allowed MS to fully expand on the proteome of OPTMs. In addition, the role of enzymatically reversible OPTMs has been further clarified in preclinical models. Critical Issues: The identification of OPTMs suffers from limitations in analytic detection based on the methodology, instrumentation, sample complexity, and bioinformatics. Currently, each type of OPTM requires a specific strategy for identification, and generalized approaches result in an incomplete assessment. Future Directions: Novel types of highly sensitive MS instrumentation that allow for improved separation and detection of modified proteins and peptides have been crucial in the discovery of OPTMs and biomarkers. To further advance the identification of relevant OPTMs in advanced search algorithms, standardized methods for sample processing and depository of MS data will be required. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1528–1559. PMID:22607061

  14. Pathogenic prion protein is degraded by a manganese oxide mineral found in soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russo, F.; Johnson, C.J.; McKenzie, D.; Aiken, Judd M.; Pedersen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Prions, the aetiological agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, exhibit extreme resistance to degradation. Soil can retain prion infectivity in the environment for years. Reactive soil components may, however, contribute to the inactivation of prions in soil. Members of the birnessite family of manganese oxides (MnO2) rank among the strongest natural oxidants in soils. Here, we report the abiotic degradation of pathogenic prion protein (PrPTSE) by a synthetic analogue of naturally occurring birnessite minerals. Aqueous MnO2 suspensions degraded the PrPTSE as evidenced by decreased immunoreactivity and diminished ability to seed protein misfolding cyclic amplification reactions. Birnessite-mediated PrPTSE degradation increased as a solution's pH decreased, consistent with the pH-dependence of the redox potential of MnO2. Exposure to 5.6 mg MnO2 ml-1 (PrPTSE:MnO2=1 : 110) decreased PrPTSE levels by ???4 orders of magnitude. Manganese oxides may contribute to prion degradation in soil environments rich in these minerals. ?? 2009 SGM.

  15. Mobilisation processes responsible for iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Central Adriatic Italy.

    PubMed

    Palmucci, William; Rusi, Sergio; Di Curzio, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Iron and manganese are two of the most common contaminants that exceed the threshold imposed by international and national legislation. When these contamination occurs in groundwater, the use of the water resource is forbidden for any purposes. Several studies investigated these two metals in groundwater, but research focused in the Central Adriatic area are still lacking. Thus, the objective of this study is to identify the origin of Fe and Mn contamination in groundwater and the hydrogeochemical processes that can enrich aquifers with these metals. This work is based on hydrogeochemical and multivariate statistical analysis of analytical results undertaken on soils and groundwater. Fe and Mn contamination are widespread in the alluvial aquifers, and their distribution is regulated by local conditions (i.e. long residence time, presence of peat or organic-rich fine sediments or anthropic pollution) that control redox processes in the aquifers and favour the mobilisation of these two metals in groundwater. The concentration of iron and manganese identified within soil indicates that the latter are a concrete source of the two metals. Anthropic impact on Fe and Mn contamination of groundwater is not related to agricultural activities, but on the contrary, the contribution of hydrocarbons (e.g. spills) is evident.

  16. Crystal Structure of Manganese Lipoxygenase of the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wennman, Anneli; Oliw, Ernst H; Karkehabadi, Saeid; Chen, Yang

    2016-04-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) are non-heme metal enzymes, which oxidize polyunsaturated fatty acids to hydroperoxides. All LOX belong to the same gene family, and they are widely distributed. LOX of animals, plants, and prokaryotes contain iron as the catalytic metal, whereas fungi express LOX with iron or with manganese. Little is known about metal selection by LOX and the adjustment of the redox potentials of their protein-bound catalytic metals. Thirteen three-dimensional structures of animal, plant, and prokaryotic FeLOX are available, but none of MnLOX. The MnLOX of the most important plant pathogen, the rice blast fungusMagnaporthe oryzae(Mo), was expressed inPichia pastoris.Mo-MnLOX was deglycosylated, purified to homogeneity, and subjected to crystal screening and x-ray diffraction. The structure was solved by sulfur and manganese single wavelength anomalous dispersion to a resolution of 2.0 Å. The manganese coordinating sphere is similar to iron ligands of coral 8R-LOX and soybean LOX-1 but is not overlapping. The Asn-473 is positioned on a short loop (Asn-Gln-Gly-Glu-Pro) instead of an α-helix and forms hydrogen bonds with Gln-281. Comparison with FeLOX suggests that Phe-332 and Phe-525 might contribute to the unique suprafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygenation mechanism of Mo-MnLOX by controlling oxygen access to the pentadiene radical. Modeling suggests that Arg-525 is positioned close to Arg-182 of 8R-LOX, and both residues likely tether the carboxylate group of the substrate. An oxygen channel could not be identified. We conclude that Mo-MnLOX illustrates a partly unique variation of the structural theme of FeLOX. PMID:26783260

  17. Effect of Different Casting Parameters on the Cleanliness of High Manganese Steel Ingots Compared to High Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schweinichen, Petrico; Chen, Zhiye; Senk, Dieter; Lob, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    The increasing demand for excellent steel properties has led to the creation of new steel grades such as high manganese TWIP and TRIP steels which are scientifically examined in Germany within the international research framework of the SFB 761 "Steel-ab initio." The production of these high-technology products, utilizing mainly the ingot-casting method, leads to new challenges in the prevention of cast defects. At RWTH Aachen University, a systematic investigation of the solidification process as it relates to shrinkage cavity, macrosegregation, cleanliness, and surface imperfections in as-cast ingots is being conducted. A particular attention was devoted to the effects of such casting parameters as superheat, pouring rate, hot top, and stirring conditions on the solidification and cleanliness of low carbon alloyed and high manganese alloyed steels. The experimental results show that rising manganese content leads to a higher amount and larger size of inclusions while rising carbon content enhances the inclusion generation in the same way. It was found that a bottom teeming system combined with an inert gas atmosphere produces the best quality and that if casting is performed with a runner-system, it is important to use a SiO2-free refractory to avoid oxidizing the Mn content of the melt to MnO inclusions by redox-reactions.

  18. Manganese concentration in lobster (Homarus americanus) gills as an index of exposure to reducing conditions in western Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draxler, Andrew F.J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Wieczorek, Dan; Lavigne, Michele G.; Paulson, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the accumulation of manganese (Mn) in gill tissues of chemically nai??ve lobsters held in situ at six sites in Long Island Sound (LIS) for up to six weeks to evaluate the possible contribution of eutrophication-driven habitat quality factors to the 1999 mass mortality of American lobsters (Homarus americanus). These western LIS lobster habitats experience seasonal hypoxia, which results in redox-mobilized Mn being transferred to and deposited on the tissues of the lobsters. Manganese accumulated in gill tissue of lobsters throughout the study, but rates were highest at western and southern LIS sites, ranging from 3.4-0.8 ??g/g/d (???16 ??g/g initial). The Baden-Eriksson observation that Mn accumulation in Norway lobsters (Nephrops norvegicus) is associated with ecosystem hypoxia is confirmed and extended to H. americanus. It seems likely that, after accounting for molting frequency, certain critical values may be applied to other lobster habitats of the NE US shelf. If a high proportion of lobsters in autumn have gill Mn concentrations exceeding 30 ??g/g, then the habitats are likely experiencing some reduced oxygen levels. Manganese concentrations above 100 ??g/g suggest exposure to conditions with the potential for lobster mortality should the temperatures of bottom waters become elevated, and gill concentrations above some higher level (perhaps 300 ??g/g) indicate the most severe habitat conditions with a strong potential for hypoxia stress.

  19. Manganese concentration in lobster (Homarus americansus) gills as an index of exposure to reducing conditions in Western Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draxler, Andrew F.J.; Sherrell, Robert M.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Lavigne, Michele G.; Paulson, Anthony J.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the accumulation of manganese (Mn) in gill tissues of chemically naïve lobsters heldin situ at six sites in Long Island Sound (LIS) for up to six weeks to evaluate the possible contribution of eutrophication-driven habitat quality factors to the 1999 mass mortality of American lobsters (Homarus americanus). These western LIS lobster habitats experience seasonal hypoxia, which results in redox-mobilized Mn being transferred to and deposited on the tissues of the lobsters. Manganese accumulated in gill tissue of lobsters throughout the study, but rates were highest at western and southern LIS sites, ranging from 3.4–0.8 μ g/g/d (~16 μg/g initial). The Baden-Eriksson observation that Mn accumulation in Norway lobsters (Nephrops norvegicus) is associated with ecosystem hypoxia is confirmed and extended to H. americanus. It seems likely that, after accounting for molting frequency, certain critical values may be applied to other lobster habitats of the NE US shelf. If a high proportion of lobsters in autumn have gill Mn concentrations exceeding 30 μg/g, then the habitats are likely experiencing some reduced oxygen levels. Manganese concentrations above 100 μg/g suggest exposure to conditions with the potential for lobster mortality should the temperatures of bottom waters become elevated, and gill concentrations above some higher level (perhaps 300 μg/g) indicate the most severe habitat conditions with a strong potential for hypoxia stress.

  20. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    PubMed

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals. PMID:20969479