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Sample records for manic depressive illness

  1. Manic depressive illness in a founder population.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Evelyne; Toupance, Bruno; Perri, Cesare; De Vito, Ornella; Foncin, Jean-François; Cecilia Bruni, Amalia

    2003-08-01

    Manic depressive illness (MDI) segregates within a founder population originating from S, a mountain village in Southern Italy. Identity by descent of affected persons cannot be established by direct genealogical methods. A 56 000 persons family reconstruction data base encompasses the whole population of S in the 17th and 18th centuries, and part of the population of S and neighbouring villages in the 19th and 20th centuries. We selected 10 MDI probands who were members of the S population and not evident close relatives of each other. A total of 10 other MDI probands not evidently related to the S population formed a first control group. A second control group was formed with 10 not closely related persons originating within the S population. We determined the founders common ancestors to all the probands of one group but not ancestors to the probands of other groups, and computed the genetic contribution of each founder to each proband. The distance between probands in the S MDI group was calculated with respect to all the founders. In all, 17 founders present in the ascendancy of all individuals of the S MDI group are not present in the ascendancy of the control groups: MDI patients are derived from a subpopulation within S. Two S MDI probands are far from one another in respect of the 'nonspecific' founders, but are very close in respect of the specific founders: a putative MDI trait originated from specific founders of the MDI subpopulation, and hence is identical by descent in the S population.

  2. The Misdiagnosis of Black Patients with Manic Depressive Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.; Mehta, Harshad

    1980-01-01

    It has been shown repeatedly that, contrary to earlier beliefs, blacks may well demonstrate similar prevalence rates for manic depressive illness when compared with whites. Yet the authors believe that black manic depressive patients are frequently misdiagnosed as being chronic undifferentiated schizophrenics and treated with major tranquilizers when lithium is the drug of choice. This contention is supported by three case histories and some institutional dynamics that cause this form of iatrogenic morbidity to continue to prey upon black psychiatric patients. PMID:7365814

  3. Linkage study between manic-depressive illness and chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Flint, T.

    1996-04-09

    Chromosome 21, of interest as potentially containing a disease gene for manic-depressive illness as possible evidence for a gene predisposing to affective disorder, has recently been reported in a single large family as well as samples of families. The present study investigates for linkage between manic-depressive illness and markers covering the long arm of chromosome 21 in two manic-depressive families, using ten microsatellite polymorphisms as markers. No conclusive evidence for a disease gene on the long arm of chromosome 21 was found. Assuming either a dominant or recessive mode of inheritance, close linkage to the marker PFKL, which has been reported as possibly linked to affective disorder, seems unlikely in the families studied here. PFKL and more telomeric markers yielded small positive lod scores at higher recombination fractions in the largest family, and small positive lod scores at lower recombination fractions in the affecteds-only analyses in the smallest family. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Linkage analysis between manic-depressive illness and 35 classical markers

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Eiberg, H.

    1994-06-15

    The present study used carefully established phenotypes, several methods to reduce misclassification, and conservative genetic parameters. For the 35 markers investigated no evidence of linkage to manic-depressive illness was found, especially not to the markers on chromosomes 4q, 9q, and 19, which earlier has been suggested as possibly being linked to subtypes of manic-depressive illness. Close linkage to FY and SS(GYPB) was excluded for all chosen phenotypic models and to ACP1 and ADA for broader phenotypic models. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Systematic chromosome examination of two families with schizophrenia and two families with manic depressive illness

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, U.; Mors, O.; Ewald, H.

    1996-02-16

    Systematic and detailed chromosome analysis, combined with a semistructured interview, was performed in 2 families with schizophrenia and in 2 families with manic depressive illness. Prometaphase technique did not reveal any subtle structural chromosome abnormalities. However, in standard techniques, gain and loss of sex chromosomes were observed. This occurred in patients at a younger age than in unaffected persons. This gives rise to the suspicion that sex chromosome aneuploidy may somehow be related to the development of psychosis. But since the data set is small, especially with respect to schizophrenia, further studies are needed to elucidate this observation. In one family, cosegregation of the disease locus with a marker on chromosome 21 was seen. Therefore, further research should determine if chromosome 21 contains a gene for manic depressive illness. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. An association between Manic-depressive illness and a pseudoautosomal DNA marker

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Toshiaki; Ishida, Toru; Inayama, Yasuhiro; Nonomura, Yasuhiro; Kono, Yoshihiro; Asaba, Hiroyuki )

    1992-11-01

    This article reports on the association between manic-depressive illness and a polymorphic DNA marker in the pseudoautosomal region (Xp22.32; Yp11.3). The authors studied two markers in 49 biologically unrelated patients and 119 normal controls. Probe 362A (DXYS20) identified four alleles. Frequencies of the A4 allele were significantly higher in patients than in controls. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  7. [Endocrinological examination and its clinical significance in manic-depressive illness].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, J; Hazama, H; Kishimoto, A

    1994-05-01

    Neuro-endocrine test is one of the useful strategies in examining the pathophysiology of manic-depressive illness (MDI). Unfortunately, however, the pathophysiology of MDI has not yet been clarified and the specific biological markers of MDI have still not been found. In the present paper, a brief general survey as to main clinical points of endocrinological examination and its results towards the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, growth hormone, melatonin, etc. are given and some mentions of biological markers in MDI are made.

  8. Linkage analysis between manic-depressive illness and markers on the long arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Eiberg, H.

    1995-10-09

    The long arm of chromosome 11 is one of the most interesting regions in the search for major genes involved in the etiology of manic-depressive illness. Several candidate genes have been identified, including the gene encoding the dopamine D2 receptor, the M1 muscarinic receptor, and porfobillinogen deaminase. Furthermore, different families with co-segregation of psychiatric illness and structural chromosome abnormalities involving regions 11q21, 11q22.3, and 11q25 have been reported. Using narrow as well as broad phenotypic models, conservative genetic parameters, models with dominant or recessive modes of inheritance, and various methods to reduce misclassification, the present study did not find evidence for a major gene causing manic-depressive illness on the long arm of chromosome 11. In the broader phenotypic models multi-point analyses excluded at least 11q14 to 11q23.3, approximately 60 cM, even in one large family. Assuming homogeneity, close linkage to DRD2 was excluded for all dominant models, and also in the affecteds-only analyses in the large family alone. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Lack of association between manic-depressive illness and a highly polymorphic marker from GABRA3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Puertollano, R.; Piqueras, J.F.; Visedo, G.

    1995-10-09

    We have carried out an association study between a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in GABRA3 gene and manic-depressive illness in a Spanish population. This may be an important candidate gene for bipolar affective disorders since it is located in the Xq28 region, previously implicated in linkage studies. In addition, severe GABergic alterations have been reported in patients. We have not found significant differences between controls and patients in allele frequencies or genotypes. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Familial cosegregation of manic-depressive illness and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Piqueras, J.F.; Santos, J.; Puertollano, R.

    1995-06-19

    We report on a Spanish family with co-occurrence of manic-depression and a form of hereditary cerebellar ataxia. All affected individuals in the second generation showed cerebellar ataxia and manic-depression simultaneously. Since anticipation has been described in both disorders and the pattern of segregation may be autosomal as well as X-linked, we have searched for a possible involvement of two candidate genes which are located either on an autosome (SCA1) or on the X-chromosome (GABRA3). We concluded that expansion of trinucleotide repeats at SCA1 gene cannot be considered as a disease-causing mutation, and this gene should be initially discarded. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Cade's identification of lithium for manic-depressive illness--the prospector who found a gold nugget.

    PubMed

    Cole, Neil; Parker, Gordon

    2012-12-01

    John Cade's identification of lithium as a treatment of manic-depressive illness has been judged as a landmark biomedical advance and as an initiator of modern psychopharmacology. His personal background, interests, character, experiences, and key observational skills are sketched to provide the background and logic for his discovery and to argue against his simple self-description as a clinician administrator. The Cade story illustrates the potential strengths of clinical research whereby the clinician observes "signals," formulates hypotheses and explanations, and then pursues or encourages their validity and application. The suggestion that Cade simply "rediscovered lithium" is rejected. PMID:23197126

  12. Reconsidering the classification of schizophrenia and manic depressive illness--a critical analysis and new conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Kalina; Lieberman, Jeffrey

    2003-04-01

    The idea of 'disease entity' in psychiatry and the nosologic map of insanity with the distinction between dementia praecox (schizophrenia since Bleuler 1911) and manic depressive insanity, originally developed by Emil Kraepelin (1986), is an important landmark in the history of psychiatry (Jablensky 1995). This classification, however, has been vigorously debated throughout the years, and new evidence emerging from epidemiological, clinical, genetic and biological research demonstrates that the two nosological categories have distinct features as well as share many similarities in their risk factors, genetic predisposition, brain pathology, neurophysiology, clinical phenomenology and response to treatment, thus raising questions about the validity of the categorical classification of psychoses. In this paper we examine some of the similarities and differences between schizophrenia and bipolar illness emerging from recent biological and clinical research and attempt to clarify major inherent logical contradictions in the application of the 'disease' model of psychiatric diagnosis to the categorical classification of schizophrenia and bipolar illness. Then we examine how similar predicaments have been resolved in other natural classification systems, namely the biological classification of species and the periodic table of the elements. Finally we propose a hypothetical conceptual approach to the classification of psychoses that has been greatly informed by the organizing principle underlying the periodic table of the elements, and is distinct from the 'disease' model of psychiatric classification.

  13. Andrés Piquer-Arrufat (1711-1772): contributions of an eighteenth-century spanish physician to the concept of manic-depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Jesús; Baldessarini, Ross J; Cruz, Núria; Salvatore, Paola; Vieta, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Largely unknown in Anglophonic medicine, eighteenth-century Spanish physician-scholar Andrés Piquer-Arrufat was early to coin a name (affectio melancholico-maníaca, or "melancholic-manic illness") for the syndrome that emerged much later as manic-depressive illness and then bipolar disorder. He considered it a single, independent diagnostic entity, distinct from mania and melancholia, with varying manifestations over time. Piquer recognized mixed states, seasonality, and rapid cycling, and hypothesized "mental or cerebral damage" as underlying the disorder. His formulations evolved from clinical observations of patients over time, including his detailed longitudinal clinical description of Spanish King Ferdinand VI (1759), and as presented in his own medical textbook (1764). Piquer anticipated the often cited nineteenth-century works of Jean Falret and Jules Baillarger in Paris, and later, Emil Kraepelin in Heidelberg, by more than a century. PMID:21425935

  14. Integrated theory to unify status among schizophrenia and manic depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, K

    2015-10-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 is primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, and has been associated with both schizophrenia and depression. Although decreased serotonin activity has been reported in both depression and mania, it is important to investigate the interaction between serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems. There are competitive relationships between branched-chain amino acids, and tryptophan and tyrosine that relate to physical activity, and between L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), both highly dependent on intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin concentrations. Here, I propose a chaos theory for schizophrenia, mania, and depression using the competitive interaction between tryptophan and tyrosine with regard to the blood-brain barrier and coenzyme tetrahydrobiopterin. Mania may be due to the initial conditions of physical hyperactivity and hypofunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing increased dopamine. Depression may be due to the initial conditions of physical hypoactivity and hypofunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing decreased serotonin. Psychomotor excitation may be due to the initial conditions of physical hyperactivity and hyperfunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing increased serotonin and substantially increased dopamine. The hallucinatory-paranoid state may be due to the initial conditions of physical hypoactivity and hyperfunctional 5-HTP-producing cells inducing increased serotonin and dopamine. PMID:26141636

  15. In vivo assessment of dopamine D-2 and serotonin S-2 receptors measured by C-11 N-methylspiperone (NMSP) in manic-depressive illness

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.F.; Pearlson, G.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Suneja, S.; Bjorgvinsson, E.; Links, J.M.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Schaerf, F.

    1985-05-01

    The hypothesis has been suggested that either the dopaminergic or serotonergic neurotransmitter systems may be involved in manic-depressive illness (MD). The authors have studied 16 subjects with C-11 NMSP PET imaging. Two had never received neuroleptics; 4 were drug free for 1 month at the time of scanning; of these 3 were acutely manic; the rest were on stable lithium treatment. The dopamine and serotonin binding was estimated by the 43 min. caudate/cerebellum (Ca/Cb) and frontal/cerebellum (FC/Cb) ratios, respectively. No statistically significant difference was detected when compared to 44 age and sex matched controls. Based upon the variance in the normal data and the average age of the patient group studied, the probability of detecting a difference of >30% between patients and normals is >0.8. Hence, identification of receptor abnormalities if present will be improved with increased sample size of both normals and patients.

  16. Kraepelin and manic-depressive insanity: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Mondimore, Francis M

    2005-02-01

    Since the time of the ancient Greeks, physicians have recognized a certain relatedness between the mental states of depression and mania. In the mid-Nineteenth century, French alienists proposed a 'double' or 'circular' illness consisting of alternating depressed and manic episodes and at the beginning of the twentieth century, Emil Kraepelin introduced the term 'manic-depressive insanity.' Kraepelin's broad clinical experience resulted in compelling descriptions of the symptoms of mood disorders that have arguably never been surpassed. The Kraepelinian nosology continues to provide a touchstone for modern classification systems of the mood disorders.

  17. Pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 and manic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Erdmann, J.; Koerner, J.; Rietschel, M.; Propping, P. ); Rappold, G.A. ); Fritze, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Yoneda et al. (1992) observed a significant association between manic-depressive illness and a 13.5-kb band of the pseudoautosomal marker DXYS20 (probe 362A) in EcoRI digests of 49 Japanese patients compared with 119 controls. The 13.5-kb allele was designated [open quotes]A4 allele[close quotes] and was found on at least one chromosome in 46.9% of the patients, compared with 26.1% of the controls. The relative risk of the A4 allele for the disease was 2.51. The authors have genotyped the EcoRI RFLP in 73 patients (40 females and 33 males) who fulfill DSM-III-R criteria of manic-depressive illness (bipolar affective disorder) and in 79 controls (34 females and 45 males). All subjects included in the study were unrelated and were of German descent. They used the probe 3cos-PP, which, by sequence analysis, was shown to be directly homologous to the independently cloned probe 362A (Rappold et al. 1992). The pseudoautosomal locus DXYS20 represents a VNTR-like minisatellite, and many polymorphic bands are recognized by means of several restriction endonucleases (Page et al. 1987). In EcoRI digests, sizes of bands cluster, and the authors grouped their bands according to allele sizes used by Yoneda et al. In addition to the alleles reported by Yoneda et al., they observed a 10-kb band in five subjects. The results are shown in a table. The frequency of the A4 allele did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Thus, the data do not support a widespread or consistent association between DXYS20 and bipolar affective disorder. A large degree of ethnic variation is seen with DXYS20 (Rappold et al. 1992) and might explain the difference of allele frequencies in controls from Japan and Germany. Since VNTRs evolve rapidly, they may not always be the best markers to detect disease associations, where a positive effect requires linkage disequilibrium. In any case, it should be useful to study larger samples of Japanese patients and controls. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  18. [THE MANIC DEPRESSIVE DISEASE: PSYCHODYNAMICS ASPECTS AND AFFECTIVE SYNTONY].

    PubMed

    Widakowich, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In a time when manic-depressive disease became bipolar disorder, and it is conceptualized and treated almost as a fully medical illness, such as epilepsy, we found worth returning to some psychodynamic aspects underlying this condition. Conventionally, we depart from the concept of melancholy, to introduce in a second time, the mania, as a liberating solution of the depression. To Abraham (1912), mania is the liberation from suffering imposed by the reality principle For Freud (1915), mania becomes a leak from the ego face a tyrannical superego (the encounter of ego and the ego ideal). Klein (1934) explains that the mania serves to counter the depressive position and thus avoid the guilt inside of ego. For Racamier (1979), mania is clearly a frantic negation of the anguish and emotional suffering. Today, some authors as Chabot and Husain try to define the manic depression organization, with the help of projective tests. This personality structure would be between psychosis and borderline. An axial element of this structure is the research for an affective symbiosis with each other. These concept, strongly resemble the "syntony", from Bleuler. We trace the evolution of manic depression from a psychodynamic and structural point of view, with particular interesting in the concept of syntony. PMID:26323110

  19. The clinical picture of mania in manic-depressive black patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, B E; Robinson, W M; Parson, E B; Gray, B A

    1982-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that misdiagnosis of manic-depressive illness among blacks is a frequent occurrence. There are a number of historical and institutional dynamics involved in this process that have the roots of racism as their foundation. In light of this the authors decided to look at the clinical symptoms and behaviors of manic-depressive illness among black patients to see if their interpretation might be another contributing factor in misdiagnosis.The authors found the clinical symptoms of manic-depressive illness in black patients to be essentially what one would expect as determined by criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM III). However, there were cultural and socioeconomic determinants of behavior that affected the clinical manifestations.

  20. The conflict of the nosologists: views on schizophrenia and manic-depressive illness in the early part of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Jablensky, A

    1999-09-29

    The distinction between schizophrenia (dementia praecox) and bipolar disorder (manic-depressive insanity), proposed by Kraepelin in 1896, was the subject of vigorous debate in the first decades of this century. The debate addressed fundamental questions about the principles underlying the nosology of psychiatric disorders, and the issues raised remain as relevant today as at the time they were formulated. A meta-analysis of a sample of Kraepelin's primary data suggests that his original classification was consistent with the empirical evidence. However, heeding his critics, Kraepelin modified considerably his earlier views and proposed a conceptual model of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and affective psychosis that is consonant with present-day ideas arising out of neuroscience and genetics. The lesson to be drawn is that nosological arguments should be put on hold until basic understanding is gained of the specific mechanisms of syndromogenesis across diagnostic boundaries.

  1. Two manic-depressives, two tyrants, two world wars.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Napoleon Bonaparte, Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin were tyrants who attained absolute power, and misused it in a gargantuan fashion, leaving in his wake a trail of hatred, devastation and death. All made war on their perceived enemies and on their own countrymen. In "A Brotherhood of Tyrants: Manic Depression and Absolute power" (1994) Amherst, Prometheus Books, D. Jablow Hershman and I expose manic-depressive disorder as the force that drove them to absolute power and the terrible abuse of it. We uncover manic-depressive disorder as a hidden cause of dictatorship, mass killing and war, and show how the psychopathology of the disorder can be a key factor in the political pathology of tyranny. In our earlier "The Key To Genius: Manic-Depression and the Creative Life" (1998) Amherst Prometheus Books we catalog the role of the disorder in the lives and careers of Isaac Newton, Ludwig von Beethoven, Charles Dickens, Vincent van Gogh and other creative geniuses. Thus manic-depressive disorder is variable to the extreme of paradox. Key to the destroyers is an indifference to the suffering of others, a need to control everyone and everything, a resistance to reason, and grandiose and paranoid delusions. The paranoid and grandiose delusions of manic-depressives are as infectious and as virulent as a deadly microbe, and can easily infect those in thrall to the host figure. It is a phenomenon known as "induced psychosis" and its imprint is often to be seen on the world stage. In this article I will add Kaiser Wilhelm to the list of manic-depressive warmongers, and passages from Robert Payne's "The Life and Death of Adolph Hitler" that are not only pathognomonic of manic-depressive disorder, but of the mixed variant. PMID:17881137

  2. Two manic-depressives, two tyrants, two world wars.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Julian

    2008-01-01

    Napoleon Bonaparte, Adolph Hitler and Joseph Stalin were tyrants who attained absolute power, and misused it in a gargantuan fashion, leaving in his wake a trail of hatred, devastation and death. All made war on their perceived enemies and on their own countrymen. In "A Brotherhood of Tyrants: Manic Depression and Absolute power" (1994) Amherst, Prometheus Books, D. Jablow Hershman and I expose manic-depressive disorder as the force that drove them to absolute power and the terrible abuse of it. We uncover manic-depressive disorder as a hidden cause of dictatorship, mass killing and war, and show how the psychopathology of the disorder can be a key factor in the political pathology of tyranny. In our earlier "The Key To Genius: Manic-Depression and the Creative Life" (1998) Amherst Prometheus Books we catalog the role of the disorder in the lives and careers of Isaac Newton, Ludwig von Beethoven, Charles Dickens, Vincent van Gogh and other creative geniuses. Thus manic-depressive disorder is variable to the extreme of paradox. Key to the destroyers is an indifference to the suffering of others, a need to control everyone and everything, a resistance to reason, and grandiose and paranoid delusions. The paranoid and grandiose delusions of manic-depressives are as infectious and as virulent as a deadly microbe, and can easily infect those in thrall to the host figure. It is a phenomenon known as "induced psychosis" and its imprint is often to be seen on the world stage. In this article I will add Kaiser Wilhelm to the list of manic-depressive warmongers, and passages from Robert Payne's "The Life and Death of Adolph Hitler" that are not only pathognomonic of manic-depressive disorder, but of the mixed variant.

  3. Continuum of depressive and manic mixed states in patients with bipolar disorder: quantitative measurement and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Swann, Alan C; Steinberg, Joel L; Lijffijt, Marijn; Moeller, Gerard F

    2009-10-01

    Bipolar mixed states combine depressive and manic features, presenting diagnostic and treatment challenges and reflecting a severe form of the illness. DSM-IV criteria for a mixed state require combined depressive and manic syndromes, but a range of mixed states has been described clinically. A unified definition of mixed states would be valuable in understanding their diagnosis, mechanism and treatment implications. We investigated the manner in which depressive and manic features combine to produce a continuum of mixed states. In 88 subjects with bipolar disorder (DSM-IV), we evaluated symptoms and clinical characteristics, and compared depression-based, mania-based, and other published definitions of mixed states. We developed an index of the extent to which symptoms were mixed (Mixed State Index, MSI) and characterized its relationship to clinical state. Predominately manic and depressive mixed states using criteria from recent literature, as well as Kraepelinian mixed states, had similar symptoms and MSI scores. Anxiety correlated significantly with depression scores in manic subjects and with mania scores in depressed subjects. Discriminant function analysis associated mixed states with symptoms of hyperactivity and negative cognitions, but not subjective depressive or elevated mood. High MSI scores were associated with severe course of illness. For depressive or manic episodes, characteristics of mixed states emerged with two symptoms of the opposite polarity. This was a cross-sectional study. Mixed states appear to be a continuum. An index of the degree to which depressive and manic symptoms combine appears useful in identifying and characterizing mixed states. We propose a depressive or manic episode with three or more symptoms of the opposite polarity as a parsimonious definition of a mixed state.

  4. Manic depression in literature: the case of Virginia Woolf.

    PubMed

    Koutsantoni, Katerina

    2012-06-01

    The steady growth of the discipline of medical humanities has facilitated better understanding of the symptoms and signs of mental health conditions and the feelings of the humans experiencing them. In this project, the arts have been seen as enabling re-engagement of the practitioner with the patient's own perceptions and feelings. With respect to the association between creativity and bipolar disorder in particular, work within medical humanities has meant that mentally ill creative individuals have been subject to scientific scrutiny and investigation, rather than continuing to be viewed as naively romanticised cases of mental illness. This paper is an attempt to supplement traditional literary criticism by examining Virginia Woolf's history of bipolar disorder through a medical humanities lens. I will provide an overview of Woolf's history of manic-depressive episodes, their symptoms and manifestation, look back on her circumstances during their occurrence, and observe the author's losing battle to salvage her identity in the throes of the disease. The aim is to offer further insight into Woolf's psychopathology and to gain some understanding of the causes and progression of the condition that led to her death by suicide. PMID:22389442

  5. Weygandt's On the Mixed States of Manic-Depressive Insanity: a translation and commentary on its significance in the evolution of the concept of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Paola; Baldessarini, Ross J; Centorrino, Franca; Egli, Samy; Albert, Matthew; Gerhard, Angela; Maggini, Carlo

    2002-01-01

    Wilhelm Weygandt's Uber die Mischzustände des manisch-depressiven Irreseins (On the Mixed States of Manic-Depressive Insanity) describes and conceptualizes mixed states of mood, behavior, and thinking commonly found in manic-depressive disorders. These ideas emerged from Weygandt's service in the 1890s at the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Heidelberg, directed by Emil Kraepelin. In the sixth (1899) edition of Kraepelin's influential textbook, the concept of manic-depressive illnesses underwent a fundamental shift from a complex group of syndromal subtypes to a single integrated disorder, widely known from the 1921 English translation of the eighth (1920) edition. In the 1899 edition, Kraepelin acknowledged Weygandt for a new section on mixed manic-depressive states within the new integrated view of manic-depressive disorder. We provide biographical notes on Weygandt, a little-known but historically important figure, as well as the first English translation of his monograph and interpretive summaries of his findings. We also consider whether Weygandt's important insight that the same person could be both manic and depressed not only at different times but even at the same time served as an important stimulus to Kraepelin's unified manic-depressive disorder concept, which survives as bipolar disorder a century later.

  6. On the periodicity of manic-depressive insanity, by Eliot Slater (1938): translated excerpts and commentary.

    PubMed

    Oepen, Godehard; Baldessarini, Ross J; Salvatore, Paola; Slater, Eliot

    2004-01-01

    Since the classic descriptions of the course of bipolar and recurrent depressive forms of manic-depressive illness by Emil Kraepelin a century ago, it has been considered a truism that the rate of cycling increases, and wellness intervals shorten, with rising counts of recurrences, particularly early in the natural history of the illness. Less well known is that the analysis of this phenomenon is vulnerable to a computational artifact first described by Eliot Slater, based on his reanalysis of data from manic-depressive patients first evaluated by Kraepelin at the Munich Psychiatric Institute. Slater realized that there is an increasingly disproportionate representation of faster-cycling patients in sub-samples involving higher cycle-counts in pooled samples of subjects. More accurate results require analyzing illness-course either within individuals, or in groups matched for episode-counts. This artifact is pervasive in the older and modern research literature, but still not widely recognized. Since Slater's 1938 report in German is not well known, we provide an abbreviated English translation with commentary and additional reanalysis to highlight the phenomenon that might be termed 'Slater's Fallacy'.

  7. Kraepelin's concept of manic-depressive insanity: one hundred years later.

    PubMed

    Zivanovic, Olga; Nedic, Aleksandra

    2012-03-01

    Kraepelin's work is frequently cited and repeatedly interpreted as groundwork for the categorical classification of mental disorders. The scope of this paper is to present a fragment of Kraepelin's contribution to the nosology of manic-depressive illness from another point of view. Studying conscientiously the original text written by Emil Kraepelin more than one hundred years ago, the reader could conclude that the author's attitudes were more in line with numerous contemporaries who promote the dimensional approach to the classification in psychiatry and spectrum concept of mood disorders. This text is an attempt to inspire the reader to examine the original textbook.

  8. Search for a gene predisposing to manic-depression on chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Byerley, W.; Holik, J.; Hoff, M.; Coon, H.

    1995-06-19

    Six kindreds containing multiple cases of manic-depressive illness (MDI) were genotyped with seven highly polymorphic microsatellite loci used in the construction of an index map for chromosome 21. The kindreds were also genotyped with a microsatellite polymorphism for PFKL, a chromosome 21 locus that has shown suggestive linkage to MDI in one pedigree. Evidence of linkage was not found assuming either autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance. The nonparametric affected sib pair test did not yield significant evidence of linkage. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Virginia Woolf: manic-depressive psychosis and genius. An illustration of separation-individuation theory.

    PubMed

    Bond, A H

    1985-04-01

    Virginia Stephen was a member of one of England's great literary families, many of whom were also mentally ill. An exquisitely endowed infant, she was beautifully matched with her mother during the symbiotic state of development, and later called this period "the base upon which life stands." Difficulties presumably began as early as the differentiation subphase of separation. Mrs. Stephen appeared to be a narcissistic woman, who required constant affirmation, and thus was unable to respond to the needs of a developing child. Virginia probably was rescued from engulfment by a powerful biologically determined practicing period of separation-individuation. This great organismic surge, in all likelihood, is as characteristic of toddlers who are incipient manics as of children of future genius. Because of the strong regressive pull, it is probable that Virginia experienced a particularly high-powered glee in evading the field of her mother. This "economic condition," according to Freud, is a given that is felt by the manic as he overthrows the imprisoning restraints of the superego. Deflated by events beyond her control, such as the sadism of her siblings, Virginia probably attempted to return to her mother. But it appears that Mrs. Stephen was not available. Hence Virginia was forced to split off her anger and turn it against herself, keeping her aggression unavailable for neutralization. As a result she was unable to proceed to an age-adequate level of development. The raw rage lay smoldering within until many years later, when it burst forth to power her manic attacks. This failure of rapprochement presumably deflated Virginia, and resulted in a basic mood of depression already apparent in the nursery. Virginia also experienced a second basic mood, elation, which appears to have been characteristic of her even in well periods, and resembles the description of the typical manic victim given by Beck. PMID:3888936

  10. Early child-rearing practices in families with a manic-depressive parent.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Y B; Zahn-Waxler, C; Adland, M L; Mayfield, A

    1984-02-01

    Nurturing attitudes and behaviors among seven married couples, each of which contained one partner who had manic-depressive illness, and their young children were compared with those of normal control families. Mothers from index families, in contrast to control mothers, were less attentive to their children's health needs, emphasized performance in some achievement-related areas, were more overprotective, and reported more negative affect toward the child. They also were more disorganized, less active with their children, and more unhappy, tense, and ineffective. Index parents secured lower scores in the areas of family interaction and social adjustment, and they experienced situational problems of considerable severity, including clinical depression in the well parent. PMID:6691483

  11. Kraepelin revisited: a reassessment and statistical analysis of dementia praecox and manic-depressive insanity in 1908.

    PubMed

    Jablensky, A; Hugler, H; Von Cranach, M; Kalinov, K

    1993-11-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out on 53 cases of dementia praecox (DP) and 134 cases of manic-depressive insanity (MDI) originally diagnosed by Kraepelin or his collaborators in Munich in 1908. The original case material was coded in terms of Present State Examination syndromes and analysed statistically for internal consistency and discrimination between the two diagnostic entities. Kraepelin's DP and MDI were found to define homogeneous groups of disorders which could be clearly distinguished from one another. A CATEGO re-classification of the cases revealed an 80.2% concordance rate between Kraepelin's diagnoses and ICD-9. Cluster analysis of the original data reproduced closely Kraepelin's dichotomous classification of the psychoses but suggested that DP was a narrower concept than schizophrenia today, while MDI was a composite group including both 'typical' manic-depressive illnesses and schizoaffective disorders.

  12. Dementia praecox and manic-depressive insanity in 1908: a Grade of Membership analysis of the Kraepelinian dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Jablensky, A; Woodbury, M A

    1995-01-01

    Grade of Membership (GoM) analysis, a multivariate classification technique based on fuzzy-set mathematics, was applied to the demographic, history, and mental-state data on 53 dementia praecox cases and 134 manic-depressive insanity cases admitted to Kraepelin's University Psychiatric Clinic in Munich in 1908. The original data recorded by Kraepelin and his collaborators on special Zählkarten (counting cards) were rated and coded in terms of the Present State Examination (PSE) Syndrome Check List. The statistical analysis resulted in a high degree of replication of Kraepelin's clinical entities. However, the dichotomy of dementia praecox and manic-depressive insanity was not fully supported. The catatonic syndrome tended to occupy an intermediate position between the two major psychoses. The possibility is discussed that catatonia in Kraepelin's time shared certain clinical features with the later diagnostic groupings of schizoaffective disorder, cycloid psychoses, and other "atypical" forms of psychotic illnesses.

  13. Examination of IMPA1 and IMPA2 genes in manic-depressive patients: association between IMPA2 promoter polymorphisms and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Sjøholt, G; Ebstein, R P; Lie, R T; Berle, J Ø; Mallet, J; Deleuze, J F; Levinson, D F; Laurent, C; Mujahed, M; Bannoura, I; Murad, I; Molven, A; Steen, V M

    2004-06-01

    Manic-depressive (bipolar) illness is a serious psychiatric disorder with a strong genetic predisposition. The disorder is likely to be multifactorial and etiologically complex, and the causes of genetic susceptibility have been difficult to unveil. Lithium therapy is a widely used pharmacological treatment of manic-depressive illness, which both stabilizes the ongoing episodes and prevents relapses. A putative target of lithium treatment has been the inhibition of the myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) enzyme, which dephosphorylates myo-inositol monophosphate in the phosphatidylinositol signaling system. Two genes encoding human IMPases have so far been isolated, namely myo-inositol monophosphatase 1 (IMPA1) on chromosome 8q21.13-21.3 and myo-inositol monophosphatase 2 (IMPA2) on chromosome 18p11.2. In the present study, we have scanned for DNA variants in the human IMPA1 and IMPA2 genes in a pilot sample of Norwegian manic-depressive patients, followed by examination of selected polymorphisms and haplotypes in a family-based bipolar sample of Palestinian Arab proband-parent trios. Intriguingly, two frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (-461C>T and -207T>C) in the IMPA2 promoter sequence and their corresponding haplotypes showed transmission disequilibrium in the Palestinian Arab trios. No association was found between the IMPA1 polymorphisms and bipolar disorder, neither with respect to disease susceptibility nor with variation in lithium treatment response. The association between manic-depressive illness and IMPA2 variants supports several reports on the linkage of bipolar disorder to chromosome 18p11.2, and sustains the possible role of IMPA2 as a susceptibility gene in bipolar disorder.

  14. A genome-wide search for genes predisposing to manic-depression, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Jensen, S.; Hoff, M.; Holik, J.; Plaetke, R.; Reimherr, F.; Wender, P.; Leppert, M.; Byerley, W. )

    1993-06-01

    Manic-depressive illness (MDI), also known as [open quotes]bipolar affective disorder[close quotes], is a common and devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Although pivotal biochemical alterations underlying the disease are unknown, results of family, twin, and adoption studies consistently implicate genetic transmission in the pathogenesis of MDI. In order to carry out linkage analysis, the authors ascertained eight moderately sized pedigrees containing multiple cases of the disease. For a four-allele marker mapping at 5 cM from the disease gene, the pedigree sample has >97% power to detect a dominant allele under genetic homogeneity and has >73% power under 20% heterogeneity. To date, the eight pedigrees have been genotyped with 328 polymorphic DNA loci throughout the genome. When autosomal dominant inheritance was assumed, 273 DNA markers gave lod scores <[minus]2.0 at [theta] = .05, and 4 DNA marker loci yielded lod scores >1 (chromosome 5 -- D5S39, D5S43, and D5S62; chromosome 11 -- D11S85). Of the markers giving lod scores >1, only D5S62 continued to show evidence for linkage when the affected-pedigree-member method was used. The D5S62 locus maps to distal 5q, a region containing neurotransmitter-receptor genes for dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although additional work in this region may be warranted, the linkage results should be interpreted as preliminary data, as 68 unaffected individuals are not past the age of risk. 72 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Prevalence and clinical significance of subsyndromal manic symptoms, including irritability and psychomotor agitation, during bipolar major depressive episodes

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lewis L.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Akiskal, Hagop; Coryell, William; Fawcett, Jan; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.; Solomon, David A.; Keller, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that subsyndromal manic symptoms occur frequently during bipolar major depressive episodes (MDEs) and may be a subtle form of ‘depressive mixed state.’ This paper examines the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDEs with subsyndromal manic symptoms. The specific effects of overt irritability and psychomotor agitation are examined. Methods Bipolar (type I or II) patients with an MDE at intake (N=142) were compared based on the presence or absence of concurrent subsyndromal manic symptoms. The groups were further subdivided by the presence of symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation. Results Subsyndromal manic symptoms during bipolar MDEs were highly prevalent (76.1%), and were associated with significantly increased severity of depression/dysphoria in the intake episode, longer episode duration, and more suicidal ideation and behavior (past, current, and during long-term follow-up). Overt irritability and psychomotor agitation were the most prevalent subsyndromal manic symptoms (co-occurring in 57% and 39% of MDEs, respectively), and accounted for most of the negative effects associated with subsyndromal manic symptoms. Limitations The findings need to be confirmed in larger samples, which also examine the relationship to adequate antidepressant and/or mood stabilizing treatment. Conclusions The presence of one or more subsyndromal manic symptoms appears to be the modal presentation of bipolar MDEs and a marker for a subtle form of bipolar mixed depressive state. In particular, patients with symptoms of overt irritability and/or psychomotor agitation should be monitored closely to avoid serious clinical outcomes such as longer affective episodes, exacerbation of manic symptoms syndromal mania, and heightened suicidality. PMID:22314261

  16. Differential Diagnosis of an Elderly Manic-Depressive Patient with Depersonalization and Other Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Shigehiro; Itohiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Yuri; Sato, Yuki; Suyama, Yudai; Atsuta, Hidenori; Iwata, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The case study of an elderly man having persecutory delusions and bizarre complaints at the first psychiatric interview is reported. The patient complained: “I have no sense of time” and “I have no sense of money.” He refused nursing care. He had delusions centered on himself including that of his own death, which were difficult to diagnose but suggested the possibility of Cotard's syndrome. We assumed that the man was depressed and treated him for depression. However, as a result of this treatment he became temporarily manic but finally recovered completely. After his recovery, we learnt the patient's past history of hospitalization for psychiatric problems, and based on that history he was diagnosed as suffering from a bipolar I disorder. The lack of typical symptoms of depression and the remarkable depersonalization and derealization in this patient made it difficult to infer a depressive state. Nevertheless, being attentive to his strange feelings related to the flow of time would have helped us to make an accurate diagnosis earlier. PMID:27293942

  17. Differential Diagnosis of an Elderly Manic-Depressive Patient with Depersonalization and Other Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shigehiro; Itohiya, Yu; Sakamoto, Yuri; Sato, Yuki; Suyama, Yudai; Atsuta, Hidenori; Iwata, Ken

    2016-01-01

    The case study of an elderly man having persecutory delusions and bizarre complaints at the first psychiatric interview is reported. The patient complained: "I have no sense of time" and "I have no sense of money." He refused nursing care. He had delusions centered on himself including that of his own death, which were difficult to diagnose but suggested the possibility of Cotard's syndrome. We assumed that the man was depressed and treated him for depression. However, as a result of this treatment he became temporarily manic but finally recovered completely. After his recovery, we learnt the patient's past history of hospitalization for psychiatric problems, and based on that history he was diagnosed as suffering from a bipolar I disorder. The lack of typical symptoms of depression and the remarkable depersonalization and derealization in this patient made it difficult to infer a depressive state. Nevertheless, being attentive to his strange feelings related to the flow of time would have helped us to make an accurate diagnosis earlier. PMID:27293942

  18. Evidence for a susceptibility locus for manic-depressive disorder in Xq26

    SciTech Connect

    Pekkarinen, P.; Bredbacka, P.E.; Terwilliger, J.

    1994-09-01

    Manic-depression (MD) is a severe psychiatric disorder affecting 1% of the population. Several linkage studies have provided evidence for a susceptibility locus for MD in chromosome Xq27-28. However, validity of these findings have remained unclear for several reasons: linkage has been suggested to two distinct chromosomal regions (F9 and CB-G6PD) separated by 30 cM, linkage has been found in only few of the pedigrees analyzed and ascertainment bias have probably been introduced when using classical markers like CB. The aim of our study was to analyze several markers expanding both of these regions in one extended Finnish pedigree with 13 affected individuals (bipolar or schizoaffective disorder) and without male-to-male transmission. Together 27 polymorphic X chromosomal markers were studied, 22 of them in Xq25-q28. Linkage analyses were carried out using a dominant model, 0.005 disease gene frequency, age-dependent penetrance with a maximum penetrance of 0.80 and low phenocopy rate. Two-point linkage analyses resulted in clearly negative lod scores (<-2) to almost all markers outside the chromosomal region of Xq26. Three markers DXS458, GABRA3 and G6PD, gave uninformative lod scores but respective chromosomal areas could be excluded by other markers in the vicinity. Opposite to this, several markers on Xq26 resulted in positive lod scores. A maximum lod score of 3.4 was obtained with the marker AFM205wd2 at {theta}=0.0. This marker is located about 7 cM centromeric to F9. When all published linkage data on Xq26-q28 was reanalyzed no evidence for locus heterogeneity emerged suggesting a more general significance of this DNA region in the predisposition to manic-depressive disorder.

  19. [Depression as chronobiological illness].

    PubMed

    Kálmán, Janos; Kálmán, Sára

    2009-06-01

    Chronobiological problems are always present as aetiological or pathoplastic conditions almost in all psychiatric disorders and considered as the greatest contributors to the mood and sleep disorders associated problems. The present review summarise the recent advances in the chronobiology research from the point of the clinician with particular emphasis on the psychobiology and pharmacotherapy of the depression. Human behaviour builds up from different length of circadian, ultradian and seasonal rhytms, strictly controlled by a hierarchical organisation of sub-cellullar, cellular, neuro-humoral and neuro-immunological clock systems. These internal clock systems are orchestrated at molecular level by certain clock genes and on the other hand--at neuro-humoral level--by the effect of the sleep hormone, melatonine, produced by the neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Beside the biological factors, social interactions are also considered as important regulators of the biological clock systems. The pacemaker centers of the SCN receive efferents from the serotoninergic raphe nuclei in order to regulate stress responses and neuroimmunological functions. The direction and the level of the chronobiological desynchronisation could be totally divergent in the case of the different affective disorders. Different chronobiological interventions are required therefore in the case of the advanced and delayed sleep disorders. Sleeping disorders are considered as the most recognised signs of the chronobiological desynchronisation in depression, but these symptoms are only the tip of the iceberg, since other chronobiological symptoms could be present due to the hidden physiological abnormalities. The serum melatonine profile is considered to be characteristic to age, gender and certain neuropsychiatric disorders. The natural and synthetic agonist of the melatonine receptors could be used as chronobiotics. The recently marketed agomelatine with a highly selective receptor

  20. Depression in medically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Rackley, Sandra; Bostwick, J Michael

    2012-03-01

    In medically ill patients, given the many entities the phenotype of depression may represent, clinicians must be prepared to cast their diagnostic nets widely, not settling for the obvious but frequently incorrect choice of major depressive episode and throwing antidepressants at it willy nilly. Having chosen the correct diagnosis from among a broad differential of depression “look-alikes,” clinicians can draw upon a broad swath of treatment modalities including medications, psychotherapy, social supports, and spiritual interventions. Working as a psychiatrist in the medical arena requires the curiosity and analytic skills of a detective and the breadth of knowledge of a polymath adapting therapeutic tools from across the biopsychosociospiritual spectrum to the specific needs of the patient. PMID:22370500

  1. Ernst Rüdin's Unpublished 1922-1925 Study "Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity": Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology.

    PubMed

    Kösters, Gundula; Steinberg, Holger; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-11-01

    In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin's seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin's 1922-1925 study on the inheritance of "manic-depressive insanity" was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 "Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring" (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses).

  2. Ernst Rüdin’s Unpublished 1922-1925 Study “Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity”: Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology

    PubMed Central

    Kösters, Gundula; Steinberg, Holger; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin’s seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin’s 1922–1925 study on the inheritance of “manic-depressive insanity” was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 “Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring” (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses). PMID:26544949

  3. Ernst Rüdin's Unpublished 1922-1925 Study "Inheritance of Manic-Depressive Insanity": Genetic Research Findings Subordinated to Eugenic Ideology.

    PubMed

    Kösters, Gundula; Steinberg, Holger; Kirkby, Kenneth Clifford; Himmerich, Hubertus

    2015-11-01

    In the early 20th century, there were few therapeutic options for mental illness and asylum numbers were rising. This pessimistic outlook favoured the rise of the eugenics movement. Heredity was assumed to be the principal cause of mental illness. Politicians, scientists and clinicians in North America and Europe called for compulsory sterilisation of the mentally ill. Psychiatric genetic research aimed to prove a Mendelian mode of inheritance as a scientific justification for these measures. Ernst Rüdin's seminal 1916 epidemiological study on inheritance of dementia praecox featured large, systematically ascertained samples and statistical analyses. Rüdin's 1922-1925 study on the inheritance of "manic-depressive insanity" was completed in manuscript form, but never published. It failed to prove a pattern of Mendelian inheritance, counter to the tenets of eugenics of which Rüdin was a prominent proponent. It appears he withheld the study from publication, unable to reconcile this contradiction, thus subordinating his carefully derived scientific findings to his ideological preoccupations. Instead, Rüdin continued to promote prevention of assumed hereditary mental illnesses by prohibition of marriage or sterilisation and was influential in the introduction by the National Socialist regime of the 1933 "Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring" (Gesetz zur Verhütung erbkranken Nachwuchses). PMID:26544949

  4. Historical aspects of the dichotomy between manic-depressive disorders and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Angst, Jules

    2002-09-01

    The history of psychiatric classification is highly complex and this presentation must be restricted to a simplified overview. Guislain [Guislain, J., 1833. Traité des phrénopathies ou doctrine nouvelle des maladies mentales. Etablissement Encyclopédique, Brussels] and Zeller [Beil. Med. Corresp.-Bl. Würtemb. Arztl. Ver. 7 (1837) 321] established a unitarian concept of psychiatric disorder, permutations of which have survived until the present day. Kraepelin's [Kraepelin, E., 1899. Psychiatrie. Ein Lehrbuch für Studierende und Arzte (6th edn.). Johann Ambrosius Barth, Leipzig] dichotomy between "manic-depressive insanity" and dementia praecox was built mainly on Kahlbaum's [Kahlbaum, K., 1863. Die Gruppirung der Psychischen Krankheiten und die Eintheilung der Seelenstörungen. AW Kafemann, Danzig] classification, which took clinical symptoms, course and outcome into account. Kraepelin's well-accepted approach sought to provide a basis for diagnosis, prognosis, choice of treatment and causal research. Kraepelin's dichotomy came to be questioned on several grounds: (1) doubts about his unification of bipolar disorder [Gaz. Hôp. 24 (1851) 18] with melancholia, (2) doubts about the significance of Kraepelin's diagnostic groups for causal research [Z. Gesamte Neurol. Psychiatr. 12 (1912) 540], illustrated best by the work of Bonhoeffer [Bonhoefferm, K., 1912. Die symptomatischen Psychosen im Gefolge akuter Infektionen, Allgemeinerkrankungen und innerer Krankheiten. In: Aschaffenburg, G. (Ed.), Handbuch der Psychiatrie, 3. Abt., 1. Hälfte. Deuticke, Leipzig Wien], (3) the complex psychopathological descriptions and classifications of numerous subgroups of psychoses by Kleist [Monatsschr. Psychiatr. Neurol. 125 (1953) 526] and Leonhard [Leonhard, K., 1968. Aufteilung der endogenen Psychosen (4th edn.). Akademie Verlag, Berlin] and (4) description of the psychoses between affective and schizophrenic disorders (intermediate psychoses, mixed psychoses, schizo

  5. Plain Talk about Depression. Plain Talk Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargent, Marilyn

    Depression is defined as a "whole-body" illness, involving the body, mood, and thoughts. Three of the most prevalent types of depressive disorders are described: major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disorders (formerly called manic-depressive illness). Eleven symptoms of depression and 10 symptoms of mania are listed. Causes of depression are…

  6. Depressive Illness: Pervasive Yet Mystifying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Doctors annually treat between approximately four and eight million Americans for depression. Behavioral changes in depressed individuals are characterized by sadness, loneliness, and apathy. Other symptoms include fatigue, early morning insomnia, loss of appetite, and suicide attempts. Underlying depression may mask itself in physical symptoms,…

  7. Illness episodes, physician visits, and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Berkanovic, E; Hurwicz, M L

    1992-08-01

    Although there is a large literature examining the effects of distress on the demand for medical care, the data on which this literature is based are equivocal. Nonetheless, this literature is cited frequently by those who advocate a national mental health policy designed to produce a cost-effective "medical offset effect." In this study, longitudinal data on illness episodes, physician visits, and depressive symptoms were collected from 940 Medicare recipients enrolled in a health maintenance organization (HMO) under a Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) contract. Seven waves of interviews were conducted over a period of 1 year. This article presents two sets of analyses. In the first, controlling for chronic conditions and demographics reported at baseline, the relationships between depressive symptoms reported at baseline, and all illness episodes and physician visits that occurred over the subsequent year are examined. In the second, controlling for depressive symptoms and demographics reported at baseline, the relationships between illness episodes and physician visits over the study year, and depressive symptoms recorded at the final interview are examined. The data indicate that, whereas depressive symptoms at baseline are virtually unrelated to subsequent illness episodes and physician visits, illness episodes and physician visits are related to subsequent depressive symptoms. These data indicate, therefore, that policies aimed at diverting the distressed from seeking medical care may result in further inequities in the receipt of needed care. PMID:10120227

  8. Manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia are neurological disorders at the extremes of CNS maturation and nutritional disorders associated with a deficit in marine fat.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    2001-12-01

    The maturational theory of brain development comprises manic depressive psychosis and schizophrenia. It holds that the disorders are part of human diversity in growth and maturation, which explains their ubiquity, shared susceptibility genes and multifactorial inheritance. Rate of maturation and age at puberty are the genotype; the disorders are localized at the extremes with normality in between. This is based on the association between onset of puberty and the final regressive event, with pruning of 40% of excitatory synapses leaving the inhibitory ones fairly unchanged. This makes excitability, a fundamental property of nervous tissue, a distinguishing factor: the earlier puberty, the greater excitability--the later puberty, the greater deficit. Biological treatment supports deviation from the norm: neuroleptics are convulsant; antidepressives are anti-epiletogenic. There is an association between onset of puberty and body-build: early maturers are pyknic broad-built, late ones linearly leptosomic. This discrepancy is similar to that in the two disorders, supporting the theory that body-build is the phenotype. Standard of living is the environmental factor, which affects pubertal age and shifts the panorama of mental illness accordingly. Unnatural death has increased with antipsychotics. Other treatment is needed. PUFA deficit has been observed in RBC in both disorders and striking improvements with addition of minor amounts of PUFA. This supports that dietary deficit might cause psychotic development and that prevention is possible. Other neurological disorders also profit from PUFA, underlining a general deficit in the diet.

  9. Anna O. had a severe depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Merskey, H

    1992-08-01

    The information available on the illness of Anna O. is reviewed together with follow-up data from the literature. It is concluded that the diagnosis of a severe depressive illness with depressive delusions is well justified. Hysterical symptoms which appeared can be understood as part of the depressive state modified by the expectations of the period and by the intervention of physicians. The illness was a very protracted one, with fluctuations or exacerbations lasting from 1880 to 1887, and was complicated by dependence upon morphine and chloral hydrate. However, by 1888, the patient appears to have made a considerable recovery, and she went on to lead an effective and fruitful life, demonstrating high intelligence and the resilience of the cyclothymic temperament. PMID:1521102

  10. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Jonas; Weiller, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I) manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA) symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study. Patients and methods Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts. Results Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6%) met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms). These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients) or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients). A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9%) than in the mild AIA group (47.6%). Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05) and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively). Conclusion The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive symptoms is further increased when they experience severe AIA symptoms. Recognizing AIA symptoms in BD-I mania could provide a means of identifying

  11. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Jonas; Weiller, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I) manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA) symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study. Patients and methods Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts. Results Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6%) met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms). These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients) or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients). A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9%) than in the mild AIA group (47.6%). Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05) and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively). Conclusion The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive symptoms is further increased when they experience severe AIA symptoms. Recognizing AIA symptoms in BD-I mania could provide a means of identifying

  12. Altered serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 in manic, depressive, mixed state of bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yayan; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Minling; Huang, Xini; Fan, Ni

    2016-10-30

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with alterations of cytokines in the immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 in manic, depressive, mixed state patients of BD. The correlations between the serum cytokines levels with the demographic characteristics and the psychiatric symptoms were also assessed. We measured serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 levels using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from 59 BD patients (37 in manic state, 12 in depressive state, 10 in mixed state) and 80 healthy control subjects. The psychotic symptoms of BD were assessed using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). The results showed that serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in manic, depressive and mixed state BD patients were significantly higher than that in controls, while serum IL-18 level was only significantly higher in depressive patients. Serum IL-6 level was significantly positively correlated with YMRS scores in manic episode as well as in mixed episode. When gender and age were added as potentially confounding covariate terms, the differences between controls and each mood state patients were still significant. Our findings provided additional evidence that elevated TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18 pathway activities may be involved in the psychopathology of BD. Due to the lack of controlling important confounding factors, such as BMI, smoking status and alcohol use, further studies are required to confirm the roles of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-18. PMID:27455146

  13. Patients' perception of their depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Manber, Rachel; Chambers, Andrea S; Hitt, Sabrina K; McGahuey, Cynthia; Delgado, Pedro; Allen, John J B

    2003-01-01

    Perception of illness has been described as an important predictor in the medical health psychology literature, but has been given little attention in the domain of mental disorders. The patient's Perception of Depression Questionnaire (PDIQ) is a newly developed measure whose factor structure and psychometric properties were evaluated on a sample of 174 outpatients meeting criteria for major depressive disorder. The clinical utility of the questionnaire was assessed on a sub-sample of 121 participants in a study of acupuncture treatment for depression. The questionnaire has four subscales, each with high internal consistency and high test-retest reliability. These four subscales are: Self-Efficacy, which reflects perceived controllability of the illness, Externalizing, which reflects attributing the illness to external causes, Hopeless/Flawed, which reflect a belief that depression is a personal trait and therefore there is little hope for cure, and Holistic, which reflects a belief in alternative therapies. Although the PDIQ did not predict outcome, its subscales were related to adherence to treatment, treatment preference, expectations, and therapeutic alliance. The subscales have adequate convergent/discriminant validity and are clinically relevant to aspects of treatment provision.

  14. Creativity in Manic-Depressives, Cyclothymes, Their Normal Relatives, and Control Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ruth L.; And Others

    Although previous studies support familial and individual relationships between creativity and affective illness, most have examined eminent creative individuals. This is the first study of creativity in subjects defined only by psychodiagnostic criteria. Creative accomplishment over the adult lifetime was assessed broadly using a new instrument,…

  15. Quantitative assessment of attribution of intentions to others in schizophrenia using an ecological video-based task: a comparison with manic and depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Nadine; Brunet-Gouet, Eric; Bourdet, Catherine; Kayser, Nadja; Falissard, Bruno; Hardy-Baylé, Marie-Christine; Passerieux, Christine

    2009-05-15

    Schizophrenia is characterized by the impairment of several facets of social cognition. This has been demonstrated in numerous studies that focused on specific aspects of social cognition such as the attribution of intentions, emotions, or false beliefs to others. However, most of these studies relied on complex verbal descriptions or impoverished social stimuli. In the present study, we evaluated a new task (Versailles-Situational Intention Reading, V-SIR) that is based on video excerpts depicting complex real-life scenes of social interactions. Subjects were required to rate the probabilities of several affirmations of the intentions of one of the characters. The V-SIR task was administered to schizophrenic patients (N=15), depressed patients (N=12), manic patients (N=15), and healthy controls (N=15). The performance of schizophrenic patients was significantly impaired in comparison to healthy and depressed subjects. There was a trend toward a significant difference between schizophrenic and manic patients. Manic patients also demonstrated impaired performance relative to healthy subjects. Schizophrenic patients' V-SIR scores were significantly correlated with their scores on another attribution of intentions task that used comic strips. These results show that tasks based on more ecological stimuli are powerful enough to detect theory-of-mind abnormalities in pathological populations such as schizophrenic patients.

  16. Do Sub-syndromal Manic Symptoms Influence Outcome in Treatment Resistant Depression in Adolescents? A Latent Class Analysis from the TORDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Maalouf, Fadi T.; Porta, Giovanna; Vitiello, Benedetto; Emslie, Graham; Mayes, Taryn; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen D.; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Shamseddeen, Wael; Iyengar, Satish; Brent, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Background To identify distinct depressive symptom trajectories in the TORDIA study and determine their correlates. Methods Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA) using the Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R) through 72 weeks from intake. Results 3 classes were identified: (1) little change in symptomatic status (“NO”), comprising 24.9% of participants, with a 72-week remission rate of 25.3%; (2) slow, steady improvement (“SLOW”), comprising 47.9% of participants, with a remission rate of 60.0%, and (3) rapid symptom response (“GO”), comprising 27.2% of participants, with a remission rate of 85.7%. Higher baseline CDRS-R (p<0.001) and poorer functioning (p=0.03) were the strongest discriminators between NO and GO. Higher baseline CDRS (p<0.001) and scores on the Mania Rating Scale (MRS) (p=0.01) were the strongest discriminators between SLOW and GO. Other variables differentiating GO from both NO and from SLOW, were better baseline functioning, lower hopelessness, and lower family conflict. Both NO and SLOW showed increases on the MRS over time compared to GO (ps≤0.04), and increasing MRS was strongly associated with lack of remission by 72 weeks (p=0.02). Limitations High rate of open treatment by the end of the follow-up period creates difficulty in drawing clear inferences about the long-term impact of initial randomization. Conclusion Along with depressive severity, sub-syndromal manic symptoms, at baseline, and over time emerged as important predictors and correlates of poor outcome in this sample. Further research is needed on the treatment of severe depression, and on the assessment and management of sub-syndromal manic symptoms in treatment resistant depression. PMID:22284022

  17. Convergent integration of animal model and human studies of bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness).

    PubMed

    Le-Niculescu, Helen; Patel, Sagar D; Niculescu, Alexander B

    2010-10-01

    Animal models and human studies of bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders are becoming increasingly integrated, prompted by recent successes. Particularly for genomics, the convergence and integration of data across species, experimental modalities and technical platforms is providing a fit-to-disease way of extracting reproducible and biologically important signal, in sharp contrast to the fit-to-cohort effect, disappointing findings to date, and limited reproducibility of human genetic analyses alone. Such work in psychiatry can provide an example of how to address other genetically complex disorders, and in turn will benefit by incorporating concepts from other areas, such as cancer biology and diabetes.

  18. Illness perceptions associated with perinatal depression treatment use.

    PubMed

    O'Mahen, Heather A; Flynn, Heather A; Chermack, Stephen; Marcus, Sheila

    2009-12-01

    The relationship between psychological beliefs about depression and depression treatment use was examined in depressed pregnant and postpartum women using the Common Sense Model as a framework (CSM; Leventhal H, Nerenz DR, Steele DF (1984) A handbook of psychology and health illness representations and coping with health threats. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.). Pregnant women who screened >/ 10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS; Cox et al. Br J Psychiatry 150:782-786, 1987) completed measures of depression symptoms, perceptions and treatment at three time points through 6 weeks postpartum. Understanding modifiable beliefs may be useful in improving low rates of perinatal depression treatment use. PMID:19471852

  19. Heading off depressive illness evolution and progression to treatment resistance.

    PubMed

    Post, Robert M

    2015-06-01

    Viewing recurrent depression as a potentially progressive illness may help transform treatment toward earlier, more consistent intervention and prevention. Evidence indicates that recurrent stressors, episodes of depression, and bouts of substance abuse can each show sensitization (increased reactivity upon repetition) and cross-sensitization to the others, and drive illness progression and treatment resistance. These long-lasting increases in pathological responsivity appear to be mediated by epigenetic mechanisms involving alterations in chemical marks placed on DNA and histories. These types of sensitization effects are amenable to clinical attempts at amelioration and prevention, and provide treatment targets and strategies to minimize the likelihood of illness progression to treatment resistance. PMID:26246786

  20. Heading off depressive illness evolution and progression to treatment resistance

    PubMed Central

    Post, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Viewing recurrent depression as a potentially progressive illness may help transform treatment toward earlier, more consistent intervention and prevention. Evidence indicates that recurrent stressors, episodes of depression, and bouts of substance abuse can each show sensitization (increased reactivity upon repetition) and cross-sensitization to the others, and drive illness progression and treatment resistance. These long-lasting increases in pathological responsivity appear to be mediated by epigenetic mechanisms involving alterations in chemical marks placed on DNA and histories. These types of sensitization effects are amenable to clinical attempts at amelioration and prevention, and provide treatment targets and strategies to minimize the likelihood of illness progression to treatment resistance. PMID:26246786

  1. Noradrenaline plays a critical role in the switch to a manic episode and treatment of a depressive episode

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Masatake

    2016-01-01

    Although antidepressants may increase the risk of switching to mania in bipolar disorder (BD), clinicians have been using antidepressants to treat patients with bipolar depression. Appropriate treatments for bipolar depression remain controversial. In BD, antidepressants comprise a double-edged sword in terms of their efficacy in treating depression and the increased risk of switching. This review presents an important table outlining the benefit in terms of depression improvement and the risk of switching in the clinical setting. It also proposes strategies based on the characteristics of antidepressants such as their pharmacology, specifically the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of the noradrenaline transporter. This table will be useful for clinicians while considering benefit and risk. Antidepressants augmenting noradrenaline may be effective in bipolar depression. However, it is easily presumed that such antidepressants may also have a risk of switching to mania. Therefore, antidepressants augmenting noradrenaline will be the recommended treatment in combination with an antimanic agent, or they may be used for short-term treatment and early discontinuation. The corresponding medical treatment guidelines probably need to be reevaluated and updated based on biological backgrounds. From previous studies, we understand that the stability of noradrenaline levels is important for BD amelioration, based on the pathophysiology of the disorder. It is hoped that researchers will reevaluate BD by conducting studies involving noradrenaline. PMID:27703355

  2. Amphetamine sensitization in mice is sufficient to produce both manic- and depressive-related behaviors as well as changes in the functional connectivity of corticolimbic structures.

    PubMed

    Pathak, G; Ibrahim, B A; McCarthy, S A; Baker, K; Kelly, M P

    2015-08-01

    It has been suggested that amphetamine abuse and withdrawal mimics the diverse nature of bipolar disorder symptomatology in humans. Here, we determined if a single paradigm of amphetamine sensitization would be sufficient to produce both manic- and depressive-related behaviors in mice. CD-1 mice were subcutaneously dosed for 5 days with 1.8 mg/kg d-amphetamine or vehicle. On days 6-31 of withdrawal, amphetamine-sensitized (AS) mice were compared to vehicle-treated (VT) mice on a range of behavioral and biochemical endpoints. AS mice demonstrated reliable mania- and depression-related behaviors from day 7 to day 28 of withdrawal. Relative to VT mice, AS mice exhibited long-lasting mania-like hyperactivity following either an acute 30-min restraint stress or a low-dose 1 mg/kg d-amphetamine challenge, which was attenuated by the mood-stabilizers lithium and quetiapine. In absence of any challenge, AS mice showed anhedonia-like decreases in sucrose preference and depression-like impairments in the off-line consolidation of motor memory, as reflected by the lack of spontaneous improvement across days of training on the rotarod. AS mice also demonstrated a functional impairment in nest building, an ethologically-relevant activity of daily living. Western blot analyses revealed a significant increase in methylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9), but not lysine 4 (H3K4), in hippocampus of AS mice relative to VT mice. In situ hybridization for the immediate-early gene activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) further revealed heightened activation of corticolimbic structures, decreased functional connectivity between frontal cortex and striatum, and increased functional connectivity between the amygdala and hippocampus of AS mice. The effects of amphetamine sensitization were blunted in C57BL/6J mice relative to CD-1 mice. These results show that a single amphetamine sensitization protocol is sufficient to produce behavioral, functional, and biochemical

  3. [Sultopride in acute manic psychoses (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rappard, P; Parr, N

    Sultopride, a benzamide derivative, provides rapid sedation. This makes it one of the main drugs used in psychiatric emergencies. Our study includes 26 cases of psychomotor hyperactivity originating in manic-depressive psychosis of schizophrenia. The medication had no effect on wakefulness. It was always effective on agitation but not on delusion or hallucinations. Manic forms of primary delirious experiences are the best indication for sultopride. It is mainly effective on delirium as a state rather than on delirium as an idea (Wahn, Delusion) which is secondary from a pathogenetic standpoint.

  4. Selective responsiveness of chronically ill children to assessments of depression.

    PubMed

    Worchel, F F; Rae, W A; Olson, T K; Crowley, S L

    1992-12-01

    Many investigators have noted that depression is a common symptom among pediatric cancer patients. However, prevalence rates vary widely across studies. This variation in prevalence rates may be due, in part, to selective reporting of patients based on measures used and environmental cues. In this study, we evaluated 50 chronically ill pediatric patients (19 cancer and 31 diabetic patients) for their use of selective reporting of depression. Factors in the 2 x 2 design were Intervention (disclosure videotape and cartoon videotape) and Examiner (familiar examiner and unfamiliar examiner). In the Intervention manipulation, subjects were shown either a videotape prompting the child that self-disclosure was appropriate or a tape of a cartoon (control condition). In the Examiner manipulation, subjects were administered the experimental measures by either a familiar (parent) or unfamiliar (research assistant) examiner. Dependent variables were the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1981), the Depression scale of the Roberts Apperception Test for Children (RATC; McArthur & Roberts, 1982), and a depression measure taken from the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL; Achenbach & Edelbrock, 1983). As hypothesized, the Examiner x Intervention interaction revealed that children who did not view the disclosure videotape and who were tested by an unfamiliar examiner gave significantly lower self-reports of depression on the CDI than children in the other conditions. However, parent and child projective reports of depression did not vary as a function of experimental condition. The results are interpreted as selective responding on the part of pediatric patients. Limitations of assessing internal psychological states in children are discussed. PMID:1487812

  5. Portrayal of Depression and Other Mental Illnesses in Australian Nonfiction Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Catherine; Pirkis, Jane; Blood, R. Warwick; Dunt, David; Burgess, Philip; Morley, Belinda; Stewart, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This study describes Australian media portrayal of mental illnesses, focusing on depression. A random sample of 1,123 items was selected for analysis from a pool of 13,389 nonfictional media items about mental illness collected between March 2000 and February 2001. Depression was portrayed more frequently than other mental illnesses. Items about…

  6. Efficacy of venlafaxine in depressive illness in general practice.

    PubMed

    Lecrubier, Y; Bourin, M; Moon, C A; Schifano, F; Blanchard, C; Danjou, P; Hackett, D

    1997-06-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 229 patients with a Research Diagnostic Criteria diagnosis of major, minor or intermittent depression was used to compare the clinical profiles of venlafaxine and imipramine in general practice. Venlafaxine produced a significant improvement compared to placebo in symptoms of depression and anxiety as rated by the total MADRS and percentage of responders, the CGI improvement, the CGI severity of illness, the BSA psychic anxiety item and the HSCL. On a number of these measures, venlafaxine was also significantly more effective than imipramine. Venlafaxine was significantly superior to both imipramine and placebo for the SARS total score and the items 'social/leisure' and 'extended family.' A similar proportion of patients discontinued treatment in each group, but fewer patients on venlafaxine discontinued treatment because of an unsatisfactory response.

  7. Multimorbidity in a Mexican Community: Secondary Analysis of Chronic Illness and Depression Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Kathleen; Vizcaino, Maricarmen; Ibarra, Jorge M.; Balcazar, Hector; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Anders, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this article are: 1) to examine the associations between health provider-diagnosed depression and multimorbidity, the condition of suffering from more than two chronic illnesses; 2) to assess the unique contribution of chronic illness in the prediction of depression; and 3) to suggest practice changes that would address risk of depression among individuals with chronic illnesses. Data collected in a cross-sectional community health study among adult Mexicans (n= 274) living in a low income neighborhood (colonia) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, were examined. We tested the hypotheses that individuals who reported suffering chronic illnesses would also report higher rates of depression than healthy individuals; and having that two or more chronic illnesses further increased the risk of depression. PMID:26640817

  8. Patients understanding of depression associated with chronic physical illness: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Detection of depression can be difficult in primary care, particularly when associated with chronic illness. Patient beliefs may affect detection and subsequent engagement with management. We explored patient beliefs about the nature of depression associated with physical illness. Methods A qualitative interview study of patients registered with general practices in Leeds, UK. We invited patients with coronary heart disease or diabetes from primary care to participate in semi-structured interviews exploring their beliefs and experiences. We analysed transcripts using a thematic approach, extended to consider narratives as important contextual elements. Results We interviewed 26 patients, including 17 with personal experience of depression. We developed six themes: recognising a problem, complex causality, the role of the primary care, responsibility, resilience, and the role of their life story. Participants did not consistently talk about depression as an illness-like disorder. They described a change in their sense of self against the background of their life stories. Participants were unsure about seeking help from general practitioners (GPs) and felt a personal responsibility to overcome depression themselves. Chronic illness, as opposed to other life pressures, was seen as a justifiable cause of depression. Conclusions People with chronic illness do not necessarily regard depression as an easily defined illness, especially outside of the context of their life stories. Efforts to engage patients with chronic illness in the detection and management of depression may need further tailoring to accommodate beliefs about how people view themselves, responsibility and negative views of treatment. PMID:24555886

  9. Clinical evaluation of Kushmanda Ghrita in the management of depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Chandre, Rajni; Upadhyay, B N; Murthy, K H H V S S Narasimha

    2011-04-01

    Depressive illness has been considered as a problematic mental illness since antiquity. The treatment modalities of depressive illness are of many kinds. Use of Medhya Rasayana drugs is a unique method of treatment described in Ayurveda for depressive illness. Kushmanda (Benincasa hispida) is one of the Medhya Rasayana as described by Bhava Mishra. Ghrita is also considered as Medhya Rasayana by almost all Acharyas. Keeping this background Kushmanda Ghrita has been selected as a trial drug to treat the patients of depressive illness. The study was carried out in 35 clinically diagnosed cases of depressive illness by using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria of depressive illness. All patients were given 20 ml of Kushmanda Ghrita in two divided doses morning and evening with 40 ml of lukewarm water for a period of one month. It has shown statistically significant results with psychometric parameters-Hamilton depression rating scale (t = 24.36, P < 0.001), Hamilton anxiety rating scale (t = 26.20, P < .001), immediate memory span direct (t = 4.35, P < 0.001), and indirect test (t = 3.43, P < 01) along with clinical symptoms. PMID:22408308

  10. Illness perceptions mediate the relationship between depression and quality of life in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Amanda J; Becker, Danielle A; Singh, Anuradha; Friedman, Daniel; Montesdeoca, Jacqueline; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Spruill, Tanya M

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined whether negative illness perceptions help explain the link between depression and quality of life. Seventy patients with epilepsy completed standardized self-report questionnaires measuring depression, illness perception, and quality of life (QOL). Illness perception statistically mediated the relationship between depression and QOL (Indirect effect (CI; confidence interval) = -.72, lower limit = -1.7, upper limit = -.22, p < .05). Results held with and without adjusting for potential confounding variables (age, sex, ethnicity, income, and seizure frequency) and when operationalizing depression as a continuous variable that indexed severity of symptoms or as a dichotomous variable that indexed criteria consistent with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. This study is the first to suggest that illness perceptions may be a useful target in screening and intervention approaches in order to improve QOL among low-income, racially/ethnically diverse patients with epilepsy.

  11. [On Annotation on the Names and Syndromes of Ancient Diseases, with textual research on"dian (depressive psychosis)","kuang (manic psychosis)", and"xian (epilepsy)"].

    PubMed

    Li, Z H; Wang, Y L

    2016-01-28

    The book Gu dai ji bing ming hou shu yi (Annotation on the Names and Syndromes of Ancient Diseases) written by Yu Yunxiu holds that dian can be divided into two conditions, namely, epilepsy and manic psychosis. By analysis on related materials in ancient lexicographical works, ancient medical books and other ancient books, it reveals that dian and kuang are two very different diseases, but dian and xian refer to the same conditions. Dian was the special name of a disease, while xian was a stage of syndrome of that disease with typical symptoms. Dian and xian might also refer to two different types of that disease. Dian always refers to epilepsy from its very beginning besides cephalopathy, including both mental symptom and physical symptom. PMID:27049739

  12. Reevaluation of patients with bipolar disorder on manic episode: improving the diagnosing of mixed episode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Ran; Cho, Hyun-Sang; Kim, Se Joo; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Eun; Jon, Duk-In

    2013-08-01

    Mixed manic/depressive episodes in patients with bipolar disorder are underdiagnosed because of restrictive diagnostic criteria. Using the broader definition of a mixed episode represented by the Cincinnati criteria, we reevaluated the medical records of patients with bipolar disorder hospitalized for a manic episode. We also examined the predictive power of previously unrecognized depressive symptoms. Of 520 inpatients with mania, we retrospectively diagnosed 59 (11.3%) as having a probable mixed episode. Compared with the patients with pure mania, the patients with mixed episodes were more likely to have a family history of psychiatric illness, comorbid personality disorder, and a history of suicide attempts. Binary logistic regression revealed that loss of interest, loss of energy, feelings of worthlessness, and feelings of helplessness had good positive predictive value (>0.7) for mixed episodes. Accurate diagnosis of mixed episodes may require a broadening of diagnostic criteria and emphasis on symptoms such as loss of interest, loss of energy, and feelings of worthlessness and helplessness.

  13. Understanding Depression (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... daylight are shorter; for example, during winter months. Bipolar disorder (also called manic depression or bipolar depression) is ... to a Therapist Anxiety Disorders Cutting Word! Depression Bipolar Disorder Why Am I So Sad? Sadness and Depression ...

  14. The relationship of major depressive disorder to bipolar disorder: continuous or discontinuous?

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2005-12-01

    Recent studies have questioned current diagnostic systems that split mood disorders into the independent categories of bipolar disorders and depressive disorders. The current classification of mood disorders runs against Kraepelin's unitary view of manic-depressive insanity (illness). The main findings of recent studies supporting a continuity between bipolar disorders (mainly bipolar II disorder) and major depressive disorder are presented. The features supporting a continuity between bipolar II disorder and major depressive disorder currently are 1) depressive mixed states (mixed depression) and dysphoric (mixed) hypomania (opposite polarity symptoms in the same episode do not support a splitting of mood disorders); 2) family history (major depressive disorder is the most common mood disorder in relatives of bipolar probands); 3) lack of points of rarity between the depressive syndromes of bipolar II disorder and major depressive disorder; 4) major depressive disorder with bipolar features such as depressive mixed states, young onset age, atypical features, bipolar family history, irritability, racing thoughts, and psychomotor agitation; 5) a high proportion of major depressive disorders shifting to bipolar disorders during long-term follow-up; 6) a high proportion of major depressive disorders with history of manic and hypomanic symptoms; 7) factors of hypomania present in major depressive disorder episodes; 8) recurrent course of major depressive disorder; and 9) depressive symptoms much more common than manic and hypomanic symptoms in the course of bipolar disorders.

  15. Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Older Adults: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Chi, Iris

    2002-01-01

    Depression is quite common among the elderly members of Hong Kong Chinese society. This study examined the impact of a series of chronic illnesses on change in depressive symptoms among the older people. The respondents were 260 people aged 70 years or older from a longitudinal study of a representative community sample of the elderly population…

  16. The Comparison of Depression in Ill and Healthy Adolescents in Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarin, H. K.

    The development of depression in ill and healthy adolescents is explored and the question of whether hospitalization is accompanied by improvement in depression among cancer and non-cancer patients is addressed. Two studies, one between and one within subjects, longitudinal design with repeated measurement over 4 months, were carried out. MANOVA…

  17. Anxiety and depression in mothers and fathers of a chronically ill child.

    PubMed

    van Oers, H A; Haverman, L; Limperg, P F; van Dijk-Lokkart, E M; Maurice-Stam, H; Grootenhuis, M A

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to determine the levels of anxiety and depression in mothers and fathers of a chronically ill child (0-18 years) and to study which parental and child variables are associated with anxiety and depression. In a cross-sectional design, anxiety and depression were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Scores were compared to a Dutch reference group by analysis of variance and logistic regression analysis. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine which variables were associated with anxiety and depression. Mothers of a chronically ill child (n = 566) scored significantly higher than the reference group (p < .001) on anxiety (Mean 5.9 vs 4.8) and depression (Mean 4.5 vs 3.1). Fathers (n = 123) had higher depression scores (Mean 4.5 vs 3.6; p < .05), but fathers' anxiety scores were comparable to the reference group. The percentages of mothers in the clinical range of anxiety (31.8 vs 20.7 %, OR 2.03, 95 % CI 1.46-2.83) and depression (23.0 vs 12.0 %, OR 2.76, 95 % CI 1.84-4.13) were higher (p < .001) than in the reference group. No differences were found for fathers in the clinical range for anxiety and depression. Practical problems in daily life (a: β = .33, d: β = .25) and parenting stress (a: β = .30, d: β = .32) showed the strongest association with anxiety and depression for parents as a group. Illness-related characteristics of the child were not related. Parents of a chronically ill child, especially mothers, reported high levels of anxiety and depression. Awareness about parental anxiety and depression in pediatrics is important as well as targeted interventions.

  18. Illness beliefs of Chinese American immigrants with major depressive disorder in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Justin A; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Parkin, Susannah; Fava, Maurizio; Yeung, Albert S

    2015-02-01

    Underutilization of mental health services in the U.S. is compounded among racial/ethnic minorities, especially Chinese Americans. Culturally based illness beliefs influence help-seeking behavior and may provide insights into strategies for increasing utilization rates among vulnerable populations. This is the first large descriptive study of depressed Chinese American immigrant patients' illness beliefs using a standardized instrument. 190 depressed Chinese immigrants seeking primary care at South Cove Community Health Center completed the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue, which probes different dimensions of illness beliefs: chief complaint, labeling of illness, stigma perception, causal attributions, and help-seeking patterns. Responses were sorted into categories by independent raters and results compared to an earlier study at the same site and using the same instrument. Contrary to prior findings that depressed Chinese individuals tend to present with primarily somatic symptoms, subjects were more likely to report chief complaints and illness labels related to depressed mood than physical symptoms. Nearly half reported they would conceal the name of their problem from others. Mean stigma levels were significantly higher than in the previous study. Most subjects identified psychological stress as the most likely cause of their problem. Chinese immigrants' illness beliefs were notable for psychological explanations regarding their symptoms, possibly reflecting increased acceptance of Western biomedical frameworks, in accordance with recent research. However, reported stigma regarding these symptoms also increased. As Asian American immigrant populations increasingly accept psychological models of depression, stigma may become an increasingly important target for addressing disparities in mental health service utilization. PMID:25563074

  19. Illness beliefs of Chinese American immigrants with major depressive disorder in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Justin A; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Parkin, Susannah; Fava, Maurizio; Yeung, Albert S

    2015-02-01

    Underutilization of mental health services in the U.S. is compounded among racial/ethnic minorities, especially Chinese Americans. Culturally based illness beliefs influence help-seeking behavior and may provide insights into strategies for increasing utilization rates among vulnerable populations. This is the first large descriptive study of depressed Chinese American immigrant patients' illness beliefs using a standardized instrument. 190 depressed Chinese immigrants seeking primary care at South Cove Community Health Center completed the Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue, which probes different dimensions of illness beliefs: chief complaint, labeling of illness, stigma perception, causal attributions, and help-seeking patterns. Responses were sorted into categories by independent raters and results compared to an earlier study at the same site and using the same instrument. Contrary to prior findings that depressed Chinese individuals tend to present with primarily somatic symptoms, subjects were more likely to report chief complaints and illness labels related to depressed mood than physical symptoms. Nearly half reported they would conceal the name of their problem from others. Mean stigma levels were significantly higher than in the previous study. Most subjects identified psychological stress as the most likely cause of their problem. Chinese immigrants' illness beliefs were notable for psychological explanations regarding their symptoms, possibly reflecting increased acceptance of Western biomedical frameworks, in accordance with recent research. However, reported stigma regarding these symptoms also increased. As Asian American immigrant populations increasingly accept psychological models of depression, stigma may become an increasingly important target for addressing disparities in mental health service utilization.

  20. Neural predictive error signal correlates with depressive illness severity in a game paradigm.

    PubMed

    Steele, J D; Meyer, M; Ebmeier, K P

    2004-09-01

    Considerable experimental evidence supports the existence of predictive error signals in various brain regions during associative learning in animals and humans. These regions include the prefrontal cortex, temporal lobe, cerebellum and monoamine systems. Various quantitative theories have been developed to describe behaviour during learning, including Rescorla-Wagner, Temporal Difference and Kalman filter models. These theories may also account for neural error signals. Reviews of imaging studies of depressive illness have consistently implicated the prefrontal and temporal lobes as having abnormal function, and sometimes structure, whilst the monoamine systems are directly influenced by antidepressant medication. It was hypothesised that such abnormalities may be associated with a dysfunction of associative learning that would be reflected by different predictive error signals in depressed patients when compared with healthy controls. This was tested with 30 subjects, 15 with a major depressive illness, using a gambling paradigm and fMRI. Consistent with the hypothesis, depressed patients differed from controls in having an increased error signal. Additionally, for some brain regions, the magnitude of the error signal correlated with Hamilton depression rating of illness severity. Structural equation modelling was used to investigate hypothesised change in effective connectivity between prespecified regions of interest in the limbic and paralimbic system. Again, differences were found that in some cases correlated with illness severity. These results are discussed in the context of quantitative theories of brain function, clinical features of depressive illness and treatments. PMID:15325374

  1. The wing of madness: the illness of Vincent van Gogh.

    PubMed

    Morrant, J C

    1993-09-01

    This paper briefly describes some aspects of Vincent van Gogh's life and attitudes. It discusses absinthe and several psychodynamic factors that may have contributed to his psychotic episodes at Arles, when he cut off his ear. It discusses Vincent's descriptions of his illness, especially at Saint Rémy de Provence and concludes that he probably suffered from partial complex seizures (temporal lobe epilepsy) with manic depressive mood swings aggravated by absinthe, brandy, nicotine and turpentine.

  2. Sleep, Illness Course, and Concurrent Symptoms in Inter-episode Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eidelman, Polina; Talbot, Lisa S.; Gruber, June; Harvey, Allison G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated associations between sleep, illness course, and concurrent symptoms in 21 participants with bipolar disorder who were inter-episode. Sleep was assessed using a week-long diary. Illness course and symptoms were assessed via validated semi-structured interviews. Lower and more variable sleep efficiency and more variable total wake time were associated with more lifetime depressive episodes. Variability in falling asleep time was positively correlated with concurrent depressive symptoms. Sleep efficiency was positively correlated with concurrent manic symptoms. These findings suggest that inter-episode sleep disturbance is associated with illness course and that sleep may be an important intervention target in bipolar disorder. PMID:20004888

  3. Functional Impairment, Illness Burden, and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults: Does Type of Social Relationship Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Joshua P.; Hirsch, Jameson K.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The nature of interpersonal relationships, whether supportive or critical, may affect the association between health status and mental health outcomes. We examined the potential moderating effects of social support, as a buffer, and family criticism, as an exacerbating factor, on the association between illness burden, functional impairment and depressive symptoms. Methods Our sample of 735 older adults, aged 65 and older, was recruited from internal and family medicine primary care offices. Trained interviewers administered the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Duke Social Support Inventory, and Family Emotional Involvement and Criticism Scale. Physician-rated assessments of health, including the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale were also completed. Results Linear multivariable hierarchical regression results indicate that social interaction was a significant buffer, weakening the association between illness burden and depressive symptoms, whereas perceived social support buffered the relationship between functional impairment and depressive symptoms. Family criticism and instrumental social support were not significant moderators. Conclusions Type of medical dysfunction, whether illness or impairment, may require different therapeutic and supportive approaches. Enhancement of perceived social support, for those who are impaired, and encouragement of social interactions, for those who are ill, may be important intervention targets for treatment of depressive symptoms in older adult primary care patients. PMID:22495689

  4. Behavioural activation interventions for depressed individuals with a chronic physical illness: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression is common in people with chronic physical illness and is associated with worse medical outcomes. Cognitive behavioural therapy and problem-solving improve depression, although usually have small to moderate effects among people with chronic physical illness. Behavioural activation interventions for depression, which aim to increase positive reinforcement from the environment by encouraging individuals to increase pleasant/rewarding activities, have been reported to be equivalent to cognitive behavioural therapy. However, the effectiveness of behavioural activation interventions for depression in individuals with chronic physical illness is unclear. The aims of this systematic review are to identify the extent to which different forms of behavioural activation have been used as a treatment for depression in this population, examine the effectiveness of the interventions, and identify any adaptations which have been made specifically to the interventions for individuals with a range of chronic physical illnesses. Methods/Design Electronic databases will be systematically searched using terms relevant to behavioural activation and depression, and the subset of studies in people with chronic physical illnesses will be identified by manual searching. References and citations of eligible studies will be searched and experts in this field will be contacted to identify additional papers. All study designs will be included in this review to allow for a more extensive identification of the extent of different forms of behavioural activation interventions. The different forms of behavioural activation and the specific chronic physical health conditions for which this intervention has been used will be reviewed narratively. For the effectiveness of the interventions, if sufficient randomised controlled trials have been undertaken the results will be meta-analysed. Non-randomised studies will be narratively synthesised and adaptations to the interventions

  5. Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphisms and Chronic Illness of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Woojae; Lim, Shinn-Won; Kim, Jinwoo; Lee, Yujin; Song, Jihye; Chang, Ki-won

    2010-01-01

    Clinical course of depression is variable. The serotonin transporter gene is one of the most studied genes for depression. We examined the association of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms with chronicity and recurrent tendency of depression in Korean subjects. This cross-sectional study involved 252 patients with major depression. Patients were genotyped for s/l polymorphisms in 5-HTT promoter region (5-HTTLPR), s/l variation in second intron of the 5-HTT gene (5-HTT VNTR intron2). Chronicity was associated with 5-HTTLPR. Patients with l/l had higher rate of chronicity than the other patients (l/l vs s/l or s/s; odds ratio, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-12.46; P=0.005; logistic regression analysis). Recurrent tendency was not associated with 5-HTTLPR. Chronicity and recurrent tendency were not associated with 5-HTT VNTR intron2. These results suggest that chronic depression is associated with 5-HTTLPR. PMID:21165304

  6. Schizo-affective disorder (Schneiderian positive), manic type: a comparison with mania.

    PubMed

    Pi, E H; Surawicz, F G

    1982-06-01

    Manic patients with (N = 12) and without (N = 27) Schneiderian first rank symptoms (SFRS) were compared with regard to age, age at illness onset, presence of good prognostic signs, psychopathologic variables, treatment, and family history. The lack of group differences seen on many variables is consistent with the notion that SFRS do not define a separate schizo-affective manic subtype with differences in etiology or outcome.

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy: results in depressive illness from the Leicestershire trial.

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, S; Cowley, P; McDonald, C; Neville, P; Palmer, R; Wellstood-Eason, S

    1984-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy was investigated in a double blind trial. Altogether 186 clinically selected patients were referred to the trial, but 48 of these did not participate. According to the present state examination, 95 of the remaining 138 patients fell into one of the classes of major depression. Patients were randomly allocated to a course of real or simulated electroconvulsive therapy. Treatment was given twice a week with a maximum of eight treatments. On the Hamilton depressive rating scale the improvement in the group given real treatment was significantly greater than that in the group given simulated treatment both at two weeks (p = 0.014) and at four weeks (p = 0.0001). At follow up at 12 and 28 weeks there was no difference between the treatment groups. At the end of the four week trial consultants, who were blind to the allocation of treatment, rated the patients who had received real treatment as having made a significantly greater improvement than the patients who had received simulated treatment (p less than 0.00005). Further analysis showed that electroconvulsive therapy was effective in depression associated with delusions and in depression associated with retardation. PMID:6418300

  8. Stress, social support, and symptoms of depression in spouses of the medically ill.

    PubMed

    Rideout, E M; Rodin, G M; Littlefield, C H

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the level and frequency of depressive symptoms in spouses of dialysis patients, as a function of a) severity of patient disease, b) level of stress experienced by the spouse, and c) perception of support from the ill partner. The subjects were forty patients who had begun dialysis in the last year and their spouses. Measures of depression, impact on family, perceived social support, and disease severity were applied. Significant depressive symptoms were reported by 20 percent of spouses. Symptom severity was not correlated with age, sex, or occupation of the spouses, nor with level of depression or functional impairment of the dialysis patients. The amount of social support received from the ill partner accounted for 37 percent of the variance in spouse depression, while social and financial stressors reported by the spouse explained 13 percent of the variance in spouse symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive symptoms in spouses of dialysis patients are associated with the social and economic consequences of the illness for the family but even more so with the amount of perceived support from the patient. The determinants of this perceived support need further exploration.

  9. Internalized stigma of mental illness and depressive and psychotic symptoms in homeless veterans over 6 months.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jennifer E; Hayward, H'Sien; Bassett, Elena D; Hoff, Rani

    2016-06-30

    We investigated the relationship between internalized stigma of mental illness at baseline and depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, controlling for baseline symptoms. Data on homeless veterans with severe mental illness (SMI) were provided by the Northeast Program Evaluation Center (NEPEC) Special Needs-Chronic Mental Illness (SN-CMI) study (Kasprow and Rosenheck, 2008). The study used the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale to measure internalized stigma at baseline and the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) to measure depressive and psychotic symptoms at baseline and 3 and 6 month follow-ups. Higher levels of internalized stigma were associated with greater levels of depressive and psychotic symptoms 3 and 6 months later, even controlling for symptoms at baseline. Alienation and Discrimination Experience were the subscales most strongly associated with symptoms. Exploratory analyses of individual items yielded further insight into characteristics of potentially successful interventions that could be studied. Overall, our findings show that homeless veterans with SMI experiencing higher levels of internalized stigma are likely to experience more depression and psychosis over time. This quasi-experimental study replicates and extends findings of other studies and has implications for future controlled research into the potential long-term effects of anti-stigma interventions on mental health recovery.

  10. Illness Conceptualizations among Older Rural Mexican-Americans with Anxiety and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Ayers, Catherine R.; Ruberg, Joshua L.; Singley, Daniel B.; Wilson, Jacqueline; Chavira, Denise; Palinkas, Lawrence; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2014-01-01

    Background Research on barriers and utilization of mental health services in older ethnic minorities has been productive. However, little is known about the characterization and beliefs about anxiety and depression symptoms among older Mexican-Americans. Exploration of these conceptualizations will lead to better detection and provision of care to this large, yet underserved group. Method The present study used a mixed methods approach to explore conceptualizations of anxiety and depression in a group of rural older Mexican-Americans. Twenty-five Spanish-speaking participants (mean age 71.2) responded to flyers that solicited individuals who felt “tense or depressed.” Participants completed a structured diagnostic interview as well as self-report questionnaires about medical health, anxiety and depressive symptoms, and cognitive functioning. Qualitative interviews included questions about how participants describe, conceptualize, and cope with anxiety and depression symptoms. Results Sixty-eight percent of the sample met criteria for at least one anxiety or mood disorder with high comorbidity rates. Self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization were below clinical ranges for all participants. Medical illness, cognitive impairment, age, education, and acculturation were not associated with distress. Qualitative analyses revealed that nearly half of the terms used by the sample to describe distress phenomena deviated from Western labels traditionally used to indicate anxious and depressive symptomatology. Discussion Multiple methods of symptom endorsement demonstrated that older Mexican-Americans may report distress differently than detected by traditional self-report measures or common Western terminology. Understanding these additional illness conceptualizations may have implications for improving the detection of mental illness and increasing service use among this growing population. PMID:24077906

  11. Loneliness, depression, social support, and quality of life in older chronically ill Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Theeke, Laurie A; Goins, R Turner; Moore, Julia; Campbell, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe loneliness and to examine the relationships between loneliness, depression, social support, and QOL in chronically ill, older Appalachians. In-person interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 60 older, chronically ill, community-dwelling, and rural adults. Those with dementia or active grief were excluded. The UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1985), Geriatric Depression Scale (Shiekh & Yesavage, 1986), Katz ADL scale (Katz, Down, & Cash, 1970), MOS Social Support Scale (Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991), and a visual analog scale for Quality of Life (Spitzer et al., 1981) scale were used. Diagnoses were obtained through chart reviews. SPSS was used for data analyses. The majority of the 65% female sample (M age = 75 years) were married and impoverished. Participants' number of chronic illnesses averaged more than 3. Over 88% of participants reported at least 1 area of functional impairment. Loneliness was prevalent with UCLA loneliness scores indicating moderate to high loneliness, ranging from 39 to 62 (possible scores were 20-80). Higher loneliness scores correlated with depression, lower Qol, and lower social support, particularly lower emotional support. This study provides evidence that loneliness is a significant problem for older chronically ill Appalachian adults and that it may be related to low emotional support. Further, it provides evidence that this population may be significantly lonely and may not self-identify as lonely. Screening for loneliness and designing interventions that target the emotional aspects of loneliness could be important in this population.

  12. Examining whether offspring psychopathology influences illness course in mothers with recurrent depression using a high-risk longitudinal sample.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Ruth; Hammerton, Gemma; Harold, Gordon T; Mahedy, Liam; Potter, Robert; Langley, Kate; Thapar, Ajay; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Depression is known to be influenced by psychosocial stressors. For mothers with recurrent depressive illness, the presence of psychopathology in their children may have important effects on their own mental health. Although the impact of maternal depression on child mental health is well-established, no study to date, as far as we are aware, has examined the extent to which offspring psychopathology influences the course of depression in mothers with a history of recurrent depressive illness, what types of child psychopathology impact maternal mental health, or whether risks vary by child gender. Aims were to (a) Use a longitudinal design to examine whether adolescent psychopathology (depression, disruptive behavior disorder; DBD) predicts recurrence of a depressive episode and depression symptom course in women with a history of recurrent depression; and (b) To test if observed effects vary by child gender. 299 mothers with recurrent major depressive disorder and their adolescent offspring were assessed on 2 occasions, 29 months apart. Maternal depression and offspring psychopathology were assessed using semistructured interview measures. Cross-generational links across time were assessed using structural equation modeling. Analyses were adjusted for past severity of maternal depression. Offspring depression symptoms but not DBD symptoms at baseline predicted future episode recurrence in mothers. Depression symptoms in daughters (β = .16, p = .039) but not sons (β = -.07, p = .461), predicted an increase in maternal depression symptoms across time. Psychopathology in daughters is associated with long-term depressive symptoms in women (mothers) with a history of recurrent depression. Findings highlight the importance of careful assessment and management of mental health problems in adolescents for more effective management of maternal depression. This study suggests that offspring symptoms of depression may be important for the recurrence of maternal depression

  13. Examining whether offspring psychopathology influences illness course in mothers with recurrent depression using a high-risk longitudinal sample.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Ruth; Hammerton, Gemma; Harold, Gordon T; Mahedy, Liam; Potter, Robert; Langley, Kate; Thapar, Ajay; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita; Collishaw, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Depression is known to be influenced by psychosocial stressors. For mothers with recurrent depressive illness, the presence of psychopathology in their children may have important effects on their own mental health. Although the impact of maternal depression on child mental health is well-established, no study to date, as far as we are aware, has examined the extent to which offspring psychopathology influences the course of depression in mothers with a history of recurrent depressive illness, what types of child psychopathology impact maternal mental health, or whether risks vary by child gender. Aims were to (a) Use a longitudinal design to examine whether adolescent psychopathology (depression, disruptive behavior disorder; DBD) predicts recurrence of a depressive episode and depression symptom course in women with a history of recurrent depression; and (b) To test if observed effects vary by child gender. 299 mothers with recurrent major depressive disorder and their adolescent offspring were assessed on 2 occasions, 29 months apart. Maternal depression and offspring psychopathology were assessed using semistructured interview measures. Cross-generational links across time were assessed using structural equation modeling. Analyses were adjusted for past severity of maternal depression. Offspring depression symptoms but not DBD symptoms at baseline predicted future episode recurrence in mothers. Depression symptoms in daughters (β = .16, p = .039) but not sons (β = -.07, p = .461), predicted an increase in maternal depression symptoms across time. Psychopathology in daughters is associated with long-term depressive symptoms in women (mothers) with a history of recurrent depression. Findings highlight the importance of careful assessment and management of mental health problems in adolescents for more effective management of maternal depression. This study suggests that offspring symptoms of depression may be important for the recurrence of maternal depression

  14. Interplay between pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors in depressive illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Marie-Claude; Anisman, Hymie

    2013-01-01

    The development of depressive disorders had long been attributed to monoamine variations, and pharmacological treatment strategies likewise focused on methods of altering monoamine availability. However, the limited success achieved by treatments that altered these processes spurred the search for alternative mechanisms and treatments. Here we provide a brief overview concerning a possible role for pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors in major depression, as well as the possibility of targeting these factors in treating this disorder. The data suggest that focusing on one or another cytokine or growth factor might be counterproductive, especially as these factors may act sequentially or in parallel in affecting depressive disorders. It is also suggested that cytokines and growth factors might be useful biomarkers for individualized treatments of depressive illnesses. PMID:23675319

  15. The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Mark A; Boyle, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends earlier research identifying an increased risk of anxiety among children with chronic physical illness (CwCPI) by examining a more complete model that explains how physical illness leads to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. We tested a stress-generation model linking chronic physical illness to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a population-based sample of children aged 10 to 15 years. We hypothesized that having a chronic physical illness would be associated with more symptoms of anxiety and depression, increased levels of maternal depressive symptoms, more family dysfunction, and lower self-esteem; and, that maternal depressive symptoms, family dysfunction, and child self-esteem would mediate the influence of chronic physical illness on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 10,646). Mediating processes were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Childhood chronic physical illness was associated with increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression, β = 0.20, p < 0.001. Mediating effects were also observed such that chronic physical illness resulted in increases in symptoms of maternal depression and family dysfunction, leading to declines in child self-esteem, and in turn, increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression. CwCPI are at-risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Some of this elevated risk appears to work through family processes and child self-esteem. This study supports the use of family-centered care approaches among CwCPI to minimize burden on families and promote healthy psychological development for children.

  16. The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Mark A; Boyle, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends earlier research identifying an increased risk of anxiety among children with chronic physical illness (CwCPI) by examining a more complete model that explains how physical illness leads to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. We tested a stress-generation model linking chronic physical illness to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a population-based sample of children aged 10 to 15 years. We hypothesized that having a chronic physical illness would be associated with more symptoms of anxiety and depression, increased levels of maternal depressive symptoms, more family dysfunction, and lower self-esteem; and, that maternal depressive symptoms, family dysfunction, and child self-esteem would mediate the influence of chronic physical illness on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 10,646). Mediating processes were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Childhood chronic physical illness was associated with increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression, β = 0.20, p < 0.001. Mediating effects were also observed such that chronic physical illness resulted in increases in symptoms of maternal depression and family dysfunction, leading to declines in child self-esteem, and in turn, increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression. CwCPI are at-risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Some of this elevated risk appears to work through family processes and child self-esteem. This study supports the use of family-centered care approaches among CwCPI to minimize burden on families and promote healthy psychological development for children. PMID:24938212

  17. Models of Care for Late-Life Depression of the Medically Ill: Examples from COPD and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Avari, Jimmy N.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Depression worsens most treatment outcomes in medically ill older adults. Chronic medical illnesses weaken and demoralize patients and compromise their ability to adhere to treatments requiring consistency and effort. Acute medical illnesses create a psychosocial storm that finds patients and their ecosystem unprepared. We describe two intervention models that can be used to target and personalize treatment in depressed, chronically or acutely medically ill older adults. Personalized Adherence Intervention for Depression and COPD (PID-C) is a model intervention for depressed patients with chronic medical illnesses. It targets patient-specific barriers to treatment engagement and aims to shift the balance in favor of treatment participation. PID-C led to higher remission rates of depression, reduction in depressive symptoms, and reduction in dyspnea-related disability. Addition of problem solving training enables patients to utilize resources available to them and hopefully improve their outcomes. Ecosystem Focused Therapy (EFT) is a model intervention for depression developing in the context of an acute medical event. It was developed for patients with post-stroke depression (PSD) and targets five areas, part of the “psychosocial storm” originating from the patient’s sudden disability and the resulting change in the patient’s needs and family’s life. A preliminary study suggests that EFT is feasible and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms and signs and disability in PSD. PMID:25028344

  18. Using mixed methods to examine the role of Veterans’ illness perceptions on depression treatment utilization and HEDIS concordance

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Mark E.; Bokhour, Barbara G.; Dell, Natalie S.; Mueller, Nora M.; Zhao, Shibei; Osei-Bonsu, Princess E.; Rodrigues, Stephanie; Coldwell, Craig M.; Ngo, Tu A.; Schlosser, James; Vielhauer, Melanie J.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; Eisen, Susan V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although depression screening occurs annually in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care, many Veterans may not be receiving guideline-concordant depression treatment. Objectives To determine whether Veterans’ illness perceptions of depression may be serving as barriers to guideline-concordant treatment. Research Design We used a prospective, observational design involving a mailed questionnaire and chart review data collection to assess depression treatment utilization and concordance with Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set guidelines adopted by the VA. The Self-Regulation Model of Illness Behavior guided the study. Subjects Veterans who screened positive for a new episode of depression at three VA primary care clinics in the U.S. Northeast. Measures The Illness Perceptions Questionnaire-Revised, measuring patients’ perceptions of their symptoms, cause, timeline, consequences, cure or controllability and coherence of depression and its symptoms, was our primary measure to calculate Veterans’ illness perceptions. Treatment utilization was assessed three months after the positive depression screen through chart review. HEDIS guideline-concordant treatment was determined according to a checklist created for the study. Results 839 Veterans screened positive for a new episode of depression from May 2009–June 2011; 275 (32.8%) completed the survey. 92 (33.9%) received HEDIS guideline-concordant depression treatment. Veterans’ illness perceptions of their symptoms, cause, timeline, and controllability of depression predicted receiving guideline-concordant treatment. Conclusions Many Veterans are not receiving guideline-concordant treatment for depression. HEDIS guideline measures may not be assessing all aspects of quality depression care. Conversations about Veterans’ illness perceptions and their specific needs are encouraged to ensure that appropriate treatment is achieved. PMID:24374425

  19. Measuring Latinos’ Perceptions of Depression: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Illness Perception Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Lagomasino, Isabel T.; Dwight-Johnson, Megan; Hansen, Marissa C.; Xie, Bin

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the psychometric properties of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire adapted for a clinical sample of low-income Latinos suffering from depression. Participants (N = 339) were recruited from public primary care centers. Their average age was 49.73 years and the majority was foreign born females of either Mexican or Central American descent. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure of this measure. Construct and discriminant validity and internal consistency were evaluated. After the elimination of three items because of low factor loadings (< .40) and the specification of seven error covariances, a revised model composed of 24 items had adequate goodness-of-fit indices and factor loadings, supporting construct validity. Each of the subscales reported satisfactory internal consistency. Intercorrelations between the 5 illness perception factors provided initial support for the discriminant validity of these factors in the context of depression. The establishment of the psychometric properties of this adapted measure will pave the way for future studies examining the role illness perceptions play in the help seeking and management of depression among Latinos. PMID:18954174

  20. Manic Depressive Disorder in Mental Handicap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, T. P.; Jones, P. M.

    1988-01-01

    Eight cases of early onset bipolar affective disorder in adolescents with mental impairment are described, focusing on age of onset; common characteristics such as rapid cycling, mixed affective states, and lithium resistance; and the likelihood that cerebral dysfunction might cause a secondary form of bipolar disorder. (JDD)

  1. Symposium on Age Differentiation in Depressive Illness. Depression in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Leon J.

    1976-01-01

    It is important that the clinician who treats older patients be aware that depression is the psychiatric symptom often encountered in the elderly and that it is as distressing in this age group as it is in younger persons. It often is reversible with prompt and appropriate treatment. (Author)

  2. Illness Appraisals and Depression in the First Year after HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie; Wrubel, Judith; Hult, Jen R.; Maurer, Stephanie; Acree, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Illness appraisals provide important context to help understand the way individuals cope with chronic illness. In the present study, a qualitative approach to the analysis of HIV diagnosis experience narratives in a sample of 100 people newly diagnosed with HIV revealed five groups that differed in their initial illness appraisals: HIV as Chronic Illness, Concern about Dying, Stigmatization, Threat to Identity, and Other Threats Overshadow HIV. When compared on quantitatively measured depressive mood, the groups differed on level and trajectory over the course of the first year post-diagnosis. Although the experience of living with HIV has changed significantly with the advent of effective Antiretroviral Therapies (ART), there were a number of similarities between the appraisals of this group of participants who were diagnosed post ART and groups who were diagnosed before ART became widely available. Posttest counselors and other HIV service providers should take individual differences in illness appraisals into account in order to help newly HIV-positive clients manage their healthcare and cope adaptively with their diagnosis. PMID:24205346

  3. Assessment of illness acceptance by patients with COPD and the prevalence of depression and anxiety in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Jankowska-Polanska, Beata; Motowidlo, Urszula; Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Chabowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is a civilization disease. It affects up to 8%–10% of population >30 years of age. Coexistence of depression occurs in 20%–40% of patients with COPD. Depression and anxiety reduce compliance and worsen prognosis. Objective The aims of this study were to determine the degree of illness acceptance among patients with COPD, to examine the relation between disease acceptance and perceived anxiety and depression, and to verify which of the sociodemographic and clinical factors are associated with illness acceptance, anxiety, and depression. Materials and methods The study included 102 patients with COPD (mean age 65.8 years), hospitalized due to exacerbations. Acceptance of Illness Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used. For statistical analysis, Student’s t-test and Pearson’s r correlation coefficient were carried out. Results The overall illness acceptance level was moderate with a tendency toward lack of acceptance (mean 20.6, standard deviation [SD] 7.62). The overall scores were 10.2 (SD 3.32) for anxiety and 10.8 (SD 4.14) for depression, which indicate borderline or high intensity of these symptoms. Acceptance of illness was negatively correlated with the intensity of depression symptoms (r=−0.46, P<0.05). Intensity of depression was significantly associated with intensity of smoking, duration of the disease, severity of dyspnea, and living in a rural area. Conclusion Early identification and assessment of depression and anxiety symptoms allow health care providers to offer patients at risk of depression a special medical supervision. Rapid start of antidepressant therapy may increase illness acceptance and improve prognosis among patients with COPD. PMID:27274217

  4. Depression predicts future emergency hospital admissions in primary care patients with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Elspeth A.; Dickens, Chris; Blakemore, Amy; Watson, Jennifer; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Lovell, Karina; Afzal, Cara; Kapur, Navneet; Tomenson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objective More than 15 million people currently suffer from a chronic physical illness in England. The objective of this study was to determine whether depression is independently associated with prospective emergency hospital admission in patients with chronic physical illness. Method 1860 primary care patients in socially deprived areas of Manchester with at least one of four exemplar chronic physical conditions completed a questionnaire about physical and mental health, including a measure of depression. Emergency hospital admissions were recorded using GP records for the year before and the year following completion of the questionnaire. Results The numbers of patients who had at least one emergency admission in the year before and the year after completion of the questionnaire were 221/1411 (15.7%) and 234/1398 (16.7%) respectively. The following factors were independently associated with an increased risk of prospective emergency admission to hospital: having no partner (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.15); having ischaemic heart disease (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.46); having a threatening experience (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29); depression (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.40); and emergency hospital admission in the year prior to questionnaire completion (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.98 to 5.86). Conclusion To prevent potentially avoidable emergency hospital admissions, greater efforts should be made to detect and treat co-morbid depression in people with chronic physical illness in primary care, with a particular focus on patients who have no partner, have experienced threatening life events, and have had a recent emergency hospital admission. PMID:26919799

  5. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  6. Older persons' experiences of depressive ill-health and family support.

    PubMed

    Lyberg, Anne; Holm, Anne Lise; Lassenius, Erna; Berggren, Ingela; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore experiences of the meaning of family support among older persons with depressive ill-health. Data were collected from twenty-nine participants through semistructured interviews and analysed using interpretative hermeneutic and reflective methodology. The findings revealed a main theme, hovering between feelings of belongingness and aloneness in relationships with family members, based on two themes: a sense of being worthy and a sense of being unworthy. Experiences of support and lack of support from family members were not opposites but connected in internal relationships and can be pictured as a movement on a continuum of ambiguity. Family support promotes the emotional needs of older persons with depressive ill-health to be confirmed. The family plays a vital role, not always by direct assistance, but indirectly by supporting the older person's own "guiding principles" for managing her/his situation. The feelings of aloneness as well as shame and guilt at poor or absent family responsiveness should be adequately addressed. Innovative nursing care can lead to improvement by focusing on acquiescence to the older person's life situation. PMID:24078871

  7. Older Persons' Experiences of Depressive Ill-Health and Family Support

    PubMed Central

    Lyberg, Anne; Holm, Anne Lise; Lassenius, Erna; Berggren, Ingela; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore experiences of the meaning of family support among older persons with depressive ill-health. Data were collected from twenty-nine participants through semistructured interviews and analysed using interpretative hermeneutic and reflective methodology. The findings revealed a main theme, hovering between feelings of belongingness and aloneness in relationships with family members, based on two themes: a sense of being worthy and a sense of being unworthy. Experiences of support and lack of support from family members were not opposites but connected in internal relationships and can be pictured as a movement on a continuum of ambiguity. Family support promotes the emotional needs of older persons with depressive ill-health to be confirmed. The family plays a vital role, not always by direct assistance, but indirectly by supporting the older person's own “guiding principles” for managing her/his situation. The feelings of aloneness as well as shame and guilt at poor or absent family responsiveness should be adequately addressed. Innovative nursing care can lead to improvement by focusing on acquiescence to the older person's life situation. PMID:24078871

  8. Psycho-physical and neurophysiological effects of qigong on depressed elders with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hector W H; Tsang, William W N; Jones, Alice Y M; Fung, Kelvin M T; Chan, Alan H L; Chan, Edward P; Au, Doreen W H

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the psychological, physical, and neurophysiological effects of a qigong exercise program on depressed elders with chronic medical illness. The experimental group (n = 21, 80 ± 7 years) was given a 12-week qigong exercise program, while the comparison group (n = 17, 81 ± 8 years) participated in a newspaper reading program with the same duration and frequency. Measurement of depression symptoms, psychosocial functioning, muscle strengths, salivary cortisol, and serum serotonin was conducted. At 12 weeks, the qigong group had significant reduction in depressive symptoms (F = 11.68; p < 0.025). Improvement in self-efficacy (F = 4.30; p < 0.050), self-concept of physical well-being (F = 6.82; p < 0.025), and right-hand grip strength (F = 5.25; p = 0.034) was also found when compared with the comparison group. A change in salivary cortisol level was found marginally insignificant between groups (F = 3.16; p = 0.087). However, a decreasing trend of cortisol level was observed. The results provided preliminary evidence for the hypotheses that the antidepressive effect of qigong exercise could be explained by improvement in psychosocial functioning and possibly down-regulation of hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:23072658

  9. Psycho-physical and neurophysiological effects of qigong on depressed elders with chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Hector W H; Tsang, William W N; Jones, Alice Y M; Fung, Kelvin M T; Chan, Alan H L; Chan, Edward P; Au, Doreen W H

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the psychological, physical, and neurophysiological effects of a qigong exercise program on depressed elders with chronic medical illness. The experimental group (n = 21, 80 ± 7 years) was given a 12-week qigong exercise program, while the comparison group (n = 17, 81 ± 8 years) participated in a newspaper reading program with the same duration and frequency. Measurement of depression symptoms, psychosocial functioning, muscle strengths, salivary cortisol, and serum serotonin was conducted. At 12 weeks, the qigong group had significant reduction in depressive symptoms (F = 11.68; p < 0.025). Improvement in self-efficacy (F = 4.30; p < 0.050), self-concept of physical well-being (F = 6.82; p < 0.025), and right-hand grip strength (F = 5.25; p = 0.034) was also found when compared with the comparison group. A change in salivary cortisol level was found marginally insignificant between groups (F = 3.16; p = 0.087). However, a decreasing trend of cortisol level was observed. The results provided preliminary evidence for the hypotheses that the antidepressive effect of qigong exercise could be explained by improvement in psychosocial functioning and possibly down-regulation of hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  10. Depression.

    PubMed

    Tallo, Donato

    2014-04-15

    Reading the CPD article was beneficial to my professional nursing practice and development. I gained a greater understanding of how depression is likely to exacerbate the effects of a physical illness or complicate the treatment of other health conditions. PMID:24712633

  11. Web-based interventions for comorbid depression and chronic illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Charova, Ekaterina; Dorstyn, Diana; Tully, Phillip; Mittag, Oskar

    2015-06-01

    Web-based interventions offer potential benefits for managing and treating depression in the context of chronic physical illness, however their use with this population has yet to be quantitatively assessed. The present systematic review examined the biopsychosocial data from 11 independent studies (N = 1348 participants), including randomised controlled and quasi-experimental designs most commonly performed with diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Study quality was evaluated using the Downs and Black (1998) index, with most studies being statistically underpowered although internal validity was demonstrated. Treatment outcomes were quantified using Cohen's d effect sizes. Results indicated significant short-term improvements in depression severity (d w = 0.36, CI = 0.20-0.52, p < 0.01), in addition to quality of life, problem-solving skills, functional ability, anxiety and pain-related cognitions (d range = 0.23 to 1.10). Longer-term outcomes could not be determined based on the limited data. Further robust studies are required before wider adoption of web techniques takes place. PMID:25712111

  12. Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Jasmine Kaur; Chalana, Harsh

    2011-09-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus mostly presents with polydipsia and polyuria but may also present with confusion, psychosis, seizure or coma. We present a case of Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms. A 21 year old Indian male had Central Diabetes Insipidus, which was confirmed by water deprivation test. He presented to our hospital with full blown manic symptoms meeting the ICD 10 criteria. He was managed with intranasal Desmopressin, water restriction and Olanzapine. In contrary to routine psychiatric patients which may present with psychogenic polydipsia or Central Diabetes Insipidus patients presenting in delirium or psychosis, our case presents a unique example of Central Diabetes Insipidus presenting with manic symptoms. It hints about a relationship between a common pathway for Central Diabetes Insipidus and mood disorders which needs further research. Diencephalon has already been the focus of attention for several researchers but no concrete evidence is available yet. PMID:23051126

  13. Religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy: a new method of treatment for major depression in patients with chronic medical illness.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Michelle J; Koenig, Harold G; Robins, Clive J; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F; Cohen, Harvey J; King, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients' spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  14. Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A New Method of Treatment for Major Depression in Patients With Chronic Medical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michelle J.; Koenig, Harold G.; Robins, Clive J.; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F.; Cohen, Harvey J.; King, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients’ spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  15. The organization of the stress system and its dysregulation in depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Gold, P W

    2015-02-01

    brain and establish premonitory, proinflammatory and prothrombotic states in anticipation of either injury or hemorrhage during a threatening situation. Essential adaptive intracellular changes include increased neurogenesis, enhancement of neuroplasticity and deployment of a successful endoplasmic reticulum stress response. In melancholic depression, the activities of the central glutamate, norepinephrine and central cytokine systems are significantly and persistently increased. The subgenual prefrontal cortex is functionally impaired, and its size is reduced by as much as 40%. This leads to sustained anxiety and activations of the amygdala, CRH/HPA axis, the sympathomedullary system and their sequella, including early morning awakening and loss of appetite. The sustained activation of the amygdala, in turn, further activates stress system neuroendocrine and autonomic functions. The activity of the nucleus accumbens is further decreased and anhedonia emerges. Concomitantly, neurogenesis and neuroplasticity fall significantly. Antidepressants ameliorate many of these processes. The processes that lead to the behavioral and physiological manifestations of depressive illness produce a significant decrease in lifespan, and a doubling of the incidence of premature coronary artery disease. The incidences of premature diabetes and osteoporosis are also substantially increased. Six physiological processes that occur during stress and that are markedly increased in melancholia set into motion six different mechanisms to produce inflammation, as well as sustained insulin resistance and a prothrombotic state. Clinically, melancholic and atypical depression seem to be antithesis of one another. In melancholia, depressive systems are at their worst in the morning when arousal systems, such as the CRH/HPA axis and the noradrenergic systems, are at their maxima. In atypical depression, depressive symptoms are at their worst in the evening, when these arousal systems are at their

  16. The manic phase of Bipolar disorder significantly impairs theory of mind decoding.

    PubMed

    Hawken, Emily R; Harkness, Kate L; Lazowski, Lauren K; Summers, David; Khoja, Nida; Gregory, James Gardner; Milev, Roumen

    2016-05-30

    Bipolar disorder is associated with significant deficits in the decoding of others' mental states in comparison to healthy participants. However, differences in theory of mind decoding ability among patients in manic, depressed, and euthymic phases of bipolar disorder is currently unknown. Fifty-nine patients with bipolar I or II disorder (13 manic, 25 depressed, 20 euthymic) completed the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Task (Eyes task) and the Animals Task developed to control for non-mentalistic response demands of the Eyes Task. Patients also completed self-report and clinician-rated measures of depression, mania, and anxiety symptoms. Patients in the manic phase were significantly less accurate than those in the depressed and euthymic phases at decoding mental states in the Eyes task, and this effect was strongest for eyes of a positive or neutral valence. Further Eyes task performance was negatively correlated with the symptoms of language/thought disorder, pressured speech, and disorganized thoughts and appearance. These effects held when controlling for accuracy on the Animals task, response times, and relevant demographic and clinical covariates. Results suggest that the state of mania, and particularly psychotic symptoms that may overlap with the schizophrenia spectrum, are most strongly related to social cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. PMID:27039012

  17. Differential diagnosis of depression: relevance of positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.M.; Baxter, L.R. Jr.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Gerner, R.H.; Phelps, M.E.

    1987-09-11

    The proper differential diagnosis of depression is important. A large body of research supports the division of depressive illness into bipolar and unipolar subtypes with respect to demographics, genetics, treatment response, and neurochemical mechanisms. Optimal treatment is different for unipolar and bipolar depressions. Treating a patient with bipolar depression as one would a unipolar patient may precipitate a serious manic episode or possibly even permanent rapid cycling disorder. The clinical distinction between these disorders, while sometimes difficult, can often be achieved through an increased diagnostic suspicion concerning a personal or family history of mania. Positron emission tomography and the FDG method, which allow in vivo study of the glucose metabolic rates for discrete cerebral structures, provide new evidence that bipolar and unipolar depression are two different disorders.

  18. The organization of the stress system and its dysregulation in depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Gold, P W

    2015-02-01

    brain and establish premonitory, proinflammatory and prothrombotic states in anticipation of either injury or hemorrhage during a threatening situation. Essential adaptive intracellular changes include increased neurogenesis, enhancement of neuroplasticity and deployment of a successful endoplasmic reticulum stress response. In melancholic depression, the activities of the central glutamate, norepinephrine and central cytokine systems are significantly and persistently increased. The subgenual prefrontal cortex is functionally impaired, and its size is reduced by as much as 40%. This leads to sustained anxiety and activations of the amygdala, CRH/HPA axis, the sympathomedullary system and their sequella, including early morning awakening and loss of appetite. The sustained activation of the amygdala, in turn, further activates stress system neuroendocrine and autonomic functions. The activity of the nucleus accumbens is further decreased and anhedonia emerges. Concomitantly, neurogenesis and neuroplasticity fall significantly. Antidepressants ameliorate many of these processes. The processes that lead to the behavioral and physiological manifestations of depressive illness produce a significant decrease in lifespan, and a doubling of the incidence of premature coronary artery disease. The incidences of premature diabetes and osteoporosis are also substantially increased. Six physiological processes that occur during stress and that are markedly increased in melancholia set into motion six different mechanisms to produce inflammation, as well as sustained insulin resistance and a prothrombotic state. Clinically, melancholic and atypical depression seem to be antithesis of one another. In melancholia, depressive systems are at their worst in the morning when arousal systems, such as the CRH/HPA axis and the noradrenergic systems, are at their maxima. In atypical depression, depressive symptoms are at their worst in the evening, when these arousal systems are at their

  19. Collaborative Depression Treatment in Older and Younger Adults with Physical Illness: Pooled Comparative Analysis of Three Randomized Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ell, Kathleen; Aranda, María P.; Xie, Bin; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Chou, Chih-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective There have been few comparisons of the effectiveness of collaborative depression care between older versus younger adults with co-morbid illness, particularly among low-income populations. Design Intent-to-treat analyses are conducted on pooled data from three randomized controlled trials that tested collaborative care aimed at improving depression, quality of life and treatment receipt. Settings Trials were conducted in oncology and primary care safety net clinics and diverse home health care programs. Participants 1,081 patients with major depressive symptoms and cancer, diabetes or other co-morbid illness. Intervention Similar intervention protocols included patient, provider, socio-cultural and organizational adaptations. Measurements The PHQ-9 depression, SF-12/20 quality-of-life, self-reported hospitalization, ER, ICU utilization, and antidepressant, psychotherapy treatment receipt are assessed at baseline, 6, 12 months. Results There are no significant differences in reducing depression symptoms (P ranged 0.18-0.58), improving quality-of-life (t=1.86, df=669, P=0.07 for physical functioning at 12 months; and P ranged 0.23-0.99 for all others) between patients ≥60 versus 18-59. Both age group intervention patients have significantly higher rates of a 50% PHQ-9 reduction (older: Wald χ2[df=1]=4.82, p=0.03; younger: Wald χ2[df=1]=6.47, p=0.02), greater reduction in major depression rates (older: Wald χ2[df=1]=7.72, p=0.01; younger: Wald χ2[df=1]=4.0, p=0.05) than enhanced-usual-care patients at 6 months, and are no significant age group differences in treatment type or intensity. Conclusion Collaborative depression care in individuals with co-morbid illness is as effective in reducing depression in older patients as younger patients, including among low-income, minority patients. Patient, provider, and organizational adaptations of depression care management models may contribute to positive outcomes. PMID:20220588

  20. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:27025465

  1. Course of illness in comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Amerio, A; Tonna, M; Odone, A; Stubbs, B; Ghaemi, S N

    2016-04-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is extremely common. One of the most common and difficult to manage comorbid conditions is the co-occurrence of bipolar disorder (BD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We updated our recent systematic review searching the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO to investigate course of illness in BD-OCD patients. We identified a total of 13 relevant papers which found that the majority of comorbid OCD cases appeared to be related to mood episodes. OC symptoms in comorbid patients appeared more often during depressive episodes, and comorbid BD and OCD cycled together, with OC symptoms often remitting during manic/hypomanic episodes.

  2. A meta-analytic investigation of neurocognitive deficits in bipolar illness: profile and effects of clinical state.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Matthew M; Gerraty, Raphael T

    2009-09-01

    A meta-analysis of neuropsychological studies of patients with bipolar disorder comprised of 42 studies of 1,197 patients in euthymia, 13 studies consisting of 314 patients in a manic/mixed phase of illness, and 5 studies of 96 patients in a depressed state. Cohen d values were calculated for each study as the mean difference between patient and control group score on each neuropsychological measure, expressed in pooled SD units. For euthymia, results revealed impairment across all neuropsychological domains, with d values in the moderate-to-large range (d = .5 - .8) for the vast majority of measures. There was evidence of large effect-size impairment on measures of verbal learning (d = .81), and delayed verbal and nonverbal memory (d = .80 - .92), while effect-size impairment on measures of visuospatial function was small-to-moderate (d manic/mixed or depressed phase of illness showed exaggerated impairment on measures of verbal learning, whereas patients tested during a depressed phase showed greater decrement on measures of phonemic fluency. These results suggest that bipolar illness during euthymia is characterized by generalized moderate level of neuropsychological impairment with particular marked impairment in verbal learning and memory. These results also show that a subset of these deficits moderately worsen during acute disease states. PMID:19702409

  3. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: The making of a “gold standard” and the unmaking of a chronic illness, 1960–1980

    PubMed Central

    Worboys, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To show why and how the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression became the ‘Gold Standard’ for assessing therapies from the mid-1960s and how it was used to frame depression as a short-term and curable illness rather than a chronic one. Methods: My approach is that of the social construction of knowledge, identifying the interests, institutional contexts and practices that produce knowledge claims and then mapping the social processes of their circulation, validation and acceptance. Results: The circulation and validation of Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was relatively slow and it became a ‘Gold Standard’ ‘from below’, from an emerging consensus amongst psychiatrists undertaking clinical trials for depression, which from the 1960s were principally with psychopharmaceuticals for short-term illness. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, drug trials and the construction of depression as non-chronic were mutually constituted. Discussion: Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression framed depression and its sufferers in new ways, leading psychiatrists to understand illness as a treatable episode, rather than a life course condition. As such, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression served the interests of psychiatrists and psychiatry in its new era of drug therapy outside the mental hospital. However, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was a strange kind of ‘standard’, being quite non-standard in the widely varying ways it was used and the meanings given to its findings. PMID:23172888

  4. Predictors of Self-Reported Physical Symptoms in Low-Income, Inner-City African American Women: The Role of Optimism, Depressive Symptoms, and Chronic Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah J.; O'Connell, Cara; Gound, Mary; Heller, Laurie; Forehand, Rex

    2004-01-01

    In this study we examined the association of optimism and depressive symptoms with self-reported physical symptoms in 241 low-income, inner-city African American women with or without a chronic illness (HIV). Although optimism was not a unique predictor of self-reported physical symptoms over and above depressive symptoms, optimism interacted with…

  5. Agreement between informant and self-reported personality in depressed older adults: what are the roles of medical illness and cognitive function?

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael; Chapman, Benjamin; Ma, Yan; Tu, Xin; Useda, J David; Hirsch, Jameson; Duberstein, Paul

    2011-12-01

    In a sample of 77 dyads, involving depressed patients at least 50 years of age and their family or friends (informants), patient illness burden and cognitive decline were associated with self-informant rating discrepancies for facets of Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) Openness and Extraversion. Informant judgments about Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were not associated with illness burden or cognitive function, underscoring the potential utility of risk-detection strategies that rely on informant-report in these two domains. Findings suggest the need for research on how patient illness severity and cognitive function affect how friends and family use or misuse information when making judgments about older depressed patients.

  6. Effects of Qigong Exercise on Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jessie S. M.; Ho, Rainbow T. H.; Wang, Chong-wen; Yuen, Lai Ping; Sham, Jonathan S. T.; Chan, Cecilia L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anxiety/depressive symptoms are common in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) like illness. Qigong as a modality of complementary and alternative therapy has been increasingly applied by patients with chronic illnesses, but little is known about the effect of Qigong on anxiety/depressive symptoms of the patients with CFS-like illness. Purpose. To investigate the effects of Qigong on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in patients with CFS-illness. Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven participants who met the diagnostic criteria for CFS-like illness were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a waitlist control group. Participants in the intervention group received 10 sessions of Qigong training twice a week for 5 consecutive weeks, followed by home-based practice for 12 weeks. Fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Results. Total fatigue score [F(1,135) = 13.888, P < 0.001], physical fatigue score [F(1,135) = 20.852, P < 0.001] and depression score [F(1,135) = 9.918, P = 0.002] were significantly improved and mental fatigue score [F(1,135) = 3.902, P = 0.050] was marginally significantly improved in the Qigong group compared to controls. The anxiety score was not significantly improved in the Qigong group. Conclusion. Qigong may not only reduce the fatigue symptoms, but also has antidepressive effect for patients with CFS-like illness. Trial registration HKCTR-1200. PMID:23983785

  7. How People with Depression Receive and Perceive Mental Illness Information: Findings from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing.

    PubMed

    Graham, Annette L; Hasking, Penelope; Clarke, David; Meadows, Graham

    2015-11-01

    Despite the recognised importance of accurate mental illness information in help-seeking and improving recovery, little is known about the dissemination of such information to people with depression. With a view to informing effective communication to those most in need, we explored the extent to which mental illness information is received by people with depression, its perceived helpfulness and we characterise those who do not receive such information. Using data from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing we observed that mental illness information was received by 54.7 % of those with depression. Most (76.7 %) found it helpful. Pamphlets were the most frequently cited source of information. People who did not receive information were less educated, unlikely to have accessed mental health services and unlikely to believe they had mental health needs. Targeted information campaigns which shape perceptions of need in relation to depression have the potential to reduce the resultant disease burden.

  8. Neuroinflammation and cytokine abnormality in major depression: Cause or consequence in that illness?

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sang Won; Kim, Yong Ku

    2016-09-22

    Depression results from changes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may result from immunological abnormalities. The immune system affects the CNS through cytokines, which regulate brain activities and emotions. Cytokines affect two biological systems that are most associated with the pathophysiology of depression: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the catecholamine/sympathetic nervous system. Neuroinflammation and cytokines affect the brain signal patterns involved in the psychopathology of depression and the mechanisms of antidepressants, and they are associated with neurogenesis and neural plasticity. These observations suggest that neuroinflammation and cytokines might cause and/or maintain depression, and that they might be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of depression. This psychoneuroimmunologic perspective might compensate for some of the limitations of the monoamine theory by suggesting that depression is a result of a failure to adapt to stress and that inflammatory responses and cytokines are involved in this process. In this review, the interactions of cytokines with the CNS, neuroendocrine system, neurotransmitters, neurodegeneration/neurogenesis, and antidepressants are discussed. The roles of cytokines in the etiology and psychopathology of depression are examined. The use of cytokine inhibitors or anti-inflammatory drugs in depression treatment is explored. Finally, the significance and limitations of the cytokine hypothesis are discussed. PMID:27679767

  9. Neuroinflammation and cytokine abnormality in major depression: Cause or consequence in that illness?

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang Won; Kim, Yong Ku

    2016-01-01

    Depression results from changes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may result from immunological abnormalities. The immune system affects the CNS through cytokines, which regulate brain activities and emotions. Cytokines affect two biological systems that are most associated with the pathophysiology of depression: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the catecholamine/sympathetic nervous system. Neuroinflammation and cytokines affect the brain signal patterns involved in the psychopathology of depression and the mechanisms of antidepressants, and they are associated with neurogenesis and neural plasticity. These observations suggest that neuroinflammation and cytokines might cause and/or maintain depression, and that they might be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of depression. This psychoneuroimmunologic perspective might compensate for some of the limitations of the monoamine theory by suggesting that depression is a result of a failure to adapt to stress and that inflammatory responses and cytokines are involved in this process. In this review, the interactions of cytokines with the CNS, neuroendocrine system, neurotransmitters, neurodegeneration/neurogenesis, and antidepressants are discussed. The roles of cytokines in the etiology and psychopathology of depression are examined. The use of cytokine inhibitors or anti-inflammatory drugs in depression treatment is explored. Finally, the significance and limitations of the cytokine hypothesis are discussed. PMID:27679767

  10. Neuroinflammation and cytokine abnormality in major depression: Cause or consequence in that illness?

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang Won; Kim, Yong Ku

    2016-01-01

    Depression results from changes in the central nervous system (CNS) that may result from immunological abnormalities. The immune system affects the CNS through cytokines, which regulate brain activities and emotions. Cytokines affect two biological systems that are most associated with the pathophysiology of depression: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the catecholamine/sympathetic nervous system. Neuroinflammation and cytokines affect the brain signal patterns involved in the psychopathology of depression and the mechanisms of antidepressants, and they are associated with neurogenesis and neural plasticity. These observations suggest that neuroinflammation and cytokines might cause and/or maintain depression, and that they might be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of depression. This psychoneuroimmunologic perspective might compensate for some of the limitations of the monoamine theory by suggesting that depression is a result of a failure to adapt to stress and that inflammatory responses and cytokines are involved in this process. In this review, the interactions of cytokines with the CNS, neuroendocrine system, neurotransmitters, neurodegeneration/neurogenesis, and antidepressants are discussed. The roles of cytokines in the etiology and psychopathology of depression are examined. The use of cytokine inhibitors or anti-inflammatory drugs in depression treatment is explored. Finally, the significance and limitations of the cytokine hypothesis are discussed.

  11. Cabergoline-induced manic episode: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Rabia Nazik; Elyas Kaya, Zeynep; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Cingi Yirün, Merve

    2016-01-01

    Cabergoline is an orally administered synthetic dopamine agonist that is used for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia, Parkinson’s disease and antipsychotic-induced prolactin elevation. One of the main characteristics of cabergoline is its long duration of effect. It is highly effective in suppressing prolactin levels up to 21 days after a single 1 mg oral dose. The prolonged elimination half-life offers an advantage of once-daily dosing, but it might be a handicap in terms of washout of adverse effects such as psychosis. Cabergoline has been associated with adverse reactions consistent with other dopaminergic agonists including cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric effects. It is known that dopaminergic treatment is a remarkable risk factor for psychosis. A number of reports implicate dopamine agonists in the development of psychosis, but there is no knowledge in the literature of dopamine agonist-induced mania. In this case, we report the first manic episode occurring after cabergoline use for hyperprolactinemia treatment. In susceptible individuals, cabergoline can cause manic episodes and cabergoline should be used more carefully considering the risk–benefit ratio. PMID:27354910

  12. Association of antepartum and postpartum depression in Ghanaian and Ivorian women with febrile illness in their offspring: a prospective birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Nan; Bindt, Carola; Te Bonle, Marguerite; Appiah-Poku, John; Hinz, Rebecca; Barthel, Dana; Koffi, Mathurin; Posdzich, Sarah; Deymann, Simon; Barkmann, Claus; Schlüter, Lisa; Jaeger, Anna; Blay Nguah, Samuel; Eberhardt, Kirsten A; N'Goran, Eliezer; Tagbor, Harry; Ehrhardt, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    In low-income countries, perinatal depression is common, but longitudinal data on its influence on child health are rare. We examined the association between maternal depression and febrile illness in children. There were 654 mother/child dyads in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire that were enrolled in a prospective birth cohort in 2010-2011 and underwent 2-years of follow up. Mothers were examined for depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire depression module antepartum and 3 and 12 months postpartum. The hazard of febrile illness in children of depressed and nondepressed mothers was estimated using a recurrent event Cox proportional hazards model. The prevalences of antepartum depression in mothers from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana were 28.3% and 26.3%, respectively. The prevalences of depression at 3 and 12 months postpartum were 11.8% and 16.1% (Côte d'Ivoire) and 8.9% and 7.2% (Ghana). The crude and adjusted (for country and socioeconomic status) hazard ratios of febrile illness in children of depressed mothers compared with those in children of nondepressed mothers were 1.57 (95% confidence interval: 1.20, 2.07) and 1.32 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.74) respectively. Perinatal depression was frequent and associated with febrile illness in the offspring. Our results showed that a high prevalence of depression in sub-Saharan Africa may pose a serious public health threat to women and their offspring.

  13. Association of antepartum and postpartum depression in Ghanaian and Ivorian women with febrile illness in their offspring: a prospective birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Nan; Bindt, Carola; Te Bonle, Marguerite; Appiah-Poku, John; Hinz, Rebecca; Barthel, Dana; Koffi, Mathurin; Posdzich, Sarah; Deymann, Simon; Barkmann, Claus; Schlüter, Lisa; Jaeger, Anna; Blay Nguah, Samuel; Eberhardt, Kirsten A; N'Goran, Eliezer; Tagbor, Harry; Ehrhardt, Stephan

    2013-11-01

    In low-income countries, perinatal depression is common, but longitudinal data on its influence on child health are rare. We examined the association between maternal depression and febrile illness in children. There were 654 mother/child dyads in Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire that were enrolled in a prospective birth cohort in 2010-2011 and underwent 2-years of follow up. Mothers were examined for depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire depression module antepartum and 3 and 12 months postpartum. The hazard of febrile illness in children of depressed and nondepressed mothers was estimated using a recurrent event Cox proportional hazards model. The prevalences of antepartum depression in mothers from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana were 28.3% and 26.3%, respectively. The prevalences of depression at 3 and 12 months postpartum were 11.8% and 16.1% (Côte d'Ivoire) and 8.9% and 7.2% (Ghana). The crude and adjusted (for country and socioeconomic status) hazard ratios of febrile illness in children of depressed mothers compared with those in children of nondepressed mothers were 1.57 (95% confidence interval: 1.20, 2.07) and 1.32 (95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.74) respectively. Perinatal depression was frequent and associated with febrile illness in the offspring. Our results showed that a high prevalence of depression in sub-Saharan Africa may pose a serious public health threat to women and their offspring. PMID:24013202

  14. Illness Perception and Depressive Symptoms among Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Cross-Sectional Study in Clinical Settings in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suira; Dhungana, Raja Ram; Subba, Usha Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess the relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among persons with diabetes. Method. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted among 379 type 2 diabetic patients from three major clinical settings of Kathmandu, Nepal. Results. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 44.1% (95% CI: 39.1, 49.1). Females (p < 0.01), homemakers (p < 0.01), 61-70 age group (p = 0.01), those without formal education (p < 0.01), and people with lower social status (p < 0.01) had significantly higher proportion of depressive symptoms than the others. Multivariable analysis identified age (β = 0.036, p = 0.016), mode of treatment (β = 0.9, p = 0.047), no formal educational level (β = 1.959, p = 0.01), emotional representation (β = 0.214, p < 0.001), identity (β = 0.196, p < 0.001), illness coherence (β = -0.109, p = 0.007), and consequences (β = 0.093, p = 0.049) as significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated a strong relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among diabetic patients. Study finding indicated that persons living with diabetes in Nepal need comprehensive diabetes education program for changing poor illness perception, which ultimately helps to prevent development of depressive symptoms.

  15. Illness Perception and Depressive Symptoms among Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Cross-Sectional Study in Clinical Settings in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Suira; Dhungana, Raja Ram; Subba, Usha Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess the relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among persons with diabetes. Method. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted among 379 type 2 diabetic patients from three major clinical settings of Kathmandu, Nepal. Results. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 44.1% (95% CI: 39.1, 49.1). Females (p < 0.01), homemakers (p < 0.01), 61–70 age group (p = 0.01), those without formal education (p < 0.01), and people with lower social status (p < 0.01) had significantly higher proportion of depressive symptoms than the others. Multivariable analysis identified age (β = 0.036, p = 0.016), mode of treatment (β = 0.9, p = 0.047), no formal educational level (β = 1.959, p = 0.01), emotional representation (β = 0.214, p < 0.001), identity (β = 0.196, p < 0.001), illness coherence (β = −0.109, p = 0.007), and consequences (β = 0.093, p = 0.049) as significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated a strong relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among diabetic patients. Study finding indicated that persons living with diabetes in Nepal need comprehensive diabetes education program for changing poor illness perception, which ultimately helps to prevent development of depressive symptoms. PMID:26236749

  16. Illness Perception and Depressive Symptoms among Persons with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analytical Cross-Sectional Study in Clinical Settings in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suira; Dhungana, Raja Ram; Subba, Usha Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess the relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among persons with diabetes. Method. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted among 379 type 2 diabetic patients from three major clinical settings of Kathmandu, Nepal. Results. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 44.1% (95% CI: 39.1, 49.1). Females (p < 0.01), homemakers (p < 0.01), 61-70 age group (p = 0.01), those without formal education (p < 0.01), and people with lower social status (p < 0.01) had significantly higher proportion of depressive symptoms than the others. Multivariable analysis identified age (β = 0.036, p = 0.016), mode of treatment (β = 0.9, p = 0.047), no formal educational level (β = 1.959, p = 0.01), emotional representation (β = 0.214, p < 0.001), identity (β = 0.196, p < 0.001), illness coherence (β = -0.109, p = 0.007), and consequences (β = 0.093, p = 0.049) as significant predictors of depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated a strong relationship between illness perception and depressive symptoms among diabetic patients. Study finding indicated that persons living with diabetes in Nepal need comprehensive diabetes education program for changing poor illness perception, which ultimately helps to prevent development of depressive symptoms. PMID:26236749

  17. How people evaluate others with social anxiety disorder: A comparison to depression and general mental illness stigma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristin N; Jeon, Andrew B; Blenner, Jordan A; Wiener, Richard L; Hope, Debra A

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of effective interventions, most individuals with social anxiety disorder do not seek treatment. Given their fear of negative evaluation, socially anxious individuals might be especially susceptible to stigma concerns, a recognized barrier for mental health treatment. However, very little is known about the stigma specific to social anxiety disorder. In a design similar to Feldman and Crandall (2007), university undergraduate students read vignettes about target individuals with a generic mental illness label, major depressive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Subjects rated each of 3 people in the vignettes on social distance and 17 dimensions including dangerousness, heritability and prevalence of the disorder, and gender ratio. Results indicated that being male and not having experience with mental health treatment was associated with somewhat greater preferred social distance. Multiple regression analyses revealed that being embarrassed by the disorder and dangerousness predicted social distance across all 3 vignettes. The vignette for social anxiety disorder had the most complex model and included work impairment, more common among women, and more avoidable. These results have implications for understanding the specific aspects of the stigma associated with social anxiety disorder. Public service messages to reduce stigma should focus on more accurate information about dangerousness and mental illness, given this is an established aspect of mental illness stigma. More nuanced messages about social anxiety might be best incorporated into the treatment referral process and as part of treatment.

  18. Molecular genetics in affective illness

    SciTech Connect

    Mendlewicz, J.; Sevy, S.; Mendelbaum, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Genetic transmission in manic depressive illness (MDI) has been explored in twins, adoption, association, and linkage studies. The X-linked transmission hypothesis has been tested by using several markers on chromosome X: Xg blood group, color blindness, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), factor IX (hemophilia B), and DNA probes such as DXS15, DXS52, F8C, ST14. The hypothesis of autosomal transmission has been tested by association studies with the O blood group located on chromosome 9, as well as linkage studies on chromosome 6 with the Human Leucocyte Antigens (HLA) haplotypes and on Chromosome 11 with DNA markers for the following genes: D2 dopamine receptor, tyrosinase, C-Harvey-Ras-A (HRAS) oncogene, insuline (ins), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Although linkage studies support the hypothesis of a major locus for the transmission of MDI in the Xq27-28 region, several factors are limiting the results, and are discussed in the present review. 105 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Endocannabinoid signaling in the etiology and treatment of major depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Hillard, Cecilia J; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine human and preclinical data that are relevant to the following hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that deficient CB1R-mediated signaling results in symptoms that mimic those seen in depression. The second hypothesis is that activation of CB1R-mediated signaling results in behavioral, endocrine and other effects that are similar to those produced by currently used antidepressants. The third hypothesis is that conventional antidepressant therapies act through enhanced CB1R mediated signaling. Together the available data indicate that activators of CB1R signaling, particularly inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase, should be considered for clinical trials for the treatment of depression. PMID:24180398

  20. Endocannabinoid Signaling in the Etiology and Treatment of Major Depressive Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Cecilia J.; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine human and preclinical data that are relevant to the following hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that deficient CB1R-mediated signaling results in symptoms that mimic those seen in depression. The second hypothesis is that activation of CB1R-mediated signaling results in behavioral, endocrine and other effects that are similar to those produced by currently used antidepressants. The third hypothesis is that conventional antidepressant therapies act through enhanced CB1R mediated signaling. Together the available data indicate that activators of CB1R signaling, particularly inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase, should be considered for clinical trials for the treatment of depression. PMID:24180398

  1. Endocannabinoid signaling in the etiology and treatment of major depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Hillard, Cecilia J; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine human and preclinical data that are relevant to the following hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that deficient CB1R-mediated signaling results in symptoms that mimic those seen in depression. The second hypothesis is that activation of CB1R-mediated signaling results in behavioral, endocrine and other effects that are similar to those produced by currently used antidepressants. The third hypothesis is that conventional antidepressant therapies act through enhanced CB1R mediated signaling. Together the available data indicate that activators of CB1R signaling, particularly inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase, should be considered for clinical trials for the treatment of depression.

  2. Spirituality and religious coping in African American youth with depressive illness

    PubMed Central

    Breland-Noble, Alfiee M.; Wong, Michele J; Childers, Trenita; Hankerson, Sidney; Sotomayor, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The research team completed a secondary data analysis of primary data from a 2 phase depression treatment engagement behavioral trial to assess African American adolescents reported experiences of spiritual and religious coping when dealing with depression. The team utilized data collected from twenty-eight youth who participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic techniques for transcript-based analysis to identify the key patterns and elements of the study participants’ accounts and to extract 6 primary themes. The main themes are reported in this manuscript and include; “Religion as Treatment Incentive”, “Prayer & Agency”, “Mixed Emotions”, “Doesn't Hurt, Might Help”, “Finding Support in the Church”, and “Prayer and Church: Barriers to Treatment?” Overall, the data suggested that religion and spirituality play a key role in African American adolescents’ experiences of depression. As well, it is surmised that these factors may be important for improving treatment seeking behaviors and reducing racial mental health disparities in this population of youth. PMID:26500425

  3. Object location and object recognition memory impairments, motivation deficits and depression in a model of Gulf War illness.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Shuai, Bing; Rao, Xiolan; Shetty, Ashok K

    2014-01-01

    Memory and mood deficits are the enduring brain-related symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Both animal model and epidemiological investigations have indicated that these impairments in a majority of GW veterans are linked to exposures to chemicals such as pyridostigmine bromide (PB, an antinerve gas drug), permethrin (PM, an insecticide) and DEET (a mosquito repellant) encountered during the Persian Gulf War-1. Our previous study in a rat model has shown that combined exposures to low doses of GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals PB, PM, and DEET with or without 5-min of restraint stress (a mild stress paradigm) causes hippocampus-dependent spatial memory dysfunction in a water maze test (WMT) and increased depressive-like behavior in a forced swim test (FST). In this study, using a larger cohort of rats exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress, we investigated whether the memory deficiency identified earlier in a WMT is reproducible with an alternative and stress free hippocampus-dependent memory test such as the object location test (OLT). We also ascertained the possible co-existence of hippocampus-independent memory dysfunction using a novel object recognition test (NORT), and alterations in mood function with additional tests for motivation and depression. Our results provide new evidence that exposure to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks causes deficits in hippocampus-dependent object location memory and perirhinal cortex-dependent novel object recognition memory. An open field test performed prior to other behavioral analyses revealed that memory impairments were not associated with increased anxiety or deficits in general motor ability. However, behavioral tests for mood function such as a voluntary physical exercise paradigm and a novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT) demonstrated decreased motivation levels and depression. Thus, exposure to GWIR-chemicals and stress causes both hippocampus-dependent and hippocampus-independent memory

  4. Bipolar depression: Managing patients with second generation antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay M; Drayton, Shannon J

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a debilitating illness that manifests as cyclical episodes of mood elevation and depression, but the treatment of the depressive episodes (i.e., bipolar depression) differs considerably from the treatment of major depressive disorder. In bipolar affective disorder, it is well known that patients spend a significantly greater amount of time in depressive episodes than manic or hypomanic episodes, yet there are currently just three Food and Drug Administration-approved agents for the treatment of bipolar depression: (1) olanzapine/fluoxetine combination (2) quetiapine, both immediate- and extended-release, and (3) lurasidone. The literature review presented here focuses on the clinical trials that led to the Food and Drug Administration-approval of these second generation antipsychotics in the treatment of bipolar depression. The discussion highlights key considerations regarding overall treatment strategies to aid clinicians in the selection of pharmacologic agents. Recommended monitoring parameters, potential adverse effects, and pertinent counseling points for second generation antipsychotics used in bipolar depression are included. PMID:27079776

  5. The presentation, recognition and management of bipolar depression in primary care.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Chwastiak, Lydia A; Chan, Ya-Fen; Harrison, David A; Unützer, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder characterized by episodes of major depression and mania or hypomania. Most patients experience chronic symptoms of bipolar disorder approximately half of the time, most commonly subsyndromal depressive symptoms or a full depressive episode with concurrent manic symptoms. Consequently, patients with bipolar depression are often misdiagnosed with major depressive disorder. Individual patient characteristics and population screening tools may be helpful in improving recognition of bipolar depression in primary care. Health risk behaviors including tobacco use, sedentary activity level and weight gain are highly prevalent in patients with bipolar disorder, as are the comorbid chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Patients with bipolar illness have about an eight-fold higher risk of suicide and a two-fold increased risk of death from chronic medical illnesses. Recognition of bipolar depression and its associated health risk behaviors and chronic medical problems can lead to the use of appropriate interventions for patients with bipolar disorder, which differ in important ways from the treatments used for major depressive disorder. The above topics are reviewed in detail in this article. PMID:23835789

  6. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... make negative thinking worse. previous continue Depression Can Go Unrecognized People with depression may not realize they ... themselves or who have eating disorders or who go through extreme mood changes may have unrecognized depression. ...

  7. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Bipolar disorder is different from depression but is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extreme low moods (depression). But ...

  8. A Pill for the Ill? Patients’ Reports of Their Experience of the Medical Encounter in the Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background Starting in the 1960s, a broad-based patients’ rights movement began to question doctors’ paternalism and to demand disclosure of medical information, informed consent, and active participation by the individual in personal health care. According to scholars, these changes contributed to downplay the biomedical approach in favor of a more patient-oriented perspective. The Swedish non-profit organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health (KILEN) has offered the possibility for consumers to report their perceptions and experiences from their use of medicines in order to strengthen consumer rights within the health care sector. Methodology In this paper, qualitative content analysis was used to analyze 181 KILEN consumer reports of adverse events from antidepressant medications in order to explore patients’ views of mental ill health symptoms and the doctor-patient interaction. Principal Findings Overall, the KILEN stories contained negative experiences of the patients’ medical encounters. Some reports indicated intense emotional outrage and strong feelings of abuse by the health care system. Many reports suggested that doctors and patients had very different accounts of the nature of the problems for which the patient was seeking help. Although patients sought help for problems like tiredness and sleeplessness (often with a personal crisis of some sort as a described cause), the treating doctor in most cases was exceptionally quick in both diagnosing depression and prescribing antidepressant treatment. When patients felt they were not being listened to, trust in the doctor was compromised. This was evident in the cases when the doctor tried to convince them to take part in medical treatment, sometimes by threatening to withdraw their sick-listing. Conclusions Overall, this study suggests that the dynamics happening in the medical encounter may still be highly affected by a medical dominance, instead of a patient-oriented perspective

  9. Surviving depressive ill-health: a qualitative systematic review of older persons' narratives.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anne Lise; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this qualitative systematic review was to report a comprehensive literature synthesis of older persons' narratives about what they need in order to survive when suffering from depression. Their survival strategies seem to be a state rarely outlined in the literature. A systematic search of EBSCOhost/Academic Search Premier, ProQuest and PubMed was conducted for the period January 2000 to April 2012. Data were analyzed by means of thematic analysis. Thirteen studies were selected and three themes emerged from synthesis: the need for courage, strength, and self-reliance; the meaning of responsibility; and wearing a mask of normalcy to hide the shame. The first comprised two subthemes: the value of faith and distraction and activity; the second had no subtheme; and the third had one subtheme: reaching out of loneliness towards aloneness and connectivity. Further research should be focused on how community projects can improve health services such as enhancing the safety of health care and disseminating health information. PMID:23692267

  10. Tryptophan: the key to boosting brain serotonin synthesis in depressive illness.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2013-10-01

    It has been proposed that focusing on brain serotonin synthesis can advance antidepressant drug development. Biochemical aspects of the serotonin deficiency in major depressive disorder (MDD) are discussed here in detail. The deficiency is caused by a decreased availability of the serotonin precursor tryptophan (Trp) to the brain. This decrease is caused by accelerated Trp degradation, most likely induced by enhancement of the hepatic enzyme tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) by glucocorticoids and/or catecholamines. Induction of the extrahepatic Trp-degrading enzyme indolylamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by the modest immune activation in MDD has not been demonstrated and, if it occurs, is unlikely to make a significant contribution. Liver TDO appears to be a target of many antidepressants, the mood stabilisers Li(+) and carbamazepine and possibly other adjuncts to antidepressant therapy. The poor, variable and modest antidepressant efficacy of Trp is due to accelerated hepatic Trp degradation, and efficacy can be restored or enhanced by combination with antidepressants or other existing or new TDO inhibitors. Enhancing Trp availability to the brain is thus the key to normalisation of serotonin synthesis and could form the basis for future antidepressant drug development. PMID:23904410

  11. Geomagnetic storms: association with incidence of depression as measured by hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Kay, R W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis that geomagnetic storms may partly account for the seasonal variation in the incidence of depression, by acting as a precipitant of depressive illness in susceptible individuals, is supported by a statistically significant 36.2% increase in male hospital admissions with a diagnosis of depressed phase, manic-depressive illness in the second week following such storms compared with geomagnetically quiet control periods. There is a smaller but not statistically significant increase in female psychotic depression and non-psychotic depression admissions following storms. There was no correlation between geomagnetic storm levels and number of male admissions with psychotic depression, which is consistent with a threshold event affecting predisposed individuals. Phase advance in pineal circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis may be a possible mechanism of causation or be present as a consequence of 5-hydroxytryptamine and adrenergic system dysfunction associated with geomagnetic disturbance. Effects on cell membrane permeability, calcium channel activity and retinal magneto-receptors are suggested as possible underlying biochemical mechanisms. PMID:8199794

  12. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care for chronically ill patients with comorbid depressive disorder in the general hospital setting, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Eva K; van Benthem, Tjeerd B; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona; van Marwijk, Harm WJ; Beekman, Aartjan TF; Rutten, Frans F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2007-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder is one of the most common disorders, and is highly prevalent in chronically ill patients. The presence of comorbid depression has a negative influence on quality of life, health care costs, self-care, morbidity, and mortality. Early diagnosis and well-organized treatment of depression has a positive influence on these aspects. Earlier research in the USA has reported good results with regard to the treatment of depression with a collaborative care approach and an antidepressant algorithm. In the UK 'Problem Solving Treatment' has proved to be feasible. However, in the general hospital setting this approach has not yet been evaluated. Methods/Design CC: DIM (Collaborative Care: Depression Initiative in the Medical setting) is a two-armed randomised controlled trial with randomisation at patient level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in general hospitals in the Netherlands based on a collaborative care framework, including contracting, 'Problem Solving Treatment', antidepressant algorithm, and manual-guided self-help. 126 outpatients with diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiovascular diseases will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Patients will be included if they have been diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on the DSM-IV criteria in a two-step screening method. The intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach; the control group will receive 'care as usual'. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months) will be performed by means of questionnaires. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, as measured with the PHQ-9. The secondary outcome measure is the cost-effectiveness of these treatments according to the TiC-P, the EuroQol and the SF-36. Discussion Earlier research has indicated that depressive disorder is a chronic, mostly

  13. Hippocampal abnormalities of glutamate/glutamine, N-acetylaspartate and choline in patients with depression are related to past illness burden

    PubMed Central

    de Diego-Adeliño, Javier; Portella, Maria J.; Gómez-Ansón, Beatriz; López-Moruelo, Olga; Serra-Blasco, Maria; Vives, Yolanda; Puigdemont, Dolors; Pérez-Egea, Rosario; Álvarez, Enric; Pérez, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Background Smaller hippocampal volumes in major depressive disorder (MDD) have been linked with earlier onset, previous recurrences and treatment refractoriness. The aim of our study was to investigate metabolite abnormalities in the hippocampus associated with past depressive illness burden. Methods Glutamate/glutamine (Glx), N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho), potential markers of glial/neuronal integrity and membrane turnover, respectively, were measured in adults with depression and healthy controls using a 3 T magnetic resonance spectroscopy scanner. Voxels were placed in the head of the right and left hippocampus. We controlled for systematic differences resulting from volume-of-interest (VOI) tissue composition and total hippocampal volume. Results Our final sample comprised a total of 16 healthy controls and 52 adult patients with depression in different stages of the illness (20 treatment-resistant/chronic, 18 remitted-recurrent and 14 first-episode), comparable for age and sex distribution. Patients with treatment-resistant/chronic and remitted-recurrent depression had significantly lower levels of Glx and NAA than controls, especially in the right hippocampal region (p ≤ 0.025). Diminished levels of Glx were correlated with longer illness duration (left VOI r = −0.34, p = 0.01). By contrast, Cho levels were significantly higher in patients with treatment-resistant/chronic depression than those with first-episode depression or controls in the right and left hippocampus (up to 19% higher; all p ≤ 0.025) and were consistently related to longer illness duration (right VOI r = 0.30, p = 0.028; left VOI r = 0.38, p = 0.004) and more previous episodes (right VOI r = 0.46, p = 0.001; left VOI r = 0.44, p = 0.001). Limitations The cross-sectional design and the inclusion of treated patients are the main limitations of the study. Conclusion Our results support that metabolite alterations within the hippocampus are more pronounced in patients with a

  14. How does mental-physical multimorbidity express itself in lived time and space? A phenomenological analysis of encounters with depression and chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Coventry, Peter A; Dickens, Chris; Todd, Chris

    2014-10-01

    Mental-physical multimorbidity (the co-existence of mental and physical ill health) is highly prevalent and associated with significant impairments and high healthcare costs. While the sociology of chronic illness has developed a mature discourse on coping with long term physical illness the impact of mental and physical health have remained analytically separated, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the day-to-day complexities encountered by people living with mental-physical multimorbidity. We used the phenomenological paradigm of the lived body to elucidate how the experience of mental-physical multimorbidity shapes people's lifeworlds. Nineteen people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and depression (defined as a score ≥8 on depression scale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were recruited from secondary NHS care and interviewed at their homes. Data were analysed phenomenologically using van Manen's lifeworld existential framework of the lived body, lived time, lived space, lived relations. Additionally, we re-analysed data (using the same framework) collected from 13 people recruited from secondary NHS care with either COPD, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, or type 1 or type 2 diabetes and depression. The phenomenology of mental-physical multimorbidity was articulated through embodied and emotional encounters with day-to-day life in four ways: [a] participants' perception of lived time and lived space contracted; [b] time and [c] space were experienced as liminal categories, enforcing negative mood and temporal and spatial contraction; and [d] time and space could also be customised to reinstate agency and self-determination. Mental-physical multimorbidity negatively impacts on individuals' perceptions of lived time and lived space, leading to a loss of agency, heightened uncertainty, and poor well-being. Harnessing people's capacity to modify their experience of time and space may be a novel way to support people

  15. A feasibility study of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults with a comorbid chronic physical illness in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective We assessed the feasibility and acceptability to patients of a telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression among adults aged 40 years or over with one of six targeted chronic physical illnesses and comorbid depressive symptoms in family practice settings. Methods An open, uncontrolled trial (feasibility study) was conducted among patients treated in Montreal family practices. Eligible patients were aged 40 years or over, had one or more of the targeted chronic physical illnesses for at least 6 months (arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and were evaluated as having at least mild depressive symptoms (a score of ≥ 5 on the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ-9). Participants received a package of six self-care tools (information booklet, video, Internet programme, action plan, workbook and mood-monitoring tool) with telephone support by a lay coach for up to 6 months. Results In total, 63 eligible patients provided written consent and completed the baseline interview; 57 (90%) and 55 (87%) patients completed 2-month and 6-month follow-up interviews, respectively. The mean number of telephone calls made by coaches to participants was 10.5 (SD 4.0), and the average length of these calls was 10.6 minutes. At the 6-month follow-up, 83.6% of the participants reported that one or more of the tools were helpful. Clinically significant improvements were seen in depressive symptoms (as assessed by the PHQ-9) at 6 months, with an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI, 0.55, 1.14). Conclusion A telephone-supported self-care intervention for depression was feasible, was acceptable to patients, and was associated with a significant 6-month improvement in depressive symptoms. A randomised trial of this intervention is justified. PMID:24294301

  16. Depression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Donna E; Gucciardi, Enza; Grace, Sherry L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: Depression causes significant distress or impairment in physical, social, occupational and other key areas of functioning. Women are approximately twice as likely as men to experience depression. Psychosocial factors likely mediate the risks for depression incurred by biological influences. KEY FINDINGS: Data from the 1999 National Population Health Survey show that depression is more common among Canadian women, with an annual self-reported incidence of 5.7% compared with 2.9% in men. The highest rates of depression are seen among women of reproductive age. Predictive factors for depression include previous depression, feeling out of control or overwhelmed, chronic health problems, traumatic events in childhood or young adulthood, lack of emotional support, lone parenthood, and low sense of mastery. Although depression is treatable, only 43% of depressed women had consulted a health professional in 1998/99 and only 32.4% were taking antidepressant medication. People with lower education, inadequate income, and fewer contacts with a health professional were less likely to receive depression treatment. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: A better understanding of factors that increase vulnerability and resilience to depression is needed. There is also a need for the collection and analysis of data pertaining to: prevalence of clinical anxiety; the prevalence of depression band 12 months after childbirth factors contributing to suicide contemplation and attempts among adolescent girls, current treatments for depression and their efficacy in depressed women at different life stages; interprovincial variation in depression rates and hospitalizations and the impact and costs of depression on work, family, individuals, and society.

  17. Bipolar and unipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jonathan; Agius, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Since Kraepelin grouped affective disorders under the title of 'manic-depressive insanity', there has been controversy over whether the bipolar and unipolar entities within this are distinct affective disorders or whether they are merely two ends of an affective continuum. In order to bring some clarity and goal-posts to this argument, we define the criteria that must be fulfilled by diseases in order to be considered as part of a spectrum. We analyse bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder with respect to these criteria and find the model fits in many respects but fails to account for either the poor correlation in severity of manic and depressive symptoms or for the apparent discontinuity in the distribution of familial mania. A one-dimensional spectrum is thus too simple and a two-dimensional approach is required; this also fits much better with our current understanding of the genetic picture.

  18. Circadian Rhythm Hypotheses of Mixed Features, Antidepressant Treatment Resistance, and Manic Switching in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Son, Gi-Hoon; Geum, Dongho

    2013-01-01

    Numerous hypotheses have been put forth over the years to explain the development of bipolar disorder. Of these, circadian rhythm hypotheses have gained much importance of late. While the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivation hypothesis and the monoamine hypothesis somewhat explain the pathogenic mechanism of depression, they do not provide an explanation for the development of mania/hypomania. Interestingly, all patients with bipolar disorder display significant disruption of circadian rhythms and sleep/wake cycles throughout their mood cycles. Indeed, mice carrying the Clock gene mutation exhibit an overall behavioral profile that is similar to human mania, including hyperactivity, decreased sleep, lowered depression-like behavior, and lower anxiety. It was recently reported that monoamine signaling is in fact regulated by the circadian system. Thus, circadian rhythm instability, imposed on the dysregulation of HPA axis and monoamine system, may in turn increase individual susceptibility for switching from depression to mania/hypomania. In addition to addressing the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the manic switch, circadian rhythm hypotheses can explain other bipolar disorder-related phenomena such as treatment resistant depression and mixed features. PMID:24302944

  19. Epidemiology and Heritability of Major Depressive Disorder, Stratified by Age of Onset, Sex, and Illness Course in Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS)

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Pippa; McKechanie, Andrew G.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Smith, Blair H.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Morris, Andrew D.; Matthews, Keith; Campbell, Archie; Linksted, Pamela; Haley, Chris S.; Deary, Ian J.; Porteous, David J.; McIntosh, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The heritability of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been estimated at 37% based largely on twin studies that rely on contested assumptions. More recently, the heritability of MDD has been estimated on large populations from registries such as the Swedish, Finnish, and Chinese cohorts. Family-based designs utilise a number of different relationships and provide an alternative means of estimating heritability. Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study (GS:SFHS) is a large (n = 20,198), family-based population study designed to identify the genetic determinants of common diseases, including Major Depressive Disorder. Two thousand seven hundred and six individuals were SCID diagnosed with MDD, 13.5% of the cohort, from which we inferred a population prevalence of 12.2% (95% credible interval: 11.4% to 13.1%). Increased risk of MDD was associated with being female, unemployed due to a disability, current smokers, former drinkers, and living in areas of greater social deprivation. The heritability of MDD in GS:SFHS was between 28% and 44%, estimated from a pedigree model. The genetic correlation of MDD between sexes, age of onset, and illness course were examined and showed strong genetic correlations. The genetic correlation between males and females with MDD was 0.75 (0.43 to 0.99); between earlier (≤ age 40) and later (> age 40) onset was 0.85 (0.66 to 0.98); and between single and recurrent episodic illness course was 0.87 (0.72 to 0.98). We found that the heritability of recurrent MDD illness course was significantly greater than the heritability of single MDD illness course. The study confirms a moderate genetic contribution to depression, with a small contribution of the common family environment (variance proportion = 0.07, CI: 0.01 to 0.15), and supports the relationship of MDD with previously identified risk factors. This study did not find robust support for genetic differences in MDD due to sex, age of onset, or illness course. However, we found

  20. Effects of illness representation, perceived quality of information provided by the health-care professional, and perceived social support on depressive symptoms of the caregivers of children with leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bozo, Ozlem; Anahar, Selin; Ateş, Gizem; Etel, Evren

    2010-03-01

    The present study examined the effects of illness representation, perceived quality of information provided by the health-care professional, and perceived social support on the depressive symptoms of the caregivers of children with leukemia. The sample was composed of 71 caregivers of children with leukemia living in Turkey. The obtained data were analyzed by path analysis. The results show that caregivers of children with leukemia experience higher levels of depressive symptoms when they have negative illness representation and lower levels of depressive symptoms when they perceive higher levels of social support. Moreover, they perceive higher social support when they perceive high quality of information provided by health-care professionals. It can be suggested that intervention programs which aim to increase caregivers' social support and change their illness representation in a positive way would be helpful for the caregivers showing depressive symptoms. PMID:19898925

  1. Personality Predispositions to Depression in Children of Affectively-Ill Parents: The Buffering Role of Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abela, John R. Z.; Fishman, Michael B.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Young, Jami F.

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a…

  2. Excessive Reassurance Seeking, Hassles, and Depressive Symptoms in Children of Affectively Ill Parents: A Multiwave Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abela, John R. Z.; Zuroff, David C.; Ho, Moon-Ho R.; Adams, Philippe; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2006-01-01

    The current study examined whether excessive reassurance seeking serves as a vulnerability factor to depression in a sample of high-risk youth using a multiwave longitudinal design. At Time 1, 140 children (aged 6-14) of affectively disordered parents completed measures assessing reassurance seeking and depressive symptoms. In addition, every 6…

  3. Towards a scientific taxonomy of depression

    PubMed Central

    K. Ranga, Rama Krishnan

    Many concepts have been introduced into the classification of depression, including manic-depressive/bipolar disorder depression, etc. Kraepelin's original concept of manic-depressive disorder has evolved into the concept of polarity, and bipolar and unipolar disorders. Psychiatric classification is characterized by an inflation of the diagnostic categories, including subtypes of depression. This rapid multiplier effect is primarily descriptive, and there is a need to rethink, in a pragmatic fashion, the classification system, in order to develop one that is likely to be of utility and which has a scientific basis. Is the time now right to ask whether there are essential conditions relevant to depression? I think that it is, and here I will introduce the notion with two such conditions. The first is early life stress disorder, and the second vascular depression. These conditions have reached a point where the data supports them as distinct entities. In this paper, the rationale for this is discussed. PMID:18979943

  4. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Bipolar Depression in Adults: An Evidence Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Ather

    2016-05-01

    In the majority of cases of bipolar disorder, manic episodes are usually brief and typically responsive to currently available psychopharmacological agents. In contrast, depressive manifestations are more prevalent and persistent, and can present as major depressive/mixed episodes or residual interepisode symptoms. The depressive phase is often associated with other neuropsychiatric conditions, such as anxiety spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, stressor-related disorders, and eating disorders. It is viewed as a systemic disease with associated ailments such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. There is an increased rate of mortality not only from suicide, but also from concomitant physical illness. This scenario is made worse by the fact that depressive symptoms, which represent the main disease burden, are often refractory to existing psychotropic drugs. As such, there is a pressing need for novel agents that are efficacious in acute depressive exacerbations, and also have applicable value in preventing recurrent episodes. The rationale of the present review is to delineate the pharmacotherapy of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder with medications for which there is evidence in the form of observational, open-label, or double-blind randomized controlled studies. In the treatment of acute bipolar depression in adults, a comprehensive appraisal of the extant literature reveals that among mood stabilizers, the most robust proof of efficacy exists for divalproex sodium; while atypical antipsychotics, which include olanzapine, quetiapine, lurasidone, and cariprazine, are also effective, as demonstrated in controlled trials. PMID:27274384

  5. Pharmacotherapy of Acute Bipolar Depression in Adults: An Evidence Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of cases of bipolar disorder, manic episodes are usually brief and typically responsive to currently available psychopharmacological agents. In contrast, depressive manifestations are more prevalent and persistent, and can present as major depressive/mixed episodes or residual interepisode symptoms. The depressive phase is often associated with other neuropsychiatric conditions, such as anxiety spectrum disorders, substance use disorders, stressor-related disorders, and eating disorders. It is viewed as a systemic disease with associated ailments such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease. There is an increased rate of mortality not only from suicide, but also from concomitant physical illness. This scenario is made worse by the fact that depressive symptoms, which represent the main disease burden, are often refractory to existing psychotropic drugs. As such, there is a pressing need for novel agents that are efficacious in acute depressive exacerbations, and also have applicable value in preventing recurrent episodes. The rationale of the present review is to delineate the pharmacotherapy of the depressive phase of bipolar disorder with medications for which there is evidence in the form of observational, open-label, or double-blind randomized controlled studies. In the treatment of acute bipolar depression in adults, a comprehensive appraisal of the extant literature reveals that among mood stabilizers, the most robust proof of efficacy exists for divalproex sodium; while atypical antipsychotics, which include olanzapine, quetiapine, lurasidone, and cariprazine, are also effective, as demonstrated in controlled trials. PMID:27274384

  6. Maternal inheritance and chromosome 18 allele sharing in unilineal bipolar illness pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Gershon, E.S.; Badner, J.A.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.

    1996-04-09

    We have replicated the observation that there is excess maternal transmission of illness in a series of previously described unilineal Bipolar manic-depressive illness extended pedigrees. ({open_quotes}Transmission{close_quotes} is defined for any ill person in a pedigree when father or mother has a personal or immediate family history of major affective disorder.) We divided our pedigrees into exclusively maternal transmission (Mat) and mixed maternal-paternal transmission (in different pedigree branches) (Pat). Using affected sib-pair-analysis, linkage to a series of markers on chromosome 18p-cen was observed in the Pat but not the Mat pedigrees, with significantly greater identity by descent (IBD) at these markers in the Pat pedigrees. As compared with the pedigree series as a whole, the proportion of alleles IBD in the linkage region is much increased in the Pat pedigrees. As the sharing proportion of alleles in affected relative pairs increases, the number of such pairs needed to resolve the linkage region to a 1 cM interval becomes smaller. Genetic subdivision of an illness by clinical or pedigree configuration criteria may thus play an important role in discovery of disease susceptibility mutations. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population.

  8. Serious mental illness and acute hospital readmission in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Goldberg, Richard; Langenberg, Patricia; Day, Hannah R; Morgan, Daniel J; Comer, Angela C; Harris, Anthony D; Furuno, Jon P

    2012-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness (SMI), particularly those with other chronic illnesses, may be vulnerable to unplanned hospital readmission. The authors hypothesized that SMI would be associated with increased 30-day hospital readmission in a cohort of adult patients with comorbid diabetes admitted to a tertiary care facility from 2005 to 2009. SMI was defined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, discharge diagnosis codes for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, bipolar, manic, or major depressive disorders, or other psychosis. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission to the index hospital. Among 26 878 eligible admissions, the prevalence of SMI was 6% and the incidence of 30-day hospital admission was 16%. Among patients aged <35 years, SMI was significantly associated with decreased odds of 30-day hospital readmission (odds ratio [OR] = 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.17, 0.91). However, among patients ≥35 years, SMI was not significantly associated with 30-day hospital readmission (OR = 1.11; 95% CI = 0.86, 1.42). SMI may not be associated with increased odds of 30-day hospital readmission in this population. PMID:22539798

  9. Depression.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Myrna

    2009-04-01

    This is an invited article on how my career as an epidemiologist studying depression unfolded. The role of the Civil Rights movement in opening the PhD doors to women at Yale began my career. The unfolding of depression studies are described. These studies included a clinical trial of medication and what later was known as interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), the first community survey of psychiatric disorder, family genetic and brain imaging studies or depression and anxiety disorders. I hope the new generation will have the wonderful opportunities I have had.

  10. Depression.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Myrna

    2009-04-01

    This is an invited article on how my career as an epidemiologist studying depression unfolded. The role of the Civil Rights movement in opening the PhD doors to women at Yale began my career. The unfolding of depression studies are described. These studies included a clinical trial of medication and what later was known as interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), the first community survey of psychiatric disorder, family genetic and brain imaging studies or depression and anxiety disorders. I hope the new generation will have the wonderful opportunities I have had. PMID:19344866

  11. Stress, Illness, and the Social Environment: Depression among First Generation Mandarin Speaking Chinese in Greater Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueling; Hofstetter, C. Richard; Irving, Veronica; Chhay, Doug; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study documents the indirect effects of social and environmental variables as mediated by immigrant stress and physical health. Methods Using data from a large dual frame sample of first generation mandarin speaking Chinese immigrants in metropolitan Los Angeles counties with the largest groups of Chinese immigrants, this study uses a path analytic approach to trace how predictors are related to depressive symptoms and to measure direct and indirect influences of variables. Results Although bivariate analyses suggested that many predictors were associated with depressive symptoms, multivariate path analysis revealed a more complex structure of mediated associations. In the multivariate path analysis only reports of physical health and immigrant stress were directly related to depressive symptoms (P<.05), while acculturation, time in the U.S., income, U.S. citizenship, and distance of persons on whom one could rely were related to stress (but not to physical health status) and only to depressive symptoms as mediated by stress. Age and educational attainment were related to health status (and to stress as mediated by physical health) and to depressive symptoms as mediated by both health and stress. These variables were also unrelated directly to health status and to depressive symptoms. Associations were evaluated using statistical significance, P<.05. Conclusions This study demonstrates the significance of stress and health as mediators of variables in the larger context of the physical environment and suggests that the mechanisms linking ecological characteristics of immigrants to depressive symptoms may be stress and physical health among immigrants. PMID:24306282

  12. Stress, illness, and the social environment: depressive symptoms among first generation mandarin speaking Chinese in greater Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Li, Yueling; Hofstetter, C Richard; Irving, Veronica; Chhay, Doug; Hovell, Melbourne F

    2014-12-01

    This study documents the indirect effects of social and environmental variables as mediated by immigrant stress and physical health. Using data from a large dual frame sample of first generation mandarin speaking Chinese immigrants in metropolitan Los Angeles counties with the largest groups of Chinese immigrants, this study uses a path analytic approach to trace how predictors are related to depressive symptoms and to measure direct and indirect influences of variables. Although bivariate analyses suggested that many predictors were associated with depressive symptoms, multivariate path analysis revealed a more complex structure of mediated associations. In the multivariate path analysis only reports of physical health and immigrant stress were directly related to depressive symptoms (P < 0.05), while acculturation, time in the US, income, US citizenship, and distance of persons on whom one could rely were related to stress (but not to physical health status) and only to depressive symptoms as mediated by stress. Age and educational attainment were related to health status (and to stress as mediated by physical health) and to depressive symptoms as mediated by both health and stress. These variables were also unrelated directly to health status and to depressive symptoms. Associations were evaluated using statistical significance, P < 0.05. This study demonstrates the significance of stress and health as mediators of variables in the larger context of the physical environment and suggests that the mechanisms linking ecological characteristics of immigrants to depressive symptoms may be stress and physical health among immigrants.

  13. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... newborns, as well as jitteriness, difficulty feeding, and low blood sugar after delivery. However, moms who stop medications can ... a kind of antidepressant for treating depression and anxiety disorders. However, a number of research studies show ...

  14. Personality predispositions to depression in children of affectively-ill parents: the buffering role of self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Abela, John R Z; Fishman, Michael B; Cohen, Joseph R; Young, Jami F

    2012-01-01

    A major theory of personality predispositions to depression posits that individuals who possess high levels of self-criticism and/or dependency are vulnerable to developing depression following negative life events. The goal of the current study was to test this theory of personality predispositions and the self-esteem buffering hypothesis in a sample of youth using an idiographic approach, a high-risk sample, and a multiwave longitudinal design. One hundred forty children aged 6 to 14 completed measures of dependency, self-criticism, self-esteem, and depressive symptoms. Over the course of the following year, 8 follow-up assessments were conducted 6 weeks apart during which all children were administered measures assessing depressive symptoms and the occurrence of negative events. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analyses indicated that higher levels of dependency were associated with greater increases in depressive symptoms following negative events among children possessing low, but not high, self-esteem. In contrast, self-criticism was not associated with changes in depressive symptoms over time regardless of children's levels of stress and/or self-esteem.

  15. [The clinical meaning and academic significance of "endogenous depression" as an ideal type].

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Katsufumi

    2013-01-01

    The assumption that a core group of depressive disorders is due to a discontinuous change in the function of the brain system, suggests that the symptoms of the core group of depressive disorders should be discerned from those of non-core depression. Core depression is thought to correspond to depression of an endogenous nature, which has recently been disregarded in diagnosing mood disorders. However, in diagnosing endogenous depression, we can identify its characteristic symptoms by referring to a traditional symptomatology. Therefore, the idea of Verstehen (Jaspers, K) becomes essential, but has been neglected in academic journals in English-speaking countries. The depressive mood in endogenous depression may be an inhibition of various kinds of emotion, which can never be experienced within a normal emotional state. Thus, it is thought to be 'unverstaendlich' (incomprehensible) in nature. The "anhedonia hypothesis" of depression from DSM-IV permits the inclusion of the non-core group of depression into major depressive disorder, because patients with the endogenous type suffer not only from a loss of pleasure but also from a loss of sadness. A new type of depression that has recently been debated in Japan is diagnosed as major depressive disorder in DSM-IV, but many suspected cases are thought to be due to a psychogenic state or neurotic condition, because their symptoms are thought to be 'verstaendlich' (comprehensible). Endogenous depression can manifest as manic-depressive disorder in almost all cases, but psychiatric practitioners have taken the necessary precautions against the risk of a shift to a manic state even when treating pure depression which seemingly appears to have no manic component. According to recent studies on bipolar disorder, pure mania is not empirically found. Thus, the manic pole may not exist, and we may be able to think of endogenous depression as manic-depressive disorder based on its genetic entity. Additionally, from the viewpoint

  16. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome and the onset of a manic episode.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Phillip; Tau, Michael; Robertson, David

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a rare, recently described, clinically diagnosed condition that is characterised by a chronic history of cannabis use, cyclic nausea and vomiting, symptomatic relief with hot water bathing, and resolution with cessation of use. We present a case of this syndrome concurrent in a patient with bipolar mania. We suggest that a 3-week period of vomiting in the context of this syndrome contributed to the precipitation of a manic episode by lowering mood stabiliser serum levels, and that this syndrome will have significant consequences for the patient's mental health. PMID:27122104

  17. Heterogeneity in the prognosis of major depression: from the common cold to a highly debilitating and recurrent illness.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Luaces, L

    2015-12-01

    Two different and seemingly competing views on the diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) exist. The first is that the diagnosis conflates adaptive sadness reactions with pathological states of depressed mood and that MDD is overdiagnosed and overtreated. The second is that MDD is an underdiagnosed and undertreated disorder, and one that is best characterised by a severe, chronic, recurrent or treatment-resistant course. Existing research suggests that both views are valid and merit being integrated. Anywhere from 30 to 50% of individuals will meet criteria for MDD at some point in their life. About half of these episodes are of brief duration and unlikely to recur. However, a remaining half is either chronic or recurrent. Data on the outpatient diagnosis of depression support the view that depression is simultaneously underdiagnosed and undertreated as well as overdiagnosed and overtreated. About one-third of the patients who meet criteria for MDD and receive placebos experience clinically significant and long-lasting improvement. Many other patients, however, are unresponsive to one or multiple active treatments. Thus, the diagnosis of MDD likely applies to individuals who are experiencing either normal periods of sadness or single-episode afflictions that are mild, unlikely to recur, and are placebo responsive, as well as to individuals with more severe clinical profiles. More research is needed that can help ascertain what contextual or biopsychological variables help distinguish between individuals who may be experiencing adaptive states of negative affect and those who experience severe, chronic, recurrent or treatment-resistant depressions. PMID:26081748

  18. Chemistry, Pharmacology, and Medicinal Property of Sage (Salvia) to Prevent and Cure Illnesses such as Obesity, Diabetes, Depression, Dementia, Lupus, Autism, Heart Disease, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hamidpour, Mohsen; Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Soheila; Shahlari, Mina

    2014-04-01

    For a long time, sage (Salvia) species have been used in traditional medicine for the relief of pain, protecting the body against oxidative stress, free radical damages, angiogenesis, inflammation, bacterial and virus infection, etc., Several studies suggest that sage species can be considered for drug development because of their reported pharmacology and therapeutic activities in many countries of Asia and Middle East, especially China and India. These studies suggest that Salvia species, in addition to treating minor common illnesses, might potentially provide novel natural treatments for the relief or cure of many serious and life-threatening diseases such as depression, dementia, obesity, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, and cancer. This article presents a comprehensive analysis of the botanical, chemical, and pharmacological aspects of sage (Saliva).

  19. The Relationship between Manic Symptoms on the Dash II and YMRS and Feeding/Mealtime Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laud, Rinita B.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2006-01-01

    This study represents the first to assess whether a relationship between manic symptoms and feeding/mealtime behavior problems exists in individuals with ID. Participants were compared across three groups (manic, non-manic psychiatrically impaired, and controls) on the diagnostic assessment for the severely handicapped-revised (DASH-II) and young…

  20. History of Manic and Hypomanic Episodes and Risk of Incident Cardiovascular Disease: 11.5 year Follow-up from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Christine M.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Mayer, Lawrence S.; Eaton, William W.; Lee, Hochang B.

    2010-01-01

    Background While several studies have suggested that bipolar disorder may elevate risk of cardiovascular disease, few studies have examined the relationship between mania or hypomania and cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study is to examine history of manic and hypomanic episodes as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) during an 11.5 year follow-up of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Follow-up Study. Methods All participants were psychiatrically assessed face-to-face based on Diagnostic Interview Schedule in 1981 and 1982 and were categorized as having either history of manic or hypomanic episode (MHE; n = 58), major depressive episode only (MDE; n=71) or no mood episode (NME; n=1339). Incident cardiovascular disease (CVD; n = 67) was determined by self-report of either myocardial infarction (MI) or congestive heart failure (CHF) in 1993–6. Results Compared with NME subjects, the odds ratio for incident CVD among MHE subjects was 2.97 (95% confidence interval: 1.40, 6.34) after adjusting for putative risk factors. Conclusions These data suggest that a history of MHE increase the risk of incident CVD among community residents. Recognition of manic symptoms and addressing related CVD risk factors could have long term preventative implications in the development of cardiovascular disease in the community. PMID:20570367

  1. First Manic Episode in an 11 Year-old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Don Quang; Beaudry, Vincent; Lajoie, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We present the case of an 11 year-old girl admitted to the Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke for a first manic episode. Method: Differential diagnoses of adjustment disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder were considered but eliminated. Results: No organic etiology was detected. Her condition rapidly remitted with aripiprazole 3mg. After her discharge, she suffered a relapse due to instability of her living conditions and was rehospitalized. Conclusion: Mania is a difficult diagnosis in youths due to its nonspecific symptoms, rare prepubertal occurrence, and diagnostic complexity. Despite ongoing research, there is little conclusive information on the impact of psychosocial stressors on the evolution of early-onset bipolar disorder. PMID:24223053

  2. [Psychosocial stress induces molecular and structural alterations in the brain - How animal experiments help to understand pathomechanisms of depressive illnesses].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, E; Flügge, G

    2001-01-01

    Affective disorders are accompanied by central nervous changes that may lead to diseases of brain and peripheral organs. To gain an insight into neurobiological mechanisms that underlie such diseases we are studying tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri). This animal model is based on the fact that male tree shrews are very territorial and that under laboratory conditions, two males establish a clear social rank order with a dominant and a subordinate animal. In the visual presence of the dominant, the subordinate shows all typical signs of stress with pronounced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and of the sympathetic nervous system. If there are daily confrontations with the dominant during a time period of several weeks, the subordinate experiences chronic psychosocial stress. Tree shrews can be regarded as a suitable animal model to investigate the neurobiological basis of affective disorders since (1) behavioral and endocrine symptoms of subordinates resemble those of depressive patients, (2) antidepressant treatments lead to an improvement of symptoms, and (3) also in humans chronic stress can lead to depression. Using this model we showed that chronic stress induces changes in the morphology of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, affects neurogenesis in the hippocampal formation, and changes the expression of glucocorticoid, serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors in the brain. These changes depend on the duration of the stress period with some of the alterations being reversible whereas others persist during a longer time period. Since the above receptors modulate neuronal activity, the stress induced alterations lead to an impairment of neuronal activity in distinct brain regions.

  3. Importance of Depression in Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Clouse, Ray E.; Anderson, Ryan J.

    Depression doubles the likelihood of comorbid depression, which presents as major depression in 11% and subsyndromal depression in 31% of patients with the medical illness. The course of depression is chronic, and afflicted patients suffer an average of one episode annually. Depression has unique importance in diabetes because of its association…

  4. Pattern of healthcare resource utilization and direct costs associated with manic episodes in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although some studies indicate that bipolar disorder causes high health care resources consumption, no study is available addressing a cost estimation of bipolar disorder in Spain. The aim of this observational study was to evaluate healthcare resource utilization and the associated direct cost in patients with manic episodes in the Spanish setting. Methods Retrospective descriptive study was carried out in a consecutive sample of patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of bipolar type I disorder with or without psychotic symptoms, aged 18 years or older, and who were having an active manic episode at the time of inclusion. Information regarding the current manic episode was collected retrospectively from the medical record and patient interview. Results Seven hundred and eighty-four evaluable patients, recruited by 182 psychiatrists, were included in the study. The direct cost associated with healthcare resource utilization during the manic episode was high, with a mean cost of nearly €4,500 per patient, of which approximately 55% corresponded to the cost of hospitalization, 30% to the cost of psychopharmacological treatment and 10% to the cost of specialized care. Conclusions Our results show the high cost of management of the patient with a manic episode, which is mainly due to hospitalizations. In this regard, any intervention on the management of the manic patient that could reduce the need for hospitalization would have a significant impact on the costs of the disease. PMID:20426814

  5. Manic patients exhibit more utilitarian moral judgments in comparison with euthymic bipolar and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwa; Kim, Tae Young; Ryu, Vin; Ha, Ra Yeon; Lee, Su Jin; Ha, Kyooseob; Cho, Hyun-Sang

    2015-04-01

    Both emotional and cognitive processes are involved in moral judgments. Ventromedial prefrontal lesions are related to impaired prosocial emotions and emotional dysregulation, and patients with these lesions exhibit increased utilitarian judgments of emotionally salient personal moral dilemmas. Bipolar patients experiencing manic episode also have impaired emotional regulation and behavioral control. We investigated the characteristics of moral judgment in manic and euthymic patients with bipolar disorder using the 50 hypothetical moral dilemma task (17 non-moral, 20 personal, and 13 impersonal). Our study included 27 manic bipolar patients, 26 euthymic bipolar patients, and 42 healthy controls. Subjects were instructed to determine whether or not each dilemma was morally acceptable, and their reaction times were recorded. Manic patients showed significantly greater utilitarian judgment than euthymic patients and normal controls for personal moral dilemmas. However, there were no significant between-group differences for the non-moral and impersonal moral dilemmas. Our results suggest that increased utilitarian judgments of personal moral dilemmas may be a state-related finding observed only in manic patients. This difference in moral judgment assessments may reflect the decision-making characteristics and underlying neurobiological mechanisms of bipolar disorder, especially during the manic state.

  6. Screening for Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... events Visit the podcast archive Mood Disorders Depression Bipolar Disorder Anxiety Screening Center Co-occurring Illnesses/Disorders Related ... for Your Patients Information about Depression Information about Bipolar Disorder Wellness Tools DBSA Support Groups Active Research Studies ...

  7. A longitudinal pilot proton MRS investigation of the manic and euthymic states of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brady, R O; Cooper, A; Jensen, J E; Tandon, N; Cohen, B; Renshaw, P; Keshavan, M; Öngür, D

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate dysfunction in brain energy production as a key component of bipolar disorder. In particular, elevated brain lactate levels observed in this condition suggest a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, possibly as a result of mitochondrial abnormalities. Most prior imaging studies of brain metabolites were performed in either euthymic or depressed bipolar patients or compared different populations in different mood states. We sought to measure brain metabolite concentrations in the same patients in both manic and euthymic states. Given the dramatic changes in clinical state of bipolar disorder patients, we hypothesized that previously observed abnormalities in lactate concentrations in bipolar disorder might show state dependent changes. In this study 15 patients (mean age 36.1 years) diagnosed with bipolar I disorder underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the anterior cingulate cortex and parieto-occipital cortex during hospitalization for acute mania (mean Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) 22.1). Seven of these subjects returned (mean interval 21.16 months) to have imaging repeated while euthymic (mean YMRS 2.0). A group of age- and gender-matched control participants (N=6) were scanned as well. We report that during mania, bipolar disorder subjects had lactate levels comparable to healthy control subjects but during euthymia these levels were significantly reduced. No significant change was observed for other metabolites. These results implicate mood dependent alterations in energy metabolism in the biology of bipolar disorder. Additionally, this finding has potential use as a biomarker for both evaluating novel treatments as well as diagnostic clarification between mood disorders. PMID:22968227

  8. Schizophrenia: the illness that made us human.

    PubMed

    Horrobin, D F

    1998-04-01

    Any hypotheses concerning the origins of humans must explain many things. Among these are: 1, the growth in brain size around two million years ago; 2, the presence of subcutaneous fat; 3, the near absence of change or cultural progress for around 2 million years after the brain grew in size; 4, the cultural explosion which began somewhere between fifty thousand and one hundred thousand years ago with the emergence of art, music, religion and warfare; 5, the further cultural explosion around ten thousand to fifteen thousand years ago which developed with the emergence of agriculture and which has continued since. Since the brain, like subcutaneous fat, is particularly rich in lipids, and since the microconnections of the brain are substantially lipid in nature, it is suggested that changes in lipid metabolism are what differentiated humans from the great apes. The growth in brain size and in the quality of subcutaneous adipose tissue may have occurred because of changes in the proteins which regulate the rate of delivery of fatty acids to tissues, notably lipoprotein lipases and fatty acid binding proteins. The creativity which occurred one hundred thousand years ago may have resulted from changes in phospholipid-synthesizing, -remodelling and -degrading enzymes which largely determine the microconnectivity of neurons. Family studies and adoption studies indicate that schizophrenia in a family member is associated with an increased risk of the illness in other family members. It is also associated with an increased risk of schizotypy, manic-depression, dyslexia, sociopathy and psychopathy. On the other hand it is also an indication of an increased likelihood of high creativity, leadership qualities, achievements in many fields, high musical skills and an intense interest in religion. I propose that the characteristics which entered the human race about one hundred thousand years ago and which ended around two million years of cultural near-stagnation are precisely

  9. Illness Progression as a Function of Independent and Accumulating Poor Prognosis Factors in Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Altshuler, Lori L.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph; Grunze, Heinz; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trisha; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Rowe, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many patients with bipolar disorder in the United States experience a deteriorating course of illness despite naturalistic treatment in the community. We examined a variety of factors associated with this pattern of illness progression. Method: From 1995 to 2002, we studied 634 adult outpatients with bipolar disorder (mean age of 40 years) emanating from 4 sites in the United States. Patients gave informed consent and completed a detailed questionnaire about demographic, vulnerability, and course-of-illness factors and indicated whether their illness had shown a pattern of increasing frequency or severity of manic or depressive episodes. Fifteen factors previously linked in the literature to a poor outcome were examined for their relationship to illness progression using Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by a 2-sample Wilcoxon rank sum (Mann-Whitney) test, χ2, and logistical regression. Results: All of the putative poor prognosis factors occurred with a high incidence, and, with the exception of obesity, were significantly (P < .05) associated with illness progression. These factors included indicators of genetic and psychosocial risk and loss of social support, early onset, long delay to first treatment, anxiety and substance abuse comorbidity, rapid cycling in any year, and the occurrence of more than 20 prior episodes prior to entering the network. A greater number of factors were linearly associated with the likelihood of a progressively worsening course. Conclusions: Multiple genetic, psychosocial, and illness factors were associated with a deteriorating course of bipolar disorder from onset to study entry in adulthood. The identification of these factors provides important targets for earlier and more effective therapeutic intervention in the hope of achieving a more benign course of bipolar disorder. PMID:25834764

  10. Depression: discrete or continuous?

    PubMed

    Bowins, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the true structure of depression is necessary if we are to advance our understanding and treatment options. Central to the issue of structure is whether depression represents discrete types or occurs on a continuum. Nature almost universally operates on the basis of continuums, whereas human perception favors discrete categories. This reality might be formalized into a 'continuum principle': natural phenomena tend to occur on a continuum, and any instance of hypothesized discreteness requires unassailable proof. Research evidence for discrete types falls far short of this standard, with most evidence supporting a continuum. However, quantitative variation can yield qualitative differences as an emergent property, fostering the appearance of discreteness. Depression as a continuum is best characterized by duration and severity dimensions, with the latter understood in terms of depressive inhibition. In the absence of some degree of cognitive, emotional, social, and physical inhibition, depression should not be diagnosed. Combining the dimensions of duration and severity provides an optimal way to characterize the quantitative and related qualitative aspects of depression and to describe the overall degree of dysfunction. The presence of other symptom types occurs when anxiety, hypomanic/manic, psychotic, and personality continuums interface with the depression continuum. PMID:25531962

  11. Circannual and menstrual rhythm characteristics in manic episodes and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Sothern, R B; Slover, G P; Morris, R W

    1993-02-01

    Most reports in the literature deal with groups when summarizing the timing of affective disorders along the scale of the year and the menstrual cycle. In order to look for any regularity in timing of manic episodes in a single individual along these two time scales, a woman with a history of mania only, caused by schizoaffective disorder and on maintenance therapy with thioridazine hydrochloride self-measured basal body temperature daily and recorded onset and duration of manic episodes for 11 years. Statistically significant rhythms were found in body temperature with periods equal to the menstrual cycle and the year, with acrophase (highest values) during the luteal phase and winter, respectively. The timing of 11 manic episodes was not random but occurred during distinct portions of the menstrual cycle and the year. Most manic days occurred near menstruation or during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (up to ovulation) and between December and May (winter-spring). A temporal schedule for psychopharmacological treatment designed from individualized, longitudinal records that adjusts daily dosages according to both time of year and stage of menstrual cycle might alleviate or minimize the occurrence, magnitude and/or duration of mania and possibly other affective disorders that are found to be associated with underlying biological periodicities.

  12. Mania and Intellectual Disability: The Course of Manic Symptoms in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Melissa; Matson, Johnny L.

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to extend the literature by examining the presence of manic symptoms in persons with intellectual deficits with and without bipolar disorder for 3 years. Three groups (bipolar, psychopathology other than bipolar disorder, and no Axis I diagnosis) were formed with 14 participants in each group. Initially, the presence of mania symptoms…

  13. Dimensions of Manic Symptoms in Youth: Psychosocial Impairment and Cognitive Performance in the IMAGEN Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Itterman, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Nees, Frauke; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Smolka, Michael N.; Schumann, Gunter; Goodman, Robert; Conrod, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that mania may be associated with superior cognitive performance. In this study, we test the hypothesis that manic symptoms in youth separate along two correlated dimensions and that a symptom constellation of high energy and cheerfulness is associated with superior cognitive performance. Method: We studied 1755…

  14. Dimensions of manic symptoms in youth: psychosocial impairment and cognitive performance in the IMAGEN sample

    PubMed Central

    Stringaris, Argyris; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Juergen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Itterman, Bernd; Lawrence, Claire; Nees, Frauke; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Smolka, Michael N; Schumann, Gunter; Goodman, Robert; Conrod, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been reported that mania may be associated with superior cognitive performance. In this study, we test the hypothesis that manic symptoms in youth separate along two correlated dimensions and that a symptom constellation of high energy and cheerfulness is associated with superior cognitive performance. Method We studied 1755 participants of the IMAGEN study, of average age 14.4 years (SD = 0.43), 50.7% girls. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Development and Wellbeing Assessment by interviewing parents and young people. Cognition was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale For Children (WISC-IV) and a response inhibition task. Results Manic symptoms in youth formed two correlated dimensions: one termed exuberance, characterized by high energy and cheerfulness and one of undercontrol with distractibility, irritability and risk-taking behavior. Only the undercontrol, but not the exuberant dimension, was independently associated with measures of psychosocial impairment. In multivariate regression models, the exuberant, but not the undercontrolled, dimension was positively and significantly associated with verbal IQ by both parent- and self-report; conversely, the undercontrolled, but not the exuberant, dimension was associated with poor performance in a response inhibition task. Conclusions Our findings suggest that manic symptoms in youth may form dimensions with distinct correlates. The results are in keeping with previous findings about superior performance associated with mania. Further research is required to study etiological differences between these symptom dimensions and their implications for clinical practice. PMID:24865127

  15. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allan H; Eberhard, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). Method This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current) manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria); symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms) or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire. Results Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4), a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%), and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%), compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05). Conclusion This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms during a manic episode), suffered, on average, from a greater burden of disease than patients with pure mania. Improved identification of these patients may help to optimize

  16. Depression Plagues Many with COPD

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159436.html Depression Plagues Many With COPD Studies found 1 in ... pulmonary disorder (COPD) may raise the risk of depression among patients with the incurable respiratory illness, two ...

  17. Assessing the prevalence of depression in Punjabi and English primary care attenders: the role of culture, physical illness and somatic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bhui, Kamaldeep; Bhugra, Dinesh; Goldberg, David; Sauer, Justin; Tylee, Andre

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies exploring the prevalence of depression among South Asians reported inconsistent findings. Research artefacts due to sampling bias, measurements errors and a failure to include ethnographic methods may all explain this. We estimated the prevalence of depression, and variations of prevalence with culture, cultural adaptation, somatic symptoms and physical disability in a cross-sectional primary care survey of Punjabi and English attendees. We included a culture specific screening instrument, culturally adapted the instruments and offered bilingual interviews. We found that, compared with their English counterparts, depressive diagnoses were more common among Punjabis, Punjabi women, Punjabis with physical complaints and, contrary to expectation, even Punjabis with low scores for somatic symptoms.

  18. Do You Have Major Depression?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  19. Darwin's illness revealed.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2005-04-01

    After returning from the Beagle in 1836, Charles Darwin suffered for over 40 years from long bouts of vomiting, gut pain, headaches, severe tiredness, skin problems, and depression. Twenty doctors failed to treat him. Many books and papers have explained Darwin's mystery illness as organic or psychosomatic, including arsenic poisoning, Chagas' disease, multiple allergy, hypochondria, or bereavement syndrome. None stand up to full scrutiny. His medical history shows he had an organic problem, exacerbated by depression. Here we show that all Darwin's symptoms match systemic lactose intolerance. Vomiting and gut problems showed up two to three hours after a meal, the time it takes for lactose to reach the large intestine. His family history shows a major inherited component, as with genetically predisposed hypolactasia. Darwin only got better when, by chance, he stopped taking milk and cream. Darwin's illness highlights something else he missed--the importance of lactose in mammalian and human evolution. PMID:15811889

  20. Darwin's illness revealed.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anthony K; Matthews, Stephanie B

    2005-04-01

    After returning from the Beagle in 1836, Charles Darwin suffered for over 40 years from long bouts of vomiting, gut pain, headaches, severe tiredness, skin problems, and depression. Twenty doctors failed to treat him. Many books and papers have explained Darwin's mystery illness as organic or psychosomatic, including arsenic poisoning, Chagas' disease, multiple allergy, hypochondria, or bereavement syndrome. None stand up to full scrutiny. His medical history shows he had an organic problem, exacerbated by depression. Here we show that all Darwin's symptoms match systemic lactose intolerance. Vomiting and gut problems showed up two to three hours after a meal, the time it takes for lactose to reach the large intestine. His family history shows a major inherited component, as with genetically predisposed hypolactasia. Darwin only got better when, by chance, he stopped taking milk and cream. Darwin's illness highlights something else he missed--the importance of lactose in mammalian and human evolution.

  1. Onset polarity and illness course in bipolar I and II disorders: The predictive role of broadly defined mixed states.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; Musetti, Laura; Benedetti, Alessandra; Berti, Benedetta; Massimetti, Gabriele; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2015-11-01

    Several studies investigating bipolar disorders have shown that polarity of onset can predict differences in symptomatology, course, and prognosis. Frequently, however, research on the topic has examined only bipolar I inpatients and has not included patients with mixed onset. The aim of the present naturalistic study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and illness course of a consecutive sample (407 outpatients, 58.7% with bipolar I (BD-I) and 41.3% with bipolar II (BD-II) disorder) according to polarity of onset: depressive (DP-o); manic/hypomanic (HM-o); or mixed--broadly defined to include agitated depression for BD-II--onset (MX-o). As compared with patients in the other two groups: a) DP-o patients (67.3%) were more frequently affected by BD-II and had lower ratings for psychotic symptoms; b) HM-o patients (17%) had a higher rate of family history for psychosis and a lower rate of suicide attempts; and c) patients in the MX-o group (15.7%) more frequently showed substance abuse and had a higher number of mixed recurrences per year. In the BD-II group, MX-o patients more frequently attempted suicide. The present study's main limitations are those of retrospective assessment of onset polarity and lack of treatment-impact evaluations over illness course. In conclusion, we confirm clinical expression differences in bipolar disorder in function of polarity of onset and underscore the importance of carefully considering broadly defined mixed state when examining polarity of onset. Further investigations are required to confirm the present study's results. PMID:26555487

  2. Onset polarity and illness course in bipolar I and II disorders: The predictive role of broadly defined mixed states.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; Musetti, Laura; Benedetti, Alessandra; Berti, Benedetta; Massimetti, Gabriele; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2015-11-01

    Several studies investigating bipolar disorders have shown that polarity of onset can predict differences in symptomatology, course, and prognosis. Frequently, however, research on the topic has examined only bipolar I inpatients and has not included patients with mixed onset. The aim of the present naturalistic study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and illness course of a consecutive sample (407 outpatients, 58.7% with bipolar I (BD-I) and 41.3% with bipolar II (BD-II) disorder) according to polarity of onset: depressive (DP-o); manic/hypomanic (HM-o); or mixed--broadly defined to include agitated depression for BD-II--onset (MX-o). As compared with patients in the other two groups: a) DP-o patients (67.3%) were more frequently affected by BD-II and had lower ratings for psychotic symptoms; b) HM-o patients (17%) had a higher rate of family history for psychosis and a lower rate of suicide attempts; and c) patients in the MX-o group (15.7%) more frequently showed substance abuse and had a higher number of mixed recurrences per year. In the BD-II group, MX-o patients more frequently attempted suicide. The present study's main limitations are those of retrospective assessment of onset polarity and lack of treatment-impact evaluations over illness course. In conclusion, we confirm clinical expression differences in bipolar disorder in function of polarity of onset and underscore the importance of carefully considering broadly defined mixed state when examining polarity of onset. Further investigations are required to confirm the present study's results.

  3. Textmania: text messaging during the manic phase of bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Emeagwali, Nkiruka Anwulika; Bailey, Rahn K; Azim, Fatima

    2012-05-01

    Advancements in modern technology have brought tremendous changes in human behavior. One such change is in modes of communication such as text messaging, or texting. This form of communication has emerged as one of the dominant modes of communication in the world. This report presents a differential pattern of texting seen during the manic episode of a young adult with bipolar I disorder. We observed all the DSM IV manic symptoms; interestingly the patient's predominant medium for communication was texting. The patient reported a dramatic increase in the quantity of both texting and sex-texting (or sexting) in addition to a decrease in quality of the message content. In addition, there was a substantial increase in the number of people with whom the patient engaged in simultaneous texting conversations. This case provides evidence for the need to consider non-traditional forms of communication when evaluating a patient's communication pattern during mania.

  4. Eukaryotic expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of murine Manic Fringe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinek, Martin; Conti, Elena

    2006-08-01

    The catalytic domain of the murine glycosyltransferase Manic Fringe was expressed in insect cells. Removal by site-directed mutagenesis of two N-glycosylation sites present in the protein was essential to obtain crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Fringe proteins are Golgi-resident β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that regulate development in metazoa through glycosylation of the Notch receptor and its ligands. The catalytic domain of murine Manic Fringe was expressed in the baculovirus/insect-cell system as a secreted protein. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the purified protein indicated the presence of two N-linked glycans. Abolishing the glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis was necessary in order to obtain orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. For phasing, a highly redundant data set was collected using a crystal soaked with halide salts.

  5. Dual Diagnosis: Substance Abuse and Mental Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... because of binge drinking, to someone’s symptoms of bipolar disorder becoming more severe when that person abuses heroin ... your story Mental Illness ADHD Anxiety Disorders Autism Bipolar Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Depression Dissociative Disorders Eating Disorders ...

  6. On the downplay of suffering in Nordenfelt's theory of illness.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-12-01

    In his influential theory of health Nordenfelt bases the concepts of health and illness on the notions of ability and disability. A premise for this is that ability and disability provide a more promising, adequate, and useful basis than well-being and suffering. Nordenfelt uses coma and manic episodes as paradigm cases to show that this is so. Do these paradigm cases (and thus the premise) hold? What consequences does it have for the theory of health and illness if it they do not? These are the key questions in this article, which first presents the relationship between pain and disability in Nordenfelt's theory and the paradigm cases he uses to argue for the primacy of disability over pain. Then, Nordenfelt's concepts of illness are outlined, highlighting its presumptions and arguments. The main point is that if you do not have an action-theoretical perspective, it is not obvious that disability is the core concept for illness. The compelling effect of the paradigm cases presupposes that you see ability as the primary issue. To those who do not share this presumption, people in coma may not be ill. There are alternative well founded arguments for the primacy of first person experiences for the concept of illness. Hence, we need better arguments for the primacy of disability over first person experiences in illness, or first-person experience should be more primarily included in the concept of illness.

  7. Aquatic blues: modeling depression and antidepressant action in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michael; Stewart, Adam Michael; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a serious psychiatric condition affecting millions of patients worldwide. Unipolar depression is characterized by low mood, anhedonia, social withdrawal and other severely debilitating psychiatric symptoms. Bipolar disorder manifests in alternating depressed mood and 'hyperactive' manic/hypomanic states. Animal experimental models are an invaluable tool for research into the pathogenesis of bipolar/unipolar depression, and for the development of potential treatments. Due to their high throughput value, genetic tractability, low cost and quick reproductive cycle, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as a promising new model species for studying brain disorders. Here, we discuss the developing utility of zebrafish for studying depression disorders, and outline future areas of research in this field. We argue that zebrafish represent a useful model organism for studying depression and its behavioral, genetic and physiological mechanisms, as well as for anti-depressant drug discovery.

  8. Foodborne Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some parasites and chemicals also cause foodborne illnesses. Bacteria Bacteria are tiny organisms that can cause infections of the GI tract. Not all bacteria are harmful to humans. Some harmful bacteria may ...

  9. Foodborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... get sick from contaminated food. Common culprits include bacteria, parasites and viruses. Symptoms range from mild to ... cramps Nausea and vomiting Diarrhea Fever Dehydration Harmful bacteria are the most common cause of foodborne illness. ...

  10. A Comparison of Somatic Compliants among Depressed and Non-Depressed Older Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Howard; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined the relationship among somatic complaints, chronic medical illness, and depression in 127 community elderly. Depression and chronic medical illness were significant contributors to somatic complaining both alone and in interaction. Demographic variables and social supports were largely unrelated to depression, somatic complaints, or…

  11. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool.

  12. Beating Depression …Help Is Available

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Beating Depression …Help Is Available Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... treatments are available from your physician. Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  13. Women and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... to other mental disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder , research has not found differences in rates that ... Featured Health Topics Anxiety Disorders Depression Eating Disorders Bipolar Disorder (Manic-Depressive Illness) Schizophrenia Borderline Personality Disorder Suicide ...

  14. Coping with Mood Changes Later in Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of mood disorders. Could my illness be bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depression)? Have you had ... a relative or friend who has depression or bipolar disorder? Encourage your loved one to get help. Talk ...

  15. Depression and Suicide in Schizophrenic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salama, Aziz A.

    1988-01-01

    Identified schizophrenic patients as distinctive subgroup of patients who can suffer from major depressive illness and can commit suicide. Found 22.4 percent of 620 schizophrenics in psychiatric facility showed symptoms of major depressive episode. Seven patients committed suicide during acute phase of illness, 9 attempted suicide while…

  16. Depression in the elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenki, D.

    1980-01-01

    Depression in the elderly is very common and may be difficult to diagnose. Because of its varied presentation and its frequent association with physical illness it will be encountered increasingly by all physicians as the elderly population expands. Depression, though treatable, is often not treated, and suicide rates are high among depressed elderly persons. Diagnostic difficulties lie in distinguishing depression from organic brain syndromes, from so-called masked depressions and from normal grief reactions. Pharmacologic treatment is effective, but care must be taken to recognize side effects and to use adequate doses. Psychologic approaches should focus on reducing feelings of helplessness and failing self-esteem. The importance of the losses borne by elderly persons in the pathogenesis of depression continues to be of theoretical and practical interest. PMID:6989463

  17. Manic Symptoms Due to Methylphenidate Use in an Adolescent with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğullari; Ekinci, Nuran; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2016-08-31

    Almost one-fifth of children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are under the risk of attention problems after injury. The efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children with a history of TBI have not been completely identified. In this case report, MPH-induced manic symptoms in an adolescent with TBI will be summarized. A male patient aged 17 years was admitted with the complaints of attention difficulties on schoolwork and forgetfullness which became evident after TBI. Long-acting MPH was administered with the dose of 18 mg/day for attention problems. After one week, patient presented with the complaints of talking to himself, delusional thoughts, irritability and sleeplessness. This case highlights the fact that therapeutic dose of MPH may cause mania-like symptoms in children with TBI. Close monitarization and slow dose titration are crucial when considering MPH in children with TBI. PMID:27489389

  18. Manic Symptoms Due to Methylphenidate Use in an Adolescent with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğullari; Ekinci, Nuran; Okuyaz, Cetin

    2016-01-01

    Almost one-fifth of children who sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are under the risk of attention problems after injury. The efficacy and tolerability of methylphenidate (MPH) in children with a history of TBI have not been completely identified. In this case report, MPH-induced manic symptoms in an adolescent with TBI will be summarized. A male patient aged 17 years was admitted with the complaints of attention difficulties on schoolwork and forgetfullness which became evident after TBI. Long-acting MPH was administered with the dose of 18 mg/day for attention problems. After one week, patient presented with the complaints of talking to himself, delusional thoughts, irritability and sleeplessness. This case highlights the fact that therapeutic dose of MPH may cause mania-like symptoms in children with TBI. Close monitarization and slow dose titration are crucial when considering MPH in children with TBI. PMID:27489389

  19. [Melancholia and neurotic depression].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, S

    1999-11-01

    The author considers the psychopathological distinction between endogenous and neurotic depression as one of differing psychodynamics. In so doing he embeds both illnesses within psychoanalytic theory while at the same time allowing a sharp differentiation. Even the premorbid personalities of patients with endogenous and neurotic depression are different. The personalities of those with endogenous depression bear a similarity to those with obsessional character and betray a pathological super-ego monopolized by defence mechanisms. The personalities of patients with neurotic depression show an oral-dependent structure characterised by a structural deficit of the ego functions and of an autonomous super-ego. These factors are responsible for the greatly differing pathodynamics found in these illnesses and point to different etiological factors in socialization. PMID:10593139

  20. Darwin's illness: a biopsychosocial perspective.

    PubMed

    Pasnau, R O

    1990-01-01

    Throughout an illustrious scientific career, Charles Robert Darwin (1809-1882) suffered from a mysterious and disabling malady. The illness, which was characterized by depressed feelings and violent and uncomfortable cardiac palpitations, gastric upsets, and headaches, began shortly after Darwin returned from a five-year voyage to South America as the naturalist of the Beagle. One explanation for Darwin's symptoms is he suffered from Chagas' disease as a result of being bitten by an insect common to South America. More psychodynamically oriented theorists speculate that Darwin's illness was an expression of repressed anger toward his father. Others have noted a familial vulnerability to the symptoms Darwin described. The author examines these theories and suggests that they all may have validity in explaining the mysterious illness of Charles Darwin.

  1. Genetic linkage mapping for a susceptibility locus to bipolar illness: Chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and Xpter

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Hseih, W.T.; Goldin, L.R.

    1994-09-15

    We are conducting a genome search for a predisposing locus to bipolar (manic-depressive) illness by genotyping 21 moderate-sized pedigrees. We report linkage data derived from screening marker loci on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10p, 11p, 22, and the pseudoautosomal region at Xpter. To analyze for linkage, two-point marker to illness lod scores were calculated under a dominant model with either 85% or 50% maximum penetrance and a recessive model with 85% maximum penetrance, and two affection status models. Under the dominant high penetrance model the cumulative lod scores in the pedigree series were less than -2 at {theta} = 0.01 in 134 of 142 loci examined, indicating that if the disease is genetically homogeneous, linkage could be excluded in these marker regions. Similar results were obtained using the other genetic models. Heterogeneity analysis was conducted when indicated, but no evidence for linkage was found. In the course of mapping we found a positive total lod score greater than +3 at the D7S78 locus at {theta} = 0.01 under a dominant, 50% penetrance model. The lod scores for additional markers within the D7S78 region failed to support the initial finding, implying that this was a spurious positive. Analysis with affected pedigree member method for COL1A2 and D7S78 showed no significance for linkage, but for PLANH1, at the weighting functions f(p)=1 and f(p)=1/sqrt(p), borderline P values of 0.036 and 0.047 were obtained. We also detected new polymorphisms at the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MLR) and calmodulin II (CALMII) genes. These genes were genetically mapped and under affection status model 2 and a dominant, high penetrance mode of transmission the lod scores of {le}2 at {theta} = 0.01 were found. 39 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Complexity of illness and adjunctive benzodiazepine use in outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder: results from the Bipolar CHOICE study.

    PubMed

    Bobo, William V; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Ketter, Terence A; Brody, Benjamin D; Kinrys, Gustavo; Kemp, David E; Shelton, Richard C; McElroy, Susan L; Sylvia, Louisa G; Kocsis, James H; McInnis, Melvin G; Friedman, Edward S; Singh, Vivek; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L; Deckersbach, Thilo; Calabrese, Joseph R; Thase, Michael E; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Rabideau, Dustin J; Schoenfeld, David A; Faraone, Stephen V; Kamali, Masoud

    2015-02-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for patients with bipolar disorders in clinical practice, but very little is known about the subtypes of patients with bipolar disorder or aspects of bipolar illness that contribute most to benzodiazepine use. We examined the prevalence of and factors associated with benzodiazepine use among 482 patients with bipolar I or II disorder enrolled in the Bipolar CHOICE study. Eighty-one subjects were prescribed benzodiazepines at study entry and were considered benzodiazepine users. Stepwise logistic regression was used to model baseline benzodiazepine use versus nonuse, using entry and exit criteria of P < 0.1. In bivariate analyses, benzodiazepine users were prescribed a significantly higher number of other psychotropic medications and were more likely to be prescribed lamotrigine or antidepressants as compared with benzodiazepine nonusers. Benzodiazepine users were more likely to have a diagnosis of bipolar I disorder and comorbid anxiety disorder, but not comorbid alcohol or substance use disorders. Benzodiazepine users also had experienced more anxiety and depressive symptoms and suicidality, but not irritability or manic symptoms, than did benzodiazepine nonusers. In the multivariate model, anxiety symptom level (regardless of diagnosis), lamotrigine use, number of concomitant psychotropic medications, college education, and high household income predicted benzodiazepine use. Benzodiazepine use in patients with bipolar disorders is associated with greater illness complexity as indicated by a higher number of concomitant psychotropic medications and higher anxiety symptom burden, regardless of a comorbid anxiety disorder diagnosis. Demographic factors were also important determinants of benzodiazepine use, which may be related to access to care and insurance coverage for benzodiazepines.

  3. Depression - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  4. The depressive situation

    PubMed Central

    A. Jacobs, Kerrin

    2013-01-01

    From a naturalistic perspective on mental illness, depression is often described in terms of biological dysfunctions, while a normative perspective emphasizes the lived experience of depression as a harmful condition. The paper relates a conceptual analysis of “depressive situation” to an analysis of the lived experience of depression. As such, it predominantly aims to specify depression as a harmful condition in lights of normative perspective on mental disorder, but partially refers to empirical research, i.e., naturalistic perspective on depression, to exemplarily stress on the methodological merits and limits of relating phenomenological considerations closer to empirical research. The depressive situation is further specified with an examination of the evaluative dynamics by which individuals meaningfully relate to themselves, others and the world. These evaluative dynamics emerge out of the interplay of pre-reflective and reflective processes, which are significantly altered in depression. Such alterations of the evaluative structure are inextricably intertwined with significant distortions of practical sense in depression. From a phenomenological perspective, these distortions of practical sense show in characteristic experiences of evaluative incoherence and impairments of agency. Finally, this paper focuses on an examination of “evaluative incapacity,” which has the integrative potential to capture a range of typical changes of meaningful relatedness that determine the depressive situation. PMID:23882238

  5. Neuroinflammation and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in psychiatric illness. While systemic autoimmune diseases are well-documented causes of neuropsychiatric disorders, synaptic autoimmune encephalitides with psychotic symptoms often go under-recognized. Parallel to the link between psychiatric symptoms and autoimmunity in autoimmune diseases, neuroimmunological abnormalities occur in classical psychiatric disorders (for example, major depressive, bipolar, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders). Investigations into the pathophysiology of these conditions traditionally stressed dysregulation of the glutamatergic and monoaminergic systems, but the mechanisms causing these neurotransmitter abnormalities remained elusive. We review the link between autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disorders, and the human and experimental evidence supporting the pathogenic role of neuroinflammation in selected classical psychiatric disorders. Understanding how psychosocial, genetic, immunological and neurotransmitter systems interact can reveal pathogenic clues and help target new preventive and symptomatic therapies. PMID:23547920

  6. The Noradrenaline Metabolite MHPG Is a Candidate Biomarker from the Manic to the Remission State in Bipolar Disorder I: A Clinical Naturalistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Masatake; Nishino, Satoshi; Numata, Yukio; Okubo, Yoshiro; Sato, Tadahiro

    2014-01-01

    Remission is the primary goal of treatment for bipolar disorder I (BDI). Metabolites of noradrenaline and dopamine, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and homovanillic acid (HVA), respectively, are reduced by treatment with antipsychotics, but whether these phenomena are caused by antipsychotics or by the pathophysiology of BDI is not known. Interactions between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and mood disorders have also been suggested. We conducted a multifaceted study in BDI patients to ascertain if biological markers are associated with the manic state. Patients with Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scores >20 participated in the study. Final analyses involved 24 BDI patients (13 men and 11 women). We used YMRS scores to identify mania stages in individual BDI patients (i.e., manic syndrome, response and remission stages). Statistical analyses were done using one-way repeated-measures analyses of variance (rep-ANOVA) throughout manic syndrome, response and remission stages. Plasma concentrations of MHPG and HVA were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Plasma levels of BDNF were measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. BDI patients had significantly reduced plasma levels of MHPG throughout manic syndrome, response and remission stages (rep-ANOVA, p = 0.002). Without a case of response state, there was a significant positive correlation between YMRS scores and plasma levels of MHPG (ρ = 0.33, p = 0.033, n = 48). Plasma levels of HVA and BDNF were not significantly altered throughout manic syndrome, response and remission stages. These data suggest that the peripheral level of MHPG (which is associated with noradrenaline levels in the brain) could be used as a biomarker for the manic state in BDI. The MHPG level is likely to reflect the clinical characteristics of the manic syndrome in BDI, and noradrenaline may reflect the pathophysiology from manic to remission states

  7. Aging and Depression: Some Unanswered Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvik, Lissy F.

    1976-01-01

    The subject of aging and depression leaves many unanswered questions which this author raises. Little is known regarding the differentiation of depressive illness from a melancholic response to the stressful aging process, and equally little regarding the natural history of depressions with onset in the teens, 20s, or 30s. (Author)

  8. Depression: What Every Woman Should Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This publication, written in English, explains why women are at greater risk for depression than men. Types of depressive illnesses are explained along with the symptoms. It states that some women are predisposed genetically to depression but biochemical, environmental, psychological, and social factors also contribute to its occurrence.…

  9. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality. PMID:26172635

  10. Bipolar Disorder, Bipolar Depression and Comorbid Illness.

    PubMed

    Manning, J Sloan

    2015-06-01

    There is a substantial need for the early recognition and treatment of the psychiatric and medical comorbidities of bipolar disorder in primary care. If comorbid conditions are recognized and treated, serious adverse health outcomes may be averted, including substantial morbidity and mortality.

  11. Treating Teen Depression in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Sabrina

    2015-11-01

    I recently had an adolescent patient who presented with a chief complaint of depression. He had classic symptoms of difficulty sleeping, dysthymia, and anhedonia (loss of interest in things that used to bring him joy). He was a very smart and self-aware 17-year-old, and was able to describe his symptoms easily. There were no concerns for manic episodes or psychosis, and he met diagnostic criteria for unipolar major depressive disorder. He denied suicidal ideation, and was already seeing a therapist weekly for the last several months. He had a strong family history of depression, with his father, aunts, and grandmother who also carried a diagnosis of depression. He presented with the support of his mother, asking about next steps, and specifically, pharmacotherapy. This patient is a perfect example of an adolescent who is a good candidate for initiation of antidepressant medication. Primary care pediatricians should feel comfortable with first-line agents for major depressive disorder in certain adolescents with depression, but many feel hesitant and rely on child and adolescent psychiatry colleagues for prescriptions. PMID:26587812

  12. Preventive Effect of Cecropia pachystachya Against Ketamine-Induced Manic Behavior and Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Marta; Kaufmann, Fernanda N; Acosta, Bruna A; Oliveira, Pathise Souto; Valente, Matheus R; Ortmann, Caroline Flach; Sturbelle, Régis; Lencina, Claiton L; Stefanello, Francieli M; Kaster, Manuella P; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Ghisleni, Gabriele

    2015-07-01

    Cecropia species are widely used in traditional medicine by its anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of the crude aqueous extract from Cecropia pachystachya leaves in a rat model of mania induced by ketamine. The results indicated that ketamine treatment (25 mg/kg i.p., for 8 days) induced hyperlocomotion in the open-field test and oxidative damage in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, evaluated by increased lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein formation and decreased total thiol content. Moreover, ketamine treatment reduced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in hippocampus. Pretreatment of rats with C. pachystachya aqueous extract (200 and 400 mg/kg p.o., for 14 days) or with lithium chloride (45 mg/kg p.o., for 14 days, used as a positive control) prevented both behavioral and pro-oxidant effects of ketamine. These findings suggest that C. pachystachya might be a useful tool for preventive intervention in bipolar disorder, reducing the episode relapse and the oxidative damage associated with the manic phase of this disorder . PMID:25998886

  13. Peripheral blood mRNA expressions of stress biomarkers in manic episode and subsequent remission.

    PubMed

    Köse Çinar, Rugül; Sönmez, Mehmet Bülent; Görgülü, Yasemin

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical models of the neuroprogressive nature of bipolar disorder (BD) are based on the hypothesis that it is an accelerated aging disease, with the allostatic load playing a major role. Glucocorticoids, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophins play important roles in BD. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were examined in the peripheral blood of 20 adult male, drug-free BD patients during manic and remission periods and in 20 adult male, healthy controls. mRNA expression was measured using the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Compared to the controls, the expressions of BDNF and tPA mRNA were down-regulated in mania. In remission, BNDF and tPA mRNA levels increased, but they were still lower than those of the controls. Between mania and remission periods, only the change in mRNA levels of BDNF reached statistical significance. The results suggest that BDNF and tPA may be biomarkers of BD and that proteolytic conversion of BDNF may be important in the pathophysiology of BD. The change in BDNF levels between mania and remission could be adaptive and used to follow the progression of BD. PMID:27138695

  14. The historical roots of the "bipolar spectrum": did Aristotle anticipate Kraepelin's broad concept of manic-depression?

    PubMed

    Pies, Ronald

    2007-06-01

    The construct of bipolar disorder, or bipolar spectrum disorders, has been a source of controversy in recent years. Some have argued that subtle variants within the putative bipolar spectrum are merely the creation of overzealous clinicians, perhaps encouraged by various special interest groups. In reality, the concept of a bipolar spectrum may be inferred from numerous classical sources, dating back to the 19th century and even into antiquity. The Greek philosopher Aristotle, usually considered the author of a work called Problemata, appears to have recognized some form of the bipolar spectrum, more than two millennia ago. This recognition continues throughout the 19th century, and into our own time. Such transcultural findings across many centuries have implications for the "objective" nature of psychiatric disease.

  15. Epigenetic Basis of Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J; Peña, Catherine J; Kundakovic, Marija; Mitchell, Amanda; Akbarian, Schahram

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial illnesses involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function as well as likely abnormalities in glial cells. While genetic factors are important in the etiology of most mental disorders, the relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins, particularly for depression and other stress-related syndromes, clearly indicate the importance of additional mechanisms. Environmental factors such as stress are known to play a role in the onset of these illnesses. Exposure to such environmental insults induces stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior, and these maladaptations appear distinct between developmental versus adult exposures. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and the aberrant epigenetic regulation that underlies this dysregulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Here, we provide a progress report of epigenetic studies of the three major psychiatric syndromes, depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. We review the literature derived from animal models of these disorders as well as from studies of postmortem brain tissue from human patients. While epigenetic studies of mental illness remain at early stages, understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery within specific brain regions to cause lasting changes in disease susceptibility and pathophysiology is revealing new insight into the etiology and treatment of these conditions. PMID:26450593

  16. Physical Abuse Among Depressed Women

    PubMed Central

    Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Rost, Kathryn M; Golding, Jacqueline M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide estimates of physical abuse and use of health services among depressed women in order to inform efforts to increase detection and treatment of physical abuse. DESIGN Retrospective assessment of abuse and health services use over 1 year in a cohort of depressed women. SETTING Statewide community sample from Arkansas. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 303 depressed women through random-digit-dial screening. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Exposure to physical abuse based on the Conflict Tactics Scale, multi-informant estimate of health and mental health services. Over half of the depressed women (55.2%) reported experiencing physical abuse as adults, with 14.5% reporting abuse during the study year. Women abused as adults had significantly more severe depressive symptoms, more psychiatric comorbidity, and more physical illnesses than nonabused women. After controlling for sociodemographic and severity-of-illness factors, recently abused, depressed women were much less likely to receive outpatient care for mental health problems as compared to other depressed women (odds ratio [OR] 0.3;p = .013), though they were more likely to receive health care for physical problems (OR 5.7, p = .021). CONCLUSIONS Because nearly all depressed women experiencing abuse sought general medical rather than mental health care during the year of the study, primary care screening for physical abuse appears to be a critical link to professional help for abused, depressed women. Research is needed to inform primary care guidelines about methods for detecting abuse in depressed women. PMID:9754516

  17. Assessment and pharmacotherapy of depression.

    PubMed

    Van Fleet, Sharon

    2006-04-01

    Depressive disorders are experienced by a significant number of patients with cancer, with reported rates of 0%-58% (Massie, 2004). Numerous studies have demonstrated that depression in patients with cancer is underdiagnosed and inadequately treated as a result of a number of factors (Schwartz, Lander, & Chochinov, 2002). Although more severe or complex situations involving depression or other mental illness necessitate specialist referral, sometimes professionals treating patients with cancer may find the need to initiate treatment. Thus, clinicians need to be aware of basic principles related to the assessment and treatment of depression.

  18. [From circular insanity (in double form) to the bipolar spectrum: the chronic tendency for depressive recurrence].

    PubMed

    Akiskal, Hagop Souren

    2004-01-01

    From a cycling standpoint, "circular insanity" (Falret) and "dual-form insanity" (Baillarger), both described in hospital patients in 1854, are at the severe end of the spectrum of what we now call "bipolar disorders". Falret was prescient in suggesting that circular insanity was rare in the community, where depressive cycles are prevalent. These disorders are now respectively referred to as the "hard" (manic-depressive) and "soft" (bipolar spectrum) phenotypes of the disorder. This paper focuses on the latter, more prevalent depressive expressions of the spectrum, which share with the manic and circular forms a lifelong tendency to recur. Their cyclicity may involve putative "clock genes". The genetics of psychotic mania overlaps somewhat with the genetics of schizophrenia. As regards depressive recurrence, putative genetic factors have been identified, including a polymorphism of the serotonin transporter, which significantly increases the subject's vulnerability to stress; a mediating pathogenetic variable appears to be temperamental dysregulation (e.g. neuroticism and cyclothymic lability), which produces hyperemotional reactivity to such stressors. The growing recognition that many depressive recurrences belong to a broad spectrum, affecting 5-10% of the population, represents a new public health challenge. Although the new class of serotoninergic antidepressants offer a practical approach to the management of depressive episodes, further research is needed to determine the point of the spectrum at which mood-stabilizing therapy should be started--and in what combinations--in order to prevent recurrence and suicide.

  19. Lunatic, Manic, and Radical Fringe Each Promote T and B Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Song, Yinghui; Kumar, Vivek; Wei, Hua-Xing; Qiu, Ju; Stanley, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Lunatic, Manic, and Radical Fringe (LFNG, MFNG, and RFNG) are N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify Notch receptors and regulate Notch signaling. Loss of LFNG affects thymic T cell development, and LFNG and MFNG are required for marginal zone (MZ) B cell development. However, roles for MFNG and RFNG in T cell development, RFNG in B cell development, or Fringes in T and B cell activation are not identified. In this study, we show that Lfng/Mfng/Rfng triple knockout (Fng tKO) mice exhibited reduced binding of DLL4 Notch ligand to CD4/CD8 double-negative (DN) T cell progenitors, and reduced expression of NOTCH1 targets Deltex1 and CD25. Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of DN1/cKit(+) and DN2 T cell progenitors and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive (DP) T cell precursors, but increased frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) single-positive T cells in the thymus. In spleen, Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of CD4(+), CD8(+), central memory T cells and MZ B cells, and an increased frequency of effector memory T cells, neutrophils, follicular, and MZ P B cells. The Fng tKO phenotype was cell-autonomous and largely rescued in mice expressing one allele of a single Fng gene. Stimulation of Fng tKO splenocytes with anti-CD3/CD28 beads or LPS gave reduced proliferation compared with controls, and the generation of activated T cells by Concanavalin A or L-PHA was also reduced in Fng tKO mice. Therefore, each Fringe contributes to T and B cell development, and Fringe is required for optimal in vitro stimulation of T and B cells. PMID:26608918

  20. Stress in Adolescents with a Chronically Ill Parent: Inspiration from Rolland's Family Systems-Illness Model.

    PubMed

    Sieh, D S; Dikkers, A L C; Visser-Meily, J M A; Meijer, A M

    2012-12-01

    This article was inspired by Rolland's Family Systems-Illness (FSI) model, aiming to predict adolescent stress as a function of parental illness type. Ninety-nine parents with a chronic medical condition, 82 partners, and 158 adolescent children (51 % girls; mean age = 15.1 years) participated in this Dutch study. The Dutch Stress Questionnaire for Children was used to measure child report of stress. Ill parents completed the Beck Depression Inventory. Children filled in a scale of the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment measuring the quality of parent attachment. Both parents filled in the Parent-Child-Interaction Questionnaire-Revised. We conducted multilevel regression analyses including illness type, the ill parent's depressive symptoms, family functioning (quality of marital relationship, parent-child interaction, and parent attachment), and adolescents' gender and age. Four regression analyses were performed separately for each illness type as defined by disability (Model 1), and onset (Model 2), course (Model 3), and outcome of illness (Model 4). In all models, higher adolescent stress scores were linked to lower quality of parent-child interaction and parent attachment, and adolescents' female gender. The four models explained approximately 37 % of the variance in adolescent stress between individuals and 43-44 % of the variance in adolescent stress between families. Adolescent stress was not related to parental illness type. Our results partially supported the FSI model stating that family functioning is essential in point of child adjustment to parental illness. In the chronic stage of parental illness, adolescent stress does not seem to vary depending on illness type.

  1. [Masked depression].

    PubMed

    Preradović, M; Griva, D; Eror, S

    1991-01-01

    The study comprised 25 patients with masked depression and 30 patients with endogenous depression. According to the general characteristics both groups were homogenous and accordingly, comparable. Together with clinical evaluation of depressive syndrome, psychological management was applied. Rorschach test, Thematic Apperception Test and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory were used in the study. In the clinical picture of masked depressions somatovegetative disorders dominated and depressive behavior in endogenous depression. The frequence of suicid does not differ between patients with masked and endogenous depression.

  2. Melanie Klein on mourning: Its relation to pastoral care.

    PubMed

    Hart, C W

    1991-09-01

    This paper connects the work of Melanie Klein on mourning to the pastor's work with the grief sufferer. Klein holds that mourning is an illness of manic depressive character rooted in infantile development. Klein's description of manic defenses in the face of loss has adult behavioral analogues with which the pastor must deal to bring mourning to resolution.

  3. Melanie Klein on mourning: Its relation to pastoral care.

    PubMed

    Hart, C W

    1991-09-01

    This paper connects the work of Melanie Klein on mourning to the pastor's work with the grief sufferer. Klein holds that mourning is an illness of manic depressive character rooted in infantile development. Klein's description of manic defenses in the face of loss has adult behavioral analogues with which the pastor must deal to bring mourning to resolution. PMID:24272673

  4. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  5. Depression in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V; Parikh, G J; Srinivasan, V

    1983-10-01

    168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed.The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level.Further hypertensives were classified into:1. Hypertension without organ involvement2. Hypertension with LVH only3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement4. Malignant hypertensionDepression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  6. Epilepsy coexisting with depression.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Barbara; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-10-01

    Depression episodes in epilepsy is the most common commorbidity, affecting between 11% and 62% of patients with epilepsy. Although researchers have documented a strong association between epilepsy and psychiatric comorbidities, the nature of this relationship is poorly understood. The manifestation of depression in epilepsy is a complex issue having many interacting neurobiological and psychosocial determinants, including clinical features of epilepsy (seizure frequency, type, foci, or lateralization of foci) and neurochemical or iatrogenic mechanisms. Other risk factors are a family history of psychiatric illness, particularly depression, a lack of control over the seizures and iatrogenic causes (pharmacologic and surgical). In addition, treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as well as social coping and adaptation skills have also been recognised as risk factors of depression associated with epilepsy. Epilepsy may foster the development of depression through being exposed to chronic stress. The uncertainty and unpredictability of seizures may instigate sadness, loneliness, despair, low self-esteem, and self-reproach in patients with epilepsy and lead to social isolation, stigmatization, or disability. Often, depression is viewed as a reaction to epilepsy's stigma and the associated poor quality of life. Moreover, patients with epilepsy display a 4-5 higher rate of depression and suicide compared with healthy population. PMID:27634589

  7. Seniors' life histories and perceptions of illness.

    PubMed

    Montbriand, Muriel J

    2004-03-01

    This life history research examined seniors' life experiences and perceived connections to illnesses. From a randomly selected sample of 190 seniors'interviews, 107 deemed to be the most expressive life stories were selected as the focus for this analysis. All seniors lived independently in a Canadian prairie city, were 60 years of age or older, Caucasian, European decent, had a chronic illness, and told of lives touched by the Great Depression and World War II. Given the paucity of research exploring seniors' life histories, these findings increase understanding of how life experiences shape seniors' identities. Four main themes emerged to describe seniors' lives: chaos, tragedy, quest, and romance. Findings reported here show that seniors with optimistic perceptions do not connect their life experiences with illnesses. Seniors with pessimistic perceptions frequently connect their life experiences with present illnesses and are most likely to remember past abuse and coping with abuse.

  8. Life event, stress and illness.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Mohd Razali

    2008-10-01

    The relationship between stress and illness is complex. The susceptibility to stress varies from person to person. Among the factors that influenced the susceptibility to stress are genetic vulnerability, coping style, type of personality and social support. Not all stress has negative effect. Studies have shown that short-term stress boosted the immune system, but chronic stress has a significant effect on the immune system that ultimately manifest an illness. It raises catecholamine and suppressor T cells levels, which suppress the immune system. This suppression, in turn raises the risk of viral infection. Stress also leads to the release of histamine, which can trigger severe broncho-constriction in asthmatics. Stress increases the risk for diabetes mellitus, especially in overweight individuals, since psychological stress alters insulin needs. Stress also alters the acid concentration in the stomach, which can lead to peptic ulcers, stress ulcers or ulcerative colitis. Chronic stress can also lead to plaque buildup in the arteries (atherosclerosis), especially if combined with a high-fat diet and sedentary living. The correlation between stressful life events and psychiatric illness is stronger than the correlation with medical or physical illness. The relationship of stress with psychiatric illness is strongest in neuroses, which is followed by depression and schizophrenia. There is no scientific evidence of a direct cause-and-effect relationship between the immune system changes and the development of cancer. However, recent studies found a link between stress, tumour development and suppression of natural killer (NK) cells, which is actively involved in preventing metastasis and destroying small metastases.

  9. Internet confessions of postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz-Gordon, Ira

    2013-12-01

    Women with postpartum depression may suffer in silence due to the stigma of depression and failed motherhood. It is important to consider how mothers are able to talk about postpartum depression and what strategies they use. Foucault's idea that confession is a widespread technique for producing truth in Western societies was tested through discourse analysis of posts on an Internet forum for women with postpartum depression. The Internet forum showed women's use of confessionary language and self-judgments as well as their sense of disconnected mothering, shame, and disembodiment. Discourses of depression included the good mother, biomedical illness, and social dysfunction. Findings have implications for creating safe spaces for helping mothers with postpartum depression. PMID:24274243

  10. A Review of Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Fike, Christa

    1999-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is an irritable, severely depressed mood that occurs within 4 weeks of giving birth and possibly as late as 30 weeks postpartum. Manifestations include crying spells, insomnia, depressed mood, fatigue, anxiety, and poor concentration. Patients may experience mild, moderate, or severe symptoms. Many psychosocial stressors may have an impact on the development of PPD. Recent studies conclude that the majority of factors are largely social in nature. The greatest risk is in women with a history of depression or other affective illness and in those who have experienced depression during past pregnancies. Women with significant risk factors should be followed closely in the postpartum period. The severity of symptoms and degree of impairment guide the approach to treatment. Treatment should begin with psychotherapy and advance to pharmacotherapy if needed; however, many patients benefit from concomitant treatment with both psychotherapy and medication. Common forms of psychotherapy include interpersonal therapy and short-term cognitive-behavioral therapy. Postpartum depression demands the same pharmacologic treatment as major depression does, with similar doses as those given to patients with nonpuerperal depression. It is essential to use an adequate dose of antidepressants in a duration sufficient to ensure complete recovery. Mothers should continue medication for 6 to 12 months postpartum to ensure a complete recovery. Inadequate treatment of depression puts women at risk for the sequelae of untreated affective illness, and the depression may become chronic, recurrent, and/or refractory. Family physicians are key players in the detection and treatment of PPD owing to the nature of the disease and the tendency for new mothers to negate their feelings as something other than a treatable psychiatric illness. PMID:15014700

  11. Illness beliefs in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kinderman, Peter; Setzu, Erika; Lobban, Fiona; Salmon, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Beliefs about health and illness shape emotional responses to illness, health-related behaviour and relationships with health-care providers in physical illness. Researchers are beginning to study the illness beliefs of people with psychosis, primarily using models developed in relation to physical illness. It is likely that modifications to these models will be necessary if they are to apply to mental disorders, and it is probable that some of the assumptions underlying the models will be inappropriate. In particular, different dimensions of understanding may be present in mental illness in comparison to those identified in physical illness. The present study examines the beliefs of 20 patients in the UK diagnosed with schizophrenia, including 10 currently psychotic inpatients and 10 outpatients in remission, about their experiences, using qualitative interviews and thematic analysis. Patients currently experiencing psychosis did not identify their experiences as separable 'illnesses' and did not have 'illness beliefs'. Patients currently in a period of remission appraised their experiences as distinct from their own normal behaviour, but used conceptual frameworks of understanding that deviated significantly from conventional 'health belief' models. Patients' ways of understanding mental illness did not parallel those described in physical illnesses. Methods for assessing beliefs about mental illness should therefore not be transferred directly from studies of beliefs about physical illness, but should be tailored to the nature of patients' beliefs about mental illness. PMID:16777306

  12. Caregiver Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... will not sell or share your name. Caregiver Depression Tweet Bookmark this page | Email | Print Many caregivers ... depression See your doctor Treatment Coping Symptoms of depression Caregiving is hard — and can lead to feelings ...

  13. Postpartum depression

    MedlinePlus

    Depression - postpartum; Postnatal depression; Postpartum psychological reactions ... The exact causes of postpartum depression are unknown. Changes in hormone levels during and after pregnancy may affect a woman's mood. Many non-hormonal factors may also ...

  14. Antidepressants in type II versus type I bipolar depression: A randomized discontinuation trial

    PubMed Central

    Vöhringer, Paul A.; Ostacher, Michael J.; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Holtzman, Niki S.; Thommi, Sairah B.; Whitham, Elizabeth A.; Sullivan, Matthew C.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Goodwin, Fredrick K.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to test the hypothesis that antidepressants (ADs) may show preferential efficacy and safety among type-II over type-I bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Methods DSM-IV BD-I (n=21) and -II patients (n=49) in acute major depressive episodes were treated with ADs plus mood-stabilizers to euthymia sustained for two months, and then randomized openly to continue or discontinue ADs for up to three years. Outcomes were episode-recurrences and changes in standardized symptom-ratings. Results In follow-up averaging 1.64±0.98 years, both subgroups showed improvement in depressive episode frequency with AD continuation, but contrary to the hypothesis, more improvement was seen in type I than in type II bipolar depression (for type II, mean decrease in depressive episodes per year 0.21 ± 0.26 [CI:0.05, 0.37]; for type I: mean decrease 0.35 ± 0.15 [CI:0.30, 0.41]). Type II subjects continued on ADs had slightly more depressive, but fewer manic/hypomanic, episodes than BD-I subjects. No notable differences were seen in either group in time to a recurrence of mood episodes or total time-in-remission. Conclusions The findings do not confirm the hypothesis that long-term AD treatment in BP-II has better outcomes than in BD-I patients, except somewhat lower risk of manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:26267418

  15. Depression in nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Abrams, R C; Teresi, J A; Butin, D N

    1992-05-01

    Although their extent remains unclear, major and minor depressions are widespread in the nursing home population. This statement appears intuitively to be correct when consideration is given to the inactivity, decline in functional competence, loss of personal autonomy, and unavoidable confrontation with the process of death and dying that are associated with nursing home placement. In addition, some nursing home residents have had previous episodes of depression or are admitted to the facility already dysthymic or with other chronic forms of the illness. Such circumstances provide a favorable culture for the development and persistence of depressive illness. When the high frequency of other psychiatric disorders among nursing home residents is factored in, it is not surprising that long-term health care facilities have come to be regarded as de facto psychiatric hospitals. Nursing homes largely lack the treatment resources of psychiatric hospitals, however. Nursing home physicians are often unprepared to make psychiatric diagnoses, and a perfunctory annual psychiatric evaluation is insufficient to manage the complex depression syndromes of nursing home residents. Because nursing home psychiatrists typically work on a consultation basis, recommendations are not necessarily acted upon by the primary physicians. The consequences of undiagnosed and untreated depression are substantial. From the psychiatric perspective, the possibility that depression increases the risk for eventual development of permanent dementia highlights the importance of early identification for cases of reversible dementia. From the rehabilitation point of view, persistent depression among individuals with physical dependency following a catastrophic illness is associated with failure to improve in physical functioning. Depression can probably be linked to increased medical morbidity in nursing home residents, a relationship that also has been suggested for elderly medical inpatients. If so

  16. Progression of Amygdala Volumetric Abnormalities in Adolescents after Their First Manic Episode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitter, Samantha M.; Mills, Neil P.; Adler, Caleb M.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Although previous neuroimaging studies suggest that adolescents with bipolar disorder exhibit smaller amygdala volumes compared with healthy adolescents, whether these abnormalities are present at illness onset or instead develop over time remains unclear. The aim of this study was to conduct a prospective longitudinal investigation…

  17. Meditation's impact on chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Ramita

    2003-01-01

    Meditation is becoming widely popular as an adjunct to conventional medical therapies. This article reviews the literature regarding the experience of chronic illness, theories about meditation, and clinical effects of this self-care practice. Eastern theories of meditation include Buddhist psychology. The word Buddha means the awakened one, and Buddhist meditators have been called the first scientists, alluding to more than 2500 years of precise, detailed observation of inner experience. The knowledge that comprises Buddhist psychology was derived inductively from the historical figure's (Prince Siddhartha Gautama) diligent self-inquiry. Western theories of meditation include Jungian, Benson's relaxation response, and transpersonal psychology. Clinical effects of meditation impact a broad spectrum of physical and psychological symptoms and syndromes, including reduced anxiety, pain, and depression, enhanced mood and self-esteem, and decreased stress. Meditation has been studied in populations with fibromyalgia, cancer, hypertension, and psoriasis. While earlier studies were small and lacked experimental controls, the quality and quantity of valid research is growing. Meditation practice can positively influence the experience of chronic illness and can serve as a primary, secondary, and/or tertiary prevention strategy. Health professionals demonstrate commitment to holistic practice by asking patients about use of meditation, and can encourage this self-care activity. Simple techniques for mindfulness can be taught in the clinical setting. Living mindfully with chronic illness is a fruitful area for research, and it can be predicted that evidence will grow to support the role of consciousness in the human experience of disease.

  18. Management of Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Guille, Constance; Newman, Roger; Fryml, Leah D.; Lifton, Clay K.; Epperson, C. Neill

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum depression, now termed peripartum depression by the DSM-V, is one of the most common complications in the postpartum period and has potentially significant negative consequences for mothers and their families. This article highlights common clinical challenges in the treatment of peripartum depression and reviews the evidence for currently available treatment options. Psychotherapy is the first-line treatment options for women with mild-to-moderate peripartum depression. Antidepressant medication in combination with therapy is recommended for women with moderate-to-severe depression. While pooled case reports and small controlled studies have demonstrated undetectable infant serum levels and no short-term adverse events in infants of mothers breastfeeding while taking sertraline (Zoloft) and paroxetine (Paxil), further research is needed including larger samples and long-term follow-up of infants exposed to antidepressants via breastfeeding with control for maternal depression. Pharmacological treatment recommendations in women who are lactating must include discussion with the patient regarding the benefits of breastfeeding, risks of antidepressant use during lactation and risks of untreated illness. There is a growing evidence base for non-pharmacological interventions including repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) which may offer an attractive option for women who wish to continue to breastfeed and are concerned about exposure of medication to their infant. Among severe cases of peripartum depression with psychosis referral to a psychiatrist or psychiatric APRN is warranted. Suicidal or homicidal ideation with a desire, intent or plan to harm oneself or anyone one else, including the infant, is a psychiatric emergency, and an evaluation by a mental health professional should be conducted immediately. Peripartum depression treatment research is limited by small samples sizes and few controlled studies. Much work is still needed to better

  19. Allergic to life: Psychological factors in environmental illness

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, G.E.; Katon, W.J.; Sparks, P.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Environmental illness is an increasingly frequent and medically unexplained syndrome of allergy to common environmental agents. A recent outbreak of chemical-induced illness allowed study of psychological factors in environmental illness. Thirty-seven symptomatic plastics workers completed structured diagnostic interviews and self-report measures of somatization and psychopathology. The 13 subjects who developed environmental illness scored higher on all measures than those who did not. The greatest differences were in prior history of anxiety or depressive disorder (54% versus 4%) and number of medically unexplained physical symptoms before exposure (6.2 versus 2.9). These findings suggest that psychological vulnerability strongly influences chemical sensitivity following chemical exposure.

  20. Depression in new fathers.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    There is a growing awareness about the burden of ill-health experienced by men. Research has shown that fatherhood has a protective effect on men's health. However, the transition can be complex and demanding, and may cause distress, anxiety and increased risk of depression. This article discusses paternal postnatal depression, which is a significant public health issue that is not acknowledged widely or well researched. As a result, men are under-screened, under-diagnosed and under-treated for the condition and other postnatal mental health problems, causing detrimental effects on their health and negative effects on the health and wellbeing of mother and child. Read Paternal postnatal depression: an overview for primary healthcare professionals in Primary Health Care. PMID:27387639

  1. Chronic illness: the process of integration

    PubMed Central

    Whittemore, Robin; Dixon, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore how adults with a chronic illness integrate the illness experience into their life context. Background Adults with chronic illnesses are challenged to learn self-management strategies to prevent complications and achieve an acceptable quality of life. Integration represents the process undertaken by an individual to achieve a sense of balance in self-managing a chronic illness and living a personally meaningful life. Design A mixed-method descriptive design was employed to recruit English-speaking adults with a chronic illness. A semi-structured interview was completed, transcribed verbatim and content analysed. Descriptive data were collected on demographics, co-morbidity and depressive symptoms. The research was undertaken in Connecticut, USA. Results The sample (n = 26) was diverse with respect to age (25–80 years), education (8–24 years), duration of illness (1–39 years), gender (63% female) and ethnicity (63% white). Participants reported a mean of four chronic illnesses and 31% of the sample had increased depressive symptoms. The process of integration was complex and multifactorial. Themes of integration included: shifting sands, staying afloat, weathering the storms, rescuing oneself and navigating life. Numerous factors including treatment side effects, a progressive or uncertain illness trajectory, co-morbidity, bad days, financial hardships and interpersonal/environmental challenges contributed to a disruption or difficulty in the integration process. Conclusion All participants made considerable effort to integrate the illness into their life context and participate in a personally meaningful life. However, it was easy to be consumed with ‘living an illness’ as the daily tasks, the changing symptoms and the fluctuating emotions could be overwhelming. There was a complex co-existence between ‘living a life’ and ‘living an illness’. Relevance to clinical practice There were numerous challenges to

  2. Cortical thickness differences between bipolar depression and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Martin J; Chhetry, Binod Thapa; Oquendo, Maria A; Sublette, M Elizabeth; Sullivan, Gregory; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) is a psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality that cannot be distinguished from major depressive disorder (MDD) until the first manic episode. A biomarker able to differentiate BD and MDD could help clinicians avoid risks of treating BD with antidepressants without mood stabilizers. Methods Cortical thickness differences were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging in BD depressed patients (n = 18), MDD depressed patients (n = 56), and healthy volunteers (HVs) (n = 54). A general linear model identified clusters of cortical thickness difference between diagnostic groups. Results Compared to the HV group, the BD group had decreased cortical thickness in six regions, after controlling for age and sex, located within frontal and parietal lobes, and posterior cingulate cortex. Mean cortical thickness changes in clusters ranged from 7.6–9.6% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.037). When compared to MDD, three clusters of lower cortical thickness in BD were identified that overlapped with clusters that differentiated the BD and HV groups. Mean cortical thickness changes in the clusters ranged from 7.5–8.2% (cluster wise p-values from 1.0 e−4 to 0.023). The difference in cortical thickness was more pronounced when the subgroup of subjects with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) was compared to the MDD group. Conclusions Cortical thickness patterns were distinct between BD and MDD. These results are a step toward developing an imaging test to differentiate the two disorders. PMID:24428430

  3. Falret's discovery: the origin of the concept of bipolar affective illness. Translated by M. J. Sedler and Eric C. Dessain.

    PubMed

    Sedler, M J

    1983-09-01

    Jean Pierre Falret's once celebrated but now neglected 1854 description of "circular insanity" has not been translated into English until now. This seminal essay clearly articulated for the first time the rudimentary elements of our present diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder. It contains lucid descriptions of manic excitement and depression and the "switch" from one to the other; moreover, it emphasizes the importance of course and prognosis, as well as hereditary and epidemiologic factors. Although American psychiatry instinctively looks to the German literature for its foundations in Kraepelin, Bleuler, and Freud, the translation of Falret's essay represents an effort to trace contemporary psychiatric concepts to their origins in nineteenth-century France.

  4. Psychosocial characteristics of adolescents with a past history of dysthymic disorder: comparison with adolescents with past histories of major depressive and non-affective disorders, and never mentally ill controls.

    PubMed

    Klein, D N; Lewinsohn, P M; Seeley, J R

    1997-02-01

    Little is known about the psychosocial functioning of persons who have recovered from dysthymic disorder. Such information might be useful in identifying trait markers for dysthymia, and for guiding continuation and maintenance treatment. We explored this issue using data from the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project, a large community-based study of the epidemiology of psychiatric disorders in a high school population. Four groups of adolescents were identified: 38 with a past history of dysthymic disorder; 217 with a past history of major depressive disorder; 142 with a past history of non-affective disorders; and 1079 with no lifetime history of psychopathology. The groups were compared on an extensive battery of psychosocial variables. The most consistent and diagnostically specific finding was that adolescents with a past history of dysthymic disorder reported having a significantly lower level of social support from friends than each of the other three groups of adolescents. Adolescents with a past history of dysthymic disorder also reported significantly higher levels of depressive, internalizing and externalizing symptoms and daily hassles than adolescents with no lifetime history of psychopathology. In addition, they reported higher levels of depressive symptoms and self-consciousness, but fewer externalizing symptoms than adolescents with a past history of non-affective disorders. These data suggest that adolescents with dysthymic disorder continue to experience significant difficulties in psychosocial functioning even after recovery.

  5. [MAJOR DEPRESSION AND PERSONALIZED MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Pitchot, W

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a major public health problem. According to the World Health Organization (OMS), depression is currently the second cause of disability in developing countries. Depression is also one of the most frequent mental illnesses. When treating depression, the main objective is to achieve complete remission and to prevent recurrence. Unfor-tunately, in clinical practice, this aim is particularly difficult to reach. Indeed, in clinical trials and in naturalistic studies, remission levels are rather low. The challenge is to individualize the treatment of depression taking account clinical specificities, but also advances in the field of biological and genetic research. Today, intense psychiatric research tries to discover biomarkers to predict treatment response. Because individuals are highly different from a biological, psychological and sociological point of view, more personalized therapeutic approaches are recommended. PMID:26285462

  6. Seasonal Variation of Depressive Symptoms in Unipolar Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Bryan S.; Coryell, William H.; Cavanaugh, Joseph; Keller, Martin; Solomon, David A.; Endicott, Jean; Potash, James B.; Fiedorowicz, Jess G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Retrospective and cross-sectional studies of seasonal variation of depressive symptoms in unipolar major depression have yielded conflicting results. We examined seasonal variation of mood symptoms in a long-term prospective cohort – the Collaborative Depression Study (CDS). Methods The sample included 298 CDS participants from five academic centers with a prospectively derived diagnosis of unipolar major depression who were followed for at least ten years of annual or semi-annual assessments. Generalized linear mixed models were utilized to investigate the presence of seasonal patterns. In a subset of 271 participants followed for at least 20 years, the stability of a winter depressive pattern was assessed across the first two decades of follow-up. Results A small increase in proportion of time depressed was found in the months surrounding the winter solstice, although the greatest symptom burden was seen in December through April with a peak in March. The relative burden of winter depressive symptoms in the first decade demonstrated no relationship to that of the second decade. The onset of new episodes was highest October through January, peaking in January. Conclusions There exists a small but statistically significant peak in depressive symptoms from the month of the winter solstice to the month of the spring equinox. However, the predominance of winter depressive symptoms did not appear stable over the long-term course of illness. PMID:25176622

  7. Nonverbal behavior during clinical interviews: similarities and dissimilarities among schizophrenia, mania, and depression.

    PubMed

    Annen, Sigrid; Roser, Patrik; Brüne, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that patients with schizophrenia and depression differ from nonclinical subjects in nonverbal behavior. In contrast, there is a paucity of studies addressing differences in nonverbal communication between diagnostic groups and as to what extent nonverbal communication feeds into standard ratings of psychopathology. Twenty-six patients with schizophrenia were compared with 24 patients with affective disorders (13 depressed, 11 manic) regarding their nonverbal behavior using the Ethological Coding System for Interviews. Symptom severity was rated using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale. Patients with mania displayed more illustrative gestures than did patients with schizophrenia or depression. Subtler behavioral differences between the groups occurred regarding assertive behaviors and displacement activities suggestive of hostility and motivational conflict, respectively. Distinct correlations between nonverbal communication and psychopathology ratings emerged in all three groups. Patients with schizophrenia, depression, and mania differ in nonverbal behavior. Nonverbal communication seems to be a significant contributor to clinicians' intuitive ratings. PMID:22210359

  8. Spotlight on quetiapine in acute mania and depression associated with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Dando, Toni M; Keating, Gillian M

    2006-01-01

    Quetiapine (Seroquel), an atypical antipsychotic with established efficacy in the treatment of schizophrenia, shows efficacy in the treatment of acute mania and depression associated with bipolar disorder.Quetiapine, either as monotherapy or in combination with lithium or divalproex sodium (valproate semisodium), is generally well tolerated and effective in reducing manic symptoms in adult and adolescent patients with acute bipolar mania, and is approved for use in adults for this indication. As monotherapy, the drug is also effective in reducing depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar depression. It is associated with a low incidence of extrapyramidal symptom (EPS)-related adverse events and low EPS ratings in bipolar disorder. Quetiapine thus shows potential in the treatment of bipolar depression, and represents a useful agent for the treatment of acute bipolar mania.

  9. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions like Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  10. A revised interpretation of the TRH test results in female depressed patients. Part I: TSH responses. Effects of severity of illness, thyroid hormones, monoamines, age, sex hormonal, corticosteroid and nutritional state.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Vandewoude, M; Maes, L; Schotte, C; Cosyns, P

    1989-01-01

    Thyrotropin secreting hormone (TSH) levels were recorded in baseline conditions and 20 and 60 min after thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 micrograms i.v.) in 60 depressed females categorized according to DSM-III. Basal TSH (TSHB) and peak TSH responses (TSHP) were measured using ultrasensitive RIA assays. The use of delta max TSH (TSHP minus TSHB) had no advantage over the use of TSHP since both factors were almost linearly (r = 0.98) correlated. TSHP was largely (72% of the variance) predicted by TSHB. It was suggested that TSHP consisted of two components. The first part was a relative deduction from TSHB. The second part was the newly proposed concept of the residual TSH (TRHR). This part was computed by partialling out the relative effects of TSHB on TSHP by means of regression analysis. In clinical practice two relevant factors should be used to evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis: (1) TSHB reflecting the setpoint of the HPT axis and (2) TSHR reflecting the latent capacity of the HPT axis to respond to overwhelming amounts of exogenous TRH. TSHB was significantly reduced in severely depressed patients (296.X3, 296.X4) as compared with minor depressives (300.40, 309.00). These differences could be attributed to significantly increased free thyroxine levels and to noradrenergic hyperactivity in the severely depressed females. TSHR correlated significantly and negatively with follicle stimulating hormone levels, age, body mass index and the post-dexamethasone cortisol values. TSHR was significantly reduced in the post-menopausal state.

  11. Seniors' survival trajectories and the illness connection.

    PubMed

    Montbriand, Muriel J

    2004-04-01

    In a recent life history research, 100 out of 190 randomly selected seniors from a Canadian prairie city determined that their lives were survival trajectories, many with connections to their present illnesses. Seniors told of surviving the Great Depression and World War II, making hard decisions, and experiencing adversities that changed their life courses and perceptions. Completed in 2003, this 5-year study consisted of two phases. The first phase, an ethnomethod, sought the meaning seniors ascribe to illness and healing. The second phase was a reentry of the initial data. Highlighting seniors' stories shows how hard decisions evolved and contrasts can be made in seniors' narratives. Through seniors' analyses of their own lives, findings in this inquiry demonstrate how the price of survival is embedded in ways of perceiving adverse experiences. Those who avoided facing adversities in making difficult decisions were those who now blame illnesses on life experiences. PMID:15068573

  12. Seniors' survival trajectories and the illness connection.

    PubMed

    Montbriand, Muriel J

    2004-04-01

    In a recent life history research, 100 out of 190 randomly selected seniors from a Canadian prairie city determined that their lives were survival trajectories, many with connections to their present illnesses. Seniors told of surviving the Great Depression and World War II, making hard decisions, and experiencing adversities that changed their life courses and perceptions. Completed in 2003, this 5-year study consisted of two phases. The first phase, an ethnomethod, sought the meaning seniors ascribe to illness and healing. The second phase was a reentry of the initial data. Highlighting seniors' stories shows how hard decisions evolved and contrasts can be made in seniors' narratives. Through seniors' analyses of their own lives, findings in this inquiry demonstrate how the price of survival is embedded in ways of perceiving adverse experiences. Those who avoided facing adversities in making difficult decisions were those who now blame illnesses on life experiences.

  13. [Spontaneous course of depression].

    PubMed

    Azorin, J M

    1995-03-01

    The study of the spontaneous course of depressions nowadays comes up against a number of obstacles. The most important of these is the necessity of using untreated cases, which virtually forces the contemporary researcher to refer to studies performed in the pretherapeutic era, if conclusions are not be drawn only from classical descriptions. Unfortunately, these studies are marked by the absence of strict diagnostic criteria, the heterogeneity of patients included in them, the lack of preciseness of evaluations and the primitive statistical methods used. They are concerned essentially with the duration of depressive phases and the factors which influence it. Among these latter are regularly found age, sex, the number of episodes, the duration of the preceding symptom-free interval, the severity and semiology of the attack, heredity, mode of onset, level of intelligence, the presence or absence of associated pathology and the presence or absence of hospitalisation. Chronicization of depression and the factors concerned with it have also been the object of several studies. A small number of investigations compare the course of the illness in untreated populations. The study of the spontaneous course of depression evidences the necessity of having consensus definitions, and may serve as a basis for a better comprehension of the process of cure and of the real impact of therapies designed to treat depression.

  14. Improving depression care: barriers, solutions, and research needs.

    PubMed

    Von Korff, M; Katon, W; Unützer, J; Wells, K; Wagner, E H

    2001-06-01

    Potential solutions for barriers to improved organization of care of depressive illness were identified. These included (1) aligning efforts to improve depression care with broader strategies for improving care of other chronic conditions; (2) increasing the availability of depression case management services in primary care; (3) developing registries and reminder systems to ensure active follow-up of depressed patients; (4) achieving agreement on how depression outcomes should be measured to provide outcomes-based performance standards; (5) providing greater support from mental health specialists for management of depressed patients by primary care providers; (6) campaigns to reduce the stigma associated with treatment of depressive illness; (7) increased dissemination of interventions that activate and empower patients managing a depressive illness; (8) redefining the lack of time of primary care providers for high-quality depression care as issues in organization of care and provider training; and (9) development of incentives (organizational or financial) for high-quality depression care. Research needs were identified according to what has been learned to date. Identified research needs included: studies of approaches to organization of case management, research in new populations (e.g., new diagnostic groups, rural populations, the disadvantaged, the elderly, and those with chronic medical illnesses), research on stepped care and relapse prevention strategies, evaluation of the societal benefits of improved depression care, and multisite trials and meta-analytic approaches that can provide adequate statistical power to assess societal benefits of improved care.

  15. Lifestyle medicine for depression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    advocated, due to the complexity of human illness/wellbeing, the emerging evidence encourages a more integrative approach for depression, and an acknowledgment that lifestyle modification should be a routine part of treatment and preventative efforts. PMID:24721040

  16. Lifestyle medicine for depression.

    PubMed

    Sarris, Jerome; O'Neil, Adrienne; Coulson, Carolyn E; Schweitzer, Isaac; Berk, Michael

    2014-04-10

    , due to the complexity of human illness/wellbeing, the emerging evidence encourages a more integrative approach for depression, and an acknowledgment that lifestyle modification should be a routine part of treatment and preventative efforts.

  17. Are the mentally ill homeless a distinct homeless subgroup?

    PubMed

    North, C S; Smith, E M; Pollio, D E; Spitznagel, E L

    1996-09-01

    The question has been raised whether it is useful or meaningful to dichotomize the homeless population by mental illness - i.e., to consider the mentally ill homeless as distinct from other homeless people. The current article presents evidence from a single data set to address this question empirically. Data from a randomly sampled population of 900 homeless men and women systemically interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule were examined to determine associations of mental illness with the problems of homelessness, controlling for the presence of substance abuse in the analyses. Although a few clinically meaningful associations with mental illness were found that might suggest directions for appropriate interventions, mental illness did not differentiate individuals in many important demographic and biographic respects. Individual diagnoses did not perform much better in differentiating the homeless by mental illness. Schizophrenia and bipolar mania showed a few significant associations not identified by the "major mental illness" construct. Major depression, constituting the majority of nonsubstance Axis I disorder in the homeless, provided no association beyond that obtained with the "major mental illness" category. The data provide little support for conceptualizing homeless subgroups or homelessness in general on the basis of mental illness alone. To do so also risks neglecting the emotional distress of the majority without major mental illness and the other problems that homeless persons share regardless of psychiatric illness. While serious mental illness is overrepresented among the homeless, it represents just one of many important vulnerability factors for homelessness. Substance abuse is far more prevalent than other Axis I disorders. Media images equating homelessness with major mental illness unnecessarily stigmatize homeless people and encourage oversimplified and narrowly conceived psychiatric interventions. While continuing attention is

  18. Are the mentally ill homeless a distinct homeless subgroup?

    PubMed

    North, C S; Smith, E M; Pollio, D E; Spitznagel, E L

    1996-09-01

    The question has been raised whether it is useful or meaningful to dichotomize the homeless population by mental illness - i.e., to consider the mentally ill homeless as distinct from other homeless people. The current article presents evidence from a single data set to address this question empirically. Data from a randomly sampled population of 900 homeless men and women systemically interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule were examined to determine associations of mental illness with the problems of homelessness, controlling for the presence of substance abuse in the analyses. Although a few clinically meaningful associations with mental illness were found that might suggest directions for appropriate interventions, mental illness did not differentiate individuals in many important demographic and biographic respects. Individual diagnoses did not perform much better in differentiating the homeless by mental illness. Schizophrenia and bipolar mania showed a few significant associations not identified by the "major mental illness" construct. Major depression, constituting the majority of nonsubstance Axis I disorder in the homeless, provided no association beyond that obtained with the "major mental illness" category. The data provide little support for conceptualizing homeless subgroups or homelessness in general on the basis of mental illness alone. To do so also risks neglecting the emotional distress of the majority without major mental illness and the other problems that homeless persons share regardless of psychiatric illness. While serious mental illness is overrepresented among the homeless, it represents just one of many important vulnerability factors for homelessness. Substance abuse is far more prevalent than other Axis I disorders. Media images equating homelessness with major mental illness unnecessarily stigmatize homeless people and encourage oversimplified and narrowly conceived psychiatric interventions. While continuing attention is

  19. Teen Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... shown that certain types of talk therapy or psychotherapy can help teens deal with depression. These include ... behaviors, and feelings related to depression, and interpersonal psychotherapy, which focuses on working on relationships. Read more ...

  20. Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... do not need treatment. The symptoms of postpartum depression last longer and are more severe. You may ... treatment right away, often in the hospital. Postpartum depression can begin anytime within the first year after ...

  1. Describing depression: Congruence between patient experiences and clinical assessments

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Morgen A. R.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Stover, Angela; Hofkens, Tara; Huisman, Emily; Shulman, Stuart; Eisen, Susan V.; Becker, Sara J.; Weinfurt, Kevin; Boland, Elaine; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Efforts to describe depression have relied on top-down methods in which theory and clinical experience define depression but may not reflect the individuals’ experiences with depression. We assessed the degree of overlap between academic descriptions of depression and patient-reported symptoms as conceptualized in the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS®). By extension, this work assesses the degree of overlap between current clinical descriptions of depression and patient-reported symptoms. Design In this content analysis study, four focus groups were conducted across two sites to elicit symptoms and the experience of depression from depressed and medically ill patients. Methods Depressed and medically ill patients were asked to describe symptoms that characterize depression. Data were transcribed and then coded using an a priori list of 43 facets of depression derived from extant depression measures. Results Participants described 93% of the symptoms from the a priori list, supporting the validity of current depression measures. Interpersonal difficulties were underscored as was anger. In general, results from the focus groups did not require the generation of new items for depression and supported the content validity of the PROMIS hierarchical framework and item pool created originally. Conclusions This work supports the validity of current depression assessment, but suggests further investigation of interpersonal functioning and anger may add to the depth and breadth of depression assessment. PMID:21332520

  2. Adolescent Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Dina M.

    Affective disorder is characterized by maladaptive changes in mood, attitudes, energy level, and physical status. These changes constitute the basic dimensions of depression. Depression results from a combination of genetic and experiential factors. There are sex differences and age differences with regard to depression, and there is a high…

  3. Perinatal depression

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Alvarez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Perinatal depression is a common condition with significant adverse maternal, fetal, neonatal, and early childhood outcomes. The perinatal period is an opportune time to screen, diagnose, and treat depression. Improved recognition of perinatal depression, particularly among low-income women, can lead to improved perinatal health outcomes. PMID:26934457

  4. P 300 EVENT RELATED POTENTIAL IN DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Singh, R.; Shukla, R.; Dalal, P.K.; Sinha, P.K.; Trivedi, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    P300 component of the event related potential (ERP) provides one neurophysiological index of cognitive dysfunction in depression. Forty subjects fulfilling DSM-III criteria for depression were compared to 40 age and sex matched normal controls. The P300 was recorded using the auditory odd-ball paradigm. Depressives had a significantly prolonged P300 latency and reduced P300 amplitude as compared to the controls. The P300 latency showed a significant positive correlation with age of the patient and severity of depression while P300 amplitude showed a significant negative correlation with age. The clinical subcategory of depression, duration of illness and sex did not show any relationship with P300 abnormality. Twelve out of 40 depressives (30%) had an abnormal P300. The mean Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) score was significantly high in those with an abnormal P300. PMID:21407978

  5. Management of postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Guille, Constance; Newman, Roger; Fryml, Leah D; Lifton, Clay K; Epperson, C Neill

    2013-01-01

    The mainstays of treatment for peripartum depression are psychotherapy and antidepressant medications. More research is needed to understand which treatments are safe, preferable, and effective. Postpartum depression, now termed peripartum depression by the DSM-V, is one of the most common complications in the postpartum period and has potentially significant negative consequences for mothers and their families. This article highlights common clinical challenges in the treatment of peripartum depression and reviews the evidence for currently available treatment options. Psychotherapy is the first-line treatment option for women with mild to moderate peripartum depression. Antidepressant medication in combination with therapy is recommended for women with moderate to severe depression. Although pooled case reports and small controlled studies have demonstrated undetectable infant serum levels and no short-term adverse events in infants of mothers breastfeeding while taking sertraline (Zoloft) and paroxetine (Paxil), further research is needed including larger samples and long-term follow-up of infants exposed to antidepressants via breastfeeding controlling for maternal depression. Pharmacologic treatment recommendations for women who are lactating must include discussion with the patient regarding the benefits of breastfeeding, risks of antidepressant use during lactation, and risks of untreated illness. There is a growing evidence base for nonpharmacologic interventions including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, which may offer an attractive option for women who wish to continue to breastfeed and are concerned about their infants being exposed to medication. Among severe cases of peripartum depression with psychosis, referral to a psychiatrist or psychiatric advanced practice registered nurse is warranted. Suicidal or homicidal ideation with a desire, intent, or plan to harm oneself or anyone else, including the infant, is a psychiatric emergency, and

  6. Depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Jovana; Nenadović, Milutin

    2016-06-30

    Breast cancer is the third most common illness in the world and the most frequent malignant disease with women. Cytotoxic therapy is connected to significant psychiatric adverse effects, and the appearance of depressive symptoms is the most common. The main goal is determining the degree of depression with breast cancer patients in the oncology ward of the University Clinical Hospital in Niš and its connection to their marital status, age, level of education, economic status and the number of therapy cycles. This research is a prospective study. The statistical data analysis included measures of descriptive and analytical statistics. The presence of depressive symptoms of different intensity was showed in 76.00% of the interviewees in group I, and the second included 77.4%. The frequency distributions show that 27.084% interviewees from the first group showed signs of depressive symptoms, while the second included 25%. The intensity of these symptoms categorizes them into the group of moderate to significantly expressed depressive states, so they require therapeutic treatment. Depression is significantly more often recorded with cancer patients receiving cytotoxic therapy; mild depression is the most common, followed by moderate and severe depression. PMID:27138829

  7. MRI in decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, J; Tempka, A; Stroszczynski, C; Amodio, F; Hosten, N; Haas, J; Felix, R

    2000-05-01

    We report a case of decompression illness in which the patient developed paraparesis during scuba diving after rapid ascent. MRI of the spine revealed a focal intramedullary lesion consistent with the symptoms. The pathophysiological and radiological aspects of spinal decompression illness are discussed.

  8. Contrasting variability patterns in the default mode and sensorimotor networks balance in bipolar depression and mania

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Matteo; Magioncalda, Paola; Huang, Zirui; Conio, Benedetta; Piaggio, Niccolò; Duncan, Niall W.; Rocchi, Giulio; Escelsior, Andrea; Marozzi, Valentina; Wolff, Annemarie; Inglese, Matilde; Amore, Mario; Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Depressive and manic phases in bipolar disorder show opposite constellations of affective, cognitive, and psychomotor symptoms. At a neural level, these may be related to topographical disbalance between large-scale networks, such as the default mode network (DMN) and sensorimotor network (SMN). We investigated topographical patterns of variability in the resting-state signal—measured by fractional SD (fSD) of the BOLD signal—of the DMN and SMN (and other networks) in two frequency bands (Slow5 and Slow4) with their ratio and clinical correlations in depressed (n = 20), manic (n = 20), euthymic (n = 20) patients, and healthy controls (n = 40). After controlling for global signal changes, the topographical balance between the DMN and SMN, specifically in the lowest frequency band, as calculated by the Slow5 fSD DMN/SMN ratio, was significantly increased in depression, whereas the same ratio was significantly decreased in mania. Additionally, Slow5 variability was increased in the DMN and decreased in the SMN in depressed patients, whereas the opposite topographical pattern was observed in mania. Finally, the Slow5 fSD DMN/SMN ratio correlated positively with clinical scores of depressive symptoms and negatively with those of mania. Results were replicated in a smaller independent bipolar disorder sample. We demonstrated topographical abnormalities in frequency-specific resting-state variability in the balance between DMN and SMN with opposing patterns in depression and mania. The Slow5 DMN/SMN ratio was tilted toward the DMN in depression but was shifted toward the SMN in mania. The Slow5 fSD DMN/SMN pattern could constitute a state-biomarker in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27071087

  9. EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS IN DEPRESSION: A CLINICAL REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Rajul; Singh, Anand Pratap; Sinha, P.K.; Trivedi, J.K.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty patients of depression and thirty normal subjects were assessed using clinical rating scales and also for the executive functions by Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The depressed subjects demonstrated poor performance on WCST suggesting cognitive inflexibility and prefrontal dysfunction. More severe illness was associated with greater impairment in the executive functioning. This pattern of result in conjunction with previous studies supported the idea that depressed patients may have fixed frontally based dysfunction and calls for the use of cognitive assessment and rehabilitation in the patients with depression. PMID:21206597

  10. Classification of depressive disorders: a multiaxial approach.

    PubMed

    Zung, W W; Mahorney, S L; Davidson, J

    1984-07-01

    Classification of depressive disorders can be performed following the Linnaean binomial nomenclature model by defining depression as a genus and the subtypes as species. A medical classification of depressive disorders would need to be jointly inclusive and mutually exclusive between subtypes, and to provide time of onset, severity of illness, pathological process, prognosis, and treatment indications. Etiologic, phenomenologic (clinical, descriptive), statistical, and biological approaches have been used to classify depression. A convergence of these various systems in different combinations has evolved, and a consensus approach using the multiaxial system, such as DSM-III, has advanced psychiatric nomenclature to provide clinical relevance and heuristic possibilities. PMID:6735996

  11. A PSYCHIATRIST'S PERSPECTIVES ON STRESS, STEROIDS AND MENTAL ILLNESS.

    PubMed

    Dunai, Magdolna

    2014-03-30

    The relationship between stress and mental illness has been extensively studied and there is a growing consensus that the occurrence of mental illness rather depends on a combination of factors than is caused by stressful external events. Significant hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis abnormalities were observed among others in major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. In both disorders, the extent of change in cortisol level was related to the severity of illness and to cognitive changes. Exogenous use of synthetic steroids also frequently resulted in severe psychiatric symptoms. In conclusion changes in the level of steroid hormones may cause impairments in the brain.

  12. Unipolar depression with racing thoughts: a bipolar spectrum disorder?

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2005-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) with racing/crowded thoughts is understudied. Kraepelin classified 'depression with flight of ideas' in the mixed states of his manic-depressive insanity. The aim of the study was to test whether MDD with racing/crowded thoughts was close to bipolar disorders. Consecutive 379 bipolar-II disorder (BP-II) and 271 MDD depressed outpatients were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, the Hypomania Interview Guide, and the Family History Screen, by a senior psychiatrist in a private practice. Intra-depression hypomanic symptoms were systematically assessed. Mixed depression was defined as a major depressive episode (MDE) plus three or more intra-MDE hypomanic symptoms. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts was compared to MDD without racing/crowded thoughts on classic bipolar validators (young onset age, many recurrences, atypical and mixed depression, bipolar family history). Frequency of MDD with racing/crowded thoughts was 56.4%. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts, versus MDD without racing/crowded thoughts, had significantly lower age at onset, more MDE severity, more psychotic, melancholic, atypical, and mixed depressions, and more bipolar family history. Of the intra-MDE hypomanic symptoms, irritability, psychomotor agitation and distractibility were significantly more common in MDD with racing/crowded thoughts. Compared to BP-II on bipolar validators, validators were less common in MDD with racing/crowded thoughts. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts seemed to be a severe variant of MDD. MDD with racing/crowded thoughts versus MDD without racing/crowded thoughts, and versus BP-II, had significant differences on bipolar validators, suggesting that it may lie along a continuum linking MDD without racing/crowded thoughts and BP-II.

  13. Maintenance Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Sessions are Associated with Reduced Depressive Relapses in Patients with Unipolar or Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; Imperatori, Claudio; Del Casale, Antonio; Di Pietro, Simone; Ferri, Vittoria R.; Serata, Daniele; Raccah, Ruggero N.; Zangen, Abraham; Angeletti, Gloria; Girardi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) is a new form of TMS allowing safe stimulation of deep brain regions. The objective of this preliminary study was to assess the role of dTMS maintenance sessions in protecting patients with bipolar disorder (BD) or recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) from developing depressive or manic relapses in a 12-month follow-up period. Methods: Twenty-four drug-resistant patients with a current depressive episode and a diagnosis of MDD or BD have been enrolled in the study. All the participants underwent daily dTMS sessions for 4 weeks. One group (maintenance – M group) received additional maintenance dTMS sessions weekly or twice a week. Results: After the first dTMS cycle, a significant reduction of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores was observed in all participants. Subsequently, the HDRS mean scores did not significantly change over time in the M group, while it significantly increased in the non-M-group after 6 and 12 months. Discussion: This study confirms previous evidence of a positive therapeutic effect of dTMS on depressive symptoms and suggests that, after recovery from acute episodes, maintenance dTMS sessions may be helpful in maintaining euthymia in a 12-month follow-up period. PMID:25709596

  14. The illness of Vincent van Gogh.

    PubMed

    Blumer, Dietrich

    2002-04-01

    Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) had an eccentric personality and unstable moods, suffered from recurrent psychotic episodes during the last 2 years of his extraordinary life, and committed suicide at the age of 37. Despite limited evidence, well over 150 physicians have ventured a perplexing variety of diagnoses of his illness. Henri Gastaut, in a study of the artist's life and medical history published in 1956, identified van Gogh's major illness during the last 2 years of his life as temporal lobe epilepsy precipitated by the use of absinthe in the presence of an early limbic lesion. In essence, Gastaut confirmed the diagnosis originally made by the French physicians who had treated van Gogh. However, van Gogh had earlier suffered two distinct episodes of reactive depression, and there are clearly bipolar aspects to his history. Both episodes of depression were followed by sustained periods of increasingly high energy and enthusiasm, first as an evangelist and then as an artist. The highlights of van Gogh's life and letters are reviewed and discussed in an effort toward better understanding of the complexity of his illness.

  15. [Nonthyroidal illness (NTI)].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masami

    2012-11-01

    Thyroxine (T4), a major secretory product of thyroid gland, needs to be converted to 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) by iodothyronine deiodinases to exert its biological effect. Nonthyroidal illness, also known as low T3 syndrome, is associated with low serum T3 concentrations, which are inversely correlated to the severity of the illness. The patients with nonthyroidal illness do not show compensatory rise in serum TSH concentrations, and sometimes develop low serum T4 and TSH concentrations. It has been postulated that decreased extrathyroidal conversion of T4 to T3 is a responsible mechanism underlying low T3 syndrome. The roles of three types of iodothyronine deiodinases (D1, D2, D3) in the pathophysiology of nonthyroidal illness are discussed.

  16. High-Altitude Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... altitude illness: Acute mountain sickness High-altitude pulmonary edema (also called HAPE), which affects the lungs High-altitude cerebral edema (also called HACE), which affects the brain These ...

  17. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result ... or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to ...

  18. Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gases Impact on Weather Health Effects Take Action Water Pollution Water Pollution Home Chemicals and Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water ... Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home Water Pollution Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Print this Page Air Pollution ...

  19. Help for Mental Illnesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mental Health America National Alliance on Mental Illness University or medical school-affiliated programs may offer treatment options. Search on the website of local university health centers for their psychiatry or psychology departments. ...

  20. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  1. [Infant moods and the chronicity of depressive symptoms: the co-creation of unique ways of being together for good or ill. Paper 1: The normal process of development and the formation of moods].

    PubMed

    Tronick, Edward Z

    2003-01-01

    The ontogenesis of moods and the process that establishes them is addressed. Moods arise out of normal developmental processes at both a macro- and micro-developmental level. Moods are part of normal development as well as a component of pathological processes and they are a ubiquitous presence that gives meaning to experience in infant and adult during daily life and therapy. In this first part of a two-part paper I will address the normal development of moods; in the second part I will to address issues related to psychopathology and therapy, especially depression and the intergenerational transfer of mood. I argue that moods are dyadic phenomena--something that develops out of the chronic co-creative interactions of two individuals--rather than solely being an intrapsychic process. I will also argue, especially when one considers the development of moods in infants, that moods make sense of the world as components of states of consciousness that give unique meaning to the individual's engagement with the world and further that moods function to bring the past into the present.

  2. Mental Illness in Persons with Mental Retardation: ARC Facts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Linda R.; Wimmer, Sharon

    This brief factsheet presents information on mental illness in mentally retarded persons. The most prevalent disorders found in this population are schizophrenia, organic brain syndrome, adjustment disorders, personality disorders, depression, and behavioral problems. Few standardized methods of assessment exist for the diagnosis of mental illness…

  3. Illness anxiety disorder related to filariasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karia, Sagar; Shah, Nilesh; Sonavane, Sushma; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-04-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is a parasitic disease which is associated with anxiety and depression and may also result in social isolation. We present here a case of illness anxiety disorder where the patient developed a morbid fear that he will develop filariasis.

  4. Cognitive Correlates of Mania Risk: Are Responses to Success, Positive Moods, and Manic Symptoms Distinct or Overlapping?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Jones, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Several measures of cognitive style have been shown to be elevated among persons diagnosed with bipolar disorder and those at risk for bipolar disorder. Several of these scales capture responses to positive affect, success, and hypomanic symptoms. We had two goals: (a) to use factor analyses to assess whether the constructs within these scales were statistically independent and (b) to examine whether the factors identified uniquely related to mania risk. A cross-national sample of 638 participants completed measures of cognitive style, including the Responses to Positive Affect scale, the Positive Overgeneralization Scale, and the Hypomanic Interpretations Questionnaire. To assess whether these measures might simply reflect more impulsive reactions to positive mood states, participants also completed the Barratt Impulsivity Scale. To measure risk of mania, participants completed the Hypomanic Personality Scale (HPS). Factor analyses suggested seven factors of cognitive style and impulsivity. Four factors uniquely correlated with HPS. That is, risk for mania related to higher scores on separable factors of acting before thinking, being overly positive in interpreting manic symptoms, being overly confident in response to success, and tendencies to dampen positive affect. Current findings suggest the need to consider multifaceted aspects of cognition in refining psychological treatments of bipolar disorder. PMID:19455611

  5. Bizarreness in dream reports and waking fantasies of psychotic schizophrenic and manic patients: empirical evidences and theoretical consequences.

    PubMed

    Limosani, Ivan; D'Agostino, Armando; Manzone, Maria Laura; Scarone, Silvio

    2011-09-30

    Several overlapping features have frequently been described between psychosis and the subjective experience of dreaming from the neurobiological to the phenomenological level, but whether this similarity reflects the cognitive organization of schizophrenic thought or rather that of psychotic mentation independent of diagnostic categories is still unclear. In this study, 40 actively psychotic inpatients were equally divided in two age- and education-matched groups according to their diagnosis (Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder). Participants were asked to report their dreams upon awakening and the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) was administered to elicit waking fantasies; the same procedure was used in a control group of 20 non-psychiatric subjects. Two highly trained judges scored the collected material according to a Dream Bizarreness scale. The same level of cognitive bizarreness was found in TAT and dream reports of schizophrenic and manic subjects but was almost completely absent in the TAT stories of the control group. Two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures assessed the effect of diagnosis and experimental conditions (TAT stories and dream reports) on bizarreness yielding a significant interaction. Cognitive bizarreness seems to be a shared feature of dreaming and psychotic mentation, beyond diagnostic categorizations. Although these findings must be considered preliminary, this experimental measure of the cognitive architecture of thought processes seems to support the view that dreaming could be a useful model for the psychoses.

  6. [Atypical depression].

    PubMed

    Escande, M; Boucard, J

    1999-04-01

    The principal atypical aspects of depressive disease are: minor and attenued aspects, monosymptomatic and atypical aspects (food disorders and sleep disorders), masqued aspects (somatoform, anxious, characterial and addict disorders), atypical aspects of child (anxious nevrotical disorder), pseudo-demented and characterial aspects of aged subjects. Facing to these aspects, the diagnosis of depression is evoqued on: the recent and fast advent of these disorders, their morning predominance, their recurrent character, the state of attenued depressive symptoms (anhedonia), the positive responsiveness to treatment.

  7. Depression as a systemic syndrome: mapping the feedback loops of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wittenborn, A. K.; Rahmandad, H.; Rick, J.; Hosseinichimeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a complex public health problem with considerable variation in treatment response. The systemic complexity of depression, or the feedback processes among diverse drivers of the disorder, contribute to the persistence of depression. This paper extends prior attempts to understand the complex causal feedback mechanisms that underlie depression by presenting the first broad boundary causal loop diagram of depression dynamics. Method We applied qualitative system dynamics methods to map the broad feedback mechanisms of depression. We used a structured approach to identify candidate causal mechanisms of depression in the literature. We assessed the strength of empirical support for each mechanism and prioritized those with support from validation studies. Through an iterative process, we synthesized the empirical literature and created a conceptual model of major depressive disorder. Results The literature review and synthesis resulted in the development of the first causal loop diagram of reinforcing feedback processes of depression. It proposes candidate drivers of illness, or inertial factors, and their temporal functioning, as well as the interactions among drivers of depression. The final causal loop diagram defines 13 key reinforcing feedback loops that involve nine candidate drivers of depression. Conclusions Future research is needed to expand upon this initial model of depression dynamics. Quantitative extensions may result in a better understanding of the systemic syndrome of depression and contribute to personalized methods of evaluation, prevention and intervention. PMID:26621339

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Innovations for Cardiopulmonary Patients with Depression and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cully, Jeffrey A.; Paukert, Amber; Falco, Jessica; Stanley, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    Medically ill patients face unique physical and emotional challenges that place them at increased risk for symptoms of depression and anxiety. Despite high prevalence and significant impact, depression and anxiety are infrequently treated in the medically ill because of a variety of patient, provider, and system factors. The current article…

  9. Latino Immigrants’ Intentions to Seek Depression Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role that illness perceptions, attitudes toward depression treatments, and subjective norms played in Latino immigrants’ intentions to seek depression care. Ninety-five Latino immigrant patients were presented a vignette depicting an individual with major depression and interviewed about their intentions to seek care if confronted with a similar situation. Patients’ preferences were to rely on informal sources of care first, and then turn to formal sources to cope with depression. Findings showed Latinos immigrants’ help-seeking intentions for depression were a function of their views of depression, attitudes toward their doctors’ interpersonal skills, and social norms related to seeking professional care after controlling for demographics, health insurance status, acculturation, clinical characteristics, perceived barriers to care, and past service use. PMID:17535121

  10. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  11. The real mental illnesses: Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (1959-2013) in memoriam.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Martin E P

    2014-02-01

    Susan Nolen-Hoeksema's life work concerned rumination, gender differences in depression, and the "transdiagnostic" processes in mental illness. The articles in this special section expand on these themes. Her work on transdiagnostic processes leads us to consider that the real mental illnesses are not the congeries of symptoms in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, but these processes themselves.

  12. Understanding Parental Grief as a Response to Mental Illness: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penzo, Jeanine A.; Harvey, Pat

    2008-01-01

    Parents who are raising children with mental illness struggle with feelings of grief and loss. Kubler-Ross' (1969) stages of grieving (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) are examined as experienced by parents raising children with chronic mental illness. Practice implications for social workers who are working with children and…

  13. Caregiver Grief in Terminal Illness and Bereavement: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers experience multiple losses during the downhill trajectory of a loved one's terminal illness. Using mixed methods, this two-stage study explored caregiver grief during a terminal illness and after the care recipient's death. Caregiver grief was a state of heightened responsiveness during end-stage care: anxiety, hostility, depression,…

  14. Pediatric IBD and Depression: Treatment Implications

    PubMed Central

    Keethy, Divya; Mrakotsky, Christine; Szigethy, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Depression in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasingly recognized to be a heterogeneous condition with diverse underlying predisposing and precipitating factors. Although there is a growing awareness regarding the benefits of integrating behavioral health into medical care, the way psychiatric treatments can best target different aspects of depression and related dysfunction has not been systematically explored. Recent findings This review discusses neurobiological risk factors for depression in IBD including inflammation, associated anti-inflammatory treatment with corticosteroids, pain, and sleep disturbance, as well as psychosocial factors including reactions to illness, illness perception, and disease and environmental stressors with emphasis of how these factors can influence treatment decisions. Empirically-supported psychosocial and psychopharmacological interventions are discussed within this context. Summary Understanding the diverse pathways that can lead to depression in youth with IBD can lead to the development of more targeted interventions and better integration of psychosocial care into the medical treatment of IBD. PMID:25010217

  15. Vaikoloa: Understanding depression in Tokelauan people in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Loan, Iain; Cunningham, Wayne; Jaye, Chrystal

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND The Tokelauan language lacks a word for 'depression' and this can make diagnosing and treating depression in Tokelauan patients difficult for general practitioners. AIMS To describe the experience of depression in Tokelauans and thereby assist diagnosis and treatment of the illness. METHOD Ten semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted. The transcripts were thematically analysed using an immersion crystallisation technique. RESULTS An illness involving profound sadness exists in the Tokelauan culture. Tokelauans recognise isolation and withdrawal from family and community activities as indicators of extreme sadness. Privacy and pride are important cultural characteristics, which may be barriers to recognising sadness. Often the smiling Tokelauan face becomes the mask hiding sadness. CONCLUSION This research demonstrates the complexity of relationships between patients, their illness and their culture, that impacts on how depression manifests. This research indicates that therapy must have a whole person approach involving family, church, community and patients' spiritual beliefs. KEYWORDS Depression; Pacific health. PMID:27477377

  16. Depression Narratives in Blogs: A Collaborative Quest for Coherence.

    PubMed

    Kotliar, Dan M

    2016-07-01

    People with depression often suffer from severe social seclusion, and the lack of an agreed upon etiology for depression makes it difficult to satisfactorily narrate and "ritually control" it. Focusing on blogs by women with major depression, I delineate the ways in which bloggers publicly express and collaboratively reconstruct their depression narratives. Specifically, using thematic analysis, I argue that depression blogs uniquely bridge between the seclusion that characterizes depression and the exposure offered in blogs, and thus offer people a rare opportunity to publicly share very intimate depression narratives, form communal bonds with their readers, and collaboratively revise their narratives. Depression blogs are also shown to function as "narrative sandboxes"-protected spaces in which bloggers can temporarily and experimentally add or remove different sections from their illness narratives, assess the compatibility of different cultural frameworks, and interchangeably use various metaphors, in an attempt to satisfactorily explain depression.

  17. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  18. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... talk therapy, that helps people change negative thinking styles and behaviors that may contribute to their depression. ... Mental Health Office of Science Policy, Planning, and Communications Science Writing, Press, and Dissemination Branch 6001 Executive ...

  19. [Sleep electroencephalography in depression and mental disorders with depressive comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Eiber, R; Escande, M

    1999-01-01

    Traditional scoring of sleep EEG in depressed patients shows abnormalities in sleep maintenance, sleep architecture, REM sleep, the distribution of slow wave and REM sleep during the night. Computerized analysis that comprises the period-amplitude analysis procedure and spectral analysis discloses changes in delta activity and distribution of delta activity. However, these methods of analysing EEG sleep are not able to distinguish the various concepts of depression: endogenous and non-endogenous depression, unipolar and bipolar depression, psychotic and non-psychotic depression. Polysomnographical data in patients with recurrent depression show alteration during remission suggesting trait-like abnormalities of sleep in depression illness. Shortened REM latency is not specific in depression. This sleep parameter is defined in many different ways explaining the heterogeneousness of study results and the failure of constituting a biological marker. Many sleep parameters are affected by several factors such as age, gender and severity. Several physiopathological hypotheses have been proposed to explain EEG sleep alterations. They refer either to circadian rhythms such as the two process model of Borbély, the phase advance hypothesis and the circadian amplitude hypothesis, or to neurotransmitter abnormalities such as the cholinergic hypothesis. None of them takes sufficient account of all the sleep abnormalities. Sleep abnormalities have also been described in other psychiatric disorders such as mania, panic and obsessional-compulsive disorders, generalized anxiety, phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, borderline personality, schizophrenia and dementia. None of them have a particular sleep EEG profile which allows to differentiate between them. A concomitant episode of major depression cannot be uncovered by sleep recordings.

  20. DISC1 genetics, biology and psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    THOMSON, Pippa A.; MALAVASI, Elise L.V.; GRÜNEWALD, Ellen; SOARES, Dinesh C.; BORKOWSKA, Malgorzata; MILLAR, J. Kirsty

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are highly heritable, and in many individuals likely arise from the combined effects of genes and the environment. A substantial body of evidence points towards DISC1 being one of the genes that influence risk of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and functional studies of DISC1 consequently have the potential to reveal much about the pathways that lead to major mental illness. Here, we review the evidence that DISC1 influences disease risk through effects upon multiple critical pathways in the developing and adult brain. PMID:23550053

  1. Explanatory Models of Illness: A Study of Within-Culture Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Elizabeth; Medin, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The current studies explore causal models of heart attack and depression generated from American healers whom use distinct explanatory frameworks. Causal chains leading to two illnesses, heart attack and depression, were elicited from participant groups: registered nurses (RNs), energy healers, RN energy healers, and undergraduates. The…

  2. Photoperiodic and circadian bifurcation theories of depression and mania

    PubMed Central

    Kripke, Daniel F.; Elliott, Jeffrey A.; Welsh, David K.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal effects on mood have been observed throughout much of human history.  Seasonal changes in animals and plants are largely mediated through the changing photoperiod (i.e., the photophase or duration of daylight).  We review that in mammals, daylight specifically regulates SCN (suprachiasmatic nucleus) circadian organization and its control of melatonin secretion.  The timing of melatonin secretion interacts with gene transcription in the pituitary pars tuberalis to modulate production of TSH (thyrotropin), hypothalamic T3 (triiodothyronine), and tuberalin peptides which modulate pituitary production of regulatory gonadotropins and other hormones.  Pituitary hormones largely mediate seasonal physiologic and behavioral variations.  As a result of long winter nights or inadequate illumination, we propose that delayed morning offset of nocturnal melatonin secretion, suppressing pars tuberalis function, could be the main cause for winter depression and even cause depressions at other times of year.  Irregularities of circadian sleep timing and thyroid homeostasis contribute to depression.  Bright light and sleep restriction are antidepressant and conversely, sometimes trigger mania.  We propose that internal desynchronization or bifurcation of SCN circadian rhythms may underlie rapid-cycling manic-depressive disorders and perhaps most mania.  Much further research will be needed to add substance to these theories. PMID:26180634

  3. [Mental illness and media].

    PubMed

    Magli, Erica; Buizza, Chiara; Pioli, Rosaria

    2004-06-01

    Many knowledges on the mental disease that the community possesses are turning out of information disclosed from the media. It's common in the press to connect actions of violence and murders to the mental diseases. For this reason, the reader is induced to infer that murders and other violent actions are more frequent in people who have suffered from mentally ill, than in the general population. The mystifying impression provided by media accrues from the fact that these reports are rarely compensated from positive reports. Objective of the present study is to characterize the type of information concerning mental illness diffused from the local daily paper "Giornale di Brescia" in the year 2001. The results show that many articles connote negatively the mental disease. The journalistic sensationalism, denounced facing the speech of the prejudgment in the comparisons of the mentally ill people, seems to still remain, in the considered year of publication, one unchanging tendency. PMID:15248412

  4. Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg illness.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Armond S; Schmalstieg, Frank C

    2007-05-01

    When Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address, he was weak and dizzy; his face had a ghastly colour. That evening on the train to Washington, DC, he was febrile and weak, and suffered severe headaches. The symptoms continued; back pains developed. On the fourth day of the illness, a widespread scarlet rash appeared that soon became vesicular. By the tenth day, the lesions itched and peeled. The illness lasted three weeks. The final diagnosis, a touch of varioloid, was an old name for smallpox that was later used in the 20th century to denote mild smallpox in a partially immune individual. It was unclear whether Lincoln had been immunized against smallpox. Indeed, this review suggests that Lincoln had unmodified smallpox and that Lincoln's physicians tried to reassure the public that Lincoln was not seriously ill. Indeed, the successful conclusion of the Civil War and reunification of the country were dependent upon Lincoln's presidency.

  5. Phenomenology of bipolar disorder not otherwise specified in youth: a comparison of clinical characteristics across the spectrum of manic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Danella; Axelson, David; Demeter, Christine; Findling, Robert L; Fristad, Mary A; Kowatch, Robert A; Youngstrom, Eric A; Horwitz, Sarah McCue; Arnold, L Eugene; Frazier, Thomas W; Ryan, Neal; Gill, Mary Kay; Hauser-Harrington, Jessica C; Depew, Judith; Rowles, Brieana M; Birmaher, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Controversy surrounds the diagnostic categorization of children with episodic moods that cause impairment, but do not meet DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I (BD-I) or bipolar II (BD-II) disorder. This study aims to characterize the degree to which these children, who meet criteria for bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BD-NOS), are similar to those with full syndromal BD, versus those with no bipolar spectrum diagnosis (no BSD). Methods Children ages 6–12 years old were recruited from nine outpatient clinics, preferentially selected for higher scores on a 10-item screen for manic symptoms. Interviews with the children and their primary caregivers assessed a wide array of clinical variables, as well as family history. Results A total of 707 children (9.4 ± 1.9 years old) were evaluated at baseline, and were diagnosed with BD-I (n = 71), BD-II (n = 3), BD-NOS (including cyclothymia; n = 88), or no BSD (n = 545). Compared to BD-I, the BD-NOS group had less severe past functional impairment. However, current symptom severity and functional impairment did not differ between BD-NOS and BD-I, even though both groups were significantly more symptomatic and impaired than the no BSD group. Parental psychiatric history was similar for BD-NOS and BD-I groups, and both were more likely than the no BSD group to have a parent with history of mania. Rates of elated mood did not differ between BD-NOS and BD-I youth. Conclusions Children with BD-NOS and BD-I are quite similar, but different from the no BSD group, on many phenomenological measures. These findings support the hypothesis that BD-NOS is on the same spectrum as BD-I. PMID:23521542

  6. [Prophecy and mental illness].

    PubMed

    Vishne, Tali; Harary, Eran

    2005-09-01

    It is a well known platitude that a mentally ill person may "think that he is God" or "believes that he is the Messiah". Despite the generalization and shallowness of this attitude, sometimes psychotic patients indeed have delusions with contents of divine revelation, messianic assignments or prophetic power. In this current article we examine the different connections between prophecy and mental condition, especially psychotic. We present sources that combine prophecy and insanity, and also possible psychiatric interpretation of these situations. Finally, we present the attitude of the Rambam to prophecy and the personality characteristics of the prophet, limiting the possibility of the mentally ill patient who pretends to be a prophet.

  7. Major depression.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Susan M; Pagalilauan, Genevieve L; Simpson, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Major depression is a common, disabling condition seen frequently in primary care practices. Non-psychiatrist ambulatory providers are increasingly responsible for diagnosing, and primarily managing patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this review is to help primary care providers to understand the natural history of MDD, identify practical tools for screening, and a thoughtful approach to management. Clinically challenging topics like co-morbid conditions, treatment resistant depression and pharmacotherapy selection with consideration to side effects and medication interactions, are also covered.

  8. Treatment of Bipolar Depression: Evolving Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Post, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Bipolar depression is the most common and difficult-to-treat phase of bipolar disorder. Antidepressants for unipolar depression are among the most widely used drugs, but recent data and meta-analyses indicate a lack of efficacy. Many of the drugs discussed here are graded provisionally for the strength of the findings in the literature, safety and tolerability, and likely utility of use in patients with bipolar disorder. Successful long-term treatment of bipolar depression is critical to preventing illness-related morbidity, disability, cognitive decline, suicide, and premature loss of years of life expectancy largely from the excess medical mortality associated with cardiovascular disorders.

  9. The nonthyroidal illness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adler, Suzanne Myers; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2007-09-01

    This article briefly summarizes thyroid function alterations generally seen in the euthyroid sick syndrome, provides an overview of specific thyroidal adaptations during several clinical conditions and secondary to specific pharmacologic agents, and discusses the current controversy in thyroid hormone treatment of nonthyroidal illness.

  10. Coping with Chronic Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... and independence. You may not be able to work, causing financial problems. For children, chronic illnesses can be frightening, because they may not understand why this is happening to them. These changes can cause stress, anxiety and anger. If they do, it is ...

  11. Mentally Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Estimates suggest that about 15% of all children have some form of mental disturbance. Potential causes can be of a physical, psychological, or environmental origin. Symptoms which indicate that a child needs professional help usually involve emotional overreaction to changes. Diagnosis of a child evidencing symptoms of mental illness should take…

  12. Mozart's illnesses and death.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P J

    1983-01-01

    Throughout his life Mozart suffered frequent attacks of tonsillitis. In 1784 he developed post-streptococcal Schönlein-Henoch syndrome which caused chronic glomerular nephritis and chronic renal failure. His fatal illness was due to Schönlein-Henoch purpura, with death from cerebral haemorrhage and bronchopneumonia. Venesection(s) may have contributed to his death. PMID:6352940

  13. Alienation and Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobasa, Suzanne C.

    Reviews of studies of four groups (business executives, lawyers, Army officers, and working women) which demonstrate the health-damaging effects of alienation in certain life situations show that, when under stress, members of these groups who feel alienated fall ill, medically and/or psychiatrically. Three models are described which may explain…

  14. Major depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... If depression is very severe, you may have hallucinations and delusions (false beliefs). This condition is called ... relieve your symptoms. If you have delusions or hallucinations, your provider may prescribe additional medicines. Tell your ...

  15. Depresion: Lo Que Toda Mujer Debe Saber (Depression: What Every Woman Should Know).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This publication, written in Spanish, explains why women are at greater risk for depression than men. Types of depressive illnesses are explained along with the symptoms. It states that some women are predisposed genetically to depression but biochemical, environmental, psychological, and social factors also often contribute to its occurrence.…

  16. Depression Research at the National Institute of Mental Health. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is committed to reducing the burden of mental illness through research on mind, brain, and behavior. This report presents the latest information on what is known about depression. The symptoms and types of depression are considered. Research on the treatments of depression is described, including the…

  17. Certified Nursing Assistants’ Explanatory Models of Nursing Home Resident Depression

    PubMed Central

    Piven, Mary Lynn; Anderson, Ruth A.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we explored how Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) understood resident depression. Interviews with 18 CNAs, working in two nursing homes were guided by Kleinman’s Explanatory Models of Illness framework. Interview data were content analyzed and CNAs’ descriptions of depression were compared to the MDS 2.0 Mood Screen and to DSM-IV-TR Depression Criteria. CNAs identified causes, signs, and symptoms of depression, but they were unsure about the duration and normalcy of depression in residents. Although they had no formal training, CNAs felt responsible for detecting depression and described verbal and non-verbal approaches that they used for emotional care of depressed residents. CNAs hold potential to improve the detection of depression and contribute to the emotional care of residents. Attention to knowledge deficits and facility barriers may enhance this capacity. PMID:18390825

  18. Alexithymia and illness behaviour among female Indian outpatients with multiple somatic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Jaydip; Chandra, Prabha

    2003-01-01

    Sixty Indian muslim women outpatients with multiple somatic complaints of nonorganic origin were assessed for alexithymia and abnormal illness behavior using the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS) and the Illness Behaviour Assessment Schedule (IBAS). Alexithymia represented by TAS scores correlated best with the IBAS variables of communication of affect, somatic illness causal beliefs and denial. Correlation with other IBAS variables was modest to poor.There was no correlation of IBAS variables with age of patient, duration of illness or nature of diagnosis: somatoform disorder or anxiety and depressive disorders, The study showed that alexithymia and illness behaviour are overlapping constructs and confirmed the usefulness of TAS as an instrument to discriminate between patients with anxiety/ depressive disorders and somatoform disorders PMID:21206863

  19. Attitudes towards mental illness in the Commonwealth of Dominica.

    PubMed

    Kohn, R; Sharma, D; Camilleri, C P; Levav, I

    2000-03-01

    Little is known about the perception of mental illness in the English-speaking Caribbean. This study was conducted in 1995 to determine the attitudes, knowledge, and help-seeking practices for emotional disorders in the Commonwealth of Dominica. Two groups in Dominica were surveyed: 67 community leaders, consisting of nurses, teachers, and police officers; and 135 community members grouped into five socioeconomic strata that were collapsed to three for the analysis. All the respondents were asked to identify and suggest management of individuals with psychosis, alcoholism, depression, and childhood hyperactivity, as depicted in case vignettes. The person in the psychosis vignette was diagnosed as suffering from mental illness by 84.0% of the leaders and by 71.2% of the community members. However, in each of the three other vignettes, fewer than 30% of the respondents thought that mental illness was present. The person with alcoholism was viewed as having a serious problem by only slightly more than half of the respondents. Fewer than half of the respondents thought that the individuals with depression or hyperactivity had serious problems. The community leaders did somewhat worse in recognizing mental illness than did the community members. Respondents were most likely to refer a family member with emotional problems to a medical practitioner. In conclusion, education about mental health problems is needed in Dominica. Especially disconcerting was the lack of knowledge on mental illness among nurses, teachers, and police officers, that is, professionals directly involved in the pathway to care.

  20. Depression among Ethiopian Adults: Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Molla, Getasew Legas; Sebhat, Haregwoin Mulat; Hussen, Zebiba Nasir; Mekonen, Amsalu Belete; Mersha, Wubalem Fekadu; Yimer, Tesfa Mekonen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Depression is one of the most common mental disorders worldwide and is the second leading cause of disability and major contributor to suicide. Methods. Community based cross-sectional study was conducted among 779 adults residing in Northwest Ethiopia. Multistage cluster sampling technique was used to select study participants. Depression was measured by Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Bivariate as well as multivariate logistic regressions were used to identify associated factors. p value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Result. The prevalence of depression was 17.5%, where 10.7% of patients were with mild depression, 4.2% were with moderate depression, 1.9% were with moderately severe depression, and 0.6% had severe depression. Being female, age of 55 years and above, poor social support, having a comorbidity medical illness, current tobacco smoking, and living alone were significantly associated with depression. Conclusion and Recommendation. The prevalence of depression in Ethiopia is as common as the other lower and middle income countries. Female gender, being currently not married, poor social support, low wealth index, tobacco smoking, older age, having comorbid illness, and living alone were significantly associated with depression. So, depression is a significant public health problem that requires a great emphasis and some factors like smoking habit are modifiable. PMID:27247932

  1. Depressed but not legally mentally impaired.

    PubMed

    Wondemaghen, Meron

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the mental impairment (insanity) defense in the Australian state of Victoria and argues that the defense is successful only when offenders suffer from psychotic mental illnesses. This raises the question about how non-psychotic offenders are dealt with by the courts when they claim 'mental impairment' for serious acts of violence such as homicide, particularly when a relatively large number of perpetrators involved in homicide suffer from non-psychotic illnesses like depression. The analysis shows that depressive illnesses do not reach the threshold for mental impairment (legal insanity) such that they mitigate violent criminal behavior, although they can, arguably, diminish culpability. This article draws upon existing literature, qualitative analysis of two court cases and semi-structured interviews with four legal representatives to make its conclusions.

  2. Depressed but not legally mentally impaired.

    PubMed

    Wondemaghen, Meron

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the mental impairment (insanity) defense in the Australian state of Victoria and argues that the defense is successful only when offenders suffer from psychotic mental illnesses. This raises the question about how non-psychotic offenders are dealt with by the courts when they claim 'mental impairment' for serious acts of violence such as homicide, particularly when a relatively large number of perpetrators involved in homicide suffer from non-psychotic illnesses like depression. The analysis shows that depressive illnesses do not reach the threshold for mental impairment (legal insanity) such that they mitigate violent criminal behavior, although they can, arguably, diminish culpability. This article draws upon existing literature, qualitative analysis of two court cases and semi-structured interviews with four legal representatives to make its conclusions. PMID:24268825

  3. Heterogeneity of Amygdala Response in Major Depressive Disorder: The Impact of Lifetime Sub-Threshold Mania

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jay C.; Keener, Matthew T.; Mullin, Benjamin C.; Hafeman, Danella M.; LaBarbara, Edmund J.; Stiffler, Richelle S.; Almeida, Jorge; Kronhaus, Dina M.; Frank, Ellen; Phillips, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) present with highly heterogeneous symptom profiles. We aimed to examine whether individual differences in amygdala activity to emotionally-salient stimuli were related to heterogeneity in lifetime levels of depressive and sub-threshold manic symptoms among adults with MDD. Methods We compared age- and gender-matched adults with MDD (N=26) with healthy controls (HC, N=28). While undergoing fMRI, participants performed an implicit emotional faces task: they labeled a color flash superimposed upon initially neutral faces that dynamically morphed into one of four emotions (angry, fearful, sad, happy). Region of interest analyses examined group differences in amygdala activity. For conditions in which adults with MDD displayed abnormal amygdala activity versus HC, within-group analyses examined amygdala activity as a function of scores on a continuous measure of lifetime depression-related and mania-related pathology. Results Adults with MDD showed significantly greater right-sided amygdala activity to angry and happy conditions than HC (p<0.05, corrected). Multiple regression analyses revealed that greater right amygdala activity to the happy condition in adults with MDD was associated with higher levels of sub-threshold manic symptoms experienced across the lifespan (p=0.002). Conclusions Among depressed adults with MDD, lifetime features of sub-threshold mania were associated with abnormally elevated amygdala activity to emerging happy faces. These findings are a first step toward identifying biomarkers that reflect individual differences in neural mechanisms in MDD, and challenge conventional mood disorder diagnostic boundaries by suggesting that some adults with MDD are characterized by pathophysiologic processes that overlap with bipolar disorder. PMID:22571805

  4. Violence and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Rueve, Marie E.; Welton, Randon S.

    2008-01-01

    Violence attracts attention in the news media, in the entertainment business, in world politics, and in countless other settings. Violence in the context of mental illness can be especially sensationalized, which only deepens the stigma that already permeates our patients’ lives. Are violence and mental illness synonymous, connected, or just coincidental phenomena? This article reviews the literature available to address this fundamental question and to investigate other vital topics, including etiology, comorbidity, risk factor management, and treatment. A psychiatrist who is well versed in the recognition and management of violence can contribute to the appropriate management of dangerous behaviors and minimize risk to patients, their families, mental health workers, and the community as a whole. PMID:19727251

  5. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston.

    PubMed

    Szasz, T

    2001-10-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness.

  6. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston

    PubMed Central

    Szasz, T

    2001-01-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness. Key Words: Agency • alchemy • behaviour • cause • chemistry • dignity PMID:11579183

  7. Mental illness: psychiatry's phlogiston.

    PubMed

    Szasz, T

    2001-10-01

    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris to pretend that the insanity defence is compassionate, just, or scientific. Mental illness is to psychiatry as phlogiston was to chemistry. Establishing chemistry as a science of the nature of matter required the recognition of the non-existence of phlogiston. Establishing psychiatry as a science of the nature of human behaviour requires the recognition of the non-existence of mental illness. PMID:11579183

  8. Images of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Mark F.

    1992-01-01

    The images we as physicians retain of our patients have a bearing on the evolution of our clinical behaviour and attributes. These images can enhance our diagnostic and therapeutic skills, increase our capacity to care for people with incurable diseases, and offer insights into our own emotional response. A recollection of five people with Parkinson's disease offers a college of images to give us further insights into the meaning of illness-for the patient and the physician. PMID:20469529

  9. The Stigma of Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Stacy L.; Medina, Sondra L.

    2008-01-01

    Stigma surrounding major mental illness creates many barriers. People who experience mental illness face discrimination and prejudice when renting homes, applying for jobs, and accessing mental health services. The authors review the current literature regarding stigma and mental illness. They define stigma and review theories that explain its…

  10. Suicide in the Medically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Douglas; Kleespies, Phillip

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between medical illness and suicide seems to be multi-faceted. While medical illness is not the sole determinant of suicide, certain illnesses, such as HIV/AIDS and brain cancers, do appear to elevate the risk of suicide. Possible effective prevention efforts include education of primary care providers, and improved medication…

  11. Illnesses of the brain in John Quincy Adams.

    PubMed

    Paulson, George

    2004-12-01

    John Quincy Adams, the sixth and perhaps most scholarly American president, served courageously despite familial essential tremor, depression, and cerebrovascular disease. His cousin Samuel Adams and his father John Adams also had essential tremor, which the later called "quiveration". Alcoholism and depression affected several members of J.Q. Adams's family. Following his own time as president, J.Q. Adams returned to duty as the congressman who most assiduously fought slavery, a fight he continued even after he had suffered a major left hemispheric stroke. His fatal collapse in Congress, protesting the Mexican War, is legendary among the final illnesses of American statesmen. PMID:15545105

  12. Illnesses of the brain in John Quincy Adams.

    PubMed

    Paulson, George

    2004-12-01

    John Quincy Adams, the sixth and perhaps most scholarly American president, served courageously despite familial essential tremor, depression, and cerebrovascular disease. His cousin Samuel Adams and his father John Adams also had essential tremor, which the later called "quiveration". Alcoholism and depression affected several members of J.Q. Adams's family. Following his own time as president, J.Q. Adams returned to duty as the congressman who most assiduously fought slavery, a fight he continued even after he had suffered a major left hemispheric stroke. His fatal collapse in Congress, protesting the Mexican War, is legendary among the final illnesses of American statesmen.

  13. The role of illness perceptions in the attachment-related process of affect regulation.

    PubMed

    Vilchinsky, Noa; Dekel, Rachel; Asher, Zvia; Leibowitz, Morton; Mosseri, Morris

    2013-01-01

    Based on the predictions of the attachment theory and the Common Sense Model of illness perceptions, the current study focused on the role played by illness perceptions in explaining the path linking attachment orientations to negative affect during recovery from cardiac illness. We predicted two putative mechanisms: (1) illness perceptions would mediate the direct association between attachment-related insecurity (especially attachment anxiety) and levels of distress at follow-up and (2) illness perceptions would interact with attachment orientations (attachment avoidance in particular) in explaining patients' distress. The sample consisted of 111 male patients admitted to the Cardiac Care Unit of the Meir Medical Center, located in the central region of Israel. Patients completed a measure of attachment orientations during hospitalization (baseline). One month later, patients' illness perceptions were measured. Patients' depression and anxiety symptoms were measured at baseline and at the six-month follow-up. The associations between attachment-related anxiety and anxiety symptoms at follow-up were fully mediated by illness perceptions. Attachment-related avoidance was found to interact with illness perceptions in the prediction of depressive symptoms at follow-up. The findings shed light on the possible dynamics among personality, cognitive appraisals, and affect regulation efforts when coping with illness.

  14. Advances in understanding illness anxiety.

    PubMed

    Harding, Kelli J; Skritskaya, Natalia; Doherty, Emily; Fallon, Brian A

    2008-08-01

    Illness anxiety, also known in its more severe form as hypochondriasis, is a debilitating and chronic condition in which normal bodily symptoms are misinterpreted as signs of serious medical illness. Patients suffer with the fear that they are ill despite reassurance to the contrary and often overuse medical services in the process. This article critically evaluates the recent literature on illness anxiety and related, medically unexplained symptoms, highlighting new and interesting findings in the areas of prevalence, classification/diagnosis, management, and evidence-based treatment and new frontiers in understanding illness anxiety, such as brain imaging, neuroimmunology, and cyberchondria. PMID:18627669

  15. Transdiagnostic Treatment of Bipolar Disorder and Comorbid Anxiety with the Unified Protocol: A Clinical Replication Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellard, Kristen K.; Deckersbach, Thilo; Sylvia, Louisa G.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Barlow, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic, debilitating disorder with recurrent manic and depressive episodes. More than 75% of bipolar patients have a current or lifetime diagnosis of a comorbid anxiety disorder. Comorbid anxiety in BD is associated with greater illness severity, greater functional impairment, and poorer illness-related outcomes.…

  16. The development of lurasidone for bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Antony; Xu, Jane; Hsu, Jay; Cucchiaro, Josephine; Pikalov, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic, recurrent illness that ranks among the top 10 causes of disability in the developed world. As the illness progresses, major depressive episodes increasingly predominate. However, few treatment options are available that have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of bipolar depression, either as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy in combination with mood stabilizers. Lurasidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug that was initially developed for the treatment of schizophrenia. Since no previous atypical antipsychotic development program had proceeded directly from work on schizophrenia to bipolar depression, the decision to focus on this indication represented an innovation in central nervous system drug development and was designed to address a clinically significant unmet need. The current review summarizes key results of a clinical development program undertaken to characterize the efficacy and safety of lurasidone in patients diagnosed with bipolar depression. Lurasidone is currently the only treatment for bipolar depression approved in the United States as both a monotherapy and an adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate. The approval of lurasidone expands available treatment options for patients with bipolar depression and provides a therapy with an overall favorable risk-benefit profile. PMID:26771990

  17. Cultural differences in the development and characteristics of depression.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, Gabriella; Eszlari, Nora; Pap, Dorottya; Gonda, Xenia

    2012-12-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent mental illness with increasing burden for the patients, their families and society as well. In spite of its increasing importance, we still do not have complete understanding either of the phenomenology or the etiopathological background of depression, and cross-country, cross-ethnic and cross-cultural differences in the prevalence and symptomatic manifestation of depression further obscure this picture. Culturally-related features of depressive illness are gaining more importance in clinical practice with the increasing migration trends worldwide. In spite of the differences replicated in multiple studies, no exhaustive explanations are offered so far. In the present paper we describe the most consistently replicated findings concerning the most important cross-national differences in the rates and characteristics of depression with a short comment on possible background factors.

  18. Mental illness in homicide-suicide: a review.

    PubMed

    Roma, Paolo; Pazzelli, Floriana; Pompili, Maurizio; Lester, David; Girardi, Paolo; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Homicide followed by suicide (H-S) is a lethal event in which an individual kills another individual and subsequently dies by suicide. This article presents a review of research carried out in Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United States of America over the past 60 years on the prevalence of mental illness among the perpetrators of H-S. Analysis of the available data indicated a great disparity in the results of the different studies. Overall, depression was the most frequent disorder reported (about 39% of the cases in the 20 studies that assessed depressive disorders), followed by substance abuse (about 20% in 10 studies) and psychosis (about 17% in 11 studies). This review, therefore, indicated that mental illness plays an important role in H-S. The prevention of these events depends on the identification and treatment of psychiatric disorder in potential perpetrators.

  19. Predominant mania course in Indian patients with bipolar I disorder.

    PubMed

    Rangappa, Sushma Bilichodu; Munivenkatappa, Shashidhara; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Jain, Sanjeev; Reddy, Y C Janardhan

    2016-08-01

    Many long-term follow-up studies suggest that bipolar disorder (BD) is highly recurrent and that depressive episodes are commoner than hypomania/manic episodes. However, some studies from tropical countries including India suggest that the patients experience a greater proportion of manic episodes than depressive episodes. The aim of the present study was to examine the course of BD type 1 (BD I) in a sample of hospitalized Indian subjects. We examined the clinical course of 285 BD I subjects with at least 5 years of illness using standard life charting method. These subjects were hospitalized between October 2010 and October 2012. The predominant polarity (having at least two-thirds of their lifetime episodes at one polarity) was mania (79%). Unipolar mania (≥ 3 mania episodes and no episodes of depression) was observed in 48% of the subjects. The frequency of rapid cycling course was noted in 2.5% of the subjects. Predominant manic polarity group had the illness onset mostly with a manic episode (88.9%) and the predominant depressive polarity group with a depressive episode (73.8%). Mania was the predominant polarity with a high rate of unipolar mania and a majority of the subjects had greater number of manic episodes than depressive/mixed episodes. The onset polarity determined the predominant polarity during the course of illness. Predominantly, mania course could have significant implications in the treatment of bipolar disorder. PMID:27520890

  20. Manic over Multimedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Pearl

    2007-01-01

    Shannon Pittman-Price graduated from North Carolina A&T State University in May 2006 with a bachelor's degree in print journalism. In past years, her degree may have been enough to set her on a career path in journalism. However, after completing an internship with "Black College Wire," Pittman-Price realized that journalism was headed in the…

  1. Determinants of depressive symptoms in Jordanian working women.

    PubMed

    Al-Modallal, H; Abuidhail, J; Sowan, A; Al-Rawashdeh, A

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms are an epidemic problem affecting different subgroups of women in clinical and non-clinical settings. However, depressive symptoms experienced by working women have rarely been studied. This study aimed at identifying depressive symptoms and their determinants in a sample of 101 Jordanian working women recruited from a higher educational institution. Data about women's depressive symptoms, their educational level, presence of children, sharing a job with an intimate partner, health status, diagnosis with chronic illnesses, and complaints of spousal abuse were collected. Logistic regression analysis was used to test for the significance of the selected factors on women's experiences of depressive symptoms. Findings indicated that 51.2% (n = 42) women complained of moderate and severe levels of depressive symptoms. Factors identified as significant in predicting depressive symptoms were women's experiences of spousal abuse (odds ratio adjusted = 3.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-11.7) and being diagnosed with chronic illnesses (odds ratio adjusted = 7.09, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-42.2). It was concluded that causes of women's depressive symptoms were imbedded in their familial and social environment, rather than their job per se. Mental health nurses can change the practice of nursing to better standards. Being familiarized with causes of depressive symptoms can empower nurses to be active advocates for depressed women. PMID:20712679

  2. Depressive symptoms in the frail elderly: physical and psycho-social correlates.

    PubMed

    Smith Barusch, A; Rogers, A; Abu-Bader, S H

    1999-01-01

    The elderly who suffer from chronic illness are at unusually high risk of depression and depressive symptoms. This study was conducted to describe the prevalence of depressive symptoms in a sample of chronically-ill elders and to examine the relationship between physical illness and depression, both as it is illuminated in a regression model and as it is understood by the respondents themselves. Interviews were conducted with a random sample of 100 clients in a community-based care program for low-income elderly at risk of nursing home placement. Over one-third of the sample (36%) reported significant depressive symptoms, as measured by the CES-D. Multiple regression analysis identified functional limitations, cognitive impairment and self-perception as significant correlates of depression in a model that explained 30 percent of the variance in CES-D scores. PMID:10615924

  3. Presentation of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mary E; Barnard, Louise; Pearson, Joanne; Hasan, Reem; O'Brien, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Depression is common in autism and Asperger syndrome, but despite this, there has been little research into this issue. This review considers the current literature on the prevalence, presentation, treatment and assessment of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome. There are diagnostic difficulties when considering depression in autism and Asperger syndrome, as the characteristics of these disorders, such as social withdrawal and appetite and sleep disturbance, are also core symptoms of depression. Impaired verbal and non-verbal communication can mask the symptoms of depression. Symptoms associated with autism and Asperger syndrome such as obsessionality and self-injury may be increased during an episode of depression. There is a clear need to develop specific tools both for diagnostic purposes and for measurement of depression in autism and Asperger syndrome in order to help alleviate the distress caused by this treatable illness.

  4. Fatherhood and emotional illness.

    PubMed

    Cavenar, J O; Butts, N T

    1977-04-01

    The authors describe four cases in which men developed emotional illnesses related to their wives' pregnancies. In all of the cases, the patients had experienced sibling rivalry at a significant time in their lives. This factor seemed to be more important dynamically in understanding their feelings about fatherhood than previously proposed factors, such as envy of the wife's childbearing capacity, dependence on the wife, and neurotic conflict with the oedipal father. The authors suggest that in men with neuroses, the issue of sibling rivalry is an important determinant of reactions to fatherhood.

  5. Positive psychology: an approach to supporting recovery in mental illness.

    PubMed

    Schrank, B; Brownell, T; Tylee, A; Slade, M

    2014-09-01

    This paper reviews the literature on positive psychology with a special focus on people with mental illness. It describes the characteristics, critiques, and roots of positive psychology and positive psychotherapy, and summarises the existing evidence on positive psychotherapy. Positive psychology aims to refocus psychological research and practice on the positive aspects of experience, strengths, and resources. Despite a number of conceptual and applied research challenges, the field has rapidly developed since its introduction at the turn of the century. Today positive psychology serves as an umbrella term to accommodate research investigating positive emotions and other positive aspects such as creativity, optimism, resilience, empathy, compassion, humour, and life satisfaction. Positive psychotherapy is a therapeutic intervention that evolved from this research. It shows promising results for reducing depression and increasing well-being in healthy people and those with depression. Positive psychology and positive psychotherapy are increasingly being applied in mental health settings, but research evidence involving people with severe mental illness is still scarce. The focus on strengths and resources in positive psychology and positive psychotherapy may be a promising way to support recovery in people with mental illness, such as depression, substance abuse disorders, and psychosis. More research is needed to adapt and establish these approaches and provide an evidence base for their application.

  6. Plasma cortisol levels and illness appraisal in deficit syndrome schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    White, Ross G; Lysaker, Paul; Gumley, Andrew I; McLeod, Hamish; McCleery, Muriel; O'Neill, Donnacha; MacBeth, Angus; Giurgi-Oncu, Catalina; Mulholland, Ciaran C

    2014-12-30

    Research investigating the association between negative symptoms and plasma cortisol levels in individuals with schizophrenia has produced inconsistent findings. This study investigated whether deficit syndrome schizophrenia (characterized by high levels of primary negative symptoms) is associated with comparatively high morning plasma cortisol levels, more negative appraisals about illness and higher levels of depression. Participants were 85 individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and 85 individuals with no history of contact with psychiatric services matched for age and gender. All participants provided fasting 9.00a.m. plasma cortisol samples. There were no significant differences between the schizophrenia and control participants in plasma cortisol levels. The Proximal Deficit Syndrome method was used to identify individuals with deficit syndrome schizophrenia. Contrary to what had been hypothesized, participants with deficit syndrome schizophrenia had significantly lower plasma cortisol levels than both non-deficit syndrome participants and control participants. Participants with the deficit syndrome reported significantly less negative appraisals about illness (assessed by PBIQ) and lower levels of depression (assessed by BDI-II). Differences in cortisol levels continued to trend toward significance when levels of depression were controlled for. The patterns of illness-related appraisals and plasma cortisol levels raise the possibility that the deficit syndrome could be a form of adaptation syndrome. PMID:25262562

  7. What are the causes of late-life depression?

    PubMed

    Aziz, Rehan; Steffens, David C

    2013-12-01

    Although depression in old age is less common than depression in younger populations, it still affects more than 1 million community-living older adults. Depression in late life has been associated with reduced quality of life and increased mortality from both suicide and illness. Its causes are multifactorial but are prominently related to both biologic and social factors. Psychological factors, although less studied in elders, are also important in understanding its cause. In this article, multiple facets of late-life depression are reviewed, including its clinical presentation, epidemiology, and biopsychosocial causes.

  8. A critical examination of studies on curcumin for depression.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, an ingredient of turmeric, is widely available as a nutritional supplement. Curcumin has biological properties that suggest its use for a large number of health-related conditions, including depression. Curcumin is effective in animal models of depression. However, controlled clinical trials provide no convincing evidence that patients with major depressive illness fare better with different extracts of curcumin (dosed at 500-1,000 mg/d) than with placebo (or no treatment) after 5-8 weeks of monotherapy or antidepressant-augmentation therapy. At present, therefore, there is insufficient evidence to encourage depressed patients to consider curcumin as a possible alternative to standard antidepressant therapy.

  9. The relative contributions of psychiatric symptoms and psychotropic medications on the sleep-wake profile of young persons with anxiety, depression and bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Robillard, Rébecca; Oxley, Cristal; Hermens, Daniel F; White, Django; Wallis, Ryan; Naismith, Sharon L; Whitwell, Bradley; Southan, James; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2016-09-30

    This study investigated the relative contribution of psychiatric symptoms and psychotropic medications on the sleep-wake cycle. Actigraphy and clinical assessments (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) were conducted in 146 youths with anxiety, depression or bipolar disorders. Independently of medications, mania symptoms were predictive of lower circadian amplitude and rhythmicity. Independently of diagnosis and symptoms severity: i) antipsychotics were related to longer sleep period and duration, ii) serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors to longer sleep period, and iii) agomelatine to earlier sleep onset. Manic symptoms and different subclasses of medications may have independent influences on the sleep-wake cycle of young people with mental disorders. PMID:27449011

  10. Heat-related illness.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stewart, Lynsey K

    2011-06-01

    Heat-related illness is a set of preventable conditions ranging from mild forms (e.g., heat exhaustion, heat cramps) to potentially fatal heat stroke. Hot and humid conditions challenge cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms. Once core temperature reaches 104°F (40°C), cellular damage occurs, initiating a cascade of events that may lead to organ failure and death. Early recognition of symptoms and accurate measurement of core temperature are crucial to rapid diagnosis. Milder forms of heat-related illness are manifested by symptoms such as headache, weakness, dizziness, and an inability to continue activity. These are managed by supportive measures including hydration and moving the patient to a cool place. Hyperthermia and central nervous system symptoms should prompt an evaluation for heat stroke. Initial treatments should focus on lowering core temperature through cold water immersion. Applying ice packs to the head, neck, axilla, and groin is an alternative. Additional measures include transporting the patient to a cool environment, removing excess clothing, and intravenous hydration. Delayed access to cooling is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with heat stroke. Identification of at-risk groups can help physicians and community health agencies provide preventive measures. PMID:21661715

  11. Locating legacy in illness.

    PubMed

    Froude, Cameron Kiely

    2016-06-01

    The author, a licensed marriage and family therapist, describes her work with Sofia, an eight-year-old Puerto Rican female with chronic and persistent abdominal pain and leg paralysis with no known organic cause. Sofia's mother, Ana, was also seen by the author. Over the course of several weeks, the family shared stories of painful medical procedures and extreme dietary plans prescribed to them by doctors to identify the etiology of Sofia's illness. Ana described her simultaneous relief and frustration when each test result indicated that there was no organic cause for Sofia's debilitating pain. They talked about the push and pull Ana's family experienced as they prayed simultaneously for abnormal and normal test results. The author told Sofia's pediatrician that she would begin to create a community genogram with the family in their next meeting. She explained that the purpose of the community genogram was to illustrate the social and historical contexts of families' lives. They learned that a seminal narrative in Sofia's family legacy connected deep understanding of others with embodiment of their immediate experience. Sofia's illness became one part of her and her family's legacy and cultural tapestry. Ana described the renewed connections that she and Sofia shared with their family members. As Sofia and Ana spoke with their family members more often, Sofia's leg paralysis and stomach pains decreased. Sofia began attending school regularly and visiting less with her pediatrician. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27270250

  12. Psychiatric Morbidity in Pediatric Critical Illness Survivors: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Richardson, Laura P.; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Katon, Wayne J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the prevalence of psychiatric syndromes in pediatric critical illness survivors as well as to summarize data on vulnerabilities and pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) exposures that may increase risk of developing these syndromes. Data Sources Medline (1966–2009), the Cochrane Library (2009, Issue 3), and PsycInfo (1967–2009) as of August 9, 2009. Study Selection Case-control, cross-sectional, prospective cohort and retrospective cohort studies, as well as randomized-controlled trials. Main Exposures Hospitalization for the treatment of a critical illness. Main Outcome Measures Assessments of psychiatric symptoms/disorders at least once after discharge. Results Seventeen studies were eligible. The most commonly assessed psychiatric disorders were posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression. The point prevalence of clinically significant PTSD symptoms ranged from 10%–28% (5 studies). The point prevalence of clinically significant depressive symptoms ranged from 7%–13% (3 studies). Pre-illness psychiatric and/or developmental problems and parental psychopathology were associated with vulnerability to psychiatric morbidity. Neither a child’s age nor gender consistently increased vulnerability to post-illness psychopathology. Exposure to increased severity of medical illness and PICU service-delivery characteristics (e.g., invasive procedures) were predictors of psychiatric illness in some, but not all, studies. Early post-illness psychiatric symptoms were predictors of later psychiatric morbidity. Conclusions Psychiatric morbidity appears to be a substantial problem for pediatric critical illness survivors. Future research should include more in-depth assessment of post-critical illness depressive, anxiety and psychotic symptoms, validate existing psychiatric instruments, and clarify how vulnerability factors, PICU service-delivery characteristics and severity of critical illnesses are associated with subsequent

  13. How patients understand depression associated with chronic physical disease – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinicians are encouraged to screen people with chronic physical illness for depression. Screening alone may not improve outcomes, especially if the process is incompatible with patient beliefs. The aim of this research is to understand people’s beliefs about depression, particularly in the presence of chronic physical disease. Methods A mixed method systematic review involving a thematic analysis of qualitative studies and quantitative studies of beliefs held by people with current depressive symptoms. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCHINFO, CINAHL, BIOSIS, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, UKCRN portfolio, National Research Register Archive, Clinicaltrials.gov and OpenSIGLE were searched from database inception to 31st December 2010. A narrative synthesis of qualitative and quantitative data, based initially upon illness representations and extended to include other themes not compatible with that framework. Results A range of clinically relevant beliefs was identified from 65 studies including the difficulty in labeling depression, complex causal factors instead of the biological model, the roles of different treatments and negative views about the consequences of depression. We found other important themes less related to ideas about illness: the existence of a self-sustaining ‘depression spiral’; depression as an existential state; the ambiguous status of suicidal thinking; and the role of stigma and blame in depression. Conclusions Approaches to detection of depression in physical illness need to be receptive to the range of beliefs held by patients. Patient beliefs have implications for engagement with depression screening. PMID:22640234

  14. Assessing the contribution of borderline personality disorder and features to suicide risk in psychiatric inpatients with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ruifan; Cohen, Lisa J; Tanis, Thachell; Qizilbash, Azra; Lopatyuk, Yana; Yaseen, Zimri S; Galynker, Igor

    2015-03-30

    Suicidal behavior often accompanies both borderline personality disorder (BPD) and severe mood disorders, and comorbidity between the two appears to further increase suicide risk. The current study aims to quantify the risk of suicidality conferred by comorbid BPD diagnosis or features in three affective disorders: major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder. One hundred forty-nine (149) psychiatric inpatients were assessed by SCID I and II, and the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Logistic regression analyses investigated the associations between previous suicide attempt and BPD diagnosis or features in patients with MDD, BP, and schizoaffective disorder, as well as a history of manic or major depressive episodes, and psychotic symptoms. Comorbid BPD diagnosis significantly increased suicide risk in the whole sample, and in those with MDD, BP, and history of depressive episode or psychotic symptoms. Each additional borderline feature also increased risk of past suicide attempt in these same groups (excepting BP) and in those with a previous manic episode. Of the BPD criteria, only unstable relationships and impulsivity independently predicted past suicide attempt. Overall, among patients with severe mood disorders, the presence of comorbid BPD features or disorder appears to substantially increase the risk of suicide attempts.

  15. Late onset schizophrenia-like illness.

    PubMed

    Craig, T J; Bregman, Z

    1988-02-01

    A chart review of 658 psychiatric inpatients aged 65 years or older with a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia revealed 32 patients (4.8%) with onset of symptoms after aged 45 who met DSM-III criteria for schizophrenia (except age of onset). Clinical course and response to treatment revealed only 25% to follow an unequivocally schizophrenic pattern. Almost 20% demonstrated substantial affective symptomatology, whereas 15.6% had a brief psychotic episode with full remission, and 40.6% showed signs of organic deterioration. These results suggest that diverse underlying pathologic processes may present initially as late onset schizophreniform illness. The presence of depressive symptoms and assaultive behavior on admission predicted good treatment response while sensory deficits and development of signs of organicity were associated with poor treatment response.

  16. [Glutamate transporter dysfunction and major mental illnesses].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohichi

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and plays an important role in most aspects of normal brain function. In spite of its importance as a neurotransmitter, excess glutamate is toxic to neurons. Clearance of extracellular glutamate is critical for maintenance of low extracellular glutamate concentration, and occurs in large part through the activity of GLT1 (EAAT2) and GLAST (EAAT1), which are primarily expressed by astrocytes. Rare variants and down-regulation of GLT1 and GLAST, in psychiatric disorders have been reported. In this review, we demonstrate that various kinds of GLT1 and/or GLAST knockout mice replicate many aspects of the behavioral abnormalities seen in major mental illnesses including schizophrenia, depression, obsessive -compulsive disorders, autism, epilepsy and addiction. PMID:26793898

  17. Sleep disorders and depression: brief review of the literature, case report, and nonpharmacologic interventions for depression

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Antonina; Luca, Maria; Calandra, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders are so frequently associated with depression that, in the absence of sleep complaints, a diagnosis of depression should be made with caution. Insomnia, in particular, may occur in 60%–80% of depressed patients. Depressive symptoms are important risk factors for insomnia, and depression is considered an important comorbid condition in patients with chronic insomnia of any etiology. In addition, some drugs commonly prescribed for the treatment of depression may worsen insomnia and impair full recovery from the illness. The aim of this paper is to review briefly and discuss the following topics: common sleep disturbances during depression (in particular pavor nocturnus, nightmares, hypersomnia, and insomnia); circadian sleep disturbances; and treatment of depression by manipulation of the sleep-wake rhythm (chronotherapy, light therapy, cycles of sleep, and manipulation of the sleep-wake rhythm itself). Finally, we present a case report of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from insomnia associated with depression who was successfully treated with sleep deprivation. PMID:24019746

  18. [Postpartal depression: possible effects on early mother-child interaction and psychotherapeutical treatment approach].

    PubMed

    Reck, Corinna

    2007-01-01

    The interaction between mother and child helds a central position in in- and outpatient treatment of postpartal depressive mothers. Infants are highly sensitive towards the emotional state of their mothers and other attachment figures. This sensivity is essential for the comprehension of the influence of a psychiatric illness of the mother on child development Postpartal depression as the most common psychiatric illness in young mothers takes a central part. The specific situation of young depressive mothers demands an adaptation of the therapeutic treatment. Different approaches towards the treatment of postpartal depression with respect to the mother-child interaction are elucidated.

  19. Assessment of Trait and State Aspects of Depression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Chiappelli, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Depression and negative symptoms can be difficult to distinguish in schizophrenia. Assessments for negative symptoms usually account for the longitudinal nature of these symptoms, whereas instruments available to measure depression mainly assess current or recent symptoms. This construct difference may confound comparison of depressive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia because both domains may have trait-like aspects. We developed an instrument to measure both longitudinal “trait” as well as recent “state” symptoms of depression and tested this instrument (Maryland Trait and State Depression [MTSD] scale) in a sample of 98 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 115 community participants without psychotic illness. Exploratory factor analysis of the MTSD revealed 2 factors accounting for 73.4% of the variance; these 2 factors corresponded with “trait” and “state” depression inventory items. Neither MTSD-state nor MTSD-trait was correlated with negative symptoms as measured with the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (r = .07 and −.06, respectively) in schizophrenia patients. MTSD state and trait scores were significantly correlated with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale depression subscale (r = .58 and .53, respectively) as well as the Profile of Mood States depression subscale (r = .57 and .44). Persons with schizophrenia had significantly greater trait depressive symptoms than controls (P = .031). Individuals with schizoaffective disorder had significantly higher trait depression (P = .001), but not state depression (P = .146), compared with schizophrenia patients. Trait depressive symptoms are prominent in schizophrenia and are distinct from negative symptoms. PMID:23686021

  20. Assessment of trait and state aspects of depression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Nugent, Katie L; Thangavelu, Kavita; Searcy, Katherine; Hong, L Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Depression and negative symptoms can be difficult to distinguish in schizophrenia. Assessments for negative symptoms usually account for the longitudinal nature of these symptoms, whereas instruments available to measure depression mainly assess current or recent symptoms. This construct difference may confound comparison of depressive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia because both domains may have trait-like aspects. We developed an instrument to measure both longitudinal "trait" as well as recent "state" symptoms of depression and tested this instrument (Maryland Trait and State Depression [MTSD] scale) in a sample of 98 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 115 community participants without psychotic illness. Exploratory factor analysis of the MTSD revealed 2 factors accounting for 73.4% of the variance; these 2 factors corresponded with "trait" and "state" depression inventory items. Neither MTSD-state nor MTSD-trait was correlated with negative symptoms as measured with the Brief Negative Symptom Scale (r = .07 and -.06, respectively) in schizophrenia patients. MTSD state and trait scores were significantly correlated with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale depression subscale (r = .58 and .53, respectively) as well as the Profile of Mood States depression subscale (r = .57 and .44). Persons with schizophrenia had significantly greater trait depressive symptoms than controls (P = .031). Individuals with schizoaffective disorder had significantly higher trait depression (P = .001), but not state depression (P = .146), compared with schizophrenia patients. Trait depressive symptoms are prominent in schizophrenia and are distinct from negative symptoms.

  1. Between health and illness.

    PubMed

    Davies, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    This essay explores the connections between health and illness, and the processes of salutogenesis, pathogenesis, and homeostasis. Written from an understanding of human embodiment and the consequences this has for our experiences of health and disease, this essay moves towards a positive definition of health, as an on-going outcome from the processes of a life lived well. "Well" here is measured in terms of wealth, relationships, coherence, fitness, and adaptability. Mencken's criticism that "Hygiene is the corruption of medicine by morality" is answered; the search for health is, in part, a moral as well as a biological enterprise. Both generative processes and remedial measures contribute to health. The patients in my consulting room usually need remedial medicine, but they would also like to flourish as human beings. Doctors should be able to provide a balance of measures towards this end.

  2. Protein Kinase C Inhibition Rescues Manic-Like Behaviors and Hippocampal Cell Proliferation Deficits in the Sleep Deprivation Model of Mania

    PubMed Central

    Abrial, Erika; Bétourné, Alexandre; Etiévant, Adeline; Lucas, Guillaume; Scarna, Hélène; Lambás-Señas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies revealed that bipolar disorder may be associated with deficits of neuroplasticity. Additionally, accumulating evidence has implicated alterations of the intracellular signaling molecule protein kinase C (PKC) in mania. Methods: Using sleep deprivation (SD) as an animal model of mania, this study aimed to examine the possible relationship between PKC and neuroplasticity in mania. Rats were subjected to SD for 72h and tested behaviorally. In parallel, SD-induced changes in hippocampal cell proliferation were evaluated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling. We then examined the effects of the mood stabilizer lithium, the antipsychotic agent aripiprazole, and the PKC inhibitors chelerythrine and tamoxifen on both behavioral and cell proliferation impairments induced by SD. The antidepressant fluoxetine was used as a negative control. Results: We found that SD triggered the manic-like behaviors such as hyperlocomotion and increased sleep latency, and reduced hippocampal cell proliferation. These alterations were counteracted by an acute administration of lithium and aripiprazole but not of fluoxetine, and only a single administration of aripiprazole increased cell proliferation on its own. Importantly, SD rats exhibited increased levels of phosphorylated synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, suggesting PKC overactivity. Moreover, PKC inhibitors attenuated manic-like behaviors and rescued cell proliferation deficits induced by SD. Conclusions: Our findings confirm the relevance of SD as a model of mania, and provide evidence that antimanic agents are also able to prevent SD-induced decrease of hippocampal cell proliferation. Furthermore, they emphasize the therapeutic potential of PKC inhibitors, as revealed by their antimanic-like and pro-proliferative properties. PMID:25577667

  3. Neuroinflammation and Comorbidity of Pain and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kavelaars, A.; Heijnen, C. J.; Dantzer, R.

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and chronic pain are highly prevalent in individuals suffering from physical illness. Here, we critically examine the possibility that inflammation is the common mediator of this comorbidity, and we explore the implications of this hypothesis. Inflammation signals the brain to induce sickness responses that include increased pain and negative affect. This is a typical and adaptive response to acute inflammation. However, chronic inflammation induces a transition from these typical sickness behaviors into depression and chronic pain. Several mechanisms can account for the high comorbidity of pain and depression that stem from the precipitating inflammation in physically ill patients. These mechanisms include direct effects of cytokines on the neuronal environment or indirect effects via downregulation of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2, activation of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase that generates neurotropic kynurenine metabolites, increased brain extracellular glutamate, and the switch of GABAergic neurotransmission from inhibition to excitation. Despite the existence of many neuroimmune candidate mechanisms for the co-occurrence of depression and chronic pain, little work has been devoted so far to critically assess their mediating role in these comorbid symptoms. Understanding neuroimmune mechanisms that underlie depression and pain comorbidity may yield effective pharmaceutical targets that can treat both conditions simultaneously beyond traditional antidepressants and analgesics. PMID:24335193

  4. Neuroinflammation and comorbidity of pain and depression.

    PubMed

    Walker, A K; Kavelaars, A; Heijnen, C J; Dantzer, R

    2014-01-01

    Comorbid depression and chronic pain are highly prevalent in individuals suffering from physical illness. Here, we critically examine the possibility that inflammation is the common mediator of this comorbidity, and we explore the implications of this hypothesis. Inflammation signals the brain to induce sickness responses that include increased pain and negative affect. This is a typical and adaptive response to acute inflammation. However, chronic inflammation induces a transition from these typical sickness behaviors into depression and chronic pain. Several mechanisms can account for the high comorbidity of pain and depression that stem from the precipitating inflammation in physically ill patients. These mechanisms include direct effects of cytokines on the neuronal environment or indirect effects via downregulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, activation of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase that generates neurotropic kynurenine metabolites, increased brain extracellular glutamate, and the switch of GABAergic neurotransmission from inhibition to excitation. Despite the existence of many neuroimmune candidate mechanisms for the co-occurrence of depression and chronic pain, little work has been devoted so far to critically assess their mediating role in these comorbid symptoms. Understanding neuroimmune mechanisms that underlie depression and pain comorbidity may yield effective pharmaceutical targets that can treat both conditions simultaneously beyond traditional antidepressants and analgesics.

  5. A Molecular Signature of Depression in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Sibille, Etienne; Wang, Yingjie; Joeyen-Waldorf, Jennifer; Gaiteri, Chris; Surget, Alexandre; Oh, Sunghee; Belzung, Catherine; Tseng, George C.; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Major depressive disorder is a heterogeneous illness with a mostly un-characterized pathology. Recent gene array attempts to identify the molecular underpinnings of the illness in human postmortem subjects have not yielded a consensus. The authors hypothesized that controlling several sources of clinical and technical variability and supporting their analysis with array results from a parallel study in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of depression would facilitate identification of the molecular pathology of major depression. Method Large-scale gene expression was monitored in postmortem tissue from the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala in paired male subjects with familial major depression and matched control subjects without major depression (N=14–16 pairs). Area dissections and analytical approaches were optimized. Results from the major depression group were compared with those from the UCMS study and confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Gene coexpression network analysis was performed on transcripts with conserved major depression-UCMS effects. Results Significant and bidirectional predictions of altered gene expression were identified in amygdala between major depression and the UCMS model of depression. These effects were detected at the group level and also identified a subgroup of depressed subjects with a more homogeneous molecular pathology. This phylogenetically conserved “molecular signature” of major depression was reversed by antidepressants in mice, identified two distinct oligodendrocyte and neuronal phenotypes, and participated in highly cohesive and interactive gene co-expression networks. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that the biological liability to major depression is reflected in a persistent molecular pathology that affects the amygdala, and support the hypothesis of maladaptive changes in this brain region as a putative primary pathology in major

  6. "Race related illness in Vietnamese refugees".

    PubMed

    Hussain, M F

    1984-01-01

    The author worked for six weeks in September 1982, as a Medical Practitioner and Psychiatrist at the first Asylum Centre Puerto-Princessa, Palawan, Philippines. This paper relates relevant aspects of Mental Health needs of Vietnamese refugees related to racism, aftermath of war, leaving home-land without preparation, perilous escape, prolonged stay in cramped refugee camps, and move on to unsettled, unsure future in another country with alien culture and environment. Changes of life situation, loss of business, property or occupation, loss of loved ones, separation from friends, disruption of family relationships are related to racism and persecution elements in 'Boat People'. The most frequent psychiatric illnesses among the refugees are: depression, anxiety state, psychosomatic disease and psychosis. A special mental health project is needed to train health workers, provide service and consultation and to organising research activities. On the preventive aspects, primary prevention may be achieved by less stress on rapid assimilation and the reduced likelihood of discrimination, hostility and prejudice. Secondary prevention consists of early detection of the disease and early initiation of treatment and tertiary prevention consists of the elimination or reduction of residual disability after an illness.

  7. Psychiatric illness in the New Zealand Maori.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, P S

    1989-12-01

    This paper compares psychiatric illness in the contemporary Maori with that in the non-Maori New Zealander. The ethnic data available are all from secondary sources. The limitations of this and the problems of achieving a satisfactory definition of "a Maori" are discussed. The data suggest that the Maori have a slightly greater risk of psychiatric hospitalization than the non-Maori. First admission rates for schizophrenia are higher for the Maori, as are the readmission rates. First admission rates for major affective illness are roughly comparable in the two groups, and those for neuroses and neurotic depression are lower in the Maori. Rates of admission for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and personality disorders are much higher for the Maori male aged 20-40 years and this group is at greatest risk of psychiatric hospitalization. A larger proportion of Maori are admitted involuntarily, especially under the Criminal Justice Act. The median stay in hospital is not longer for the Maori but their re-admissions are more frequent. The Maori have shown an increase in first psychiatric admission rates since the 1950s, with rapid increases in the early 60s and the 80s. The rates for psychotic disorders have been relatively constant and the most significant changes have been for alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and personality disorders. The author relates this historical change to socioeconomic and politico-cultural factors, particularly the stress of rapid urbanization. PMID:2610653

  8. Assessing and managing depression in older people.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Hywel

    Depression is the most common mental health condition in people aged 65 and over. It can have a detrimental effect on quality of life and reduce patients' ability to manage their health. Nurses caring for older people with physical health problems are in an ideal position to identify depression; this article outlines how general receive the appropriate mental health care. nurses can do so and ensure their patientsepression can occur as a result of major life changes. It affects an estimated two million people over the age of 65 in the UK and is the most common mental illness

  9. HIV Testing Among Adults with Mental Illness in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wanjun; Thompson, William W.; Zack, Matthew M.; McKnight-Eily, Lela; DiNenno, Elizabeth; Rose, Charles E.; Blank, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nationally representative data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to compare HIV testing prevalence among US adults with mental illness (schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, depression, and/or anxiety) to those without, providing an update of prior work using 1999 and 2002 NHIS data. Logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the probability of ever being tested for HIV by mental illness status, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, substance abuse, excessive alcohol or tobacco use, and HIV risk factors. Based on data from 21,785 respondents, 15% of adults had a psychiatric disorder and 37% ever had an HIV test. Persons with schizophrenia (64%), bipolar disorder (63%), and depression and/or anxiety (47%) were more likely to report ever being tested for HIV than those without mental illness (35%). In multivariable models, individuals reporting schizophrenia (adjusted prevalence ratio=1.68, 95% confidence interval=1.33–2.13), bipolar disease (1.58, 1.39–1.81), and depression and/or anxiety (1.31, 1.25–1.38) were more likely to be tested for HIV than persons without these diagnoses. Similar to previous analyses, persons with mental illness were more likely to have been tested than those without mental illness. However, the elevated prevalence of HIV in populations with mental illness suggests that high levels of testing along with other prevention efforts are needed. PMID:25459230

  10. HIV testing among adults with mental illness in the United States.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Cui, Wanjun; Thompson, William W; Zack, Matthew M; McKnight-Eily, Lela; DiNenno, Elizabeth; Rose, Charles E; Blank, Michael B

    2014-12-01

    Nationally representative data from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used to compare HIV testing prevalence among US adults with mental illness (schizophrenia spectrum disorder, bipolar disorder, depression, and/or anxiety) to those without, providing an update of prior work using 1999 and 2002 NHIS data. Logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the probability of ever being tested for HIV by mental illness status, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, substance abuse, excessive alcohol or tobacco use, and HIV risk factors. Based on data from 21,785 respondents, 15% of adults had a psychiatric disorder and 37% ever had an HIV test. Persons with schizophrenia (64%), bipolar disorder (63%), and depression and/or anxiety (47%) were more likely to report ever being tested for HIV than those without mental illness (35%). In multivariable models, individuals reporting schizophrenia (adjusted prevalence ratio=1.68, 95% confidence interval=1.33-2.13), bipolar disease (1.58, 1.39-1.81), and depression and/or anxiety (1.31, 1.25-1.38) were more likely to be tested for HIV than persons without these diagnoses. Similar to previous analyses, persons with mental illness were more likely to have been tested than those without mental illness. However, the elevated prevalence of HIV in populations with mental illness suggests that high levels of testing along with other prevention efforts are needed.

  11. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fornaro, Michele; Stubbs, Brendon; De Berardis, Domenico; Perna, Giampaolo; Valchera, Alessandro; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Ganança, Licínia

    2016-01-01

    Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs) associated with bipolar disorder (BD) is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo-) controlled trials (RCTs) or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI). Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports) representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-)manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) (SMD −0.74, 95% CI −1.20 to −0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652). Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979) experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores (SMD −1.08, 95% CI −1.35 to −0.81, p < 0.001) vs. placebo (n = 678). Publication and measurement biases and relative paucity of studies. Overall, SGAs appear to offer favorable improvements in MADRS and YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable and

  12. Lunar phase and psychiatric illness in goa.

    PubMed

    Parmeshwaran, R; Patel, V; Fernandes, J M

    1999-01-01

    There has been considerable research on the influence of the lunar cycle on mental illness with conflicting findings. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between full moon (FM), new moon (NM), and other moon (OM) days and the frequency of specific psychiatric disorders in patients seen at a tertiary psychiatric hospital in Goa and to examine relationships with eclipses. Analysis of all new patients in two calendar years (1997 & 1993) was carried out. Diagnoses of interest were : Non affective psychoses; depression; and mania. The numbers of new patients seen at the OPD of the Institute of Psychiatry & Human Behaviour, Goa, with these diagnoses were compared between FM, NM and OM days. Numbers of patients with these diagnoses on eclipse days (lunar/solar) were also examined. A significant trend was observed for greater numbers of patients with non-affective psychoses on FM days, but no pattern was observed for mania or depression. The excess of non-affective psychoses was more marked on days of a visible lunar eclipse. A relationship between FM and non-affective psychoses has been demonstrated. Its implications for further research and the potential mechanism to explain these findings are discussed. PMID:21455355

  13. Depression: What We Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobel, Brana; Hirschfeld, Robert M. A.

    This booklet is concerned with the area of clinical depression. Questions about clinical depression are briefly answered in an overview section and are examined in greater detail in the five chapters that follow. In chapter 1, depression is defined and various types of depression are identified. The origins of depression are explored in the second…

  14. Depression and Suicidality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, C. V.

    1974-01-01

    Suicidality ratings for 90 patients in a voluntary psychiatric hospital ward are correlated with five possible indices of depression: self-ratings of depression, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Depression scale scores, depressive diagnosis, and alcohol and drug use. Both depression and suicidality emerges in the factor structure as…

  15. [Fatigue and depression].

    PubMed

    Hell, Daniel

    2015-04-22

    Fatigue is characterised in an overview of the literature as a specific phenomenon of depression. Its differential diagnosis is discussed. Distinctions and correspondences to burnout are elaborated. Fatigue is not an obligatory symptom of depressive episodes, although it can contribute to depressive developments. The importance of fatigue in depressive episodes and its therapy is shown with the help of a circular model of depression.

  16. Responding to Students' Chronic Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Steven R.; Glaser, Sarah E.; Stern, Melissa; Sferdenschi, Corina; McCabe, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic illnesses are long-term or permanent medical conditions that have recurring effects on everyday life. Large and growing number of students have chronic illnesses that affect their emotional development, physical development, academic performance, and family interactions. The primary error in educating those students is assuming that the…

  17. Children Coping with Chronic Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Lissette M.

    Children who live with chronic illness are confronted with challenges that frequently force them to cope in myriad ways. The ways in which children face chronic illness are summarized in this literature review. Also covered, are how the effects of family can influence coping strategies and how family members, especially parents, cope with their…

  18. Fifteen-year follow-up of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition depressive disorders: the prognostic significance of psychotic features.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Markus; Bottlender, Ronald; Strauss, Anton; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), after Kraepelin's original description of "manic-depressive insanity," embodied a broad concept of affective disorders including mood-congruent and mood-incongruent psychotic features. Controversial results have been reported about the prognostic significance of psychotic symptoms in depressive disorders challenging this broad concept of affective disorders. One hundred seventeen inpatients first hospitalized in 1980 to 1982 who retrospectively fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for depressive disorders with mood-congruent or mood-incongruent psychotic features (n = 20), nonpsychotic depressive disorders (n = 33), or schizophrenia (n = 64) were followed up 15 years after their first hospitalization. Global functioning was recorded with the Global Assessment Scale; the clinical picture at follow-up was assessed using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms. With respect to global functioning, clinical picture, and social impairment at follow-up, depressive disorders with psychotic features were similar to those without, but markedly different from schizophrenia. However, patients with psychotic depressive disorders experienced more rehospitalizations than those with nonpsychotic ones. The findings indicating low prognostic significance of psychotic symptoms in depressive disorders are in line with the broad concept of affective disorders in DSM-IV.

  19. Clinical interventions for late-life anxious depression.

    PubMed

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Goethe, John

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety symptoms are frequently present in patients with late-life depression. The designation "anxious depression" has been used to describe major depressive disorder (MDD) accompanied by clinically significant but subsyndromal anxiety symptoms. MDD may also present comorbid with diagnosable anxiety disorders, although this presentation is less common in late life. Diagnosis of anxious depression in the elderly is complicated by several factors (eg, their tendency to experience and report psychiatric symptoms as somatic illness) and is associated with a more severe clinical presentation, increased risk for suicidal ideation, increased disability, and poorer prognosis. Standard pharmacotherapy for depression may be sufficient but for many patients must be modified or augmented. Psychosocial interventions may also be an important component in the treatment of these patients, although no specific psychosocial treatments have been developed for late-life anxious depression.

  20. Perfusion deficits, inflammation and aging precipitate depressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Buga, Ana Maria; Tica, Andrei Adrian; Albu, Carmen Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a severe psychiatric illness that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite advances in the treatment of major depression, one-third of depressed patients fail to respond to conventional antidepressant medication. One pathophysiologic mechanism hypothesized to contribute to treatment resistance in depression is inflammation. Inflammation has been linked to depression by a number of putative mechanisms involving perfusion deficits that can trigger microglial activation and subsequent neuroinflammation in the elderly. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. This review focusses on recent studies addressing the complex relationships between depression, aging, inflammation and perfusion deficits in the elderly. We expect that a better understanding of neuroinflammatory mechanisms associated with age-related diseases may lead to the discovery of new biomarkers of MDD and development of new therapeutic interventions.

  1. Chronic illness and Hmong shamans.

    PubMed

    Helsel, Deborah; Mochel, Marilyn; Bauer, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Among the challenges health care personnel in California's central valley face has been finding ways to help Hmong Americans manage chronic illness. Interviews were conducted with 11 Hmong shamans diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension and were qualitatively analyzed to ascertain respondents' understanding and management of their illnesses. Hmong shamans are influential individuals within their communities and are often the resource persons to whom patients turn for information on health. Understanding the shamans' perspective on chronic illness was seen as a gateway to understanding how the broader Hmong American community perceived these conditions. The concept of chronic illness was not well understood, resulting in sporadic medication and dietary regimens, limited awareness of potential complications, and a persistent impression that these illnesses could be cured rather than managed. Suggestions for patient educators include family and community involvement in care regimens and the use of descriptive terminology to identify the disease.

  2. Burden to others and the terminally ill.

    PubMed

    Chochinov, Harvey Max; Kristjanson, Linda J; Hack, Thomas F; Hassard, Thomas; McClement, Susan; Harlos, Mike

    2007-11-01

    Studies of patients who are terminally ill consistently identify strong associations between "sense of burden to others" and marked end-of-life distress. However, little research has addressed the issue of burden to others among patients nearing death. The aim of this study was to carefully examine "burden to others" and clarify its relationship with various psychosocial, physical, and existential issues arising in patients who are terminally ill. A cohort of 211 patients with end-stage cancer was assessed, using an assortment of validated psychometrics to document psychosocial, physical, and existential aspects of their end-of-life experience. This included an assessment of their sense of "burden to others." Forty percent of participants indicated a negligible sense of burden to others, scoring within the lowest quarter on an ordinal measure of "burden to others;" 25% scored within the second lowest quarter; 12% within the third quarter; and 23% within the highest or most severe range. The most highly correlated variables with "sense of burden to others" included depression (r=0.460; df=201, P<0.0001), hopelessness (r=0.420; df=199, P<0.0001), and outlook (r=0.362; df=200, P<0.0001). Four variables emerged in a multiple regression analysis predicting burden to others, including hopelessness, current quality of life, depression, and level of fatigue [R(2) adj=0.32, F(6,174)=13.76, P<0.0001]. There was no association between sense of burden to others and actual degree of physical dependency. Feeling a sense of burden to others is common among dying patients. Although 40% of the sample reported little in the way of sense of burden to others, the remainder endorsed higher degrees of burden-related distress, with 23% scoring within the most severe range. The lack of association between "sense of burden to others" and the degree of physical dependency suggests this perception is largely mediated through psychological and existential considerations. Strategies that

  3. Expatriates ill after travel: Results from the Geosentinel Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Expatriates are a distinct population at unique risk for health problems related to their travel exposure. Methods We analyzed GeoSentinel data comparing ill returned expatriates with other travelers for demographics, travel characteristics, and proportionate morbidity (PM) for travel-related illness. Results Our study included 2,883 expatriates and 11,910 non-expatriates who visited GeoSentinel clinics ill after travel. Expatriates were more likely to be male, do volunteer work, be long-stay travelers (>6 months), and have sought pre-travel advice. Compared to non-expatriates, expatriates returning from Africa had higher proportionate morbidity (PM) for malaria, filariasis, schistosomiasis, and hepatitis E; expatriates from the Asia-Pacific region had higher PM for strongyloidiasis, depression, and anxiety; expatriates returning from Latin America had higher PM for mononucleosis and ingestion-related infections (giardiasis, brucellosis). Expatriates returning from all three regions had higher PM for latent TB, amebiasis, and gastrointestinal infections (other than acute diarrhea) compared to non-expatriates. When the data were stratified by travel reason, business expatriates had higher PM for febrile systemic illness (malaria and dengue) and vaccine-preventable infections (hepatitis A), and volunteer expatriates had higher PM for parasitic infections. Expatriates overall had higher adjusted odds ratios for latent TB and lower odds ratios for acute diarrhea and dermatologic illness. Conclusions Ill returned expatriates differ from other travelers in travel characteristics and proportionate morbidity for specific diseases, based on the region of exposure and travel reason. They are more likely to present with more serious illness. PMID:23273048

  4. Life expectancy without depression increases among Brazilian older adults

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Flávia Cristina Drumond; Wu, Fan; Lebrão, Maria Lúcia; Duarte, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To estimate life expectancy with and without depressive symptoms in older adults for the years 2000 and 2010. METHODS We evaluated individuals aged 60 years or older (n = 1,862 in 2000 and n = 1,280 in 2010), participants of the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE – Health, Wellbeing and Aging) study in in Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Depression was measured using the shorter version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15); respondents scoring ≥ 6 were classified as having depression. Estimates of life expectancy with and without depression were obtained using the Sullivan method. RESULTS Data from 2000 indicate that 60-year-old men could expect to live, on average, 14.7 years without depression and 60-year-old women could expect to live 16.5 years without depression. By 2010, life expectancy without depression had increased to 16.7 years for men and 17.8 years for women. Expected length of life with depression differed by sex, with women expected to live more years with depression than men. CONCLUSIONS Between 2000 and 2010, life expectancy without depression in Sao Paulo increased. However, older adults in Brazil, especially older women, still face a serious burden of mental illness. PMID:27143612

  5. Illness perceptions, negative emotions, and pain in patients with noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Israel, Jared I; White, Kamila S; Gervino, Ernest V

    2015-03-01

    Illness-specific cognitions are associated with outcomes in numerous health conditions, however, little is known about their role in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). NCCP is prevalent, impairing, and associated with elevated health care utilization. Our objective was to investigate the relations between illness perceptions, emotion, and pain in a sample of 196 adult patients diagnosed with NCCP. We found that negative illness perceptions were associated with greater anxiety, depression, chest pain, and pain-related life interference while controlling for the effects of demographic and pain-related variables. These results expand current NCCP theory and may inform future treatment development.

  6. Cognition in Late Life Depression: Treatment Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Opinion statement Late life depression (LLD) frequently presents with cognitive impairment, and growing evidence suggests that these disease processes are “linked” in multiple ways. For some individuals, LLD may be a recurrence of a long-standing depressive illness, while for others it may be the leading symptom of a developing neuropathological disorder. Overall, studies investigating the relationship between treatment of LLD and improvement in cognitive functioning have yielded mixed results. Research suggests that a subset of individuals with LLD and cognitive dysfunction will experience an improvement in cognitive function after antidepressant treatment, though a significant proportion will continue to exhibit cognitive impairment following resolution of their depressive symptoms. From a treatment standpoint, it is critical to ensure that an individual's depressive symptoms have been treated to remission, measured by a standardized rating scale such as the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). SSRI or SNRI monotherapy is often effective, and may be enhanced by employing an evidence-based psychotherapy such as Problem Solving Therapy (PST) or Interpersonal Therapy (IPT), modified to accommodate cognitive impairments that may be present. With respect to specific treatment of cognitive dysfunction, cognitive augmentation or training strategies can be helpful for some patients, and may be explored in combination with treatment of the primary depressive episode. While the introduction of a cholinesterase inhibitor (e.g. donepezil) may be considered, the potential benefit (modest improvement in cognition and functioning) must be weighed against an increased risk for worsening or recurrent depression. Finally, lifestyle factors—such as aerobic exercise, follow-up with a primary care physician for management of co-morbid medical illnesses, and regular participation in stimulating activities (such as through a senior center)—are important and should be included as

  7. Illness Beliefs in End Stage Renal Disease and Associations with Self-Care Modality Choice

    PubMed Central

    Jayanti, Anuradha; Foden, Philip; Wearden, Alison; Mitra, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Background Interest in self-care haemodialysis (HD) has increased because it improves patients’clinical and quality-of-life outcomes. Patients who undertake self-management for haemodialysis may hold illness beliefs differently to those choosing institutional care at the time of making the modality choice or moulded by their illness and dialysis treatment experience. Illness perceptions amongst predialysis patients and in those undertaking fully-assisted and self-care haemodialysis are being investigated in a combined cross-sectional and longitudinal study. Study Design The study data are derived from the BASIC-HHD study, a multicentre observational study on factors influencing home haemodialysis uptake. 535 patients were enrolled into three groups: Predialysis CKD-5 group, prevalent ‘in-centre’ HD and self-care HD groups (93% at home). We explore illness perceptions in the cross-sectional analyses of the three study groups, using the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R). Predialysis patients’ illness beliefs were reassessed prospectively, typically between 4 and 12 months after dialysis commencement. Results Illness belief subscales are significantly different between in-centre and self-care HD groups. In a step-wise hierarchical regression analysis, after adjustment for age, education, marital status, diabetes, dialysis vintage, depression, anxiety scores, and IPQ-R subscales, personal control (p = 0.01) and illness coherence (p = 0.04) are significantly higher in the self-care HD group. In the predialysis group, no significant associations were found between illness representations and modality choices. In prospectively observed predialysis group, scores for personal control, treatment control, timeline cyclical and emotional representations reduced significantly after commencing dialysis and increased significantly for illness coherence. Conclusions Illness beliefs differ between hospital and self-care haemodialysis patients. Patient

  8. [Women seek for help - men die! Is depression really a female disease?].

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Armand; Rutz, Wolfgang; Benke, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Prevalence rates of depression in females are about two to three times higher as compared to men. Biological evidence seems to support these data. Genderspecific suiciderates, closely linked to depressive illness, however raise doubts about the genderspecific epidemiological data of depression as males commit suicide three to ten times more often than females. The sociomedical concept of "male depression" delivers an explanation. A gender bias in diagnose as well as a reduced male helpseeking behavior and dysfuntional stress coping in males might be reasons for the reported low prevalence-rates of depression in males. Depression might hide behind addictive- and risk-behavior as well as irritability. As these symptoms differ from the classic depressive symptoms they might not be detected and identified as such. Validated rating scales which specifically assess male symptoms of depression, as well as peer-education programs for colleagues might change current depression rates in males. PMID:18381057

  9. Persistent depressive disorder

    MedlinePlus

    PDD; Chronic depression; Depression - chronic ... The exact cause of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is unknown. It tends to run in families. PDD occurs more often in women. Most people with PDD will also ...

  10. Nutrition, psychoneuroimmunology and depression: the therapeutic implications of omega-3 fatty acids in interferon-α-induced depression.

    PubMed

    Su, Kuan-Pin

    2015-12-01

    The unmet need of current pharmacotherapy and the high occurrence of somatic symptoms and physical illness in depression imply that the 'monoamine hypothesis' is insufficient in approaching the aetiology of depression. Clinically, depressed patients manifest higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers, while proinflammatory cytokines induce neuropsychiatric symptoms (sickness behaviour) as well as major depressive episodes. Indeed, accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation dysregulation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Biological mechanisms that link inflammation to neuropsychiatric symptoms are vital in the understanding of the "mind-body" interface. IFN-α-induced depression is the most powerful support for the inflammation theory of depression. This clinical observation provides an excellent model for depression research. By comparing subjects with and without major depression induced by the cytokine treatment, statistical powers could be largely increased by reducing phenotypic variation (homogeneity in aetiological factors). In addition, the anti-inflammatory pathway has recently become an important topic in looking for new antidepressant therapies. For example, anti-inflammatory compounds, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 PUFAs or n-3 PUFAs), have been found to be associated with the development and treatment for depression in human and animal models. Here I review recent epidemiological studies, cross-sectional and longitudinal case-controlled studies, interventional clinical trials, as well as basic animal and cellular studies to prove the linkage among omega-3 PUFAs, inflammation, and depression.

  11. Newspaper coverage of mental illness in the UK, 1992-2008

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent years have seen a number of attempts to reduce the stigma related to mental illness; the media can play a significant role in perpetuating this stigma. This paper analyses trends in newspaper coverage of mental illness in the UK between 1992-2008 across a range of psychiatric diagnoses. Methods A content analysis was performed on a sample of articles (n = 1361) about mental illness in a range of UK newspapers in 1992, 2000, and 2008. Results There was a significant proportional reduction in negative articles about mental illness between 1992 and 2008, and a significant increase in articles explaining psychiatric disorders. Coverage improved for depression but remained largely negative for schizophrenia. Conclusions Newspaper coverage of mental illness became less stigmatising overall in the 1990s and 2000s, but this was not true for all diagnoses. PMID:21992410

  12. Comorbidity Factors and Brain Mechanisms Linking Chronic Stress and Systemic Illness

    PubMed Central

    Duric, Vanja; Clayton, Sarah; Leong, Mai Lan; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and mental illness are commonly present in patients with chronic systemic diseases. Mood disorders, such as depression, are present in up to 50% of these patients, resulting in impaired physical recovery and more intricate treatment regimen. Stress associated with both physical and emotional aspects of systemic illness is thought to elicit detrimental effects to initiate comorbid mental disorders. However, clinical reports also indicate that the relationship between systemic and psychiatric illnesses is bidirectional, further increasing the complexity of the underlying pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence linking chronic stress and systemic illness, such as activation of the immune response system and release of common proinflammatory mediators. Altogether, discovery of new targets is needed for development of better treatments for stress-related psychiatric illnesses as well as improvement of mental health aspects of different systemic diseases. PMID:26977323

  13. Comorbidity Factors and Brain Mechanisms Linking Chronic Stress and Systemic Illness.

    PubMed

    Duric, Vanja; Clayton, Sarah; Leong, Mai Lan; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms and mental illness are commonly present in patients with chronic systemic diseases. Mood disorders, such as depression, are present in up to 50% of these patients, resulting in impaired physical recovery and more intricate treatment regimen. Stress associated with both physical and emotional aspects of systemic illness is thought to elicit detrimental effects to initiate comorbid mental disorders. However, clinical reports also indicate that the relationship between systemic and psychiatric illnesses is bidirectional, further increasing the complexity of the underlying pathophysiological processes. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence linking chronic stress and systemic illness, such as activation of the immune response system and release of common proinflammatory mediators. Altogether, discovery of new targets is needed for development of better treatments for stress-related psychiatric illnesses as well as improvement of mental health aspects of different systemic diseases.

  14. Unintended Consequences of not Specifying Exclusionary Illnesses for Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Kot, Bobby; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine recently proposed a new case definition for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), as well as a new name, Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). Contrary to the Fukuda et al.’s CFS case definition, there are few exclusionary illnesses specified for this new SEID case definition. The current study explored this decision regarding exclusionary illnesses using the SEID criteria with four distinct data sets involving patients who had been identified as having CFS, as well as healthy controls, community controls, and other illness groups. The findings indicate that many individuals from major depressive disorder illness groups as well as other medical illnesses were categorized as having SEID. The past CFS Fukuda et al. prevalence rate in a community based sample of 0.42 increased by 2.8 times with the new SEID criteria. The consequences for this broadening of the case definition are discussed. PMID:26854153

  15. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice.

  16. Treatment of depression in general practice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D A

    1973-04-01

    With the co-operation of the family doctors in five selected urban general practices the general-practitioner treatment of 73 patients suffering from a new episode of depressive illness was evaluated over a period of four months. The purpose was to test the belief that general practitioners are best fitted to manage most psychological ailments, and depression was chosen as the psychiatric illness most commonly seen in general practice. Medication was the principal treatment offered, and this was often inadequate in dosage or the patient defaulted. Drug defaulting was thought to be due partly to failure of supervision and follow-up and to too low a consultation rate. The low consultation rate was also thought to explain why few patients thought there was a therapeutic value in the doctor-patient relationship. The results of the study indicate that patients with depressive illness do not receive the best treatment in general practice. The reasons are several and responsibility must be shared by the medical practitioners, the current system of the general practice, and the patients themselves.

  17. Youth blogging and serious illness.

    PubMed

    Nesby, Linda; Salamonsen, Anita

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a growing number of young people who experience illness tend to blog about it. In this paper, we question whether and how illness blogs illustrate the intercommunicative aspect of blogging by bringing forth both the literary concept of the implied reader and the sociological concepts of empowerment and agency in the analysis. We argue that young people blogging about serious illness demonstrate the inherent intercommunicative potential of blogging. We also argue that youth blogging about serious illness may represent a fruitful strategy for ill young people to create meaning, stay front-stage in youth communities and build self-esteem and confidence out of chaos. Furthermore, we argue that these blogs may contribute rather unique experience-based knowledge and reflections about existential issues to other young blog readers, who may otherwise not get access to this aspect of life. Youth blogging about serious illness thereby reflects a patient group so far not very visible and through the genre youth stand out as more competent when it comes to illness and healthcare issues than what is often presumed.

  18. Youth blogging and serious illness.

    PubMed

    Nesby, Linda; Salamonsen, Anita

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, a growing number of young people who experience illness tend to blog about it. In this paper, we question whether and how illness blogs illustrate the intercommunicative aspect of blogging by bringing forth both the literary concept of the implied reader and the sociological concepts of empowerment and agency in the analysis. We argue that young people blogging about serious illness demonstrate the inherent intercommunicative potential of blogging. We also argue that youth blogging about serious illness may represent a fruitful strategy for ill young people to create meaning, stay front-stage in youth communities and build self-esteem and confidence out of chaos. Furthermore, we argue that these blogs may contribute rather unique experience-based knowledge and reflections about existential issues to other young blog readers, who may otherwise not get access to this aspect of life. Youth blogging about serious illness thereby reflects a patient group so far not very visible and through the genre youth stand out as more competent when it comes to illness and healthcare issues than what is often presumed. PMID:26671292

  19. Treatment of suspected heat illness.

    PubMed

    Eichner, E R

    1998-06-01

    1. Despite advances in the art and science of fluid balance, exertional heat illness -- even life-threatening heat stroke -- remains a threat for some athletes today. 2. Risk factors for heat illness include: being unacclimatized, unfit, or hypohydrated; certain illnesses or drugs; not drinking in long events; and a fast finishing pace. 3. Heat cramps typically occur in conditioned athletes who compete for hours in the sun. They can be prevented by increasing dietary salt and staying hydrated. 4. Early diagnosis of heat exhaustion can be vital. Early warning signs include: flushed face, hyperventilation, headache, dizziness, nausea, tingling arms, piloerection, chilliness, incoordination, and confusion. 5. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of heat illness include: confusion preventing self-diagnosis; the lack of trained spotters; rectal temperature not taken promptly; the problem of "seek not, find not;" and the mimicry of heat illness. 6. Heat stroke is a medical emergency. Mainstays of therapy include: emergency on-site cooling; intravenous fluids; treating hypoglycemia as needed; intravenous diazepam for seizures or severe cramping or shivering; and hospitalizing if response is slow or atypical. 7. The best treatment is prevention. Tips to avoiding heat illness include: rely not on thirst; drink on schedule; favor sports drinks; monitor weight; watch urine; shun caffeine and alcohol; key on meals for fluids and salt; stay cool when you can; and know the early warning signs of heat illness.

  20. Interactional Patterns of Schizophrenic, Depressed and Well Mothers and Their Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musick, Judith S.; And Others

    This study analyzes the interaction patterns and behavioral characteristics of mentally ill and well mothers and their young children. The children were between 1 and 4 years of age. The group of mentally ill mothers was comprised of 18 schizophrenic and psychotically depressed women each with a history of at least one psychiatric hospitalization.…

  1. Spouse Health Status, Depressed Affect, and Resilience in Mid and Late Life: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bookwala, Jamila

    2014-01-01

    This study used longitudinal data to examine the effects of spousal illness on depressive symptoms among middle-aged and older married individuals and the extent to which the adverse effects of illness in a spouse were mitigated by 2 psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem. Using 1,704 married participants who were 51 years of age on…

  2. Tendencies Toward Mania and Tendencies Toward Depression Have Distinct Motivational, Affective, and Cognitive Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.

    2010-01-01

    Debate has emerged in the literature on mania, with some evidence suggesting that tendencies toward mania relate to negative emotional and cognitive styles, and other evidence suggesting that tendencies toward mania relate to positive emotional and cognitive styles. An initial study examined how tendencies toward mania (as measured by the Hypomanic Personality Scale) and tendencies toward depression (as measured by the Inventory to Diagnose Depression-Lifetime version) were related to diverse measures pertaining to incentive and threat motivations, negative and positive emotionality, and cognitive responses to emotion, among 238 undergraduates. Tendencies toward mania related to a self-reported pattern of reacting intensely to positive stimuli, both cognitively and emotionally, as well as lower sensitivity to threatening stimuli and less restraint over impulses. In contrast, tendencies toward depression related to a pattern of reacting more strongly to negative stimuli emotionally and cognitively, as well as deficits in the ability to savor positive affect. This pattern was re-confirmed in a second sample of 394 undergraduates, who completed many of the same measures plus a measure of current mood symptoms. This second sample confirmed that the pattern was not mood-state dependent. Implications for future research and clinical work are discussed, including an intriguing conceptual parallel in the distinct sets of correlates of depressive versus manic tendencies. PMID:20376291

  3. Life Events as Predictors of Mania and Depression in Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Cueller, Amy K.; Ruggero, Camilo; Winett-Perlman, Carol; Goodnick, Paul; White, Richard; Miller, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    To date, few prospective studies of life events and bipolar disorder are available, and even fewer have separately examined the role of life events in depression and mania. The goal of this study was to prospectively examine the role of negative and goal-attainment life events as predictors of the course of bipolar disorder. One hundred twenty-five individuals with bipolar I disorder were interviewed monthly for an average of 27 months. Negative and goal-attainment life events were assessed with the Life Events and Difficulties Schedule. Changes in symptoms were evaluated using the Modified Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale. The clearest results were obtained for goal-attainment life events, which predicted increases in manic symptoms over time. Negative life events predicted increases in depressive symptoms within regression models but were not predictive within multilevel modeling of changes in depressive symptoms. Given different patterns for goal attainment and negative life events, it appears important to consider specific forms of life events in models of bipolar disorder. PMID:18489203

  4. [Religious beliefs, illness and death: family's perspectives in illness experience].

    PubMed

    Bousso, Regina Szylit; Poles, Kátia; Serafim, Taís de Souza; de Miranda, Mariana Gonçalves

    2011-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify predominant themes in religion, illness and death in the life histories of families and examine the relationship between religion creeds, illness and death in the discourse of families that have an ill person. The theoretical framework used in this study was Symbolic Interactionism and the method was Oral History. Participants were seventeen families with nine different religions, who had experienced the death of a relative. Data analysis showed that following a religion is a relevant part of the lives of many families and cannot be neglected in the illness context. Results point to the importance of understanding the meaning that religion has to the families in the health-disease process, so nurses can work on the promotion of health.

  5. Sperm function in affective illness.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, J; Winokur, A; Levin, R

    1981-04-01

    There is evidence for functional changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of patients with affective disorders. Little is known concerning spermatogenesis or sperm function in depressed men. We systematically evaluated the sperm indices in a group of depressed males complaining of diminished libido, and a healthy control group. No differences were noted in sperm parameters between the groups.

  6. [Non thyroidal illnesses (NTIS)].

    PubMed

    Luca, F; Goichot, B; Brue, T

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities in the circulating levels of thyroid hormones, without evidence of coexisting thyroid or pituitary gland disease can be observed in all general diseases. These nonthyroidal illnesses (NTIS) are the result of complex mechanisms that combine the effect of some drugs, cytokines, nutritional and endocrine factors at all levels of the thyrotropic axis, from the hypothalamus to the cellular transporters and nuclear receptors of thyroid hormones. The patterns of NTIS depend on the underlying disease and its severity. Thirtyfive years after the initial description, the pathophysiological significance of these anomalies remains controversial. One of the dilemma of NTIS is whether the hormone responses represent an adaptive and normal, physiologic response to conserve energy and protect against hypercatabolism in case of aggression, or whether it is a maladaptive response contributing to a worsening of the disease. This debate is not just a theoretical question, because in the first case the process must be respected, in the other case a vigorous treatment to restore circulating thyroid hormone levels is justified. There have been very few clinical studies designed to address whether the substitution with thyroid hormone is advantageous, and there is at current time no permissive evidence for the use of thyroid hormone replacement in patients with NTIS. But the clinical context, the choice of the molecule or of the dose and the way of administration were not necessarily the most relevant. Theoretically, stimulation of thyreotrope axis used a continuous infusion of TRH seems to provide clinical benefit. With the expectation that randomized clinical trials will provide demonstration of NTIS treatment efficiency, the question might remain unanswered for several more years.

  7. Recognising and managing decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Caton-Richards, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    Seen primarily in scuba divers who have breathed compressed air, decompression illness is a rare but potentially fatal condition. Prompt recognition and treatment of the illness, and urgent referral of patients to hyperbaric chambers, can mean the difference between full recovery and paralysis or death. This article describes decompression illness and how to recognise it, and discusses the treatment that patients require for the best chance of recovery with no adverse effects. It also includes a case study of a patient who developed this condition after a dive. PMID:24219686

  8. Recognising and managing decompression illness.

    PubMed

    Caton-Richards, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    Seen primarily in scuba divers who have breathed compressed air, decompression illness is a rare but potentially fatal condition. Prompt recognition and treatment of the illness, and urgent referral of patients to hyperbaric chambers, can mean the difference between full recovery and paralysis or death. This article describes decompression illness and how to recognise it, and discusses the treatment that patients require for the best chance of recovery with no adverse effects. It also includes a case study of a patient who developed this condition after a dive.

  9. Treatment response for acute depression is not associated with number of previous episodes: lack of evidence for a clinical staging model for major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael; Kelin, Katarina; Mancini, Michele; Schacht, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Mental illness has been observed to follow a neuroprogressive course, commencing with prodrome, then onset, recurrence and finally chronic illness. In bipolar disorder and schizophrenia responsiveness to treatment mirrors these stages of illness progression, with greater response to treatment in the earlier stages of illness and greater treatment resistance in chronic late stage illness. Using data from 5627 participants in 15 controlled trials of duloxetine, comparator arm (paroxetine, venlafaxine, escitalopram) or placebo for the treatment of an acute depressive episode, the relationship between treatment response and number of previous depressive episodes was determined. Data was dichotomised for comparisons between participants who had >3 previous episodes (n=1697) or ≤3 previous episodes (n=3930), and additionally for no previous episodes (n=1381) or at least one previous episode (n=4246). Analyses were conducted by study arm for each clinical trial, and results were then pooled. There was no significant difference between treatment response and number of previous depressive episodes. This unexpected finding suggests that treatments to reduce symptoms of depression during acute illness do not lose efficacy for patients with a longer history of illness.

  10. Postpartum depression

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, Teri; Howard, Margaret; Salisbury, Amy; Zlotnick, Caron

    2014-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects up to 15% of mothers. Recent research has identified several psychosocial and biologic risk factors for PPD. The negative short-term and long-term effects on child development are well-established. PPD is under recognized and under treated. The obstetrician and pediatrician can serve important roles in screening for and treating PPD. Treatment options include psychotherapy and antidepressant medication. Obstacles to compliance with treatment recommendations include access to psychotherapists and concerns of breastfeeding mothers about exposure of the infant to antidepressant medication. Further research is needed to examine systematically the short-term and long-term effect of medication exposure through breastmilk on infant and child development. PMID:19318144

  11. Gullied Depression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    26 February 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows gullies formed in the wall of a depression located on the floor of Rabe Crater west of the giant impact basin, Hellas Planitia. Gullies such as these are common features on Mars, but the process by which they are formed is not fully understood. The debate centers on the role and source of fluids in the genesis of these features.

    Location near: 44.1oS, 325.9oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  12. [Depression in Sub-Saharan Africa].

    PubMed

    Perez, S; Junod, A

    1998-01-01

    We now have a better knowledge of the specific features of depression in sub-Saharan Africa. Anthropologically speaking, the Western model is irrelevant. Depression in sub-Saharan Africa involves the relationship of the subject to himself or others in a mode specific to African cultures. Ignoring this fact can lead to simplistic ethnocentrism. From a clinical standpoint, depressive illness characterized by somatic manifestations, delusions of persecution, and anxiety are increasingly uncommon. As African societies modernize, these traditional forms are being gradually supplanted by states with symptoms and prognoses more like those observed in industrialized countries. Hybrid depressive syndromes are now the most widespread. Epidemiologically the notion widely held only a few decades ago that depression is a rare occurrence in Africa has now been dispelled. Many studies have been conducted to determine the exact incidence, age distribution, and sex ratio but more precise data is still needed. This investigation will require improvement in screening and diagnostic methods which must be not only suitable for clinical use but also adaptable to local conditions. This is also true with regard to management which has the same goals as anywhere else in the world. Treatment facilities are different in urban and rural areas but care is often dispensed in unconventional settings and may be combined with traditional methods. Drug availability is limited by problems involving supply and cost. This explains why electro-convulsive therapy which was introduced into sub-Saharan Africa long ago still plays a major role in the treatment of depression.

  13. Stresses and Disability in Depression across Gender

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sharmishtha S.; Kalmegh, Bhalchandra; Patil, Poonam N.; Ghate, Madhav R.; Sarmukaddam, Sanjeev; Paralikar, Vasudeo P.

    2014-01-01

    Depression, though generally episodic, results in lasting disability, distress, and burden. Rising prevalence of depression and suicide in the context of epidemiological transition demands more attention to social dimensions like gender related stresses, dysfunction, and their role in outcome of depression. Cross-sectional and follow-up assessment of men and women with depression at a psychiatric tertiary centre was undertaken to compare their illness characteristics including suicidal ideation, stresses, and functioning on GAF, SOFAS, and GARF scales (N = 107). We reassessed the patients on HDRS-17 after 6 weeks of treatment. Paired t-test and chi-square test of significance were used to compare the two groups, both before and after treatment. Interpersonal and marital stresses were reported more commonly by women (P < 0.001) and financial stresses by men (P < 0.001) though relational functioning was equally impaired in both. Women had suffered stresses for significantly longer duration (P = 0.0038). Men had more impairment in social and occupational functioning compared to females (P = 0.0062). History of suicide attempts was significantly associated with more severe depression and lower levels of functioning in case of females with untreated depression. Significant cross-gender differences in stresses, their duration, and types of dysfunction mandate focusing on these aspects over and above the criterion-based diagnosis. PMID:24579042

  14. Psychoanalytic Notes on the Status of Depression in Curriculum Affected by Histories of Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines debates about the meaning and value of depression in relationship to efforts to teach about, and learn from, historical loss. It is argued that depression is not solely an individual illness or biological aberration, but a trace and effect of facing the many and profound losses--of culture, language and life--that constitute…

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szigethy, Eva; Whitton, Sarah W.; Levy-Warren, Anna; DeMaso, David Ray; Weisz, John; Beardslee, William R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in physically ill adolescents. Method: In an open trial, 11 adolescents (12-17 years) with inflammatory bowel disease and either major or minor depression underwent 12 sessions of a manual-based CBT enhanced by social skills, physical illness…

  16. Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare-Mustin, Rachel T.; Garvine, Richard

    1974-01-01

    Inquiry into the initial attitudes toward mental illness of students taking an abnormal psychology class indicates students' concerns and preconceptions and provides a basis for shaping the course to respond to student needs. (JH)

  17. Life Events, Stress, and Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabkin, Judith G.; Struening, Elmer L.

    1976-01-01

    Selectively reviews the research literature on the relation of life events, stress, and the onset of illness; delineates trends in the development of this research, and evaluates the conceptual and methodological approaches employed. (MLH)

  18. Improving Communication About Serious Illness

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Critical Illness; Chronic Disease; Terminal Care; Palliative Care; Communication; Advance Care Planning; Neoplasm Metastasis; Lung Neoplasms; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Heart Failure; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic

  19. Mental Illness in the Family. Families Today: A Research Sampler on Families and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfman, Eunice, Ed.

    Science Monographs, published by the National Institute of Mental Health, are book-length, integrative state-of-the-art reviews, critical evaluations of findings, or program assessments of current research on topics related to the NIMH mandate. This set of articles concentrate on mental illness in the family. "Depression and Low-Income,…

  20. Influences of Maternal Mental Illness on Psychological Outcomes for Adolescent Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyserman, Daphna; Bybee, Deborah; Mowbray, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Explores the effects of maternal psychiatric symptoms and community functioning on child outcomes in a diverse sample of seriously mentally ill women caring for their teenaged children. In hierarchical multiple regression, for youth depression, we find effects for parenting style and maternal mental health; for youth anxiety and efficacy, effects…

  1. Diversity of Outcomes Among Adolescent Children of Mothers With Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Carol T.; Bybee, Deborah; Oyserman, Daphna; Allen -Meares, Paula; MacFarlane, Peter; Hart-Johnson, Tamera

    2004-01-01

    Children of parents with mental illness are an at-risk population according to research on psychiatric outcomes using White, middle-class samples of depressed parents and infants and preschool children. The current study expands this evidence by exploring within-group heterogeneity across psychosocial outcomes, in a racially diverse, low-income…

  2. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  3. REM sleep dysregulation in depression: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Palagini, Laura; Baglioni, Chiara; Ciapparelli, Antonio; Gemignani, Angelo; Riemann, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Disturbances of sleep are typical for most depressed patients and belong to the core symptoms of the disorder. Since the 1960s polysomnographic sleep research has demonstrated that besides disturbances of sleep continuity, depression is associated with altered sleep architecture, i.e., a decrease in slow wave sleep (SWS) production and disturbed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. Shortened REM latency (i.e., the interval between sleep onset and the occurrence of the first REM period), increased REM sleep duration and increased REM density (i.e., the frequency of rapid eye movements per REM period) have been considered as biological markers of depression which might predict relapse and recurrence. High risk studies including healthy relatives of patients with depression demonstrate that REM sleep alterations may precede the clinical expression of depression and may thus be useful in identifying subjects at high risk for the illness. Several models have been developed to explain REM sleep abnormalities in depression, like the cholinergic-aminergic imbalance model or chronobiologically inspired theories, which are reviewed in this overview. Moreover, REM sleep alterations have been recently considered not only as biological "scars" but as true endophenotypes of depression. This review discusses the genetic, neurochemical and neurobiological factors that have been implicated to play a role in the complex relationships between REM sleep and depression. We hypothesize on the one hand that REM sleep dysregulation in depression may be linked to a genetic predisposition/vulnerability to develop the illness; on the other hand it is conceivable that REM sleep disinhibition in itself is a part of a maladaptive stress reaction with increased allostatic load. We also discuss whether the REM sleep changes in depression may contribute themselves to the development of central symptoms of depression such as cognitive distortions including negative self-esteem and the

  4. The Liver in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Damm, Tessa W; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    Caring for critically ill patients with acute and/or chronic liver dysfunction poses a unique challenge. Proper resuscitation and early consideration for transfer to liver transplant centers have resulted in improved outcomes. Liver support devices and cellular models have not yet shown mortality benefit, but they hold promise in the critical care of patients with liver disease. This article reviews pertinent anatomic and physiologic considerations of the liver in critical illness, followed by a selective review of associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27339681

  5. Heat Illness - A Practical Primer.

    PubMed

    Raukar, Neha; Lemieux, Renee; Finn, George; Stearns, Rebecca; Casa, Douglas J

    2015-07-01

    Heat stroke is one of the top three causes of death for athletes. Vigilance is required to prevent these illnesses and when faced with an individual who is suffering an exertional heat stroke, the goal is to aggressively cool the patient to 102°F within 30 minutes to optimize survival. The elderly are also at risk for heat illness and physicians caring for these patients should discuss prevention and treatment plans.

  6. A 10-week memantine treatment in bipolar depression: a case report. Focus on depressive symptomatology, cognitive parameters and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Strzelecki, Dominik; Tabaszewska, Agnieszka; Barszcz, Zbigniew; Józefowicz, Olga; Kropiwnicki, Paweł; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2013-12-01

    Memantine and other glutamatergic agents have been currently investigated in some off-label indications due to glutamatergic involvement in several psychoneurological disorders. We assumed that memantine similarly to ketamine may positively influence mood, moreover having a potential to improve cognition and general quality of life. We report a case of a 49-year-old male hospitalized during a manic and a subsequent moderate depressive episode. After an ineffective use of lithium, olanzapine and antidepressive treatment with mianserin, memantine was added up to 20 mg per day for 10 weeks. The mental state was assessed using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Clinical Global Inventory, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale and psychological tests. After 10 weeks the patient achieved a partial symptomatic improvement in mood, anxiety and quality of sleep, but his activity remained insufficient. We also observed an improvement in the parameters of cognitive functioning and quality of life. There was neither significant mood variations during the memantine use nor mood changes after its termination. No significant side effects were noted during the memantine treatment. We conclude that using memantine in bipolar depression may improve mood, cognitive functioning and quality of life. PMID:24474993

  7. Healthcare Disparities in Critical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Graciela J.; Martin, Greg S.; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarize the current literature on racial and gender disparities in critical care and the mechanisms underlying these disparities in the course of acute critical illness. Data Sources MEDLINE search on the published literature addressing racial, ethnic, or gender disparities in acute critical illness such as sepsis, acute lung injury, pneumonia, venous thromboembolism, and cardiac arrest. Study Selection Clinical studies that evaluated general critically ill patient populations in the United States as well as specific critical care conditions were reviewed with a focus on studies evaluating factors and contributors to health disparities. Data Extraction Study findings are presented according to their association with the incidence, clinical presentation, management, and outcomes in acute critical illness. Data Synthesis This review presents potential contributors for racial and gender disparities related to genetic susceptibility, comorbidities, preventive health services, socioeconomic factors, cultural differences, and access to care. The data is organized along the course of acute critical illness. Conclusions The literature to date shows that disparities in critical care are most likely multifactorial involving individual, community, and hospital-level factors at several points in the continuum of acute critical illness. The data presented identify potential targets as interventions to reduce disparities in critical care and future avenues for research. PMID:24121467

  8. The impact of psychosocial factors on late-life depression.

    PubMed

    Areán, Patricia A; Reynolds, Charles F

    2005-08-15

    Mental illnesses in later life are multidimensional phenomena that occur in interpersonal, psychosocial, and biological contexts. With depression used as an example, the purpose of this article is to review how psychosocial variables contribute to the onset and maintenance of depression in late life, as well as influence treatment outcomes. Particular issues discussed are how these variables can be modified to prevent the onset and relapse of depression, how nonmodifiable risk factors can be addressed to prevent onset and relapse, and how research in this area needs to evolve to improve prevention and treatment.

  9. Discriminating Between Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Rates of misdiagnosis between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder have been reported to be substantial, and the consequence of such misdiagnosis is likely to be a delay in achieving effective control of symptoms, in some cases spanning many years. Particularly in the midst of a depressive episode, or early in the illness course, it may be challenging to distinguish the 2 mood disorders purely on the basis of cross-sectional features. To date, no useful biological markers have been reliably shown to distinguish between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder.

  10. Discriminating Between Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Rates of misdiagnosis between major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder have been reported to be substantial, and the consequence of such misdiagnosis is likely to be a delay in achieving effective control of symptoms, in some cases spanning many years. Particularly in the midst of a depressive episode, or early in the illness course, it may be challenging to distinguish the 2 mood disorders purely on the basis of cross-sectional features. To date, no useful biological markers have been reliably shown to distinguish between bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder. PMID:26876315

  11. How illness affects family members: a qualitative interview survey

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Eve; Saada, Adrianna; Prosser, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Spillover effects of illness on family members can be substantial. The purpose of this study was to identify the domains of family members’ health and well-being that are affected when a relative has a chronic health condition. Methods Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted in February, 2012 with 49 individuals whose relatives had any of five chronic health conditions (arthritis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease/dementia, cerebral palsy, and depression), purposively sampled to include different relationships with the ill relative (parent, child, spouse). Subjects were queried on whether and how having an ill relative affected their health and well-being; they were also asked about their caregiving responsibilities and the relative’s health. Interview data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Family members in our sample reported experiencing psychological and non-health effects from having an ill relative, and secondarily somatic effects. Effects on emotional health were most commonly reported as psychological spillover; non-health effects frequently included changes in daily activities and provision of caregiving. Spouses of patients reported the broadest range of spillover domains affected and adolescents of ill parents the fewest. Family members reported experiencing effects that were perceived as both positive and negative. Conclusions Spillover of illness onto family members encompasses a wide range of domains of health and well-being, extending beyond those included in many existing health-related quality of life measures. Outcomes measurement efforts should be expanded to adequately capture these health and well-being outcomes for analysis, to ensure that the benefits of interventions are accurately estimated and conclusions are valid. PMID:24142495

  12. [Chronic illness and contraception].

    PubMed

    Saarikoski, S

    1987-01-01

    In recent years sterilization that can cause problems of the psyche and marital life has been recommended much less frequently with respect to chronic diseases. As regards heart and hypertensive diseases pregnancy is always contraindicated in case of 3rd and 4th disease categories and sterilization is recommended according to the New York Heart Association. As far as 1st and 2nd category patients are concerned if the load carrying capacity is normal pregnancy could be undertaken. Combination pills are not recommended for contraception because they can cause fluid retention or increase the risk of thrombosis. If the patient has a higher-than-normal risk of developing thrombosis or infection, for instance, those who wear pacemakers only tablets containing progesterone or subdermal capsule implants can be used. In those with blood pressure problems the additional use of the IUD is also advised. Among diseases of neurological and psychic origin the effect of hormonal contraceptives is weakened by antiepileptics, but even in such cases older combination pills of larger doses of active ingredients can be employed. Migraine is exacerbated in 1/3 of patients; here IUDs can be used. Even the contraceptive tablets themselves can induce depression. In psychosis methods requiring regular attention can be easily forgotten, therefore the IUD is the most suitable device. In diabetes progesterone and other progestogens reduce insulin response, harm carbohydrate metabolism; therefore in young people the IUD is preferred an in older women with children even sterilization can be employed. Hormonal tablets must not be used in hyperlipidemia and liver diseases. Caution must be exercised in hyperthyroidism and in endocrine disorders (e.g., Cushing's syndrome); if it is accompanied by blood pressure disorders appropriate treatment is required. In kidney diseases pregnancy is contraindicated if it is accompanied by blood pressure increase or a higher level of creatine. On the other hand

  13. Self-help interventions for depressive disorders and depressive symptoms: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J; Jorm, Anthony F

    2008-01-01

    was found for autogenic training, light therapy, omega 3 fatty acids, pets, and prayer. Many of the trials were poor quality and may not generalise to self-help without professional guidance. Conclusion A number of self-help interventions have promising evidence for reducing subthreshold depressive symptoms. Other forms of evidence such as expert consensus may be more appropriate for interventions that are not feasible to evaluate in randomised controlled trials. There needs to be evaluation of whether promotion to the public of effective self-help strategies for subthreshold depressive symptoms could delay or prevent onset of depressive illness, reduce functional impairment, and prevent progression to other undesirable outcomes such as harmful use of substances. PMID:18710579

  14. The effects of pity on self- and other-perceptions of mental illness.

    PubMed

    Fominaya, Adam W; Corrigan, Patrick W; Rüsch, Nicolas

    2016-07-30

    Previous research has demonstrated that pity may have a positive influence on public perceptions of individuals with a mental illness but has not adequately addressed the potential negative impacts of pity perceptions. Seventy-five research participants with serious mental illness completed measures of pity, public stigma, shame, hopelessness, personal empowerment, self-esteem, depression, and quality of life at baseline. Measures of hopelessness, personal empowerment, self-esteem, and depression were repeated six months later. Bivariate correlations found significant associations between pity and "other" effects of stigma including dangerousness, fear, segregation, avoidance and perceived stigma. Baseline pity was significantly correlated with self-effects of stigma such as shame, hopelessness, lower empowerment, lower self-esteem, depression, and decreased quality of life. At six-month follow-up, baseline pity was still associated with increased hopelessness and depression along with decreased empowerment and self-esteem. Anger, avoidance, perceived stigma, shame, and self-esteem were significantly related to pity in multiple linear regressions. Outcomes of path analyses suggest that the significant positive relationship between pity at baseline and depression at six-month follow-up was mediated by self-esteem and hopelessness. Individuals who view mental illness with pity experience negative self- and other-effects of stigma. These effects persist 6-months later. These findings have important implications for stigma-reducing advertising programs.

  15. The effects of pity on self- and other-perceptions of mental illness.

    PubMed

    Fominaya, Adam W; Corrigan, Patrick W; Rüsch, Nicolas

    2016-07-30

    Previous research has demonstrated that pity may have a positive influence on public perceptions of individuals with a mental illness but has not adequately addressed the potential negative impacts of pity perceptions. Seventy-five research participants with serious mental illness completed measures of pity, public stigma, shame, hopelessness, personal empowerment, self-esteem, depression, and quality of life at baseline. Measures of hopelessness, personal empowerment, self-esteem, and depression were repeated six months later. Bivariate correlations found significant associations between pity and "other" effects of stigma including dangerousness, fear, segregation, avoidance and perceived stigma. Baseline pity was significantly correlated with self-effects of stigma such as shame, hopelessness, lower empowerment, lower self-esteem, depression, and decreased quality of life. At six-month follow-up, baseline pity was still associated with increased hopelessness and depression along with decreased empowerment and self-esteem. Anger, avoidance, perceived stigma, shame, and self-esteem were significantly related to pity in multiple linear regressions. Outcomes of path analyses suggest that the significant positive relationship between pity at baseline and depression at six-month follow-up was mediated by self-esteem and hopelessness. Individuals who view mental illness with pity experience negative self- and other-effects of stigma. These effects persist 6-months later. These findings have important implications for stigma-reducing advertising programs. PMID:27175911

  16. Living with sickle cell disease and depression in Lagos, Nigeria: A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Ola, Bolanle A; Yates, Scott J; Dyson, Simon M

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disorders (SCD) and depression are both chronic illnesses of global significance. Past research on SCD and depression struggles to make sense of statistical associations, essentializes depression within the person with SCD, and treats stigma as an automatic correlate of chronic illness. A mixed methods study (March 2012-April 2014) was undertaken with people living with SCD and depression in Lagos, Nigeria, examining depression-as disease (questionnaires); depression-as-illness-experience (individual depth interviews), and depression-as-societal-sickness (focus groups). 103 people with SCD attending an outpatients clinic were administered the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and 82 self-identified with some level of depression. Fifteen were subsequently interviewed about their illness experience. Their lives were characterized by being extensively subjected to vicious discriminatory remarks, including from significant others, negative experiences they felt contributed to their depression and even to suicidal thoughts and actions. Contrary to misconceptions of the relational nature of stigma, respondents recognized that stigma resulted not from their SCD but from assumed broken social norms and expectations, norms to do with educability, employability and parenthood. They recounted either that they successfully met such expectations in their own lives, or that they could conceivably do so with reasonable societal adjustments. Ten respondents with SCD and depression further took part in two series of three focus groups with five people in each series of groups. In groups people living with SCD were able to challenge negative assumptions about themselves; to begin to recognize collective social interests as a group, and to rehearse backstage, in discussions between themselves, social actions that they might engage in frontstage, out in wider society, to challenge discriminatory societal arrangements they held to contribute to their depression. To the extent

  17. Smoking cessation and reduction in people with chronic mental illness

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mollie E

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence of cigarette smoking and tobacco related morbidity and mortality in people with chronic mental illness is well documented. This review summarizes results from studies of smoking cessation treatments in people with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It also summarizes experimental studies aimed at identifying biopsychosocial mechanisms that underlie the high smoking rates seen in people with these disorders. Research indicates that smokers with chronic mental illness can quit with standard cessation approaches with minimal effects on psychiatric symptoms. Although some studies have noted high relapse rates, longer maintenance on pharmacotherapy reduces rates of relapse without untoward effects on psychiatric symptoms. Similar biopsychosocial mechanisms are thought to be involved in the initiation and persistence of smoking in patients with different disorders. An appreciation of these common factors may aid the development of novel tobacco treatments for people with chronic mental illness. Novel nicotine and tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes and very low nicotine content cigarettes may also be used to improve smoking cessation rates in people with chronic mental illness. PMID:26391240

  18. Detecting disorder: the treatment of mental illness among jail detainees.

    PubMed

    Teplin, L A

    1990-04-01

    This article investigates the extent to which mentally ill jail detainees are treated while they are in the custody of the criminal justice system. A random sample of 728 subjects were administered the National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule (NIMH-DIS) during jail intake and then followed up throughout their stay in jail. Of those subjects who met criteria for severe mental illness (psychosis or major affective disorder), only one third were given treatment within 1 week of intake. Log-linear analysis revealed that treatment decisions were influenced by treatment history (the strongest predictor), the type of mental disorder (schizophrenia vs. depression), type of crime, and whether symptoms were documented by jail intake personnel.

  19. Psychiatric complications in the critically ill cardiac patient.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, K M; Cassem, E H

    1993-01-01

    Psychiatric consultation to the critically ill cardiac patient focuses on several common problems: anxiety, delirium, depression, personality reactions, and behavioral disturbances. A review of the causes and treatment of anxiety in the coronary care unit is followed by a discussion of delirium in the critically ill cardiac patient. A description of delirium associated with the use of the intraaortic balloon pump and its treatment with high doses of intravenous haloperidol is also included. After the initial crisis has been stabilized in the critical care unit, the premorbid personality traits of the patient may emerge as behavioral disturbances--particularly as the duration of stay increases. The use of psychiatric consultation completes the discussion. PMID:8219821

  20. [Gustave Flaubert's illness].

    PubMed

    Gastaut, H; Gastaut, Y

    1982-01-01

    All those interested in Gustave Flaubert's illness, during his lifetime as well as after his death, have agreed that he had epilepsy. The one important exception is Jean-Paul Sartre, who, in the 2800 pages of his "Idiot de la famille" claimed that Flaubert was a hysteric with very moderate intelligence who somatized his neurosis in the form of seizures. These, in Sartre's views, were moreover probably hysterical, but possibly epileptic resulting from the existence of a psychogenic epilepsy bred from the neurosis. The basis for this neurosis could have originated at the time of Gustave's birth, as this occurred between those of two brothers who both died young, and as his mother had wished for a daughter. Further development of the neurosis might have taken place during a temporary phase of learning difficulties, exaggerated and exploited by his father to make his youngest son the idiot of a family in which the eldest son was the dauphin. Destroyed in this way, Gustave would have sought refuge in passivity and could have developed a hatred for his father and for his elder brother, who he would have liked to kill before killing himself. But, unable to carry out his wishes and desiring both to die and to survive, Gustave, adolescent, might have chosen the pathway of "false deaths", as exemplified by the seizures. Modern epileptology data enables not only to confirm the epileptic etiology and to discount the hysterical nature of the fits, but also: 1. to establish precise details of the site and nature of the cerebral lesions responsible for the attacks: neonatal atrophy or vascular malformation of the occipitotemporal cortex of the left hemisphere, the only lesion capable of provoking: a) the phosphenes marking the onset of the seizures; b) the intellectual manifestations (forced thoughts or flight of ideas), affective features (panic terror), and psychosensory (ecmnesic hallucinations) or psychomotor (confusional automatism) symptoms accompanying some attacks; c) the

  1. Depression in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Laurel D.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Marano, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common in the elderly. Depression is also a common feature of cognitive impairment although the symptoms of depression in cognitive impairment differ from depression without cognitive impairment. Pre-morbid depression approximately doubles the risk of subsequent dementia. There are two predominant, though not mutually exclusive, constructs linking pre-morbid depression to subsequent cognitive impairment: Alzheimer’s pathology and the vascular depression hypothesis. When evaluating a patient with depression and cognitive impairment, it is important to obtain caregiver input and to evaluate for alternative etiologies for depressive symptoms such as delirium. We recommend a sequential approach to the treatment of depression in dementia patients: (1) a period of watchful waiting for milder symptoms, (2) psychosocial treatment program, (3) a medication trial for more severe symptoms or failure of psychosocial interventions, and (4) possible ECT for refractory symptoms. PMID:23933974

  2. Psychosocial Illness in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevalence, Pattern and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sengar, Ghanshyam Singh; Sharma, Monika; Choudhary, Shyama; Nagaraj, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) and psychosocial illness influence each other in multiple ways. The extent of psychosocial disorders in children with T1DM remains largely unstudied in India. Aim To assess the prevalence, severity, pattern and variables affecting psychosocial illness in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Material and Methods This observational study included 84 children (6-14 years of age) having T1DM at least for 1 year and 100 non diabetic children for comparison. “DSM-5 parent/guardian-Rated Level 1 & 2 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure –Child age 6-17” was used to assess psychosocial illness, specific domains and severity. Socio-demographic variables were studied and HbA1c levels were measured. Results Significantly higher prevalence of psychosocial illness was observed in children with T1DM as compared with non diabetic group (55.95% vs 20%; p<0.0001). The prevalence for mild, moderate and severe psychosocial illness was 8.33%, 27.38% and 20.24% respectively in diabetic children. Most common psychosocial abnormality was irritation (38.1%), followed by depression (36.9%) and anxiety (32.1%). The prevalence of psychosocial illness was significantly higher in T1DM patients with poorer metabolic control (HbA1c>7.5, p=0.014). Significant association of psychosocial illness was also noticed with poor dietary compliance (p=0.021) and higher mean HbA1c level (p<0.001). Conclusion This study established T1DM as a risk factor for development of psychosocial illness. Irritation, depression and anxiety were most common abnormalities. Significant association of psychosocial illness with poor dietary compliance and poor metabolic control was observed. Psychosocial assessment of every diabetic child is suggested for optimal management. PMID:27790539

  3. Dopamine, depression and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Chenu, Franck; Renard, Caroline E; Bourin, Michel

    2004-12-01

    Abstract The relationship between depression and dopamine deficiency in the mesolimbic pathway has been hypothesized for many years. The experimental studies with animal models of depression and the human studies implicate the role of the dopamine system in depression. Not only do dopaminergic receptor agonists, but also antagonists such as olanzapine exhibit antidepressant effects associated with standard antidepressants in patients with treatment-resistant depression. This paradoxical result suggests that further investigations are necessary to understand the role played by dopamine in depression.

  4. Perspectives on perceived stigma and self-stigma in adult male patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Prasko, Jan

    2014-01-01

    There are two principal types of stigma in mental illness, ie, "public stigma" and "self-stigma". Public stigma is the perception held by others that the mentally ill individual is socially undesirable. Stigmatized persons may internalize perceived prejudices and develop negative feelings about themselves. The result of this process is "self-stigma". Stigma has emerged as an important barrier to the treatment of depression and other mental illnesses. Gender and race are related to stigma. Among depressed patients, males and African-Americans have higher levels of self-stigma than females and Caucasians. Perceived stigma and self-stigma affect willingness to seek help in both genders and races. African-Americans demonstrate a less positive attitude towards mental health treatments than Caucasians. Religious beliefs play a role in their coping with mental illness. Certain prejudicial beliefs about mental illness are shared globally. Structural modeling indicates that conformity to dominant masculine gender norms ("boys don't cry") leads to self-stigmatization in depressed men who feel that they should be able to cope with their illness without professional help. These findings suggest that targeting men's feelings about their depression and other mental health problems could be a more successful approach to change help-seeking attitudes than trying to change those attitudes directly. Further, the inhibitory effect of traditional masculine gender norms on help-seeking can be overcome if depressed men feel that a genuine connection leading to mutual understanding has been established with a health care professional. PMID:25114531

  5. Suicide in the medically and terminally ill: psychological and ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kleespies, P M; Hughes, D H; Gallacher, F P

    2000-09-01

    For the clinician who works in a behavioral-medicine or primary-care setting, this article presents the association between medical illness and suicide. Specific illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, cancers of the brain and nervous system, and multiple sclerosis all are associated with an increased risk of suicide. Rates of major depression rise with increasing rates of serious medical illness; however, depression and associated suicidal ideation tend to be undertreated in the medically ill. When medical illness becomes terminal, the clinician's patient may be confronted with difficult end-of-life decisions. Great concern exists in the United States about the ethics of end-of-life decision making and the issue of physician-assisted suicide. The latter part of this article examines the terminally ill patient's right to refuse life-sustaining treatments or to have death hastened according to the principle of the "double effect." It also reviews psychologists' apparent acceptance of the concept of rational suicide, as well as assisted suicide under certain conditions, and offers several caveats. A reexamination of psychology's role, standards, and principles with respect to rational suicide is recommended.

  6. Clinical variables and implications of the personality on the outcome of bipolar illness: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Casas-Barquero, Nieves; García-López, Olga; Fernández-Argüelles, Pedro; Camacho-Laraña, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Outcome in bipolar patients is affected by comorbidity. Comorbid personality disorders are frequent and may complicate the course of bipolar illness. This pilot study examined a series of 40 euthymic bipolar patients (DSM-IV criteria) (bipolar I disorder 31, bipolar II disorder 9) to assess the effect of clinical variables and the influence of comorbid personality on the clinical course of bipolar illness. Bipolar patients with a diagnosis of comorbid personality disorder (n = 30) were compared with “pure” bipolar patients (n = 10) with regard to demographic, clinical, and course of illness variables. Comorbid personality disorder was diagnosed in 75% of patients according to ICD-10 criteria, with obsessive-compulsive personality disorder being the most frequent type. Sixty-three per cent of subjects had more than one comorbid personality disorder. Bipolar patients with and without comorbid personality disorder showed no significant differences regarding features of the bipolar illness, although the group with comorbid personality disorder showed a younger age at onset, more depressive episodes, and longer duration of bipolar illness. In subjects with comorbid personality disorders, the number of hospitalizations correlated significantly with depressive episodes and there was an inverse correlation between age at the first episode and duration of bipolar illness. These findings, however, should be interpreted taking into account the preliminary nature of a pilot study and the contamination of the sample with too many bipolar II patients. PMID:19300559

  7. Lipid Peroxidation in Psychiatric Illness: Overview of Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Yash B.; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The brain is known to be sensitive to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. While lipid peroxidation has been shown to contribute to many disease processes, its role in psychiatric illness has not been investigated until recently. In this paper, we provide an overview of lipid peroxidation in the central nervous system as well as clinical data supporting a link between lipid peroxidation and disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. These data support further investigation of lipid peroxidation in the effort to uncover therapeutic targets and biomarkers of psychiatric disease. PMID:24868318

  8. [Suicidality in mental illness – prevention and therapy].

    PubMed

    Röcker, Sabine; Bachmann, Silke

    2015-10-01

    The great majority of suicides and suicide attempts are related to mental illness. Special risk has been attributed to depression, psychosis, substance use, personality, and trauma-related disorders. Many affected persons seek medical attention prior to taking action. Primary care therefor plays an outstanding role in suicide prevention. Doctors should pay attention to potential risk constellations and actively address the issue. This paper presents possibly helpful models and instruments for everyday use. Most importantly, however, professionals’ empathy and time are required as well as appropriate decisions concerning a referral to a psychiatrist or psychiatric inpatient treatment.

  9. Authoritarian parenting and youth depression: Results from a national study.

    PubMed

    King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Merianos, Ashley L

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent illness affecting youth across the nation. The study purpose was to examine depression and authoritarian parenting among youth from 12 to 17 years of age. A secondary data analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health was performed in the present study. All participants in the present study were youth (N = 17,399) nationwide. The results revealed that 80.6% of youth participants reported having five or more depressive symptoms. Parenting styles based on depression significantly differed among males, females, 12-13-year-olds, 14-15-year-olds, and 16-17-year-olds. Specifically, those who reported experiencing authoritarian parenting practices were more likely to report depressive symptoms compared to their counterparts who experienced authoritative parenting practices. Emphasizing the role of the parents and teaching positive parenting practices and authoritative parenting styles may increase success of prevention programs.

  10. Authoritarian parenting and youth depression: Results from a national study.

    PubMed

    King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Merianos, Ashley L

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent illness affecting youth across the nation. The study purpose was to examine depression and authoritarian parenting among youth from 12 to 17 years of age. A secondary data analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health was performed in the present study. All participants in the present study were youth (N = 17,399) nationwide. The results revealed that 80.6% of youth participants reported having five or more depressive symptoms. Parenting styles based on depression significantly differed among males, females, 12-13-year-olds, 14-15-year-olds, and 16-17-year-olds. Specifically, those who reported experiencing authoritarian parenting practices were more likely to report depressive symptoms compared to their counterparts who experienced authoritative parenting practices. Emphasizing the role of the parents and teaching positive parenting practices and authoritative parenting styles may increase success of prevention programs. PMID:26939843

  11. Are your patients depressed? Implications for dental practice.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Dale A

    2003-05-01

    Depressive disorders traditionally reside outside the realm of customary dental practice. Nonetheless, one in every five patients who visits a dentist experiences clinically significant symptoms of depression. The clinical implications of this are substantial. Depression is associated with diminished salivary flow and the complaint of dryness of mouth. It is associated with a diminished and distorted taste sensation, and a higher oral lactobacillus count. Depression is a risk factor for the development of dental caries, periodontal disease, and the erosive variant of oral lichen planus. Antidepressant medications can produce xerostomia, dysgeusia and bruxism. Depressive illness is a legitimate medical condition, with recognizable signs and symptoms, definable pathophysiology, and a significant response to treatment. Unfortunately, despite the availability of effective therapeutic measures, the majority of patients remain untreated. Routine dental checkup visits provide an opportunity for screening. PMID:12756671

  12. PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS AND LEUKOCYTE TELOMERE LENGTH: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS LINKING MENTAL ILLNESS WITH CELLULAR AGING

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Epel, Elissa S.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Révész, Dóra; Verhoeven, Josine E.; Reus, Victor I.; Lin, Jue; Mahan, Laura; Hough, Christina M.; Rosser, Rebecca; Bersani, F. Saverio; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric illnesses are associated with early mortality and with an increased risk of developing physical diseases that are more typically seen in the elderly. Moreover, certain psychiatric illnesses may be associated with accelerated cellular aging, evidenced by shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which could underlie this association. Shortened LTL reflects a cell’s mitotic history and cumulative exposure to inflammation and oxidation as well as the availability of telomerase, a telomere-lengthening enzyme. Critically short telomeres can cause cells to undergo senescence, apoptosis or genomic instability, and shorter LTL correlates with poorer health and predicts mortality. Emerging data suggest that LTL may be reduced in certain psychiatric illnesses, perhaps in proportion to exposure to the psychiatric illnesses, although conflicting data exist. Telomerase has been less well characterized in psychiatric illnesses, but a role in depression and in antidepressant and neurotrophic effects has been suggested by preclinical and clinical studies. In this article, studies on LTL and telomerase activity in psychiatric illnesses are critically reviewed, potential mediators are discussed, and future directions are suggested. A deeper understanding of cellular aging in psychiatric illnesses could lead to re-conceptualizing them as systemic illnesses with manifestations inside and outside the brain and could identify new treatment targets. PMID:25999120

  13. Illness behaviour in mental ill-health in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    el-Islam, M F; Abu-Dagga, S I

    1990-09-01

    Two hundred and eight individuals were interviewed in order to study the behaviour they adopt in relation to the most common somatic and emotional symptoms of mental ill-health. Illness behaviour included ignoring, brooding, self-help and consultation of others. Older individuals tended more frequently to resort to meditation, native healers and doctors. Males consulted doctors more than females. Brooding was more frequent in well educated subjects. A group of married expatriates who left their wives in their original countries were the most likely to consult doctors. Education and marital status were the most predictive of brooding and self-help behaviour. Self-help was the most commonly adopted illness behaviour. The results are explained in terms of the social and cultural background of the individuals studied because this influences their methods of expressing distress and their action in relation to symptoms.

  14. Spouse health status, depressed affect, and resilience in mid and late life: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bookwala, Jamila

    2014-04-01

    This study used longitudinal data to examine the effects of spousal illness on depressive symptoms among middle-aged and older married individuals and the extent to which the adverse effects of illness in a spouse were mitigated by 2 psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem. Using 1,704 married participants who were 51 years of age on average, depressive symptoms were compared in 4 groups varying in their experience of spousal health transitions: those whose spouse remained ill at T1 and T2, those whose spouse declined in health from T1 to T2, those whose spouse's health improved from T1 to T2, and those whose spouse remained healthy at both time points. Mixed analyses of covariance showed that, as hypothesized, having a spouse who became or remained ill over time was linked to greater depressed affect by T2, whereas having a spouse improve in health was associated with a decline in depressive symptomatology. Moderated regression analyses indicated that while higher mastery and self-esteem were linked to lower depressed affect in general, these resources were especially protective against depressed affect for those whose spouse remained ill at both time points. These findings are at the intersection of life course theory and the stress process model highlighting the contextual forces in and the interconnectedness of individual development as well as the plasticity and resilience evident in adaptation to stress during mid and late life.

  15. Cognitions and Procedures in Response to Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diefenbach, Michael A.; And Others

    Recent research in illness has stressed the importance of constructive processes as determinants for coping and appraisal with illnesses. The goal of this study was to construct a lexicon of cognitive and behavioral responses people employ to cope with illness. Undergraduate college students (N=105) were given two illness scenarios describing the…

  16. Depression and Social Context: Primary Supporter Relationship Factors Associated with Depressive Symptoms among a Disadvantaged Population with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlton, Amy R.; Curry, Aaron; Hua, Wei; Wissow, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Social support is associated with better health outcomes among chronically ill individuals, yet support receipt can be stressful. The study examined supporter relationship factors, among n = 156 main-supporter-HIV+support-recipient dyads, associated with recipient's depression (CES-D greater than or equal to 16). Results indicated that support…

  17. Somali Refugees' Perceptions of Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Bettmann, Joanna E; Penney, Deb; Clarkson Freeman, Pamela; Lecy, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 13% of the U.S. population is comprised of foreign-born individuals, with Somalis constituting one of the largest resettled groups. Research suggests that, among Somali refugees, rates of mental illness are high. Yet research shows Somalis underutilize mental health services. Understanding their perceptions of mental illness and its cures may help practitioners to design more effective treatments for this population. Thus, this pilot study investigated Somali refugees' perceptions of mental illness and its treatments. Using purposive sampling, this qualitative study interviewed 20 Somali refugees using a semi-structured interview guide. Qualitative analysis yielded participants' perceptions of mental illness through their descriptions of physical symptoms accompanying mental illness, the stigma of mental illness, causes of mental illness, medical and non-medical treatments for mental illness, spirit possession causing mental illness, and the Qur'an as treatment for mental illness. Such information may help practitioners in the United States approach Somali clients in the most culturally coherent manner.

  18. The Relationship between Body Mass Index and Depression among High School Girls in Ahvaz

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Forough; Mohammadpour, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, obesity and depression are two major illnesses that are on the rise all over the world and threaten human health. This research was done to determine the relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and depression among Ahvaz high school female students. Method. In a descriptive-analytical study using stratified random sampling, 400 female high school students in academic year of 2013-2014 were picked and their height and weight were measured. BMI was classified based on World Health Organization classification. To assess the severity of depression, Beck depression questionnaire was used. In order to analyze the data, descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test were used. Results. In terms of BMI 9% of students were slim, 77% were at an acceptable level, and 14% were overweight. Also, the prevalence of depression was 86.20% major depression and 13.79% moderate depression for obese persons, 10.41% major depression and 70.83% moderate depression for overweight persons, 8.78% major depression and 12.97% moderate depression for normal weight persons, and 9% moderate depression for slim persons. The relationship between BMI and depression among high school students is positive and significant (P < 0.001; r = 0.555). Conclusion. There is a positive and significant relationship between BMI and the severity of depression among Ahvaz high school female students. PMID:27689134

  19. The Relationship between Body Mass Index and Depression among High School Girls in Ahvaz.

    PubMed

    Tashakori, Ashraf; Riahi, Forough; Mohammadpour, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, obesity and depression are two major illnesses that are on the rise all over the world and threaten human health. This research was done to determine the relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and depression among Ahvaz high school female students. Method. In a descriptive-analytical study using stratified random sampling, 400 female high school students in academic year of 2013-2014 were picked and their height and weight were measured. BMI was classified based on World Health Organization classification. To assess the severity of depression, Beck depression questionnaire was used. In order to analyze the data, descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test were used. Results. In terms of BMI 9% of students were slim, 77% were at an acceptable level, and 14% were overweight. Also, the prevalence of depression was 86.20% major depression and 13.79% moderate depression for obese persons, 10.41% major depression and 70.83% moderate depression for overweight persons, 8.78% major depression and 12.97% moderate depression for normal weight persons, and 9% moderate depression for slim persons. The relationship between BMI and depression among high school students is positive and significant (P < 0.001; r = 0.555). Conclusion. There is a positive and significant relationship between BMI and the severity of depression among Ahvaz high school female students. PMID:27689134

  20. The Relationship between Body Mass Index and Depression among High School Girls in Ahvaz

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Forough; Mohammadpour, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, obesity and depression are two major illnesses that are on the rise all over the world and threaten human health. This research was done to determine the relationship between Body Mass Index (BMI) and depression among Ahvaz high school female students. Method. In a descriptive-analytical study using stratified random sampling, 400 female high school students in academic year of 2013-2014 were picked and their height and weight were measured. BMI was classified based on World Health Organization classification. To assess the severity of depression, Beck depression questionnaire was used. In order to analyze the data, descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test were used. Results. In terms of BMI 9% of students were slim, 77% were at an acceptable level, and 14% were overweight. Also, the prevalence of depression was 86.20% major depression and 13.79% moderate depression for obese persons, 10.41% major depression and 70.83% moderate depression for overweight persons, 8.78% major depression and 12.97% moderate depression for normal weight persons, and 9% moderate depression for slim persons. The relationship between BMI and depression among high school students is positive and significant (P < 0.001; r = 0.555). Conclusion. There is a positive and significant relationship between BMI and the severity of depression among Ahvaz high school female students.

  1. Rehabilitation of mentally ill women.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Rajni; Hashim, Uzma

    2015-07-01

    Women, the fair sex, are principal providers of care and support to families. But, they are considered to be the weaker sex and one of the most powerless and marginalized sections of our society. The provision of Rehabilitation for mentally ill women has been, and still is, one of the major challenges for mental health systems reform in the last decades, for various reasons. The present paper discusses the global and Indian scenario of rehabilitation of mentally ill women and goes on to detail the contribution of the state and voluntary agencies in this regard. It explores the need of recovery, multilayered strategy of Rehabilitation services and the availability of present services. The stigma attached and legal defects which interfere in good quality of life for the mentally ill women are reviewed. Strategies for changes in future are recommended. PMID:26330653

  2. Rehabilitation of mentally ill women

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Rajni; Hashim, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Women, the fair sex, are principal providers of care and support to families. But, they are considered to be the weaker sex and one of the most powerless and marginalized sections of our society. The provision of Rehabilitation for mentally ill women has been, and still is, one of the major challenges for mental health systems reform in the last decades, for various reasons. The present paper discusses the global and Indian scenario of rehabilitation of mentally ill women and goes on to detail the contribution of the state and voluntary agencies in this regard. It explores the need of recovery, multilayered strategy of Rehabilitation services and the availability of present services. The stigma attached and legal defects which interfere in good quality of life for the mentally ill women are reviewed. Strategies for changes in future are recommended. PMID:26330653

  3. Technology, Society, and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    SE Keefe, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Technology is rapidly changing society, and many activities now require the ability to use technology. This situation has the potential to lead to problems for several populations, including the elderly, the disadvantaged, and people with severe mental illness. In this column, we review the state of technology as it affects daily activities. We then review previous efforts to use technology positively for both the assessment and treatment of psychiatric conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder and severe mental illness. We conclude that technology-based interventions and assessment strategies have the potential to deliver benefit to a wide array of older people and those with severe mental illness, including reaching people who would not have had access otherwise. PMID:23346519

  4. [Historical notes on the therapy of depression].

    PubMed

    Haenel, T

    1986-11-22

    Melancholy originally had another meaning from the present one. Only since the last century has melancholy taken on the meaning of severe depression. The Arabs were the first to introduce special wards for the mentally ill in their hospitals in the 8th and 9th centuries. In the West, mental wards in general hospitals have been known since the 13th century only. In the Renaissance dietary measures played an important part in the treatment of depression. Lean meat, fresh eggs, freshwater fish and particularly grapes were recommended. In the 17th and 18th centuries music therapy against depression came back into favour after being used in ancient times. In the 19th century opium was recommended and held its ground well into the middle of our century. Various methods and drugs were recommended and used for the therapy of depression in the 19th century, such as baths and massage, ferrous iodide, arsenic, ergot, strophantin, and cinchona. Actual antidepressants have been known only for approximately 30 years. The classic papers concerning therapy with lithium salts date back to the years 1948/49. It is a little known fact, however, that lithium salts had been used as prophylactic treatment against periodic depression 50 years earlier. PMID:3541174

  5. Caring for mentally ill people.

    PubMed Central

    van Os, J.; Neeleman, J.

    1994-01-01

    Despite legislation to harmonise mental health practice throughout Europe and convergence in systems of training there remains an extraordinary diversity in psychiatric practice in Europe. Approaches to tackling substance misuse vary among nations; statistics on psychiatric morbidity are affected by different approaches to diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders; attitudes towards mental illness show definite international differences. Everywhere, though, mental health care for patients with psychotic illnesses is a "cinderella service," and there is a general move towards care falling increasingly on the family and the community. PMID:7987157

  6. Positive mental health and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Heather

    2014-09-01

    Based on the Mental Health Continuum Short Form administered in the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey - Mental Health (CCHS-MH), the percentages of Canadians aged 15 or older classified as having flourishing, moderate or languishing mental health were 76.9%, 21.6% and 1.5%, respectively. Compared with estimates for other countries, a higher percentage of Canadians were flourishing. In accordance with the complete mental health model, mental health was also assessed in combination with the presence or absence of mental illness (depression; bipolar disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; alcohol, cannabis or other drug abuse or dependence). An estimated 72.5% of Canadians (19.8 million) were classified as having complete mental health; that is they were flourishing and did not meet the criteria for any of the six past 12-month mental or substance use disorders included in the CCHS-MH. Age, marital status, socio-economic status, spirituality and physical health were associated with complete mental health. Men and women were equally likely to be in complete mental health. PMID:25229895

  7. Gulf War illness: a view from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Malcolm; Kelsall, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Australia sent a small, mostly naval, deployment to the 1991 Gulf War. When papers and media concerns arose about unexplained Gulf War illnesses in Gulf War troops from other countries, Australia decided to undertake its own study of Australian veterans. Undertaking a later study, more than 10 years after the Gulf War, allowed us to incorporate some methodological improvements on previous research, such as the inclusion of a face-to-face health assessment where more objective health data could be collected in addition to using a postal questionnaire. Despite the different Gulf War experience for the mostly naval Australian group, there were remarkable consistencies in the patterns of multiple symptom reporting found in overseas studies, including the fact that no unique symptom clusters were identified. In general, this excess symptom reporting was not found to occur with excesses in more objective measures of physical health. These objective physical measures included a wide range of haematological, biochemical and serological markers, a physical examination, spirometry and a step test of fatigability. In contrast, several psychological disorders, including anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and substance abuse, were found to occur in excess in the Australian Gulf War group and were associated with Gulf War psychological stressors. These findings have helped raise awareness in Australia of psychological health problems in deployed military personnel. PMID:16687266

  8. Mental illness among Bhutanese shamans in Nepal.

    PubMed

    van Ommeren, Mark; Komproe, Ivan; Cardeña, Etzel; Thapa, Suraj B; Prasain, Dinesh; de Jong, Joop T V M; Sharma, Bhogendra

    2004-04-01

    Despite efforts to promote traditional medicine, allopathic practitioners often look with distrust at traditional practices. Shamans in particular are often regarded with ambivalence and have been considered mentally ill people. We tested the hypothesis that shamanism is an expression of psychopathology. In the Bhutanese refugee community in Nepal, a community with a high number of shamans, we surveyed a representative community sample of 810 adults and assessed ICD-10 mental disorders through structured diagnostic interviews. Approximately 7% of male refugees and 0.5% of female refugees reported being shamans. After controlling for demographic differences, the shamans did not differ from the comparison group in terms of 12-month and lifetime ICD-10 severe depressive episode, specific phobia, persistent somatoform pain, posttraumatic stress, generalized anxiety, or dissociative disorders. This first-ever, community-based, psychiatric epidemiological survey among shamans indicated no evidence that shamanism is an expression of psychopathology. The study's finding may assist in rectifying shamans' reputation, which has been tainted by past speculation of psychopathology.

  9. Assessment of Intra-subject Variability in the Bioavailability of Chlorpromazine Hydrochloride

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Anti-Psychotic; Management of Manifestations of Psychotic Disorders; Treatment of Schizophrenia; Control Nausea and Vomiting; Relief of Restlessness and Apprehension Before Surgery; Acute Intermittent Porphyria; Adjunct in the Treatment of Tetanus; Control Manifestations of the Manic Type of Mani-depressive Illness; Relief of Intractable Hiccups

  10. Major Disorders of Mind and Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershon, Elliot S.; Rieder, Ronald O.

    1992-01-01

    Presents research findings relating to the major disorders of the mind and brain. Discusses the anatomic, biochemical and hereditary bases of schizophrenia and manic-depressive illness. Vignettes provide additional information and diagrams of the brain stress system, medicines for mental disorders, and a graph of generational trends. (MCO)

  11. Augmentation of light therapy in difficult-to-treat depressed patients: an open-label trial in both unipolar and bipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Camardese, Giovanni; Leone, Beniamino; Serrani, Riccardo; Walstra, Coco; Di Nicola, Marco; Della Marca, Giacomo; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the clinical benefits of bright light therapy (BLT) as an adjunct treatment to ongoing psychopharmacotherapy, both in unipolar and bipolar difficult-to-treat depressed (DTD) outpatients. Methods In an open-label study, 31 depressed outpatients (16 unipolar and 15 bipolar) were included to undergo 3 weeks of BLT. Twenty-five completed the treatment and 5-week follow-up. Main outcome measures Clinical outcomes were evaluated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The Snaith–Hamilton Pleasure Scale and the Depression Retardation Rating Scale were used to assess changes in anhedonia and psychomotor retardation, respectively. Results The adjunctive BLT seemed to influence the course of the depressive episode, and a statistically significant reduction in HDRS scores was reported since the first week of therapy. The treatment was well-tolerated, and no patients presented clinical signs of (hypo)manic switch during the overall treatment period. At the end of the study (after 5 weeks from BLT discontinuation), nine patients (36%, eight unipolar and one bipolar) still showed a treatment response. BLT augmentation also led to a significant improvement of psychomotor retardation. Conclusion BLT combined with the ongoing pharmacological treatment offers a simple approach, and it might be effective in rapidly ameliorating depressive core symptoms of vulnerable DTD outpatients. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind clinical trial on larger samples. PMID:26396517

  12. Familiarity with mental illness and approval of structural discrimination against psychiatric patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Schomerus, Georg; Matschinger, Herbert; Angermeyer, Matthias C

    2007-01-01

    Structural discrimination against psychiatric patients may occur as a result of distribution of resources in the health system. We examine whether familiarity with mental illness, which reduces discrimination on the individual level, also moderates the approval of structural discrimination in health care funding. We conducted a representative survey of the German population (N=5025) in 2001 using a fully structured personal interview, including a measure of preferences for the allocation of health resources and an assessment of familiarity with mental illness. The approval of structural discrimination was inversely related to the individual's familiarity with mental illness in depression and, to a lesser extent, in schizophrenia. This relationship was absent for alcoholism and generally weak for contacts to mentally ill persons outside one's own family. Strategies successful in reducing individual discrimination are thus not necessarily suitable for combating structural discrimination and need to be tailored to their specific target.

  13. Music and melancholia.

    PubMed Central

    Wintersgill, P

    1994-01-01

    This is a brief look at the psychiatric ailments of some of the great composers: two of whom committed suicide; four suffered from severe depression; three had other assorted ailments; and three were suffering from manic depressive illnesses. Their mood swings are compared with their periods of intense composition. For some composers it seems that they are most productive immediately after a phase of depression. PMID:7853306

  14. UNIPOLAR AND BIPOLAR DEPRESSIONS—A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Rao, A. Venkoba

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY The paper discusses the emergence of the concept of polarity out of the rubric of manic depressive illness. The polar types are defined and changes in polarity, frequency and similarities and the differences between them are discussed. The author ventures to suggest that a change in the polarity viz., occurrence of mania in depressive or of depressive episodes in mania to be designated “LAP Phenomenon” after Leonhard, Angst and Perris who have been mainly responsible for the concept. PMID:21965967

  15. Comorbid illnesses and chest radiographic severity in African-American sarcoidosis patients.

    PubMed

    Westney, Gloria E; Habib, Sadia; Quarshie, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis disease expression differs along racial/ethnic lines and black race has been cited as a poor prognostic factor. Besides genetic, healthcare, and socioeconomic factors, comorbid illnesses may influence sarcoidosis disease expression. We set out to investigate the association between comorbid illnesses and chest radiographic severity in a population of African-American sarcoidosis patients. The study was designed as a retrospective database analysis. The hospital and outpatient databases of the Grady Health System were searched to capture adult patients between November 1999 and December 2003 with the ICD-9 codes of 135 or 519.8, along with all associated secondary and tertiary diagnostic codes. Patient electronic pathology and radiographic reports were reviewed for tissue biopsies showing noncaseating granulomas and for chest radiographic Scadding stage. A total of 165 African-American patients were identified (64% female, 43 +/- 10 years old). Ninety percent (149/165) had comorbid illnesses. The most frequent chronic comorbid illnesses were hypertension (39%), diabetes mellitus (19%), anemia (19%), asthma (15%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (15%), depression (13%), and heart failure (10%). Females had increased frequency and clustering of chronic illnesses. Chest radiographic stages were more severe in patients with anemia, depression, and those less than 40 years old. Males, within each chronic illnesses category, had more severe CXR stages compared to females; however, significance was not achieved. We concluded that most adult patients with sarcoidosis have comorbid illnesses and these, in addition to gender differences, may influence sarcoidosis disease expression. Screening for comorbid illnesses should be an important aspect of sarcoidosis patient management.

  16. Assessing illness- and non-illness-based motivations for violence in persons with major mental illness.

    PubMed

    Penney, Stephanie R; Morgan, Andrew; Simpson, Alexander I F

    2016-02-01

    Research on violence perpetrated by individuals with major mental illness (MMI) typically focuses on the presence of specific psychotic symptoms near the time of the violent act. This approach does not distinguish whether symptoms actually motivate the violence or were merely present at the material time. It also does not consider the possibility that non-illness-related factors (e.g., anger, substance use), or multiple motivations, may have been operative in driving violence. The failure to make these distinctions clouds our ability to understand the origins of violence in people with MMI, to accurately assess risk and criminal responsibility, and to appropriately target interventions to reduce and manage risk. This study describes the development of a new coding instrument designed to assess motivations for violence and offending among individuals with MMI, and reports on the scheme's interrater reliability. Using 72 psychiatric reports which had been submitted to the court to assist in determining criminal responsibility, we found that independent raters were able to assess different motivational influences for violence with a satisfactory degree of consistency. More than three-quarters (79.2%) of the sample were judged to have committed an act of violence as a primary result of illness, whereas 20.8% were deemed to have offended as a result of illness in conjunction with other non-illness-based motivating influences. Current findings have relevance for clarifying the rate of illness-driven violence among psychiatric patients, as well as legal and clinical issues related to violence risk and criminal responsibility more broadly.

  17. Illness representations, psychological distress and non-cardiac chest pain in patients attending an emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R.; Norman, P.; Goodacre, S.; Thompson, A.R.; McEachan, R.R.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Many patients who attend an emergency department (ED) with chest pain receive a diagnosis of non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), and often suffer poor psychological outcomes and continued pain. This study assessed the role of illness representations in explaining psychological distress and continued chest pain in patients attending an ED. Methods: ED NCCP patients (N = 138) completed measures assessing illness representations, anxiety, depression and quality of life (QoL) at baseline, and chest pain at one month. Results: Illness representations explained significant amounts of the variance in anxiety (Adj. R² = .38), depression (Adj. R² = .18) and mental QoL (Adj. R² = .36). A belief in psychological causes had the strongest associations with outcomes. At one month, 28.7% of participants reported experiencing frequent pain, 13.2% infrequent pain and 58.1% no pain. Anxiety, depression and poor QoL, but not illness representations, were associated with continued chest pain. Conclusions: The findings suggest that (i) continued chest pain is related to psychological distress and poor QoL, (ii) interventions should be aimed at reducing psychological distress and improving QoL and (iii) given the associations between perceived psychological causes and psychological distress/QoL, NCCP patients in the ED might benefit from psychological therapies to manage their chest pain. PMID:24831735

  18. The critically ill immunosuppressed patient

    SciTech Connect

    Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H. )

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the papers on the diagnosis and management of immunosuppressed patient. Some of the topics are: life-threatening organ failure in immunosuppressed patients; diagnosis and therapy of respiratory disease in the immunosuppressed patient; CNS complication of immunosuppression; infections; antineoplastic therapy of immunosuppressed patient; radiation therapy-issues in critically ill patient; AIDS; and management of bone marrow transplant patients.

  19. Program for the Chronically Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenherr, Arline; Schnarr, Barbara

    The program for chronically ill students in the Detroit public schools is described. Forms are presented listing needed information and implications for teachers of the following conditions: diabetes, sickle cell anemia, chronic renal failure, congenital heart disease, hemophilia, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, leukemia, and cystic fibrosis. The…

  20. Marriage, mental illness and law.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Indira; Reddy, Karri Rama; Kamath, Rabindra Mukund

    2015-07-01

    The Special Marriage Act (SMA), 1954 and the Hindu Marriage Act (HMA), 1955 have put restrictions on the marriage of persons with mental illness, which are proving to be detrimental to patients and their families. There is an urgent need to address this problem. The deficiencies in the existing legislation have been projected and constructive suggestions have been put forward. PMID:26330652