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Sample records for manganese steel welds

  1. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  2. Properties of the welded joints of manganese steel made by low-frequency pulsed arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu. N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Gladovskii, S. V.; Golikov, N. I.

    2017-04-01

    The structure, the mechanical properties, the impact toughness, and the fracture mechanisms of the welded joints made of steel 09G2S plates by direct current welding and pulsed arc welding with a modulated arc current in the frequency range 0.25-5.0 Hz are studied. The application of low-frequency pulsed arc welding allowed us to form welded joints with a fine-grained structure in the weld metal and the heat-affected zone and to achieve a higher impact toughness and a longer cyclic fatigue life as compared to the welded joints fabricated by direct current welding. The achieved effect manifests itself over the entire testing range from 20 to-60°C.

  3. Tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient or iron-deficient rats after stainless steel welding-fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Duck; Kim, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Won; Choi, Seong-Jin; Choi, Byung-Sun; Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Kwon, Il Hoon; Mun, Je-Hyeok; Yu, Il Je

    2007-05-01

    Welders can be exposed to high levels of manganese through welding fumes. Although it has already been suggested that excessive manganese exposure causes neurotoxicity, called manganism, the pathway of manganese transport to the brain with welding-fume exposure remains unclear. Iron is an essential metal that maintains a homeostasis in the body. The divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) transports iron and other divalent metals, such as manganese, and the depletion of iron is known to upregulate DMT1 expression. Accordingly, this study investigated the tissue distribution of manganese in iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats after welding-fume exposure. The feeding of an iron-deficient diet for 4 wk produced a depletion of body iron, such as decreased iron levels in the serum and tissues, and upregulated the DMT1 expression in the rat duodenum. The iron-sufficient and iron-deficient rats were then exposed to welding fumes generated from manual metal arc stainless steel at a concentration of 63.5 +/- 2.3 mg/m3 for 2 h per day over a 30-day period. Animals were sacrificed on days 1, 15, and 30. The level of body iron in the iron-deficient rats was restored to the control level after the welding-fume exposure. However, the tissue distributions of manganese after the welding-fume exposure showed similar patterns in both the iron-sufficient and iron-deficient groups. The concentration of manganese increased in the lungs and liver on days 15 and 30, and increased in the olfactory bulb on day 30. Slight and heterogeneous increases of manganese were observed in different brain regions. Consequently, these findings suggest that the presence of Fe in the inhaled welding fumes may not have a significant effect on the uptake of Mn into the brain. Thus, the condition of iron deficiency did not seem to have any apparent effect on the transport of Mn into the brain after the inhalation of welding fumes.

  4. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (<0.01 to ≈ 1% or <0.1 to ≈ 10 microg ml(-1)) and Ni2+ (<0.01 to ≈ 0.2% or <0.1 to ≈ 2 mg ml(-1)) ions were found in biological buffer media, but amounts were highly dependent on pH and the

  5. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2001-12-04

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal for the carbon-manganese steel studied in this investigation. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld to investigate transformation kinetics under both positive and negative temperature gradients in the HAZ. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can now be better understood and modeled.

  6. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  7. Mapping Phase Transformations in the Heat-Affected-Zone of Carbon Manganese Steel Welds using Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Ressler, T; Palmer, T A

    2002-02-12

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) was used to investigate phase transformations that occur in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in AISI 1005 carbon-manganese steel. In situ SRXRD experiments performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) probed the phases present in the HAZ during welding, and these real-time observations of the HAZ phases were used to construct a map of the phase transformations occurring in the HAZ. This map identified 5 principal phase regions between the liquid weld pool and the unaffected base metal. Regions of annealing, recrystallization, partial transformation and complete transformation to {alpha}-Fe, {gamma}-Fe, and {delta}-Fe phases were identified using SRXRD, and the experimental results were combined with a heat flow model of the weld and thermodynamic calculations to compare these results with the important phase transformation isotherms. From the resulting phase transformation map, the kinetics of phase transformations that occur under the highly non-isothermal heating and cooling cycles produced during welding of steels can be better understood and modeled.

  8. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  9. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  10. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  11. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  12. Welding properties of thin steel sheets by laser-arc hybrid welding: laser focused arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Moriaki; Shinbo, Yukio; Yoshitake, Akihide; Ohmura, Masanori

    2003-03-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding combines the laser and arc welding processes to provide advantages not found in either. This process can weld lapped steel sheets that have a larger gap than is possible with laser welding. Blowholes form when lap-welding zinc-coated steel sheets because of the zinc that is vaporized. The laser-arc hybrid welding process can lap-weld zinc-coated steel sheets without causing blowholes. The welding speed of laser-arc hybrid welding is nearly equivalent to that of laser welding. Laser-arc hybrid welding produces high-quality lap joints and is ideal for assembly welding of automotive parts.

  13. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  14. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  15. Cryogenic mechanical properties of heavy-section weldment in high-manganese austenitic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, O.; Tsuchiyama, T.; Hada, S.

    1997-06-01

    Cryogenic mechanical properties of a heavy-section weldment of high-manganese austenitic steel for the structure of superconducting magnet were evaluated, The heavy-section weld joint with a 200 mm thickness was manufactured by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process using 21Mn-13Cr-5Ni-0.2N-B steel weld material. No cracks were observed in the weld metal. Tensile property and fracture toughness were tested at 4 K. The yield strength and the fracture toughness value, K{sub Ic}(J), were 1223 - 1278 MPa and 181{approximately} 201 MPam{sup {1/2}} in the weld metal, respectively.

  16. Dynamics of phase transformations and microstructure evolution in carbon-manganese steel arc welds using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Joe; Ressler, Thorsten; Elmer, John W

    2003-03-01

    Phase transformations that occur in both the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the fusion zone (FZ) of a carbon-manganese steel spot weld have been investigated using time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXRD) with time resolutions down to 50 ms. It is found that in both zones the gamma(f.c.c.) --> alpha(b.c.c.) transformation on cooling is twice as fast as the forward transformation of alpha --> gamma on heating. Profile analysis of the major Bragg reflections recorded in the TRXRD patterns reveals similarities and differences in the microstructural evolution with time in the HAZ and in the FZ. The latter undergoes melting and solidification in addition to solid-state transformations. With increasing temperature, the (110) d-spacing of the alpha phase prior to and during the alpha --> gamma transformation and the (111) d-spacing of the gamma phase just after the same transformation exhibit a decrease. The observed (and unusual) lattice contraction with temperature rise may be attributed to chemical effects, such as carbide precipitation in the alpha matrix, and/or mechanical effects due to stress relief. In the FZ, the gamma-Fe that forms has a preferential (200) texture on solidification of the liquid, whereas, on cooling in the HAZ, the gamma-Fe retains largely a (111) texture that is induced in the alpha --> gamma transformation on heating. On cooling in the HAZ, the width of the gamma(111) reflection increases initially, which is indicative of microstrain developing in the f.c.c. lattice, but decreases as expected, with a reduction of thermal disorder, on further cooling until the completion of the gamma --> alpha transformation. In the FZ, however, the microstrain in the gamma phase increases steadily on solidification and more rapidly for the duration of the gamma --> alpha transformation on further cooling. The final microstructure of the FZ is likely to consist of a single alpha phase dispersed in two morphological entities, whereas in the HAZ the alpha phase

  17. The cause of welding cracks in aircraft steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, J

    1940-01-01

    The discussion in this article refers to gas welding of thin-walled parts of up to about 3 mm thickness. It was proven that by restricting the sulphur, carbon, and phosphorous content, and by electric-furnace production of the steel, it was possible in a short time to remove this defect. Weld hardness - i.e., martensite formation and hardness of the overheated zone - has no connection with the tendency to weld-crack development. Si, Cr, Mo, or V content has no appreciable effect, while increased manganese content tends to reduce the crack susceptibility.

  18. Manganese exposures during shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) in an enclosed space.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael K; Ewing, William M; Longo, William; DePasquale, Christopher; Mount, Michael D; Hatfield, Richard; Stapleton, Randall

    2005-08-01

    The work reported here evaluates the effectiveness of various rates of dilution ventilation in controlling welder exposures to manganese in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) fume when working in enclosed or restricted spaces. Personal and area monitoring using total and respirable sampling techniques, along with multiple analytical techniques, was conducted during the welding operations. With 2000 cubic feet per minute (CFM) (56.63 m3/min) dilution ventilation, personal breathing zone concentrations for the welder using 1/8 inches (3.18 mm) E6010 and E7018 mild steel electrodes were within 75% of the existing threshold limit value (TLV of 0.2 mg/m3 for total manganese and were five times greater than the 2001-2003 proposed respirable manganese TLV of 0.03 mg/m3. Manganese concentrations using high manganese content electrodes were five times greater than those for E6010 and E7018 electrodes. Area samples upstream and downstream of the welder using E6010 and E7018 electrodes exceeded 0.2 mg/m3 manganese. Concentrations inside and outside the welding helmet do not indicate diversion of welding fume by the welding helmet from the welder's breathing zone. There was close agreement between respirable manganese and total manganese fume concentrations. Total fume concentrations measured by gravimetric analysis of matched-weight, mixed cellulose ester filters were comparable to those measured via preweighed PVC filter media. This study indicates that 2000 CFM general dilution ventilation per 29 CFR 1910.252 (c)(2) may not be a sufficient means of controlling respirable manganese exposures for either welders or their helpers in restricted or enclosed spaces. In the absence of site-specific monitoring data indicating otherwise, it is prudent to employ respiratory protection or source capture ventilation for SMAW with E6010, E7018, and high manganese content electrodes rather than depending solely on 2000 CFM general dilution ventilation in enclosed spaces.

  19. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  20. Corrosion of stainless steel piping in high manganese fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Lutey, R.W.; Musick, J.; Pinnow, K.E.; Tuthill, A.H.

    1996-09-01

    A potable water treatment plant, designed to reduce manganese and iron in well water, experienced leaks in the 16 in. (406 mm) raw water headers about nine months after startup. The material, type 304 (UNS 30403) stainless steel, was purchased to American Society of Testing Materials specification A 778, with additional stipulations governing internal finish, the use of filler metal, and pickling for scale removal. Laboratory screenings of deposits for bacteria revealed some potentially additive corrosive effects from microbial action. However, the correlation of corrosion with the presence or absence of heat tint in the heat-affected zone of the circumferential welds prevailed as a primary cause of the corrosion observed beneath an adherent manganese-iron deposit in a low chloride, high manganese, raw water.

  1. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-09-16

    A process is described for welding chromium-molybdenum steels which consist of: subjecting the steel to normalization by heating to above the transformation temperature and cooling in air; subjecting the steel to a partial temper by heating to a temperature less than a full temper; welding the steel using an appropriate filler metal; subjecting the steel to a full temper by heating to a temperature sufficient to optimize strength, reduce stress, increase ductility and reduce hardness.

  2. Welding and properties of welds of TMCP-steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brederholm, A.T.; Kotamies, J.M.N.; Haenninen, H.

    1995-12-31

    Thermomechanical control process (TMCP) of steel includes a multiplicity of processing schedules of combined thermal and mechanical working treatments that have been developed to optimize the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties of various steel grades. Weld metal properties of multipass submerged arc welded (SAW) TMCP steel joints were investigated in order to study the influences of different welding wires and heat inputs. Weld metal characterization consisted of tensile, Charpy-V Notch (CVN) and hardness testing, and microstructural examination. Cross-weld tensile specimens were tested principally to examine whether HAZ softening, which might have occurred, causes failure in this region. The tests verified that by using the right welding wire; it is possible to achieve weld joint which fulfills the strength requirements and gives satisfactory toughness at low temperatures.

  3. Influence of Mn contents in 0Cr18Ni10Ti thin wall stainless steel tube on TIG girth weld quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    2017-03-01

    Three kinds of cold worked 0Cr18Ni10Ti thin wall stainless steel tubes with the manganese contents of 1.27%, 1.35% and 1.44% and the cold worked 0Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel end plug with manganese content of 1.35% were used for TIG girth welding in the present investigation. The effect of different manganese contents in stainless steel tube on weld quality was studied. The results showed that under the same welding conditions, the metallographic performance of the girth weld for the thin wall stainless steel tube with the manganese element content 1.44% welded with end plug was the best. Under the appropriate welding conditions, the quality of the girth weld increased with the increase of the manganese content till 1.44%. It was found that in the case of the Mn content of 1.44%, and under the proper welding condition the welding defects, such as welding cracks were effectively avoided, and the qualified weld penetration can be obtained.. It is concluded that the appropriate increase of the manganese content can significantly improve the TIG girth weld quality of the cold worked 0Cr18Ni10Ti stainless steel tube.

  4. Manganese speciation of laboratory-generated welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Ronnee N.; Keane, Michael; Hanley, Kevin W.; Feng, H. Amy; Ashley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) fractions in chamber-generated welding fumes (WF) and to evaluate and compare the results from a sequential extraction procedure for Mn fractions with that of an acid digestion procedure for measurement of total, elemental Mn. To prepare Mn-containing particulate matter from representative welding processes, a welding system was operated in short circuit gas metal arc welding (GMAW) mode using both stainless steel (SS) and mild carbon steel (MCS) and also with flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) using MCS. Generated WF samples were collected onto polycarbonate filters before homogenization, weighing and storage in scintillation vials. The extraction procedure consisted of four sequential steps to measure various Mn fractions based upon selective solubility: (1) soluble Mn dissolved in 0.01 M ammonium acetate; (2) Mn (0,II) dissolved in 25 % (v/v) acetic acid; (3) Mn (III,IV) dissolved in 0.5% (w/v) hydroxylamine hydrochloride in 25% (v/v) acetic acid; and (4) insoluble Mn extracted with concentrated hydrochloric and nitric acids. After sample treatment, the four fractions were analyzed for Mn by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). WF from GMAW and FCAW showed similar distributions of Mn species, with the largest concentrations of Mn detected in the Mn (0,II) and insoluble Mn fractions. On the other hand, the majority of the Mn content of SMAW fume was detected as Mn (III,IV). Although the concentration of Mn measured from summation of the four sequential steps was statistically significantly different from that measured from the hot block dissolution method for total Mn, the difference is small enough to be of no practical importance for industrial hygiene air samples, and either method may be used for Mn measurement. The sequential extraction method provides valuable information about the oxidation state of Mn in samples

  5. Manganese speciation of laboratory-generated welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Ronnee N; Keane, Michael; Hanley, Kevin W; Feng, H Amy; Ashley, Kevin

    The objective of this laboratory study was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) fractions in chamber-generated welding fumes (WF) and to evaluate and compare the results from a sequential extraction procedure for Mn fractions with that of an acid digestion procedure for measurement of total, elemental Mn. To prepare Mn-containing particulate matter from representative welding processes, a welding system was operated in short circuit gas metal arc welding (GMAW) mode using both stainless steel (SS) and mild carbon steel (MCS) and also with flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) using MCS. Generated WF samples were collected onto polycarbonate filters before homogenization, weighing and storage in scintillation vials. The extraction procedure consisted of four sequential steps to measure various Mn fractions based upon selective solubility: (1) soluble Mn dissolved in 0.01 M ammonium acetate; (2) Mn (0,II) dissolved in 25 % (v/v) acetic acid; (3) Mn (III,IV) dissolved in 0.5% (w/v) hydroxylamine hydrochloride in 25% (v/v) acetic acid; and (4) insoluble Mn extracted with concentrated hydrochloric and nitric acids. After sample treatment, the four fractions were analyzed for Mn by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). WF from GMAW and FCAW showed similar distributions of Mn species, with the largest concentrations of Mn detected in the Mn (0,II) and insoluble Mn fractions. On the other hand, the majority of the Mn content of SMAW fume was detected as Mn (III,IV). Although the concentration of Mn measured from summation of the four sequential steps was statistically significantly different from that measured from the hot block dissolution method for total Mn, the difference is small enough to be of no practical importance for industrial hygiene air samples, and either method may be used for Mn measurement. The sequential extraction method provides valuable information about the oxidation state of Mn in samples

  6. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  7. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-03

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks.

  8. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m3; 3 h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas–metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their ne counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. PMID:25549921

  9. Occupational rhinitis due to steel welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Castano, Roberto; Suarthana, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to welding fumes is a recognized respiratory hazard. Occupational asthma but not occupational rhinitis has been documented in workers exposed to steel welding fumes. We report a 26-year-old male with work-related rhinitis symptoms as well as lower airways symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma and metal fume fever associated with exposure to steel welding fumes. The diagnosis of occupational rhinitis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge.

  10. High Strength Steel Welding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    22000 C to 15000 C. - Kluken and Gr6ng [57] considered three major growth processes: collision, 0S diffusion, and Ostwald ripening. They excluded...0- zz * 22000 - * 21000 *20000 0 0 0 0 0 .51o.5225o . Figure 4.7 Temperature profiles at indicated heights for a UMAW process with 220-ppm hydrogen...steel weld metal. With increasing S100 -- 1 0.-Pt I -. , -s ll ie (XO oil - a - IS - 3S0 o 0.20 -- 30 t* \\+ 0~4xo- bg s0o 10 10 IV 60o I0D ISO 0o 0o OION

  11. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  12. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  13. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    PubMed

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders.

  14. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  15. Friction Stir Welding of Steel Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The friction stir welding process has been developed primarily for the welding of aluminum alloys. Other higher melting allows such, as steels are much more difficult to join. Special attention must be given to pin tool material selection and welding techniques. This paper addresses the joining of steels and other high melting point materials using the friction stir welding process. Pin tool material and welding parameters will be presented. Mechanical properties of weldments will also be presented. Significance: There are many applications for the friction stir welding process other than low melting aluminum alloys. The FSW process can be expanded for use with high melting alloys in the pressure vessel, railroad and ship building industries.

  16. High Strength Steel Weldment Reliability: Weld Metal Hydrogen Trapping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-01

    additions to welding consumables to control weld metal hydrogen and thus reduce susceptibility to cold cracking in high strength steel weldments. 14...applying weld metal hydrogen trapping to improve the resistance to hydrogen cracking in welding of high strength steels . Hydrogen cracking in high...requirements which are necessary to prevent hydrogen cracking in high strength steel welding. Common practices to prevent hydrogen cracking in steel

  17. Microstructural analysis of a single pass 2.25% Cr-1.0% Mo steel weld metal with different manganese contents

    SciTech Connect

    Guimares de Souza, Luis Felipe; Souza Bott, Ivani de; Ferreira Jorge, Jorge Carlos; Sauer Guimaraes, Ari; Pinheiro Rocha Paranhos, Ronaldo . E-mail: paranhos@uenf.br

    2005-07-15

    Weld metals of the 2.25% Cr-1.0% Mo type with 0.84%, 1.21% and 2.3% Mn produced by submerged-arc welding were analyzed in the as-welded (AW), post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and PWHT followed by step-cooling (SC) heat treatment conditions. Fracture surface analysis revealed an evolution in the mode of fracture due to Mn content variations and heat treatment conditions, the occurrence of intergranular fracture being observed in welds with 2.30% Mn that were step-cooled. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the microstructure was predominantly composed of bainite, although martensite was also observed for high Mn contents. A marked carbide precipitation was observed, preferentially at grain boundaries. This could be attributed to the SC heat treatment and associated with the embrittlement. However, the application of a de-embrittlement heat treatment to this step cooled weld metal has proved efficient, because the impact energy levels after this heat treatment surpassed those obtained in the stress relieved condition. This indicates that segregation of impurities to grain boundaries was responsible for the low impact energy levels observed after SC of weld metal containing > 0.84% Mn.

  18. Diode laser welding of high yield steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisiecki, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The following article describes results of investigations on influence of laser welding parameters on the weld shape, quality and mechanical properties of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel for cold forming S420MC (according to EN 10149 - 3 and 060XLK according to ASTM) welded with high power diode laser HPDL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 with rectangular laser beam spot and 2.2 kW output power, and 808 nm wavelength. The investigations at the initial stage were focused on detailed analysis of influence of the basic laser welding parameters such as laser power and welding speed on the shape and quality of single bead produced during bead-on-plate welding. Then the optimal parameters were chosen for laser welding of 2.5 mm thick butt joints of the thermo-mechanically rolled, high yield strength steel sheets for cold forming S420MC. The test joints were prepared as single square groove and one-side laser welded without an additional material, at a flat position. Edges of steel sheets were melted in argon atmosphere by the laser beam focused on the top joint surface. The test welded joints were investigated by visual inspection, metallographic examinations, mechanical tests such as tensile tests and bending tests. It was found that the high power diode laser may be applied successfully for one-side welding of the S420MC steel butt joints. Additionally it was found that in the optimal range of laser welding parameters the high quality joint were produced.

  19. Associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Amy R.; Nelson, Lorene M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease (PD) using meta-analyses of data from cohort, case-control, and mortality studies. Methods: Epidemiologic studies related to welding or manganese exposure and PD were identified in a PubMed search, article references, published reviews, and abstracts. Inclusion criteria were 1) cohort, case-control, or mortality study with relative risk (RR), odds ratio (OR), or mortality OR (MOR) and 95 confidence intervals (95% CI); 2) RR, OR, and MOR matched or adjusted for age and sex; 3) valid study design and analysis. When participants of a study were a subgroup of those in a larger study, only results of the larger study were included to assure independence of datasets. Pooled RR/OR estimates and 95% CIs were obtained using random effects models; heterogeneity of study effects were evaluated using the Q statistic and I2 index in fixed effect models. Results: Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria for the welding meta-analysis and 3 studies for the manganese exposure meta-analysis. The pooled RR for the association between welding and PD for all study designs was 0.86 (95% CI 0.80–0.92), with absence of between-study heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0). Effect measures for cohort, case-control, and mortality studies were similar (0.91, 0.82, 0.87). For the association between manganese exposure and PD, the pooled OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.41–1.42). Conclusions: Welding and manganese exposure are not associated with increased PD risk. Possible explanations for the inverse association between welding and PD include confounding by smoking, healthy worker effect, and hormesis. PMID:22965675

  20. Automatic Welding of Stainless Steel Tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    To determine if the use of automatic welding would allow reduction of the radiographic inspection requirement, and thereby reduce fabrication costs, a series of welding tests were performed. In these tests an automatic welder was used on stainless steel tubing of 1/2, 3/4, and 1/2 inch diameter size. The optimum parameters were investigated to determine how much variation from optimum in machine settings could be tolerate and still result in a good quality weld. The process variables studied were the welding amperes, the revolutions per minute as a function of the circumferential weld travel speed, and the shielding gas flow. The investigation showed that the close control of process variables in conjunction with a thorough visual inspection of welds can be relied upon as an acceptable quality assurance procedure, thus permitting the radiographic inspection to be reduced by a large percentage when using the automatic process.

  1. Investigation of underwater welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.J.; Watson, J.; Deans, W.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1994-12-01

    The preliminary underwater welding study described forms part of a European funded research program (EUREKA EU194) which involves a feasibility study into laser welding applications in the offshore oil industry. An investigation was undertaken using a 1.2 KW carbon dioxide laser for underwater butt welding of BS 4360 43A and 50D steel, in order to assess the quality of the welds and to achieve an understanding of the laser/water/material interaction. Using a high-speed camera, the temporal behavior of the melt pool and ''plasma'' dynamics surrounded by an aqueous environment were monitored. Experiments were undertaken to characterize the attenuation of the laser beam in the water as a function of various focal length optics and depth of water. The effect of energy input conditions on the weld bead appearance and mechanical properties were also examined. The interaction of the laser beam with water produced a wave-guiding mechanism in which the focused beam instantaneously vaporizes the water and directs the beam on to the workpiece. The underwater weld beads exhibited sound microstructures over a range of weld energy inputs, mainly due to the formation of a ''dry region'' during welding. Metallurgical analysis of the welds showed a slight increase in hardness, though other post-weld mechanical strengths were similar to in-air results.

  2. Submerged arc fillet welds between mild steel and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kotecki, D.J.; Rajan, V.B.

    1997-02-01

    Submerged arc fillet welds between mild steel and Type 304 stainless steel, made with ER309L wire, may contain no ferrite and be at risk of hot cracking, or they may be sufficiently diluted that they transform to martensite with both hot cracking risk and low ductility. This situation is most prevalent when direct current electrode positive (DCEP) polarity is used and when the flange is the mild steel part of the T-joint. A flux that adds chromium to the weld can somewhat alleviate this tendency. Direct current electrode negative (DCEN) polarity greatly reduces this tendency by limiting dilution. Fillet weld compositions and dilutions are obtained for a number of welding conditions and fluxes.

  3. The Structure and Mechanical Properties of Bridge Steel Weldings With Glass-Steel Liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzalev, V. N.; Semukhin, B. S.; Danilov, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology is developed for welding multi-span bridge constructions. The mechanical properties and structure of the low-carbon bridge steel welds have been studied. The welding parameters and application of steel-glass liners provide for long-term service of steel constructions in conformity with the welding industry specifications.

  4. Electrochemical transport of manganese between the flux and the weld metal in submerged arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Indacochea, J.E.; Blander, M.; Polar, A.

    1989-01-01

    Submerged arc welds were made using a SiO/sub 2/-CaO-CaF/sub 2/MnO flux containing 20 w/o MnO, 15 w/o CaF/sub 2/, and SiO/sub 2/ to CaO ratios that varied from 5.5 to 1.17; the slags formed from this flux system show good detachability and the welds produced have good bead morphology. The effect of dilution was eliminated by drawing the filler metal from the same material as the base plate. The welding parameters were the same for all welds and two polarities were used. The stability of the arc was also monitored and found to be stable, but more so for the reverse polarity welds. Chemical analyses were performed on flux, slag, and weld samples. The manganese content in the weld metal increases for all the fluxes, with the increases being larger the smaller the silica to calcium oxide ratio. This behavior can be explained by thermodynamically driven kinetic factors since, in this composition range, the activity of the manganese oxide increases with a decrease in the SiO/sub 2//CaO ratio. When the SiO/sub 2//CaO ratio is smaller than about 2.25, the manganese content in the welds made with reverse polarity is higher than those made with straight polarity. This difference in the manganese level is explained in terms of an electrochemical mechanism. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Mechanisms of inclusion formation in Al-Ti-Si-Mn deoxidized steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluken, A. O.; Grong, Ø.

    1989-08-01

    The present investigation is concerned with basic studies of the mechanisms of inclusion formation in submerged arc (SA), gas metal arc (GMA), and flux cored arc (FCA) steel weld metals. Theoretical models of deoxidation have been developed to establish a basis for quantitative predictions of important inclusion characteristics, such as volume fraction, size, and chemical composition from knowledge of weld metal chemistry and operating parameters. The relevance of these models has been tested against extensive inclusion data obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) examinations of a large number of experimental welds containing various contents of aluminum, titanium, silicon, manganese, and oxygen.

  6. Multiphysical Modeling of Transport Phenomena During Laser Welding of Dissimilar Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métais, A.; Matteï, S.; Tomashchuk, I.; Gaied, S.

    The success of new high-strength steels allows attaining equivalent performances with lower thicknesses and significant weight reduction. The welding of new couples of steel grades requires development and control of joining processes. Thanks to high precision and good flexibility, laser welding became one of the most used processes for joining of dissimilar welded blanks. The prediction of the local chemical composition in the weld formed between dissimilar steels in function of the welding parameters is essential because the dilution rate and the distribution of alloying elements in the melted zone determines the final tensile strength of the weld. The goal of the present study is to create and to validate a multiphysical numerical model studying the mixing of dissimilar steels in laser weld pool. A 3D modelling of heat transfer, turbulent flow and transport of species provides a better understanding of diffusion and convective mixing in laser weld pool. The present model allows predicting the weld geometry and element distribution. The model has been developed based on steady keyhole approximation and solved in quasi-stationary form in order to reduce the computation time. Turbulent flow formulation was applied to calculate velocity field. Fick law for diluted species was used to simulate the transport of alloying elements in the weld pool. To validate the model, a number of experiments have been performed: tests using pure 100 μm thick Ni foils like tracer and weld between a rich and poor manganese steels. SEM-EDX analysis of chemical composition has been carried out to obtain quantitative mapping of Ni and Mn distributions in the melted zone. The results of simulations have been found in good agreement with experimental data.

  7. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  8. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  9. Development of covered electrodes for welding HSLA-100 steel

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, J.J. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    HSLA-100 steel is a low-carbon, copper-precipitation-strengthened steel developed by the U.S. Navy as a replacement for HY-100 steel. HSLA-100 has excellent resistance to hydrogen cracking, offering the potential for dramatic savings in fabrication costs through reduction or elimination of preheat and postheat requirements. Unfortunately, s the cracking-resistance of the base metal has improved, the weld metal crack susceptibility has become the primary concern. The objective of the present study is to develop covered electrodes for shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) of HSLA-100. This paper presents the mechanical property evaluation phase of this program. A series of test weldments were fabricated in 3/4-in. thick HSLA-100 plate under nominally constant conditions. The alloy selected for evaluation was a low carbon, Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti system. Results showed that mechanical property goals were achieved with the low-carbon, Ni,Mo-Ti design. Manganese and molybdenum were found to be potent strengtheners and were able to compensate for the reduced carbon and chromium. Nickel also provided effective strengthening. The influence of alloying of impact toughness was complex. In general, increasing nickel decreased upper shelf and CVN transition temperature. Maganese and titanium appeared to generally have a positive effect on impact toughness. The influence of molybdenum was dependent on the level of nickel present.

  10. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  11. Recommended Stainless Steel Welding Procedures for Corps of Engineers Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Two stainless steel welding methods are investigated for potential use in Corps of Engineers construction. The methods-gas tungsten-arc welding ( GTAW ...electron microscopy. Results show that GTAW and SMAW provide sound welds in the two stainless steels tested. Moreover, using low-carbon electrodes and

  12. Novel Approach for Welding Stainless Steel Using Cr-Free Welding Consumables

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-31

    compared to type 304L stainless steel. Keywords: Welding , Corrosion , Stainless steel, Nickel, Copper, Palladium , Molybdenum, Dilution... Corrosion Center, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering **Dept. of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering The Ohio State University...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) *Fontana Corrosion Center, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering **Dept. of Industrial, Welding and

  13. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  14. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Carpenter, Joseph A.; Warren, C. D.; Smith, Mark T.

    2008-12-28

    Experiments are continuing to evaluate the feasibility of friction stir spot welding advanced high-strength steels including, DP780, martensitic hot-stamp boron steel, and TRIP steels. Spot weld lap-shear strengths can exceed those required by industry standards such as AWS D8.1.

  15. Explosive welding technique for joining aluminum and steel tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Silver sheet is wrapped around aluminum portion of joint. Mylar powder box is wrapped over silver sheet. Explosion welds silver to aluminum. Stainless-steel tube is placed over silver-aluminum interface. Mylar powder box, covered with Mylar tape, is wrapped around steel member. Explosion welds steel to silver-aluminum interface.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  17. The effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructure of ferritic and duplex stainless steels welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkarinen, J.; Kujanpää, V.

    This study is focused to determine empirically, which microstructural changes occur in ferritic and duplex stainless steels when heat input is controlled by welding parameters. Test welds were done autogenously bead-on-plate without shielding gas using 5 kW fiber laser. For comparison, some gas tungsten arc welds were made. Used test material were 1.4016 (AISI 430) and 1.4003 (low-carbon ferritic) type steels in ferritic steels group and 1.4162 (low-alloyed duplex, LDX2101) and 1.4462 (AISI 2205) type steels in duplex steels group. Microstructural changes in welds were identified and examined using optical metallographic methods.

  18. Material Flow during Friction Stir Welding of HSLA 65 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John; Field, David; Nelson, Tracy

    2013-07-01

    Material flow during friction stir welding of HSLA-65 steel was investigated by crystallographic texture analysis. During the welding process, the steel deforms primarily by local shear deformation in the austenite phase and then transforms upon cooling. Texture data from three weld specimens were compared to theoretical textures calculated using ideal Euler angles for shear in face centered cubic (FCC) structures transformed by the Kurdjumov-Sacks (KS) relationship. These theoretical textures show similarities to the experimental textures. Texture data from the weld specimens revealed a rotation of the shear direction corresponding to the tangent of the weld tool on both the area directly under the weld tool shoulder and weld cross sections. In addition, texture data showed that while the shear plane of the area under the weld tool shoulder remained constant, the shear plane of the weld cross sections is influenced by the weld tool pin.

  19. Mechanical behavior study of laser welded joints for DP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are gaining considerable market shares in the automotive industry. The development and application of Dual Phase (DP) steel is just a consistent step towards high-strength steel grades with improved mechanical behavior. Tailor welded blanks with DP steel are promoted in the application of Body-In-White (BIW) structure by the automotive industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that are laser welded together before stamping. Applied cases of tailor welded blanks of high strength steels on the automotive structural parts are investigated in this paper. The mechanical behavior of laser welded joints for DP steel is studied. Microstructure of laser welded joints for DP steel was observed by SEM. Martensite in the weld seam explains the higher strength of welded joints than the base metal. Results show that the strain safety tolerance of laser welded seam for high strength steel can meet the requirement of automobile parts for stamping if the location of laser welded seam is designed reasonably.

  20. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  1. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  2. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  3. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  4. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  5. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  6. Spot welding of steel and aluminum using insert sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, H.; Saito, T.; Yoshimura, T.

    1994-12-31

    Automobile industries have been increasingly interested in the use of aluminum and thus joining of steel and aluminum becomes of importance. The joining of the two types of metal raises a problem of brittle welds caused by the formation of intermetallic compounds. The authors solved the problem by using an insert sheet. This paper deals with the resistance spot welding of steel and aluminum sheets using insert sheets. The insert sheet used in the present development was a steel/aluminum clad sheet of the 0.8 mm thickness with 50% steel and 50% aluminum. The clad sheet was produced by warm rolling of steel and aluminum with a direct resistance heating process. Steel to be warm rolled was of EDDQ of the 0.4 mm thickness and aluminum was of JIS A1050 of 0.6 mm thickness. The mechanical properties of the insert clad sheets were in between those of the steel sheets and the aluminum sheets, while the clad sheets showed much better formability than the aluminum sheets. Resistance spot welding was conducted for 0.8 mm thick EDDQ steel sheets and 1.0 mm thick aluminum alloy (AL-5.5%Mg) sheets under the welding force of 1.96 kN, welding current ranging between 4.2 and 20.1 kA, and welding time from 0.5 to 10 cycles. The steel was spot welded to the steel side of the insert sheet while the aluminum was welded to the aluminum side. What the authors investigated were the applicable welding current range, nugget diameter, tensile shear strength, U-tension strength, and macro- and microstructures. In conclusion, steel sheets can be spot welded to aluminum sheets without difficulty by using clad sheets as insert materials while the strength level of the dissimilar metal spot welds is close to that of aluminum joints.

  7. [Assessment of occupational exposure of welders based on determination of fumes and their components produced during stainless steel welding].

    PubMed

    Stanisławska, Magdalena; Janasik, Beata; Trzcinka-Ochocka, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. The aim of this study was to determine concentrations of welding fumes components such as: iron, manganese, nickel and chromium (including chromium speciation) to assess exposure of stainless steel welders. The survey covered 14 workers of two metallurgic plants engaged in welding stainless steel (18% Cr and 8% Ni) by different techniques: manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG). Personal air samples were collected in the welders' breathing zone over a period of about 6-7 h (dust was collected on a membrane and glass filter) to determine time weighted average (TWA) concentration of welding fumes and its components. The concentrations of welding fumes (total particulate) were determined with use of the gravimetric method. Concentrations and welding fume components, such as: iron, manganese, nickel and chromium were determined by ICP-MS technique. The total hexavalent chromium was analyzed by applying the spectrophotometry method according to NIOSH. The water-soluble chromium species were analyzed by HPLC-ICP-MS. Time weighted average concentrations of the welding fumes and its components at the worker's breathing zone were (mg/m3): dust, 0.14-10.7; iron, 0.004-2.9; manganese, 0.001-1.12; nickel, < 0.001-0.2; and chromium <0.002-0.85 (mainly Cr(III) and insoluble Cr(VI)). The maximum admissible limits for workplace pollutants (TLV-TWA) were exceeded for manganese and for insoluble chromium Cr (VI). For Cr (III) the limit was exceeded in individual cases. The assessment of the workers' occupational exposure, based on the determined time weighted average (TWA) of fumes and their components, shows that the stainless steel welders worked in conditions harmful to their health owing to the significantly exceeded maximum admissible limits for manganese and the exceeded TLV value for insoluble chromium (VI).

  8. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  9. Oxygen effect on low-alloy steel weld metal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, N.N. . Welding Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    It is shown that the weld metal oxygen content in submerged arc low-alloy steel welds, as well as in low-carbon steel welds is dependent on the concentration of oxides decomposed at low temperatures in a weld pool slag phase. The oxygen is mainly in the form of fine dispersed oxide inclusions of less than 0.03 [mu]m. Differentiated evaluation of silicon reduction effects in submerged arc welded low-alloy steels revealed that weld metal brittle fracture strength depends to a considerable degree on total weld metal oxide inclusion content than on silicon increment in the weld. Therefore, the increase of weld metal brittle fracture susceptibility with the growth of weld oxide inclusion content is important to know. Welds with lowered oxygen content [0] [<=] 0.02% also display the tendency to decrease in plasticity because (1) the ferritic-pearlitic matrix of improved purity is likely to generate unbalanced structures on cooling and, (2) when there are no oxide inclusions, the shape of sulfur and phosphor precipitation from the melt changes from globular to film-like. Optimal low-alloy steel weld metal oxygen content is defined in the range of 0.02-0.035.

  10. Weld repair without PWHT for Cr-Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, L.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Edison Welding Institute and TWI of Cambridge, England have completed a group sponsored project that has been successful in demonstrating the acceptability to weld repair 1{1/4}Cr-{1/2}Mo and 2{1/4}Cr-1Mo steels without PWHT. A detailed SMAW welding procedure was developed for all welding positions that provides excellent weldment properties in the as-welded condition for both the 1{1/4}Cr-{1/2}Mo and 2{1/4}Cr-1Mo steels. This procedure is supported by detailed welding instructions for controlled deposition welding, a welder training document, and instructions for welding of the welder qualification test assembly. The program included a significant amount of mechanical property characterization and performance testing to validate the acceptability of controlled deposition, as-welded repair of the CrMo steels. Another important accomplishment of this program was the development of a set of guidelines that identifies where, when, and how to apply controlled deposition, as-welded repairs for electric utility and petroleum refinery equipment. One final and important result, partly due to this program, is that a new set of rules have been approved for the National Board Inspection Code (ANSI/NB-23) for weld repair of ferritic steel components without PWHT. This is Chapter 3, Supplement 3 in the NBIC Code, ``Welding Methods as Alternatives to Postweld Heat Treatment.``

  11. Boundary effects in welded steel moment connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hyeog

    Unprecedented widespread failure of welded moment connections in steel frames caused by the 1994 Northridge and the 1995 Kobe earthquakes have alarmed the engineering communities throughout the world. Welded moment connections in steel frames have been traditionally designed by using the classical beam theory which leads to assumptions that the flanges transfer moment while the web connection primarily resists the shear force. However, this study shows that the magnitude and direction of the principal stresses in the connection region are better approximated by using truss analogy rather than the classical beam theory. Accordingly, both the bending moment and the shear force are transferred across the connection near the beam flanges through diagonal strut action. Thus, the beam flange region of the traditionally designed connection is overloaded. This conclusion explains, to a large extent, the recently observed steel moment connection failures. In this study, detailed finite element analyses were carried out for a representative beam-to-column subassemblage with fully welded connection. The stress distribution in the beam web and flanges in the vicinity of the connection were closely studied. The factors responsible for stress redistribution and concentration were identified by using fundamental principles of mechanics. It was concluded that peak resultant stresses can exceed the values used in simple design calculations by large margins. Using the finite element analysis results and the truss analogy to establish a realistic load path in the connection, a practical and more rational analysis and design procedure was developed. The proposed design procedure and the new connection details were successfully validated through cyclic load testing of a nearly full size specimen. The truss model represented the force transmission around the beam-to-column moment connection region very well. Results of the finite element analyses and the laboratory testing showed

  12. Effect of Weld Schedule on the Residual Stress Distribution of Boron Steel Spot Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raath, N. D.; Norman, D.; McGregor, I.; Dashwood, R.; Hughes, D. J.

    2017-06-01

    Press-hardened boron steel has been utilized in anti-intrusion systems in automobiles, providing high strength and weight-saving potential through gage reduction. Boron steel spot welds exhibit a soft heat-affected zone which is surrounded by a hard nugget and outlying base material. This soft zone reduces the strength of the weld and makes it susceptible to failure. Additionally, different welding regimes lead to significantly different hardness distributions, making failure prediction difficult. Boron steel sheets, welded with fixed and adaptive schedules, were characterized. These are the first experimentally determined residual stress distributions for boron steel resistance spot welds which have been reported. Residual strains were measured using neutron diffraction, and the hardness distributions were measured on the same welds. Additionally, similar measurements were performed on spot welded DP600 steel as a reference material. A correspondence between residual stress and hardness profiles was observed for all welds. A significant difference in material properties was observed between the fixed schedule and adaptively welded boron steel samples, which could potentially lead to a difference in failure loads between the two boron steel welds.

  13. CO2 laser welding of AISI 321stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, A.; Hamdani, A. H.; Akhter, R.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 laser welding of AISI 321austenitic stainless steel has been carried out. Bead on plate welds on 2 mm thick steel were performed with 450W CO2 laser at speeds ranging from 200 to 900 mm/min. It was observed that weld depth and width was decreased with increasing the speed at constant laser power. Butt welds on different sheet thickness of 1, 2 and 2.5 mm were performed with laser power of 450 W and at speed 750, 275 and 175 mm/min, respectively. The microstructures of the welded joints and the heat affected zones (HAZ) were examined by optical microscopy and SEM. The austenite/delta ferrite microstructure was reported in the welded zone. The microhardness and tensile strength of the welded joints were measured and found almost similar to base metal due to austenitic nature of steel.

  14. Effect of parameters in diode laser welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpaeae, Veli; Maaranen, Petteri; Kostamo, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel sheets and ordinary cold-rolled carbon steel sheets with variable thickness were welded with 1 kW diode laser. Different weld joints were utilized. The optimal parameters for each case were determined. The joints were examined by metallography and mechanical testing. The results show that diode laser is an optimal tool for sheet metal welding, when a considerable narrow weld is aimed. The edges prepared by mechanical sheering are acceptable as the joint preparation. The tensile strength and ductility of all the joints were acceptable and on the same level or better than that of base metal. The shielding gas seems to play a much higher role than in conventional laser welding (CO2 or Nd:YAG laser welding). When using the non-oxidizing shielding gas (nitrogen or argon), the welding speed to be reached is much slower than when welding without any shielding gas. This is probably due to the increase of absorption by oxygen.

  15. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  16. Heat input and dilution effects in microalloyed steel weld metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.C. ); Kluken, A.O. . Div. of Metallurgy); Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research)

    1994-01-01

    The sensitivity of weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties to variations in both heat input (i.e., cooling rate) and weld dilution in submerged arc (SA) welding of microalloyed steel was examined. Weldments were prepared with weld metal dilutions of approximately 40% and 70% at heat inputs of 2.0, 3.3, 4.6, and 5.3 kJ/mm, using two commercial welding wires and a basic commercial flux. The high dilution welds, which were ordinary bead-on-plate welds, resulted in microstructures that ranged from ferrite with aligned second phase at low heat inputs to acicular ferrite at high heat inputs. Special over-welding techniques were used to make the low dilution welds, allowing use of the same welding parameters as those for the high dilution welds. The technique involved remelting of weld metal to simulate the effect of multipass welding. The microstructure of these welds was predominantly acicular ferrite, independent of heat input. As a consequence, the low dilution welds had superior toughness compared to the high dilution welds.

  17. 75 FR 32911 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  18. 76 FR 33210 - Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  19. Metallurgical aspects in laser welding of steels and aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kutsuna, Muneharu

    1996-12-31

    Rapid cooled microstructures, solid state transformation, hardness distribution, porosity formation, hot cracking and crack susceptibility are discussed as the metallurgical aspects in laser welding of carbon steels, stainless steels and aluminum alloys in the present paper. In the cases of CO{sub 2} and YAG laser welding, the thermal cycles during welding of carbon steels showed a rapid heating rate of 10{sup 5} K/s and a rapid cooling rate of 10{sup 4} K/s. The solid state transformations during the thermal cycle are different from that in steel welds by arc. The microstructure in heat affected zone consists of ferrite band or matrix and hard martensite colonies with high carbon. It seems a kind of composite materials. The hardness distribution of steel welds by laser is different from that of arc welds in which the location of maximum hardness is coarse grain zone. However, it is the center of fusion zone or near the base metal in laser welds of carbon steel. Even in ultra low carbon steel welds, the hardness of weld metal is higher than 200 Hv and the microstructure is bainitic ferrite and low carbon martensite which have a low cold crack susceptibility. In addition, two mechanisms of porosity formation in laser welding of aluminum alloys including A3003, A5052, A5083, A5182 and A6061 alloys were investigated using the fundamental knowledge and the solidification crack susceptibility in laser welding of A5052, A5083, A6061 and A7NO1 alloys were studied for the application of laser welding in industries.

  20. Carbide-Free Bainitic Weld Metal: A New Concept in Welding of Armor Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Murthy, N.; Janaki Ram, G. D.; Murty, B. S.; Reddy, G. M.; Rao, T. J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Carbide-free bainite, a fine mixture of bainitic ferrite and austenite, is a relatively recent development in steel microstructures. Apart from being very strong and tough, the microstructure is hydrogen-tolerant. These characteristics make it well-suited for weld metals. In the current work, an armor-grade quenched and tempered steel was welded such that the fusion zone developed a carbide-free bainitic microstructure. These welds showed very high joint efficiency and ballistic performance compared to those produced, as per the current industrial practice, using austenitic stainless steel fillers. Importantly, these welds showed no vulnerability to cold cracking, as verified using oblique Y-groove tests. The concept of carbide-free bainitic weld metal thus promises many useful new developments in welding of high-strength steels.

  1. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  2. Iron and manganese removal by using manganese ore constructed wetlands in the reclamation of steel wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Cheng; Chen, Gu; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Li, Guang-Ming; Liu, Jia; Yang, Na; Gao, Sai-Nan

    2009-09-30

    To reclaim treated steel wastewater as cooling water, manganese ore constructed wetland was proposed in this study for the removal of iron and manganese. In lab-scale wetlands, the performance of manganese ore wetland was found to be more stable and excellent than that of conventional gravel constructed wetland. The iron and manganese concentration in the former was below 0.05 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 2-5 days when their influent concentrations were in the range of 0.16-2.24 mg/L and 0.11-2.23 mg/L, respectively. Moreover, its removals for COD, turbidity, ammonia nitrogen and total phosphorus were 55%, 90%, 67% and 93%, respectively, superior to the corresponding removals in the gravel wetland (31%, 86%, 58% and 78%, respectively). The good performance of manganese ore was ascribed to the enhanced biological manganese removal with the aid of manganese oxide surface and the smaller size of the medium. The presence of biological manganese oxidation was proven by the facts of good manganese removal in wetlands at chemical unfavorable conditions (such as ORP and pH) and the isolation of manganese oxidizing strains from the wetlands. Similar iron and manganese removal was later observed in a pilot-scale gravel-manganese-ore constructed wetland, even though the manganese ore portion in total volume was reduced from 100% (in the lab-scale) to only 4% (in the pilot-scale) for the sake of cost-saving. The quality of the polished wastewater not only satisfied the requirement for cooling water but also suitable as make-up water for other purposes.

  3. Manganese accumulation in nail clippings as a biomarker of welding fume exposure and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Roberts, Jenny R; Andrews, Ronnee N; Kashon, Michael L; Antonini, James M

    2012-01-27

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes (WF) is thought to cause Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological dysfunction. An apprehension that WF may accelerate the onset of PD also exists. Identifying reliable biomarkers of exposure and neurotoxicity are therefore critical for biomonitoring and neurological risk characterization of WF exposure. Manganese (Mn) in welding consumables is considered the causative factor for the neurological deficits seen in welders. Hence, we sought to determine if Mn accumulation in blood or nail clippings can be a marker for adverse exposure and neurotoxicity. To model this, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to dissolved or suspended fume components collected from gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) or manual metal arc-hard surfacing (MMA-HS) welding. Trace element analysis revealed selective Mn accumulation in dopaminergic brain areas, striatum (STR) and midbrain (MB), following exposure to the two fumes. This caused dopaminergic abnormality as evidenced by loss of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (Th; 25-32% decrease) and Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset) 7 (Park7; 25-46% decrease) proteins. While blood Mn was not detectable, Mn levels in nails strongly correlated with the pattern of Mn accumulation in the striatum (R(2)=0.9386) and midbrain (R(2)=0.9332). Exposure to manganese chloride (MnCl(2)) caused similar Mn accumulation in STR, MB and nail. Our findings suggest that nail Mn has the potential to be a sensitive and reliable biomarker for long-term Mn exposure and associated neurotoxicity. The non-invasive means by which nail clippings can be collected, stored, and transported with relative ease, make it an attractive surrogate for biomonitoring WF exposures in occupational settings.

  4. Feasibility of Underwater Friction Stir Welding of Hardenable Alloy Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    bead-on-plate FSW traverses, approximately 64 inches (1.6 m) in total length, on 0.25 inch (6.4 mm) thick plates of a hardenable alloy steel . The...base plate. Based on preliminary findings, FSW of hardenable alloy steel is a feasible process and should be further researched and refined. 15...v ABSTRACT The objective of this thesis is to determine whether friction stir welding ( FSW ) is a feasible welding process for steels in an

  5. Fusion welding of a modern borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments designed to assess the fabrication and service weldability of 304B4A borated stainless steel were conducted. Welding procedures and parameters for manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, autogenous electron beam (EB) welding and filler-added EB welding were developed and found to be similar to those for austenitic stainless steels. Following the procedure development, four test welds were produced and evaluated by microstructural analysis and Charpy impact testing. Further samples were used for determination of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) response of the welds. The fusion zone structure of welds in this alloy consists of primary austenite dendrites with an interdendritic eutectic-like austenite/boride constituent. Welds also show an appreciable partially molten zone that consists of the austenite/boride eutectic surrounding unmelted austenite islands. The microstructure of the EB welds was substantially finer than that of the GTA welds, and boride coarsening was not observed in the solid state heat-affected zone (HAZ) of either weld type. The impact toughness of as-welded samples was found to be relatively poor, averaging less than 10 J for both GTA and EB welds. For fusion zone notched GTA and EB samples and centerline notched EB samples, fracture generally occurred along the boundary between the partially molten and solid-state regions of the HAZ. The results of the PWHT study were very encouraging, with typical values of the impact energy for HAZ notched samples approaching 40 J, or twice the minimum code-acceptable value.

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    most of the commercially available metallic materials, in particular steels (including stainless steels ), super alloys, aluminum alloys, etc., can...REPORT Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel 14. ABSTRACT 16...Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Report Title ABSTRACT A conventional gas metal

  7. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  8. Radiation embrittlement of manganese-stabilized martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    Fractographic examination has been performed on selected Charpy specimens of manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels in order to identify the cause of irradiation embrittlement. Embrittlement was found to be partly due to enhanced failure at grain boundaries arising from precipitation. Microstructural examination of a specimen irradiated at higher temperature has demonstrated the presence of Fe-Cr-Mn chi phase, a body centered cubic intermetallic phase known to cause embrittlement. This work indicated that manganese stabilized martensitic stainless steels are prone to intermetallic phase formation which is detrimental to mechanical properties.

  9. Practical method for diffusion welding of steel plate in air.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a simple and easily applied method of diffusion welding steel plate in air which does not require a vacuum furnace or hot press. The novel feature of the proposed welding method is that diffusion welds are made in air with deadweight loading. In addition, the use of an autogenous (self-generated) surface-cleaning principle (termed 'auto-vac cleaning') to reduce the effects of surface oxides that normally hinder diffusion welding is examined. A series of nine butt joints were diffusion welded in thick sections of AISI 1020 steel plate. Diffusion welds were attempted at three welding temperatures (1200, 1090, and 980 C) using a deadweight pressure of 34,500 N/sq m (5 psi) and a two-hour hold time at temperature. Auto-vac cleaning operations prior to welding were also studied for the same three temperatures. Results indicate that sound welds were produced at the two higher temperatures when the joints were previously fusion seal welded completely around the periphery. Also, auto-vac cleaning at 1200 C for 2-1/2 hours prior to diffusion welding was highly beneficial, particularly when subsequent welding was accomplished at 1090 C.

  10. Practical method of diffusion-welding steel plate in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.; Moore, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Method is ideal for critical service requirements where parent metal properties are equaled in notch toughness, stress rupture and other characteristics. Welding technique variations may be used on a variety of materials, such as carbon steels, alloy steels, stainless steels, ceramics, and reactive and refractory materials.

  11. CMT Welding of Low Carbon Steel Thin Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, E. M.; Pascu, A.; Gheorghiu, I.

    2017-06-01

    This paper addresses to the cold metal transfer MAG welding of low carbon steel thin sheets. The paper highlights the advantages of using CMT process for but joining of S235 carbon sheets by comparing the CMT with the conventional synergic pulse MAG welding. A lower weld bead area and heat affected zone is obtained by the continuous movement of the wire, digitally synchronised with the short-circuit of the arc. CMT welding can produce good welds even in unfavorable conditions, such as using thin plates and high diameter wire.

  12. Alloying element losses in pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding of stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandaghi, M.; Parvin, P.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2008-12-01

    Experimental studies of pulsed laser welding of stainless steel 316 in keyhole mode were done to examine a vaporization model based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. Undesirable loss of volatile elements affects the weld metal composition and properties. The profile of the keyhole was simulated as a function of time from a 'hydrodynamic' physical model. The power density and pulse duration were the main investigated variables. The model predicts that loss of alloying elements increases at higher peak powers and longer pulse durations. Accordingly, the concentrations of iron, chromium, nickel and manganese were determined in the weld pool by means of the proton-induced x-ray emission and energy dispersive x-ray/wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis. It was shown that the composition alteration, predicted by the model due to varying laser parameters, accords well with the corresponding experimental data.

  13. Interfacial characterization of joint between mild steel and aluminum alloy welded by resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Ranfeng; Shi Hongxin; Zhang Keke; Tu Yimin; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Satonaka, Shinobu

    2010-07-15

    The interfacial characteristics of resistance spot welded steel-aluminum alloy joint have been investigated using electron microscopy. The results reveal that reaction product FeAl{sub 3} is generated in the peripheral region of the weld while a reaction layer consisting of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} adjacent to steel and FeAl{sub 3} adjacent to aluminum alloy forms in the central region of the weld, and that the morphology and thickness of the reaction layer vary with the position at the welding interface.

  14. Homopolar pulse welding of API 5L carbon steel linepipe

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, P.; Carnes, R.; Harville, M.

    1994-12-31

    Homopolar pulse welding (HPW) is a resistance welding process being investigated as a method to rapidly join API 5L carbon steel linepipe. The target application for this investigation is deepwater offshore pipeline construction utilizing the J-lay method, which requires a rapid one-shot welding process for economic feasibility. HPW utilizes the high current, low-voltage pulse produced by a homopolar generator to rapidly resistance heat the interface between abutting workpieces, and follows that pulse with an upset action to produce a weld. A large number of controllable parameters affecting the quality of the resultant weld are present in the process. Three inch nominal diameter, schedule 160 API 5L X-52 pipe sections were welded in this series while controlling variations in generator discharge speed electrode location and upsetting parameters. Welding current voltage and temperature curves were recorded for the welds. Tensile and Charpy V-notch impact specimens were machined from each weld and tested. Weld cross-sections were macroscopically examined. By delaying the application of the forging action, the `white line` or decarburized zone commonly found in high frequency resistance or flash butt welds was eliminated. Weld tensile strength was found to be primarily dependent on generator discharge speed (heat input). Electrode distance from the weld interface was found to be the critical factor determining weld zone cooling rate. HPW parameters can be selected to produce welds without the `white line` or decarburized zone commonly found in high frequency resistance and flash butt welds. Full tensile strength welds are easily achieved providing two conditions are met: sufficient heat input is supplied and a nominal upsetting action is applied within a few seconds of the discharge current peak. Electrode location provides control over the weld zone cooling rate.

  15. Slag Metal Reactions during Submerged Arc Welding of Alloy Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, U.; Eagar, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    The transfer of Cr, Si, Mn, P, S, C, Ni, and Mo between the slag and the weld pool has been studied for submerged arc welds made with calcium silicate and manganese silicate fluxes. The results show a strong interaction between Cr and Si transfer but no interaction with Mn. The manganese silicate flux produces lower residual sulfur while the calcium silicate fluxes are more effective for removal of phosphorus. The effective oxygen reaction temperature lies between 1700 and 2000 °C for all elements studied. Evidence of Cr and Mn loss by metal vaporization is also presented.

  16. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  17. Tensile and Impact Toughness Properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Friction Stir Welded Interstitial Free Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-02-01

    Welded regions of interstitial free (IF) steel grades in the vicinity of weld center exhibits larger grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often causes inferior weld mechanical properties. In the present study, tensile properties, charpy impact toughness, microhardness, microstructure, lowest hardness distribution profile, and fracture surface morphology of the gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) and friction stir welded joints were evaluated, and the results are compared. From this investigation, it is found that friction stir welded joint of IF steel showed superior tensile and impact properties compared with GTAW joint, and this is mainly due to the formation of very fine, equiaxed microstructure in the weld zone.

  18. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Corrosion Resistance of Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of carbon steel weld metal with three different microstructures has been systematically evaluated using electrochemical techniques with the simulated produced water containing CO2 at 90 °C. Microstructures include acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, and a small amount of pearlite. With welding heat input increasing, weld metal microstructure becomes more uniform. Electrochemical techniques including potentiodynamic polarization curve, linear polarization resistance, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the corrosion properties on weld joint, indicating that the best corrosion resistance corresponded to the weld metal with a polygonal ferrite microstructure, whereas the weld metal with the acicular ferrite + polygonal ferrite microstructure showed the worst corrosion resistance. The samples with high welding heat input possessed better corrosion resistance. Results were discussed in terms of crystal plane orientation, grain size, and grain boundary type found in each weld metal by electron backscatter diffraction test.

  19. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-01

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  20. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  1. Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu

    2011-01-17

    Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

  2. Critical Aspects of Alloying of Sintered Steels with Manganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryha, Eduard; Dudrova, Eva; Nyborg, Lars

    2010-11-01

    This study examines the sintering behavior and properties of Fe-0.8Mn-0.5C manganese powder metallurgy steels. The study focuses on the influence of mode of alloying—admixing using either high-purity electrolytic manganese or medium carbon ferromanganese as well as the fully prealloying of water-atomized powder. Three main aspects were studied during the whole sintering process—microstructure development, interparticle necks evolution, and changes in the behavior of manganese carrier particles during both heating and sintering stages. The prealloyed powder shows considerable improvement in carbon homogenization and interparticle neck development in comparison with admixed materials. The first indication of pearlite for the fully prealloyed material was registered at ~1013 K (740 °C) in comparison with ~1098 K (825 °C) in the case of the admixed systems. The negative effect of the oxidized residuals of manganese carrier particles and high microstructure inhomogeneity, which is a characteristic feature of admixed systems, is reflected in the lower values of the mechanical properties. The worst results in this respect were obtained for the system admixed with electrolytic manganese because of more intensive manganese sublimation and resulting oxidation at lower temperatures. According to the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses, the observed high brittleness of admixed materials is connected with intergranular decohesion failure associated with manganese oxide formation on the grain boundaries.

  3. Welding of AM350 and AM355 steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. J.; Wroth, R. S.

    1967-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to establish optimum procedures for TIG welding and heat treating of AM350 and AM355 steel sheet in thicknesses ranging from 0.010 inch to 0.125 inch. Statistical analysis of the test data was performed to determine the anticipated minimum strength of the welded joints.

  4. Building No. 392, interior overview with welding stalls and steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building No. 392, interior overview with welding stalls and steel plate floor, view facing west-southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Marine Railway No. 1 Accessories House & Apprentice Welding School, Additions, Intersection of Avenue B & Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  6. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  7. Manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Major-Sosias, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a hard, brittle, gray-white transition metal, with the most numerous oxidation states of the elements in the first series of the Periodic Table. Since the manganese atom can donate up to seven electrons from its outer two shells, manganese compounds exist with valences from -3 to +7, the most common being +2, +4, and +7. Due to its sulfur-fixing, deoxidizing, and alloying properties, as well as its low cost, the principal commercial application for manganese is in iron and steel production. Manganese is also employed in non-ferrous metallurgy, batteries and chemical processes. Although potentially harmful to the respiratory and nervous systems, manganese is an essential element for animals and humans, and a micronutrient for plants.

  8. Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strum, M.J.

    1995-05-25

    The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

  9. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  10. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  11. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  12. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, Michael L; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Frederick, D Alan; Dahl, Michael E

    2009-02-01

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  13. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  14. Welding of HSLA-100 steel using ultra low carbon bainitic weld metal to eliminate preheating

    SciTech Connect

    Devletian, J.H.; Singh, D.; Wood, W.E.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced high strength steels such as the Navy`s HSLA-100 and HSLA-80 contain sufficiently low carbon levels to be weldable without preheating. Unfortunately, commercial filler metals specifically designed to weld these steels without costly preheating have not yet been developed. The objective of this paper is to show that the Navy`s advanced steels can be welded by gas metal-arc (GMAW) and gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) without preheating by using filler metal compositions that produce weld metal with an ultra-low carbon bainitic (ULCB) microstructure. Filler metals were fabricated from vacuum induction melted (VIM) ingots containing ultra-low levels of C, O and N. HSLA-100 plate and plate from the VIM ingots were welded by both GMAW and GTAW with Ar-5% CO{sub 2} shielding gas using welding conditions to achieve cooling times from 800 to 500 C (t{sub 8-5}) from 35 to 14 sec. Weld metal tensile, hardness and CVN impact toughness testing as well as microstructural studies using transmission electron microscopy were conducted. The ULCB weld metal was relatively insensitive to cooling rate, resulting in good strength and toughness values over a wide range of t{sub 8-5} cooling times. Filler metal compositions which met the mechanical property requirements for HSLA-100, HSLA-80 and HSLA-65 weld metal were developed.

  15. Fracture toughness properties of welded stainless steels for tritium service

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    1994-10-01

    Studies to determine tritium exposure effects on the properties of welded steels are being conducted. In this investigation, the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) Incoloy 903 were. Fracture toughness measurements were conducted for tritium-exposed samples in the as-forged condition and compared with welded samples. Tritium-exposed HERF Incoloy 903 had fracture toughness values that were 33% lower than those for unexposed HERF Incoloy 903. Tritium-exposed welded samples had fracture toughness values that were just 8% of the unexposed HERF alloys and 28% of unexposed welded alloys.

  16. Microstructural Development in HSLA-100 Steel Weld Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AD-A2 3 7 931 MICROSTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT IN HSLA-100 STEEL WELD METALS A*.t - AI* Final Report Grant No. N00014-89-J-1958 -. .o, Submitted by j Paul...on pages 30-32. The microstructures that develop in the coarse-grained heat affected zone (CG- HAZ) of the welds are discussed on page 21 and figures...stringent welding procedures as well as reduce the mechanical property deterioration from welding operations. The development of the ultra low carbon

  17. Stainless Steel Cladding Of Structural Steels By CO2 Laser Welding Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, A.; Daurelio, G.; Arcamone, O.

    1989-01-01

    Steel cladding processes are usually performed in different ways: hot roll cladding, strip cladding, weld cladding, explosion forming. For the first time, a medium power (2 KW c.w.) CO2 laser was used to clad structural steels (Fe 37C), 3 and 5 mm thick, with austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and AISI 316), 0.5 and 1.5 mm thick. The cladding technique we have developed uses the laser penetration welding process.

  18. Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

    1999-10-01

    The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

  19. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  20. Research on the activating flux gas tungsten arc welding and plasma arc welding for stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Her-Yueh

    2010-10-01

    A systematic study of the effects of activating flux in the weld morphology, arc profile, and angular distortion and microstructure of two different arc welding processes, namely, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), was carried out. The results showed that the activating fluxes affected the penetration capability of arc welding on stainless steel. An increase in energy density resulting from the arc constriction and anode spot reduction enhanced the penetration capability. The Depth/Width (D/W) ratio of the weld played a major role in causing angular distortion of the weldment. Also, changes in the cooling rate, due to different heat source characteristics, influenced the microstructure from the fusion line to the centre of the weld.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  2. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; ...

    2015-09-14

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this paper, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW onmore » grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Finally, post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.« less

  3. Friction Stir Welding of ODS and RAFM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Hoelzer, David; Tan, Lizhen; Sokolov, Mikhail A.

    2015-09-01

    Advanced structural materials such as oxide dispersion strengthened steels and reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are desired in fusion reactors as primary candidate materials for first wall and blanket structures, due to their excellent radiation and high-temperature creep resistance. However, their poor fusion weldability has been the major technical challenge limiting practical applications. For this reason, solid-state friction stir welding (FSW) has been considered for such applications. In this work, the effect of FSW parameters on joining similar and dissimilar advanced structural steels was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction methods were used to reveal the effects of FSW on grain size, micro-texture distribution, and phase stability. Hardness mapping was performed to evaluate mechanical properties. Post weld heat treatment was also performed to tailor the microstructure in the welds in order to match the weld zone mechanical properties to the base material.

  4. Effect of Post-Welding Heat Treatment on Mechanical Properties of Joints of Steel P92 Formed by Submerged Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohyla, P.; Foldynová, K.

    2014-07-01

    Results of mechanical tests and metallographic studies of welded joints of steel P92 obtained by submerged arc welding are presented. The effect of the post-welding heat treatment on the mechanical properties of the welds is described.

  5. Corrosion behavior of a welded stainless-steel orthopedic implant.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Lerf, R; Eschler, P Y; Meyer, J M

    2001-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of combinations of materials used in an orthopedic implant: the spherical part (forged or forged and annealed) constituting the head, the weld (tungsten inert gas (TIG) or electron beam (EB) techniques), and the cylindrical part (annealed) constituting the shaft of a femoral prosthesis - has been investigated. Open-circuit potentials, potentiodynamic curves, Tafel slope, mixed potential theory and susceptibility to intergranular attack are electrochemical and chemical procedures selected for this work. Electrochemical measurements using a microelectrode have been made in the following zones: spherical part, cylindrical part, weld, and weld/sphere, and weld/shaft interfaces. To detect intergranular attack, the Strauss test has been used. At the interfaces, corrosion currents, measured (Icorr) and predicted (Icouple) are low, in the order of the pico- to nanoampere. The electrochemical behavior of the electron beam (EB) weld is better than that of the tungsten inert gas (TIG). Welds at interfaces can behave either anodically or cathodically. It is better if welds, which are sensitive parts of the femoral prosthesis, behave cathodically. In this way, the risk of starting localized corrosion (pitting, crevice or intergranular corrosion) from a galvanic couple, remains low. From this point of view, the sample with the EB weld offers the best behavior. All the other samples containing a TIG type of weld exhibit a less favorable behavior. The mechanical treatments (forged, and forged and annealed) of the steel sphere did not show any difference in the corrosion behavior. No intergranular corrosion has been observed at the weld/steel interface for unsensitized samples. With sensitized samples, however, a TIG sample has exhibited some localized intergranular corrosion at a distance of 500 microm along the weld/stainless steel (sphere) interface.

  6. Effects of flux modifications on high strength steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, G.L.

    1994-12-31

    The performance of high strength steel welds is sensitive to the weld metal chemistry, and that, in turn, is dependent on the composition of the welding consumables. In the case of submerged arc welding, the flux plays an important role in determining the chemistry of the resulting weld metal. The u.S. Navy is conducting a program to gain a basic understanding of fluxes used for welding high strength steels in an effort to be able to better select the appropriate flux, or design a new flux, for a given application. The objective of the present work is to analyze the effects of a systematic chance in flux composition on weld metal chemistry and properties The dry mix of a commercial flux was modified with additions of MnO to produce a series of four experimental flux mixes with target MnO levels from 1 wt% to 4 wt%. A fifth experimental flux mix was produced with an addition of 1/2 wt% CeO{sub 2} to examine the effect of rare earth additions to the flux. Tensile and impact properties and weld metal chemistry were tested for each weldment, and correlations were made with flux composition. Weld metal Mn levels from 1.37 wt% (0.76 wt% flux MnO) to 1.75 wt% (4.26 wt% flux MnO) were achieved with the MnO-added fluxes.The small CeO{sub 2} addition appeared to improve weld metal impact performance it was concluded that a more basic knowledge of welding fluxes can be used in selecting or designing appropriate fluxes for Navy applications. Further work is required to characterize the specific effects of other flux constituents and their interactions on weld metal performance.

  7. 77 FR 65712 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From Vietnam; Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From Vietnam; Termination of Investigation AGENCY... investigation concerning circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from Vietnam (investigation No....

  8. Influence of low nickel (0.09 wt%) content on microstructure and toughness of P91 steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Vasudevan, M.; Kamaraj, M.

    2015-05-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo (P91) steel is widely used as a high temperature structural material in the fabrication of power plant components. Alloying elements significantly influences the microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel weldments. The alloying elements manganese and nickel significantly influence the lower critical phase transformation temperature (AC1) as well as tempering response of welds. In the existing published information there was wide spread use of high Mn+Ni filler wire. In the present study, weldment preparation was completed using GTA filler wire having low Nickel content (Mn+Ni of 0.58 wt% including nickel content of 0.09 wt%). Microstructure and mechanical properties characterization was done. There is a requirement on minimum toughness of 47 Joules for P91 steel tempered welds at room temperature. Microstructural observation revealed that the GTA welds have low δ-ferrite content (<0.5%) in the martensite matrix. In the as-weld condition, the toughness was 28 Joules whereas after PWHT at 760 °C-2 h it was 115 Joules. In the present study, toughness of low nickel weld was higher due to low δ-ferrite content (<0.5%), multipass grain refinement and weld metal deposition of single pass per layer of weldment.

  9. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  10. Ferritic, martensitic, and precipitation hardening stainless steel laser weldings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Ludovico, Antonio D.; Panagopoulos, Christos N.; Tundo, Corrado

    1998-07-01

    Even if many steels and alloys have been welded on the last years, nowadays there are some other stainless steel alloys that need a further comprehension when they have to be welded. Typically these alloys are martensitic and precipitation hardening ones that still present some problems to be weld, i.e. hot cracks, fragile beads, an excessive grain size and other surface defects. In this work some martensitic stainless steels of which a AISI 420B, a AISI 440C and a AISI 630 have been studied. The last one is always with a martensitic structure but, in particular, some interesting mechanical properties are reached by a precipitation hardening process. This research has experimented and studied the mechanical and technological properties of the welds obtained on the above cited AISI 420B, AISI 440C and AISI 630, welded by 1.5 kW CO2 laser. The results have also been compared with the ones obtained on ferritic stainless steels AISI 430 and 430F. A technological characterization of the welds has followed as metallographic tests and evaluations, microhardness, tensile and fatigue tests.

  11. FE Simulation Models for Hot Stamping an Automobile Component with Tailor-Welded High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bingtao; Wang, Qiaoling; Wei, Zhaohui; Meng, Xianju; Yuan, Zhengjun

    2016-05-01

    Ultra-high-strength in sheet metal parts can be achieved with hot stamping process. To improve the crash performance and save vehicle weight, it is necessary to produce components with tailored properties. The use of tailor-welded high-strength steel is a relatively new hot stamping process for saving weight and obtaining desired local stiffness and crash performance. The simulation of hot stamping boron steel, especially tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) stamping, is more complex and challenging. Information about thermal/mechanical properties of tools and sheet materials, heat transfer, and friction between the deforming material and the tools is required in detail. In this study, the boron-manganese steel B1500HS and high-strength low-alloy steel B340LA are tailor welded and hot stamped. In order to precisely simulate the hot stamping process, modeling and simulation of hot stamping tailor-welded high-strength steels, including phase transformation modeling, thermal modeling, and thermal-mechanical modeling, is investigated. Meanwhile, the welding zone of tailor-welded blanks should be sufficiently accurate to describe thermal, mechanical, and metallurgical parameters. FE simulation model using TWBs with the thickness combination of 1.6 mm boron steel and 1.2 mm low-alloy steel is established. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the hot stamped automotive component (mini b-pillar), hardness and microstructure at each region are investigated. The comparisons between simulated results and experimental observations show the reliability of thermo-mechanical and metallurgical modeling strategies of TWBs hot stamping process.

  12. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; Muransky, Ondrej; Sisneros, Thomas A.

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250 MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.

  13. Measured Biaxial Residual Stress Maps in a Stainless Steel Weld

    DOE PAGES

    Olson, Mitchell D.; Hill, Michael R.; Patel, Vipul I.; ...

    2015-09-16

    Here, this paper describes a sequence of residual stress measurements made to determine a two-dimensional map of biaxial residual stress in a stainless steel weld. A long stainless steel (316L) plate with an eight-pass groove weld (308L filler) was used. The biaxial stress measurements follow a recently developed approach, comprising a combination of contour method and slitting measurements, with a computation to determine the effects of out-of-plane stress on a thin slice. The measured longitudinal stress is highly tensile in the weld- and heat-affected zone, with a maximum around 450 MPa, and compressive stress toward the transverse edges around ₋250more » MPa. The total transverse stress has a banded profile in the weld with highly tensile stress at the bottom of the plate (y = 0) of 400 MPa, rapidly changing to compressive stress (at y = 5 mm) of ₋200 MPa, then tensile stress at the weld root (y = 17 mm) and in the weld around 200 MPa, followed by compressive stress at the top of the weld at around ₋150 MPa. Finally, the results of the biaxial map compare well with the results of neutron diffraction measurements and output from a computational weld simulation.« less

  14. Microstructure and high temperature properties of the dissimilar weld between ferritic stainless steel and carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Kil; Hong, Seung Gab; Kang, Ki Bong; Kang, Chung Yun

    2009-10-01

    Dissimilar joints between STS441, a ferritic stainless steel, and SS400, a carbon steel, were welded by GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) using STS430LNb as a welding wire. The fracture behavior of the dissimilar weld was analyzed by a microstructural observation and thermo-mechanical tests. Martensite was formed at the region between SS400 and the weld metal because the Cr and Nb content in this region decreased due to the dilution of SS400 carbon steel during welding. According to results from a high temperature tensile test with a specimen aged at 900 °C, it was found that the tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature was equal to that of STS441 base metal and the formation of martensite had little influence on tensile strength of the dissimilar weld at high temperature. However, in the case of thermal fatigue resistance, the dissimilar weld had an inferior thermal fatigue life to STS441 because of the presence of martensite and the softened region around the interface between the dissimilar weld metal and SS400.

  15. Helium-induced weld degradation of HT-9 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chin-An; Chin, B.A.; Lin, Hua T.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Helium-bearing Sandvik HT-9 ferritic steel was tested for weldability to simulate the welding of structural components of a fusion reactor after irradiation. Helium was introduced into HT-9 steel to 0.3 and 1 atomic parts per million (appm) by tritium doping and decay. Autogenous single pass full penetration welds were produced using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process under laterally constrained conditions. Macroscopic examination showed no sign of any weld defect in HT-9 steel containing 0.3 appm helium. However, intergranular micro cracks were observed in the HAZ of HT-9 steel containing 1 appm helium. The microcracking was attributed to helium bubble growth at grain boundaries under the influence of high stresses and temperatures that were present during welding. Mechanical test results showed that both yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature, while the total elongation increased with increasing temperature for all control and helium-bearing HT-9 steels.

  16. Subclinical neurophysiological effects of manganese in welding workers.

    PubMed

    He, S C; Niu, Q

    2004-01-01

    High-level occupational manganese (Mn) exposure has been reported to induce irreversible brain alterations determining a Parkinson-like disease. This study aimed to assess subclinical neurophysiological alterations in welding workers. They were employed in a machine building factory with an average Mn exposure <200 mg/m3. Sixty-eight workers (mean age: 34 years; mean Mn exposure duration: 16 years) and 42 flour factory workers (control group) with similar age and smoking habit were recruited. Autonomic nervous function test battery (ANSFT), composed of Valsalva maneuvre-induced heart rate variation (HR-V), heart rate variation following deep breathing (HR-DB) and heart rate variation following immediate standing up (HR-IS) was assessed. Electroencephalogram (EEG), brain electricity activity mapping (BEAM) were also performed. HR-V, HR-DB, and HR-IS were significantly lower in Mn-exposed subjects showing altered autonomic nervous system activity, parasympathetic-sympathetic imbalance and, and consequently, altered cardiovascular regulation and reactivity. The EEG of the Mn-exposed workers evidenced beta-wave rhythms significantly reduced, theta-waves markedly increased and abnormal wave activities of either localized or diffusive type. In the same workers BEAM revealed higher theta, delta and beta power values in the F7 area, lower d power values in the FP1, FP2 and C4 areas as well as dissymmetry in the central area, parietal region and occipital region. This study suggests that Mn impairs neuron activity within central nervous system. In this context, brainstem parasympathetic and sympathetic centers receiving axon projections from cortical and diencephalic areas, may reflect Mn effects on upper pathways. However, direct actions of Mn on these centers cannot be excluded.

  17. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  18. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  19. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  20. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  1. 76 FR 76437 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would... Publication 4280 (December 2011), entitled Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe from Korea and...

  2. 75 FR 44766 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe from Turkey: Final Results of...) order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey for the January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2008, period of review (POR). See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From...

  3. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  4. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  5. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  6. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  7. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  8. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  9. 49 CFR 178.51 - Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.51 Specification 4BA welded or brazed steel...) Cylindrical type cylinders must be of circumferentially welded or brazed construction. (b) Steel. The...

  10. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  11. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  12. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  13. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  14. 49 CFR 178.56 - Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. 178... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.56 Specification 4AA480 welded steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4AA480 cylinder is a welded steel cylinder having a...

  15. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  16. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  17. 78 FR 70069 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1... antidumping and countervailing duty orders on circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from China would be... Publication 4435 (November 2013), entitled Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from China:...

  18. 49 CFR 178.58 - Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.58 Specification 4DA welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4DA is a welded steel sphere (two...

  19. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  20. 49 CFR 178.47 - Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4DS welded stainless steel cylinders...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.47 Specification 4DS welded stainless steel... stainless steel sphere (two seamless hemispheres) or circumferentially welded cylinder both with a...

  1. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  2. 49 CFR 178.53 - Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.53 Specification 4D welded steel cylinders for aircraft use. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4D cylinder is a welded steel sphere...

  3. 49 CFR 178.50 - Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders... FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Cylinders § 178.50 Specification 4B welded or brazed steel cylinders. (a) Type, size, and service pressure. A DOT 4B is a welded or brazed steel cylinder with...

  4. 75 FR 53714 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... 564 (Third Review)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. SUMMARY: The... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to...

  5. 77 FR 20782 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes have been made below normal value (NV) during the March...

  6. 77 FR 64468 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Final Affirmative... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel... the publication of the preliminary determination.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel...

  7. 78 FR 45271 - Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... COMMISSION Welded Stainless Steel Pressure Pipe From Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam Determination On the... injured by reason of imports from Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam of welded stainless steel pressure pipe... injured or threatened with material injury by reason of LTFV imports of welded stainless steel...

  8. Profiling mild steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions and costs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael J; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G

    2014-05-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g(-1) electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5mg g(-1)) and CMT (~1mg g(-1)). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g(-1) (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g(-1) (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g(-1) (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g(-1) (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  9. Profiling Mild Steel Welding Processes to Reduce Fume Emissions and Costs in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael J.; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T.; Stone, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g−1 electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5 mg g−1) and CMT (~1 mg g−1). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g−1 (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g−1 (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g−1 (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g−1 (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  10. Pulmonary fibrosis and exposure to steel welding fume.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, M P

    2015-12-01

    Arc welders who have been exposed to high concentrations of steel welding fume for prolonged periods of time may develop pulmonary fibrosis but the nature of the fibrotic changes has been debated over the last 80 years without any clear international consensus. To characterize the nature of the pulmonary fibrosis that develops in response to steel welding fume exposure and to provide a working hypothesis that would explain the findings of the existing research, to provide a platform for future research and to inform future occupational and clinical management of welders with pulmonary effects from welding fume. Review of the world literature on pulmonary fibrosis and welding of steel in all languages using PubMed, with further secondary search of references in the articles found in the primary search. Google and Reference Manager were used as further confirmatory search tools. Only case series and case reports were found but these provided consistent evidence that the consequence of exposure to steel welding fume at high levels for a prolonged period of time is a type of pulmonary fibrosis similar to, and possibly the same as, respiratory bronchiolitis which eventually develops into desquamative interstitial pneumonia with ongoing exposure. Steel welding fume may cause an occupational respiratory bronchiolitis which may develop into de squamative interstitial pneumonia with ongoing exposure. This concept may explain the difficulties in interpreting the wider literature on welding fume and lung function at lower exposures and may also explain the increased risk of lung cancer in welders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-18

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  12. Associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease: review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, James A; Borenstein, Amy R; Nelson, Lorene M

    2012-09-11

    To examine associations of welding and manganese exposure with Parkinson disease (PD) using meta-analyses of data from cohort, case-control, and mortality studies. Epidemiologic studies related to welding or manganese exposure and PD were identified in a PubMed search, article references, published reviews, and abstracts. Inclusion criteria were 1) cohort, case-control, or mortality study with relative risk (RR), odds ratio (OR), or mortality OR (MOR) and 95 confidence intervals (95% CI); 2) RR, OR, and MOR matched or adjusted for age and sex; 3) valid study design and analysis. When participants of a study were a subgroup of those in a larger study, only results of the larger study were included to assure independence of datasets. Pooled RR/OR estimates and 95% CIs were obtained using random effects models; heterogeneity of study effects were evaluated using the Q statistic and I(2) index in fixed effect models. Thirteen studies met inclusion criteria for the welding meta-analysis and 3 studies for the manganese exposure meta-analysis. The pooled RR for the association between welding and PD for all study designs was 0.86 (95% CI 0.80-0.92), with absence of between-study heterogeneity (I(2) = 0.0). Effect measures for cohort, case-control, and mortality studies were similar (0.91, 0.82, 0.87). For the association between manganese exposure and PD, the pooled OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.41-1.42). Welding and manganese exposure are not associated with increased PD risk. Possible explanations for the inverse association between welding and PD include confounding by smoking, healthy worker effect, and hormesis.

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  14. Microstructure/property relationships in dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steels and carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhouse, E.J.; Lippold, J.C.

    1998-12-01

    The metallurgical characteristics, toughness and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steel Alloy 2205 and carbon steel A36 have been evaluated. Both duplex stainless steel ER2209 and Ni-based Alloy 625 filler metals were used to join this combination using a multipass, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Defect-free welds were made with each filler metal. The toughness of both the 625 and 2209 deposits were acceptable, regardless of heat input. A narrow martensitic region with high hardness was observed along the A36/2209 fusion boundary. A similar region was not observed in welds made with the 625 filler metal. The corrosion resistance of the welds made with 2209 filler metal improved with increasing heat input, probably due to higher levels of austenite and reduced chromium nitride precipitation. Welds made with 625 exhibited severe attack in the root pass, while the bulk of the weld was resistant. This investigation has shown that both filler metals can be used to joint carbon steel to duplex stainless steels, but that special precautions may be necessary in corrosive environments.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  16. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2017-08-31

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of oxygen on the impact toughness and microstructure of steel weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Yoshihiro; Kuwana, Takeshi; Maie, Tsuyoshi

    1995-12-31

    A steel plate was welded in a low oxygen potential welding atmosphere. The weld metal obtained is classified in two groups on the oxygen content, very low oxygen content (less than 0.002 mass %) weld metal and relatively high oxygen content (over 0.015 mass%) weld metal. The effect of oxygen in steel weld metal on the Charpy v-notch impact values and the microstructure is investigated and discussed. Very low oxygen content steel weld metal shows superior impact toughness at 273 K as well as the well-known ``optimum oxygen`` containing steel weld metal. The very low oxygen weld metal has relatively large amounts of grain boundary ferrite and side plate ferrite microstructure, instead of upper bainite compared with the relatively high oxygen content weld metal.

  18. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  19. Effect of Submerged Arc Welding Parameters on the Microstructure of SA516 and A709 Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanie, James

    The effects of submerged arc welding (SAW) current and speed on the microstructures of SA516 grade 70 and A709 grade 50 steel welds were studied in this research. Steel plates 17 mm-thick were submerged arc welded using different welding currents (from 700 to 850 A) and welding speeds (from 5.3 to 15.3 mm/s). The effect of heat input on the weld metal chemistry, morphologies and chemistry of inclusions and nucleation of acicular ferrite (AF), grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) were evaluated. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the microstructures of the developed weld joints. PAX-it image analysis software program was utilized for quantitative analysis of the microstructures. The results showed that it is difficult to ascribe changes in the microstructure that occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal regions to a single welding process parameter. Inclusion analysis revealed two types of inclusions formed in the weld metals for both steels. They are spherical and faceted inclusions. It was also observed that acicular ferrite nucleated only on the spherical inclusions. EDS analysis showed that the two inclusions have different chemical compositions. The results further showed that the total oxygen content of the weld metals of both steels generally increased with welding current, but decreased with increasing welding speed. The prior austenite grain width decreased with increasing welding speed, but increased with increasing welding current (increased heat input). For both SA516 and A709 steel welds, the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF) in the weld metals increased initially, while those of grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) decreased with increasing welding current when welding current was increased from 700 A to 800 A. With further increase in the

  20. Characteristics comparison of weld metal zones welded to cast and forged steels for piston crown material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyung-Man; Kim, Yun-Hae; Lee, Myeong-Hoon; Baek, Tae-Sil

    2015-03-01

    An optimum repair welding for the piston crown which is one of the engine parts exposed to the combustion chamber is considered to be very important to prolong the engine lifetime from an economical point of view. In this study, two types of filler metals such as 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 0.5Mo were welded with SMAW method and the other two types of filler metals such as Inconel 625 and 718 were welded with GTAW method, respectively, and the used base metals were the cast and forged steels of the piston crown material. The weld metal zones welded with Inconel 625 and 718 filler metals exhibited higher corrosion resistance compared to 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 0.5Mo filler metals. In particular, the weld metal zone welded with Inconel 718 and 0.5Mo, filler metals indicated the best and worst corrosion resistance, respectively. Consequently, it is suggested that the corrosion resistance of the weld metal zone surely depends on the chemical components of each filler metal and welding method irrespective of the types of piston crown material.

  1. Hybrid Welding of 45 mm High Strength Steel Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F.

    Thick section welding has significant importance for oil and gas industry in low temperature regions. Arc welding is usually employed providing suitable quality joints with acceptable toughness at low temperatures with very limited productivity compared to modern high power laser systems. Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) can enhance the productivity by several times due to higher penetration depth from laser beam and combined advantages of both heat sources. LAHW was applied to join 45 mm high strength steel with double-sided technique and application of metal cored wire. The process was captured by high speed camera, allowing process observation in order to identify the relation of the process stability on weld imperfections and efficiency. Among the results, it was found that both arc power and presence of a gap increased penetration depth, and that higher welding speeds cause unstable processing and limits penetration depth. Over a wide range of heat inputs, the welds where found to consist of large amounts of fine-grained acicular ferrite in the upper 60-75% part of welds. At the root filler wire mixing was less and cooling faster, and thus found to have bainitic transformation. Toughness of deposited welds provided acceptable toughness at -50 °C with some scattering.

  2. A Study to Increase Weld Penetration in P91 Steel During TIG Welding by using Activating Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Kumar, Mayank; Dey, Vidyut; Naresh Rai, Ram

    2017-08-01

    Activated Flux TIG (ATIG) welding is a unique joining process, invented at Paton Institute of electric welding in 1960. ATIG welding process is also known as flux zoned TIG (FZTIG). In this process, a thin layer of activating flux is applied along the line on the surface of the material where the welding is to be carries out. The ATIG process aids to increase the weld penetration in thick materials. Activating fluxes used in the literature show the use of oxides like TiO2, SiO2, Cr2O3, ZnO, CaO, Fe2O3, and MnO2 during welding of steels. In the present study, ATIG was carried out on P-91 steel. Though, Tungsten Inert Gas welding gives excellent quality welds, but the penetration obtained in such welding is still demanding. P91 steel which is ferritic steel is used in high temperature applications. As this steel is, generally, used in thick sections, fabrication of such structures with TIG welding is limited, due to its low depth of penetration. To increase the depth of penetration in P91while welding with ATIG, the role of various oxides were investigated. Apart from the oxides mentioned above, in the present study the role of B2O3, V2O5 and MgO, during ATIG welding of P91 was investigated. It was seen that, compared to TIG welding, there was phenomenal increase in weld penetration during ATIG welding. Amongst all the oxides used in this study, maximum penetration was achieved in case of B2O3. The measurements of weld penetration, bead width and heat affected zone of the weldings were carried out using an image analysis technique.

  3. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  4. Solidification behavior and microstructural analysis of austenitic stainless steel laser welds

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel laser welds has been investigated with a high-power laser system. The welds were made at speeds ranging from 13 to 60 mm/s. The welds sowed a wide variety of microstructural features. The ferrite content in the 13-mm/s weld varied from less than 1% at the root of the weld to about 10% at the crown. The duplex structure at the crown of the weld was much finer than the one observed in conventional weld metal. However, the welds made at 25 and 60 mm/s contained an austenitic structure with less than 1% ferrite throughout the weld. Microstructural analysis of these welds used optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and analytical electron microscopy. The austenitic stainless steel welds were free of any cracking, and the results are explained in terms of the rapid solidification conditions during laser welding.

  5. Properties of submerged arc welded TMCP-steel weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamies, J.M.N.; Brederholm, A.T.; Haenninen, H.E.

    1996-12-01

    In this investigation weldability, mechanical properties and effects of different heat inputs and welding consumables on the properties of weldments of the thermomechanically control processed (TMCP) steel, RAEX 500M were examined. The hardness measurements and transverse tensile tests showed that HAZ softening was insignificant in the TMCP-steel weldments studied. The weld metal strength properties were equal to or higher than those of the base metal through the heat input range of 2.0 to 6.0 kJ/mm. The required low temperature impact toughness of 40 J was achieved with plate thickness of 40 mm at {minus}60 C with all the filler materials used except with S2Ni2 (welding energy 5.8 kJ/mm) and S2Ni2 with metal powder addition (welding energy 5.9 kJ/mm). With high welding energies and longer cooling times (t{sub 8/5}) favorable weld metal microstructures were achieved with Mo-, Ti- and B-alloyed filler materials.

  6. Mechanical properties and microstructure evaluation of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlami, C. S.; Pan, X.

    2017-07-01

    Austenitic manganese steel has a high toughness, high ductility, high strain hardening capacity and excellent wear resistance, the material is mostly used in the mining industry for crushing and loading equipment. High manganese steel shows superior wear resistance when used under primary crushing system than when used under secondary and tertiary modes of crushing. This work presents the effect of vanadium content on the mechanical properties and microstructure evaluation of high manganese steel. The addition of vanadium to high manganese steels has a direct increase on the hardness and wear resistance. Impact testing for alloys containing vanadium showed low impact energies compared to the standard manganese steel. The increase in hardness and the wear resistance of the alloys was explained based on the vanadium carbide which had formed on the austenitic matrix. It was observed that the carbon and vanadium content will influence the mechanical properties of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium. Microstructural examination showed that the size and distribution of vanadium carbidesinfluences the mechanical properties and the wear behaviour. Therefore, this work showsthat the addition of vanadium to high manganese steel will increase the hardness and wear resistance while decreasing the impact energy of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium.

  7. Effect of Welding Consumables on Fatigue Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded High Strength, Q&T Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2009-02-01

    Quenched and Tempered (Q&T) steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen-induced cracking in the heat affected zone (HAZ) after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel consumables to weld the above steel was the only remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. Recent studies proved that high nickel steel and low hydrogen ferritic steel consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the effect of welding consumables on high cycle fatigue properties of high strength, Q&T steel joints. Three different consumables namely (i) austenitic stainless steel, (ii) low hydrogen ferritic steel, and (iii) high nickel steel have been used to fabricate the joints by shielded metal arc (SMAW) welding process. The joints fabricated using low hydrogen ferritic steel electrodes showed superior fatigue properties than other joints.

  8. Tensile Strength of Welded Steel Tubes : First Series of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A

    1928-01-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to determine the difference in the strength of steel tubes welded by different methods, as compared with one another and also with unwelded, unannealed tubes, including; moreover, a comparison of the results obtained by experienced and inexperienced welders.

  9. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel to chromium-nickel steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-2103-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1) to 300 series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 in.; filler metals are ERNiCr-3 (F-43) (GTAW) and ENiCrFe-3 (F-43) (SMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  10. Ultrasonic velocity testing of steel pipeline welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón, Hector

    2017-04-01

    In general the ultrasonic techniques have been used to determine the mechanical properties of materials on based of their relationship with metallurgical characteristics. In this research work, the relationship between ultrasonic velocity and phased array and the microstructure of steel pipeline welded joints is investigated. Measurements of ultrasonic wave velocity were made as a function of the location across the weld. Hardness measurements were performated in an attempt to correlate with ultrasonic response. In addition, the coarse and dendritic grain structure of the weld material is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Thus, due to the acoustic anisotropy of the crystal itself weld material of studied joints is anisotropic, too. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of conventional ultrasonic phased array techniques becomes desirable.

  11. Arc characteristics of submerged arc welding with stainless steel wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Liu, Cui-rong; Chen, Feng-hua

    2014-08-01

    The arc characteristics of submerged arc welding (SAW) with stainless steel wire were studied by using Analysator Hannover (AH). The tests were carried out under the same preset arc voltage combined with different welding currents. By comparing the probability density distribution (PDD) curves of arc voltage and welding current, the changes were analyzed, the metal transfer mode in SAW was deduced, and the characteristics of a stable arc were summarized. The analysis results show that, with an increase of welding parameters, the short-circuiting peak in the PDD curves of arc voltage decreases gradually until it disappears, and the dominant metal transfer mode changes from flux-wall guided transfer to projected transfer and then to streaming transfer. Moreover, when the PDD curves of arc voltage are both unimodal and generally symmetrical, the greater the peak probability and the smaller the peak span, the more stable the arc becomes.

  12. Residual stresses and plastic deformation in GTA-welded steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, P.C. ); Keijser, T.H. de; Ouden, G. den )

    1993-03-01

    Residual stresses and plastic deformation in single pass GTA welded low-carbon steel were studied by means of x-ray diffraction in combination with optical microscopy and hardness measurements. The residual stresses and the amount of plastic deformation (microstrain) were obtained from x-ray diffraction line positions and line broading. Since the plates were polished before welding, it was possible to observe in the optical microscope two types of Lueders bands. During heating curved Lueders bands and during cooling straight Lueders bands perpendicular to the weld are formed. The curved Lueders bands extend over a larger distance from the weld than the straight Lueders bands. The amount of plastic deformation as obtained from the x-ray diffraction analysis is in agreement with these observations. An explanation is offered for the stresses measured in combination with plastic deformations observed. It is concluded that in the present experiments plastic deformation is the main cause of the residual stresses.

  13. Weld Properties of a Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Brooks; S. H. Goods; C. V. Robino

    2000-08-01

    The all weld metal tensile properties from gas tungsten arc and electron beam welds in free machining austenitic stainless steels have been determined. Ten heats with sulfur contents from 0.04 to 0.4 wt.% and a wide range in Creq/Nieq ratios were studied. Tensile properties of welds with both processes were related to alloy composition and solidification microstructure. The yield and ultimate tensile strengths increased with increasing Creq/Nieq ratios and ferrite content, whereas the ductility measured by RA at fracture decreased with sulfur content. Nevertheless, a range in alloy compositions was identified that provided a good combination of both strength and ductility. The solidification cracking response for the same large range of compositions are discussed, and compositions identified that would be expected to provide good performance in welded applications.

  14. Physicochemical Characterization of Aerosol Generated in the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Stainless Steel.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Mirella; Torvela, Tiina; Leskinen, Jari T T

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to stainless steel (SS) welding aerosol that contain toxic heavy metals, chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), has been associated with numerous adverse health effects. The gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is commonly applied to SS and produces high number concentration of substantially smaller particles compared with the other welding techniques, although the mass emission rate is low. Here, a field study in a workshop with the GTAW as principal welding technique was conducted to determine the physicochemical properties of the airborne particles and to improve the understanding of the hazard the SS welding aerosols pose to welders. Particle number concentration and number size distribution were measured near the breathing zone (50cm from the arc) and in the middle of the workshop with condensation particle counters and electrical mobility particle sizers, respectively. Particle morphology and chemical composition were studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In the middle of the workshop, the number size distribution was unimodal with the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of 46nm. Near the breathing zone the number size distribution was multimodal, and the GMDs of the modes were in the range of 10-30nm. Two different agglomerate types existed near the breathing zone. The first type consisted of iron oxide primary particles with size up to 40nm and variable amounts of Cr, Mn, and Ni replacing iron in the structure. The second type consisted of very small primary particles and contained increased proportion of Ni compared to the proportion of (Cr + Mn) than the first agglomerate type. The alterations in the distribution of Ni between different welding aerosol particles have not been reported previously. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  15. Quantification of Microtexture at Weld Nugget of Friction Stir-Welded Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Md M.; Sarkar, R.; Pal, T. K.; Ghosh, M.; Prabhu, N.

    2017-05-01

    Friction stir welding of C-Mn steel was carried out under 800-1400 rpm tool rotation. Tool traversing speed of 50 mm/min remained same for all joints. Effect of thermal state and deformation on texture and microstructure at weld nugget was investigated. Weld nugget consisted of ferrite + bainite/Widmanstatten ferrite with different matrix grain sizes depending on peak temperature. A texture around ( ϕ 2 = 0°, φ = 30°, ϕ 2 = 45°) was developed at weld nugget. Grain boundary misorientation at weld nugget indicated that continuous dynamic recrystallization influenced the development of fine equiaxed grain structure. Pole figures and orientation distribution function were used to determine crystallographic texture at weld nugget and base metal. Shear texture components D1, D2 and F were present at weld nugget. D1 shear texture was more prominent among all. Large number of high-angle grain boundaries ( 60-70%) was observed at weld nugget and was the resultant of accumulation of high amount of dislocation, followed by subgrain formation.

  16. Welding stainless steels for structures operating at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Witherell, C.E.

    1980-04-18

    Superconducting magnets for fusion energy reactors require massive monolithic stainless steel weldments which must operate at extremely low temperatures under stresses approaching 100 ksi (700 MPa). A three-year study was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing heavy-section welds having usable levels of strength and toughness at 4.2/sup 0/K for fabrication of these structures in Type 304LN plate. Seven welding processes were evaluated. Test weldments in full-thickness plate were made under severe restraint to simulate that of actual structures. Type 316L filler metal was used for most welds. Welds deposited under some conditions and which solidify as primary austenite have exhibited intergranular embrittlement at 4.2/sup 0/K. This is believed to be associated with grain boundary metal carbides or carbonitrides precipitated during reheating of already deposited beads by subsequent passes. Weld deposits which solidify as primary delta ferrite appear immune. Through use of fully austenitic filler metals of low nitrogen content under controlled shielded metal arc welding conditions, and through use of filler metals solidifying as primary delta ferrite where only minimum residuals remain to room temperature, welds of Type 316L composition have been made with 4.2K yield strength matching that of Type 304LN plate and acceptable levels of soundness, ductility and toughness.

  17. Structural and mechanical properties of welded joints of reduced activation martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filacchioni, G.; Montanari, R.; Tata, M. E.; Pilloni, L.

    2002-12-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding and electron beam welding methods were used to realise welding pools on plates of reduced activation martensitic steels. Structural and mechanical features of these simulated joints have been investigated in as-welded and post-welding heat-treated conditions. The research allowed to assess how each welding technique affects the original mechanical properties of materials and to find suitable post-welding heat treatments. This paper reports results from experimental activities on BATMAN II and F82H mod. steels carried out in the frame of the European Blanket Project - Structural Materials Program.

  18. The role of titanium in the non-metallic inclusions which nucleate acicular ferrite in the submerged arc weld (SAW) fusion zones of Navy HY-100 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, A.G.; Brothers, D.G.

    1995-04-01

    The origin of acicular ferrite in the weld metal of submerged arc weldments on high strength steels is very complex and depends upon the chemical composition for the steel base plate and filler wire, the composition of the flux used during welding and the cooling rate of the weld metal during the transformation of the undercooled metastable austenite. The strength and toughness of weld metal improves as the amount of acicular ferrite increases due its fine basket weave microstructure and so it is important to understand the mechanism of its formation so that the volume fraction of acicular ferrite can be maximized in steel weld metal. The chemical composition of the filler wire mostly determines the final composition of the weld metal although the composition of the base plate is important because of dilution effects. In high strength steels the alloying elements such as carbon, nickel, chromium, copper nd niobium are present to achieve the required strength levels and a fortuitous outcome of this is a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram with features that mean that bainite is the major transformation product during the arc welding of these steels provided a suitable weld power and preheat/interpass temperature is chosen during multi-run welding. Once a suitable weld-metal hardenability and cooling rate has been established the amount of acicular ferrite nucleated will depend on the size, number, distribution and chemical composition of the non-metallic inclusions. Suitable inclusions appear to be in the size range 0.2--2.0 micrometers with a mean size of 0.5 micrometers being about an optimum value. These inclusions usually contain manganese, silicon, aluminum and titanium as their major constituents and do not appear to be exactly spherical but have a faceted or slightly angular appearance.

  19. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-03-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with <50 ppm of sulfur. There was no degradation in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the A-TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  20. Effect of A-TIG Welding Process on the Weld Attributes of Type 304LN and 316LN Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, M.

    2017-02-01

    The specific activated flux has been developed for enhancing the penetration performance of TIG welding process for autogenous welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels through systematic study. Initially single-component fluxes were used to study their effect on depth of penetration and tensile properties. Then multi-component activated flux was developed which was found to produce a significant increase in penetration of 10-12 mm in single-pass TIG welding of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels. The significant improvement in penetration achieved using the activated flux developed in the present work has been attributed to the constriction of the arc and as well as reversal of Marangoni flow in the molten weld pool. The use of activated flux has been found to overcome the variable weld penetration observed in 316LN stainless steel with <50 ppm of sulfur. There was no degradation in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the A-TIG welds compared to that of the welds produced by conventional TIG welding on the contrary the transverse strength properties of the 304LN and 316LN stainless steel welds produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base metals. Improvement in toughness values were observed in 316LN stainless steel produced by A-TIG welding due to refinement in the weld microstructure in the region close to the weld center. Thus, activated flux developed in the present work has greater potential for use during the TIG welding of structural components made of type 304LN and 316LN stainless steels.

  1. Laser Welded Corrugated Steel Panels in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananen, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Keskitalo, M.; Hietala, M.; Järvenpää, A.; Holappa, K.; Saine, K.; Teiskonen, J.

    Corrugated core steel panels are an effective way to reduce weight and increase stiffness of steel structures. In numerous applications, these panels have shown very promising commercial possibilities. This study presents the design, manufacturing and commercializing process for two practical examples: Case 1) a fly wheel cover for a diesel engine and Case 2) rotationally symmetrical panel for an electric motor. Test materials of various kinds were used for corrugated cores and skin plates: conventional low-carbon steel grade EN 10130 and ferritic stainless steel grade 1.4509 with plate the thicknesses of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.75 mm. To manufacture different kinds of corrugated core steel panels, flexible manufacturing tools and cost-effective processes are needed. The most important criterion for laser welding panels was the capability of forming tools for producing high quality geometry for the core. Laser welding assembly showed that the quality of the core in both studied cases was good enough for welding the lap joints properly. Developed panels have been tested in industrial applications with excellent feedback. If thickness of a corrugated panel structure is not a limiting issue, these panels are good solution on application where stiffness and lighter weight are required as well as vibrational aspect considered.

  2. Axisymmetric guided wave scattering by cracks in welded steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, W.; Shah, A.H.; Datta, S.K.

    1997-11-01

    Scattering of axisymmetric guided waves by cracks and weldments of anisotropic bonding material in welded steel pipes is investigated in this paper by a hybrid method employing finite element and modal representation techniques. The study is motivated by the need to develop a quantitative ultrasonic technique to distinguish flaws and bonding materials in welded cylindrical structures. Numerical results for reflection coefficients are presented for a steel pipe with cracks and V-shaped weldments with and without cracks at the interface between the weldment and the steel pipe. It is shown that as the frequency increases, the coefficients of reflection exhibit resonant peaks at the cutoff frequencies of higher guided modes. These peaks become increasingly pronounced as the slope and the length of the crack increase. Numerical results presented have important applications in quantitative nondestructive evaluation.

  3. Upset Resistance Welding of Carbon Steel to Austenitic Stainless Steel Narrow Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozlati, Ashkaan; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Mohammadkamal, Helia

    2016-11-01

    Effects of welding current (at the range of 2-4 kA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of upset resistance welds of AISI-1035 carbon steel to AISI-304L austenitic stainless steel rods were investigated. The results showed that the joint strength first increased by raising the welding current up to 3 kA and then decreased beyond it. Increasing trend was related to more plastic deformation, accelerated diffusion, reduction of defects and formation of mechanical locks at the joint interface. For currents more than 3 kA, decrease in the joint strength was mainly caused by formation of hot spots. Using the optimum welding current of 3 kA, tensile strength of the joint reached to 76% of the carbon steel base metal strength. Microstructural observations and microhardness results confirmed that there was no hard phase, i.e., martensite or bainite, at the weld zone. Moreover, a fully austenitic transition layer related to carbon diffusion from carbon steel was observed at the weld interface.

  4. Effect of Stress Relief Annealing on Microstructure & Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Between Low Alloy Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivas, R.; Das, G.; Das, S. K.; Mahato, B.; Kumar, S.; Sivaprasad, K.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2017-01-01

    Two types of welded joints were prepared using low alloy carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel as base materials. In one variety, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 82. In another type, buttering material and weld metal were Inconel 182. In case of Inconel 82, method of welding was GTAW. For Inconel 182, welding was done by SMAW technique. For one set of each joints after buttering, stress relief annealing was done at 923 K (650 °C) for 90 minutes before further joining with weld metal. Microstructural investigation and sub-size in situ tensile testing in scanning electron microscope were carried out for buttered-welded and buttered-stress relieved-welded specimens. Adjacent to fusion boundary, heat-affected zone of low alloy steel consisted of ferrite-pearlite phase combination. Immediately after fusion boundary in low alloy steel side, there was increase in matrix grain size. Same trend was observed in the region of austenitic stainless steel that was close to fusion boundary between weld metal-stainless steel. Close to interface between low alloy steel-buttering material, the region contained martensite, Type-I boundary and Type-II boundary. Peak hardness was obtained close to fusion boundary between low alloy steel and buttering material. In this respect, a minimum hardness was observed within buttering material. The peak hardness was shifted toward buttering material after stress relief annealing. During tensile testing no deformation occurred within low alloy steel and failure was completely through buttering material. Crack initiated near fusion boundary between low alloy steel-buttering material for welded specimens and the same shifted away from fusion boundary for stress relieved annealed specimens. This observation was at par with the characteristics of microhardness profile. In as welded condition, joints fabricated with Inconel 82 exhibited superior bond strength than the weld produced with Inconel 182. Stress relief annealing

  5. 77 FR 41967 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Certain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-17

    ..., and Turkey; Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea... pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and Turkey; (2) certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from... welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and Turkey, certain circular welded...

  6. 75 FR 33262 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube from Turkey: Notice of Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube from Turkey: Notice of Preliminary... order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube (``welded pipe and tube'') from Turkey. See... tube from Turkey. See Antidumping Duty Order; Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From...

  7. Hardness, Microstructure, and Residual Stresses in Low Carbon Steel Welding with Post-weld Heat Treatment and Temper Bead Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloraier, Abdulkareem S.; Joshi, Suraj; Price, John W. H.; Alawadhi, Khaled

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) and temper bead welding (TBW) on hardness, microstructure and residual stresses in multi-layer welding on low carbon steel specimens made with two different weld geometries, viz. (1) smooth-contoured and (2) U-shaped. It was found that the PWHT technique gave overall lower hardness than the TBW technique, but the hardness values in both techniques were acceptable. Microscopy analysis showed that the TBW technique was more effective in tempering the heat affected zone as the grain size decreased slightly at the fusion line in spite of the higher temperature at the fusion line. Residual stresses measured using the hole-drilling method showed that the residual stress is not reduced below yield stress near the last bead solidified in TBW. Only PWHT gives low residual stress results in this area. High tensile residual stresses may result in sensitivity to fatigue loading.

  8. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  9. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  10. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  11. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  12. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr6+). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered and analyzed by inductively-coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr6+. GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, Cold Metal Transfer™, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr6+ ranged from 50 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1 to 270μg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13 to 330μg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50 to 300μg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4 to140 μg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as 5 times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes

  13. Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils

    DOEpatents

    Leigh, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

  14. Modeling of Linear Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maran, P.; Sornakumar, T.; Sundararajan, T.

    2008-08-01

    A heat and fluid flow model has been developed to solve the gas tungsten arc (GTA) linear welding problem for austenitic stainless steel. The moving heat source problem associated with the electrode traverse has been simplified into an equivalent two-dimensional (2-D) transient problem. The torch residence time has been calculated from the arc diameter and torch speed. The mathematical formulation considers buoyancy, electromagnetic induction, and surface tension forces. The governing equations have been solved by the finite volume method. The temperature and velocity fields have been determined. The theoretical predictions for weld bead geometry are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  15. Numerical Microstructural Analysis of Automotive-Grade Steels when Joined with an Array of Welding Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, J. E.; Khurana, S. P.; Li, T.

    2004-06-01

    Weld strength, formability, and impact resistance for joints on automotive steels is dependent on the underlying microstructure. A martensitic weld area is often a precursor to reduced mechanical performance. In this paper, efforts are made to predict underlying joint microstructures for a range of processing approaches, steel types, and gauges. This was done first by calculating cooling rates for some typical automotive processes [resistance spot welding (RSW), resistance mash seam welding (RMSEW), laser beam welding (LBW), and gas metal arc welding (GMAW)]. Then, critical cooling rates for martensite formation were calculated for a range of automotive steels using an available thermodynamically based phase transformation model. These were then used to define combinations of process type, steel type, and gauge where welds could be formed avoiding martensite in the weld area microstructure.

  16. Stress corrosion cracking of type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Sanecki, J. E.; Zaluzec, N. J.; Yu, M. S.; Yang, T. T.

    1999-10-26

    Microstructural analyses by advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on mockup welds and a cracked BWR core shroud weld fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel. heat-affected zones of the shroud weld and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds were free of grain-boundary carbide, martensite, delta ferrite, or Cr depletion near grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the welds were significantly contaminated by fluorine and oxygen which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination promotes fluorine contamination and suppresses classical thermal sensitization, even in Type 304 steels. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of Type 304L stainless steel core shroud welds.

  17. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  18. Influence of Oxides on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yangchuan; Luo, Zhen; Huang, Zunyue; Zeng, Yida

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive investigation was conducted into the effect of oxides on penetrations, microstructures and mechanical properties of BS700MC super steel weld bead. Boron oxide changed the penetration of weld bead by changing the Marangoni convection in the weld pool and contracting the welding arc. Chromium oxide only changed the Marangoni convection in the weld pool to increase the penetration of super steel. Thus, the super steel weld bead has higher penetration coated with flux boron oxide than that coated with chromium oxide. In other words, the activating flux TIG (A-TIG) welding with flux boron oxide has less welding heat input than the A-TIG welding with flux chromium oxide. As a result, on the one hand, there existed more fine and homogeneous acicular ferrites in the microstructure of welding heat-affected zone when the super steel was welded by A-TIG with flux boron oxide. Thus, the weld beads have higher value of low-temperature impact toughness. On the other hand, the softening degree of welding heat-affected zone, welded by A-TIG with flux boron oxide, will be decreased for the minimum value of welding heat input.

  19. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  20. Microstructure characteristics of laser MIG hybrid welded mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yan, Jun; Hu, Qianwu

    2008-07-01

    To deepen the understanding of laser-arc hybrid welding, the weld shape and microstructure characteristics of laser-metal inert gas hybrid welded mild steel were analyzed. The results showed typical hybrid weld could be classified as two parts: the wide upper zone and the narrow nether zone, which were defined as arc zone and laser zone, respectively. In the hybrid weld, the microstructure, alloy element distribution and microhardness all have evident difference between laser zone and arc zone. The microstructure of arc zone consists of coarse columnar dendrite and fine acicular dendrite between the columnar dendrites, but that of laser zone is composed of fine equiaxed dendrite in weld center and columnar dendrite around the equiaxed dendrite. Compared to arc zone, laser zone has finer grain size, higher microhardness, smaller alloy element content in the fusion zone and narrower heat affected zone. The discussions demonstrated that the observed difference was caused by the difference of temperature gradient, crystallizing and the effects of arc pressure on the molten pool between laser zone and arc zone.

  1. 77 FR 39735 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ...)] Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines Determination On the basis...)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings From Italy... the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4337 (June 2012), entitled Stainless Steel...

  2. 78 FR 21107 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey: Preliminary Results... carbon steel pipes and tubes from Turkey (pipes and tubes from Turkey) for the period of review (POR) of... welded carbon steel pipe and tube with an outside diameter of 0.375 inch or more, but not over 16...

  3. 75 FR 973 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the... review covers one respondent, SeAH Steel Corporation (SeAH). We preliminarily determine that sales...

  4. 77 FR 19192 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Preliminary Affirmative... being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular... Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from India, the Sultanate of Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and the...

  5. After Effects of Welding Armor Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-31

    the coating and moisture • Different electrodes causes different hydrogen content in the weld metal • SMAW electrodes produce the widest range of...Low Hydrogen Processes – SMAW – FCAW • Electrode Selection – Solid Core Wires or Metal Core – Non- Low Hydrogen Rods • Electrode Storage – Rod

  6. A Study of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thick Welded Joints of a Cr - Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I. Kon; Chien, Yi Cheng

    2015-07-01

    The effect of stress-relieving tempering on the mechanical properties of a welded joint of a high-strength low-alloy steel SAE 4130 (0.3% C - 1% Cr - 0.25% Mo) obtained by multipass arc welding with nonconsumable electrode is studied. The steel is quenched and tempered before the welding. An optimum tempering mode providing a good combination of the characteristics of strength, ductility and toughness of the welded joint is suggested.

  7. 76 FR 27987 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Amended Final... on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand, which covered Saha Thai Steel Pipe... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

  8. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  9. Selecting Processes to Minimize Hexavalent Chromium from Stainless Steel Welding

    PubMed Central

    KEANE, M.; SIERT, A.; STONE, S.; CHEN, B.; SLAVEN, J.; CUMPSTON, A.; ANTONINI, J.

    2015-01-01

    Eight welding processes/shielding gas combinations were assessed for generation of hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in stainless steel welding fumes. The processes examined were gas metal arc welding (GMAW) (axial spray, short circuit, and pulsed spray modes), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The Cr6+ fractions were measured in the fumes; fume generation rates, Cr6+ generation rates, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit mass of welding wire were determined. A limited controlled comparison study was done in a welding shop including SMAW, FCAW, and three GMAW methods. The processes studied were compared for costs, including relative labor costs. Results indicate the Cr6+ in the fume varied widely, from a low of 2800 to a high of 34,000 ppm. Generation rates of Cr6+ ranged from 69 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per unit of wire ranged from 1 to 270 μg/g. The results of field study were similar to the findings in the laboratory. The Cr6+ (ppm) in the fume did not necessarily correlate with the Cr6+ generation rate. Physical properties were similar for the processes, with mass median aerodynamic diameters ranging from 250 to 336 nm, while the FCAW and SMAW fumes were larger (360 and 670 nm, respectively). Conclusion: The pulsed axial spray method was the best choice of the processes studied based on minimal fume generation, minimal Cr6+ generation, and cost per weld. This method is usable in any position, has a high metal deposition rate, and is relatively simple to learn and use. PMID:26690276

  10. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  11. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  12. Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel: Procedure Development and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    2 Welding The material used in this study was quenched and tempered martensitic HY80 steel which conforms to MIL-S-1621 [2]. The testing...Canada Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel Proceedure Development and Testing Christopher Bayley DLP Neil Aucoin DLP Xinjin Cao NRC IAR AMTC Technical...Memorandum DRDC Atlantic TM 2009-187 September 2010 This page intentionally left blank. Fibre Laser Welding of HY-80 Steel Procedure

  13. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    report of FSW on a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel is the work of Chung, which applied this approach to a dissimilar weld between F82H (ferritic...January 2007. [43] Y. Chung et al., ―Interface microstructure evolution of dissimilar friction stir butt welded F82H steel and SUS304,‖ Materials... WELDING OF HT9 FERRITIC- MARTENSITIC STEEL: AN ASSESSMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES by Lara L. Ray June 2013 Thesis Advisor: Luke N

  14. Influence of second-phase particles on weld HAZ of Ti-deoxidized steels: Laboratory steels

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, F.J.; Chipperfield, C.G.; Krauklis, P.

    1994-12-31

    Over the past few decades, steel has increased in strength and toughness by judicious use of appropriate microalloy additions and thermomechanical controlled processing (TMCP). Considerable improvement in weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties has also occurred over this period. This article describes recent work aimed at evaluating the potential to control microstructure by means of Ti-rich particle dispersions for the development of structural steels (0.08%C, 1.4%Mn) with improved weldability. Three different precipitate species [Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ti(O,N) and TiN] were identified in Ti deoxidized steels. The formation of the different precipitate species can be understood in terms of steel composition and published solubility product data for the compounds. The presence of fine Ti-rich oxynitride precipitates indicated the strong competition between oxygen and nitrogen for Ti despite thermodynamic prediction. The purpose of the present work was to study microstructural development in a range of oxide-containing steels and to assess the role of oxides in the critical HAZ region following welding. Ti deoxidized steels contain different precipitate species depending on steel composition. The weld HAZ microstructure and mechanical properties produced by these particle dispersions justified further study in full-scale production heats.

  15. Effect of soft root weld layer on fracture toughness of under-matched weld joints on Q+T steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1996-12-01

    Welding of quenched and tempered (Q+T) high strength low alloyed steels can cause weld strength undermatching to satisfy the toughness requirements for the weld deposit. Cost of pre-heating of these steels can be saved if one can prove that use of soft electrodes for root passes do not endanger the overall quality of the joint. By welding of 40 mm thick Q+T structural steel (grade HT 80), over-matched condition had appeared in the root area of the X-groove weld despite of welding consumable which would give entire weld under-matched properties. This is the effect of weld metal alloying by elements from base material. So, the weld joint is not protected against cold cracking especially in the root region, therefore, a high preheating should be used to reduce the possibility of this phenomenon. In this work soft (lower strength) filler metal was used for first two and four root passes of X-joint. In this case root area was also alloyed by elements from base material and obtained mis-matching factor M was higher than it was expected. So, one homogeneous and two non homogeneous weld joints (with two and four soft passes) were considered. Mechanical properties of weld joints were measured by round tensile bars taken from different parts of the weld. The under-matching factor of weld joint with two and four soft root passes was around 0.80--0.90 in the soft root layer. It was expected that uneven strength distribution along the fatigue crack tip line would affect fracture initiation behavior of all three different weld joints. The metallographical post-test sectioning has revealed the initiation points mainly at the lowest weld metal strength.

  16. Alteration of Serum Concentrations of Manganese, Iron, Ferritin, and Transferrin Receptor Following Exposure to Welding Fumes Among Career Welders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ling; Zhang, Long-lian; Li, G. Jane; Guo, Wenrui; Liang, Wannian; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to determine airborne manganese levels during welding practice and to establish the relationship between long-term, low-level exposure to manganese and altered serum concentrations of manganese, iron, and proteins associated with iron metabolism in career welders. Ninety-seven welders (average age of 36 years) who have engaged in electric arc weld in a vehicle manufacturer were recruited as the exposed group. Welders worked 7–8 h per day with employment duration of 1–33 years. Control subjects consisted of 91 employees (average age of 35 years) in the same factory but not in the welding profession. Ambient manganese levels in welders’ breathing zone were the highest inside the vehicle (1.5 ± 0.7 mg/m3), and the lowest in the center of the workshop (0.2 ± 0.05 mg/m3). Since the filter size was 0.8 μm, it is possible that these values may be likely an underestimation of the true manganese levels. Serum levels of manganese and iron in welders were about three-fold (p < 0.01) and 1.2-fold (p < 0.01), respectively, higher than those of controls. Serum concentrations of ferritin and transferrin were increased among welders, while serum transferrin receptor levels were significantly decreased in comparison to controls. Linear regression analyses revealed a lack of association between serum levels of manganese and iron. However, serum concentrations of iron and ferritin were positively associated with years of welder experience (p < 0.05). Moreover, serum transferrin receptor levels were inversely associated with serum manganese concentrations (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that exposure to welding fume among welders disturbs serum homeostasis of manganese, iron, and the proteins associated with iron metabolism. Serum manganese may serve as a reasonable biomarker for assessment of recent exposure to airborne manganese. PMID:15713346

  17. Assessing Hydrogen Assisted Cracking Modes in High Strength Steel Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    posed theoretical hydrogen assisted cracking mechanisms. It was found that the microplasticity theory of Beachem can best describe how the stress ...steel and determined the stress corrosion cracking toughness, Kscc. Herman and Campbell found that the fracture toughness of this material was 16 MPa...embrittlement Welding Cracking (fracturing) Implant tests Stress intensity ("T, ) ’ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary end identify by

  18. Manganese in exhaled breath condensate: a new marker of exposure to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Hulo, Sébastien; Chérot-Kornobis, Nathalie; Howsam, Mike; Crucq, Sébastien; de Broucker, Virginie; Sobaszek, Annie; Edme, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-07

    To evaluate manganese in exhaled breath condensate (Mn-EBC) as an indicator of exposure to fumes from metal inert gas welding process. We collected EBC and urine from 17 welders and 16 unexposed control subjects after 5 days exposure. Concentrations of manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe) and chromium (Cr) were measured in EBC and urine samples and correlated with cumulative exposure indices for the working week (CIW) and for the total welding years (WY), based on duration of welding activity and atmospheric metal measurements. Concentrations of Mn and Ni in EBC were significantly higher among welders than controls whereas this difference was not significant for Mn in urine. Levels of Mn and Ni in EBC were not correlated with their respective levels in urine. The linear regressions found significant positive coefficients between Mn-EBC, Ni-EBC, Ni-U and Cr-U concentrations and the cumulative exposure indices. Taking into account tobacco use, statistical analysis showed the same trends except for the relationship between Mn-U and CIW. This pilot study showed that Mn-EBC, as well as Ni-EBC, can serve as reliable indices of occupational exposure to welding fumes and provide complimentary toxicokinetic information to that provided by urine analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Weld-bead profile and costs optimisation of the CO 2 dissimilar laser welding process of low carbon steel and austenitic steel AISI316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, A.; Tricarico, L.; Olabi, A. G.; Benyounis, K. Y.

    2011-02-01

    The dissimilar full depth laser-butt welding of low carbon steel and austenitic steel AISI 316 was investigated using CW 1.5 kW CO 2 laser. The effect of laser power (1.1-1.43 kW), welding speed (25-75 cm/min) and focal point position (-0.8 to -0.2 mm) on the weld-bead geometry (i.e. weld-bead area, A; upper width, Wu; lower width, Wl and middle width, Wm) and on the operating cost C was investigated using response surface methodology (RSM). The experimental plan was based on Box-Behnken design; linear and quadratic polynomial equations for predicting the weld-bead widthness references were developed. The results indicate that the proposed models predict the responses adequately within the limits of welding parameters being used. The regression equations were used to find optimum welding conditions for the desired geometric criteria.

  20. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  1. Effects of water temperature on cracking of wet-welded carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    West, T.C.; Mitchell, W.E.; Murray, R.I.

    1996-10-01

    Industry generally accepts that carbon steel shielded metal arc welding electrodes can be used to wet-weld carbon steel base metals without incurring hydrogen-induced underbead cracking, as long as the carbon equivalent of the base metal is approximately 0.40 or less. At higher carbon equivalents, austenitic wet welding electrodes can be used to avoid such cracking. ANSI/AWS D3.6-93, Specification for Underwater Welding, lists both the carbon equivalent and carbon content as essential variables during wet welding procedure qualification. Since variations in water temperature might seem insignificant compared to typical electric welding arc temperatures, the specification omits water temperature as an essential variable during wet welding procedure qualification. However, recent welding procedure qualification testing, and follow-on evaluations, have shown that the water temperature does contribute to base metal cracking, if the carbon equivalent of the carbon steel (ASTM A516 Gr.70) base metal approaches 0.40.

  2. Optimization of Fiber Laser Welding of DP980 Steels Using RSM to Improve Weld Properties for Formability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of laser parameters on weld quality is a critical laboratory study before implementation of newly developed high-strength dual-phase steels in fabrication of auto-bodies. In present work, dual-phase steels having tensile strength of 980 MPa (DP980) were welded using different welding speeds by Yb-fiber laser source to fabricate similar material combinations laser-welded blanks (LWBs). The weld zone microhardness, microstructure, and formability of DP980 LWBs were compared with those of the DP600 and micro-alloyed interstitial free high-strength steel (IFHS) LWBs. It was found that the formation of soft zone at the outer side of the HAZ was responsible for significant reduction in formability of DP980 LWBs due to strain localization and premature failure. Hence, response surface methodology based on Box-Behnken design was implemented to establish a mathematical model which could correlate the influence of laser process parameters such as power, welding speed, and focal position on weld quality in terms of aspect ratio of fusion zone, width of the soft zone, and surface roughness of weld to improve formability. The model was successfully implemented to optimize the laser parameters, and approximately 13.58% improvement in Erichsen cup height was achieved due to complete weld penetration with simultaneous 67% reduction in soft zone width and 55% reduction in softening. However, the failure was still observed to occur in the soft zone propagating parallel to weld in radial direction.

  3. Sulfur Content Precision Control Technology for CO2-Shielded Welding Wire Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaofa, Zhang; Huaqiang, Hao; Youbing, Xiang; Shanxi, Liu

    As a kind of impurity and displaying with FeS and MnS form in steel, Sulfur can make the disadvantage effect on the performance of hot-working, welding and corrosion resistance. The high content sulfur in steel can cause the hot brittle phenomenon for the steel. For the welding steel, when the sulfur content is higher, the drawing performance of wire rod become worst and the yield of wire rod decrease. When the sulfur is lower, the automatic wire feeding performance for the gas shielded welding become worst and the weld seam is not smooth. According to the results of welding expert research, 0.010%≤ S≤ 0.020% in CO2-shielded welding wire steel is reasonable.

  4. Application of Hybrid Laser arc Welding for the Joining of Large Offshore Steel Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, Morten; Farrokhi, Farhang; Kristiansen, Ewa; Villumsen, Sigurd

    To reduce the costs of the fabrication of offshore wind turbine foundations it is necessary to investigate new fabrication technologies. Hybrid laser arc welding is a potentially well-suited process for this because it requires less groove preparation to achieve deep weld penetration and lower heat input, compared to traditional arc welding. A skirt section of a suction bucket in 16 mm steel was used as a case to investigate the hybrid laser-arc welding in order to demonstrate which types of weld and which weld positions are possible. Three types of weld joints were chosen and welded with different welding positions; a butt joint of a bended section, a butt joint of a flat section and a lap joint. Stable welds with sufficient penetration were achieved for the flat welding position of the butt joint of bended section and butt joint of flat section.

  5. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  6. Multi objective Taguchi optimization approach for resistance spot welding of cold rolled TWIP steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutar, Mumin; Aydin, Hakan; Bayram, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Formability and energy absorption capability of a steel sheet are highly desirable properties in manufacturing components for automotive applications. TWinning Induced Plastisity (TWIP) steels are, new generation high Mn alloyed steels, attractive for the automotive industry due to its outstanding elongation (%40-45) and tensile strength (~1000MPa). So, TWIP steels provide excellent formability and energy absorption capability. Another required property from the steel sheets is suitability for manufacturing methods such as welding. The use of the steel sheets in the automotive applications inevitably involves welding. Considering that there are 3000-5000 welded spots on a vehicle, it can be interpreted that one of the most important manufacturing method is Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) for the automotive industry. In this study; firstly, TWIP steel sheet were cold rolled to 15% reduction in thickness. Then, the cold rolled TWIP steel sheets were welded with RSW method. The welding parameters (welding current, welding time and electrode force) were optimized for maximizing the peak tensile shear load and minimizing the indentation of the joints using a Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The effect of welding parameters was also evaluated by examining the signal-to-noise ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA) results.

  7. Aluminum and stainless steel tubes joined by simple ring and welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townhill, A.

    1967-01-01

    Duranel ring is used to join aluminum and stainless steel tubing. Duranel is a bimetal made up of roll-bonded aluminum and stainless steel. This method of joining the tubing requires only two welding operations.

  8. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of chromium-nickel steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of 300 Series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 in.; filler metals are ER3XX (F-6, A-8) (GTAW) and E3XX-15 (F-5, A-8); shielding gas for GTAW is argon.

  9. Gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of AISI 41XX steels. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-127 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of AISI 4130 and 4142 steels (ASTM A519) (P-No: None), 0.438-in. wall pipe; filler metal is AMS 6457, Class 4130 MC (F-, A-No; None) (GTAW) and E8018-B2L (F-4, A-3) (GMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  10. Gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-128-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and low hydrogen shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 2 inch; filler metals are ER70S-3 (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E7018 (F-4, A-1); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  11. Manual gas tungsten arc and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of carbon steel. Welding procedure specification

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-107-ASME-1 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Vessel Code for manual gas tungsten arc and semiautomatic gas metal arc welding of carbon steel (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.237 to 2.0 inch; filler metal is ER70S-3 (F-6, A-1); shielding gas for GTAW is argon, and for GMAW is 95-5 argon-oxygen.

  12. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1985-08-01

    Procedure WPS-104-ASME-2 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc and shielded metal arc welding of carbon steels (P-1-1), in thickness range 0.25 to 1 in.; filler metals are E70S-3 (F-6, A-1) (GTAW) and E6010 (F-3, A-1) (SMAW); shielding gas is argon (GTAW).

  13. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China... revocation of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular welded pipe... circular welded pipe from the PRC, pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (the...

  14. Effect of carbon, manganese, nickel, and nitrogen concentrations on the phase composition and properties of wrought high-manganese steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarin, N. Ya.; Kats, R. Z.; Startsev, V. A.; Petrova, I. A.

    1981-01-01

    Strain hardening of high-manganese steel is characterized not only by the formation of dislocations but also by precipitation of second phase (primarily α martensite with a carbon concentration <1.0% and carbides with a carbon content >1.2%), lowering the ductility of the cold worked metal, which induces the formation on the working surfaces of defects due to contact fatigue.

  15. Dissimilar Al/steel friction stir welding lap joints for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, D.; Spena, P. Russo; Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.

    2016-10-01

    A widespread usage of aluminum alloys for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with automotive steel grades. Dissimilar welding of aluminum alloys and steel grades poses some issues concerning the formation of brittle intermetallic compounds, difference in physical and chemical properties of the parent metals, and poor wetting behavior of aluminum. Friction stir welding is considered to be a reasonable solution to obtain sound aluminum/steel joints. A study on the join quality of dissimilar lap joints of steel and aluminum alloy sheets after friction stir welding is proposed here. A low carbon steel is joined with AA6016 aluminum alloy to study preliminarily the feasibility to assembly car-body parts. The joints, welded with tool rotation and feed rate varying in a wide range, have been studied from a visual examination and microstructural point of view. Optical microscopy has been used to characterize the microstructure of the examined sheets in as-received and welded conditions. Micro-hardness measurements have been carried out to quantitatively analyze the local hardness of the welded joints. Set welding process parameters are identified to assemble without the presence of macroscopic defects the examined steel and aluminum welded parts.

  16. Environmental cracking behavior of submerged arc-welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Sharkawy, S. W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-04-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel welds produced by submerged are welding were assessed for their microstructure and properties. Slow strain rate tests conducted on these specimens revealed that both the parent material and the weld metals are susceptible to cracking under conditions of hydrogen (H) charging.

  17. Shielding gas effect on weld characteristics in arc-augmented laser welding process of super austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiya, P.; Kumar Mishra, Mahendra; Soundararajan, R.; Shanmugarajan, B.

    2013-02-01

    A series of hybrid welding (gas metal arc welding-CO2 laser beam welding) experiments were conducted on AISI 904L super austenitic stainless steel sheet of 5 mm thickness. A detailed study of CO2 Laser-GMAW hybrid welding experiments with different shielding gas mixtures (100% He, 50% He+50% Ar, 50%He+45% Ar+5% O2, and 45% He+45% Ar+10% N2) were carried out and the results are presented. The resultant welds were subjected to detailed mechanical and microstructural characterization. Hardness testing revealed that the hardness values in the fusion zone were higher than the base material irrespective of the parameters. Transverse tensile testing showed that the joint efficiency is 100% with all the shielding gas experimented. Impact energy values of the welds were also found to be higher than the base material and the fractrograph taken in scanning electron microscope (SEM) has shown that the welds exhibited dimple fracture similar to the base material.

  18. 76 FR 63902 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of... preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan, 76 FR 33210 (June 8, 2011) (Preliminary Results)....

  19. 76 FR 64106 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Scheduling of Expedited Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and... duty orders on certain welded stainless steel pipe (specifically ASTM A-312 pipe) from Korea and...

  20. 75 FR 27987 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes From the Republic of Korea: Final... welded stainless steel pipes (WSSP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea). This review covers one producer... antidumping duty order on WSSP from Korea. See Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipes from the Republic of...

  1. 75 FR 60814 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMISSION Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand AGENCY... antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and... antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and...

  2. 76 FR 67473 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and The Philippines; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines... antidumping duty orders on imports of stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the...

  3. 77 FR 5240 - Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... International Trade Administration Light-Walled Welded Rectangular Carbon Steel Tubing From Taiwan: Continuation... light-walled welded rectangular carbon steel tubing from Taiwan would likely lead to a continuation or... sunset review of the antidumping duty order \\1\\ on light-walled welded rectangular carbon steel...

  4. 75 FR 69626 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India... duty order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. See Certain...

  5. 75 FR 70723 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Partial... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The review covers two firms: Yieh Phui Enterprise... the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan covering...

  6. 76 FR 77480 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Notice of... of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. The period... the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan covering...

  7. 76 FR 78886 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Intent To Rescind Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Intent To... the countervailing duty (CVD) order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey. See... products covered by this order are certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube with an outside diameter of...

  8. 77 FR 6542 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of... of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey for... the preliminary decision. See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube from Turkey:...

  9. 75 FR 28557 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time... antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Preliminary Results and Rescission, in Part, of...

  10. 75 FR 4529 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes (pipes and tubes) from Thailand. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty New Shipper Review, 74...

  11. 77 FR 72818 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Final Results of... circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Turkey.\\1\\ This review covers four producers and... section entitled ``Final Results of Review.'' \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  12. 75 FR 62366 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Taiwan. See Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review: Circular Welded Carbon Steel...

  13. 77 FR 64473 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Sultanate of Oman: Final Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Sultanate of Oman: Final... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel... Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe from the Sultanate of Oman: Preliminary Negative Countervailing...

  14. 77 FR 64465 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Final Affirmative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates... countervailable subsidies are being provided to producers and exporters of circular welded carbon-quality steel...\\ \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the United Arab Emirates: Preliminary...

  15. 76 FR 78313 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... COMMISSION Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam of circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe, provided for in... material injury by reason of LTFV and subsidized imports of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe...

  16. 75 FR 68327 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission... certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. The period of review is May 1, 2009... initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel...

  17. 77 FR 73015 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe... merchandise subject to the order is circular welded non-alloy steel pipe and tube. The product is...

  18. 78 FR 34342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results and... duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico.\\1\\ This administrative review.... \\1\\ See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and...

  19. 77 FR 73617 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... covered by the order are circular welded non-alloy steel pipes and tubes, of circular cross-section,...

  20. 75 FR 20342 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of... antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

  1. 76 FR 44304 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended Final Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Amended..., 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the... during the period of review. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of...

  2. 76 FR 14649 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Extension of Time Limit for Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Extension of Time... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico for the November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009, period of review. See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results...

  3. 75 FR 34980 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Final Results of the Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Final... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), covering the period November 1, 2007, through October 31, 2008. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic...

  4. 75 FR 78216 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe and Tube...

  5. 76 FR 77770 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico.\\1\\ This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

  6. 77 FR 8808 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  7. 76 FR 76369 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''), covering... Korea. See Notice of Antidumping Duty Orders: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from...

  8. 76 FR 15941 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of... antidumping duty administrative review of circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2008, through October 31, 2009. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel...

  9. 75 FR 77838 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``CWP'') from the Republic of Korea (``Korea''). The period... Antidumping Duty Orders: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Brazil, the Republic of...

  10. 78 FR 17637 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Notice of Amended... welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. The period of review (POR) is November 1, 2007, through October 31, 2008.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Final Results...

  11. 78 FR 78336 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary... the antidumping duty order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea...: Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the order is circular welded non-alloy steel pipe and...

  12. 76 FR 49437 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Preliminary Results... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico. This administrative review covers mandatory respondents... Circumstances Review: Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico, 75 FR 82374 (December 30,...

  13. 78 FR 35248 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Final... order on circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (CWP) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) for the period... has been sold at less than normal value. \\1\\ See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From...

  14. 76 FR 66893 - Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand, and Turkey; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From India, Thailand... antidumping duty orders on certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from India, Thailand, and... India, Thailand, and Turkey. See Antidumping Duty Order; Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes...

  15. 76 FR 78614 - Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan: Continuation of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Welded ASTM A-312 Stainless Steel Pipe From South Korea and Taiwan... welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from South Korea (Korea) and Taiwan would likely lead to... published the antidumping duty orders on welded ASTM A-312 stainless steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan.\\1\\ On...

  16. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  17. Emission of dust and gases in tubular cored wire welding of steel.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Jolanta; Rams, Beata

    2003-01-01

    The emission of dusts and gases, which are generated during tubular cored wire welding and which are hazardous to health and the environment, were studied. Tests included various kinds of tubular electrode wires used for welding steel, that is, rutile flux cored wires, basic flux cored wires, and metal cored wires for welding unalloyed, low-alloy, and high-alloy steels as well as self-shielded flux cored wires used for welding low-alloy steels. The research results make it possible to assess the influence of the type of wire and welding conditions on the emission volume and to compare chemical hazards generated during tubular cored wire welding with those typical for other arc welding processes.

  18. Structural strength of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Raimond, E.D.; Lapin, P.G.; Pautkin, U.S.; Shiganov, N.V.; Tashchikov, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors devise special measures to increase the resistance of welded shells made of corrosion-resistant maraging steels. High structural strenght is ensured for shells loaded by internal pressure when ait (impact toughness) greater than or equal to10 J/cm/sup 2/. For welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels of the O3Kh11N10M2T type, this condition is satisfied when the weld strength does not exceed 1400-1450 MPa. A structural strength of 15001750 MPa in welds of corrosion-resistant maraging steels can be obtained by means of mechanicothermal treatment.

  19. Double-Sided Single-Pass Submerged Arc Welding for 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jian; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaoming; Yao, Zongxiang

    2013-09-01

    The duplex stainless steel (DSS), which combines the characteristics of ferritic steel and austenitic steel, is used widely. The submerged arc welding (SAW) method is usually applied to join thick plates of DSS. However, an effective welding procedure is needed in order to obtain ideal DSS welds with an appropriate proportion of ferrite (δ) and austenite (γ) in the weld zone, particularly in the melted zone and heat-affected zone. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a high efficiency double-sided single-pass (DSSP) SAW joining method for thick DSS plates. The effectiveness of the converse welding procedure, characterizations of weld zone, and mechanical properties of welded joint are analyzed. The results show an increasing appearance and continuous distribution feature of the σ phase in the fusion zone of the leading welded seam. The converse welding procedure promotes the σ phase to precipitate in the fusion zone of leading welded side. The microhardness appears to significantly increase in the center of leading welded side. Ductile fracture mode is observed in the weld zone. A mixture fracture feature appears with a shear lip and tears in the fusion zone near the fusion line. The ductility, plasticity, and microhardness of the joints have a significant relationship with σ phase and heat treatment effect influenced by the converse welding step. An available heat input controlling technology of the DSSP formation method is discussed for SAW of thick DSS plates.

  20. 77 FR 60478 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1279, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. Revision 4 updates the guide to remove references to outdated......

  1. 75 FR 76025 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, Korea, and Taiwan AGENCY: United States... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, Korea, and Taiwan would be likely to lead to...

  2. 78 FR 21105 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Preliminary... tubes from Thailand. This review covers two producers/exporters of the subject merchandise, Saha Thai... The products covered by the antidumping order are certain circular welded carbon steel pipes and...

  3. 75 FR 16439 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe From Turkey: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Countervailing Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on certain welded carbon steel standard pipe from Turkey... carbon steel pipe and tube products from Turkey. See Countervailing Duty Order: Certain Welded Carbon...

  4. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). 54.25-25 Section 54.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding...

  5. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). 54.25-25 Section 54.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding...

  6. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). 54.25-25 Section 54.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding...

  7. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). 54.25-25 Section 54.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding...

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-25 - Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding of quenched and tempered steels (modifies UHT-82). 54.25-25 Section 54.25-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-25 Welding...

  9. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F.; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J.; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel. PMID:7597679

  10. Effect of cooling after welding on microstructure and mechanical properties of 12 Pct Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1997-07-01

    The microstructure of three 12 pct cr steel weld metals with different nickel and nitrogen contents was studied in as-welded condition and after postweld heat treatment with and without intercooling. Tensile strength and impact toughness of the weld metals were investigated in different postweld heat treatment conditions. In weld metals heat treated without intercooling, austenite decomposed by a eutectoid reaction that resulted in M23C6 aggregates around retained δ-ferrite. Two morphologies of M2N and MN precipitates were found in a low-dislocation α-ferrite. It was concluded that these phases were also transformed from austenite. In weld metals heat treated with intercooling, M23C6 precipitates were smaller and more homogeneously distributed. Different MN precipitates were found in the tempered martensite. The fracture mode of the weld metals at room temperature was mainly transgranular cleavage with some fibrous fracture. Intercooling treatment improved Charpy impact toughness of the 12 pct Cr steel weld metals substantially. It was found that the important microstructural factors affecting the impact toughness of the weld metals which were heat treated without intercooling were the sizes of the α-ferrite grains, nonmetallic inclusions, and M23C6 aggregates. For the weld metals heat treated with intercooling, the factors which affect the toughness of the weld metals were the sizes of martensite packets and nonmetallic inclusions.

  11. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  12. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

  13. Nine percent nickel steel heavy forging weld repair study. [National Transonic Wind Tunnel fan components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. P., Jr.; Gerringer, A. H.; Brooks, T. G.; Berry, R. F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The feasibility of making weld repairs on heavy section 9% nickel steel forgings such as those being manufactured for the National Transonic Facility fan disk and fan drive shaft components was evaluated. Results indicate that 9% nickel steel in heavy forgings has very good weldability characteristics for the particular weld rod and weld procedures used. A comparison of data for known similar work is included.

  14. Hybrid/Tandem Laser-Arc Welding of Thick Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates =

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh

    High efficiency and long-term life of hydraulic turbines and their assemblies are of utmost importance for the hydropower industry. Usually, hydroelectric turbine components are made of thick-walled low carbon martensitic stainless steels. The assembly of large hydroelectric turbine components has been a great challenge. The use of conventional welding processes involves typical large groove design and multi-pass welding to fill the groove which exposes the weld to a high heat input creating relatively large fusion zone and heat affected zone. The newly-developed hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding technique is believed to offer a highly competitive solution to improve the overall hydro-turbine performance by combining the high energy density and fast welding speed of the laser welding technology with the good gap bridging and feeding ability of the gas metal arc welding process to increase the productivity and reduce the consumable material. The main objective of this research work is to understand different challenges appearing during hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) of thick gauge assemblies of low carbon 13%Cr- 4%Ni martensitic stainless steel and find a practical solution by adapting and optimizing this relatively new welding process in order to reduce the number of welding passes necessary to fill the groove gap. The joint integrity was evaluated in terms of microstructure, defects and mechanical properties in both as-welded and post-welded conditions. A special focus was given to the hybrid and tandem laser-arc welding technique for the root pass. Based on the thickness of the low carbon martensitic stainless steel plates, this work is mainly focused on the following two tasks: • Single pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick low carbon martensitic stainless steel. • Multi-pass hybrid/tandem laser-arc welding of 25-mm thick martensitic stainless steel.

  15. Immediate hypersensitivity type of occupational laryngitis in a welder exposed to welding fumes of stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Hannu, Timo; Piipari, Ritva; Toskala, Elina

    2006-05-01

    Although upper respiratory symptoms have been reported to occur in welders, occupational laryngitis of immediate hypersensitivity type due to welding fumes of stainless steel has not been previously reported. Occupational laryngitis was diagnosed based on the specific challenge test combined with the patient's history of occupational exposure and laryngeal symptoms. During the past few years, a 50-year-old man had started to experience laryngeal symptoms while welding stainless steel. The welding challenge test with stainless steel caused significant changes in the laryngeal status 30 min after challenge: increased erythema, edema, and hoarseness of the voice. The referent inhalation challenge test by welding mild steel was negative. The welding of stainless steel should be included in the etiological factors of occupational laryngitis of immediate hypersensitivity type. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  17. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  18. Effects of welding technology on welding stress based on the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jianke; Jin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Finite element method is used to simulate the welding process under four different conditions of welding flat butt joints. Welding seams are simulated with birth and death elements. The size and distribution of welding residual stress is obtained in the four kinds of welding conditions by Q345 manganese steel plate butt joint of the work piece. The results shown that when using two-layers welding,the longitudinal and transverse residual stress were reduced;When welding from Middle to both sides,the residual stress distribution will change,and the residual stress in the middle of the work piece was reduced.

  19. Chemical composition variations in shielded metal arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bracarense, A.Q.; Liu, S. . Center for Welding and Joining Research)

    1993-12-01

    The use of shielded metal arc (SMA) welding can result in chemical composition variations along the weld length. Manganese and silicon, commonly found in low-carbon steel welds, change in composition with weld position. This research was performed to better characterize the composition variations observed in structural steel welds and to understand the controlling factors that determine the extent of these composition changes. Single bead-on-plate and multipass welds were performed and analyzed. Manganese, silicon, and oxygen contents showed significant variation along the weld length. To determine the cause of such composition variations, additional experiments were carried out with the welding arc established between the electrode and a water-cooled copper pipe. The individual metal droplets were collected in water and processed using standard particulate materials processing techniques to remove the slag covering. The droplet size distribution was determined and related to the composition variation and position along the weld length.

  20. In-Situ Phase Mapping and Direct Observations of Phase Transformations During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T

    2005-09-13

    In-situ Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments were performed during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. Ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases were identified and quantified in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) from the real time x-ray diffraction data. The results were compiled along with weld temperatures calculated using a coupled thermal fluids weld model to create a phase map of the HAZ. This map shows the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation taking place during weld heating and the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation taking place during weld cooling. Superheating is required to complete the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation, and the amount of superheat above the A3 temperature was shown to vary with distance from the centerline of the weld. Superheat values as high as 250 C above the A3 temperature were observed at heating rates of 80 C/s. The SRXRD experiments also revealed details about the {gamma} phase not observable by conventional techniques, showing that {gamma} is present with two distinct lattice parameters as a result of inhomogeneous distribution of carbon and manganese in the starting pearlitic/ferritic microstructure. During cooling, the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} phase transformation was shown to depend on the HAZ location. In the fine grained region of the HAZ, at distances greater than 2 mm from the fusion line, the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation begins near the A3 temperature and ends near the A1 temperature. In this region of the HAZ where the cooling rates are below 40 C/s, the transformation occurs by nucleation and growth of pearlite. For HAZ locations closer to the fusion line, undercoolings of 200 C or more below the A1 temperature are required to complete the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation. In this region of the HAZ, grain growth coupled with cooling rates in excess of 50 C/s causes the transformation to occur by a bainitic mechanism.

  1. High Strength Stainless Steel Properties that Affect Resistance Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R.

    2001-08-01

    This report discusses results of a study on selected high strength stainless steel alloy properties that affect resistance welding. The austenitic alloys A-286, JBK-75 (Modified A-286), 21-6-9, 22-13-5, 316 and 304L were investigated and compared. The former two are age hardenable, and the latter four obtain their strength through work hardening. Properties investigated include corrosion and its relationship to chemical cleaning, the effects of heat treatment on strength and surface condition, and the effect of mechanical properties on strength and weldability.

  2. Investigations Into the Influence of Weld Zone on Formability of Fiber Laser-Welded Advanced High Strength Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Panda, S. K.; Saha, P.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two different dual phase steel grades DP980 and DP600, and IFHS steel sheets were laser welded by a 2-kW fiber laser. The weld quality of these three different LWBs was assessed with the help of microstructure, micro-hardness and transverse tensile tests. Tensile testing of longitudinal and miniature samples was performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld zone. Formability of parent materials and LWBs were assessed in bi-axial stretch forming condition by Erichsen cupping test. To validate the weld zone properties, 3-D finite element models of Erichsen cupping test of LWBs was developed, and the failures in the deformed cups were predicted using two theoretical forming limit diagrams. It was observed that hardness of the fusion zone and HAZ in laser welded DP600 and IFHS steels was more compared to the respective parent metal. However, 29% reduction in hardness was observed at the outer HAZ of DP980 steel weldments due to tempering of martensite. Reduction of formability was observed for all the LWBs with two distinct failure patterns, and the maximum reduction in formability was observed in the case of DP980 LWBs. The presence of the soft zone is detrimental in forming of welded DP steels.

  3. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  4. Application of lap laser welding technology on stainless steel railway vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao; Wang, Chunsheng; He, Guangzhong; Li, Wei; Liu, Liguo

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steel railway vehicles with so many advantages, such as lightweight, antirust, low cost of maintenance and simple manufacturing process, so the production of high level stainless steel railway vehicles has become the development strategy of European, American and other developed nations. The current stainless steel railway vehicles body and structure are usually assembled by resistance spot welding process. The weak points of this process are the poor surface quality and bad airtight due to the pressure of electrodes. In this study, the partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated to resolve the problems, by controlling the laser to stop at the second plate in the appropriate penetration. The lap laser welding joint of stainless steel railway vehicle car body with partial penetration has higher strength and surface quality than those of resistance spot welding joint. The biggest problem of lap laser welding technology is to find the balance of the strength and surface quality with different penetrations. The mechanism of overlap laser welding of stainless steel, mechanical tests, microstructure analysis, the optimization of welding parameters, analysis of fatigue performance, the design of laser welding stainless steel railway vehicles structure and the development of non-destructive testing technology were systematically studied before lap laser welding process to be applied in manufacture of railway vehicles. The results of the experiments and study show that high-quality surface state and higher fatigue strength can be achieved by the partial penetration overlap laser welding of the side panel structure, and the structure strength of the car body can be higher than the requirements of En12663, the standard of structural requirements of railway vehicles bodies. Our company has produced the stainless steel subway and high way railway vehicles by using overlap laser welding technology. The application of lap laser welding will be a big

  5. Elucidation of high-power fibre laser welding phenomena of stainless steel and effect of factors on weld geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Mizutani, Masami; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-10-01

    The fibre laser has been receiving great attention due to its advantages of high efficiency, high power and high beam quality, and is expected to be one of the most desirable heat sources for high-speed and deep-penetration welding. In this study, therefore, in bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 stainless steel plates with 6 kW fibre laser, the effects of laser power, power density and welding speed on the formation of sound welds were investigated with four laser beams of 130, 200, 360 and 560 µm in spot diameter, and their welding phenomena were clarified with high-speed video cameras and an x-ray transmission real-time imaging system. The weld beads showed a keyhole type of penetration at any diameter, and the maximum penetration of 11 mm in depth was obtained at 130 µm spot diameter and 0.6 m min-1 welding speed. It was found that the laser power density exerted a remarkable effect on the increase in weld penetration at higher welding speeds, and sound partially penetrated welds without welding defects such as porosity, underfilling or humping could be produced at wide process windows of welding speeds between 4.5 and 10 m min-1 with fibre laser beams of 360 µm or 560 µm in spot diameter. The high-speed video observation pictures and the x-ray images of the welding phenomena at 6 m min-1 welding speed and 360 µm spot diameter show that a sound weld bead was formed owing to a long molten pool suppressing and accommodating spattering and a stable keyhole generating no bubbles from the tip, respectively.

  6. Experimental Characterization of Electron Beam Welded SAE 5137H Thick Steel Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattire, Prakash; Bhawar, Valmik; Thakare, Sandeep; Patil, Sachin; Mane, Santosh; Singh, Rajkumar, Dr.

    2017-09-01

    Electron beam welding is known for its narrow weld zone with high depth to width ratio, less heat affected zone, less distortion and contamination. Electron beam welding is fusion welding process, where high velocity electrons impinge on material joint to be welded and kinetic energy of this electron is transformed into heat upon impact to fuse the material. In the present work electron beam welding of 60 mm thick SAE 5137H steel is studied. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of electron beam welded joint of SAE 5137H were evaluated. Mechanical properties are analysed by tensile, impact and hardness test. Metallurgical properties are investigated through optical and scanning electron microscope. The hardness traverse across weld zone shows HV 370-380, about 18% increase in the tensile strength and very low toughness of weld joint compared to parent metal. Microstructural observation shows equiaxed dendrite in the fusion zone and partial grain refinement was found in the HAZ.

  7. Microstructures and Properties of Medium Manganese Sheet Steels - Strategies and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Radhakanta

    2015-10-06

    Medium manganese steels, with 3 to 10 wt pct Mn, have been shown to be capable of being thermally-processed to produce sheet products with a variety of strength-ductility combinations and thus are receiving considerable attention as candidates for 3rd generation advanced high strength steels (3GAHSS). The steels typically contain refined microstructures with characteristic microstructural dimensions of 1 to 2 µm and consist of significant amounts of retained austenite in a fine grained ferritic matrix. Strategies for development of medium manganese steels are reviewed and results of recent property predictions based on composite modeling are presented. The importance of controlling austenite stability is illustrated with data on medium Mn (7 and 10 wt pct.), low carbon (0.1 and 0.15 wt pct) steels. Important forming variables (strain, strain rate, and temperature) are discussed, along with a consideration of yield point elongation, present in many medium Mn steels.

  8. Exposure to stainless steel welding fumes and lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, B; Hansen, K S; Kjuus, H; Persson, P G

    1994-01-01

    Stainless steel welding is associated with exposure to metals including hexavalent chromium and nickel. This study is a meta-analysis of five studies of stainless steel welders and the occurrence of lung cancer. Asbestos exposure and smoking habits have been taken into account. The calculated pooled relative risk estimate was 1.94 with a 95% confidence interval of 1.28-2.93. This result suggests a causal relation between exposure to stainless steel welding and lung cancer. PMID:8199684

  9. Residual stress in laser welded dissimilar steel tube-to-tube joints

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zheng . Lab. of Production Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Austenitic-ferritic dissimilar steel joints are widely used in power generation systems. Their utilization has proved to be efficient in terms of satisfactory properties and the economics. These types of joints have usually been produced using conventional welding processes, such as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. With the rapid development of high power lasers, laser welding has received considerable attention. Laser welding offers many advantages over conventional welding processes, e.g. low heat input, small heat-affected zone (HAZ), small distortion, and welding in an exact and reproducible manner. Residual stress distribution in laser welds may also differ from those made by conventional welding processes due to its special features. Residual stress, particularly tensile residual stress in the weld, can be very important factor in controlling the quality and service life of the welded structure. The formation of tensile residual stress in the weld may result in the initiation of fatigue cracking, stress corrosion cracking or other types of fractures. It is useful, therefore, to understand the distribution of residual stress in austenitic-ferritic laser welds, and thus evaluate the quality of the joints. Although residual stress distribution in the welded joints has been extensively investigated, little data are available for the residual stress distribution in laser welds. The aim of the work was to examine residual stress distribution along laser welds of dissimilar steel tube-to-tube joints, which were made by both autogeneous welding and welding with filler wire. The results were also compared with the joints made by plasma arc and TIG welding.

  10. Precipitation in CF-8M duplex stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Ann M.; Cieslak, Michael J.; Savage, Warren F.

    1983-01-01

    Welds of CF-8M, a cast 316-type stainless steel which normally solidifies as primary delta-ferrite, were induced to solidify as primary austenite by the addition of nitrogen to the shielding gas used during gas tungsten arc welding. Those welds which experienced a shift in solidification mode formed eutectic ferrite during the terminal transient stage of solidification. Primary delta-ferrite and eutectic ferrite are differentiated by their location in the dendritic microstructure. The shape of the ferrite/austenite interface tends to be rounded for primary delta-ferrite and more angular for eutectic ferrite. Elemental profiles were plotted from STEM/EDS measurements across the two types of ferrite, and showed differences between the composition of the austenite immediately adjacent to the primary delta-ferrite, as opposed to the eutectic ferrite. In addition, while the primary delta-ferrite/austenite interfaces are largely devoid of precipitation, the eutectic ferrite/austenite interfaces are densely covered with small precipitates of x-phase. The mean stoichiometry of this phase has been calculated from STEM/EDS data on extraction replicas, and approximates Fe50Cr32Mo13Ni5. Intragranular inclusions were also examined and found to be complex, with most of them containing varying quantities of Mn, Si, and S.

  11. Welding fabrication defects in two offshore steel jacket structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thurlbeck, S.D.; Stacey, A.; Sharp, J.V.; Nichols, N.W.

    1996-12-01

    The results of a survey of welding fabrication defects in two North Sea jacket structures fabricated in the mid 1980`s and the early 1990`s are presented in this paper. The results were used to assess the general defectiveness of the two structures. Information was collected from the initial fabrication inspections and the post-repair inspections. The defects were classified as reportable defects, which remain unrepaired, and repairable defects, which are repaired and re-inspected. The data showed that the defects were exclusively embedded defects or root defects which were detected by ultrasonic and radiographic methods respectively. No surface breaking defects were reported from the magnetic particle inspections. The data were used to determine incidence rates, expressed in terms of the length of defective weld, distributions of defect sizes and the number of defective welds. The results can be used in the consideration of fabrication inspection capability and construction standards, as well as to obtain a measure of the level of reportable defects which remain un-repaired in a steel jacket.

  12. Laser Welding of Coated Press-hardened Steel 22MnB5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siltanen, Jukka; Minkkinen, Ari; Järn, Sanna

    The press-hardening process is widely used for steels that are used in the automotive industry. Using ultra-high-strength steels enables car manufacturers to build lighter, stronger, and safer vehicles at a reduced cost and generating lower CO2 emissions. In the study, laser welding properties of the coated hot stamped steel 22BMn5 were studied. A constant 900 °C temperature was used to heat the steel plates, and two different furnace times were used in the press-hardening, being 300 and 740 seconds. Some of the plates were shot blasted to see the influence of the partly removed oxide layer on the laser welding and quality. The welding set-up, welding, and testing of the weld specimens complied with the automotive testing code SEP 1220.

  13. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  14. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  15. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  16. Microstructure and Failure Analysis of Flash Butt Welded HSLA 590CL Steel Joints in Wheel Rims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xu, Zhixin; Shu, Yang; Ma, Feng

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the microstructures, mechanical properties and failure behavior of flash butt welded high strength low alloy 590CL steel joints. Acicular ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite and granular bainite were observed in the weld. The micro-hardness values of the welded joints varied between 250 HV and 310 HV. The tensile strength of the welded joints met the strength standard of the wheel steel. The Charpy V-notch impact absorbing energy of the welded joints was higher than the base metal, and the impact fracture of the welded joints was composed of shearing and equiaxed dimples. The fracture mode of the wheel rim in the flaring and expanding process was brittle fracture and ductile fracture, respectively. A limited deviation was found in the terminal of the crack for the wheel in the flaring process. A transition from the weld to the Heat Affected Zone was observed for the wheel in the expanding process.

  17. Low Frequency-SAFT Inspection Methodology for Coarse-Grained Steel Rail Components (Manganese Steel Frogs)

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Aaron A.; Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.

    2004-11-01

    In the rail industry, sections of high strength Manganese steel are employed at critical locations in railroad networks. Ultrasonic inspections of Manganese steel microstructures are difficult to inspect with conventional means, as the propagation medium is highly attenuative, coarse-grained, anisotropic and nonhomogeneous in nature. Current in-service inspection methods are ineffective while pre-service X-ray methods (used for full-volumetric examinations of components prior to shipment) are time-consuming, costly, require special facilities and highly trained personnel for safe operations, and preclude manufacturers from inspecting statistically meaningful numbers of frogs for effective quality assurance. In-service examinations consist of visual inspections only and by the time a defect or flaw is visually detected, the structural integrity of the component may already be compromised, and immediate repair or replacement is required. A novel ultrasonic inspection technique utilizing low frequency ultrasound (100 to 500 kHz) combined with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for effective reduction of signal clutter and noise, and extraction of important features in the data, has proven to be effective for these coarse grained steel components. Results from proof-of-principal tests in the laboratory demonstrate an effective means to detect and localize reflectors introduced as a function of size and depth from the top of the frog rail. Using non-optimal, commercially available transducers coupled with the low-frequency/SAFT approach, preliminary evaluations were conducted to study the effects of the material microstructure on ultrasonic propagation, sensitivity and resolution in thick section frog components with machined side-drilled holes. Results from this study will be presented and discussed.

  18. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  19. Initiation and growth of microcracks in high strength steel butt welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Edward

    1993-05-01

    Early tests such as the explosion bulge test created a preference for overmatched welds (welds which are stronger than the base metal) which eventually became codified for many structural applications. While an overmatched system offers advantages such as the shedding of strain to the base plate, it requires the use of expensive fabrication procedures to avoid cracking. Undermatched welding of some high strength steels may offer reductions in welding costs with little sacrifice in weld performance or low cycle fatigue integrity. An experimental study was carried out to observe microcrack initiation and growth of overmatched and undermatched butt welded high strength steel samples using globally elastic low cycle fatigue testing. First, 1 inch thick HY-80 and HY-100 base plates were multipass, spray gas metal arc welded (GMAW) with overmatching and undermatching filler metal using a semiautomatic welding machine. Second, 1/4 inch thick MIL-A-46100 high hardness armor plates (HHA) were manually, two pass spray GMAW welded with two grades of undermatching consumables. Weld reinforcements were removed from all HY specimens and six HHA specimens. All specimens had a crack initiator slit machined in the test section. The specimens were fatigue tested by transverse tensile loading with a 12 to 13 Hz tension-tension profile. The loading range was from 10% to 85% of the tensile strength of the HY steel base plate and HHA weld metal respectively. Crack initiation and propagation was observed in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope.

  20. Welding Stainless Steels and Refractory Metals Using Diode-Pumped Continuous Wave Nd:YAG Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Pong, R; Gauthier, M D

    2004-09-27

    This report provides an overview of a series of developmental welding studies performed on a 2.2 kW Rofin Sinar DY-022 Diode Pumped Continuous Wave (CW) Nd:YAG welder at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Several materials systems, ranging from refractory metals, such as commercially pure tantalum and vanadium, to austenitic stainless steels, including both 304L and 21-6-9 grades, are examined. Power input and travel speed are systematically varied during the welding of each materials system, and the width, depth, and cross sectional area of the resulting weld fusion zones are measured. These individual studies are undertaken in order to characterize the response of the welder to changes in these welding parameters for a range of materials and to determine the maximum depth of penetration of which this welder is capable in each materials system. The maximum weld depths, which are on the order of 5.4 mm, are observed in the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel at the maximum laser power setting (2200 W) and a slow travel speed (6.4 mm/sec). The next highest weld depth is observed in the 304L stainless steel, followed by that observed in the vanadium and, finally, in the tantalum. Porosity, which is attributed to the collapse of the keyhole during welding, is also observed in the welds produced in tantalum, vanadium, and 304L stainless steel. Only the 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel welds displayed little or no porosity over the range of welding parameters. Comparisons with similar laser welding systems are also made for several of these same materials systems. When compared with the welds produced by these other systems, the LLNL system typically produces welds of an equivalent or slightly higher depth.

  1. Synthetically Focused Imaging Techniques in Simulated Austenitic Steel Welds Using AN Ultrasonic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, G. D.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Temple, J. A. G.

    2010-02-01

    In austenitic steel welds employed in safety-critical applications, detection of defects that may propagate during service or may have occurred during welding is particularly important. In this study, synthetically focused imaging techniques are applied to the echoes received by phased arrays in order to reconstruct images of the interior of a simulated austenitic steel weld, with application to sizing and location of simplified defects. Using a ray-tracing approach through a previously developed weld model, we briefly describe and then apply three focusing techniques. Results generated via both ray-tracing theory and finite element simulations will be shown.

  2. Choice of Heat Treatment Regimes for Welded Joints of Preliminarily Mechanically Hardened Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazukhina, E. A.; Priymak, E. Yu.; Gryzunov, V. I.; Firsova, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    Results of an evaluation of the possibility of the use of electrically welded cold-drawn pipe billets from steels 09GSF and 22GYu for making drill pipes with welded-on tool joint are presented. The structure and properties of friction-welded joints are studied in the initial condition and after annealing. The effect of the annealing on the strength characteristics of the joints is considered. The results of the study are used to recommend the steel for the production of a pilot batch of drill pipes with welded-on tool joints and field testing.

  3. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  4. Technical note: Preliminary results on underwater laser beam welding of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.J.; Watson, J.; Deans, W.F. . Dept. of Engineering); Nuttall, R. )

    1994-07-01

    An investigation is underway at The University of Aberdeen using a high-power carbon dioxide laser for direct underwater butt joint welding of steels to assess the quality of welds compared to in-air laser welds. This preliminary work forms part of a general study of the application of laser beam welding and cutting within the offshore oil and gas industry. To this end, the feasibility of laser beam welding in both direct wet conditions and in dry hyperbaric conditions is being explored. Considerable advantages may lie in the remote direct wet repair of pipelines and structural members in terms of convenience, low cost and freedom from diver intervention. The laser beam welding mechanism, being fundamentally different from arc welding processes, may be able to overcome the normal problems of weld embrittlement and porosity when wet welding is attempted. In the current work, the primary concern is with the butt joint welding of steel plate without a filler metal. This technical note provides a comparison of underwater and in-air weld characteristics for fully penetrating butt joint welds, and provides an insight into the propagation characteristics of a high-power beam in water. The effect of increasing water depth is also investigated.

  5. Optimization of process parameters of pulsed TIG welded maraging steel C300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, P.; Jualeash, M. J.; Jishnu, J.; Srinivasan, P.; Arivarasu, M.; Padmanaban, R.; Thirumalini, S.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed TIG welding technology provides excellent welding performance on thin sections which helps to increase productivity, enhance weld quality, minimize weld costs, and boost operator efficiency and this has drawn the attention of the welding society. Maraging C300 steel is extensively used in defence and aerospace industry and thus its welding becomes an area of paramount importance. In pulsed TIG welding, weld quality depends on the process parameters used. In this work, Pulsed TIG bead-on-plate welding is performed on a 5mm thick maraging C300 plate at different combinations of input parameters: peak current (Ip), base current (Ib) and pulsing frequency (HZ) as per box behnken design with three-levels for each factor. Response surface methodology is utilized for establishing a mathematical model for predicting the weld bead depth. The effect of Ip, Ib and HZ on the weld bead depth is investigated using the developed model. The weld bead depth is found to be affected by all the three parameters. Surface and contour plots developed from regression equation are used to optimize the processing parameters for maximizing the weld bead depth. Optimum values of Ip, Ib and HZ are obtained as 259 A, 120 A and 8 Hz respectively. Using this optimum condition, maximum bead depth of the weld is predicted to be 4.325 mm.

  6. Thermomechanical history measurements on Type 304L stainless steel pipe girth welds

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Atteridge, D.G.; Anderson, W.E.; Turpin, R.; West, S.L.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal and strain histories were recorded for three 40-cm-diameter (16 inch), Type 304L stainless steel (SS), schedule 40 (1.27 cm thickness) pipe girth welds. Two weld groove preparations were standard V grooves while the third was a narrow groove configuration. The welding parameters for the three pipe welds simulated expected field practice as closely as possible. The narrow gap weld was completed in four continuous passes while the other two welds required six and nine (discontinuous) passes, due to the use of different weld wire diameters. Thermomechanical history measurements were taken on the inner counterbore surface, encompassing the weld centerline and heat-affected zone (HAZ), as well as 10 cm of inner counterbore surface on either side of the weld centerline; a total of 47 data acquisition instruments were used for each weld. These instruments monitored: (1) weld shrinkages parallel to the pipe axis; (2) surface temperatures; (3) surface strains parallel to weld centerline; and (4) radial deformations. Results show that the weld and HAZ experienced cyclic deformation in the radial direction during welding, indicating that the final residual stress distribution in multi-pass pipe weldments is not axisymmetric. Measured radial and axial deformations were smaller for the narrow gap groove than for the standard V grooves, suggesting that the narrow gap groove weldment may have lower residual stress levels than the standard V groove weldments. This study provides the experimental database and a guideline for further computational modeling work.

  7. Control of Softening Processes in the Heat-Affected Zone During Welding of High-Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimenko, L. A.; Kapustin, O. E.; Ramus', A. A.; Ramus', R. O.

    2016-11-01

    The hardness and the structure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under welding of tube steels of strength category K60 - K70 are studied. The steels are treated by regimes imitating the thermal cycles of different welding processes applied to tubes starting with manual arc welding and ending with energy-intensive automatic submerged-arc welding. The welding modes causing maximum decrease in the hardness of HAZ regions are determined. The conditions preventing softening under one-pass and multipass welding of high-strength steels are presented.

  8. Reliable Welding of HSLA Steels by Square Wave Pulsing Using an Advanced Sensing (EDAP) Technique.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    situation is the result of welding on A710 steel . (A similar effect on welding on HY80 ?) The following is offered by Woods and Milner (Ref. 12): "The...AD-R69 762 RELIABLE MELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE MAVE PULSING 1/2 USING AN ADV NCED.. (U) APPLIED FUSION TECHNOLOGIES INC FORT COLLINS CO C...6 p . 0 Report 0001 AZ AD-A 168 762 I "RELIABLE WELDING OF HSLA STEELS BY SQUARE WAVE PULSING USING AN ADVANCED SENSING (EDAP) TECHNIQUE- Preliminary

  9. The Influence of TIG Welding Thermal Cycles on HSLA-100 Steel Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    THERMAL CYCLES ON HSLA-100 STEEL PLATE Alan G. Fox Sanjiwan D. Bhole November 1993 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Prepared for...Cycles on HSLA-100 Steel Plate I. AUTHOR(S) N00167-93-WR-30331 Alan G3. Fox and Sanjiwan D. Bhole 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION MAMES(S) AND ADORESS(ES...welds were performed on U.S. Navy HSLA-100 steel . Power variations in these welds was achieved by altering the welding speed, voltage and current and

  10. Influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade, V. B.; Mello, R. S. T.; Payão, J. C.; Paranhos, R. P. R.

    2006-06-01

    The influence of zirconium on microstructure and toughness of low-alloy steel weld metal was studied. Weld metals with different zirconium contents were obtained adding iron-zirconium alloy in the welding flux formulation. Weld metal chemical composition proved that zirconium was able to be transferred from the flux to the weld metal. The addition of zirconium refined the weld metal microstructure, increasing the acicular ferrite content. Weld metal toughness, determined by means of impact Charpy-V tests, showed that the zirconium addition is beneficial up to a content of 0.005 wt.%. Above this level, zirconium was not able to produce further microstructure refinement, although the toughness was reduced, possibly due to the formation of microconstituent such as the martensite-austenite constituent (M-A), which is considered to be deleterious to the weld metal toughness.

  11. Characterization of Phase Transformations and Stresses During the Welding of a Ferritic Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, D.; Stone, H. J.; Watson, M.; Rogge, R. B.

    2014-04-01

    The transient stresses and phase evolution have been characterized in the quasi-steady state produced around a gas tungsten arc welding torch in a plain carbon (ASTM 1018) steel using in situ neutron diffraction. A novel method has been developed to isolate the deviatoric or plane stress state in the presence of isotropic contributions to the lattice parameter, such as thermal expansion and solute content. The stress state was found to evolve in the anticipated manner, with compressive stresses ahead of the weld and tensile stresses behind the weld, in the weld and heat-affected zone, and compression in the far field behind the weld. In particular, the region of compression in the heat-affected zone adjacent to and just behind the welding torch expected from weld models was observed. The evolution of phase fraction around the weld was also determined using the technique and the stresses obtained from the ferrite phase.

  12. Design of reinforcement welding machine within steel framework for marine engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Jin

    2017-04-01

    In this project, a design scheme that reinforcement welding machine is added within the steel framework is proposed according to the double-side welding technology for box-beam structure in marine engineering. Then the design and development of circuit and transmission mechanism for new welding equipment are completed as well with one sample machine being made. Moreover, the trial running is finished finally. Main technical parameters of the equipment are: the working stroke: ≥1500mm, the welding speed: 8˜15cm/min and the welding sheet thickness: ≥20mm.

  13. Internal surface residual stresses in girth butt-welded steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, W.C.

    1996-12-01

    Welding residual stresses are often needed as inputs in fitness for service determinations. This paper collects data on the welding residual stress at the internal surface of girth welds in steel pipes. Comparing the available measurements at the weld centerline, large variations can be noted in residual stress, both in the axial and hoop direction, even on pipes of similar thickness. The range can be somewhat reduced by including the effects of welding net heat input and material yield strength, but at best the range is {+-} 0.4 yield strength. Mechanisms of residual stress formation and estimation techniques are discussed.

  14. Joining of high-nitrogen stainless steel by capacitor discharge welding

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.W.; Wilson, R.D.

    1996-06-01

    The effectiveness of nitrogen as an interstitial strengthening agent has led to the development of a new class of austenitic stainless steels -- high-nitrogen alloys defined by their nitrogen contents. Unlike most alloying elements, nitrogen has a very limited solubility in liquid iron-based alloys at atmospheric pressure. Therefore, high-nitrogen stainless steels presents unique challenges since the nonequilibrium nature of the material results in loss of nitrogen from the fusion and partially melted zones during welding procedures typically utilized for stainless steels, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Loss of nitrogen from the molten base metal can result in severe weld porosity and reduced solid-solution strengthening. In this study, rapid solidification joining of a high-nitrogen stainless steel by capacitor discharge welding resulted in complete retention of the nonequilibrium level of nitrogen in the material, which is responsible for the alloy`s high strength. Joining of the high-nitrogen material using optimized welding parameters produced virtually porosity-free welds with joint efficiencies greater than 95% and no heat-affected zone. Optimization of welding parameters was aided by the use of a computer-based data collection system, which allows for a systematic analysis of the effect of welding parameters on weld properties.

  15. Exposure to respirable dust and manganese and prevalence of airways symptoms, among Swedish mild steel welders in the manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Hedmer, Maria; Karlsson, Jan-Eric; Andersson, Ulla; Jacobsson, Helene; Nielsen, Jörn; Tinnerberg, Håkan

    2014-08-01

    Welding fume consists of metal fumes, e.g., manganese (Mn) and gases, e.g., ozone. Particles in the respirable dust (RD) size range dominate. Exposure to welding fume could cause short- and long-term respiratory effects. The prevalence of work-related symptoms among mild steel welders was studied, and the occupational exposure to welding fumes was quantified by repeated measurements of RD, respirable Mn, and ozone. Also the variance components were studied. A questionnaire concerning airway symptoms and occupational history was answered by 79% of a cohort of 484 welders. A group of welders (N = 108) were selected and surveyed by personal exposure measurements of RD and ozone three times during 1 year. The welders had a high frequency of work-related symptoms, e.g., stuffy nose (33%), ocular symptoms (28%), and dry cough (24%). The geometric mean exposure to RD and respirable Mn was 1.3 mg/m(3) (min-max 0.1-38.3 mg/m(3)) and 0.08 mg/m(3) (min-max <0.01-2.13 mg/m(3)), respectively. More than 50% of the Mn concentrations exceeded the Swedish occupational exposure limit (OEL). Mainly, low concentrations of ozone were measured, but 2% of the samples exceeded the OEL. Of the total variance for RD, 30 and 33% can be attributed to within-worker variability and between-company variability, respectively. Welders had a high prevalence of work-related symptom from the airways and eyes. The welders' exposure to Mn was unacceptably high. To reduce the exposure further, control measures in the welding workshops are needed. Correct use of general mechanical ventilation and local exhaust ventilation can, for example, efficiently reduce the exposure.

  16. 77 FR 36256 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Postponement of Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Postponement of Final... investigation on circular welded carbon- quality steel pipe from India.\\1\\ On June 1, 2012, the Department... antidumping duty investigation is currently due on August 6, 2012. \\1\\ See Circular Welded...

  17. 76 FR 78612 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipes and Tubes From India: Rescission... certain welded carbon steel standard pipes and tubes from India. The period of review is May 1, 2010... notice of initiation of an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded...

  18. 78 FR 9676 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China...'') is rescinding the administrative review of the countervailing duty order on circular welded carbon... countervailing duty order on circular welded carbon quality steel pipe from the PRC covering the period January 1...

  19. 76 FR 52636 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Partial... the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe (``circular welded...

  20. 76 FR 66899 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Brazil, Mexico, the... certain circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Korea, and Taiwan; and... initiation of the sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders on certain circular welded non-alloy...

  1. 78 FR 72863 - Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Continuation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Quality Steel Pipe From the People's Republic of China... carbon quality steel pipe (circular welded pipe) from the People's Republic of China (PRC) would likely... circular welded pipe from the PRC pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (the Act...

  2. 76 FR 21331 - Certain Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Brazil, Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, and the People...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... order consists of certain carbon steel butt-weld type fittings, other than couplings, under 14 inches in... consists of certain carbon steel butt-weld type fittings, other than couplings, under 14 inches in inside...-weld type fittings, other than couplings, under 14 inches in inside diameter, whether finished...

  3. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  5. Adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and Listeria monocytogenes on stainless steel welds.

    PubMed

    Casarin, Letícia Sopeña; Brandelli, Adriano; de Oliveira Casarin, Fabrício; Soave, Paulo Azevedo; Wanke, Cesar Henrique; Tondo, Eduardo Cesar

    2014-11-17

    Pathogenic microorganisms are able to adhere on equipment surfaces, being possible to contaminate food during processing. Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are important pathogens that can be transmitted by food, causing severe foodborne diseases. Most surfaces of food processing industry are made of stainless steel joined by welds. However currently, there are few studies evaluating the influence of welds in the microorganism's adhesion. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to investigate the adhesion of Salmonella Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes on surface of metal inert gas (MIG), and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, as well as to evaluate the cell and surface hydrophobicities. Results demonstrated that both bacteria adhered to the surface of welds and stainless steel at same levels. Despite this, bacteria and surfaces demonstrated different levels of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, results indicated that there was no correlation between adhesion to welds and stainless steel and the hydrophobicity.

  6. Effect of preheat on residual stress distributions in arc-welded mild steel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Adedayo, S.M.; Adeyemi, M.B.

    2000-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in the longitudinal and transverse directions on a 6-mm-thick arc-welded mild steel plate was experimentally examined with and without initial preheat. Stress measurements were completed by monitoring strain changes on mounted strain gauges resulting from successive milling of the welded plate specimens. Machining stresses were also compensated for by carrying out measurements of strain changes due to milling operation of a stress-free unwelded annealed mild steel plate. High tensile residual stresses exist close to the weld line in both longitudinal and transverse stresses. Maximum longitudinal residual stress values existing close to the weld line are reduced (between 50 and 75%) due to the effect of initial metal preheat of 200 C of the welded steel plate.

  7. Welding of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Activated Tungsten Inert Gas Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, E.; Ebrahimi, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of the most notable techniques which are developed recently. This technique, known as A-TIG welding, increases the penetration depth and improves the productivity of the TIG welding. In the present study, four oxide fluxes (SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO) were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth/width ratio and mechanical property of 316L austenitic stainless steel. The effect of coating density of activating flux on the weld pool shape and oxygen content in the weld after the welding process was studied systematically. Experimental results indicated that the maximum depth/width ratio of stainless steel activated TIG weld was obtained when the coating density was 2.6, 1.3, 2, and 7.8 mg/cm2 for SiO2, TiO2, Cr2O3, and CaO, respectively. The certain range of oxygen content dissolved in the weld, led to a significant increase in the penetration capability of TIG welds. TIG welding with active fluxes can increase the delta-ferrite content and improves the mechanical strength of the welded joint.

  8. Delta ferrite in the weld metal of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Shiju; Das, C. R.; Ramasubbu, V.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-12-01

    Formation of delta(δ)-ferrite in the weld metal, during autogenous bead-on-plate welding of Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel using Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process, has been studied. Composition of the alloy is such that delta-ferrite is not expected in the alloy; but examination of the weld metal revealed presence of delta-ferrite in the weld metal. Volume fraction of delta-ferrite is found to be higher in the weld interface than in the rest of the fusion zone. Decrease in the volume fraction of delta-ferrite, with an increase in preheat temperature or with an increase in heat input, is observed. Results indicate that the cooling rate experienced during welding affects the volume fraction of delta-ferrite retained in the weld metal and variation in the delta-ferrite content with cooling rate is explained with variation in the time that the weld metal spends in various temperature regimes in which delta-ferrite is stable for the alloy during its cooling from the liquid metal to the ambient temperature. This manuscript will discuss the effect of welding parameters on formation of delta-ferrite and its retention in the weld metal of RAFM steel.

  9. Wet underwater welding trials with commercial manual metal arc electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Abson, D.J.; Cooper, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Six commercial wet underwater welding manual metal arc electrodes were evaluated in trials which simulated repairs to structures in shallow water. Welding was carried out both vertically down and overhead, at a depth of approximately 5 meters. One of the electrodes was an austenitic stainless steel, and the remainder were ferritic steel, containing low levels of carbon and manganese. Two weld configurations were employed in 8 mm thick C-Mn steel plate. Each weld was radiographed, sectioned, and examined metallographically. Tensile, Charpy and hardness testing were carried out. The trials revealed significant differences in the handleability of the six commercial electrodes. Handleability was better when welding vertically than when welding overhead, and was also better for fillet welds than for butt welds. Worm-holes and porosity were common in the latter. Extensive cracking occurred in the panels welded with the stainless steel electrode, preventing the extraction of mechanical test specimens from them. For the weld metal of the ferritic steel butt welds, strength and hardness increased with increasing alloying. Weld metal Charpy toughness varied widely between the different deposits. HAZ toughness was higher than that of the weld metal, but followed the trend of the weld metal data. On the patch plates, failure occurred in the parent steel on cross weld tensile specimens for the ferritic consumables, and in weld metal for the panels welded with the stainless steel electrodes. Viewed overall, two of the ferritic electrodes gave the best handleability and mechanical properties. However, fine-scale cracking was observed in the vertical butt weld deposited with one of them, and thus the other ferritic electrode gave the best all-round behavior. The remaining electrodes showed poorer handleability and a higher incidence of weld defects, including the extensive cracking observed in the butt welds produced with the stainless steel electrode.

  10. Microsegregation in high-molybdenum austenitic stainless steel laser beam and gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kujanpaeae, V.P.; David, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel with 6% molybdenum (thickness 6 mm) was welded using laser beam (LB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes at various welding speeds. Depending on the welding speed the primary dendrite spacing ranged from 12 to 17 ..mu..m and from 2 to 7 ..mu..m for the GTA and LB welds, respectively. Extensive segregation of molybdenum was observed in the GTA welds. The segregation ratio for molybdenum, C/sub ID//C/sub D/, was found to be 1.9 in the GTA weld, and 1.2 in the LB weld. Distribution of iron, chromium and nickel was found nearly uniform in both welds. A recovered microstructure was observed after a post-weld annealing heat treatment. Annealing had a profound effect on the molybdenum segregation ratio in the laser weld. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) determined by a standard test was 55/sup 0/C for welds made using both processes, whereas it was 75/sup 0/C for the base metal. Upon homogenization the CPT of the laser beam weld increased to the base metal value, while that of the gas tungsten arc weld remained at 60/sup 0/C.

  11. Amorphization by friction welding between 5052 aluminum alloy and 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, S.; Tsubakino, H.; Okita, K.; Aritoshi, M.; Tomita, T.

    2000-04-14

    The joining of dissimilar metals such as aluminum/stainless steel is a very important technique. In the case of fusion welding of an Fe-Al system, excess formation of brittle intermetallic compounds degrades the joint. Since friction welding is one of the solid-state bonding procedures, few intermetallic compounds are formed at the weld interface. However, in the Al-Fe system, the solid solubility is almost nil, so some intermetallic compounds will be formed in spite of the friction welding. In the present study, microstructure of the friction weld interface between Al-Mg alloy and austenitic stainless steel was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the mechanism of friction welding was examined.

  12. Investigation of defect rate of lap laser welding of stainless steel railway vehicles car body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxiao

    2015-02-01

    In order to resolve the disadvantages such as poor appearance quality, poor tightness, low efficiency of resistance spot welding of stainless steel rail vehicles, partial penetration lap laser welding process was investigated widely. But due to the limitation of processing technology, there will be local incomplete fusion in the lap laser welding seam. Defect rate is the ratio of the local incomplete fusion length to the weld seam length. The tensile shear strength under different defect rate and its effect on the car body static strength are not clear. It is necessary to find the biggest defect rate by numerical analysis of effects of different defect rates on the laser welding stainless steel rail vehicle body structure strength ,and tests of laser welding shear tensile strength.

  13. Submerged Arc Welding Consumables for HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy)-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    0.001 Manganese 0.02 Silicon 0.01 Phosphorus 0.002 Sulfur 0.001 Nickel 0.05 Molybdenum 0.01 Chromium 0.02 Vanadium 0.001 Aluminum 0.002 Titanium 0.002...carbon-manganese steels with small amounts of alloys added such as aluminum, titanium , niobium , or vanadium . Since these steels exhibit high strength...83 Chemical check analysis for boron and phosphorus ................................................. 88 Mechanical property data summary

  14. Evaluation of Distortion in Welding Unions of 304 Stainless Steel with Elliptic Trajectory Using a Welding Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-González, L. A.; Hurtado-Delgado, E.; Reyes-Valdés, F. A.

    The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the distortions generated in welding unions of stainless steel 304 by effect of the welding temperature and the microestructural changes. The joint design is a 100 × 100 mm steel plate of 3 mm thickness. The plate was joined to a tube of 50 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness, which has a defined angular cut; therefore, the trajectory followed by the seam has an elliptic form. Temperature data acquisition was developed by type K thermocouples, placed in pairs at 0°, 90°, 180° and 270° along the welding trajectory and connected to a data acquisition device yo obtain the measures to generate time-temperature plots. The welding process was executed by a KUKA ®; KR16 welding robot with an integrated GMAW (Gas metal arc welding) process where the input parameters of voltage, wire feed and travel speed are set to constant. The distortion of the work piece was measured using a laser scanning technique that generates a point cloud with the VXelements TM software for comparison between the pre and post-weld condition. Microstructural evaluation was performed on transversal sections of the seam, at the mentioned angles for correlation.

  15. Significance of Delta Ferrite Content to Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    Compositions of AISI Type 308 Shielded Metal Arc Weld Series With Variable Delta Ferrite Content NRL Weld Delta Ferrite T Chemical Composition (wt%) b Code...3 NRL Report201 Significance of Delta Ferrite Content to Fatigue Crack Growth Resistance of Austentic Stainless Steel We!d Deposits J, R. HAWTHORNE...RIults for the preirradlatlon (as-welded) condition show that delta ferrite content a’id tempera. ture variations in the ranges studied do not exert

  16. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Evolution of Welded Eglin Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leister, Brett M.

    Eglin steel is a new ultra-high strength steel that has been developed at Eglin Air Force Base in the early 2000s. This steel could be subjected to a variety of processing steps during fabrication, each with its own thermal history. This article presents a continuous cooling transformation diagram developed for Eglin steel to be used as a guideline during processing. Dilatometry techniques performed on a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator were combined with microhardness results and microstructural characterization to develop the diagram. The results show that four distinct microstructures form within Eglin steel depending on the cooling rate. At cooling rates above about 1 °C/s, a predominately martensitic microstructure is formed with hardness of ˜520 HV. Intermediate cooling rates of 1 °C/s to 0.2 °C/s produce a mixed martensitic/bainitic microstructure with a hardness that ranges from 520 - 420 HV. Slower cooling rates of 0.1 °C/s to 0.03 °C/s lead to the formation of a bainitic microstructure with a hardness of ˜420 HV. The slowest cooling rate of 0.01 °C/s formed a bainitic microstructure with pearlite at the prior austenite grain boundaries. A comprehensive study was performed to correlate the mechanical properties and the microstructural evolution in the heat affected zone of thermally simulated Eglin steel. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was used to resistively heat samples of wrought Eglin steel according to calculated thermal cycles with different peak temperatures at a heat input of 1500 J/mm. These samples underwent mechanical testing to determine strength and toughness, in both the `as-simulated' condition and also following post-weld heat treatments. Mechanical testing has shown that the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) has the lowest strength following thermal simulation, and the fine-grain and coarse-grain heat affected zone having an increased strength when compared to the inter-critical HAZ. The toughness of the heat

  18. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  19. Introduction and Validation of Chromium-Free Consumables for Welding Stainless Steels. Version 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-14

    of such alkali compounds in the gas metal welding arc, the GMAW process generates significantly lower emission of Cr(VI) compared to SMAW. This was...79 7.1.2 Updated Status of Filler Metal Development...Analysis Based on Filler Metal Costs .................................. 83 7.2 Stainless Steel Welding in Locations with Limited Access to

  20. 77 FR 64471 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Final Negative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... Vietnam: Final Negative Countervailing Duty Determination AGENCY: Import Administration, International... welded carbon-quality steel pipe (``circular welded pipe'') from the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (``Vietnam''). DATES: Effective Date: October 22, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Christopher...

  1. Effect of Spot and Stud Welding on ESR 4340 Steel Armor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    ESR ) 4340 steel armor. MATERIALS The armor used in this program was commercially produced ESR 4340 steeL in thicknesses of...N — AO—AO5k 025 ARMY MATERIALS AND MECHANICS RESEARCH CENTER WATERTO——ETC F/S 13/5 EFFECT OF SPOT AND STUD WELDING ON ESR 14314 0 STEEL ARMOR. (U...5 lAD I ~ EFFECT OF SPOT~AND STUD WELDING ON ESR 434O~ STEEL ARMOR~ ~~ - /, ‘ , ~ . ~~~ — ~ — ~~~ — , ~~~~~~ ——-...—- ( -~~/ ~~~ - ‘~/ ~~~ ‘ .

  2. Gravitational effects on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding of 304 stainless steel and Al-4 wt% Cu alloy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Namhyun; Singh, Jogender; Kulkarni, Anil K

    2004-11-01

    Effects of gravitational acceleration were investigated on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution for 304 stainless steel and Al-4wt% Cu alloy. Effects of welding heat source were investigated by using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). As the gravitational level was increased from low gravity (LG approximately 1.2 g) to high gravity (HG approximately 1.8 g) using a NASA KC-135 aircraft, the weld pool shape for 304 stainless steel was influenced considerably during GTAW. However, insignificant change in the microstructure and solute distribution was observed at gravitational levels between LG and HG. The GTAW on Al-4 wt% Cu alloy was used to investigate the effect of gravitational orientation on the weld solidification behavior. Gravitational orientation was manipulated by varying the welding direction with respect to gravity vector; that is, by welding upward opposing gravity ( ||-U) and downward with gravity ( ||-D) on a vertical weld piece and welding perpendicular to gravity (perpendicular) on a horizontal weld piece. Under the same welding conditions, a larger primary dendrite spacing in the ||-U weld was observed near the weld pool surface and the fusion boundary than in the case of perpendicular or ||-D welds. The ||-D weld exhibited different solidification morphology and abnormal S shape of solidification rate curve during its growth. For 304 stainless steel GTAW, significant effects of gravitational orientation were observed on the weld pool shape that was associated with weld surface morphology and convection flow. However, the weld pool shape for LBW was mostly constant with respect to the gravitational orientation.

  3. Effect of Different Casting Parameters on the Cleanliness of High Manganese Steel Ingots Compared to High Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schweinichen, Petrico; Chen, Zhiye; Senk, Dieter; Lob, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    The increasing demand for excellent steel properties has led to the creation of new steel grades such as high manganese TWIP and TRIP steels which are scientifically examined in Germany within the international research framework of the SFB 761 "Steel-ab initio." The production of these high-technology products, utilizing mainly the ingot-casting method, leads to new challenges in the prevention of cast defects. At RWTH Aachen University, a systematic investigation of the solidification process as it relates to shrinkage cavity, macrosegregation, cleanliness, and surface imperfections in as-cast ingots is being conducted. A particular attention was devoted to the effects of such casting parameters as superheat, pouring rate, hot top, and stirring conditions on the solidification and cleanliness of low carbon alloyed and high manganese alloyed steels. The experimental results show that rising manganese content leads to a higher amount and larger size of inclusions while rising carbon content enhances the inclusion generation in the same way. It was found that a bottom teeming system combined with an inert gas atmosphere produces the best quality and that if casting is performed with a runner-system, it is important to use a SiO2-free refractory to avoid oxidizing the Mn content of the melt to MnO inclusions by redox-reactions.

  4. A comparison of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress from welding fumes generated with a new nickel-, copper-based consumable versus mild and stainless steel-based welding in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Antonini, James M; Leonard, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. While federal regulations have reduced permissible worker exposure limits to Cr(VI), this is not always practical considering that welders may work in confined spaces and exhaust ventilation may be ineffective. Thus, there has been a recent initiative to minimize the potentially hazardous components in welding materials by developing new consumables containing much less Cr(VI) and Mn. A new nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu)-based material (Ni-Cu WF) is being suggested as a safer alternative to stainless steel consumables; however, its adverse cellular effects have not been studied. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of the newly developed Ni-Cu WF with two well-characterized welding fumes, collected from gas metal arc welding using mild steel (GMA-MS) or stainless steel (GMA-SS) electrodes. RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were exposed to the three welding fumes at two doses (50 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml) for up to 24 hours. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic function, and cytokine production were examined. The GMA-MS and GMA-SS samples were found to be more reactive in terms of ROS production compared to the Ni-Cu WF. However, the fumes from this new material were more cytotoxic, inducing cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction at a lower dose. Additionally, pre-treatment with Ni-Cu WF particles impaired the ability of cells to phagocytize E. coli, suggesting macrophage dysfunction. Thus, the toxic cellular responses to welding fumes are largely due to the metal composition. The results also suggest that reducing Cr(VI) and Mn in the generated fume by increasing the concentration of other metals (e.g., Ni, Cu) may not necessarily improve welder safety.

  5. A Comparison of Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress from Welding Fumes Generated with a New Nickel-, Copper-Based Consumable versus Mild and Stainless Steel-Based Welding in RAW 264.7 Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Badding, Melissa A.; Fix, Natalie R.; Antonini, James M.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. While federal regulations have reduced permissible worker exposure limits to Cr(VI), this is not always practical considering that welders may work in confined spaces and exhaust ventilation may be ineffective. Thus, there has been a recent initiative to minimize the potentially hazardous components in welding materials by developing new consumables containing much less Cr(VI) and Mn. A new nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu)-based material (Ni-Cu WF) is being suggested as a safer alternative to stainless steel consumables; however, its adverse cellular effects have not been studied. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of the newly developed Ni-Cu WF with two well-characterized welding fumes, collected from gas metal arc welding using mild steel (GMA-MS) or stainless steel (GMA-SS) electrodes. RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were exposed to the three welding fumes at two doses (50 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml) for up to 24 hours. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic function, and cytokine production were examined. The GMA-MS and GMA-SS samples were found to be more reactive in terms of ROS production compared to the Ni-Cu WF. However, the fumes from this new material were more cytotoxic, inducing cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction at a lower dose. Additionally, pre-treatment with Ni-Cu WF particles impaired the ability of cells to phagocytize E. coli, suggesting macrophage dysfunction. Thus, the toxic cellular responses to welding fumes are largely due to the metal composition. The results also suggest that reducing Cr(VI) and Mn in the generated fume by increasing the concentration of other metals (e.g., Ni, Cu) may not necessarily improve welder safety. PMID:24977413

  6. 78 FR 63517 - Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing a revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.31, ``Control of Ferrite Content in Stainless Steel Weld Metal.'' This guide (Revision 4) describes a method that the NRC staff considers acceptable for controlling ferrite content in stainless steel weld metal. It updates the guide to remove references to outdated standards and to remove an appendix......

  7. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    applied to a prototypical (plain) low- carbon steel (AISI 1005) to predict the distribution of various crystalline phases within the as-welded material...a prototypical (plain) low- carbon steel (AISI 1005) to predict the distribution of various crystalline phases within the as-welded material micro...arc voltage/current should be placed between the short- circuiting and spray transfer/mode counterparts. Typically, using carbon dioxide as a

  8. 77 FR 61738 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... preliminary results of administrative review of the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel... (Pacific Pipe) and Saha Thai Steel Pipe (Public) Company, Ltd. (Saha Thai). Based on our analysis of...

  9. 77 FR 73674 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ...-1191-1194 (Final)] Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India, Oman, The United Arab Emirates... of circular welded carbon-quality steel pipe from India, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam... and Conduit, Harvey, IL; JMC Steel Group, Chicago, IL; Wheatland Tube, Sharon, PA; and United...

  10. 78 FR 65272 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Final Results of... antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand. This review covers two... carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand.\\1\\ We invited interested parties to comment on...

  11. 75 FR 73033 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Thailand: Amended Final... steel pipes and tubes (pipes and tubes) from Thailand, covering the period March 1, 2008 through... published in the Federal Register on October 20, 2010. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  12. 78 FR 79664 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of the 2011-2012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico: Final Results of the 2011-2012 Antidumping Duty... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from Mexico for the period November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012... Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from Mexico: Preliminary Results and Partial Rescission of Antidumping...

  13. 77 FR 24459 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... grades of stainless steel and ``commodity'' and ``specialty'' fittings. Specifically excluded from the... International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy: Final Results of... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings (SSBW pipe fittings) from Italy.\\1\\ This review covers...

  14. 76 FR 38688 - Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Institution of a Five-Year Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMISSION Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Certain Welded Stainless Steel Pipe From Korea and Taiwan AGENCY... steel pipe from Korea and Taiwan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of...

  15. Effect of Groove Design and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of P91 Steel Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The martensitic creep-resistant steel designated as ASTM A335 for plate and as P91 for pipe is primarily used for high-temperature and high-pressure applications in steam power plants due to its excellent high-temperature properties such as high creep strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and so on. However, in the case of welded joints of such steels, the presence of an inter-critical heat-affected zone (IC-HAZ) can cause the joint to have lower creep strength than the base metal. In the present study, the effect of post-welding heat treatment (PWHT) and weld groove designs on the overall microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel pipe welds produced by the gas tungsten arc welding process was studied. Various regions of welded joints were characterized in detail for hardness and metallographic and tensile properties. Sub-size tensile samples were also tested to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) with respect to PWHT. After PWHT, a homogenous microstructure was observed in the HAZ and tensile test fracture samples revealed shifting of the fracture location from the IC-HAZ to the fine-grained heat-affected zone. Before PWHT, the conventional V-grooved welded joints exhibited higher tensile strength compared to the narrow-grooved joints. However, after PWHT, both narrow- and V-grooved joints exhibited similar strength. Fractography of the samples indicates the presence of carbide precipitates such as Cr23C6, VC, and NbC on the fracture surface.

  16. Processing-Microstructure Relationships in Friction Stir Welding of MA956 Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Bradford W.; Menon, E. Sarath K.; McNelley, Terry R.; Brewer, Luke N.; El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.; Mahoney, Murray W.; Sanderson, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive set of processing-microstructure relationships is presented for friction stir welded oxide dispersion strengthened MA956 steel. Eight rotational speed/traverse speed combinations were used to produce friction stir welds on MA956 plates using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Weld conditions with high thermal input produced defect-free, full-penetration welds. Electron backscatter diffraction results showed a significant increase in grain size, a persistent body centered cubic torsional texture in the stir zone, and a sharp transition in grain size across the thermo-mechanically affected zone sensitive to weld parameters. Micro-indentation showed an asymmetric reduction in hardness across a transverse section of the weld. This gradient in hardness was greatly increased with higher heat inputs. The decrease in hardness after welding correlates directly with the increase in grain size and may be explained with a Hall-Petch type relationship.

  17. Experimental study of hot cracking at circular welding joints of 42CrMo steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Chen, Genyu; Chen, Binghua; Wang, Jinhai; Zhou, Cong

    2017-12-01

    The hot cracking at circular welding joints of quenched and tempered 42CrMo steel were studied. The flow of the molten pool and the solidification process of weld were observed with a high-speed video camera. The information on the variations in the weld temperature was collected using an infrared (IR) thermal imaging system. The metallurgical factors of hot cracking were analyzed via metallographic microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result shows that leading laser laser-metal active gas (MAG) hybrid welding process has a smaller solid-liquid boundary movement rate (VSL) and a smaller solid-liquid boundary temperature gradient (GSL) compared with leading arc laser-MAG hybrid welding process and laser welding process. Additionally, the metal in the molten pool has superior permeability while flowing toward the dendritic roots and can compensate for the inner-dendritic pressure balance. Therefore, leading laser laser-MAG hybrid welding process has the lowest hot cracking susceptibility.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Poapongsakorn, Piyamon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonitrided low-carbon steels are resistance welded in various engineering components. However, there are no reports on the microstructure and mechanical properties of their resistance spot welding (RSW) joints. Therefore, various carbonitridings were performed on the low-carbon steel sheets, and then various RSWs were applied to these carbonitrided sheets. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of the welding joint were investigated and discussed. The peak load and failure energy increased with the increases of welding current and fusion zone (FZ) size. At 11 kA welding current, the carbonitrided steel joint had the failure energy of 16 J, i.e., approximately 84 pct of untreated steel joint. FZ of carbonitrided steel joint consisted of ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite, and untempered martensite, i.e., the solid-state transformation products, while the microstructure at the outer surfaces consisted of untempered martensite and retained austenite. The surface hardening of carbonitrided steel after RSW could be maintained, i.e., approximately 810 HV. The results can be applied to carbonitriding and RSW to achieve a good welding joint.

  19. Toughness of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acarer, Mustafa; Arici, Gökhan; Acar, Filiz Kumdali; Keskinkilic, Selcuk; Kabakci, Fikret

    2017-09-01

    2,25Cr-1Mo steel is extensively used at elevated temperature structural applications in fossil fire power plants for steam pipes, nozzle chambers and petrochemical industry for hydrocracking unit due to its excellent creep resistance and good redundant to oxidation. Also they should have acceptable weldability and toughness. The steels are supplied in quenched and tempered condition and their welded components are subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Tempering process is carried out at 690-710°C to improve toughness properties. However they are sensitive to reheat cracking and temper embrittlement. To measure temper embrittlement of the steels and their weld metal, temper embrittlement factor and formula (J factor - Watanabe and X formula- Bruscato) are used. Step cooling heat treatment is also applied to determine temper embrittlement. In this study, toughness properties of Cr Mo (W) steels were reviewed. Also transition temperature curves of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel and its weld metal were constructed before and after step cool heat treatment as experimental study. While 2,25Cr-1Mo steel as base metal was supplied, all weld metal samples were produced in Gedik Welding Company. Hardness measurements and microstructure evaluation were also carried out.

  20. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  1. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the <101> + <001> grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  2. The influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qiang; Zou, Yan; Kong, Xiangfeng; Gao, Yang; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The high strength low-alloy steels are welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes. The micro-structural and electrochemical corrosion study of base metal (BM), weld zone (WZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) are carried out to understand the influence of the corrosion product layer generated on the high strength low-alloy steels welded by underwater wet welding with stainless steel electrodes, methods used including, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the WZ acts as a cathode and there is no corrosion product on it throughout the immersion period in seawater. The HAZ and BM acts as anodes. The corrosion rates of the HAZ and BM change with the immersion time increasing. In the initial immersion period, the HAZ has the highest corrosion rate because it has a coarse tempered martensite structure and the BM exhibites a microstructure with very fine grains of ferrite and pearlite. After a period of immersion, the BM has the highest corrosion rate. The reason is that the corrosion product layer on the HAZ is dense and has a better protective property while that on the BM is loose and can not inhibit the diffusion of oxygen.

  3. In-situ phase mapping and direct observations of phase transformations during arc welding of 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, J. W.; Palmer, T. A.

    2006-07-01

    In-situ spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) experiments were performed during gas tung-sten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. Ferrite (α) and austenite (γ) phases were identified and quantified in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) from the real time SRXRD data. The results were compiled with weld temperatures calculated using a coupled thermal fluids model to create a phase map of the HAZ. Kinetics of the α → γ transformation during weld heating and the reverse γ → α transformation during weld cooling were extracted from the map. Superheating as high as 250 °C above the A3 temperature was observed for the α → γ phase transformation to reach completion at locations near the fusion zone (FZ) boundary. The SRXRD experiments revealed that the newly created γ phase exists with two distinct lattice parameters, resulting from the inhomogeneous distribution of carbon and manganese in the starting pearlitic/ferritic microstructure. During cooling, the reverse γ → α phase transformation was shown to depend on the HAZ location. In the fine-grained region of the HAZ, the γ → α transformation begins near the A3 temperature and ends near the A1 temperature. In this region, where the cooling rates are below 40 °C/s, the transformation occurs by nucleation and growth of pearlite. In the coarse-grained region of the HAZ, the γ → α transformation requires 200 °C of undercooling for completion. This high degree of undercooling is caused by the large grains coupled with cooling rates in excess of 50 °C/s that result in a bainitic transformation mechanism.

  4. Welding duplex stainless steels for maximum corrosion resistance in chemical process industry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gooch, T.G.; Gunn, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fabrication of process plant, pipework etc in ferritic-austenitic steels commonly entails fusion welding. The weld thermal cycle can significantly influence material corrosion behavior and hence service performance. The paper reviews the situation, with emphasis on arc welding as most commonly employed by industry. An outline is given of the major metallurgical changes due to welding which take place in the heat affected zone in base steel and in the fused weld metal. The weld thermal cycle experienced alters the ferrite/austenite structure from that in the parent material, and can induce intermetallic precipitation. Nitrogen may also be lost from the weld metal. These changes affect corrosion resistance, and must be controlled to achieve optimum service properties. The consequences of surface oxidation in the weld area and of local residual stresses are also considered, and it is pointed out that resistance to stress corrosion cracking in chloride or sour, H{sub 2}S media is dependent on ferrite/austenite balance. The main factors in formulating a welding procedure are described. Depending on the material composition and joint heat sink, arc energy should be held between minimum and maximum levels to promote adequate austenite formation in the weld area without inducing intermetallic formation. Nitrogen loss should be minimized, and adequate filler should be added: slight overalloying of the consumable is preferred, provided that intermetallic precipitation is avoided.

  5. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  6. Effect of sulfur and oxygen on weld penetration of high-purity austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidun, D. K.; Martin, S. A.

    1997-08-01

    Convective flow during arc welding depends upon the surface tension gradient (dy/dT, Marangoni flow), buoyancy, arc drag force, electromagnetic force, shielding gas, and the viscosity of the melt. The Marangoni and the buoyancy-driven flow are the major factors in controlling weld penetration in ferrous alloys, especially austenitic stainless steels such as 304 and 316. Small variations in the concentration of surfactants, such as sulfur and oxygen, in stainless steels cause significant changes in the weld penetration and depth/width (D/W) ratio of the fusion zone. Gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welds were done on low- and high-sulfur 304 and 316 heats using pure argon and argon/oxygen shielding gases. Also, laser beam (LB) welds were done on the 304 and 316 heats using pure argon as the shielding gas. Increase in the sulfur content decreased the D/W ratio for the GTA 304 welds using pure argon, but for the case of LB 304 welds the results were the opposite. For the GTA 316 welds and LB 316 welds, increase in sulfur increased the D/W ratio of the fusion zone. Oxygen increased the D/W ratio of both the 304 and 316 GTA welds.

  7. Corrosion fracture resistance of welded joints in 16GMYuCh steel

    SciTech Connect

    Steklov, O.I.; Efimenko, L.A.; Khakimov, A.M.; Paul', A.I.; Pushkina, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of combined welding of thick-wall gas and oil chemical equipment consisting of welding the weld root by automatic submerged-arc welding and electrosag welding (ESW) with the control of thermal cycles (CWC) of the main joint, on the corrosion resistance of welded joints in low-alloy normalized 16GMYuCh steel 50 mm thick. The chemical composition of the steel, % 0.16 C; 1.05 Mn; 0.25 Si; 0.42 Mo; 0.14 Ni; 0.1 Cu; 0.11 Cr; 0.049 Al; 0.032 S; 0.019 P. The authors determined the effect of cooling rate in the temperature range of diffusion transformation of austenite on the corrosion resistance of the weld zone. Attention was then given to the corrosion resistance of the welded joints produced by conventional ESW welding and ESW with CWC. The investigations show that the corrosion resistance of the parent metal is lower than that of the welded joints.

  8. [Methodology and evaluation of exposure to fumes formed during welding of chromium-nickel steel].

    PubMed

    Matczak, W; Chmielnicka, J

    1988-01-01

    Using various methods for determination of welding fumes components and taking into account a simultaneous determination of soluble compounds of chromium III and IV, hygienic evaluation in two working places employing different systems of MMA/SS welding, TIG/SS welding and padding was carried out. As it is indicated by the results, proper hygienic evaluation of working conditions is possible owing to the measurements of individual exposure of workers in the breathing zone, allowing for determination of chromium manganese, nickel, and, while applying low-hydrogen electrodes, also fluorides, in every test.

  9. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO2 and Al2O3 were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO2 leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al2O3. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO2, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO2 has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al2O3 does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO2 uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al2O3 results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides. PMID:28788704

  10. UNS S31603 Stainless Steel Tungsten Inert Gas Welds Made with Microparticle and Nanoparticle Oxides.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Po-Yu

    2014-06-20

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference between tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of austenitic stainless steel assisted by microparticle oxides and that assisted by nanoparticle oxides. SiO₂ and Al₂O₃ were used to investigate the effects of the thermal stability and the particle size of the activated compounds on the surface appearance, geometric shape, angular distortion, delta ferrite content and Vickers hardness of the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG weld. The results show that the use of SiO₂ leads to a satisfactory surface appearance compared to that of the TIG weld made with Al₂O₃. The surface appearance of the TIG weld made with nanoparticle oxide has less flux slag compared with the one made with microparticle oxide of the same type. Compared with microparticle SiO₂, the TIG welding with nanoparticle SiO₂ has the potential benefits of high joint penetration and less angular distortion in the resulting weldment. The TIG welding with nanoparticle Al₂O₃ does not result in a significant increase in the penetration or reduction of distortion. The TIG welding with microparticle or nanoparticle SiO₂ uses a heat source with higher power density, resulting in a higher ferrite content and hardness of the stainless steel weld metal. In contrast, microparticle or nanoparticle Al₂O₃ results in no significant difference in metallurgical properties compared to that of the C-TIG weld metal. Compared with oxide particle size, the thermal stability of the oxide plays a significant role in enhancing the joint penetration capability of the weld, for the UNS S31603 stainless steel TIG welds made with activated oxides.

  11. Influence of weld metal alloying additions to extend the heat input range for the submerged arc welding of high strength steels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ramirez, J.E.

    1993-12-16

    Weld metal microstructural development for high strength steels when welded with submerged arc welding process was investigated as a function of consumable composition and thermal experience. Of specific interest is the effect of systematic variations of microalloying additions on broadening of applicable heat input range. Controlled weld metal oxygen content, particularly in the range of 300 to 400 ppm, has been found to improve HY-130 steel weld metal toughness. Molybdenum additions was found to increase the strength of the HY-130 steel weld deposits. Copper additions up to 3.5 wt.pct. were found to strengthen the high strength steel weld metals, in particular, those of higher heat input, 3.6 kJ/mm. Niobium additions alone did not provide as powerful strengthening effect in the high heat input weld metals as the copper additions. In the case of copper-enriched welds, multi-pass welding induced both the precipitation and overaging of epsilon copper precipitates in the reheated weld metal which resulted in non-uniform mechanical properties. When added together, copper and niobium produced the synergistic effect of dual precipitation (Epsilon copper and niobium carbides) which provided the needed strength and thermal stability to the reheated weld metal even at high heat inputs. With this novel approach, the applicable heat input range to produce both adequate weld metal strength and toughness in high strength steels (Sigma y > 690 MPa) can be extended significantly. The optimal additions for copper and niobium were found to be 3.3 and up to 0. 1 wt. pct., Heat input, High strength steel, Precipitation strengthening, Copper, Niobium, Single and multi-pass welding.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welding Between St37 Steel and 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadi, Ali; Shamanian, Morteza; Karimzadeh, Fathallah

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, St37 low-carbon steel and 304 stainless steel were welded successfully, with the thickness of 2 mm, by a friction stir spot welding process carried out at the tool dwell time of 6 s and two different tool rotational speeds of 630 and 1250 rpm. Metallographic examinations revealed four different zones including SZ and HAZ areas of St37 steel and SZ and TMAZ regions of 304 stainless steel in the weld nugget, except the base metals. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy experiments were used to investigate the possible formation of such phases as chromium carbide. Based on these experiments, no chromium carbide precipitation was found. The recrystallization of the weld nugget in the 304 steel and the phase transformations of the weld regions in the St37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld joint. Hardness changes of joint were acceptable and approximately uniform, as compared to the resistance spot weld. In this research, it was also observed that the tensile/shear strength, as a crucial factor, was increased with the rise in the tool rotational speed. The bond length along the interface between metals, as an effective parameter to increase the tensile/shear strength, was also determined. At higher tool rotational speeds, the bond length was found to be improved, resulting in the tensile/shear strength of 6682 N. Finally, two fracture modes were specified through the fracture mode analysis of samples obtained from the tensile/shear test consisting of the shear fracture mode and the mixed shear/tensile fracture mode.

  13. Manganese: it turns iron into steel (and does so much more)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is a common ferrous metal with atomic weight of 25 and the chemical symbol Mn. It constitutes roughly 0.1 percent of the Earth’s crust, making it the 12th most abundant element. Its early uses were limited largely to pigments and oxidants in chemical processes and experiments, but the significance of manganese to human societies exploded with the development of modern steelmaking technology in the 1860s. U.S consumption of manganese is about 500,000 metric tons each year, predominantly by the steel industry. Because manganese is essential and irreplaceable in steelmaking and its global mining industry is dominated by just a few nations, it is considered one of the most critical mineral commodities for the United States.

  14. Hardening characteristics of CO2 laser welds in advanced high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tae-Kyo; Park, Bong-Gyu; Kang, Chung-Yun

    2012-06-01

    When the CO2 laser welder with 6 kW output was used to weld 4 TRIP steels, 2 DP steels and a precipitation-hardened steel, which have the tensile strength in the range of 600-1000 MPa, the effect of welding speed on hardening characteristics was investigated. In the weld of TRIP steels and DP steels, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the HAZ near the bond line, and the hardness was decreased from the HAZ to the base metal. Only in the PH600 steel, the maximum hardness was shown in the fusion zone and the hardness was decreased from bond line to the base metal. The maximum hardness value was not changed due to the variation of the welding speed within a given range of the welding speed. When the correlation with maximum hardness value using 6 known carbon equivalents was examined, those of CEL (=C+Si/50+Mn/25+P/2+Cr/25) and PL (=C+Mn/22+14B) were 0.96 and 0.95 respectively, and CEL was better because it could reflect the contribution of Si and Cr added to AHSS. The maximum hardness value could be calculated by the equation "Hmax=701CEL+281". The phase transformation analysis indicated that only martensitic transformation was expected in the given range of the welding conditions. Therefore, the maximum hardness of the weld was the same as that of water cooled steel and not changed with the variation of the welding speed

  15. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    distribution is unlimited. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation The views...Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation Report Title In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the...utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor- grade martensitic steel

  16. Laser-welded Dissimilar Steel-aluminum Seams for Automotive Lightweight Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimek, M.; Springer, A.; Kaierle, S.; Kracht, D.; Wesling, V.

    By reducing vehicle weight, a significant increase in fuel efficiency and consequently a reduction in CO 2 emissions can be achieved. Currently a high interest in the production of hybrid weld seams between steel and aluminum exists. Previous methods as laser brazing are possible only by using fluxes and additional materials. Laser welding can be used to join steel and aluminum without the use of additives. With a low penetration depth increases in tensile strength can be achieved. Recent results from laser welded overlap seams show that there is no compromise in strength by decreasing penetration depth in the aluminum.

  17. Growth of lamellar pearlite in the weld zone between dissimilar steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Popelyukh, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the welds between high-carbon pearlitic and chromium-nickel austenitic steel workpieces performed by flash butt welding. It has been established that lamellar pearlite colonies alloyed with chromium and nickel are formed in the weld zones between dissimilar steels. Thin austenite interlayers have been detected in the center of ferrite plates. The structure formed presents the C-F-A-F-C-F-A-F (and so on) sequence of three plate-shaped phases. The ferrite-cementite structure in alloyed-pearlite colonies is finer than that in unalloyed pearlite.

  18. Microstructure evaluation in low alloy steel weld metal from convective heat transfer calculations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mundra, K.; DebRoy, T.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Heat transfer and fluid flow during manual metal arc welding of low alloy steels were investigated by solving the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in three dimensions. Cooling rates were calculated at various locations in the weldment. Calculated cooling rates were coupled with an existing phase transformation model to predict percentages of acicular, allotriomorphic, and Widmanstaetten ferrites in various low alloy steel welds containing different concentration of V and Mn. Computed microstructures were in good agreement with experiment, indicating promise for predicting weld metal microstructure from the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  19. Characterization of Defocused Electron Beams and Welds in Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals using the Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W

    2009-01-23

    As the first part of a project to compare new generation, continuous wave, laser welding technology to traditional electron beam welding technology, electron beam welds were made on commercially pure vanadium refractory metal and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel. The electron beam welds were made while employing EB diagnostics to fully characterize the beams so that direct comparisons could be made between electron beam and laser beams and the welds that each process produces.

  20. Design of High Manganese Steels: Calculation of SFE and Ms Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh

    High Mn steels have great plasticity when deformed due to twinning, known as TWIP effect (Twinning Induced Plasticity) or due to martensitic transformation, called as TRIP effect (Transformation Induced Plasticity). The stacking fault energy (SFE) controls the deformation mechanism. So calculation of SFE value and Ms temperature is essential for designing of high manganese steels. For twinning to occur, it is usually necessary for the steel stacking fault energy (SFE) to be in the range of 18-35 mJ/m2. If the SFE is <18 mJ/m2, twinning is replaced by martensitic transformation. However, if it is >35 mJ/m2, then the slipping processing will be the only mechanism that contributes to the plastic deformation of steel. For alloys with Mn content between 15% and 25% the SFE is intermediate and then TRIP and TWIP effects coexist. In this work stacking fault energy of some compositions of High manganese steel has been calculated through thermodynamic model and X-ray line profile analysis and these values are verified with the SFE values available in literature. It was found that value of stacking fault energy calculated through thermodynamic model is found to be close with the value calculated through TEM node method and have large difference in values with comparison to X — ray diffraction method. Different empirical equations are used to calculate the Stacking fault energy of high manganese compositions and Martensite start temperature (Ms). Empirical equations are found to be more suitable for SFE calculation for austenitic stainless steels. Ms Temperature calculation from empirical equations is found to be more suitable for austenitic and high manganese steels.

  1. The time-dependent health and biochemical effects in rats exposed to stainless steel welding dust and its soluble form.

    PubMed

    Halatek, Tadeusz; Stanislawska, Magdalena; Kaminska, Irena; Cieslak, Malgorzata; Swiercz, Radoslaw; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2017-02-23

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. The principal objective of this study was to determine the dynamics of toxic effects of inhalation exposure to morphologically rated welding dust from stainless steel welding and its soluble form in TSE System with a dynamic airflow. We assessed the pulmonary toxicity of welding dust in Wistar rats exposed to 60.0 mg/m(3) of respirable-size welding dust (mean diameter 1.17 µm) for 2 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week); the aerosols were generated in the nose-only exposure chambers (NOEC). An additional aim included the study of the effect of betaine supplementation on oxidative deterioration in rat lung during 2 weeks of exposure to welding dust or water-soluble dust form. The animals were divided into eight groups (n = 8 per group): control, dust, betaine, betaine + dust, soluble-form dust, soluble-form dust + betaine, saline and saline + betaine groups. Rats were euthanized 1 or 2 weeks after the last exposure for assessment of pulmonary toxicity. Differential cell counts, total protein concentrations and cellular enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase-LDH) activities were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and corticosterone and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentrations were assessed in serum. The increase in polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes in BAL fluid (a cytological index of inflammatory responses of the lung) is believed to reflect pulmonary toxicity of heavy metals. Biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar fluids indicate that the level of the toxic effect depends mainly on the solubility of studied metal compounds; biomarkers that showed treatment effects included: total cell, neutrophil and lymphocyte counts, total protein concentrations, and cellular enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase) activity

  2. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  3. Atom-probe investigation of precipitation in 12% Cr steel weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guang-Jun; Lundin, Lars; Andrén, Hans-Olof; Svensson, Lars-Erik

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure of two types of 12% Cr steel weld metals, one with the composition of a common 12% Cr steel and the other with a higher nitrogen content, was studied using TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and APFIM (atom-probe field-ion microscopy) in post-weld heat-treated condition. The microstructure of the 12% Cr weld metals consisted of tempered martensite, retained δ-ferrite, an irregular low-dislocation α-ferrite and precipitates. Precipitates in the weld metals were dominantly M 23C 6 on different boundaries. Plate-like and fine cubic MN and M 2N were found inside the α-ferrite. APFIM analysis showed that M 23C 6 was almost a pure carbide and MN was almost a pure nitride. Carbon and nitrogen in the weld metals mainly existed in the precipitates. High nitrogen content did not change the composition of the precipitates, but increased the quantity of nitrides. Therefore, in the high nitrogen weld metal, the content of strong nitride-forming elements in the matrix decreased. These results are important in order to understand the strengthening mechanism of the high Cr steel weld metals, as well as of other high Cr heat-resistant steels.

  4. Ultrasonic butt welding of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hidai, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Atsushi; Kanai, Ryoichi; Matsuura, Hisanori; Matsushima, Kaoru; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2002-05-01

    Welding characteristics of aluminum, aluminum alloy and stainless steel plate specimens of 6.0 mm thickness by a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding system were studied. There are no detailed welding condition data of these specimens although the joining of these materials are required due to anticorrosive and high strength characteristics for not only large specimens but small electronic parts especially. These specimens of 6.0 mm thickness were welded end to end using a 15 kHz ultrasonic butt welding equipment with a vibration source using eight bolt-clamped Langevin type PZT transducers and a 50 kW static induction thyristor power amplifier. The stainless steel plate specimens electrolytically polished were joined with welding strength almost equal to the material strength under rather large vibration amplitude of 25 microm (peak-to-zero value), static pressure 70 MPa and welding time of 1.0-3.0 s. The hardness of stainless steel specimen adjacent to a welding surface increased about 20% by ultrasonic vibration.

  5. Effect of Initial Hardness on Interfacial Features in Underwater Explosive Welding of Tool Steel SKS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims at investigating effects of initial hardness on interfacial features for identical compositional materials under identical welding conditions. Two underwater explosive welding experiments on tool steel SKS3 with copper foil were carried out: one as-received and the other heat-treated. The welding process was simulated using the commercially available software package LS-DYNA. Numerical simulation gave deformation of the flyer/base plate and pressure distribution during the welding process. Microstructure and hardness at interface of the welded metals were evaluated. The results indicate that decreasing impact energy is accompanied by a shift from wavy to linear interface. Moreover, a comparison of the two experiments allows the conclusion that high initial hardness results in a decrease of wavelength and amplitude under identical welding conditions. Hardness profiles of as-received tool steel-copper welding reveal the hardening effect of impact in the vicinity of the interface. However, of interest is that a decrease in hardness was seen in the case of heat-treated martensitic tool steel with copper, fundamentally differing from previous explosive welding research; phase transition is proposed to discuss the relation between the effects of impact and heat, and those of work hardening and softening.

  6. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Welds Calculated Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    Temperature histories of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and solidification-boundary constraints. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries. In addition, the present study uses experimentally measured estimates of the heat effect zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds.

  7. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  8. Influence of Material Model on Prediction Accuracy of Welding Residual Stress in an Austenitic Stainless Steel Multi-pass Butt-Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Dean; Zhang, Chaohua; Pu, Xiaowei; Liang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Both experimental method and numerical simulation technology were employed to investigate welding residual stress distribution in a SUS304 steel multi-pass butt-welded joint in the current study. The main objective is to clarify the influence of strain hardening model and the yield strength of weld metal on prediction accuracy of welding residual stress. In the experiment, a SUS304 steel butt-welded joint with 17 passes was fabricated, and the welding residual stresses on both the upper and bottom surfaces of the middle cross section were measured. Meanwhile, based on ABAQUS Code, an advanced computational approach considering different plastic models as well as annealing effect was developed to simulate welding residual stress. In the simulations, the perfect plastic model, the isotropic strain hardening model, the kinematic strain hardening model and the mixed isotropic-kinematic strain hardening model were employed to calculate the welding residual stress distributions in the multi-pass butt-welded joint. In all plastic models with the consideration of strain hardening, the annealing effect was also taken into account. In addition, the influence of the yield strength of weld metal on the simulation result of residual stress was also investigated numerically. The conclusions drawn by this work will be helpful in predicting welding residual stresses of austenitic stainless steel welded structures used in nuclear power plants.

  9. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  10. Capabilities of Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for Far-Side Examinations of Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of advanced ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of nuclear system austenitic piping welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements for near side inspection. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm (24inch) diameter, 36mm (1.42inch) thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches ranged in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through-wall to 64% through-wall. The welds were examined with phased array technology at 2.0 MHz, and compared to conventional ultrasonic techniques as a baseline. The examinations showed that phased-array methods were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, the notches and flaws through the welds. The ultrasonic results were insensitive to the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  11. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  12. Re-weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steels studied by multi-pass TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, K.; Oishi, M.; Koshiishi, M.; Hashimoto, T.; Anzai, H.; Saito, Y.; Kono, W.

    2002-12-01

    Weldability of neutron-irradiated stainless steel (SS) has been studied by multi-pass bead-on-plate and build-up tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, simulating the repair-welding of reactor components. Specimens were submerged arc welding (SAW) joint of Type 304 SS containing 0.5 appm helium (1.8 appm in the SAW weld metal). Sound welding could be obtained by one- to three-pass welding on the plates at weld heat inputs less than 1 MJ/m in the irradiated 304 SS base metal. In the case of the build-up welding of a groove, no visible defects appeared in the specimen at a heat input as low as 0.4 MJ/m. However, build-up welding at a high heat input of 1 MJ/m was prone to weld cracking, owing to the formation of helium bubbles on grain boundaries of the base metal or dendrite boundaries of pre-existing SAW weld metal, in the area within 0.6 mm from the fusion line.

  13. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of laser welded high strength low alloy steel

    PubMed Central

    Oyyaravelu, Ramachandran; Kuppan, Palaniyandi; Arivazhagan, Natarajan

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser welded high strength low alloy (HSLA) SA516 grade 70 boiler steel. The weld joint for a 4 mm thick plate was successfully produced using minimum laser power of 2 kW by employing a single pass without any weld preheat treatment. The micrographs revealed the presence of martensite phase in the weld fusion zone which could be due to faster cooling rate of the laser weldment. A good correlation was found between the microstructural features of the weld joints and their mechanical properties. The highest hardness was found to be in the fusion zone of cap region due to formation of martensite and also enrichment of carbon. The hardness results also showed a narrow soft zone at the heat affected zone (HAZ) adjacent to the weld interface, which has no effect on the weld tensile strength. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints were 338 MPa and 549 MPa, respectively, which were higher than the candidate metal. These tensile results suggested that the laser welding process had improved the weld strength even without any weld preheat treatment and also the fractography of the tensile fractured samples showed the ductile mode of failure. PMID:27222751

  14. Influence of sulfur and welding conditions on penetration in thin strip stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, P.R. ); Brooks, R.F.; Mills, K.C. . Division of Materials Metrology)

    1995-02-01

    Welding trials and surface tension measurements have been carried out on 304 stainless steels with sulfur (S) contents between 20 and 100 ppm. Surface tension measurements, determined by the levitated drop method, indicated that the temperature coefficient of surface tension (d[gamma]/dT) changed from negative to positive values at S contents exceeding approximately 50 ppm. Strips with a thickness of approximately 1 mm were GTA welded on both single-electrode, small-scale and multi-electrode industrial-scale units. Welding speeds of 1 to 2 m min[sup [minus]1] were used on the small-scale unit and up to 5 m min[sup [minus]1] on the industrial unit. The weld penetration was found to increase, for both full and partial penetration welds, with (1) increasing sulfur contents; and (2) increasing linear energy. On the small scale-unit markedly higher penetration was observed in heats with S contents > 60 ppm. But the influence of S contents was only of minor importance for welds obtained on the industrial unit. It was found that the similar weld geometry could be obtained for both low ([<=] 60 ppm) and high (> 60 ppm) sulfur contents by careful adjustment of welding parameters. The observed changes in weld geometry are consistent with the proposition that the fluid flow in the weld pool is dominated by thermo-capillary (Marangoni) forces during the GTA welding of thin strips.

  15. Influence of processing on the cryogenic mechanical properties of high strength high manganese stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, R.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    New high strength structural steels have been required for the large superconducting magnets that will be used for the next step test facility for fusion reactor research. The new materials must have high yield strength accompanied with better toughness and better fatigue resistance compared with the conventional nitrogen-strengthened stainless steels such as AISI 304LN and 316LN that were used for the cases of the toroidal field coils for the Large Coil Project. A number of new high manganese austenitic steels have been proposed for new cryogenic structural alloys since they can offer low cost, stable austenite and high strength.

  16. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh R., V.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  17. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-17

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  18. The Influence of Modes of Deposition of Coatings on the Corrosion Resistance of Welded Joints of Steels in Acidic Media;

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Selivanov, Y. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, effect of welding on corrosion of welded joints of austenitic steel 12KH18N10T. It is shown that the use of pulsed - arc welding steel 12KH18N10T allows you to create a protective coating with dispersed structure with less thermal impact on the zone of the welded joint. Coating is of such structure allows 1.5 to 6 times to reduce the corrosion rate of welded joints of steel 12KH18N10T in active chemical environments. Pulse the process of deposition of coatings on welded joint of steels can be effectively used for the protection against corrosion in the repair of equipment of chemical industry. The results obtained can be recommended for use when welding a protective corrosion - resistant coatings on working surfaces of equipment of chemical productions.

  19. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  20. Microstructure and Tensile-Shear Properties of Resistance Spot Welded 22MnMoB Hot-Stamping Annealed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Cui, Xuetuan; Luo, Zhen; Ao, Sansan

    2017-01-01

    The present paper deals with the joining of 22MnMoB hot-stamping annealed steel carried out by the spot welding process. Microstructural characterization, microhardness testing and tensile-shear testing were conducted. The effects of the welding parameters, including the electrode tip diameter, welding current, welding time and electrode force upon the tensile-shear properties of the welded joints, were investigated. The results showed that a weld size of 9.6 mm was required to ensure pullout failure for the 1.8 -mm-thick hot-stamping annealed steel sheet. The welding current had the largest influence upon the tensile-shear properties of the 22MnMoB steel welded joint. The bulk resistance should play an important role in the nugget formation. In pullout failure mode, failure was initiated at the heat-affected zone, where softening occurs owing to the tempering of martensite.

  1. Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - Part II: Finite Element Analyses of Nugget Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes work on finite element modeling of nugget growth for resistance spot welding of aluminum alloy to steel. It is a sequel to a previous paper on experimental studies of resistance spot welding of aluminum to steel using a transition material. Since aluminum alloys and steel cannot be readily fusion welded together due to their drastically different thermal physical properties, a cold-rolled clad material was introduced as a transition to aid the resistance welding process. Coupled electrical-thermal-mechanical finite element analyses were performed to simulate the nugget growth and heat generation patterns during the welding process. The predicted nugget growth results were compared to the experimental weld cross sections. Reasonable comparisons of nugget size were achieved. The finite element simulation procedures were also used in the electrode selection state to help reduce weld expulsion and improve weld quality.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Electron Beam Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmer, John W.; Ellsworth, G. Fred; Florando, Jeffrey N.; Golosker, Ilya V.; Mulay, Rupalee P.

    2017-04-01

    Welds can either be stronger or weaker than the base metals that they join depending on the microstructures that form in the fusion and heat-affected zones of the weld. In this paper, weld strengthening in the fusion zone of annealed 21-6-9 stainless steel is investigated using cross-weld tensile samples, hardness testing, and microstructural characterization. Due to the stronger nature of the weld, the cross-weld tensile tests failed in the base metal and were not able to generate true fusion zone mechanical properties. Nanoindentation with a spherical indenter was instead used to predict the tensile behavior for the weld metal. Extrapolation of the nanoindentation results to higher strains was performed using the Steinberg-Guinan and Johnson-Cook strength models, and the results can be used for weld strength modeling purposes. The results illustrate how microstructural refinement and residual ferrite formation in the weld fusion zone can be an effective strengthener for 21-6-9 stainless steel.

  3. Magnetic Barkhausen noise for reliable detection of the heat affected zone in welded ship steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaow, Mohamed M.; Shaw, Brian A.

    2014-02-01

    The applicability of the Barkhausen noise technique to non-destructively determine the heat affected zone (HAZ) in welded steel plates was investigated. Magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements were conducted on welded hot-rolled low carbon ship steel plates to determine the MBN behaviour following the exposure to elevated heat in a localized region by welding. The exciting field was applied parallel to the weld bead. The results showed a variation in MBN level along a line that crosses the weld bead. The MBN intensity was higher in the near weld material compared with a lower intensity when the measurement setup was moved away from the weld bead in both sides of the weld. The increased MBN level was attributed to the induced residual tensile stresses as a result of the shrinkage of the hot zone. The variation of MBN along the measurement line was eliminated after the welded plate was shot peened. The decrease in MBN intensity after shot peening was attributed to the induced compressive stresses. The results were explained in terms of different mechanisms of interaction of domain walls with residual tensile and compressive stresses.

  4. Research of selected properties of two types of high manganese steel wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewska, A.; Jabłońska, M.; Hadasik, E.; Niewielski, G.; Kawalla, R.

    2011-05-01

    The article presents results of tests that aimed at establishing the impact of deformation on properties of wires made of two types of high manganese steels. The deformation process was carried out with the use of a draw bench machine at a speed of 0.5 m min-1. Mechanical properties and structure of strengthened and annealed wires for both steels at different levels of relative reduction in cross-section were determined. Strength of the tested materials was determined in the tensile test, while its hardness was measured with the Vickers hardness test method. Fractographic tests were performed using a scanning electron microscope. It was shown that at the beginning of tensile test, the investigated high manganese steels were characterized by very high plasticity and become stronger as the degree of deformation grows. Surfaces of fractures that were created in the areas where the sample was torn were analyzed. These fractures indicate the presence of transcrystalline ductile fractures.

  5. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Hovanski, Y.; Grant, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in a lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential: a 0.8 mm thick, electrogalvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5 mm thick hot-dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel. These steels were joined to 2.33 mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and the process parameters were kept the same. The average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating present on the steel sheets, and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulted in the formation of a solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer.

  6. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  7. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  8. Effect of Zinc Coatings on Joint Properties and Interfacial Reactions in Aluminum to Steel Ultrasonic Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, F.; Strong, D.; Prangnell, P. B.

    2012-03-01

    Dissimilar joining of aluminum to steel sheet in multimaterial automotive structures is an important potential application of ultrasonic spot welding (USW). Here, the weldability of different zinc-coated steels with aluminum is discussed, using a 2.5-kW USW welder. Results show that soft hot-dipped zinc (DX56-Z)-coated steel results in better weld performance than hard (galv-annealed) zinc coatings (DX53-ZF). For Al to hard galv-annealed-coated steel welds, lap shear strengths reached a maximum of ~80% of the strength of an Al-Al joint after a 1.0 s welding time. In comparison, welds between Al6111-T4 and hot dipped soft zinc-coated steel took longer to achieve the same maximum strength, but nearly matched the Al-Al joint properties. The reasons for these different behaviors are discussed in terms of the interfacial reactions between the weld members.

  9. Finite element modeling and analysis of electro-magnetic pulse welding of aluminium tubes to steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ramesh; Doley, Jyoti; Kore, Sachine

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic pulse welding is a high-speed, solid-state welding process that is applicable to sheets or tube-to-tube or tube-to-bar configurations. In this article we discuss about the MPW process modeling and simulation for welding Al tubes to steel bars. Finite element simulation was done to weld 6061 Al tubes of 1.65 mm wall thickness to 1010 steel bars of a 47.6 mm nominal diameter. Simulation results indicate that Al tubes can be successfully welded to steel bars using MPW. It is found that the standoff distance between the Al tube and the steel bar i.e. gap between inner diameter of Al tube and diameter of steel bar is a dominant factor for achieving a sound weld. The addition of receding angles to the bars can promote MPW weldability window.

  10. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  11. Fracture Behaviour of Type 304LN Stainless Steel and its Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, J.S.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Singh, P.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-07-01

    SA312 type 304LN stainless steel material, having closer control over impurities and inclusion content, is the intended piping material in the Advanced Heavy Water Reactors. Deformation, fatigue and fracture behaviour of this material and its weldments have been characterized at ambient temperature and at 558 K. The details of the fractographic investigations and stretch zone width measurements are also discussed. The base metals shows high initiation toughness (>500 kJ/m{sup 2}) and large tearing modulus at ambient and operating temperatures. Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) weld metal shows much much reduced initiation toughness and tearing resistance in comparison to base metal and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) welds. This is attributed to larger density of second phase inclusions in the SMAW weld metal. SZW measurements give a good alternate estimate of the toughness of the materials. Fatigue crack growth rate in SMAW weld metal was found to be comparable to base metal at higher load ratios. (authors)

  12. Microstructural Characteristics of a Stainless Steel/Copper Dissimilar Joint Made by Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Xingke

    2013-08-01

    The microstructures and its formation mechanism of a stainless steel/copper dissimilar joint by laser welding were investigated. It was found that the two modes of joining, i.e., welding-brazing and fusion welding, depend on different processing parameters. In the welding-brazing mode, the interface between copper and the fusion zone has scraggy morphology because the molten pool is frozen by solid copper with high thermal conductivity. The interdiffusion of elements occurs in the neighborhood of the interface, which leads to the metallurgy bond of the mode. In the fusion welding mode, the liquid phase in the fusion zone undergoes not only primary but also secondary liquid separation due to the high cooling rate and high supercooling level of laser welding. Some microcracks generated in the fusion zone by thermal stress mismatch are healed by liquid copper filling.

  13. Investigation of the efficiency process during CO2 laser welding of low-alloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Peter; Apostolova, Tzveta

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports results from the theoretical and experimental study of the energy transfer during CO2 laser beam welding of 10 mm low-alloyed steels square butt joints. The laser beam power and the welding speed are varied systematically from 9 kW to 32 kW and from 1 m/min to 5 m/min, respectively. The observed weld depth penetration is up to 10 mm and the width of weld seams is between 0.8 and 1.25 mm. The joining efficiency during the laser welding was in the range of 11.8 to 32 mm2/kJ. Melting efficiency is determined from the measured welding seams cross section for a specified laser power and travel speed. Theoretically, predicted values of melting efficiency are calculated using Rosenthal's and Rycalin moving heat sources equation in 2D (line source).

  14. Characteristics of Laser Beam and Friction Stir Welded AISI 409M Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the comparative evaluation of microstructural features and mechanical properties of friction stir welded (solid-state) and laser beam welded (high energy density fusion welding) AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints. Optical microscopy, microhardness testing, transverse tensile, and impact tests were performed. The coarse ferrite grains in the base material were changed to fine grains consisting duplex structure of ferrite and martensite due to the rapid cooling rate and high strain induced by severe plastic deformation caused by frictional stirring. On the other hand, columnar dendritic grain structure was observed in fusion zone of laser beam welded joints. Tensile testing indicates overmatching of the weld metal relative to the base metal irrespective of the welding processes used. The LBW joint exhibited superior impact toughness compared to the FSW joint.

  15. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  16. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2016-06-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  17. An Approach to Maximize Weld Penetration During TIG Welding of P91 Steel Plates by Utilizing Image Processing and Taguchi Orthogonal Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Debnath, Tapas; Dey, Vidyut; Rai, Ram Naresh

    2017-10-01

    P-91 is modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Fabricated structures and components of P-91 has a lot of application in power and chemical industry owing to its excellent properties like high temperature stress corrosion resistance, less susceptibility to thermal fatigue at high operating temperatures. The weld quality and surface finish of fabricated structure of P91 is very good when welded by Tungsten Inert Gas welding (TIG). However, the process has its limitation regarding weld penetration. The success of a welding process lies in fabricating with such a combination of parameters that gives maximum weld penetration and minimum weld width. To carry out an investigation on the effect of the autogenous TIG welding parameters on weld penetration and weld width, bead-on-plate welds were carried on P91 plates of thickness 6 mm in accordance to a Taguchi L9 design. Welding current, welding speed and gas flow rate were the three control variables in the investigation. After autogenous (TIG) welding, the dimension of the weld width, weld penetration and weld area were successfully measured by an image analysis technique developed for the study. The maximum error for the measured dimensions of the weld width, penetration and area with the developed image analysis technique was only 2 % compared to the measurements of Leica-Q-Win-V3 software installed in optical microscope. The measurements with the developed software, unlike the measurements under a microscope, required least human intervention. An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) confirms the significance of the selected parameters. Thereafter, Taguchi's method was successfully used to trade-off between maximum penetration and minimum weld width while keeping the weld area at a minimum.

  18. Stainless Steel 18-10 CO2 Laser Welding And Plasma Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Amar, Taibi; Michel, Laurent

    2008-09-23

    The welding of materials by CO2 laser took significant considerations in industry, for the reason of the quality of the carried out weldings, and for other many advantages, but the automation of the welding operation requires a control system in real time. The operation of welding is an operation of interaction between the radiation (laser), and the matter (welded part), which is characterized by the vaporization of the matter, formation of the keyhole in material, and appearance of plasma over the material. This study relates to the relation between the welding (molten material) and the plasma which is formed on material. The light emitted by plasma during laser welding was recorded by an OMA detector (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) over a wavelength width of 450 A ring . The analysis of this light allows to determine the composition of this plasma, its dimensions, and the state of its energy according to the laser parameters. The welded material is the stainless steel 18-10, it was found that the intensity of the light emitted by plasma depends on laser power, the welding speed, the flow rate of assist gas. The relation between the plasma and the state of the bead were analyzed for on-line monitoring welding.

  19. Stainless Steel 18-10 CO2 Laser Welding And Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Taibi; Michel, Laurent

    2008-09-01

    The welding of materials by CO2 laser took significant considerations in industry, for the reason of the quality of the carried out weldings, and for other many advantages, but the automation of the welding operation requires a control system in real time. The operation of welding is an operation of interaction between the radiation (laser), and the matter (welded part), which is characterized by the vaporization of the matter, formation of the keyhole in material, and appearance of plasma over the material. This study relates to the relation between the welding (molten material) and the plasma which is formed on material. The light emitted by plasma during laser welding was recorded by an OMA detector (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) over a wavelength width of 450 Å. The analysis of this light allows to determine the composition of this plasma, its dimensions, and the state of its energy according to the laser parameters. The welded material is the stainless steel 18-10, it was found that the intensity of the light emitted by plasma depends on laser power, the welding speed, the flow rate of assist gas. The relation between the plasma and the state of the bead were analyzed for on-line monitoring welding.

  20. Optimization of hybrid laser - TIG welding of 316LN steel using response surface methodology (RSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragavendran, M.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Ravikumar, R.; Saxena, Rajesh; Vasudevan, M.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, the hybrid laser - TIG welding parameters for welding of 316LN austenitic stainless steel have been investigated by combining a pulsed laser beam with a TIG welding heat source at the weld pool. Laser power, pulse frequency, pulse duration, TIG current were presumed as the welding process parameters whereas weld bead width, weld cross-sectional area and depth of penetration (DOP) were considered as the process responses. Central composite design was used to complete the design matrix and welding experiments were conducted based on the design matrix. Weld bead measurements were then carried out to generate the dataset. Multiple regression models correlating the process parameters with the responses have been developed. The accuracy of the models were found to be good. Then, the desirability approach optimization technique was employed for determining the optimum process parameters to obtain the desired weld bead profile. Validation experiments were then carried out from the determined optimum process parameters. There was good agreement between the predicted and measured values.

  1. Blue-light hazard from CO2 arc welding of mild steel.

    PubMed

    Okuno, T; Ojima, J; Saito, H

    2010-04-01

    The objective was to quantify the blue-light hazard from CO(2) arc welding of mild steel. The spectral radiance of arcs in CO(2) arc welding of mild steel was measured for solid and flux-cored wires at welding currents of 120-480 A. Effective blue-light radiance and the maximum acceptable exposure duration were calculated from the spectral radiance using their definitions in American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective blue-light radiance ranged from 22.9 to 213.1 Wcm(-2)sr(-1). The corresponding maximum acceptable exposure duration was only 0.47-4.36 s, meaning that the total daily exposure to the welding arc without eye protection should not exceed this duration. It is very hazardous to view the arcs in CO(2) arc welding of mild steel. Welders and their helpers should use appropriate eye protectors in these arc-welding operations. Also, they should avoid direct light exposure when starting an arc-welding operation.

  2. Qualification of large diameter duplex stainless steel girth welds intended for low temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, K.; Robinson, A.G.; Rogers, P.F.

    1996-12-31

    British Gas recently had a requirement to fabricate some UNS31803 duplex stainless steel pipework for an offshore topsides process plant. The pipework had a maximum diameter of 600mm, with a corresponding wall thickness of 18mm, and it was designed to operate at a minimum temperature of {minus}40 C. There is a lack of published toughness data for girth welds in duplex stainless steel at this thickness and minimum design temperature. Additionally, toughness requirements for girth welds in current pipework and pressure vessel codes are based on experience with carbon steels. As a result, a program of work has been carried out to study the Charpy, CTOD and wide plate toughness of girth welds in 22%Cr duplex stainless steel pipework. The welds were produced using a typical gas tungsten arc/gas metal arc pipework fabrication procedure. In addition, non-destructive evaluation trials have been carried out on a deliberately defective weld using radiography and ultrasonics. It was demonstrated that double wall single image {gamma}-radiography, single wall single image and panoramic X-radiography, and conventional shear wave ultrasonics were all able to detect planar root defects varying from 3 to 7mm in depth. There was good agreement between the sizes recorded by ultrasonics and those measured from macrosections. Small scale mechanical tests demonstrated that welds with overmatching tensile properties, and low temperature toughness properties which were acceptable to specification, could be produced. Wide plate tests demonstrated that defect size calculations from BS PD7493 were conservative.

  3. Friction stir welding of F82H steel for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Ando, Masami; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, friction stir welding was employed to join F82H steels and develop a potential joining technique for a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. The microstructures and mechanical properties on the joint region were investigated to evaluate the applicability of friction stir welding. F82H steel sheets were successfully butt-joined with various welding parameters. In welding conditions, 100 rpm and 100 mm/min, the stirred zone represented a comparable hardness distribution with a base metal. Stirred zone induced by 100 rpm reserved uniformly distributed precipitates and very fine ferritic grains, whereas the base metal showed a typical tempered martensite with precipitates on the prior austenite grain boundary and lath boundary. Although the tensile strength was decreased at 550 °C, the stirred zone treated at 100 rpm showed comparable tensile behavior with base metal up to 500 °C. Therefore, friction stir welding is considered a potential welding method to preserve the precipitates of F82H steel.

  4. Acoustic emisson and ultrasonic wave characteristics in TIG-welded 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Joon Hyun; Lee, Sang Pill; Son, In Su; Bae, Dong Su

    2014-05-01

    A TIG welded 316 stainless steel materials will have a large impact on the design and the maintenance of invessel components including pipes used in a nuclear power plant, and it is important to clear the dynamic behavior in the weld part of stainless steel. Therefore, nondestructive techniques of acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasonic wave were applied to investigate the damage behavior of welded stainless steel. The velocity and attenuation ratio of the ultrasonic wave at each zone were measured, and a 10 MHz sensor was used. We investigated the relationship between dynamic behavior and AE parameters analysis and derived the optimum parameters to evaluate the damage degree of the specimen. By measuring the velocity and the attenuation of an ultrasonic wave propagating each zone of the welded stainless steel, the relation of the ultrasonic wave and metal structure at the base metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) metal and weld metal is also discussed. The generating tendency of cumulated counts is similar to that of the load curve. The attenuation ratios from the ultrasonic test results were 0.2 dB/mm at the base zone, and 0.52 dB/mm and 0.61 dB/mm at the HAZ zone and weld zone, respectively.

  5. Reduction in welding fume and metal exposure of stainless steel welders: an example from the WELDOX study.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Weiss, Tobias; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Zilch-Schöneweis, Sandra; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Brüning, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a plant where flux-cored arc welding was applied to stainless steel, we investigated changes in airborne and internal metal exposure following improvements of exhaust ventilation and respiratory protection. Twelve welders were examined at a time in 2008 and in 2011 after improving health protection. Seven welders were enrolled in both surveys. Exposure measurement was performed by personal sampling of respirable welding fume inside the welding helmets during one work shift. Urine and blood samples were taken after the shift. Chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), and manganese (Mn) were determined in air and biological samples. The geometric mean of respirable particles could be reduced from 4.1 mg/m(3) in 2008-0.5 mg/m(3) in 2011. Exposure to airborne metal compounds was also strongly reduced (Mn: 399 vs. 6.8 μg/m(3); Cr: 187 vs. 6.3 μg/m(3); Ni: 76 vs. 2.8 μg/m(3)), with the most striking reduction inside helmets with purified air supply. Area sampling revealed several concentrations above established or proposed exposure limits. Urinary metal concentrations were also reduced, but to a lesser extent (Cr: 14.8 vs. 4.5 μg/L; Ni: 7.9 vs. 3.1 μg/L). Although biologically regulated, the mean Mn concentration in blood declined from 12.8 to 8.9 μg/L. This intervention study demonstrated a distinct reduction in the exposure of welders using improved exhaust ventilation and welding helmets with purified air supply in the daily routine. Data from area sampling and biomonitoring indicated that the area background level may add considerably to the internal exposure.

  6. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-09-30

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO2 and 100% CO2. The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous.

  7. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. Methods: We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO2 and 100% CO2. The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. Results: The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm2 at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. Conclusions: The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous. PMID:27488036

  8. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, S.; Fernandezbaca, J. A.; David, S. A.; Hubbard, C. R.; Holden, T. M.; Root, J. H.

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction technique. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances strain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ), and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition during welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 +/- 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa +/- 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 x 10(exp -4) compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  9. Welding stainless and 9% nickel steel cryogenic vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Parsons, D.

    1995-11-01

    Gases are often more efficiently stored and shipped as liquids at cryogenic temperatures. Pure gases commonly stored below liquefaction temperatures include oxygen {minus}297 F ({minus}183 C), argon {minus}302 f ({minus}186 C), nitrogen {minus}320 F ({minus}196 C), hydrogen {minus}423 F ({minus}253 C) and helium {minus}452 F ({minus}269 C). Natural gas is also transported and frequently stored as liquefied natural gas (LNG) at temperatures below {minus}261 F ({minus}163 C). Storage tanks for the pure gases are generally shop fabricated in sizes that can be shipped by conventional carriers. Smaller LNG vessels for over-the-road and railroad fuel applications are also shop-fabricated. Shown in a figure is a rail-mounted tank designed to supply liquefied natural gas to locomotives. Another example of a tank installation is also shown. LNG terminal storage tanks are generally field-erected vessels fabricated from 9% nickel steel in sizes of 50,000 to 100,000 m{sup 3} (315,000 to 630,000 bbls). This article focuses on welding practices for shop-fabricated vessels and equipment.

  10. Investigation into Microstructures of Maraging Steel 250 Weldments and Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Fawad; Baloch, Rasheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Bilal; Naz, Nausheen

    2010-03-01

    This study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of microstructures obtained by multipass gas tungsten arc welding in maraging steel grade 250. Metallography and microhardness measurements were carried out on sheet and welded joints in as-welded and post-weld aged conditions. It was found that there was a significant amount of reverted austenite formed on cell boundaries of weld metal after aging at 758-823 K for 3-5 h, and was stable at room temperature. Aging at higher temperatures led to an increase in the continuous network of patchy austenite along the cell boundaries. The reason for the above, in our opinion, is the concentrational heterogeneity which characterizes the microstructure of maraging steel welds. No reverted austenite was observed in as-welded specimens. Solution annealing at 1093 K for 1 h did not completely eliminate the chemical heterogeneity associated with weld structures. However, homogenizing at 1373 K produced homogenous structure that on subsequent aging produces austenite-free lath martensitic structure.

  11. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A MULTILAYERED MULTIPASS FRICTION STIR WELD IN STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    Multilayered multipass friction stir welding (MM-FSW) makes it possible to use FSW to fabricate thick-section structures. In this work, MM-FSW was demonstrated on a high strength low alloy steel; ASTM A572 Grade 50. Three steel plates with thicknesses of 0.18", 0.18", 0.24" respectively were stacked and friction stir welded together to form a 0.6" thick welded structure. The welded plate was sectioned into rectangular bars transverse to the weld direction for tensile testing to evaluate mechanical properties. Digital image correlation (DIC) was employed to map the local strain fields during tensile testing. The initial failure was found to occur simultaneously at the bottom and middle layers away from the weld zone. The top layer failed last in the base metal. The failure locations were consistent among different samples tested. Also, Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted for weld metal, heat affected zone, and the base metal at each layer as a function of temperature. The weld microstructures were characterized using optical and electron microscopy and micro-hardness mapping.

  12. Hydrogen Cracking in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of an AISI Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, P.; Unigovski, Ya.; Shneck, R.

    The effects of in situ cathodic charging on the tensile properties and susceptibility to cracking of an AISI type 321 stainless steel, welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, was studied by various treatments. Appearance of delta-ferrite phase in the as-welded steels in our tested conditions was observed with discontinuous grain boundaries (M23C6) and a dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C), which precipitated in the matrix. Shielding gas rates changes the mechanical properties of the welds. Ultimate tensile strength and ductility are increases with the resistance to the environments related the increase of the supplied shielding inert gas rates. Charged specimens, caused mainly in decreases in the ductility of welded specimens. However, more severe decrease in ductility was obtained after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited massive transgranular regions. Both types of specimen demonstrated narrow brittle zones at the sides of the fracture surface and ductile micro-void coalescences in the middle. Ferrite δ was form after welding with high density of dislocation structures and stacking faults formation and the thin stacking fault plates with e-martensite phase were typically found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodical charging process.

  13. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  14. Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1999-09-29

    'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

  15. Assessment of biological chromium among stainless steel and mild steel welders in relation to welding processes.

    PubMed

    Edmé, J L; Shirali, P; Mereau, M; Sobaszek, A; Boulenguez, C; Diebold, F; Haguenoer, J M

    1997-01-01

    Air and biological monitoring were used for assessing external and internal chromium exposure among 116 stainless steel welders (SS welders) using manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes (MMA: n = 57; MIG: n = 37; TIG: n = 22) and 30 mild steel welders (MS welders) using MMA and MIG welding processes (MMA: n = 14; MIG: n = 16). The levels of atmospheric total chromium were evaluated after personal air monitoring. The mean values for the different groups of SS welders were 201 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 185 micrograms/m3 (MIG), 52 micrograms/m3 (TIG) and for MS welders 8.1 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 7.3 micrograms/m3 (MIG). The curve of cumulative frequency distribution from biological monitoring among SS welders showed chromium geometric mean concentrations in whole blood of 3.6 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 19.9), in plasma of 3.3 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 21.0) and in urine samples of 6.2 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 58.0). Among MS welders, mean values in whole blood and plasma were rather more scattered (1.8 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 9.3 and 1.3 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 8.4, respectively) and in urine the value was 2.4 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 13.3). The analysis of variance of chromium concentrations in plasma previously showed a metal effect (F = 29.7, P < 0.001), a process effect (F = 22.2, P < 0.0001) but no metal-process interaction (F = 1.3, P = 0.25). Concerning urinary chromium concentration, the analysis of variance also showed a metal effect (F = 30, P < 0.0001), a process effect (F = 72, P < 0.0001) as well as a metal-process interaction (F = 13.2, P = 0.0004). Throughout the study we noted any significant differences between smokers and non-smokers among welders. Taking in account the relationships between chromium concentrations in whole, plasma or urine and the different welding process. MMA-SS is definitely different from other processes because the biological values

  16. 75 FR 13729 - Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... International Trade Administration Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea: Extension of... circular welded non-alloy steel pipe from the Republic of Korea, covering the period November 1, 2007 through October 31, 2008. See Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe from the Republic of Korea:...

  17. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  18. Stress Engineering of Multi-pass Welds of Structural Steel to Enhance Structural Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Supriyo; Sule, Jibrin; Yakubu, Mustapha Y.

    2016-08-01

    In multi-pass welding, the weld metal and the associated heat-affected zone are subjected to repeated thermal cycling from successive deposition of filler metals. The thermal straining results into multi-mode deformation of the weld metal which causes a variably distributed residual stress field through the thickness and across the weld of a multi-pass weldment. In addition to this, the as-welded fusion zone microstructure shows dendritic formation of grains and segregation of alloying element. This may result in formation of micro-corrosion cells and the problem would aggravate in case of highly alloyed materials. Local mechanical tensioning is an effective way of elimination of the weld tensile residual stress. It has been shown that application of cold rolling is capable not only of removing the residual stress, but depending on its magnitude it may also form beneficial compressive stress state. Multi-pass structural steel welds used as structural alloy in general engineering and structural applications. Such alloys are subjected to severe in-service degradation mechanisms e.g., corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Welds and the locked-in residual stress in the welded area often initiate the defect which finally results in failure. In the present study, a multi-pass structural steel weld metal was first subjected to post-weld cold rolling which was followed by controlled heating by a fiber laser. Cold straining resulted in redistribution of the internal stress through the thickness and controlled laser processing helps in reforming of the grain structure. However, even with controlled laser, processing the residual stress is reinstated. Therefore, a strategy has been adopted to roll the metal post-laser processing so as to obtain a complete stress-free and recrystallized microstructure.

  19. 76 FR 5205 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings from Brazil, China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand AGENCY... concerning the antidumping duty orders on carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Brazil, China, Japan..., China, Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  20. 75 FR 68324 - Certain Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, South Korea and Taiwan; Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Japan, South Korea and... stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. See Initiation of Five-Year... to the scope of the order. South Korea The products subject to this order are certain...

  1. 76 FR 56395 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Extension of... and tube from Turkey for the period May 1, 2009, through April 30, 2010. See Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey; Notice of Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

  2. 76 FR 3612 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Taiwan; Extension of Time... rescinding the review with respect to Yieh Hsing. See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes...

  3. 76 FR 71938 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time Limit for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Thailand: Extension of Time... the antidumping duty order on circular welded carbon steel pipes and tubes from Thailand for...

  4. 78 FR 79665 - Welded Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-31

    ... Carbon Steel Standard Pipe and Tube Products From Turkey: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... order on welded carbon steel standard pipe and tube products (welded pipe and tube) from Turkey.\\1\\ The... Tube Products from Turkey: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2011-2012,...

  5. 78 FR 286 - Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Amended Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes From Turkey; Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative... and tubes from Turkey for the period of review (POR) May 1, 2010, through April 30, 2011.\\1\\ We are..., as amended (the Act). \\1\\ See Circular Welded Carbon Steel Pipes and Tubes from Turkey; Final...

  6. 76 FR 4633 - Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Court...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... International Trade Administration Carbon Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China... scope of the Order \\1\\ as excluding carbon steel butt-weld pipe fittings from the People's Republic of.... LLC, d/b/a King Architectural Metals v. United States, Slip Op. 10-111, Court No. 09-00477...

  7. 77 FR 10773 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines; Scheduling of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy, Malaysia, and the Philippines; Scheduling of... antidumping duty orders on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy, Malaysia, and the...

  8. 76 FR 67146 - Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Stainless Steel Butt-Weld Pipe Fittings From Italy; Extension of Time Limit... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on stainless steel butt-weld pipe fittings from Italy in...

  9. 75 FR 44763 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From Mexico; Extension of Time... welded non- alloy steel pipe from Mexico. We also received review requests on November 30, 2009,...

  10. 76 FR 40689 - Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time Limit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Circular Welded Non-Alloy Steel Pipe From the Republic of Korea... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain circular welded non- alloy steel pipe...

  11. 76 FR 3083 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Extension of Time... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on certain welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey...

  12. 76 FR 76939 - Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... or cold-rolled mechanical tubing, pipe and tube hollows for redraws, finished scaffolding, and... International Trade Administration Certain Welded Carbon Steel Pipe and Tube From Turkey: Notice of Final... welded carbon steel pipe and tube from Turkey. The administrative review covers the Borusan Group \\1\\...

  13. Three-Dimensional Visualization of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of Steel and Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisada, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Takuya; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Matsushita, Muneo; Ikeda, Rinsei

    2014-11-01

    Material flow is a key phenomenon to obtain sound joints by friction stir welding (FSW), and it is highly dependent of the welded material. It is well known that the optimal FSW condition depends on the welded material. However, the material flow during FSW has not been totally clarified in spite of many researches. Especially, the material flow of steel during FSW is still unclear. It seems difficult to understand the material flow by the traditional method such as the tracer method or observation of the microstructure in the stir zone. Therefore, in this study, the material flow of steel was three dimensionally visualized by x-ray radiography using two pairs of x-ray transmission real-time imaging systems, and was then compared with the material flow of aluminum. The result revealed the effect of the welded material on the material flow during FSW.

  14. Finite element based simulation on friction stud welding of metal matrix composites to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Tharmaraj, R.; Velu, P. Shenbaga; Kumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Friction welding is a solid state joining technique used for joining similar and dissimilar materials with high integrity. This new technique is being successfully applied to the aerospace, automobile, and ship building industries, and is attracting more and more research interest. The quality of Friction Stud Welded joints depends on the frictional heat generated at the interface. Hence, thermal analysis on friction stud welding of stainless steel (AISI 304) and aluminium silicon carbide (AlSiC) combination is carried out in the present work. In this study, numerical simulation is carried out using ANSYS software and the temperature profiles are predicted at various increments of time. The developed numerical model is found to be adequate to predict temperature distribution of friction stud weld aluminium silicon carbide/stainless steel joints.

  15. Experimental characterization of creep damage in a welded steel pipe section using a nonlinear ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, C.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Qu, J.; Wall, J.

    2012-05-01

    To ensure the long and safe operation of power plants, structural parts must be monitored for damage. In the case of welded steel pipes that maintain high pressures in high temperature environments, a common cause of failure is creep damage. Severe creep damage often occurs in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Previous research has shown that nonlinear acoustic techniques are sensitive to creep damage. This research develops a procedure using longitudinal waves to obtain the nonlinearity parameter on a welded steel pipe in order to detect creep damage. These experiments show higher levels of nonlinearity in the HAZ. Additional measurements on an undamaged, welded sample suggest that the high nonlinearity is due to creep (stresses at a high temperature for extended time) damage and not welding (high temperature only for a short time).

  16. Overview of weld repair without PWHT for Cr-Mo steels

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    This a review paper looking at two major programs conducted over the past 5 to 6 years investigating repair welding of Cr-Mo steels without PWHT. The two programs were a joint Ontario Hydro/University of Tennessee program sponsored by the Pressure Vessel Research Council, and a joint Edison Welding Institute/TWI group sponsored project. Both programs developed SMAW controlled deposition welding procedures for repair of 1{1/4}Cr-{1/2}Mo and 2{1/4}Cr-1Mo steels. This review identifies the differences in the two sets of SMAW controlled deposition welding procedures, and reviews the mechanical property and performance data developed in the two programs.

  17. Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-01

    This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

  18. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  19. Austenite Stability Effects on Tensile Behavior of Manganese-Enriched-Austenite Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, P. J.; de Moor, E.; Merwin, M. J.; Clausen, B.; Speer, J. G.; Matlock, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Manganese enrichment of austenite during prolonged intercritical annealing was used to produce a family of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels with varying retained austenite contents. Cold-rolled 0.1C-7.1Mn steel was annealed at incremental temperatures between 848 K and 948 K (575 °C and 675 °C) for 1 week to enrich austenite in manganese. The resulting microstructures are comprised of varying fractions of intercritical ferrite, martensite, and retained austenite. Tensile behavior is dependent on annealing temperature and ranged from a low strain-hardening "flat" curve to high strength and ductility conditions that display positive strain hardening over a range of strain levels. The mechanical stability of austenite was measured using in-situ neutron diffraction and was shown to depend significantly on annealing temperature. Variations in austenite stability between annealing conditions help explain the observed strain hardening behaviors.

  20. Corrosion of stainless steel piping in a high manganese fresh water

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Lutey, R.W.; Musick, J.; Pinnow, K.E.; Tuthill, A.H.

    1996-07-01

    In March of 1993, about two years after startup in early 1991, pinhole leaks were found in the 16 in. (406 mm) type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403) raw water piping at the Brunswick-Topsham Water District (BTWD) Potable Water Treatment Plant (PWTP) in Brunswick, Maine. The low chloride manganese-containing well water is chlorinated in the pump house. After reaching the plant, the raw water is handled in type 304L stainless steel (UNS S30403) piping. It was initially felt that the corrosion might be the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) type corrosion described by Tverberg, Pinnow, and Redmerski. Investigation showed that the role of manganese and chlorine differed, in important respects, from that described by Tverberg et. al., and that heat tint scale may have played a significant role in the corrosion that occurred at the BTWD plant.