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Sample records for manipulated peritoneal cell

  1. [Ultrastructure of peritoneal mesothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Obradovic, M M; Stojimirovic, B B; Trpinac, D P; Milutinovic, D D; Obradovic, D I; Nesic, V B

    2001-01-01

    The introduction of peritoneal dialysis (PD) as a respectable modality of renal replacement therapy some three decades ago, suddenly drew attention of many authors to peritoneal membrane as insufficiently investigated structure. In order to explain the pathological changes in peritoneum due to renal diseases, it became necessary to explore the normal peritoneal structure. The aim of this study was to examine the morphology of peritoneal lining cells in healthy persons. Biopsies of the peritoneum were performed on 20 volunteer kidney donors. Tissue samples were taken during renal transplantation. Special care was taken in getting appropriate samples without artificial damage because of the extreme fragility of the peritoneal tissue. The preparing procedure was standard for routine HE staining and for plastic embedded semifine and fine sections studies. Semifine sections were made on ultramicrotome, stained with Toluidin blue and studied by light microscope, while fine sections were made by ultramicrotome and studied by transmission electron microscope. One layer of cuboidal or flattened lining cells present over the lamina propria connective tissue presented mesothelium. The cells were overlapped like tiles on the roof. Lateral parts of their interdigitated membranes were interconnected with different types of cell junctions: unpermeable, adhesion and communication junctions; inhibiting intercellular transport. Cell surface was often covered with great number of microvilli and lamellar bodies. A single kinocilia was also often present on apical cell surface. Nuclei were euchromatic with well developed nucleoli. Cytoplasm was filled with a great number of ribosomes, mitochondria, cisterns of rough endoplasmatic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, lamellar bodies and lipid inclusions. Numerous pinocytic vesicles on all parts of the membrane as well as in the cytoplasm indicating active endocytosis, egsocytosis and transcytosys in the process of secretion and reabsorption

  2. Microfluidics for manipulating cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xuan; Zheng, Wenfu; Sun, Jiashu; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-01-14

    Microfluidics, a toolbox comprising methods for precise manipulation of fluids at small length scales (micrometers to millimeters), has become useful for manipulating cells. Its uses range from dynamic management of cellular interactions to high-throughput screening of cells, and to precise analysis of chemical contents in single cells. Microfluidics demonstrates a completely new perspective and an excellent practical way to manipulate cells for solving various needs in biology and medicine. This review introduces and comments on recent achievements and challenges of using microfluidics to manipulate and analyze cells. It is believed that microfluidics will assume an even greater role in the mechanistic understanding of cell biology and, eventually, in clinical applications.

  3. Cell manipulation in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hoyoung; Kim, Kisoo; Lee, Won Gu

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in the lab-on-a-chip field in association with nano/microfluidics have been made for new applications and functionalities to the fields of molecular biology, genetic analysis and proteomics, enabling the expansion of the cell biology field. Specifically, microfluidics has provided promising tools for enhancing cell biological research, since it has the ability to precisely control the cellular environment, to easily mimic heterogeneous cellular environment by multiplexing, and to analyze sub-cellular information by high-contents screening assays at the single-cell level. Various cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics have been developed in accordance with specific objectives and applications. In this review, we examine the latest achievements of cell manipulation techniques in microfluidics by categorizing externally applied forces for manipulation: (i) optical, (ii) magnetic, (iii) electrical, (iv) mechanical and (v) other manipulations. We furthermore focus on history where the manipulation techniques originate and also discuss future perspectives with key examples where available.

  4. Peritonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Acute abdomen; Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; SBP; Cirrhosis - spontaneous peritonitis ... blood, body fluids, or pus in the belly ( abdomen ). One type is called spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SPP). ...

  5. Peritonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Peritonitis By Mayo Clinic Staff Peritonitis is inflammation of the peritoneum — a silk-like membrane that lines your inner abdominal ... usually due to a bacterial or fungal infection. Peritonitis can result from any rupture (perforation) in your ...

  6. Aquaporin-1 in the peritoneal membrane: implications for peritoneal dialysis and endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier; Ni, Jie; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc

    2005-09-01

    PD (peritoneal dialysis) is an established mode of renal replacement therapy, based on the exchange of fluid and solutes between blood in peritoneal capillaries and a dialysate that has been introduced into the peritoneal cavity. The dialysis process involves diffusive and convective transports and osmosis through the PM (peritoneal membrane). Computer simulations predicted that the PM contains ultrasmall pores (radius <3 A, 1 A=10(-10) m), responsible for up to 50% of UF (ultrafiltration), i.e. the osmotically driven water movement during PD. Several lines of evidence suggest that AQP1 (aquaporin-1) is the ultrasmall pore responsible for transcellular water permeability during PD. Treatment with corticosteroids induces the expression of AQP1 in the PM and improves water permeability and UF in rats without affecting the osmotic gradient and permeability for small solutes. Studies in knockout mice provided further evidence that osmotically driven water transport across the PM is mediated by AQP1. AQP1 and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) show a distinct regulation within the endothelium lining the peritoneal capillaries. In acute peritonitis, the up-regulation of eNOS and increased release of nitric oxide dissipate the osmotic gradient and prevent UF, whereas AQP1 expression is unchanged. These results illustrate the usefulness of the PM to investigate the role and regulation of AQP1 in the endothelium. The results also emphasize the critical role of AQP1 during PD and suggest that manipulation of AQP1 expression may be used to increase water permeability across the PM.

  7. Phagocytosis of dying tumor cells by human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Britta Janina; Lindau, Dennis; Ripper, Dagmar; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Glatzle, Jörg; Witte, Maria; Beck, Henning; Keppeler, Hildegard; Lauber, Kirsten; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2011-05-15

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is an advanced form of metastatic disease characterized by cancer cell dissemination onto the peritoneum. It is commonly observed in ovarian and colorectal cancers and is associated with poor patient survival. Novel therapies consist of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, aiming at tumor cell death induction. The resulting dying tumor cells are considered to be eliminated by professional as well as semi-professional phagocytes. In the present study, we have identified a hitherto unknown type of 'amateur' phagocyte in this environment: human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HMCs). We demonstrate that HMCs engulf corpses of dying ovarian and colorectal cancer cells, as well as other types of apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric, confocal and electron microscopical analyses revealed that HMCs ingest dying cell fragments in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the internalized material subsequently traffics into late phagolysosomes. Regarding the mechanisms of prey cell recognition, our results show that HMCs engulf apoptotic corpses in a serum-dependent and -independent fashion and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that diverse opsonin receptor systems orchestrating dying cell clearance are expressed in HMCs at high levels. Our data strongly suggest that HMCs contribute to dying cell removal in the peritoneum, and future studies will elucidate in what manner this influences tumor cell dissemination and the antitumor immune response.

  8. Lack of galectin-3 up-regulates IgA expression by peritoneal B1 lymphocytes during B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Felipe L; Bernardes, Emerson S; Brand, Camila; dos Santos, Sofia N; Cabanel, Mariana P; Arcanjo, Kátia D; Brito, José M; Borojevic, Radovan; Chammas, Roger; El-Cheikh, Márcia C

    2016-02-01

    Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside-binding protein with an inhibitory role in B cell differentiation into plasma cells in distinct lymphoid tissues. We use a model of chronic schistosomiasis, a well-characterized experimental disease hallmarked by polyclonal B cell activation, in order to investigate the role of galectin-3 in controlling IgA production through peritoneal B1 cells. Chronically infected, galectin-3-deficient mice (Lgals3(-/-)) display peritoneal fluid hypercellularity, increased numbers of atypical peritoneal IgM(+)/IgA(+) B1a and B1b lymphocytes and histological disturbances in plasma cell niches when compared with Lgals3(+/+) mice. Similar to our infection model, peritoneal B1 cells from uninfected Lgals3(-/-) mice show enhanced switching to IgA after in vitro treatment with interleukin-5 plus transforming growth factor-β (IL-5 + TGF-β1). A higher number of IgA(+) B1a lymphocytes was found in the peritoneal cavity of Lgals3(-/-)-uninfected mice at 1 week after i.p. injection of IL-5 + TGF-β1; this correlates with the increased levels of secreted IgA detected in the peritoneal fluid of these mice after cytokine treatment. Interestingly, a higher number of degranulated mast cells is present in the peritoneal cavity of uninfected and Schistosoma mansoni-infected Lgals3(-/-) mice, indicating that, at least in part, mast cells account for the enhanced differentiation of B1 into IgA-producing B cells found in the absence of galectin-3. Thus, a novel role is revealed for galectin-3 in controlling the expression of surface IgA by peritoneal B1 lymphocytes; this might have important implications for manipulating the mucosal immune response.

  9. Sperm cells manipulation employing dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Cruzaley, E; Cota-Elizondo, P A; Sánchez, D; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2013-10-01

    Infertility studies are an important growing field, where new methods for the manipulation, enrichment and selection of sperm cells are required. Microfluidic techniques offer attractive advantages such as requirement of low sample volume and short processing times in the range of second or minutes. Presented here is the application of insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) for the enrichment and separation of mature and spermatogenic cells by employing a microchannel with cylindrical insulating structures with DC electric potentials in the range of 200-1500 V. The results demonstrated that iDEP has the potential to concentrate sperm cells and distinguish between mature and spermatogenic cells by exploiting the differences in shape which lead to differences in electric polarization. Viability assessments revealed that a significant percentage of the cells are viable after the dielectrophoretic treatment, opening the possibility for iDEP to be developed as a tool in infertility studies.

  10. Rapid white blood cell detection for peritonitis diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Mei, Zhe; Chiu, Yu-Jui; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    A point-of-care and home-care lab-on-a-chip (LoC) system that integrates a microfluidic spiral device as a concentrator with an optical-coding device as a cell enumerator is demonstrated. The LoC system enumerates white blood cells from dialysis effluent of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. The preliminary results show that the white blood cell counts from our system agree well with the results from commercial flow cytometers. The LoC system can potentially bring significant benefits to end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients that are on peritoneal dialysis (PD).

  11. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  12. Virus manipulation of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, R; Costa, H; Parkhouse, R M E

    2012-07-01

    Viruses depend on host cell resources for replication and access to those resources may be limited to a particular phase of the cell cycle. Thus manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment. For example, viruses capable of infecting nondividing cells induce S phase in order to activate the host DNA replication machinery and provide the nucleotide triphosphates necessary for viral DNA replication (Flemington in J Virol 75:4475-4481, 2001; Sullivan and Pipas in Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:179-202, 2002). Viruses have developed several strategies to subvert the cell cycle by association with cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and molecules that regulate their activity. Viruses tend to act on cellular proteins involved in a network of interactions in a way that minimal protein-protein interactions lead to a major effect. The complex and interactive nature of intracellular signaling pathways controlling cell division affords many opportunities for virus manipulation strategies. Taking the maxim "Set a thief to catch a thief" as a counter strategy, however, provides us with the very same virus evasion strategies as "ready-made tools" for the development of novel antivirus therapeutics. The most obvious are attenuated virus vaccines with critical evasion genes deleted. Similarly, vaccines against viruses causing cancer are now being successfully developed. Finally, as viruses have been playing chess with our cell biology and immune responses for millions of years, the study of their evasion strategies will also undoubtedly reveal new control mechanisms and their corresponding cellular intracellular signaling pathways.

  13. Source of peritoneal proteoglycans. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells synthesize and secrete mainly small dermatan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Yung, S.; Thomas, G. J.; Stylianou, E.; Williams, J. D.; Coles, G. A.; Davies, M.

    1995-01-01

    This study describes experiments that compare the proteoglycans (PGs) extracted from the dialysate from patients receiving continuous peritoneal ambulatory dialysis (CAPD) with those secreted by metabolically labeled human peritoneal mesothelial cells in vitro. The PGs isolated from both sources were predominantly small chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate PGs. Western blot of the core proteins obtained after chondroitin ABC lyase treatment with specific antibodies identified decorin and biglycan. With [35S]sulfate and [35S]methionine as labeling precursors it was shown that dermatan sulfate rather than chondroitin sulfate were the major glycosaminoglycan chains and that decorin was the predominant species. These data provide the first evidence that human peritoneal mesothelial cells may be the principal source of PGs in the peritoneum. Given the proposed functions of decorin and biglycan, the results suggest that these PGs may be involved in the control of transforming growth factor-beta activity and collagen fibril formation in the peritoneum. Images Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856761

  14. Ultrastructural Changes in Murine Peritoneal Cells Following Cyclophosphamide Administration

    PubMed Central

    Chin, K. N.; Hudson, G.

    1974-01-01

    Peritoneal cells were studied at intervals of between 6 h and 30 days following a single intravenous injection of a sublethal dose of cyclophosphamide. With the electron microscope, evidence of cell damage and death could be seen at 6 h, and by 12 h large numbers of dead cells were noted, either lying free or within the cytoplasm of macrophages. Most of the damaged cells were lymphocytes but degenerating blast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils and mast cells were also identified. Nuclei were seen in which margination of chromatin had occurred but nuclei of uniform density were also prominent and showed irregular shape and lobulation. Macrophages exhibited all stages of phagocytosis and digestion and a few phagocytes of atypical appearance were noted. By 24 h most of the dead cells lay within the cytoplasm of macrophages which showed many phagocytic inclusions as well as lipid droplets. By 6 days, the peritoneal cells had regained normal appearances although the proportion of lymphoid cells was still reduced. By the 18th day, all features were indistinguishable from normal. The changes observed showed a general similarity to those noted previously in the lymphoreticular cells of the Peyer's patch; they provide no evidence that the environment of the peritoneal cavity protects cells against the action of cyclophosphamide. ImagesFigs. 4-6Figs. 7-9Figs. 10-12Figs. 1-3 PMID:4447790

  15. Stimulation of peritoneal cell arginase by bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J L; Yohe, W B; Morrison, D C

    1980-05-01

    The conditions under which bacterial endotoxins stimulate arginase production in mouse peritoneal macrophages have been defined. Both lipid-A and lipid-A-associated protein are potent activators. Fetal calf serum and normal mouse serum enhance macrophage arginase levels in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS in the amount of 10(-1) microgram/ml represents a maximal stimulus for macrophage arginase production and release. Thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal cells have increased arginase activity, compared with resident cells. This activity can be stimulated further by the addition of LPS. Arginase levels may alter the outcome of in vitro immunologic processes by depleting arginine and may also serve as a useful indicator of the state of activation of macrophages.

  16. A very advanced case of a T cell peritoneal lymphomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ridolfini, Marco Pericoli; Caprino, Paola; Berardi, Stefano; Rotondi, Fabio; Cusumano, Giacomo; Sofo, Luigi; Pacelli, Fabio; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista

    2012-01-01

    Small-bowel lymphoma is not a common disease, accounting for 15-20% of primary extranodal gastrointestinal lymphomas. Peritoneal lymphomatosis is considered a rare and aggressive presentation. We describe the case of a 55 years-old man affected by T-cell intestinal lymphoma, presenting with diffuse abdominal involvement, bowel dysfunction, severe ascites and pleural effusion, who underwent surgery. Clinical course led dramatically to death. Preoperative cytology and radiologic investigations did not yield diagnosis and were unable to differentiate between peritoneal carcinosis and lymphomatosis. It is suggested that, in such advanced cases, with rapidly deteriorating clinical conditions and huge systemic involvement, surgery is not indicated. On the contrary, maximum effort has to be spent to obtain a preoperative diagnosis.

  17. Transition of Mesothelial Cell to Fibroblast in Peritoneal Dialysis: EMT, Stem Cell or Bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Dong, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Jiefu; Liu, Fuyou; Chen, Guochun

    2015-01-01

    Long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to fibrotic changes in the peritoneum, characterized by loss of mesothelial cells (MCs) and thickening of the submesothelial area with an accumulation of collagen and myofibroblasts. The origin of myofibroblasts is a central question in peritoneal fibrosis that remains unanswered at present. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have suggested that MCs, through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), contribute to the pool of peritoneal myofibroblasts. However, recent work has placed significant doubts on the paradigm of EMT in organ fibrogenesis (in the kidney particularly), highlighting the need to reconsider the role of EMT in the generation of myofibroblasts in peritoneal fibrosis. In particular, selective cell isolation and lineage-tracing experiments have suggested the existence of progenitor cells in the peritoneum, which are able to switch to fibroblast-like cells when stimulated by the local environment. These findings highlight the plastic nature of MCs and its contribution to peritoneal fibrogenesis. In this review, we summarize the key findings and caveats of EMT in organ fibrogenesis, with a focus on PD-related peritoneal fibrosis, and discuss the potential of peritoneal MCs as a source of myofibroblasts. PMID:25700459

  18. Optoelectronic tweezers for microparticle and cell manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 .mu.m or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or groups of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  19. Optoelectronic Tweezers for Microparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Ming Chiang (Inventor); Chiou, Pei-Yu (Inventor); Ohta, Aaron T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An optical image-driven light induced dielectrophoresis (DEP) apparatus and method are described which provide for the manipulation of particles or cells with a diameter on the order of 100 micromillimeters or less. The apparatus is referred to as optoelectric tweezers (OET) and provides a number of advantages over conventional optical tweezers, in particular the ability to perform operations in parallel and over a large area without damage to living cells. The OET device generally comprises a planar liquid-filled structure having one or more portions which are photoconductive to convert incoming light to a change in the electric field pattern. The light patterns are dynamically generated to provide a number of manipulation structures that can manipulate single particles and cells or group of particles/cells. The OET preferably includes a microscopic imaging means to provide feedback for the optical manipulation, such as detecting position and characteristics wherein the light patterns are modulated accordingly.

  20. Peritoneal mast cell stabilization potential of Pothos scandens L

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Duraiswamy, B.; Satishkumar, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity of Pothos scandens extracts Materials and Methods: Pothos scandens L. (family- Araceae) aerial part was successively extracted with ethanol and aqueous to prepare extract of the plant. The extracts of P. scandens were evaluated for stabilization of mast cell in rat allergic models. The extract of P. scandens ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous (1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) was studied for peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity in rat mesenteric preparation induced by C 48/80. Result: Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of carbohydrates, fixed oil, proteins, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. The ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous extracts of P. scandens L. showed dose dependent increase in the number of intact cells when compare with C48/80 at the concentration of 10 and 100 μg/ml. It virtues further work towards the isolation of phytoconstituents from this plant. Conclusion: This finding provides evidence that the P. scandens L. inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and mast cell degranulation. P. scandens has a potential as allergic anti- asthmatic agent. PMID:23542883

  1. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    PubMed

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-12-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  2. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-01-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  3. Pericardial, pleural and peritoneal involvement in a patient with primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Keklik, Muzaffer; Yildirim, Afra; Keklik, Ertugrul; Ertan, Sirac; Deniz, Kemal; Ozturk, Fahir; Ileri, Ibrahim; Cerci, Ilkcan; Camlica, Demet; Cetin, Mustafa; Eser, Bulent

    2015-05-01

    Primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma is a rare form of gastointestinal tumour. Although peritoneal carcinomatosis accompanied by malignant ascites is relatively common, mantle cell lymphoma presenting with ascites is rare. Also, effusions involving pericardial and pleural cavities are uncommon during the course of lymphomas. We report the first case in which pericardial, pleural and peritoneal effusion of a primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma.

  4. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  5. Single-cell analysis reveals new subset markers of murine peritoneal macrophages and highlights macrophage dynamics upon Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Accarias, Solène; Genthon, Clémence; Rengel, David; Boullier, Séverine; Foucras, Gilles; Tabouret, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Resident macrophages play a central role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. Here, we used single cell-based qPCR coupled with flow cytometry analysis to further define the phenotypes of large and small resident peritoneal macrophages (LPMs and SPMs, respectively) in mice. We demonstrated that the expression of Cxcl13, IfngR1, Fizz-1 and Mrc-1 clearly distinguished between LPMs and SPMs subsets. Using these markers, the dynamics of peritoneal macrophages in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced peritonitis model were analyzed. We found that S. aureus infection triggers a massive macrophage disappearance reaction in both subsets. Thereafter, inflammatory monocytes rapidly infiltrated the cavity and differentiated to replenish the SPMs. Although phenotypically indistinguishable from resident SPMs by flow cytometry, newly recruited SPMs had a different pattern of gene expression dominated by M2 markers combined with M1 associated features (inos expression). Interestingly, S. aureus elicited SPMs showed a robust expression of Cxcl13, suggesting that these cells may endorse the role of depleted LPMs and contribute to restoring peritoneal homeostasis. These data provide information on both resident and recruited macrophages dynamics upon S. aureus infection and demonstrate that single-cell phenotyping is a promising and highly valuable approach to unraveling macrophage diversity and plasticity.

  6. Nanopipette Apparatus for Manipulating Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seger, R. Adam (Inventor); Actis, Paolo (Inventor); Vilozny, Boaz (Inventor); Pourmand, Nader (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Disclosed herein are methods and systems for controlled ejection of desired material onto surfaces including in single cells using nanopipettes, as well as ejection onto and into cells. Some embodiments are directed to a method and system comprising nanopipettes combined with an xyz controller for depositing a user defined pattern on an arbitrary substrate for the purpose of controlled cell adhesion and growth. Alternate embodiments are directed to a method and system comprising nanopipettes combined with an xyz controller and electronic control of a voltage differential in a bore of the nanopipette electroosmotically injecting material into a cell in a high-throughput manner and with minimal damage to the cell. Yet other embodiments are directed to method and system comprising functionalized nanopipettes combined with scanning ion conductance microscopy for studying molecular interactions and detection of biomolecules inside a single living cell.

  7. Resident peritoneal leukocytes are important sources of MMP-9 during zymosan peritonitis: superior contribution of macrophages over mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Lelito, Monika; Kozakiewicz, Elzbieta; van Rooijen, Nico; Plytycz, Barbara; Arnold, Bernd

    2007-11-15

    Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is crucial for normal neutrophil infiltration into zymosan-inflamed peritoneum. During the course of zymosan peritonitis MMP-9 is produced in a biphasic-manner as its presence is detectable as early as 30 min post zymosan and then between 2 and 8 h of inflammation. As inflammatory leukocytes were shown to produce MMP-9 we asked if also resident leukocytes, mast cells and macrophages, contribute to its production. And furthermore, if their contribution is limited only to the early phase of inflammation or extends to the later stages. For this purpose some mice were depleted of either resident macrophages or functional mast cells and expression of MMP-9 in peritoneal leukocytes and its release to the exudate were monitored. It turned out that depletion of peritoneal macrophages decreased both MMP-9 content in the leukocytes and its release to the inflammatory exudate at 30 min and 6h of peritonitis. The functional depletion of mast cells also caused a significant decrease in the production/release of MMP-9 that was especially apparent at the early time point (30 min). Moreover, the study shows concomitant kinetics of MMP-9 expression in leukocytes and its release to the exudatory fluid. The findings indicate that resident tissue leukocytes, and among them especially macrophages, constitute an important source of MMP-9 during acute peritoneal inflammation. Overall, the study shows that resident tissue leukocytes, mostly macrophages, constitute an important cellular source(s) of inflammation-related factors and should be regarded as possible targets of anti-inflammatory treatment.

  8. CD4-Positive T Cells and M2 Macrophages Dominate the Peritoneal Infiltrate of Patients with Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Sayed M.; Abrahams, Alferso C.; Korte, Mario R.; Zietse, Robert; de Vogel, Lisette L.; Boer, Walther H.; Dendooven, Amélie; Clahsen-van Groningen, Marian C.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a severe complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Previously, it has been shown that infiltrating CD4-positive T cells and M2 macrophages are associated with several fibrotic conditions. Therefore, the characteristics of the peritoneal cell infiltrate in EPS may be of interest to understand EPS pathogenesis. In this study, we aim to elucidate the composition of the peritoneal cell infiltrate in EPS patients and relate the findings to clinical outcome. Study Design, Setting, and Participants We studied peritoneal membrane biopsies of 23 EPS patients and compared them to biopsies of 15 PD patients without EPS. The cellular infiltrate was characterized by immunohistochemistry to detect T cells(CD3-positive), CD4-positive (CD4+) and CD8-positive T cell subsets, B cells(CD20-positive), granulocytes(CD15-positive), macrophages(CD68-positive), M1(CD80-positive), and M2(CD163-positive) macrophages. Tissues were analysed using digital image analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to investigate the survival in the different staining groups. Results The cellular infiltrate in EPS biopsies was dominated by mononuclear cells. For both CD3 and CD68, the median percentage of area stained was higher in biopsies of EPS as opposed to non-EPS patients (p<0.001). EPS biopsies showed a higher percentage of area stained for CD4 (1.29%(0.61-3.20)) compared to CD8 (0.71%(0.46-1.01), p = 0.04), while in the non-EPS group these cells were almost equally represented (respectively 0.28%(0.05-0.83) versus 0.22%(0.17-0.43), p = 0.97). The percentage of area stained for both CD80 and CD163 was higher in EPS than in non-EPS biopsies (p<0.001), with CD163+ cells being the most abundant phenotype. Virtually no CD20-positive and CD15-positive cells were present in biopsies of a subgroup of EPS patients. No relation was found between the composition of the mononuclear cell infiltrate and clinical outcome. Conclusions A

  9. TWEAK Promotes Peritoneal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Ana Belen; Aroeira, Luiz Stark; Bellon, Teresa; del Peso, Gloria; Jimenez-Heffernan, Jose; Santamaria, Beatriz; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Lopez-Cabrera, Manuel; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Selgas, Rafael; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is complicated by peritonitis episodes that cause loss of mesothelium and eventually sclerosing peritonitis. An improved understanding of the molecular contributors to peritoneal injury and defense may increase the therapeutic armamentarium to optimize peritoneal defenses while minimizing peritoneal injury. There is no information on the expression and function of the cytokine TWEAK and its receptor Fn14 during peritoneal injury. Fn14 expression and soluble TWEAK levels were measured in human PD peritoneal effluent cells or fluids with or without peritonitis. Fn14 expression was also analyzed in peritoneal biopsies from PD patients. Actions of intraperitoneal TWEAK were studied in mice in vivo. sTWEAK levels were increased in peritoneal effluent in PD peritonitis. Effluent sTWEAK levels correlated with the number of peritoneal macrophages (r = 0.491, p = 0.002). Potential TWEAK targets that express the receptor Fn14 include mesothelial cells and macrophages, as demonstrated by flow cytometry of peritoneal effluents and by analysis of peritoneal biopsies. Peritoneal biopsy Fn14 correlated with mesothelial injury, fibrosis and inflammation, suggesting a potential deleterious effect of TWEAK/Fn14. In this regard, intraperitoneal TWEAK administration to mice promoted peritoneal inflammation characterized by increased peritoneal effluent MCP-1, Fn14 and Gr1+ macrophages, increased mesothelial Fn14, MCP-1 and CCL21 expression and submesothelial tissue macrophage recruitment. Taken together these data suggest that the TWEAK/Fn14 system may promote inflammation and tissue injury during peritonitis and PD. PMID:24599047

  10. Mechanism of the modulation of murine peritoneal cell function and mast cell degranulation by low doses of malathion.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, K; Ellefson, D

    1992-01-01

    Malathion is a widely used organophosphate pesticide that modulates immune function at noncholinergic doses. Previous studies showed that this alteration in immune function was the result of enhanced macrophage function. In the present study, the effects of low doses of purified malathion (as low as 0.25 mg/kg malathion) administered orally to mice enhanced the respiratory burst of peritoneal cells. Microscopic examination of the peritoneal cells showed that mast cells were degranulated within 4 hr after malathion administration. The amount of beta-hexosaminidase, an enzyme released upon immunologic degranulation of mast cells, in the peritoneal lavage fluid of malathion-treated mice was also significantly elevated with 4 hours after malathion administration. Treatment of RBL-1, a rat basophilic cell line, cells with malathion, parathion or paroxon in vitro also led to the release of beta-hexosaminidase with paraoxon being the most potent. Further examination of the peritoneal cells of malathion-treated mice showed that the percentage of phagocytic peritoneal cells ingesting mast cell granules and the number of granules ingested per cell were elevated. These data suggest that malathion may enhance the respiratory burst of peritoneal cells through degranulation of peritoneal mast cells and the subsequent exposure to peritoneal cells to mast cell mediators.

  11. French National Registry of Rare Peritoneal Surface Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Rare Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Peritoneal Mesothelioma; Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Psammocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Carcinoma; Diffuse Peritoneal Leiomyomatosis; Appendiceal Mucinous Neoplasms

  12. Blocking TGF-β1 by P17 peptides attenuates gastric cancer cell induced peritoneal fibrosis and prevents peritoneal dissemination in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zhi-Dong; Zhao, Wei-Jun; Jin, Li-Ying; Wang, Wen-Juan; Dong, Qian; Li, Na; Xu, Hui-Mian; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2017-04-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that the peritoneal stroma environment favors proliferation of tumor cells by serving as a rich source of growth factors and chemokines known to be involved in tumor metastasis. In this study, we investigated the interaction between gastric cancer cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells, and determined the effects of TGF-β1 in this processing. Human peritoneal tissues and peritoneal wash fluid were obtained, which examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining or ELISA for measurements of TGF-β1 levels. The peritoneal mesothelial cells were co-incubated with the supernatants of gastric cancer, the expression of TGF-β1, collagen and fibronectin was observed by ELISA and western blot. We then investigated the effects of serum-free conditioned media from HSC-39 gastric cancer cells on the peritoneum of nude mice, and the effects of peritoneal fibrosis on the development of peritoneal metastasis in vivo. The peritoneum from gastric patients were thickened and contained extensive fibrosis. After co-culture both gastric tumor cells and mesothelial cells, we found that TGF-β1 expression was greatly increased in the co-culture system compared to individual culture condition. Serum-free Conditioned Media from HSC-39 was able to induce extracellular matrix expression in vitro and in vivo, and tumorigenicity in mice with peritoneal fibrosis was greater than in mice with normal peritoneum, while blocking TGF-β1 by peptide P17 can partially inhibit these effects. In conclusion, these results indicated that the interaction of gastric cancer with peritoneal fibrosis and determined that TGF-β1 plays a key role in induction of peritoneal fibrosis, which in turn affected dissemination of gastric cancer.

  13. Optofluidic cell manipulation for a biological microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Michael; Bigelow, Alan W.; Garty, Guy; Attinger, Daniel; Brenner, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and integration of light-induced dielectrophoresis for cellular manipulation in biological microbeams. An optoelectronic tweezers (OET) cellular manipulation platform was designed, fabricated, and tested at Columbia University's Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF). The platform involves a light induced dielectrophoretic surface and a microfluidic chamber with channels for easy input and output of cells. The electrical conductivity of the particle-laden medium was optimized to maximize the dielectrophoretic force. To experimentally validate the operation of the OET device, we demonstrate UV-microspot irradiation of cells containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged DNA single-strand break repair protein, targeted in suspension. We demonstrate the optofluidic control of single cells and groups of cells before, during, and after irradiation. The integration of optofluidic cellular manipulation into a biological microbeam enhances the facility's ability to handle non-adherent cells such as lymphocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that OET cell handling is successfully implemented in a biological microbeam.

  14. Biological cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertz, Frederick; Khitun, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We report a manipulation of biological cells (erythrocytes) by magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The experiment was accomplished on the top of a micro-electromagnet consisting of two magnetic field generating contours. An electric current flowing through the contour(s) produces a non-uniform magnetic field, which is about 1.4 mT/μm in strength at 100 mA current in the vicinity of the current-carrying wire. In responses to the magnetic field, magnetic nanoparticles move towards the systems energy minima. In turn, magnetic nanoparticles drag biological cells in the same direction. We present experimental data showing cell manipulation through the control of electric current. This technique allows us to capture and move cells located in the vicinity (10-20 microns) of the current-carrying wires. One of the most interesting results shows a periodic motion of erythrocytes between the two conducting contours, whose frequency is controlled by an electric circuit. The obtained results demonstrate the feasibility of non-destructive cell manipulation by magnetic nanoparticles with micrometer-scale precision.

  15. Peritoneal fluid immunocytochemistry used for the diagnosis of a possible case of equine gastrointestinal B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Maria Carolina; Starrak, Gregory; Dickinson, Ryan; Montgomery, Julia

    2016-01-01

    After physical examination, ultrasonographic evaluation of thorax and abdomen, and peritoneal fluid analysis, gastrointestinal neoplasia with suspected diffuse peritoneal metastasis was diagnosed in a 17-year-old Arabian gelding. The owner elected euthanasia and declined postmortem examination. Immunocytochemistry analysis of the peritoneal fluid resulted in a diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. PMID:27247458

  16. [A test for sperm cell survival in peritoneal fluid].

    PubMed

    Radwan, J; Niwald, W; Bielak, A; Pawlicki, J; Banaszczyk, R; Makuła, D

    1995-06-01

    The role of the peritoneal fluid in the physiology of reproduction, as well as in the transportation and survival of gametes, is little known. The authors have examined interactions between spermatozoa and the peritoneal fluid, collected during laparoscopy in the, so-called, survival test, from 42 infertile couples. The studied survival of spermatozoa in the peritoneal fluid was relatively high--19% after 48 hours--longer than in Menezo B2 fluid. Values of the test have been indicated, especially in cases of endometriosis-caused and idiopathic infertility.

  17. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    PubMed

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p < 0.05) followed by late apoptosis at 12 hpi (p < 0.05) and necrosis from 24 hpi (p < 0.05). Then, next generation sequencing was performed on 9 hpi and control uninfected cells by Illumina analyzer. An aggregate of 4546 genes (2229 down-regulated and 2317 up-regulated) from 17 cellular process, 11 molecular functions and 130 possible biological pathways were affected by FIPV. 131 genes from apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells.

  18. Differential Susceptibility of Human Pleural and Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells to Asbestos Exposure.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Julie; Thompson, Joyce; MacPherson, Maximilian; Shukla, Arti

    2015-08-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of mesothelial cells of pleural and peritoneal cavities. In 85% of cases both pleural and peritoneal MM is caused by asbestos exposure. Although both are asbestos-induced cancers, the incidence of pleural MM is significantly higher (85%) than peritoneal MM (15%). It has been proposed that carcinogenesis is a result of asbestos-induced inflammation but it is not clear what contributes to the differences observed between incidences of these two cancers. We hypothesize that the observed differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM are the result of differences in the direct response of these cell types to asbestos rather than to differences mediated by the in vivo microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we characterized cellular responses to asbestos in a controlled environment. We found significantly greater changes in genome-wide expression in response to asbestos exposure in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. In particular, a greater response in many common genes (IL-8, ATF3, CXCL2, CXCL3, IL-6, GOS2) was seen in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. Unique genes expressed in pleural mesothelial cells were mainly pro-inflammatory (G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1α, GREM1) and have previously been shown to be involved in development of MM. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM upon exposure to asbestos are the result of differences in mesothelial cell physiology that lead to differences in the inflammatory response, which leads to cancer.

  19. Differential susceptibility of human pleural and peritoneal mesothelial cells to asbestos exposure

    PubMed Central

    Dragon, Julie; Thompson, Joyce; MacPherson, Maximilian; Shukla, Arti

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive cancer of mesothelial cells of pleural and peritoneal cavities. In 85% of cases both pleural and peritoneal MM is caused by asbestos exposure. Although both are asbestos-induced cancers, the incidence of pleural MM is significantly higher (85%) than peritoneal MM (15%). It has been proposed that carcinogenesis is a result of asbestos-induced inflammation but it is not clear what contributes to the differences observed between incidences of these two cancers. We hypothesize that the observed differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM are the result of differences in the direct response of these cell types to asbestos rather than to differences mediated by the in vivo microenvironment. To test this hypothesis we characterized cellular responses to asbestos in a controlled environment. We found significantly greater changes in genome-wide expression in response to asbestos exposure in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. In particular, a greater response in many common genes (IL-8, ATF3, CXCL2, CXCL3, IL-6, GOS2) was seen in pleural mesothelial cells as compared to peritoneal mesothelial cells. Unique genes expressed in pleural mesothelial cells were mainly pro-inflammatory (G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1α, GREM1) and have previously been shown to be involved in development of MM. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that differences in incidences of pleural and peritoneal MM upon exposure to asbestos are the result of differences in mesothelial cell physiology that lead to differences in the inflammatory response, which leads to cancer. PMID:25757056

  20. Role of progenitor cell producing normal vagina by metaplasia in laparoscopic peritoneal vaginoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mhatre, Pravin N.; Narkhede, Hemraj R.; Pawar, P. Amol; Mhatre, P. Jyoti; Kumar, Das Dhanjit

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Host of vaginoplasty techniques have been described. None has been successful in developing normal vagina. Laparoscopic peritoneal vaginoplasty (LPV) is performed in Mayer–Rokitansky–Küster–Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) culminating in normal vagina. AIMS: This study aims to confirm normal development of neovagina by anatomical and functional parameters of histology, cytology, and ultrasonography (USG) in LPV. To identify peritoneal progenitor cell by OCT4/SOX2 markers. To demonstrate the metaplastic conversion of peritoneum to neovagina and the progenitor cell concentration, distribution pattern. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This is prospective experimental study, conducted at teaching hospital and private hospital. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Fifteen women of MRKHS underwent LPV followed by histology, cytology, two-/three-dimensional USG of neovagina. Four women underwent peritoneal biopsy for identification of progenitor cells with OCT4/SOX2 markers. One patient underwent serial biopsies for 4 weeks for histology and progenitor cell immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Normal vaginal histology and cytology were apparent. USG of neovagina showed normal appearance and blood flow. Two peritoneal samples confirmed the presence of progenitor cells. Serial biopsies demonstrated the epithelial change from single to multilayer with stromal compaction and neoangiogenesis. The progenitor cells concentration and different distribution patterns were described using SOX2/OCT4 markers. CONCLUSIONS: We have shown successful peritoneal metaplastic conversion to normal vagina in LPV. The progenitor cell was identified in normal peritoneum using SOX2/OCT4 markers. The progenitor cell concentration and pattern were demonstrated at various stages of neovaginal development. PMID:28216908

  1. Trafficking of phagocytic peritoneal cells in hypoinsulinemic-hyperglycemic mice with systemic candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candidemia is a severe fungal infection that primarily affects hospitalized and/or immunocompromised patients. Mononuclear phagocytes have been recognized as pivotal immune cells which act in the recognition of pathogens, phagocytosis, inflammation, polarization of adaptive immune response and tissue repair. Experimental studies have showed that the systemic candidiasis could be controlled by activated peritoneal macrophages. However, the mechanism to explain how these cells act in distant tissue during a systemic fungal infection is still to be elucidated. In the present study we investigate the in vivo trafficking of phagocytic peritoneal cells into infected organs in hypoinsulinemic-hyperglycemic (HH) mice with systemic candidiasis. Methods The red fluorescent vital dye PKH-26 PCL was injected into the peritoneal cavity of Swiss mice 24 hours before the intravenous inoculation with Candida albicans. After 24 and 48 hours and 7 days of infection, samples of the spleen, liver, kidneys, brain and lungs were submitted to the microbiological evaluation as well as to phagocytic peritoneal cell trafficking analyses by fluorescence microscopy. Results In the present study, PKH+ cells were observed in the peritoneum, kidney, spleen and liver samples from all groups. In infected mice, we also found PKH+ cells in the lung and brain. The HH condition did not affect this process. Conclusions In the present study we have observed that peritoneal phagocytes migrate to tissues infected by C. albicans and the HH condition did not interfere in this process. PMID:23521724

  2. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  3. Vaccine-induced modulation of gene expression in turbot peritoneal cells. A microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Fontenla, Francisco; Blanco-Abad, Verónica; Pardo, Belén G; Folgueira, Iria; Noia, Manuel; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Martínez, Paulino; Leiro, José M; Lamas, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    We used a microarray approach to examine changes in gene expression in turbot peritoneal cells after injection of the fish with vaccines containing the ciliate parasite Philasterides dicentrarchi as antigen and one of the following adjuvants: chitosan-PVMMA microspheres, Freund́s complete adjuvant, aluminium hydroxide gel or Matrix-Q (Isconova, Sweden). We identified 374 genes that were differentially expressed in all groups of fish. Forty-two genes related to tight junctions and focal adhesions and/or actin cytoskeleton were differentially expressed in free peritoneal cells. The profound changes in gene expression related to cell adherence and cytoskeleton may be associated with cell migration and also with the formation of cell-vaccine masses and their attachment to the peritoneal wall. Thirty-five genes related to apoptosis were differentially expressed. Although most of the proteins coded by these genes have a proapoptotic effect, others are antiapoptotic, indicating that both types of signals occur in peritoneal leukocytes of vaccinated fish. Interestingly, many of the genes related to lymphocytes and lymphocyte activity were downregulated in the groups injected with vaccine. We also observed decreased expression of genes related to antigen presentation, suggesting that macrophages (which were abundant in the peritoneal cavity after vaccination) did not express these during the early inflammatory response in the peritoneal cavity. Finally, several genes that participate in the inflammatory response were differentially expressed, and most participated in resolution of inflammation, indicating that an M2 macrophage response is generated in the peritoneal cavity of fish one day post vaccination.

  4. Tumor-environment biomimetics delay peritoneal metastasis formation by deceiving and redirecting disseminated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    De Vlieghere, Elly; Gremonprez, Félix; Verset, Laurine; Mariën, Lore; Jones, Christopher J; De Craene, Bram; Berx, Geert; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Remon, Jean-Paul; Ceelen, Wim; Demetter, Pieter; Bracke, Marc; De Geest, Bruno G; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is life threatening and is the result of an extensive communication between disseminated cancer cells, mesothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). CAFs secrete extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins creating a receptive environment for peritoneal implantation. Considering cancer as an ecosystem may provide opportunities to exploit CAFs to create biomimetic traps to deceive and redirect cancer cells. We have designed microparticles (MP) containing a CAF-derived ECM-surface that is intended to compete with natural niches. CAFs were encapsulated in alginate/gelatine beads (500-750 μm in diameter) functionalised with a polyelectrolyte coating (MP[CAF]). The encapsulated CAFs remain viable and metabolically active (≥35 days), when permanently encapsulated. CAF-derived ECM proteins are retained by the non-biodegradable coating. Adhesion experiments mimicking the environment of the peritoneal cavity show the selective capture of floating cancer cells from different tumor origins by MP[CAF] compared to control MP. MP[CAF] are distributed throughout the abdominal cavity without attachment to intestinal organs and without signs of inflammatory reaction. Intraperitoneal delivery of MP[CAF] and sequential removal redirects cancer cell adhesion from the surgical wound to the MP[CAF], delays peritoneal metastasis formation and prolongs animal survival. Our experiments suggest the use of a biomimetic trap based on tumor-environment interactions to delay peritoneal metastasis.

  5. Aberrant expression of Cx43 is associated with the peritoneal metastasis of gastric cancer and Cx43-mediated gap junction enhances gastric cancer cell diapedesis from peritoneal mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bo; Peng, Zhi-hong; Yu, Pei-wu; Yu, Ge; Qian, Feng; Zeng, Dong-zhu; Zhao, Yong-liang; Shi, Yan; Hao, Ying-xue; Luo, Hua-xing

    2013-01-01

    The process of peritoneal metastasis involves the diapedesis of intra-abdominal exfoliated gastric cancer cells through the mesothelial cell monolayers; however, the related molecular mechanisms for this process are still unclear. Heterocellular gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between gastric cancer cells and mesothelial cells may play an active role during diapedesis. In this study we detected the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) in primary gastric cancer tissues, intra-abdominal exfoliated cancer cells, and matched metastatic peritoneal tissues. We found that the expression of Cx43 in primary gastric cancer tissues was significantly decreased; the intra-abdominal exfoliated cancer cells and matched metastatic peritoneal tissues exhibited increasing expression compared with primary gastric cancer tissues. BGC-823 and SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells were engineered to express Cx43 or Cx43T154A (a mutant protein that only couples gap junctions but provides no intercellular communication) and were co-cultured with human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). Heterocellular GJIC and diapedesis through HPMC monolayers on matrigel-coated coverslips were investigated. We found that BGC-823 and SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells expressing Cx43 formed functional heterocellular gap junctions with HPMC monolayers within one hour. A significant increase in diapedesis was observed in engineered Cx43-expressing cells compared with Cx43T154A and control group cells, which suggested that the observed upregulation of diapedesis in Cx43-expressing cells required heterocellular GJIC. Further study revealed that the gastric cancer cells transmigrated through the intercellular space between the mesothelial cells via a paracellular route. Our results suggest that the abnormal expression of Cx43 plays an essential role in peritoneal metastasis and that Cx43-mediated heterocellular GJIC between gastric cancer cells and mesothelial cells may be an important regulatory

  6. The Lectin ArtinM Induces Recruitment of Rat Mast Cells from the Bone Marrow to the Peritoneal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Moulin, Maria Raquel Isnard; Souza, Devandir Antonio; Jamur, Maria Célia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Background The D-mannose binding lectin ArtinM is known to recruit neutrophils, to degranulate mast cells and may have potential therapeutic applications. However, the effect of ArtinM on mast cell recruitment has not been investigated. Methodology Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with ArtinM or ConA (control). The ability of the lectin to degranulate peritoneal and mesenteric mast cells was examined. Recruitment of mast cells to the peritoneal cavity and mesentery after ArtinM injection was examined with or without depletion of peritoneal mast cells by distilled water. Results ArtinM degranulated both peritoneal and mesentery mast cells in vitro. Three days after i.p. injection of the lectin there were reduced numbers of mast cells in the peritoneal lavage, while at 7 days post injection of ArtinM, the number of peritoneal mast cells was close to control values. Since immature mast cells are recruited from the bone marrow, the effect of the lectin on bone marrow mast cells was examined. Injection of ArtinM resulted in an increased number of mast cells in the bone marrow. To determine if degranulation of mast cells in the peritoneal cavity was required for the increase in bone marrow mast cells, the peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells with ultrapure water. Exposure to ArtinM increased the number of mast cells in the bone marrow of rats depleted of peritoneal mast cells. Conclusions The ArtinM induced recruitment of mast cells from the bone marrow to the peritoneal cavity may partially explain the therapeutic actions of ArtinM. PMID:20339538

  7. Regional CAR-T cell infusions for peritoneal carcinomatosis are superior to systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Katz, S C; Point, G R; Cunetta, M; Thorn, M; Guha, P; Espat, N J; Boutros, C; Hanna, N; Junghans, R P

    2016-05-01

    Metastatic spread of colorectal cancer (CRC) to the peritoneal cavity is common and difficult to treat, with many patients dying from malignant bowel obstruction. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) immunotherapy has shown great promise, and we previously reported murine and phase I clinical studies on regional intrahepatic CAR-T infusion for CRC liver metastases. We are now studying intraperitoneal (IP) delivery of CAR-Ts for peritoneal carcinomatosis. Regional IP infusion of CAR-T resulted in superior protection against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA+) peritoneal tumors, when compared with systemically infused CAR-Ts. IP CAR-Ts also provided prolonged protection against IP tumor re-challenges and demonstrated an increase in effector memory phenotype over time. IP CAR-Ts provided protection against tumor growth at distant subcutaneous (SC) sites in association with increases in serum IFNγ levels. Given the challenges posed by immunoinhibitory pathways in solid tumors, we combined IP CAR-T treatment with suppressor cell targeting. High frequencies of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg) were found within the IP tumors, with MDSC expressing high levels of immunosuppressive PD-L1. Combinatorial IP CAR-T treatment with depleting antibodies against MDSC and Treg further improved efficacy against peritoneal metastases. Our data support further development of combinatorial IP CAR-T immunotherapy for peritoneal malignancies.

  8. Platelet derived growth factor B and epithelial mesenchymal transition of peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pranali; West-Mays, Judy; Kolb, Martin; Rodrigues, Juan-Carlos; Hoff, Catherine M; Margetts, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) is involved in wound healing in various organ systems. Its potential role in the context of peritoneal injury following long-term peritoneal dialysis is unclear. We used an adenovirus expressing the B chain of PDGF (AdPDGF-B) to assess its effect on pro-fibrotic pathways in the peritoneal membrane. To assess the transforming growth factor (TGF) beta independent effects of PDGF, we over-expressed PDGF-B in the peritoneum of either wild-type mice (Smad3+/+) or those with a deletion of the TGFbeta signaling protein Smad3 (Smad3(-/-)). PDGF-B induced sustained angiogenesis in both Smad3+/+ and Smad3(-/-) mice. Despite increased collagen gene expression, collagen accumulation was transient and fibrogenesis was associated with induction of collagenase activity. We observed epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) involving the peritoneal mesothelial cells, as shown by increased SNAIL and decreased E-Cadherin expression with evidence of mesothelial cells expressing both epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Unlike TGFbeta-induced EMT, PDGF-B exposure did not lead to mobilization of the mesothelial cells; they remained as a single monolayer throughout the observation period. This "non-invasive" EMT phenomenon is a novel finding and may have implications concerning the role of EMT in peritoneal fibrosis and injury to other organ systems. The observed effects were similar in Smad3(-/-) and Smad3+/+ animals, suggesting that the PDGF-B effects were independent of TGFbeta or Smad signaling.

  9. Presence of SNAP-23 and syntaxin 4 in mouse and hamster peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Eva; Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Quintanar, J Luis

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) play a crucial role in inflammatory reactions. Their presence and number in the peritoneal cavity is important to overcome and enhance resistance to peritoneal infection. When MCs are activated they release a variety of biological mediators from their granules, such as histamine, that contribute to the appropriate and rapid local immune response. Granular content is released using a process of compound exocytosis, also termed degranulation. SNAP-23 and syntaxin 4 are plasma membrane proteins involved in degranulation of rat MCs. Their presence, however, has not been studied in MCs of other rodent species. The aim of the present study was to investigate using immunocytochemistry whether SNAP-23 and syntaxin 4 are present in peritoneal MCs of the mouse and hamster. In addition, the diameter, percentage and histamine content of these cells were also analyzed. Our results demonstrate that SNAP-23 and syntaxin 4 are present in the mouse and hamster peritoneal MCs, suggesting that proteins involved in the secretory process in MCs are conserved among species. Likewise, we conclude that peritoneal MCs of mouse and hamster are heterogeneous in size, percentage and histamine content.

  10. Retinoic acid improves morphology of cultured peritoneal mesothelial cells from patients undergoing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Retana, Carmen; Sanchez, Elsa I; Gonzalez, Sirenia; Perez-Lopez, Alejandro; Cruz, Armando; Lagunas-Munoz, Jesus; Alfaro-Cruz, Carmen; Vital-Flores, Socorro; Reyes, José L

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis are classified according to their peritoneal permeability as low transporter (low solute permeability) or High transporter (high solute permeability). Factors that determine the differences in permeability between them have not been fully disclosed. We investigated morphological features of cultured human peritoneal mesothelial cells from low or high transporter patients and its response to All trans retinoic Acid (ATRA, vitamin A active metabolite), as compared to non-uremic human peritoneal mesothelial cells. Control cells were isolated from human omentum. High or low transporter cells were obtained from dialysis effluents. Cells were cultured in media containing ATRA (0, 50, 100 or 200 nM). We studied length and distribution of microvilli and cilia (scanning electron microscopy), epithelial (cytokeratin, claudin-1, ZO-1 and occludin) and mesenchymal (vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin) transition markers by immunofluorescence and Western blot, and transforming growth factor β1 expression by Western blot. Low and high transporter exhibited hypertrophic cells, reduction in claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 expression, cytokeratin and vimentin disorganization and positive α-smooth muscle actin label. Vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor-β1 were overexpressed in low transporter. Ciliated cells were diminished in low and high transporters. Microvilli number and length were severely reduced in high transporter. ATRA reduced hypertrophic cells number in low transporter. It also improved cytokeratin and vimentin organization, decreased vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and increased claudin 1, occludin and ZO-1 expression, in low and high transporter. In low transporter, ATRA reduced transforming growth factor-β1 expression. ATRA augmented percentage of ciliated cells in low and high transporter. It also augmented cilia length in high transporter. Alterations in

  11. Effect of lactate-buffered peritoneal dialysis fluids on human peritoneal mesothelial cell interleukin-6 and prostaglandin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Witowski, J; Topley, N; Jörres, A; Liberek, T; Coles, G A; Williams, J D

    1995-01-01

    The present study focused on the evaluation of constitutive and cytokine-stimulated human peritoneal mesothelial cell (HPMC) IL-6 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha release following pre-exposure to peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF). Exposure of HPMC to PDF pH 5.2 resulted in a time-dependent increase in cell cytotoxicity [as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release] and concomitant inhibition of constitutive and IL-1 beta stimulated IL-6 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha synthesis. After 15 minutes of exposure to PDF constitutive and IL-1 beta stimulated IL-6 release were reduced by 32.0 +/- 9.7% and 76.0 +/- 7.4% (N = 6, P < 0.046 and P < 0.027, respectively). PCR amplification of reverse transcribed mRNA from HPMC pre-exposed to PDF pH 5.2 demonstrated suppression of IL-1 beta stimulated IL-6 and cyclooxygenase (Cox-1 and Cox-2) transcripts. In order to mimic the dialysis cycle in vivo, an in vitro dialysis system was established. HPMC were exposed first to control medium, PDF pH 5.2 or PDF 7.3 for 15 minutes and then sequentially to pooled spent peritoneal dialysis effluent for up to four hours. The cells were subsequently allowed to recover in control medium for 12 hours in the presence or absence of IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha (both at 1000 pg/ml). There was no evidence of significant cell toxicity as assessed by LDH release during either the 'in vitro dialysis' or 'recovery' phases. Under these conditions short term exposure to PDF pH 5.2 followed by 'in vitro dialysis' resulted in significant inhibition of cytokine stimulated IL-6 (69.6 +/- 18.2 vs. 96.7 +/- 27.9 pg/microgram, N = 13; P < 0.020 for IL-1 beta) and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (197.5 +/- 89.2 vs. 289.6 +/- 114.5 pg/microgram, N = 13; P < 0.020 for IL-1 beta) and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (197.5 +/- 89.2 vs. 289.6 +/- 114.5 pg/microgram, N = 13; P < 0.003) release when compared to cells incubated in control medium. Adjustment of the pH of PDF to 7.3 reversed its inhibitory effects. We conclude that short-term exposure to PDF pH 5

  12. ARAP3 inhibits peritoneal dissemination of scirrhous gastric carcinoma cells by regulating cell adhesion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Yagi, R; Tanaka, M; Sasaki, K; Kamata, R; Nakanishi, Y; Kanai, Y; Sakai, R

    2011-03-24

    During the analysis of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins in scirrhous gastric carcinoma cell lines, we observed an unusual expression of Arf-GAP with Rho-GAP domain, ankyrin repeat and PH domain 3 (ARAP3), a multimodular signaling protein that is a substrate of Src family kinases. Unlike other phosphotyrosine proteins, such as CUB domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) and Homo sapiens chromosome 9 open reading frame 10/oxidative stress-associated Src activator (C9orf10/Ossa), which are overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in scirrhous gastric carcinoma cell lines, ARAP3 was underexpressed in cancerous human gastric tissues. In this study, we found that overexpression of ARAP3 in the scirrhous gastric carcinoma cell lines significantly reduced peritoneal dissemination. In vitro studies also showed that ARAP3 regulated cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, as well as invasive activities. These effects were suppressed by mutations in the Rho-GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain or in the C-terminal two tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src. Thus, the expression and phosphorylation state of ARAP3 may affect the invasiveness of cancer by modulating cell adhesion and motility. Our results suggest that ARAP3 is a unique Src substrate that suppresses peritoneal dissemination of scirrhous gastric carcinoma cells.

  13. Vascular Endothelial Cell Injury Is an Important Factor in the Development of Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis in Long-Term Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tawada, Mitsuhiro; Ito, Yasuhiko; Hamada, Chieko; Honda, Kazuho; Mizuno, Masashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sakata, Fumiko; Terabayashi, Takeshi; Matsukawa, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shoichi; Imai, Enyu; Matsuo, Seiichi; Takei, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare but serious and life-threatening complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). However, the precise pathogenesis remains unclear; in addition, predictors and early diagnostic biomarkers for EPS have not yet to be established. Methods Eighty-three peritoneal membrane samples taken at catheter removal were examined to identify pathological characteristics of chronic peritoneal deterioration, which promotes EPS in patients undergoing long-term PD treatment with low occurrence of peritonitis. Results According to univariable logistic regression analysis of the pathological findings, thickness of the peritoneal membrane (P = 0.045), new membrane formation score (P = 0.006), ratio of luminal diameter to vessel diameter (L/V ratio, P<0.001), presence of CD31-negative vessels (P = 0.021), fibrin deposition (P<0.001), and collagen volume fraction (P = 0.018) were associated with EPS development. In analyses of samples with and without EPS matched for PD treatment period, non-diabetes, and PD solution, univariable analysis identified L/V ratio (per 0.1 increase: odds ratio (OR) 0.44, P = 0.003) and fibrin deposition (OR 6.35, P = 0.027) as the factors associated with EPS. L/V ratio was lower in patients with fibrin exudation than in patients without fibrin exudation. Conclusions These findings suggest that damage to vascular endothelial cells, as represented by low L/V ratio, could be a predictive finding for the development of EPS, particularly in long-term PD patients unaffected by peritonitis. PMID:27119341

  14. Involvement of peritoneal dendritic cells in the induction of autoimmune prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Correa, S G; Riera, C M; Iribarren, P

    1997-04-01

    We have been working within a model of autoimmune prostatitis induced by the intraperitoneal administration of saline extract of rat male accessory glands (RAG) associated to liposomes. The intraperitoneal administration of RAG-liposomes elicits both primary and secondary cellular autoimmune responses to RAG as well as organ-specific lesions. To evaluate the participation of dendritic cells (DC) in the induction of the autoimmune response, we purified peritoneal DC (PDC) after a single injection of RAG-liposomes and we characterized this population by morphology and phenotype. Based on adherence and morphologic criteria, we determined that PDC comprised approximately 1% of the total peritoneal cells. The ultrastructure of the dendritic cell enriched fraction was assessed by electron microscopy. By FACS analysis, PDC showed a two to three-fold increase in expression of the IA molecule compared to macrophages. They expressed low but positive levels of the CD14 marker, and intermediate levels of both CD11b (Mac-1) and CD54 (ICAM-1) adhesion molecules. In addition, PDC transferred either intravenously or intraperitoneally efficiently elicited the autoimmune response to RAG in normal receptors. These results support the involvement of peritoneal dendritic cells in the induction of autoimmune prostatitis, modifying the idea of macrophages as the single antigen presenting cell in the peritoneal cavity.

  15. Genetic manipulation of sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takei, Yoshiyuki; Maruyama, Atsushi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Yamashina, Shunhei; Lemasters, John J; Sato, Nobuhiro

    2007-06-01

    Altered gene expression in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) is associated with a variety of aspects of liver pathophysiology. It is, therefore, possible to envision a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of intractable liver diseases and achievement of graft-specific immunotolerance through modulation of SEC functions by genetic engineering. The SEC possesses unique hyaluronan receptors that recognize and internalize hyaluronic acid (HA). This characteristic was used in the development of a system for targeting foreign DNA to SEC. A gene carrier system was prepared by coupling HA oligomers to poly L-lysine (PLL) in a 1:1 weight ratio by reductive amination reaction. The resulting copolymer (PLL-g-HA) was mixed with various amounts of DNA in 154 mM NaCl. Inter-polyelectrolyte complex formation between PLL-g-HA and DNA exhibited minimal self-aggregation, explaining the highly soluble nature of the complex. Complex formation between PLL-g-HA and DNA was further assessed with a gel retardation assay. The titration point representing the minimum proportion of PLL-g-HA required to retard the DNA completely occurred at a 1:1 copolymer (based on PLL) to DNA charge ratio. Following intravenous injection of (32)P-labeled pSV beta-Gal plasmid complexed to PLL-g-HA in Wistar rats, >90% of the injected counts were shown to be taken up by the liver. Further, it was shown that the PLL-g-HA/DNA complex was distributed exclusively in the SEC. At 72 h after injection of 90 mug of pSV beta-Gal in a PLL-g-HA-complexed form, a large number of SEC expressing beta-galactosidase were detected. So, the PLL-g-HA/DNA system permits targeted delivery of exogenous nucleotide agents selectively to the liver SEC, providing a novel strategy for manipulation of SEC functions.

  16. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-11-13

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF-κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy.

  17. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF−κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:26565726

  18. Characterization of cell envelope proteins of Staphylococcus epidermidis cultured in human peritoneal dialysate.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Wilcox, M H; Williams, P; Finch, R G; Denyer, S P

    1991-01-01

    The cell envelope protein profiles of Staphylococcus epidermidis cultured in used human peritoneal dialysate (HPD) differed markedly from those of cells cultured in nutrient broth. Compared with broth-grown cells, many cell wall proteins were repressed in HPD, although three proteins of 42, 48, and 54 kDa predominated and an iron-repressible 130-kDa protein was induced. Growth in HPD also resulted in expression of two cell membrane proteins of 32 and 36 kDa which were iron repressible. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis using monospecific polyclonal antisera raised against the 32- and 36-kDa proteins revealed considerable antigenic and molecular mass homology among 12 S. epidermidis isolates from patients with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis. The 32-kDa antiserum also cross-reacted with a 32-kDa S. aureus cell membrane protein. Immunoblots of S. epidermidis cell walls and membranes were also probed with normal human serum and serum and HPD from continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients. While the cell wall proteins of S. epidermidis appeared to be relatively poorly immunogenic, the 32- and 36-kDa membrane proteins reacted strongly with antibodies present in each of the body fluids evaluated. These results suggest that the highly conserved 32- and 36-kDa iron-repressible proteins are expressed during growth in vivo and may be involved in iron transport, since all 12 S. epidermidis strains examined also produced iron chelators. Images PMID:1987078

  19. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  20. [³H]serotonin release assay using antigen-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune states in conjunction with increased accumulation of mast cells. Mast cells, which are of hematopoietic lineage, and NGF appear to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. Mast cells themselves are capable of producing and responding to NGF. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation and culture of peritoneal-derived rat mast cells, together with a [(3)H]serotonin release assay which is useful in assessing the effects of antigens and neurotrophic factors on mast-cell activation.

  1. Cellular plasticity of inflammatory myeloid cells in the peritoneal foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Jane E; Rolfe, Barbara E; Osborne, Geoffrey W; Sester, David P; van Rooijen, Nico; Campbell, Gordon R; Hume, David A; Campbell, Julie H

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of sterile foreign objects in the peritoneal cavity of an animal initiates an inflammatory response and results in encapsulation of the objects by bone marrow-derived cells. Over time, a multilayered tissue capsule develops with abundant myofibroblasts embedded in extracellular matrix. The present study used the transgenic MacGreen mouse to characterize the time-dependent accumulation of monocyte subsets and neutrophilic granulocytes in the inflammatory infiltrate and within the tissue capsule by their differential expression of the csf1r-EGFP transgene, F4/80, and Ly6C. As the tissue capsule developed, enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive cells changed from rounded to spindle-shaped morphology and began to co-express the myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin. Expression increased with time: at day 14, 11.13 +/- 0.67% of tissue capsule cells co-expressed these markers, compared with 50.77 +/- 12.85% of cells at day 28. The importance of monocyte/macrophages in tissue capsule development was confirmed by clodronate-encapsulated liposome removal, which resulted in almost complete abrogation of capsule development. These results confirm the importance of monocyte/macrophages in the tissue response to sterile foreign objects implanted in the peritoneal cavity. In addition, the in vivo plasticity of peritoneal macrophages and their ability to transdifferentiate from a myeloid to mesenchymal phenotype is demonstrated.

  2. Cellular Plasticity of Inflammatory Myeloid Cells in the Peritoneal Foreign Body Response

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Jane E.; Rolfe, Barbara E.; Osborne, Geoffrey W.; Sester, David P.; van Rooijen, Nico; Campbell, Gordon R.; Hume, David A.; Campbell, Julie H.

    2010-01-01

    Implantation of sterile foreign objects in the peritoneal cavity of an animal initiates an inflammatory response and results in encapsulation of the objects by bone marrow-derived cells. Over time, a multilayered tissue capsule develops with abundant myofibroblasts embedded in extracellular matrix. The present study used the transgenic MacGreen mouse to characterize the time-dependent accumulation of monocyte subsets and neutrophilic granulocytes in the inflammatory infiltrate and within the tissue capsule by their differential expression of the csf1r-EGFP transgene, F4/80, and Ly6C. As the tissue capsule developed, enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive cells changed from rounded to spindle-shaped morphology and began to co-express the myofibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin. Expression increased with time: at day 14, 11.13 ± 0.67% of tissue capsule cells co-expressed these markers, compared with 50.77 ± 12.85% of cells at day 28. The importance of monocyte/macrophages in tissue capsule development was confirmed by clodronate-encapsulated liposome removal, which resulted in almost complete abrogation of capsule development. These results confirm the importance of monocyte/macrophages in the tissue response to sterile foreign objects implanted in the peritoneal cavity. In addition, the in vivo plasticity of peritoneal macrophages and their ability to transdifferentiate from a myeloid to mesenchymal phenotype is demonstrated. PMID:20008135

  3. Acoustic devices for particle and cell manipulation and sensing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E M; Hughes, David A; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Bolhovitins, Aleksandrs; Poltarjonoks, Romans; Weijer, Kees; Schönecker, Andreas; Hill, Martyn; Cochran, Sandy

    2014-08-13

    An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed.

  4. Acoustic Devices for Particle and Cell Manipulation and Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yongqiang; Wang, Han; Demore, Christine E. M.; Hughes, David A.; Glynne-Jones, Peter; Gebhardt, Sylvia; Bolhovitins, Aleksandrs; Poltarjonoks, Romans; Weijer, Kees; Schönecker, Andreas; Hill, Martyn; Cochran, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz) ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed. PMID:25123465

  5. Plasmonic cell manipulation for biomedical and screening applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Sinram, Merve; Heeger, Patrick; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Modulation of the cell membrane permeability by the plasmonic interaction of gold nanoparticles and short laser pulses for cell manipulation or destruction has been the objective of several recent studies. Gold nanoparticles in close vicinity to the cellular membrane are irradiated to evoke a nanoscale membrane perforation, enabling extracellular molecules to enter the cell. However, besides several basic studies no real translation from proof of concept experiments to routine usage of this approach was achieved so far. In order to provide a reproducible and easy-to-use platform for gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser manipulation, we established an automated and encased laser setup. We demonstrate its feasibility for high-throughput cell manipulation. In particular, protein delivery into canine cancer cells is shown. The biofunctional modification of cells was investigated using the caspase 3 protein, which represents a central effector molecule in the apoptotic signaling cascade. An efficient and temporally well-defined induction of apoptosis was observed with an early onset 2 h after protein delivery by GNOME laser manipulation. Besides protein delivery, modulation of gene function using GNOME laser transfection of antisense molecules was demonstrated, showing the potential of this technique for basic science and screening purposes. Concluding, we established GNOME laser manipulation of cells as a routine method, which can be utilized reliably for the efficient delivery of biomolecules. Its intrinsic features, being low impairment of the cell viability, high delivery efficiency and universal applicability, render this method well suited for a large variety of biomedical application.

  6. Rapid cell separation with minimal manipulation for autologous cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alban J.; O’Rorke, Richard D.; Kale, Akshay; Rimsa, Roberts; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Davies, A. Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Wood, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to isolate specific, viable cell populations from mixed ensembles with minimal manipulation and within intra-operative time would provide significant advantages for autologous, cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Current cell-enrichment technologies are either slow, lack specificity and/or require labelling. Thus a rapid, label-free separation technology that does not affect cell functionality, viability or phenotype is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate separation of viable from non-viable human stromal cells using remote dielectrophoresis, in which an electric field is coupled into a microfluidic channel using shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves, producing an array of virtual electrodes within the channel. This allows high-throughput dielectrophoretic cell separation in high conductivity, physiological-like fluids, overcoming the limitations of conventional dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate viable/non-viable separation efficacy of >98% in pre-purified mesenchymal stromal cells, extracted from human dental pulp, with no adverse effects on cell viability, or on their subsequent osteogenic capabilities. PMID:28150746

  7. Rapid cell separation with minimal manipulation for autologous cell therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alban J.; O’Rorke, Richard D.; Kale, Akshay; Rimsa, Roberts; Tomlinson, Matthew J.; Kirkham, Jennifer; Davies, A. Giles; Wälti, Christoph; Wood, Christopher D.

    2017-02-01

    The ability to isolate specific, viable cell populations from mixed ensembles with minimal manipulation and within intra-operative time would provide significant advantages for autologous, cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Current cell-enrichment technologies are either slow, lack specificity and/or require labelling. Thus a rapid, label-free separation technology that does not affect cell functionality, viability or phenotype is highly desirable. Here, we demonstrate separation of viable from non-viable human stromal cells using remote dielectrophoresis, in which an electric field is coupled into a microfluidic channel using shear-horizontal surface acoustic waves, producing an array of virtual electrodes within the channel. This allows high-throughput dielectrophoretic cell separation in high conductivity, physiological-like fluids, overcoming the limitations of conventional dielectrophoresis. We demonstrate viable/non-viable separation efficacy of >98% in pre-purified mesenchymal stromal cells, extracted from human dental pulp, with no adverse effects on cell viability, or on their subsequent osteogenic capabilities.

  8. Neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Terasawa, Masao; Nagata, Kisaburo; Kobayashi, Yoshiro

    2008-12-12

    Antigen-transporting cells take up pathogens, and then migrate from sites of inflammation to secondary lymphoid tissues to induce an immune response. Among antigen-transporting cells, dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to be the most potent and professional antigen-presenting cells that can stimulate naive T cells. However, the cells that transport antigens, tumor cell antigens in particular, have not been clearly identified. In this study we have analyzed what types of cells transport tumor cell antigens to secondary lymphoid tissues. We show that neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages but not DCs engulf X-irradiated P388 leukemic cells after their injection into the peritoneal cavity, and that neutrophils and monocytes but not macrophages migrate to the parathymic lymph nodes (pLN), the blood, and then the spleen. The monocytes in the pLN comprise Gr-1{sup -} and Gr-1{sup +} ones, and some of these cells express CD11c. Overall, this study demonstrates that neutrophils and monocytes transport tumor cell antigens from the peritoneal cavity to secondary lymphoid tissues.

  9. Ultrashort laser pulse cell manipulation using nano- and micro- materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Markus; Killian, Doreen; Willenbrock, Saskia; Diebold, Eric; Mazur, Eric; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Junghanß, Christian; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-08-01

    The delivery of extra cellular molecules into cells is essential for cell manipulation. For this purpose genetic materials (DNA/RNA) or proteins have to overcome the impermeable cell membrane. To increase the delivery efficiency and cell viability of common methods different nano- and micro material based approaches were applied. To manipulate the cells, the membrane is in contact with the biocompatible material. Due to a field enhancement of the laser light at the material and the resulting effect the cell membrane gets perforated and extracellular molecules can diffuse into the cytoplasm. Membrane impermeable dyes, fluorescent labelled siRNA, as well as plasmid vectors encoded for GFP expression were used as an indicator for successful perforation or transfection, respectively. Dependent on the used material, perforation efficiencies over 90 % with a cell viability of about 80 % can be achieved. Additionally, we observed similar efficiencies for siRNA transfection. Due to the larger molecule size and the essential transport of the DNA into the nucleus cells are more difficult to transfect with GFP plasmid vectors. Proof of principle experiments show promising and adequate efficiencies by applying micro materials for plasmid vector transfection. For all methods a weakly focused fs laser beam is used to enable a high manipulation throughput for adherent and suspension cells. Furthermore, with these alternative optical manipulation methods it is possible to perforate the membrane of sensitive cell types such as primary and stem cells with a high viability.

  10. Increased NHC Cells in the Peritoneal Cavity of Plasmacytoma Susceptible BALB/c Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Berenice; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Farfán-Morales, José Eduardo; Jiménez-Zamudio, Luis Antonio

    2015-01-01

    BALB/c strain mice are unique in that they develop murine plasmacytoma (MPC) as a consequence of the inflammation induced by pristane oil injection in the peritoneal cavity. In this work the Treg, Th17, B1, B2, and NHC lymphocyte populations from the peritoneal environment of BALB/c, the susceptible strain, and C57BL/6 mice, which do not develop MPC after oil treatment, were studied. Both oil-treated strains showed decreased levels of Th17 lymphocytes, no significant variation in Treg lymphocytes, and a drastic decrease of all B lymphocyte populations. However, only oil-induced BALB/c showed increased levels of natural helper cells (NHC) which could be important in the myeloma induction. PMID:26504358

  11. Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Daniel; Ozcelik, Adem; Bojanala, Nagagireesh; Nama, Nitesh; Upadhyay, Awani; Chen, Yuchao; Hanna-Rose, Wendy; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation. PMID:27004764

  12. Cell stimulation with optically manipulated microsources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cells are sensitive to spatial and temporal heterogeneities in concentrations of molecules. Polarization of tissues and cells in molecular gradients plays a critical role for a large variety of biological processes including embryogenesis, and the response of immune cells to chemical ques. The ...

  13. Paricalcitol Reduces Peritoneal Fibrosis in Mice through the Activation of Regulatory T Cells and Reduction in IL-17 Production

    PubMed Central

    González-Mateo, Guadalupe T.; Fernández-Míllara, Vanessa; Bellón, Teresa; Liappas, Georgios; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Selgas, Rafael; Aroeira, Luiz S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis is a significant health problem associated with a chronic inflammatory reaction. The precise mechanisms involved in the fibrotic process are still poorly understood. However, given that inflammation is a major causative factor, immunomodulation is a possible therapeutic approach to reduce fibrosis. The vitamin D receptor (VDR) that is present in all hematopoietic cells has been associated with immunomodulation. We investigated whether the intraperitoneal administration of paricalcitol, a specific activator of the VDR, modulates peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF)-induced peritoneal fibrosis. We characterized the inflammatory process in the peritoneal cavity of mice treated or not treated with paricalcitol and analyzed the ensuing fibrosis. The treatment reduced peritoneal IL-17 levels, which strongly correlated with a significantly lower peritoneal fibrotic response. In vitro studies demonstrate that both CD4+ and CD8+ regulatory T cells appear to impact the regulation of IL-17. Paricalcitol treatment resulted in a significantly increased frequency of CD8+ T cells showing a regulatory phenotype. The frequency of CD4+ Tregs tends to be increased, but it did not achieve statistical significance. However, paricalcitol treatment increased the number of CD4+ and CD8+ Treg cells in vivo. In conclusion, the activation of immunological regulatory mechanisms by VDR signaling could prevent or reduce fibrosis, as shown in peritoneal fibrosis induced by PDF exposure in mice. PMID:25279459

  14. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood.

  15. Digital Microfluidics for Manipulation and Analysis of a Single Cell.

    PubMed

    He, Jie-Long; Chen, An-Te; Lee, Jyong-Huei; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2015-09-15

    The basic structural and functional unit of a living organism is a single cell. To understand the variability and to improve the biomedical requirement of a single cell, its analysis has become a key technique in biological and biomedical research. With a physical boundary of microchannels and microstructures, single cells are efficiently captured and analyzed, whereas electric forces sort and position single cells. Various microfluidic techniques have been exploited to manipulate single cells through hydrodynamic and electric forces. Digital microfluidics (DMF), the manipulation of individual droplets holding minute reagents and cells of interest by electric forces, has received more attention recently. Because of ease of fabrication, compactness and prospective automation, DMF has become a powerful approach for biological application. We review recent developments of various microfluidic chips for analysis of a single cell and for efficient genetic screening. In addition, perspectives to develop analysis of single cells based on DMF and emerging functionality with high throughput are discussed.

  16. Prevention of peritoneal carcinomatosis from colon cancer cell seeding using a pirarubicin solution in rats and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Favoulet, Patrick; Benoit, Laurent; Osmak, Liliana; Polycarpe, Emmanuel; Esquis, Philippe; Duvillard, Christian; Guiu, Boris; Rat, Patrick; Favre, Jean Pierre; Chauffert, Bruno

    2004-05-01

    Free malignant cells, which are frequently detected in the washing liquid from the peritoneal cavity before and after resection of human colorectal cancer, are suspected to cause recurrent peritoneal cancer. We carried out an experimental study to compare the prophylactic efficacy of washing the peritoneum with several anticancer drugs and the antiseptic povidone-iodine against the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis from colonic origin in rats and nude mice. The in vitro anticancer activity of a short, 15-minute exposure of pirarubicin, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, mitomycin C, and 1% povidone-iodine was first evaluated by an MTT assay on DHD/K12/PROb rat and LS174T human colon cancer cells. For the in vivo experiments, BDIX rats were inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 1 x 10(6) DHD/K12/PROb cells followed by peritoneal scarring and a colocolic anastomosis. A 15-minute peritoneal washing with the anticancer drugs or povidone-iodine was then performed. Nude mice were i.p.-inoculated with 1 x 10(7) LS174T human cells and treated 2 hours later with i.p. pirarubicin. Only pirarubicin, mitomycin C, and povidone-iodine were fully cytotoxic in vitro against DHD/K12/PROb rat colon cancer cells. In contrast to pirarubicin and povidone-iodine, mitomycin C was not completely active against LS174Tcells. In vivo, pirarubicin cured DHD/K12/PROb-inoculated rats, even at the site of the peritoneal scarring and intestinal anastomosis. i.p. pirarubicin prevented the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis and liver metastasis in LS174T-inoculated mice. i.p. washing with pirarubicin cured 2-day-old, but not 7-day-old, peritoneal carcinomatosis in rats. Short exposure to i.p. pirarubicin is nontoxic and more active than povidone-iodine and other anticancer drugs in preventing the development of peritoneal carcinomatosis from colonic origin in rats and mice. The prophylactic effect of preoperative peritoneal washing with pirarubicin on the development of

  17. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of cells with spiral electrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X B; Huang, Y; Wang, X; Becker, F F; Gascoyne, P R

    1997-01-01

    Electrokinetic responses of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were studied in suspensions of conductivities 18, 56, and 160 mS/m on a microelectrode array consisting of four parallel spiral electrode elements energized with phase-quadrature signals of frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 MHz. At low frequencies cells were levitated and transported toward or away from the center of the spiral array, whereas at high frequencies cells were trapped at electrode edges. The frequencies of transition between these characteristic cell behaviors increased with increasing suspension conductivity. Levitation heights and radial velocities were determined simultaneously for individual cells as a function of the applied field magnitude and frequency. Results were compared with theoretical predictions from generalized dielectrophoresis theory applied in conjunction with cell dielectric parameters and simulated electric field distributions corrected for electrode polarization effects. It was shown that the conventional and traveling-wave dielectrophoretic force components dominated cell levitation and radial motion, respectively. Both theoretical predictions and experimental data showed that the cell radial velocity was very sensitive to the field frequency when the in-phase component of the field-induced polarization was close to zero. Applications of spiral electrode arrays, including the isolation of cells of clinical relevance, are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 11 PMID:9083692

  18. Host manipulation by cancer cells: Expectations, facts, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Tissot, Tazzio; Arnal, Audrey; Jacqueline, Camille; Poulin, Robert; Lefèvre, Thierry; Mery, Frédéric; Renaud, François; Roche, Benjamin; Massol, François; Salzet, Michel; Ewald, Paul; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Ujvari, Beata; Thomas, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Similar to parasites, cancer cells depend on their hosts for sustenance, proliferation and reproduction, exploiting the hosts for energy and resources, and thereby impairing their health and fitness. Because of this lifestyle similarity, it is predicted that cancer cells could, like numerous parasitic organisms, evolve the capacity to manipulate the phenotype of their hosts to increase their own fitness. We claim that the extent of this phenomenon and its therapeutic implications are, however, underappreciated. Here, we review and discuss what can be regarded as cases of host manipulation in the context of cancer development and progression. We elaborate on how acknowledging the applicability of these principles can offer novel therapeutic and preventive strategies. The manipulation of host phenotype by cancer cells is one more reason to adopt a Darwinian approach in cancer research.

  19. Perspectives in nanostructure assisted laser manipulation of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Hoerdt, Anton; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of cell-adhered nanostructures with laser light has attracted much interest within the biomedical field. Molecular delivery using a variety of plasmonic nanostructures, such as structured surfaces, nanoparticles and particle clusters, is currently evolving from its proof-of-concept into a routine method. Here, gold represents the material of choice, as it provides unique optical properties, different surface modifications as well as biocompatibility. In addition, new materials (e.g. polypyrrole) provide interesting alternatives. Applying this approach, a variety of molecules, such as fluorescent dyes, proteins, antisense structures, and DNA, has been transfected in order to manipulate the cellular functions in different experimental settings. Antisense structures, for example, allow the efficient down regulation of the gene activity of a target, providing insights into the gene's function. The delivery of proteins, as executing molecules in the cell, can exhibit an immediate effect on the cell behavior, allowing a minute observation of the intracellular kinetics. Direct cell manipulation can be achieved with this approach as well. Increasing the nanoparticle concentration and/or the radiant exposure, effective cell destruction is induced. Using targeted nanoparticles (e.g. by antibody conjugation) in combination with spatially selective laser irradiation permits well-directed cell manipulation even in mixed cultures and potentially in tissues. Furthermore, excited gold nanoparticles can directly trigger cellular reactions, which can possibly be utilized for cell stimulation. The manifold possibilities of nanostructure assisted laser manipulation are still in development.

  20. Detection methods and clinical significance of free peritoneal tumor cells found during colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sibio, Simone; Fiorani, Cristina; Stolfi, Carmine; Divizia, Andrea; Pezzuto, Roberto; Montagnese, Fabrizio; Bagaglini, Giulia; Sammartino, Paolo; Sica, Giuseppe Sigismondo

    2015-09-27

    Peritoneal washing is now part of the standard clinical practice in several abdominal and pelvic neoplasias. However, in colorectal cancer surgery, intra-peritoneal free cancer cells (IFCC) presence is not routinely investigated and their prognostic meaning is still unclear. When peritoneal washing results are positive for the presence of IFCC a worse outcome is usually expected in these colorectal cancer operated patients, but it what is not clear is whether it is associated with an increased risk of local recurrence. It is authors' belief that one of the main reasons why IFCC are not researched as integral part of the routine staging system for colon cancer is that there still isn't a diagnostic or detection method with enough sensibility and specificity. However, the potential clinical implications of a routine research for the presence IFCC in colon neoplasias are enormous: not only to obtain a more accurate clinical staging but also to offer different therapy protocols, based on the presence of IFCC. Based on this, adjuvant chemotherapy could be offered to those patients found to be positive for IFCC; also, protocols of proactive intraperitoneal chemotherapy could be applied. Although presence of IFCC appears to have a valid prognostic significance, further studies are needed to standardize detection and examination procedures, to determine if there are and which are the stages more likely to benefit from routine search for IFCC.

  1. In vivo function of immune murine peritoneal exudate cells after freezing and thawing

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, L.R.; Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells were collected from Balb/c mice immunized against a 3-methylcholanthrene-induced (3-MCA) tumor and known to be capable of conferring tumor transplantation resistance in vivo in syngeneic recipients. These PEC were frozen-using dimethylsulfoxide as the cryopreservative agent. Adoptive transfer of tumor resistance in syngeneic recipients challenged with homologous 3-MCA sarcoma cells was attempted using these frozen exudate cells. Cells were thawed 1, 4, 7, 10 or 30 days after freezing and admixed with tumor cells in ratios of 100:1 or 1000:1 before injecting into mice. Tumorigenesis was decreased and delayed in groups receiving the 100:1 ratio. Less than 3% of the mice developed tumors in groups receiving the 1000:1 ratio. The number of cells recovered post-thawing ranged from 60 to 80%; viability of post-thawed cells ranged from 80 to 96%.

  2. Ultrasonic manipulation of particles and cells. Ultrasonic separation of cells.

    PubMed

    Coakley, W T; Whitworth, G; Grundy, M A; Gould, R K; Allman, R

    1994-04-01

    Cells or particles suspended in a sonic standing wave field experience forces which concentrate them at positions separated by half a wavelength. The aims of the study were: (1) To optimise conditions and test theoretical predictions for ultrasonic concentration and separation of particles or cells. (2) To investigate the scale-up of experimental systems. (3) To establish the maximum acoustic pressure to which a suspension might be exposed without inducing order-disrupting cavitation. (4) To compare the efficiencies of techniques for harvesting concentrated particles. The primary outcomes were: (1) To design of an acoustic pressure distribution within cylindrical containers which led to uniformly repeating sound pressure patterns throughout the containers in the standing wave mode, concentrated suspended eukaryotic cells or latex beads in clumps on the axis of wide containers, and provided uniform response of all particle clumps to acoustic harvesting regimes. Theory for the behaviour (e.g. movement to different preferred sites) of particles as a function of specific gravity and compressibility in containers of different lateral dimensions was extended and was confirmed experimentally. Convective streaming in the container was identified as a variable requiring control in the manipulation of particles of 1 micron or smaller size. (2) Consideration of scale-up from the model 10 ml volume led to the conclusion that flow systems in intermediate volume containers have more promise than scaled up batch systems. (3) The maximum acoustic pressures applicable to a suspension without inducing order-disrupting cavitation or excessive conductive streaming at 1 MHz and 3 MHz induce a force equivalent to a centrifugal field of about 10(3) g. (4) The most efficient technique for harvesting concentrated particles was the introduction of a frequency increment between two transducers to form a slowly sweeping pseudo-standing wave. The attractive inter-droplet ultrasonic standing

  3. High-Throughput Single-Cell Manipulation in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of neurons and neuronal circuits in brain tissue requires the genetic manipulation, labeling, and tracking of single cells. However, current methods for manipulating cells in brain tissue are limited to either bulk techniques, lacking single-cell accuracy, or manual methods that provide single-cell accuracy but at significantly lower throughputs and repeatability. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput, efficient, reliable, and combinatorial delivery of multiple genetic vectors and reagents into targeted cells within the same tissue sample with single-cell accuracy. Our system automatically loads nanoliter-scale volumes of reagents into a micropipette from multiwell plates, targets and transfects single cells in brain tissues using a robust electroporation technique, and finally preps the micropipette by automated cleaning for repeating the transfection cycle. We demonstrate multi-colored labeling of adjacent cells, both in organotypic and acute slices, and transfection of plasmids encoding different protein isoforms into neurons within the same brain tissue for analysis of their effects on linear dendritic spine density. Our platform could also be used to rapidly deliver, both ex vivo and in vivo, a variety of genetic vectors, including optogenetic and cell-type specific agents, as well as fast-acting reagents such as labeling dyes, calcium sensors, and voltage sensors to manipulate and track neuronal circuit activity at single-cell resolution. PMID:22536416

  4. Magnetic Wire Traps and Programmable Manipulation of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, G.; Henighan, T.; Chen, A.; Hauser, A. J.; Yang, F. Y.; Chalmers, J. J.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2009-09-01

    We present a multiplex method, based on microscopic programmable magnetic traps in zigzag wires patterned on a platform, to simultaneously apply directed forces on multiple fluid-borne cells or biologically inert magnetic microparticles or nanoparticles. The gentle tunable forces do not produce damage and retain cell viability. The technique is demonstrated with T-lymphocyte cells remotely manipulated (by a joystick) along desired trajectories on a silicon surface with average speeds up to 20μm/s.

  5. Inhibition of NF-kappaB with Dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin modifies the function of human peritoneal mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sosińska, Patrycja; Baum, Ewa; Maćkowiak, Beata; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Jasinski, Tomasz; Umezawa, Kazuo; Bręborowicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal mesothelial cells exposed to bioincompatible dialysis fluids contribute to damage of the peritoneum during chronic dialysis. Inflammatory response triggered in the mesothelium leading to neovascularization and fibrosis plays an important role in that process. We studied the effects of Dehydroxymethyepoxyquinmicin (DHMEQ)-an NF-κB inhibitor on function of human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) in in vitro culture. DHMEQ studied in concentrations of 1-10 µg/ml was not toxic to HPMC. Synthesis of IL-6, MCP-1 and hyaluronan in unstimulated and stimulated with interleukin-1 (100 pg/ml) HPMC was inhibited in the presence of DHMEQ and the effect was proportional to the dose of the drug. DHMEQ (10 µg/ml) reduced in unstimulated HPMC synthesis of IL-6 (-55%), MCP-1 (-58%) and hyaluronan (-41%). Respective values for stimulated HMPC were: -63% for IL-6, -57% for MCP-1 and -67% for hyaluronan. The observed effects were due to the suppression of the expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of these molecules. DHMEQ modified the effects of the effluent dialysates from CAPD patients on the function of HMPC. Dialysate induced accelerated growth of these cells, and synthesis of collagen was inhibited in the presence of DHMEQ 10 µg/ml, by 69% and 40%, respectively. The results of our study show that DHMEQ effectively reduces inflammatory response in HMPC and prevents excessive dialysate induced proliferation and collagen synthesis in these cells. All of these effects may be beneficial during chronic peritoneal dialysis and prevents progressive dialysis-induced damage to the peritoneum. PMID:28078047

  6. Isolation and manipulation of mouse trophoblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Koji; Himeno, Emi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kunath, Tilo

    2015-02-02

    The isolation of stable trophoblast stem (TS) cell lines from early mouse embryos has provided a useful cell culture model to study trophoblast development. TS cells are derived from pre-implantation blastocysts or from the extraembryonic ectoderm of early post-implantation embryos. The derivation and maintenance of mouse TS cells is dependent upon continuous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling. Gene expression analysis, differentiation in culture, and chimera formation show that TS cells accurately model the mouse trophoblast lineage. This unit describes how to derive, maintain, and manipulate TS cells, including DNA transfection and chimera formation.

  7. Ghrelin and obestatin promote the allergic action in rat peritoneal mast cells as basic secretagogues.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Tatsuya; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushima, Miyoko; Nishimura, Yuko; Kobe, Yuko; Ota, Yui; Baba, Kenji; Takagi, Kenzo

    2010-11-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand of the type 1a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a) that regulates energy balance. Ghrelin and obestatin, derived from the post-translational processing of preproghrelin, are involved in a diverse range of biological activities, yet their effect on the immune system is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the roles of ghrelin and obestatin on mast cell degranulation and found that both ghrelin and obestatin induce the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells. This induced histamine release was inhibited by the pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gα(i) protein, and extracellular Ca(2+). Rat peritoneal mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells did not express the ghrelin receptor GHSR1a, suggesting that histamine release induced by ghrelin occurs via a receptor-independent mechanism. We report here that ghrelin and obestatin, belonging to the family of basic secretagogues, stimulate mast cells independent of a receptor, and this may play a crucial role at the site of allergy or inflammation.

  8. Phagocytosis of PLGA Microparticles in Rat Peritoneal Exudate Cells: A Time-Dependent Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Anderson De Jesus; Nain Lunardi, Claure; Henrique Caetano, Flávio; Orive Lunardi, Laurelúcia; da Hora Machado, Antonio Eduardo

    2006-07-01

    With the purpose of enhancing the efficacy of microparticle-encapsulated therapeutic agents, in this study we evaluated the phagocytic ability of rat peritoneal exudate cells and the preferential location of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles inside these cells. The microparticles used were produced by a solvent evaporation method and were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Size distribution analysis using DLS and SEM showed that the particles were spherical, with diameters falling between 0.5 and 1.5 [mu]m. Results from cell adhesion by SEM assay, indicated that the PLGA microparticles are not toxic to cells and do not cause any distinct damage to them as confirmed by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. Among the large variety of cell populations found in the peritoneal exudates (neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes, and macrophages), TEM showed that only the latter phagocytosed PLGA microparticles, in a time-dependent manner. The results obtained indicate that the microparticles studied show merits as possible carriers of drugs for intracellular delivery.

  9. Microfluidic integrated acoustic waving for manipulation of cells and molecules.

    PubMed

    Barani, Alireza; Paktinat, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Aminollah; Mosaddegh, Peiman; Fadaei-Tehrani, Alireza; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2016-11-15

    Acoustophoresis with its simple and low-cost fabrication, rapid and localized fluid actuation, compatibility with microfluidic components, and biocompatibility for cellular studies, has been extensively integrated into microfluidics to provide on-chip microdevices for a variety of applications in biology, bioengineering and chemistry. Among different applications, noninvasive manipulation of cells and biomolecules are significantly important, which are addressed by acoustic-based microfluidics. Here in this paper, we briefly explain the principles and different configurations of acoustic wave and acoustic streaming for the manipulation of cells and molecules and overview its applications for single cell isolation, cell focusing and sorting, cell washing and patterning, cell-cell fusion and communication, and tissue engineering. We further discuss the application of acoustic-based microfluidic systems for the mixing and transport of liquids, manipulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules, followed by explanation on the present challenges of acoustic-based microfluidics for the handling of cells and molecules, and highlighting the future directions.

  10. 18. Photocopy of photograph. VIEW WITHIN POSTMORTEM CELL OF MANIPULATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph. VIEW WITHIN POST-MORTEM CELL OF MANIPULATOR ARMS BEING USED TO MOVE METAL BARS FROM ONE LOCATION TO ANOTHER. Photographer unknown, ca. 1965, original photograph and negative on file at the Remote Sensing Laboratory, Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. - Nevada Test Site, Engine Maintenance Assembly & Disassembly Facility, Area 25, Jackass Flats, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  11. Interleukin-5 induces tumor suppression by peritoneal exudate cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Y; Mita, S; Takatsu, K; Ogawa, M

    1993-09-01

    The antitumor activity of peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) induced by murine interleukin-5 (mIL-5) was examined using Meth-A sarcoma cells transplanted into the peritoneal cavity of mice. Although in vitro treatment of Meth-A sarcoma cells with mIL-5 did not result in inhibition of their growth, treatment of mice intraperitoneally with mIL-5 (1 microgram/day) from day -5 to +5 (tumor cells were inoculated on day 0) led to a significant increase in survival or even rejection of tumor cells. This antitumor effect depended on the dose of mIL-5. Interestingly, there was identical therapeutic activity when the protocol of days -10 to -1 was used as opposed to -5 to +5. In addition, post-treatment with mIL-5 from day +1 to +10 was ineffective. This suggests that the therapeutic activity of IL-5 is largely prophylactic. Under the former condition, the number of PEC was found to increase over 50-fold when compared to levels in control mice. Moreover, the antitumor effect of mIL-5 was completely abolished by subcutaneous injection of anti-mIL-5 monoclonal antibodies. The treatment of mice injected intraperitoneally with human IL-2 also resulted in an increase in survival. Winn assay experiments using PEC recovered from mIL-5-treated mice (1 microgram/day, from day -10 to -1) revealed that these PEC could mediate antitumor activity against Meth-A sarcoma cells. Furthermore, when the cured mice were re-injected with Meth-A sarcoma cells or syngeneic MOPC104E cells, they could reject Meth-A sarcoma cells but not MOPC104E cells, indicating that immune memory had been generated. These results suggest that IL-5 augmented the PEC tumoricidal activity but we have no indication that the tumoricidal activity was mediated through a mIL-5-dependent mechanism.

  12. The effects of nonidet P40 on the function of rat peritoneal mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, K W; Stanworth, D R

    1981-01-01

    1 Treatment of purified rat peritoneal mast cells at 37 degrees C with concentrations of the non-ionic detergent nonidet P40 (NP40) up to 0.005% (v/v) failed to reduce their viability. 2 There was a marked reduction in the histamine releasing capacity of NP40-treated mast cells upon challenge with a variety of selective (adrenocorticotrophic hormone 1-24 (Synacthen), rabbit anti-rat IgE antiserum, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the calcium ionophore, A 23187) and non-selective (rabbit anti-rat mast cell antiserum plus complement) histamine liberators. 3 Nonidet P40 (0.005%) was found to reduce the activity of a mast cell membrane 'ecto-enzyme', calcium-activated ATPase, by about 45% when presented at the time of its assay.

  13. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  14. Mechanical force characterization in manipulating live cells with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanhua; Sun, Dong; Huang, Wenhao

    2011-02-24

    Laser trapping with optical tweezers is a noninvasive manipulation technique and has received increasing attentions in biological applications. Understanding forces exerted on live cells is essential to cell biomechanical characterizations. Traditional numerical or experimental force measurement assumes live cells as ideal objects, ignoring their complicated inner structures and rough membranes. In this paper, we propose a new experimental method to calibrate the trapping and drag forces acted on live cells. Binding a micro polystyrene sphere to a live cell and moving the mixture with optical tweezers, we can obtain the drag force on the cell by subtracting the drag force on the sphere from the total drag force on the mixture, under the condition of extremely low Reynolds number. The trapping force on the cell is then obtained from the drag force when the cell is in force equilibrium state. Experiments on numerous live cells demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed force calibration approach.

  15. Manipulation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells for Knockout Mouse Production

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Advait; Hall, Bradford; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell liness has allowed for the generation of the knockout mouse. ES cells that are genetically altered in culture can then be manipulated to derive a whole mouse containing the desired mutation. To successfully generate a knockout mouse, however, the ES cells must be carefully cultivated in a pluripotent state throughout the gene targeting experiment. This unit describes detailed step-by-step protocols, reagents, equipment, and strategies needed for the successful generation of gene knockout embryonic stem cells using homologous recombination technologies. PMID:19731225

  16. Efficacy and safety of selenium nanoparticles administered intraperitoneally for the prevention of growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Kang; Tan, Yanping; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jinsong

    2014-07-01

    Peritoneal implantation of cancer cells, particularly postoperative seeding metastasis, frequently occurs in patients with primary tumors in the stomach, colon, liver, and ovary. Peritoneal carcinomatosis is associated with poor prognosis. In this work, we evaluated the prophylactic effect of intraperitoneal administration of selenium (Se), an essential trace element and a putative chemopreventive agent, on peritoneal implantation of cancer cells. Elemental Se nanoparticles were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice, into which highly malignant H22 hepatocarcinoma cells had previously been inoculated. Se concentrations in the cancer cells and tissues, as well as the efficacy of proliferation inhibition and safety, were evaluated. Se was mainly concentrated in cancer cells compared to Se retention in normal tissues, showing at least an order of magnitude difference between the drug target cells (the H22 cells) and the well-recognized toxicity target of Se (the liver). Such a favorable selective distribution resulted in strong proliferation suppression without perceived host toxicity. The mechanism of action of the Se nanoparticle-triggered cytotoxicity was associated with Se-mediated production of reactive oxygen species, which impaired the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Our results suggest that intraperitoneal administration of Se is a safe and effective means of preventing growth of cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity for the above-mentioned high-risk populations.

  17. Inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB suppresses peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer by blocking cancer cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Mino, Kazuhiro; Ozaki, Michitaka; Nakanishi, Kazuaki; Haga, Sanae; Sato, Masanori; Kina, Masaya; Takahashi, Masato; Takahashi, Norihiko; Kataoka, Akihiko; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Kamiyama, Toshiya; Umezawa, Kazuo; Todo, Satoru

    2011-05-01

    Currently, patients with peritoneal dissemination of gastric cancer must accept a poor prognosis because there is no standard effective therapy. To inhibit peritoneal dissemination it is important to inhibit interactions between extracellular matrices (ECM) and cell surface integrins, which are important for cancer cell adhesion. Although nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is involved in various processes in cancer progression, its involvement in the expression of integrins has not been elucidated. We used a novel NF-κB inhibitor, dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), to study whether NF-κB blocks cancer cell adhesion via integrins in a gastric cancer dissemination model in mice and found that DHMEQ is a potent suppressor of cancer cell dissemination. Dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin suppressed the NF-κB activity of human gastric cancer cells NUGC-4 and 44As3Luc and blocked the adhesion of cancer cells to ECM when compared with the control. Dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin also inhibited expression of integrin (α2, α3, β1) in in vitro studies. In the in vivo model, we injected 44As3Luc cells pretreated with DHMEQ into the peritoneal cavity of mice and performed peritoneal lavage after the injection of cancer cells. Viable cancer cells in the peritoneal cavities were evaluated sequentially by in vivo imaging. In mice injected with DHMEQ-pretreated cells and lavaged, live cancer cells in the peritoneum were significantly reduced compared with the control, and these mice survived longer. These results indicate that DHMEQ could inhibit cancer cell adhesion to the peritoneum possibly by suppressing integrin expression. Nuclear factor-kappa B inhibition may be a new therapeutic option for suppressing postoperative cancer dissemination.

  18. Anticancer effect of bromelain with and without cisplatin or 5-FU on malignant peritoneal mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Ehteda, Anahid; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David L

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare neoplasm of the peritoneum, causally related to asbestos exposure. Nonspecific symptoms with a late diagnosis results in poor survival (<1 year). Treatment with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has improved survival in some patients (median 3-5 years). Hence, new therapies are urgently needed. MUC1 is a glycosylation-dependent protein that confers tumours with invasiveness, metastasis and chemoresistance. Bromelain (cysteine proteinase) hydrolyses glycosidic bonds. Therefore, we investigated the antitumour effect of bromelain on MUC1-expressing MPM cell lines. MUC1 expressions in cells were assessed using immunofluorescent probes with cells grown on cover slips and western blot analysis on cell lysates. The cell lines were treated with various concentrations of bromelain and after 4 and 72 h, their viability was assessed using standard sulforhodamine assays. The cells were also treated with combinations of bromelain and cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin or 5-FU) and their viability was assessed at 72 h. Finally, with western blotting, the effects of bromelain on cellular survival proteins were investigated. PET cells expressed more MUC1 compared with YOU cells. The cell viability of both PET and YOU cells was adversely affected by bromelain, with PET cells being slightly resistant. The addition of bromelain increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin significantly in both cell lines. However, 5-FU with bromelain did not show any significant increase in cytotoxicity. Bromelain-induced cell death is by apoptosis and autophagy. Bromelain has the potential of being developed as a therapeutic agent in MPM.

  19. A portable and integrated instrument for cell manipulation by dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Burgarella, Sarah; Di Bari, Marco

    2015-07-01

    The physical manipulation of biological cells is a key point in the development of miniaturized systems for point-of-care analyses. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been reported by several laboratories as a promising method in biomedical research for label-free cell manipulation without physical contact, by exploiting the dielectric properties of cells suspended in a microfluidic sample, under the action of high-gradient electric fields. In view of a more extended use of DEP phenomena in lab-on-chip devices for point-of-care settings, we have developed a portable instrument, integrating on the same device the microfluidic biochip for cell manipulation and all the laboratory functions (i.e., DEP electric signal generation, microscopic observation of the biological sample under test and image acquisition) that are normally obtained by combining different nonportable standard laboratory instruments. The nonuniform electric field for cell manipulation on the biochip is generated by microelectrodes, patterned on the silicon substrate of microfluidic channels, using standard microfabrication techniques. Numerical modeling was performed to simulate the electric field distribution, quantify the DEP force, and optimize the geometry of the microelectrodes. The developed instrument includes an electronic board, which allows the control of the electric signal applied to electrodes necessary for DEP, and a miniaturized optical microscope system that allows visual inspection and eventually cell counting, as well as image and video recording. The system also includes the control software. The portable and integrated platform described in this work therefore represents a complete and innovative solution of applied research, suitable for many biological applications.

  20. beta-Naphthoflavone protects from peritonitis by reducing TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Yao; Liou, Je-Wen; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Peng, Shih-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Wei-Cheng; Huang, Zheng-Kai; Jiang, Shinn-Jong

    2015-12-01

    β-Naphthoflavone (β-NF), a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, has been shown to possess anti-oxidative properties. We investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory potential of β-NF in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Pretreatment with β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species, translocation of p67(phox), and TNF-α-induced monocyte binding and transmigration. In addition, β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. The mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were reduced by β-NF, as was the infiltration of white blood cells, in a peritonitis model. The inhibition of adhesion molecules was associated with suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and Akt, and suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38. The translocation of Egr-1, a downstream transcription factor involved in the MEK-ERK signaling pathway, was suppressed by β-NF treatment. Our findings show that β-NF inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-kB and ERK1/2 activation and ROS generation, thereby suppressing the expression of adhesion molecules. This results in reduced adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes in vitro and prevents the infiltration of leukocytes in a peritonitis model. Our findings also suggest that β-NF might prevent TNF-α-induced inflammation.

  1. Effect of peritoneal dialysis fluid containing osmo-metabolic agents on human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonomini, Mario; Di Silvestre, Sara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Di Pietro, Natalia; Mandatori, Domitilla; Di Liberato, Lorenzo; Sirolli, Vittorio; Chiarelli, Francesco; Indiveri, Cesare; Pandolfi, Assunta; Arduini, Arduino

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of glucose as the only osmotic agent in peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions (PDSs) is believed to exert local (peritoneal) and systemic detrimental actions, particularly in diabetic PD patients. To improve peritoneal biocompatibility, we have developed more biocompatible PDSs containing xylitol and carnitine along with significantly less amounts of glucose and have tested them in cultured Human Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) obtained from the umbilical cords of healthy (C) and gestational diabetic (GD) mothers. Methods Primary C- and GD-HUVECs were treated for 72 hours with our PDSs (xylitol 0.7% and 1.5%, whereas carnitine and glucose were fixed at 0.02% and 0.5%, respectively) and two glucose-based PDSs (glucose 1.36% or 2.27%). We examined their effects on endothelial cell proliferation (cell count), viability (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay), intracellular nitro-oxidative stress (peroxynitrite levels), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 membrane exposure (flow cytometry), and HUVEC-monocyte interactions (U937 adhesion assay). Results Compared to glucose-based PDSs, our in vitro studies demonstrated that the tested PDSs did not change the proliferative potential both in C- and GD-HUVECs. Moreover, our PDSs significantly improved endothelial cell viability, compared to glucose-based PDSs and basal condition. Notably, glucose-based PDSs significantly increased the intracellular peroxynitrite levels, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 membrane exposure, and endothelial cell–monocyte interactions in both C- and GD-HUVECs, as compared with our experimental PDSs. Conclusion Present results show that in control and diabetic human endothelial cell models, xylitol–carnitine-based PDSs do not cause cytotoxicity, nitro-oxidative stress, and inflammation as caused by hypertonic glucose-based PDSs. Since xylitol and carnitine are also known to

  2. The use of microelectrode array (MEA) to study rat peritoneal mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chi-Kong; Law, Jessica Ka-Yan; Sam, Sze-Wing; Ingebrandt, Sven; Lau, Hang-Yung Alaster; Rudd, John Anthony; Chan, Mansun

    2008-06-01

    We performed this study to demonstrate the applicability of the microelectrode array (MEA) to study electrophysiological changes of rat peritoneal mast cells in the presence of compound 48/80 under normal, Ca(2+)-free, Ca(2+)-free with EDTA, and Cl(-)-free conditions. The use of high extracellular K(+) (KCl, 150 mM), charybdotoxin (ChTX, 100 nM), and Cl(-)-free containing ChTX buffers verified that the hyperpolarizing signal was due to the activation of mainly K(+) and, to a lesser extent, Cl(-) channels. Compound 48/80 concentration-dependently shortened the latent periods (the onset of response) and increased both the spatial (the K(+) and Cl(-) hyperpolarizing field potentials, HFP) and temporal measurements (the duration of response). Ca(2+)-free buffer had no effect on the latent period of compound 48/80 but increased the HFP at high concentrations. The latent period increased while the HFP diminished when cells were equilibrated in Ca(2+)-free buffer containing EDTA. Durations of the HFP were generally longer when cells were in either Ca(2+)-free or Ca(2+)-free containing EDTA buffers than when cells were in normal buffer. The EC(50) values confirmed that effects were only affected in Ca(2+)-free buffer containing EDTA but not in Ca(2+)-free or Cl(-)-free buffers, further reinforcing the hypothesis that the presence of Ca(2+) is not essential to the action of compound 48/80. The present study is the first application of MEA to study rat peritoneal mast cells, and our results indicate that it could be of value in future pharmacological research on other non-excitable cells.

  3. Hybrid IC / Microfluidic Chips for the Manipulation of Biological Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hakho

    2005-03-01

    A hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip that can manipulate individual biological cells in a fluid with microscopic resolution has been demonstrated. The chip starts with a custom-designed silicon integrated circuit (IC) produced in a foundry using standard processing techniques. A microfluidic chamber is then fabricated on top of the IC to provide a biocompatible environment. The motion of biological cells in the chamber is controlled using a two-dimensional array of micro-scale electromagnets in the IC that generate spatially patterned magnetic fields. A local peak in the magnetic field amplitude will trap a magnetic bead and an attached cell; by moving the peak's location, the bead-bound cell can be moved to any position on the chip surface above the array. By generating multiple peaks, many cells can be moved independently along separate paths, allowing many different manipulations of individual cells. The hybrid IC / Microfluidic chip can be used, for example, to sort cells or to assemble tissue on micrometer length scales. To prove the concept, an IC / Microfluidic chip was fabricated, based on a custom-designed IC that contained a two-dimensional microcoil array with integrated current sources and control circuits. The chip was tested by trapping and moving biological cells tagged with magnetic beads inside the microfluidic chamber over the array. By combining the power of silicon technology with the biocompatibility of microfluidics, IC / Microfluidic chips will make new types of investigations possible in biological and biomedical studies.

  4. Effects of Icodextrin and Glucose Bicarbonate/Lactate-Buffered Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids on Effluent Cell Population and Biocompatibility Markers IL-6 and CA125 in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Opatrná, Sylvie; Pöpperlová, Anna; Lysák, Daniel; Fuchsová, Radka; Trefil, Ladislav; Racek, Jaroslav; Topolčan, Ondrej

    2016-04-01

    Icodextrin peritoneal dialysis (PD) solution has been shown to increase interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in PD effluent as well as leukocyte and mesothelial cell count. Mesothelial cells release cancer antigen 125 (CA125), which is used as a marker of mesothelial cell mass. This 1-year prospective study was designed to compare peritoneal effluent cell population, its inflammatory phenotype and biocompatibility biomarkers IL-6 and CA125 between icodextrin (E) and glucose bicarbonate/lactate (P) based PD solutions. Using baseline peritoneal ultrafiltration capacity, 19 stable incident PD patients were allocated either to P only (N = 8) or to P plus E for the overnight dwell (N = 11). Flow cytometry was used to measure white blood cell count and differential and the expression of inflammatory molecules on peritoneal cells isolated from timed overnight peritoneal effluents. Compared to P, E effluent showed higher leukocyte (10.9 vs. 7.9), macrophages (6.1 vs. 2.5) and mesothelial cells (0.3 vs. 0.1)×10(6) /L count, as well as expression of HLA DR on mesothelial cells and IL-6 (320.5 vs. 141.2 pg/min) on mesothelial cells and CA125 appearance rate (159.6 vs. 84.3 IU/min), all P < 0.05. In the E group, correlation between IL-6 and CA125 effluent levels (r = 0.503, P < 0.05) as well as appearance rates (r = 0.774, P < 0.001) was demonstrated. No effect on systemic inflammatory markers or peritoneal permeability was found. Icodextrin PD solution activates local inflammation without systemic consequences so the clinical relevance of this observation remains obscure. Correlation between effluent IL-6 and CA125 suggests that CA125 might be upregulated due to inflammation and thus is not a reliable marker of mesothelial cell mass and/or biocompatibility.

  5. Ultra-deep sequencing detects ovarian cancer cells in peritoneal fluid and reveals somatic TP53 mutations in noncancerous tissues.

    PubMed

    Krimmel, Jeffrey D; Schmitt, Michael W; Harrell, Maria I; Agnew, Kathy J; Kennedy, Scott R; Emond, Mary J; Loeb, Lawrence A; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Risques, Rosa Ana

    2016-05-24

    Current sequencing methods are error-prone, which precludes the identification of low frequency mutations for early cancer detection. Duplex sequencing is a sequencing technology that decreases errors by scoring mutations present only in both strands of DNA. Our aim was to determine whether duplex sequencing could detect extremely rare cancer cells present in peritoneal fluid from women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSOCs). These aggressive cancers are typically diagnosed at a late stage and are characterized by TP53 mutations and peritoneal dissemination. We used duplex sequencing to analyze TP53 mutations in 17 peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC and 20 from women without cancer. The tumor TP53 mutation was detected in 94% (16/17) of peritoneal fluid samples from women with HGSOC (frequency as low as 1 mutant per 24,736 normal genomes). Additionally, we detected extremely low frequency TP53 mutations (median mutant fraction 1/13,139) in peritoneal fluid from nearly all patients with and without cancer (35/37). These mutations were mostly deleterious, clustered in hotspots, increased with age, and were more abundant in women with cancer than in controls. The total burden of TP53 mutations in peritoneal fluid distinguished cancers from controls with 82% sensitivity (14/17) and 90% specificity (18/20). Age-associated, low frequency TP53 mutations were also found in 100% of peripheral blood samples from 15 women with and without ovarian cancer (none with hematologic disorder). Our results demonstrate the ability of duplex sequencing to detect rare cancer cells and provide evidence of widespread, low frequency, age-associated somatic TP53 mutation in noncancerous tissue.

  6. Fluorescence Cell Imaging and Manipulation Using Conventional Halogen Lamp Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Iwamoto, Daisaku; Terashita, Yukari; Li, Chong; Wakayama, Sayaka; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Saeki, Kazuhiro; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2012-01-01

    Technologies for vitally labeling cells with fluorescent dyes have advanced remarkably. However, to excite fluorescent dyes currently requires powerful illumination, which can cause phototoxic damage to the cells and increases the cost of microscopy. We have developed a filter system to excite fluorescent dyes using a conventional transmission microscope equipped with a halogen lamp. This method allows us to observe previously invisible cell organelles, such as the metaphase spindle of oocytes, without causing phototoxicity. Cells remain healthy even after intensive manipulation under fluorescence observation, such as during bovine, porcine and mouse somatic cell cloning using nuclear transfer. This method does not require expensive epifluorescence equipment and so could help to reduce the science gap between developed and developing countries. PMID:22347500

  7. Biophotonics for imaging and cell manipulation: quo vadis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexandros A.; Makropoulou, Mirsini; Kotsifaki, Domna G.; Tsigaridas, Giorgos

    2016-01-01

    As one of the major health problems for mankind is cancer, any development for the early detection and effective treatment of cancer is crucial to saving lives. Worldwide, the dream for the anti-cancer procedure of attack is the development of a safe and efficient early diagnosis technique, the so called "optical biopsy". As early diagnosis of cancer is associated with improved prognosis, several laser based optical diagnostic methods were developed to enable earlier, non-invasive detection of human cancer, as Laser Induced Fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFs), Diffuse Reflectance spectroscopy (DRs), confocal microscopy, and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Among them, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) imaging is considered to be a useful tool to differentiate healthy from malignant (e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma) skin tissue. If the demand is to perform imaging in sub-tissular or even sub-cellular level, optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy have enabled the visualization of molecular events underlying cellular processes in live cells, as well as the manipulation and characterization of microscale or even nanoscale biostructures. In this work, we will present the latest advances in the field of laser imaging and manipulation techniques, discussing some representative experimental data focusing on the 21th century biophotonics roadmap of novel diagnostic and therapeutical approaches. As an example of a recently discussed health and environmental problem, we studied both experimentally and theoretically the optical trapping forces exerted on yeast cells and modified with estrogen-like acting compounds yeast cells, suspended in various buffer media.

  8. Magnetically driven microrobotic system for cancer cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lucarini, G; Iacovacci, V; Ricotti, L; Comisso, N; Dario, P; Menciassi, A

    2015-08-01

    Lab-on-a-chip applications, such as single cell manipulation and targeted delivery of chemicals, could greatly benefit from mobile untethered microdevices able to move in fluidic environments by using magnetic fields. In this paper a magnetically driven microrobotic system enabling the controlled locomotion of objects placed at the air/liquid interface is proposed and exploited for cell manipulation. In particular authors report the design, fabrication and testing of a polymeric thin film-based magnetic microrobot (called "FilmBot") used as a support for navigating cancer cells. By finely controlling magnetic film locomotion, it is possible to navigate the cells by exploiting their adhesion to the film without affecting their integrity. Preliminary in vitro tests demonstrated that the magnetic thin film is able to act as substrate for T24 bladder cancer cells without affecting their viability and that film locomotion can be magnetically controlled (with a magnetic field and a gradient of 6 mT and 0.6 T/m, respectively) along specific directions, with a mean speed of about 3 mm/s.

  9. Dual effects of protoporphyrin and long wave ultraviolet light on histamine release from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, A.; Gigli, I.; Barrett, K.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of long wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and various doses of protoporphyrin (PP) on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells. We also correlated these results with morphologic characteristics and viability of the cells. PP at a dose of 30 ng/ml plus UVA-induced negligible histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), but was able to suppress the ability of the cells to release histamine in response to subsequent exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, or the combination of Ag and IgE. This functional change was associated with an increase in cell size, and cell lysis that gradually occurred during 24 h in culture. PP at a dose of 3 ng/ml plus UVA also significantly inhibited secretogogue-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, but this dose was not associated with significant changes in morphology or viability. These various effects of PP plus UVA were also observed with mast cell preparations obtained by the enzymatic dispersion of rat skin. The suppression of secretogogue-induced histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells treated with PP (3 ng/ml) and UVA could not be reversed by culturing the cells in the dark for 24 h in the absence of PP. Unlike the direct cytotoxic histamine releasing action of high doses of PP plus UVA, the suppressive effect of low PP doses could not be inhibited by catalase, but could be reduced by the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that PP plus UVA has dual effects on mast cells, apparently involving distinct mechanisms. This implies the possibility that PP and UVA at appropriate doses could be used in photochemotherapy of mast cell-mediated skin diseases.

  10. Neuroendocrine circuitry and endometriosis: progesterone derivative dampens corticotropin-releasing hormone-induced inflammation by peritoneal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tariverdian, Nadja; Rücke, Mirjam; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Blois, Sandra M; Karpf, Eva F; Sedlmayr, Peter; Klapp, Burghard F; Kentenich, Heribert; Siedentopf, Friederike; Arck, Petra C

    2010-03-01

    Clinical symptoms of endometriosis, such as pain and infertility, can be described as persistent stressors. Such continuous exposure to stress may severely affect the equilibrium and bidirectional communication of the endocrine and immune system, hereby further aggravating the progression of endometriosis. In the present study, we aimed to tease apart mediators that are involved in the stress response as well as in the progression of endometriosis. Women undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy due to infertility were recruited (n = 69). Within this cohort, early stage of endometriosis were diagnosed in n = 30 and advanced stage of endometriosis in n = 8. Levels of progesterone in serum were determined. Frequency of progesterone receptor (PR) expression on CD56(+) and CD8(+) peritoneal lymphocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. The production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10 by peritoneal leukocytes upon stimulation with the potent stress mediator corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the progesterone derivative dydrogesterone, or both, were evaluated. Furthermore, the production of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) by peritoneal leukocytes and the expression of PR in endometriotic tissue were investigated. Levels of progesterone in serum were decreased in women with endometriosis and inversely correlated to pain scores. Furthermore, an increased frequency of CD56(+)PR(+) and CD8(+)PR(+) peritoneal lymphocytes was present in advanced endometriosis. The TNF/IL-10 ratio, reflecting cytokine secretion by peritoneal cells, was higher in cells derived from endometriosis patients and could be further heightened by CRH stimulation, whereas stimulation with dydrogesterone abrogated the CRH-mediated inflammation. Finally, the expression of PIBF by peritoneal leukocytes was increased in endometriosis. Low levels of progesterone in the follicular phase could be responsible for the progression of endometriosis and related pain. Peripheral CRH

  11. The Therapeutic Potential of Human Umbilical Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Wharton’s Jelly in the Treatment of Rat Peritoneal Dialysis-Induced Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yu-Pei; Hsia, Ching-Chih; Tseng, Kuang-Wen; Liao, Chih-Kai; Fu, Tz-Win; Ko, Tsui-Ling; Chiu, Mei-Miao; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Pei-Yu; Chiang, Yi-Chia

    2016-01-01

    A major complication in continuous, ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease who are undergoing long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) is peritoneal fibrosis, which can result in peritoneal structural changes and functional ultrafiltration failure. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) in Wharton’s jelly possess stem cell properties and are easily obtained and processed. This study focuses on the effects of HUMSCs on peritoneal fibrosis in in vitro and in vivo experiments. After 24-hour treatment with mixture of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium and PD solution at a 1:3 ratio, primary human peritoneal mesothelial cells became susceptible to PD-induced cell death. Such cytotoxic effects were prevented by coculturing with primary HUMSCs. In a rat model, intraperitoneal injections of 20 mM methylglyoxal (MGO) in PD solution for 3 weeks (the PD/MGO 3W group) markedly induced abdominal cocoon formation, peritoneal thickening, and collagen accumulation. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated neoangiogenesis and significant increase in the numbers of ED-1- and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)-positive cells in the thickened peritoneum in the PD/MGO 3W group, suggesting that PD/MGO induced an inflammatory response. Furthermore, PD/MGO treatment for 3 weeks caused functional impairments in the peritoneal membrane. However, in comparison with the PD/MGO group, intraperitoneal administration of HUMSCs into the rats significantly ameliorated the PD/MGO-induced abdominal cocoon formation, peritoneal fibrosis, inflammation, neoangiogenesis, and ultrafiltration failure. After 3 weeks of transplantation, surviving HUMSCs were found in the peritoneum in the HUMSC-grafted rats. Thus, xenografts of HUMSCs might provide a potential therapeutic strategy in the prevention of peritoneal fibrosis. Significance This study demonstrated that direct intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells into the rat effectively

  12. High-glucose-based peritoneal dialysis solution induces the upregulation of VEGF expression in human peritoneal mesothelial cells: The role of pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wu, Xia; Liu, Yanchun; Xu, Yaguang; Huang, Yuhan; Xing, Changying; Wang, Xiaoyun

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a high-glucose-based peritoneal dialysis solution (HGPDS) on the expression of pleiotrophin (PTN) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) and the mechanisms through which fluvastatin (Flu) protects the peritoneal membrane in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). HPMCs were cultured with HGPDS, Flu (10-8‑10-6 mol/l) and PTN (10‑30 nmol/l). The expression of PTN and VEGF was examined at the mRNA and protein level. To define the role of PTN in the regulation of VEGF expression, HPMCs were cultured with HGPDS in the presence or absence of the blocking peptide of PTN. The signaling pathways involved in PTN synthesis induced by HGPDS were also characterized. The phenotypic characteristics of HPMCs were observed under a light microscope. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetry and the mRNA and protein expression of PTN, VEGF and ERK1/2 was assessed by RT‑PCR and the western blot analysis, respectively. Following incubation with HGPDS for 48 h, the morphology of the HPMCs changed from a typical cobblestone‑like appearance to a fibroblast‑like phenotype. The same alteration in the morphology of the HPMCs also occurred following incubation with 20 nmol/l PTN. Flu (10-6 mol/l), GSK650394 [a competitive inhibitor of serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), 10-5 mol/l] and PD98059 (a competitive inhibitor of ERK1/2, 10-5 mol/l) improved the negative changes in cell morphology induced by HGPDS. The results of MTT assay revealed that the reduction in HPMC viability occurred in the groups treated with HGPDS and this reduction was partially restored by Flu, GSK650394 and PD98059. A significant improvement in cell viability, which had been decreased by HGPDS, was observed following treatment with Flu (10-6 mol/l), PD98059 (10-5 mol/l) or GSK650394 (10-5 mol/l) (P<0

  13. Dysregulation of peritoneal cavity B1a cells and murine primary biliary cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-Qing; Yang, Wei; Yao, Yuan; Ma, Hong-Di; Wang, Yin-Hu; Li, Liang; Wu, Qingfa; Gershwin, M. Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune liver disease with progressive cholestasis and liver fibrosis. Similar to human patients with PBC, p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice spontaneously develop severe autoimmune cholangitis. Although there has been considerable work on immune regulation and autoimmunity, there is a relative paucity of work directed at the functional implications of the key peritoneal cavity (PC) B cell subset, coined B1a cells in PBC. We used flow cytometry and high-resolution microarrays to study the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of B cells, particularly B1a cells, in the PC of p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice compared to controls. Importantly, B1a cell proliferation was markedly lower as the expression of Ki67 decreased. Meanwhile, the apoptosis level was much higher. These lead to a reduction of B1a cells in the PC of p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice compared to controls. In contrast, there was a dramatic increase of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells accompanied by elevated production of IFN-γ. In addition, we found a negative correlation between the frequency of B1a cells and the presence of autoreactive CD8+ T cells in both liver and PC of p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice. From a functional perspective, B cells from p40−/−IL-2Rα−/− mice downregulated IL-10 production and CTLA-4 expression, leading to loss of B cell regulatory function. We suggest that the dysfunction of B1a cells in the PC in this murine model of autoimmune cholangitis results in defective regulatory function. This highlights a new potential therapeutic target in PBC. PMID:27105495

  14. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Wilhelm, Claire; Clément, Olivier; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Interleukin-6 production by peritoneal mesothelial cells and its regulation by inflammatory factors in rats administered carbon tetrachloride intraperitoneally

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaji, Kenzaburo; Ohnishi, Ken-ichi; Zuinen, Ryoji; Ochiai, Yosuke; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Hojo, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that a high level of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is protective against CCl{sub 4}-induced hepatotoxicity, is produced in the peritoneal cavity in the early period after ip carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) administration. The objective of this study was to identify the tissues and cells involved in IL-6 production and clarify the mechanisms underlying its regulation. IL-6 mRNA levels increased significantly in the serous membranes of the mesentery and peritoneum, but not in the parenchymal organs including liver, kidney and spleen, 3 h after ip CCl{sub 4} administration. Peritoneal mesothelial cells (PMCs), a major cell population in serous membranes, were isolated from rat peritoneal walls by trypsin digestion and cultured with peritoneal exudate fluid (PEF) from CCl{sub 4}-administered rats. PMCs produced a high level of IL-6 in the presence of PEF recovered 0.5 h after ip CCl{sub 4} administration. Analyses of PEF revealed that the levels of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), histamine, IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) increased immediately after ip CCl{sub 4} administration. These inflammatory factors, except for histamine, stimulated IL-6 production to varying degrees, in the following order: IL-1{alpha} > IL-1{beta} > TNF-{alpha} >> PGE{sub 2}. In summary, the present study indicates that the high level of IL-6 observed in the rat peritoneal cavity after ip CCl{sub 4} administration is at least partially produced by PMCs stimulated cooperatively with IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, TNF-{alpha} and PGE{sub 2}. These inflammatory factors may be released from tissues or cells either stimulated or injured directly by CCl{sub 4}.

  16. Automated transportation of single cells using robot-tweezer manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Songyu; Sun, Dong

    2011-08-01

    Manipulation of biological cells becomes increasingly important in biomedical engineering to address challenge issues in cell-cell interaction, drug discovery, and tissue engineering. Significant demand for both accuracy and productivity in cell manipulation highlights the need for automated cell transportation with integrated robotics and micro/nano manipulation technologies. Optical tweezers, which use highly focused low-power laser beams to trap and manipulate particles at micro/nanoscale, have emerged as an essential tool for manipulating single cells. In this article, we propose to use a robot-tweezer manipulation system to solve the problem of automatic transportation of biological cells, where optical tweezers function as special robot end effectors. Dynamics equation of the cell in optical tweezers is analyzed. A closed-loop controller is designed for transporting and positioning cells. Experiments are performed on live cells to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach in effective cell positioning.

  17. Primary marrow-derived stromal cells: isolation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. "MSC" also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSCs do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded by-product of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs-both primary and immortalized cell lines.

  18. PRIMARY MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS: ISOLATION AND MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. “MSC” also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSC do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we will describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded byproduct of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We will also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs – both primary and immortalized cell lines. PMID:23959984

  19. Local probing and stimulation of neuronal cells by optical manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojoc, Dan

    2014-09-01

    During development and in the adult brain, neurons continuously explore the environment searching for guidance cues, leading to the appropriate connections. Elucidating these mechanisms represents a gold goal in neurobiology. Here, I discuss our recent achievements developing new approaches to locally probe the growth cones and stimulate neuronal cell compartments with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical tweezers force spectroscopy applied in conjunction with metabolic inhibitors reveals new properties of the cytoskeleton dynamics. On the other hand, using optically manipulated microvectors as functionalized beads or filled liposomes, we demonstrate focal stimulation of neurons by small number of signaling molecules.

  20. Dipolar Rings of Microscopic Ellipsoids: Magnetic Manipulation and Cell Entrapment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Cebers, Andrejs; Tierno, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    We study the formation and the dynamics of dipolar rings composed by microscopic ferromagnetic ellipsoids, which self-assemble in water by switching the direction of the applied field. We show how to manipulate these fragile structures and control their shape via the application of external static and oscillating magnetic fields. We introduce a theoretical framework which describes the ring deformation under an applied field, allowing us to understand the underlying physical mechanism. Our microscopic rings are finally used to capture, entrap, and later release a biological cell via a magnetic command, i.e., performing a simple operation which can be implemented in other microfluidic devices which make use of ferromagnetic particles.

  1. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  2. Influence of salmeterol and benzalkonium chloride on G-protein-mediated exocytotic responses of rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Krebs, D; Ziegler, A

    2000-05-26

    The long-acting beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist salmeterol and the invert soap benzalkonium chloride share physicochemically important structures, namely a polar head group and a long aliphatic chain. Low concentrations of benzalkonium chloride have been shown to inhibit exocytotic responses in rat peritoneal mast cells by selectively interacting with heterotrimeric G-proteins of the G(i)-type. The present study investigates whether salmeterol inhibits, independently of beta-adrenoceptors, exocytotic responses of rat peritoneal mast cells induced by the direct agonists at G-proteins mastoparan or guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (++GTP gamma S++). Exocytosis was studied by secretion assays ([3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT)-release) using intact, streptolysin O-permeabilised or metabolically inhibited (antimycin, deoxyglucose) rat peritoneal mast cells. Both amphiphilics, salmeterol, and benzalkonium chloride, dose-dependently exerted biphasic effects on mastoparan-induced [3H]5-HT release in intact mast cells. In contrast to benzalkonium chloride, the dose-response curves for secretostatic and celltoxic effects of salmeterol markedly overlapped. Similar to benzalkonium chloride, salmeterol in non-cytotoxic concentrations (1-25 microg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited exocytosis induced by mastoparan (intact cells) or ++GTP gamma S (permeabilised cells). These findings indicate a direct, adrenoceptor-independent affection of G proteins by salmeterol in mast cells.

  3. Patterned Magnetic Structures for Micro-/Nanoparticle and Cell Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Gregory Butler

    Remote manipulation of fluid-borne magnetic particles on a surface is useful to probe, assemble, and sort microscale and nanoscale objects. By patterning magnetic structures in shapes designed to exploit local heterogeneities in thin film magnetization, we have demonstrated effective trapping mechanisms for superparamagnetic micro- and nanoparticles. The features necessary for trapping are shown to arise at domain walls or indentations in microscale and smaller magnetic wires, at the periphery of magnetized disks, and at corners of magnetized triangles. Weak (<150 Oe) in- and out-of-plane external magnetic fields modify the energy landscape of the trapped particles, allowing for the objects to be remotely maneuvered along selected routes across the surface. The mechanism is multiplexed, allowing for simultaneous manipulation of many trapped particles, and their motion is directed using a handheld user interface. Particles are able to be transported over hundreds of micrometers with velocities of upwards of 200 µm/s and average forces of up to hundreds of picoNewtons. The magnetic fields, their spatial distribution, and resulting forces are estimated by modeling magnetization of the patterned structures using micromagnetic simulation or by approximating the traps as point sources of fields. The quality of these models and their relevance for describing particle manipulation under the experimental conditions is discussed. The applicability of these techniques is demonstrated for various biological, biomolecular, and nanoscale systems. Binding of magnetic particles to cells allows for guided cell transport. Composite micelle nanostructures, only tens of nm across, are simultaneously trapped and maneuvered magnetically and tracked fluorescently, despite their small size. The implications for use of this technology in lab-on-chip devices are discussed.

  4. [Experimental investigations on cell resorption from the peritoneal cavity by use of the scanning electron microscope (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Remmele, W; Richter, I E; Wildenhof, H

    1975-10-01

    1. It is well known that microscopically small particles may be absorbed from the peritoneal cavity via the large lymphatic vessels. The present experiments were carried out in order to elucidate the site of the absorption. In addition, the role of transperitoneal transport of neoplastic cells as a possible cause of cancer metastases was studied. 2. The peritoneal surface of 40 rats and mice was studied with the scanning electron microscope (diaphragm, lateral abdominal wall). The investigations were carried out in 8 rats and 3 mice 24 hrs following the intraperitoneal injection of washed homologous erythrocytes and in 20 rats and 5 mice 24 hrs after the intraperitoneal injection of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. 2 rats and 2 mice served as controls. 3. In the control animals no stomata could be shown in the peritoneum of the diaphragm or in the lateral abdominal wall. 4. The i.p. injection of erythrocytes was followed by the appearance of stomata in the peritoneal surface of the diaphragm, and absorption of erythrocytes could be demonstrated. No stomata were found in the peritoneum of the lateral abdominal wall. 5. Tumor cells were found in the stomata following the i.p. injection of ascites tumor cells. It is concluded that a lympho-hematogenous spread of tumor cells seems probable at least in the early stage of tumor infiltration of the peritoneum. This stage is followed by implantation of the tumor cells on the peritoneum.

  5. Adoptive transfer of fibrocytes enhances splenic T-cell numbers and survival in septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Nemzek, Jean A; Fry, Christopher; Moore, Bethany B

    2013-08-01

    Fibrocytes are unique, fibroblast-like cells with diverse functions and the potential for immunomodulation, which prompted investigation of their previously unexplored role in sepsis. Specifically, the study goals were to determine if adoptive transfer of fibrocytes would affect outcome in sepsis and to define relevant immunopathologic changes associated with the outcomes. Initial in vitro studies demonstrated that naive T-cell proliferation was significantly increased in cocultures with tissue-derived fibrocytes as compared with culture either alone or with fibroblasts. In vivo, the adoptive transfer of fibrocytes at the time of cecal ligation and puncture significantly improved survival of mice compared with transfer of fibroblasts or saline. Septic mice had lower blood levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and markers of organ injury after fibrocyte transfer as well as a reduced bacterial burden. Locally, peritoneal lavage fluid yielded lower bacterial counts, lower IL-6, and reduced inflammatory cell counts when fibrocyte transfer was compared with saline. This was also accompanied by significant increases in splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In vitro stimulation of the splenic T cells demonstrated that, after cecal ligation and puncture and adoptive transfer, the percentages of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with intracellular interferon γ were increased, whereas those with IL-4 remained similar between the groups. Therefore, it appears the adoptive transfer of fibrocytes improves sepsis survival, lowers bacterial burden, and promotes the proliferation of splenic T cells with a T(H)1 phenotype. These results confirm the immunomodulatory effects of exogenous, tissue-derived fibrocytes in sepsis and suggest their potential in cell therapy.

  6. Peritoneal Dialysis–Related Peritonitis Due to Abiotrophia defectiva

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikhil; Naidu, Prenilla; Pauly, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abiotrophia defectiva is a fastidious aerobic gram-positive bacterium which is part of the normal flora of the human oral cavity. It is an unusual cause of peritoneal dialysis–related peritonitis. Case Presentation: We present a case of a man in his fifties with end-stage renal failure secondary to polycystic kidney disease who presented with a cloudy peritoneal fluid effluent and a cell count of 35 620 × 106 cells/L with 90% polymorphonuclear cells. The fluid was cultured per unit protocol, and the organism was identified as Abiotrophia defectiva. Post–peritonitis dialysis technique review revealed frequent lapses in the use of facemask and hand washing during cycler connection and disconnection. The patient responded well to vancomycin; however, he subsequently developed ultrafiltration failure and symptoms of fluid overload and uremia and was transferred to home hemodialysis. Conclusions: Abiotrophia defectiva is an unusual cause of peritoneal dialysis–related peritonitis. The organism is a normal commensal of the oral cavity and may cause peritonitis in patients with nonadherence to dialysis technique. In our case, the infection was followed by peritoneal membrane failure and transfer to hemodialysis. It remains to be seen if peritonitis with Abiotrophia defectiva heralds a worse outcome. PMID:28270927

  7. Piezoelectric driven non-toxic injector for automated cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, H B; Su, Hao; Chen, H Y; Mills, J K

    2011-01-01

    Stimulated by state-of-the-art robotic and computer technology, Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) automation aims to scale and seamlessly transfer the human hand movements into more precise and fast movements of the micro manipulator. Piezo-drill cell injection, a novel technique using piezo-driven pipettes with a very small mercury column, has significantly improves the survival rates of ICSI process. It is found that complications are due, in large part, to toxicity of mercury and the damage to the cell membrane because of the lateral tip oscillations of injector pipette. In this paper, a new design of piezo-driven cell injector is proposed for automated suspended cell injection. This new piezo-driven cell injector design centralizes the piezo oscillation power on the injector pipette which eliminates the vibration effect on other parts of the micromanipulator. Detrimental lateral tip oscillations of the injector pipette are attenuated to a desirable level even without the help of mercury column. This mercury-free injector can sublime the piezoelectric driven injection technique to completely non-toxic level with great research and commercial application in gene injection, in-vitro fertilization, ICSI and drug development.

  8. Cell envelope proteins of Staphylococcus epidermidis grown in vivo in a peritoneal chamber implant.

    PubMed Central

    Modun, B; Williams, P; Pike, W J; Cockayne, A; Arbuthnott, J P; Finch, R; Denyer, S P

    1992-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis was grown in vivo in chambers implanted intraperitoneally in rats. The cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane protein profiles of the in vivo-grown organisms were compared with those of S. epidermidis grown in vitro in nutrient broth (NB), in iron-restricted NB, or in pooled human peritoneal dialysate (HPD). Compared with growth in broth and in common with growth in HPD, growth in vivo in chambers resulted in the repression of many S. epidermidis wall proteins, with proteins of 27, 42, 54, and 70 kDa predominating. Growth in vivo also resulted in the induction of two iron-repressible cytoplasmic membrane proteins of 32 and 36 kDa, which were also present in staphylococci grown in HPD and in iron-restricted NB. Immunoblotting experiments revealed that in sera taken 21 days after inoculation of the intraperitoneal chambers, the predominant antibody response to cell envelope proteins was directed against the 32- and 36-kDa iron-repressible membrane proteins. Images PMID:1587623

  9. Association between red cell distribution width and mortality in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Peng; Tsai, Shr-Mei; Chang, Chia-Chu; Kor, Chew-Teng; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Although red cell distribution width (RDW) has emerged as a biomarker of clinical prognostic value across a variety of clinical settings in the last two decades, limited evidence is available for its role in end-stage renal disease. We enrolled 313 incident patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in this retrospective observational study from 2006 to 2015. In the fully adjusted model of Cox regression analysis, the adjusted hazard ratios for the high RDW group versus the low RDW group were 2.58 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.31–5.09, p = 0.006) and 3.48 (95% CI = 1.44–8.34, p = 0.006) for all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, respectively. Based on area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analysis, RDW (AUC = 0.699) had a stronger predictive value for all-cause and CVD-related mortality than other biological markers including hemoglobin (AUC = 0.51), ferritin (AUC = 0.584), iron saturation (AUC = 0.535), albumin (AUC = 0.683) and white blood cell count (AUC = 0.588). Given that RDW is a readily available hematological parameter without the need for additional cost, we suggest that it can be used as a valuable index to stratify the risk of mortality beyond a diagnosis of anemia. PMID:28367961

  10. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

  11. Intestinal and peritoneal mast cells differ in kinetics of quantal release.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Acosta, Jorge; Ales, Eva; Flores, Juan A

    2016-01-15

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT, serotonin) storage and release in mast cell (MC) secretory granules (SG) are dependent on serglycin proteoglycans (PG). This notion is based on the studies of MC of the connective tissue subtype that predominantly contain PG of the heparin type, whereas intestinal mucosal MC, which contain predominantly chondroitin sulfate, have been poorly explored. In the present study, we addressed the possibility that PG contents may differently affect the storage and release of preformed mediators in these two MC subclasses and explain in part their different functional properties. Rat peritoneal (PMC) and intestinal mast cells (IMC) were isolated and purified using a percoll gradient, and the efflux of 5-HT from each SG was measured by amperometric detection. IMC exhibited a ∼34% reduction in the release of 5-HT compared with PMC because of a lower number of exocytotic events, rather than a lower secretion per single exocytotic event. Amperometric spikes from IMC exhibited a slower decay phase and increased half-width but a similar ascending phase and foot parameters, indicating that the fusion pore kinetics are comparable in both MC subclasses. We conclude that both PG subtypes are equally efficient systems, directly involved in serotonin accumulation, and play a crucial role in regulating the kinetics of exocytosis from SG, providing specific secretory properties for the two cellular subtypes.

  12. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-21

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or "click chemistry". The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.

  13. Cells and Stripes: A novel quantitative photo-manipulation technique.

    PubMed

    Mistrik, Martin; Vesela, Eva; Furst, Tomas; Hanzlikova, Hana; Frydrych, Ivo; Gursky, Jan; Majera, Dusana; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-01-18

    Laser micro-irradiation is a technology widely used in the DNA damage response, checkpoint signaling, chromatin remodeling and related research fields, to assess chromatin modifications and recruitment of diverse DNA damage sensors, mediators and repair proteins to sites of DNA lesions. While this approach has aided numerous discoveries related to cell biology, maintenance of genome integrity, aging and cancer, it has so far been limited by a tedious manual definition of laser-irradiated subcellular regions, with the ensuing restriction to only a small number of cells treated and analyzed in a single experiment. Here, we present an improved and versatile alternative to the micro-irradiation approach: Quantitative analysis of photo-manipulated samples using innovative settings of standard laser-scanning microscopes. Up to 200 cells are simultaneously exposed to a laser beam in a defined pattern of collinear rays. The induced striation pattern is then automatically evaluated by a simple algorithm, which provides a quantitative assessment of various laser-induced phenotypes in live or fixed cells. Overall, this new approach represents a more robust alternative to existing techniques, and provides a versatile tool for a wide range of applications in biomedicine.

  14. Endowing carbon nanotubes with superparamagnetic properties: applications for cell labeling, MRI cell tracking and magnetic manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamanna, Giuseppe; Garofalo, Antonio; Popa, Gabriela; Wilhelm, Claire; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Felder-Flesch, Delphine; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2013-05-01

    Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or ``click chemistry''. The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high resolution MRI.Coating of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) imparts novel magnetic, optical, and thermal properties with potential applications in the biomedical domain. Multi-walled CNTs have been decorated with iron oxide superparamagnetic NPs. Two different approaches have been investigated based on ligand exchange or ``click chemistry''. The presence of the NPs on the nanotube surface allows conferring magnetic properties to CNTs. We have evaluated the potential of the NP/CNT hybrids as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and their interactions with cells. The capacity of the hybrids to magnetically monitor and manipulate cells has also been investigated. The NP/CNTs can be manipulated by a remote magnetic field with enhanced contrast in MRI. They are internalized into tumor cells without showing cytotoxicity. The labeled cells can be magnetically manipulated as they display magnetic mobility and are detected at a single cell level through high

  15. Peritonitis - secondary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bacteria may enter the peritoneum through a hole (perforation) in an of the organ digestive tract. The ... function tests X-rays or CT scan Peritoneal fluid culture Urinalysis Treatment Often, surgery is needed to ...

  16. Seabream (Sparus aurata) long-term dominant-subordinate interplay affects phagocytosis by peritoneal cavity cells.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, M; Vazzana, M; Accardi, D; Parrinello, N

    2012-05-01

    Fish are sensitive to stressful conditions that affect their innate immune systems and increase their susceptibility to diseases. We examined the social stress of paired gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata). Social hierarchies (dominant/subordinate) were characterised by behavioural changes, such as "aggressiveness" and "feeding order"; hierarchical positions were established within an hour of exposure to social stress and remained unchanged for approximately 1 year. To characterise physiological stress, we measured blood plasma levels of cortisol, glucose, and lactate as well as osmolarity and observed that the levels of these stress markers were higher in subordinate individuals than in dominant ones. The discriminant analysis revealed a separation of the subordinate fish groups, and at 15 days, a significant separation among groups was observed. Moreover, diminished phagocytic and respiratory burst activities revealed that social stress appeared to affect the cellular innate immune response of the subordinate specimens. Finally, to examine the effect of cortisol on phagocytosis, peritoneal cavity cells were treated in vitro, and an inhibitory effect was observed.

  17. Whole exome sequencing of independent lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant peritoneal mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Vanni, Irene; Coco, Simona; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Cittaro, Davide; Genova, Carlo; Biello, Federica; Mora, Marco; Rossella, Valeria; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Truini, Anna; Banelli, Barbara; Lazarevic, Dejan; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Grossi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The presence of multiple primary tumors (MPT) in a single patient has been identified with an increasing frequency. A critical issue is to establish if the second tumor represents an independent primary cancer or a metastasis. Therefore, the assessment of MPT clonal origin might help understand the disease behavior and improve the management/prognosis of the patient. Herein, we report a 73-year-old male smoker who developed 2 primary lung cancers (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and a malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (PM). Whole exome sequencing (WES) of the 3 tumors and of germline DNA was performed to determine the clonal origin and identify genetic cancer susceptibility. Both lung cancers were characterized by a high mutational rate with distinct mutational profiles and activation of tumor-specific pathways. Conversely, the PM harbored a relative low number of genetic variants and a novel mutation in the WT1 gene that might be involved in the carcinogenesis of nonasbestos-related mesothelioma. Finally, WES of the germinal DNA displayed several single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair genes likely conferring higher cancer susceptibility. Overall, WES did not disclose any somatic genetic variant shared across the 3 tumors, suggesting their clonal independency; however, the carcinogenic effect of smoke combined with a deficiency in DNA repair genes and the patient advanced age might have been responsible for the MPT development. This case highlights the WES importance to define the clonal origin of MPT and susceptibility to cancer. PMID:27902597

  18. Cell manipulation tool with combined microwell array and optical tweezers for cell isolation and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Gou, Xue; Chen, Shuxun; Yan, Xiao; Sun, Dong

    2013-07-01

    Isolation from rare cells and deposition of sorted cells with high accuracy for further study are critical to a wide range of biomedical applications. In the current paper, we report an automated cell manipulation tool with combined optical tweezers and a uniquely designed microwell array, which functions for recognition, isolation, assembly, transportation and deposition of the interesting cells. The microwell array allows the passive hydrodynamic docking of cells, while offering the opportunity to inspect the interesting cell phenotypes with high spatio-temporal resolution based on the flexible image processing technique. In addition, dynamic and parallel cell manipulation in three dimensions can realize the target cell levitation from microwell and pattern assembly with multiple optical traps. Integrated with the programmed motorized stage, the optically levitated and assembled cells can be transported and deposited to the predefined microenvironment, so the tool can facilitate the integration of other on-chip functionalities for further study without removing these isolated cells from the chip. Experiments on human embryonic stem cells and yeast cells are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed cell manipulation tool. Besides the application to cell isolation and deposition, three other biological applications with this tool are also presented.

  19. Involvement of MIP-2 and CXCR2 in neutrophil infiltration following injection of late apoptotic cells into the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Iyoda, T; Kobayashi, Y

    2004-07-01

    Apoptotic cells are cleared by phagocytes, such as macrophages, as soon as they appear in vivo. If apoptosis occurs acutely, however, macrophages may be outnumbered by apoptotic cells, which causes late apoptosis. We previously showed that injection of late apoptotic cells into the peritoneal cavity led to transient infiltration of neutrophils. In this study, we examined the involvement of MIP-2 and CXCR2 in the neutrophil infiltration. We first produced a recombinant MIP-2 protein, and a fusion protein between CXCR2 and GST in E. coli, and then generated anti-MIP-2 antibodies and anti-CXCR2 antibodies in rabbits. We then confirmed their specificity by Western blotting analysis and flow cytometry. Injection of late apoptotic cells, such as P388 cells treated with etoposide for 24 hours and CTLL-2 cells cultured in IL-2-free medium for 28 hours, induced neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity, as expected. The antibodies, but not control antibodies against GST, suppressed the neutrophil infiltration to the level caused by injection of normal (viable) cells, suggesting that MIP-2 and CXCR2 are mainly involved in the neutrophil infiltration caused by late apoptotic cells.

  20. MicroBioRobots for single cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakar, Mahmut Selman

    One of the great challenges in nano and micro scale science and engineering is the independent manipulation of biological cells and small man-made objects with active sensing. For such biomedical applications as single cell manipulation, telemetry, and localized targeted delivery of chemicals, it is important to fabricate microstructures that can be powered and controlled without a tether in fluidic environments. These microstructures can be used to develop microrobots that have the potential to make existing therapeutic and diagnostic procedures less invasive. Actuation can be realized using various different organic and inorganic methods. Previous studies explored different forms of actuation and control with microorganisms. Bacteria, in particular, offer several advantages as controllable microactuators: they draw chemical energy directly from their environment, they are genetically modifiable, and they are scalable and configurable in the sense that any number of bacteria can be selectively patterned. Additionally, the study of bacteria inspires inorganic schemes of actuation and control. For these reasons, we chose to employ bacteria while controlling their motility using optical and electrical stimuli. In the first part of the thesis, we demonstrate a biointegrated approach by introducing MicroBioRobots (MBRs). MBRs are negative photosensitive epoxy (SU8) microfabricated structures with typical feature sizes ranging from 1-100 mum coated with a monolayer of the swarming Serratia marcescens . The adherent bacterial cells naturally coordinate to propel the microstructures in fluidic environments which we call Self-Actuation. First, we demonstrate the control of MBRs using self-actuation, DC electric fields and ultra-violet radiation and develop an experimentally-validated mathematical model for the MBRs. This model allows us to to steer the MBR to any position and orientation in a planar micro channel using visual feedback and an inverted microscope. Examples

  1. Oral administration of lipopolysaccharides activates B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity and lamina propria of the gut and induces autoimmune symptoms in an autoantibody transgenic mouse

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    About a half of the antierythrocyte autoantibody transgenic (autoAb Tg) mice, in which almost all B cells are detected in the spleen, lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches, but not in the peritoneal cavity, suffer from autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The occurrence of this disease is strongly linked to production of autoAb by activated peritoneal B-1 cells in the Tg mice. In this study, we have shown that oral administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) activated B-1 cells in the lamina propria of the gut as well as the peritoneal cavity in the healthy Tg mice and induced the autoimmune symptoms in all the Tg mice. The activation of peritoneal and lamina propria B-1 cells by enteric LPS is found not only in the anti-RBC autoAb Tg mice and normal mice but also in the aly mice which congenitally lack lymph nodes and Peyer's patches. These results suggest that B-1 cells in the two locations may form a common pool independent of Peyer's patches and lymph nodes, and can be activated by enteric thymus-independent antigens or polyclonal activators such as LPS. The induction of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in the Tg mice by enteric LPS through the activation of B-1 cells in the lamina propria of gut and in the peritoneal cavity suggests that B-1 cells and bacterial infection may play a pathogenic role in the onset of autoimmune diseases. PMID:8006578

  2. Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Natour, Mohammed; Thompson, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is becoming more important in the management of patients with end-stage renal disease. Because of the efforts of the “Fistula First Breakthrough Initiative,” dialysis venous access in the United States has become focused on promoting arteriovenous fistula creation and reducing the number of patients who start dialysis with a tunneled catheter. This is important because tunneled catheters can lead to infection, endocarditis, and early loss of more long-term access. When planned for, peritoneal dialysis can offer patients the opportunity to start dialysis at home without jeopardizing central access or the possibilities of eventual arteriovenous fistula creation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the indications, contraindications, and procedural methods for implanting peritoneal dialysis catheters in the interventional radiology suite. PMID:27011420

  3. Ribozyme modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by peritoneal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sioud, M

    1996-05-01

    We have utilized synthetic ribozymes to modulate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by peritoneal cells. Two hammerhead ribozymes (mRz1 and mRz2) were prepared by transcription in vitro and their activities in vitro and in vivo were investigated. Both ribozymes cleaved their RNA target with an apparent turnover number (kcat) of 2 min(-1), and inhibited TNF-alpha gene expression in vitro by 50% and 70%, respectively. When mRz1 and mRz2, entrapped in liposomes, were delivered into mice by intraperitoneal injection, they inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha gene expression in vivo with mRz2 being the most effective. This enhanced activity could result from the facilitation of catalysis by cellular endogenous proteins, since they specifically bind to mRz2 as compared to mRz1. Furthermore, a significant mRz2 activity can be recovered from peritoneal cells 2 days post-administration in vivo. The anti-TNF-alpha ribozyme treatment in vivo resulted in a more significant reduction of LPS-induced IFN-gamma protein secretion compared to IL-10. In contrast to this pleiotropic effect, the anti-TNF-alpha ribozyme treatment did not affect the heterogenous expression of Fas ligand by peritoneal cells, indicating the specificity of the treatment. Taken together, the present data indicate that the biological effects of TNF-alpha can be modulated by ribozymes. In addition, the data suggest that ribozymes can be administered in a drug-like manner, and therefore indicate their potential in clinical applications.

  4. Dialysis - peritoneal

    MedlinePlus

    ... health. Some people feel more comfortable having a health care provider handle their treatment. You and your provider can decide what is best for you. TYPES OF PERITONEAL DIALYSIS PD gives you more flexibility because you do not have to go to ...

  5. Recent patents and advances on applications of magnetic nanoparticles and thin films in cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Eslamian, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Cell manipulation is instrumental in most biological applications. One of the most promising methods in handling cells and other biological particles is the magnetic manipulation technique. In this technique, magnetic nanoparticles are employed to magnetize cells. Such cells then can be manipulated, sorted, or separated by applying an external magnetic field. In this work, first recent works and patents on the synthesis methods used for producing magnetic nanoparticles are investigated. These methods include co-precipitation, solvothermal, electrical wire explosion, microemulsion, laser pyrolysis, spray pyrolysis and carbon reduction. Then recent patents and articles on surface modification and functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles using polymers, dithiocarbamate, superparamagnetic shells, antibodies, graphene shells, and fluorescent materials are reviewed. Finally, different techniques on magnetic cell manipulation, such as direct attaching of magnetic particles to cells, employing intercellular markers or extra support molecules, as well as magnetic thin films, microfluidic channels and magnetic beads, are studied.

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of outwardly rectifying Cl- currents in rat peritoneal mast cells: a comparison of different stilbene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Roloff, Tim; Ziegler, Albrecht; Heber, Dieter; Seebeck, Jörg

    2003-10-08

    Diethylstilbestrol and other stilbene derivatives can provide some inhibition of the outwardly rectifying Cl- current (I(Cl-,OR)) in rat peritoneal mast cells. In order to elucidate structure-activity relationships of diethylstilbestrol, 12 stilbenes as well as 17beta-estradiol and hexestrol were tested in rat peritoneal mast cells using the nystatin-perforated patch approach of the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Since trans-stilbene showed no effect, the substituents of diethylstilbestrol must be of importance. The introduction of only one hydroxy group in trans-stilbene produced potent inhibition of the I(Cl-,OR) (IC50: 3.3 microM). But in contrast, resveratrol with hydroxy groups at positions 4, 3', and 5' as well as methoxy substituted stilbene derivatives and 17beta-estradiol were ineffective. On the other hand, hexestrol potently inhibited I(Cl-,OR) indicating that the aromatic ring systems can also be connected by an ethyl bridge. In summary, a hydroxy group at position 4 (or 4') is a prerequisite for diethylstilbestrol-mediated inhibition of I(Cl-,OR).

  7. Small molecules, big roles -- the chemical manipulation of stem cell fate and somatic cell reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Wenlin; Laurent, Timothy; Ding, Sheng

    2012-12-01

    Despite the great potential of stem cells for basic research and clinical applications, obstacles - such as their scarce availability and difficulty in controlling their fate - need to be addressed to fully realize their potential. Recent achievements of cellular reprogramming have enabled the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or other lineage-committed cells from more accessible and abundant somatic cell types by defined genetic factors. However, serious concerns remain about the efficiency and safety of current genetic approaches to cell reprogramming and traditional culture systems that are used for stem cell maintenance. As a complementary approach, small molecules that target specific signaling pathways, epigenetic processes and other cellular processes offer powerful tools for manipulating cell fate to a desired outcome. A growing number of small molecules have been identified to maintain the self-renewal potential of stem cells, to induce lineage differentiation and to facilitate reprogramming by increasing the efficiency of reprogramming or by replacing genetic reprogramming factors. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations of the effects of these chemicals also provide new biological insights. Here, we examine recent achievements in the maintenance of stem cells, including pluripotent and lineage-specific stem cells, and in the control of cell fate conversions, including iPSC reprogramming, conversion of primed to naïve pluripotency, and transdifferentiation, with an emphasis on manipulation with small molecules.

  8. Immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Momoko; Ose, Saya; Nishi, Kosuke; Sugahara, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    We herein report the immunostimulatory effect of spinach aqueous extract (SAE) on mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. SAE significantly enhanced the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by both J774.1 cells and peritoneal macrophages by enhancing the expression levels of these cytokine genes. In addition, the phagocytosis activity of J774.1 cells was facilitated by SAE. Immunoblot analysis revealed that SAE activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB cascades. It was found that SAE activates macrophages through not only TLR4, but also other receptors. The production of IL-6 was significantly enhanced by peritoneal macrophages from SAE-administered BALB/c mice, suggesting that SAE has a potential to stimulate macrophage activity in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that SAE would be a beneficial functional food with immunostimulatory effects on macrophages.

  9. Morphological effects of autologous hsp70 on peritoneal macrophages in a murine T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gautam, P K; Kumar, S; Deepak, P; Acharya, A

    2013-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 is highly conserved cytosolic protein which have important role in growth, development, and apoptosis. Hsp70 is well-known activator of macrophages and enhances the release of specific and non-specific effector molecules that have major role in tumor destruction and immunopotentiation of host. However, morphological effects of hsp 70 has not been carried out, therefore, morphological effects of hsp 70 on murine peritoneal macrophages were examined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thioglycolate-induced peritoneal macrophages were prepared from BALB/c mice and cultured for 24 h in the presence of the hsp70. Tumor-associated macrophages treated with 10 μg/ml were varied in shape, mostly spindle shaped, i.e., stretched bidirectionally; surface ruffles were increased and their lamellipodia was prominent which suggest that hsp 70 treatment not only enhances the functional state of the peritoneal macrophages but also initiate immense morphological changes leading to increased endothelium adherence, increased antigen uptake, and increased migration to the inflammatory site.

  10. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 induces proinflammatory responses in peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Umikawa, Masato; Umikawa, Asako; Asato, Tsuyoshi; Takei, Kimiko; Matsuzaki, Goro; Kariya, Ken-ichi; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are important effectors and regulators of inflammation, and both their differentiation and activation are regulated strictly in response to environmental cues. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 (Angptl2) is a multifaceted protein, displaying many physiological and pathological functions in inflammation, angiogenesis, hematopoiesis, and tumor development. Although recent studies implicate Angptl2 in chronic inflammation, the mechanisms of inflammation caused by Angptl2 remain unclear. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the role of Angptl2 in inflammation by understanding the effects of Angptl2 on monocytes/macrophages. We showed that Angptl2 directly activates resident murine peritoneal monocytes and macrophages and induces a drastic upregulation of the transcription of several inflammatory genes including nitric oxide synthase 2 and prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, and several proinflammatory cytokine genes such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and CSF2, along with activation of ERK, JNK, p38, and nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathways. Concordantly, proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and GM-CSF, were rapidly elavated from murine peritoneal monocytes and macrophages. These results demonstrate a novel role for Angptl2 in inflammation via the direct activation of peritoneal monocytes and macrophages. PMID:26435501

  11. Cross-Omics Comparison of Stress Responses in Mesothelial Cells Exposed to Heat- versus Filter-Sterilized Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Bender, Thorsten O.; Lichtenauer, Anton M.; Herzog, Rebecca; Tarantino, Silvia; Bialas, Katarzyna; Jörres, Achim; Aufricht, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cytoprotective responses, such as expression of heat-shock proteins, might be inadequately induced in mesothelial cells by heat-sterilized peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids. This study compares transcriptome data and multiple protein expression profiles for providing new insight into regulatory mechanisms. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) based proteomics and topic defined gene expression microarray-based transcriptomics techniques were used to evaluate stress responses in human omental peritoneal mesothelial cells in response to heat- or filter-sterilized PD fluids. Data from selected heat-shock proteins were validated by 2D western-blot analysis. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data discriminated differentially regulated protein abundance into groups depending on correlating or noncorrelating transcripts. Inadequate abundance of several heat-shock proteins following exposure to heat-sterilized PD fluids is not reflected on the mRNA level indicating interference beyond transcriptional regulation. For the first time, this study describes evidence for posttranscriptional inadequacy of heat-shock protein expression by heat-sterilized PD fluids as a novel cytotoxic property. Cross-omics technologies introduce a novel way of understanding PDF bioincompatibility and searching for new interventions to reestablish adequate cytoprotective responses. PMID:26495307

  12. Cross-omics comparison of stress responses in mesothelial cells exposed to heat- versus filter-sterilized peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    Kratochwill, Klaus; Bender, Thorsten O; Lichtenauer, Anton M; Herzog, Rebecca; Tarantino, Silvia; Bialas, Katarzyna; Jörres, Achim; Aufricht, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cytoprotective responses, such as expression of heat-shock proteins, might be inadequately induced in mesothelial cells by heat-sterilized peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids. This study compares transcriptome data and multiple protein expression profiles for providing new insight into regulatory mechanisms. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) based proteomics and topic defined gene expression microarray-based transcriptomics techniques were used to evaluate stress responses in human omental peritoneal mesothelial cells in response to heat- or filter-sterilized PD fluids. Data from selected heat-shock proteins were validated by 2D western-blot analysis. Comparison of proteomics and transcriptomics data discriminated differentially regulated protein abundance into groups depending on correlating or noncorrelating transcripts. Inadequate abundance of several heat-shock proteins following exposure to heat-sterilized PD fluids is not reflected on the mRNA level indicating interference beyond transcriptional regulation. For the first time, this study describes evidence for posttranscriptional inadequacy of heat-shock protein expression by heat-sterilized PD fluids as a novel cytotoxic property. Cross-omics technologies introduce a novel way of understanding PDF bioincompatibility and searching for new interventions to reestablish adequate cytoprotective responses.

  13. Generation of a complement-derived chemotactic factor for tumor cells in experimentally induced peritoneal exudates and its effect on the local metastasis of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Orr, F. W.; Mokashi, S.; Delikatny, J.

    1982-01-01

    A chemotactic factor for tumor cells was found in inflammatory exudate fluids induced by giving intraperitoneal injections of glycogen to Sprague-Dawley rats. The quantity of chemotactic activity and the period of time during which it could be detected correlated with the inflammatory reaction, measured by the cellular composition of the exudates and their content of protein and lysosomal enzymes. In gel filtration the chemotactic factor behaved mainly as a molecule having a molecular weight of approximately 6000 daltons. Its biologic activity was blocked by antiserums directed against C5 but not by antiserums against C3 or C4. In these two respects, the factor generated in vivo has the same properties as a previously described chemotactic factor that can be generated in vitro by proteolysis of purified C5 or C5a. Chemotactic activity was not detected in the glycogen-induced peritoneal exudates of rats depleted of serum complement by cobra venom factor. Intravenously injected Walker tumor cells arrested and formed metastases in the mesenteries of rats with peritonitis in greater numbers than in normal controls, animals depleted of complement during the experimental period, or animals given intraperitoneal injections of the vasopermeability agent, histamine. The growth of tumor cells in vitro was not promoted by peritoneal exudate fluids, nor was the number of metastases on vivo greater than in negative controls, in animals in which peritonitis was induced 24 hours after the intravenous injection of tumor cells. It is argued that chemotactic mechanisms can contribute to the formation of metastases at sites of tissue injury. PMID:7091299

  14. Peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Coccolini, Federico; Gheza, Federico; Lotti, Marco; Virzì, Salvatore; Iusco, Domenico; Ghermandi, Claudio; Melotti, Rita; Baiocchi, Gianluca; Giulini, Stefano Maria; Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto

    2013-01-01

    Several gastrointestinal and gynecological malignancies have the potential to disseminate and grow in the peritoneal cavity. The occurrence of peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) has been shown to significantly decrease overall survival in patients with liver and/or extraperitoneal metastases from gastrointestinal cancer. During the last three decades, the understanding of the biology and pathways of dissemination of tumors with intraperitoneal spread, and the understanding of the protective function of the peritoneal barrier against tumoral seeding, has prompted the concept that PC is a loco-regional disease: in absence of other systemic metastases, multimodal approaches combining aggressive cytoreductive surgery, intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy and systemic chemotherapy have been proposed and are actually considered promising methods to improve loco-regional control of the disease, and ultimately to increase survival. The aim of this review article is to present the evidence on treatment of PC in different tumors, in order to provide patients with a proper surgical and multidisciplinary treatment focused on optimal control of their locoregional disease. PMID:24222942

  15. Manipulation of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells for the study of directed cell migration.

    PubMed

    Millius, Arthur; Weiner, Orion D

    2010-01-01

    Many cells undergo directed cell migration in response to external cues in a process known as chemotaxis. This ability is essential for many single-celled organisms to hunt and mate, the development of multicellular organisms, and the functioning of the immune system. Because of their relative ease of manipulation and their robust chemotactic abilities, the neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60) has been a powerful system to analyze directed cell migration. In this chapter, we describe the maintenance and transient transfection of HL-60 cells and explain how to analyze their behavior with two standard chemotactic assays (micropipette and EZ-TAXIS). Finally, we demonstrate how to fix and stain the actin cytoskeleton of polarized cells for fluorescent microscopy imaging.

  16. Expression and function of the murine B7 antigen, the major costimulatory molecule expressed by peritoneal exudate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Freeman, G J; Galvin, F; Benacerraf, B; Nadler, L; Reiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The murine B7 (mB7) protein is a potent costimulatory molecule for the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of murine CD4+ T cells. We have previously shown that stable mB7-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells but not vector-transfected controls synergize with either anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody-induced or concanavalin A-induced T-cell activation, resulting ultimately in lymphokine production and proliferation. We now have generated a hamster anti-mB7 monoclonal antibody. This reagent recognizes a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50-60 kDa. The mB7 antigen is expressed on activated B cells and on peritoneal exudate cells (PECs). Antibody blocking experiments demonstrate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule expressed by PECs for the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. This suggests an important role for mB7 during immune-cell interactions. We have also surveyed a panel of murine cell lines capable of providing costimulatory activity. Our results indicate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule on some but not all cell lines and that there may be additional molecules besides mB7 that can costimulate the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. Images PMID:1373896

  17. Biochemical and functional characterization of glycosaminoglycans released from degranulating rat peritoneal mast cells: Insights into the physiological role of endogenous heparin.

    PubMed

    Lever, Rebecca; Smailbegovic, Amir; Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Gray, Elaine; Hogwood, John; Francis, Stephen M; Richardson, Neville V; Page, Clive P; Mulloy, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    The properties of commercially prepared heparin as an anticoagulant and antithrombotic agent in medicine are better understood than is the physiological role of heparin in its native form, where it is uniquely found in the secretory granules of mast cells. In the present study we have isolated and characterised the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) released from degranulating rat peritoneal mast cells. Analysis of the GAGs by NMR spectroscopy showed the presence of both heparin and the galactosaminoglycan dermatan sulphate; heparinase digestion profiles and measurements of anticoagulant activity were consistent with this finding. The rat peritoneal mast cell GAGs significantly inhibited accumulation of leukocytes in the rat peritoneal cavity in response to IL-1β (p < 0.05, n = 6/group), and inhibited adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes in the inflamed rat cremasteric microcirculation in response to LPS (p < 0.001, n = 4/group). FTIR spectra of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were altered by treatment of the cells with heparin degrading enzymes, and restored by the addition of exogenous heparin. In conclusion, we have shown that rat peritoneal mast cells contain a mixture of GAGs that possess anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  18. Peritoneal Fluid Reduces Angiogenesis-Related MicroRNA Expression in Cell Cultures of Endometrial and Endometriotic Tissues from Women with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Braza-Boïls, Aitana; Gilabert-Estellés, Juan; Ramón, Luis A.; Gilabert, Juan; Marí-Alexandre, Josep; Chirivella, Melitina; España, Francisco; Estellés, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    Endometriosis, defined as the presence of endometrium outside the uterus, is one of the most frequent gynecological diseases. It has been suggested that modifications of both endometrial and peritoneal factors could be implicated in this disease. Endometriosis is a multifactorial disease in which angiogenesis and proteolysis are dysregulated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the protein expression and may be the main regulators of angiogenesis. Our hypothesis is that peritoneal fluid from women with endometriosis could modify the expression of several miRNAs that regulate angiogenesis and proteolysis in the endometriosis development. The objective of this study has been to evaluate the influence of endometriotic peritoneal fluid on the expression of six miRNAs related to angiogenesis, as well as several angiogenic and proteolytic factors in endometrial and endometriotic cell cultures from women with endometriosis compared with women without endometriosis. Methods Endometrial and endometriotic cells were cultured and treated with endometriotic and control peritoneal fluid pools. We have studied the expression of six miRNAs (miR-16, -17-5p, -20a, -125a, -221, and -222) by RT-PCR and protein and mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, thrombospondin-1, urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by ELISA and qRT-PCR respectively. Results Control and endometriotic peritoneal fluid pools induced a significant reduction of all miRNAs levels in endometrial and endometriotic cell cultures. Moreover, both peritoneal fluids induced a significant increase in VEGF-A, uPA and PAI-1 protein levels in all cell cultures without significant increase in mRNA levels. Endometrial cell cultures from patients treated with endometriotic peritoneal fluid showed lower expression of miRNAs and higher expression of VEGF-A protein levels than cultures from controls. In conclusion, this “in vitro” study indicates that

  19. Thermophoretic Tweezers for Low-Power and Versatile Manipulation of Biological Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Wei, Xiaoling; Mao, Zhangming; Xie, Chong; Zheng, Yuebing

    2017-03-28

    Optical manipulation of biological cells and nanoparticles is significantly important in life sciences, early disease diagnosis, and nanomanufacturing. However, low-power and versatile all-optical manipulation has remained elusive. Herein, we have achieved light-directed versatile thermophoretic manipulation of biological cells at an optical power 100-1000 times lower than that of optical tweezers. By harnessing the permittivity gradient in the electric double layer of the charged surface of the cell membrane, we succeed at the low-power trapping of suspended biological cells within a light-controlled temperature gradient field. Furthermore, through dynamic control of optothermal potentials using a digital micromirror device, we have achieved arbitrary spatial arrangements of cells at a resolution of ∼100 nm and precise rotation of both single and assemblies of cells. Our thermophoretic tweezers will find applications in cellular biology, nanomedicine, and tissue engineering.

  20. Peritoneal and hematogenous metastases of ovarian cancer cells are both controlled by the p90RSK through a self-reinforcing cell autonomous mechanism.

    PubMed

    Torchiaro, Erica; Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Valdembri, Donatella; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Gai, Marta; Erriquez, Jessica; Serini, Guido; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2016-01-05

    The molecular mechanisms orchestrating peritoneal and hematogenous metastases of ovarian cancer cells are assumed to be distinct. We studied the p90RSK family of serine/threonine kinases that lie downstream the RAS-ERK/MAPK pathway and modulate a variety of cellular processes including cell proliferation, survival, motility and invasiveness. We found the RSK1 and RSK2 isoforms expressed in a number of human ovarian cancer cell lines, where they played redundant roles in sustaining in vitro motility and invasiveness. In vivo, silencing of both RSK1 and RSK2 almost abrogated short-term and long-term metastatic engraftment of ovarian cancer cells in the peritoneum. In addition, RSK1/RSK2 silenced cells failed to colonize the lungs after intravenous injection and to form hematogenous metastasis from subcutaneous xenografts. RSK1/RSK2 suppression resulted in lessened ovarian cancer cell spreading on endogenous fibronectin (FN). Mechanistically, RSK1/RSK2 knockdown diminished FN transcription, α5β1 integrin activation and TGF-β1 translation. Reduced endogenous FN deposition and TGF-β1 secretion depended on the lack of activating phosphorylation of the transcription/translation factor YB-1 by p90RSK. Altogether data show how p90RSK activates a self-reinforcing cell autonomous pro-adhesive circuit necessary for metastatic seeding of ovarian cancer cells. Thus, p90RSK inhibitors might hinder both the hematogenous and the peritoneal metastatic spread of human ovarian cancer.

  1. Manipulating CD4+ T cells by optical tweezers for the initiation of cell-cell transfer of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    McNerney, Gregory P.; Hübner, Wolfgang; Chen, Benjamin K.; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions through direct contact are very important for cellular communication and coordination – especially for immune cells. The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) induces immune cell interactions between CD4+ cells to shuttle between T cells via a virological synapse. A goal to understand the process of cell-cell transmission through virological synapses is to determine the cellular states that allow a chance encounter between cells to become a stable cell-cell adhesion. Here we demonstrate the use of optical tweezers to manipulate uninfected primary CD4+ T cells near HIV Gag-iGFP transfected Jurkat T cells to probe the determinants that induce stable adhesion. When combined with fast 4D confocal fluorescence microscopy, optical tweezers can be utilized to not only facilitate cell-cell contact, but to also allow one to simultaneously track the formation of a virological synapse, and ultimately to enable us to precisely determine all events preceding virus transfer. HIV-1 infected T cell (green) decorated with uninfected primary T cells (red) by manipulating the primary cells with an optical tweezers system PMID:20301121

  2. Optoelectronic Tweezers as a Tool for Parallel Single-Cell Manipulation and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Justin K.; Ohta, Aaron T.; Hsu, Hsan-Yin; Neale, Steven L.; Jamshidi, Arash; Wu, Ming C.

    2010-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) is a promising approach for the parallel manipulation of single cells for a variety of biological applications. By combining the manipulation capabilities of OET with other relevant biological techniques (such as cell lysis and electroporation), one can realize a true parallel, single-cell diagnostic and stimulation tool. Here, we demonstrate the utility of the OET device by integrating it onto single-chip systems capable of performing in-situ, electrode-based electroporation/lysis, individual cell, light-induced lysis, and light-induced electroporation. PMID:20543904

  3. Massively parallel manipulation of single cells and microparticles using optical images.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Pei Yu; Ohta, Aaron T; Wu, Ming C

    2005-07-21

    The ability to manipulate biological cells and micrometre-scale particles plays an important role in many biological and colloidal science applications. However, conventional manipulation techniques--including optical tweezers, electrokinetic forces (electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, travelling-wave dielectrophoresis), magnetic tweezers, acoustic traps and hydrodynamic flows--cannot achieve high resolution and high throughput at the same time. Optical tweezers offer high resolution for trapping single particles, but have a limited manipulation area owing to tight focusing requirements; on the other hand, electrokinetic forces and other mechanisms provide high throughput, but lack the flexibility or the spatial resolution necessary for controlling individual cells. Here we present an optical image-driven dielectrophoresis technique that permits high-resolution patterning of electric fields on a photoconductive surface for manipulating single particles. It requires 100,000 times less optical intensity than optical tweezers. Using an incoherent light source (a light-emitting diode or a halogen lamp) and a digital micromirror spatial light modulator, we have demonstrated parallel manipulation of 15,000 particle traps on a 1.3 x 1.0 mm2 area. With direct optical imaging control, multiple manipulation functions are combined to achieve complex, multi-step manipulation protocols.

  4. Massively parallel manipulation of single cells and microparticles using optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Pei Yu; Ohta, Aaron T.; Wu, Ming C.

    2005-07-01

    The ability to manipulate biological cells and micrometre-scale particles plays an important role in many biological and colloidal science applications. However, conventional manipulation techniques-including optical tweezers, electrokinetic forces (electrophoresis, dielectrophoresis, travelling-wave dielectrophoresis), magnetic tweezers, acoustic traps and hydrodynamic flows-cannot achieve high resolution and high throughput at the same time. Optical tweezers offer high resolution for trapping single particles, but have a limited manipulation area owing to tight focusing requirements; on the other hand, electrokinetic forces and other mechanisms provide high throughput, but lack the flexibility or the spatial resolution necessary for controlling individual cells. Here we present an optical image-driven dielectrophoresis technique that permits high-resolution patterning of electric fields on a photoconductive surface for manipulating single particles. It requires 100,000 times less optical intensity than optical tweezers. Using an incoherent light source (a light-emitting diode or a halogen lamp) and a digital micromirror spatial light modulator, we have demonstrated parallel manipulation of 15,000 particle traps on a 1.3 × 1.0mm2 area. With direct optical imaging control, multiple manipulation functions are combined to achieve complex, multi-step manipulation protocols.

  5. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms.

  6. Electrical field manipulation of cancer cell behavior monitored by whole cell biosensing device.

    PubMed

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Melnick, Steven J; Zhang, Xueji; Wu, Ze-Zhi; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2013-08-01

    All living cells possess electrical characteristics and are thus responsive to, and even generate electric fields and currents. It has been shown that the electrical properties of cancer cells differ from normal proliferating cells, thus electric fields may induce differential effects in normal and cancer cells. Manipulation of these electrical properties may provide a powerful direct and/or adjuvant therapeutic option for cancer. A whole cell impedance-based biosensor to monitor the effects of a range of different frequencies (50 kHz-2 MHz) at low-intensity (<2 V/cm) on the growth rate of human SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells versus non-cancerous HUVECs is reported. Rapid real-time monitoring of the SKOV3 behavior was observed as the alternating electric fields were applied and the impedimetric response of the cells was recorded. The cells were also labeled with propidium iodide to examine morphological changes and cell viability with fluorescence microscopy with trypan blue for comparison. A noticeable decrease in the growth profile of the SKOV3 was observed with the application of 200 kHz alternating electric fields indicating specific inhibitory effects on dividing cells in culture in contrast to the HUVECs. The outcome of this research will improve our fundamental understanding of the behavior of cancer cells when exposed to alternating electric fields at specific frequencies and foster the development strategies and optimal parameters for alternating electric field therapies for clinical and drug delivery applications.

  7. Suppression of NK cells and regulatory T lymphocytes in cats naturally infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Ben L; Devriendt, Bert; Olyslaegers, Dominique A; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Favoreel, Herman W; Dewerchin, Hannah L; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-05-31

    A strong cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is thought to be indispensable for protection against infection with feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) in cats. In this study, the role of natural killer (NK) cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), central players in the innate and adaptive CMI respectively, was examined during natural FIPV infection. When quantified, both NK cells and Tregs were drastically depleted from the peripheral blood, mesenteric lymph node (LN) and spleen in FIP cats. In contrast, mesentery and kidney from FIP cats did not show any difference when compared to healthy non-infected control animals. In addition, other regulatory lymphocytes (CD4+CD25-Foxp3+ and CD3+CD8+Foxp3+) were found to be depleted from blood and LN as well. Phenotypic analysis of blood-derived NK cells in FIP cats revealed an upregulation of activation markers (CD16 and CD25) and migration markers (CD11b and CD62L) while LN-derived NK cells showed upregulation of only CD16 and CD62L. LN-derived NK cells from FIPV-infected cats were also significantly less cytotoxic when compared with healthy cats. This study reveals for the first time that FIPV infection is associated with severe suppression of NK cells and Tregs, which is reflected by cell depletion and lowered cell functionality (only NK cells). This will un-doubtfully lead to a reduced capacity of the innate immune system (NK cells) to battle FIPV infection and a decreased capacity (Tregs) to suppress the immunopathology typical for FIP. However, these results will also open possibilities for new therapies targeting specifically NK cells and Tregs to enhance their numbers and/or functionality during FIPV infection.

  8. Amadori adducts activate nuclear factor-κB-related proinflammatory genes in cultured human peritoneal mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nevado, Julián; Peiró, Concepción; Vallejo, Susana; El-Assar, Mariam; Lafuente, Nuria; Matesanz, Nuria; Azcutia, Veronica; Cercas, Elena; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2005-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus leads to a high incidence of several so-called complications, sharing similar pathophysiological features in several territories. Previous reports points at early nonenzymatic glycosylation products (Amadori adducts) as mediators of diabetic vascular complications. In the present study, we analysed a possible role for Amadori adducts as stimulators of proinflammatory pathways in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). Cultured HPMCs isolated from 13 different patients (mean age 38.7±16 years) were exposed to different Amadori adducts, that is, highly glycated haemoglobin (10 nM) and glycated bovine serum albumin (0.25 mg ml−1), as well as to their respective low glycosylation controls. Amadori adducts, but not their respective controls, elicited a marked increase of NF-κB activation, as determined by electromobility shift assays and transient transfection experiments. Additionally, Amadori adducts significantly increased the production of NF-κB-related proinflammatory molecules, including cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β or IL-6, and enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase, this latter leading to the release of NO by HPMCs. The effects of Amadori adducts were mediated by different reactive oxygen and nitrosative species (e.g. superoxide anions, hydroxyl radicals, and peroxynitrite), as they were blunted by coincubation with the appropriate scavengers. Furthermore, NO generated upon exposure to Amadori adducts further stimulated NF-κB activation, either directly or after combination with superoxide anions to form peroxynitrite. We conclude that Amadori adducts can favour peritoneal inflammation by exacerbating changes in NO synthesis pathway and triggering NF-κB-related proinflammatory signals in human mesothelial cells. PMID:15997235

  9. Stimulation of 14-3-3 protein and its isoform on histamine secretion from permeabilized rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Ueeda, Takayuki

    2002-12-01

    The effect of the 14-3-3 protein, an adaptor protein of intracellular signal pathways, on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells was investigated. The exogenous 14-3-3 protein from bovine brain increased the Ca(2+)-dependent histamine release from permeabilized mast cells, but only slightly affected the non-permeabilized cells. Partial amino acid sequences showed that the bovine brain 14-3-3 protein contained 14-3-3beta, gamma and zeta isoforms, and that these recombinant isoforms were prepared. Among them, 14-3-3zeta was an active species while the 14-3-3beta and gamma were inactive for histamine release from the permeabilized mast cells. Approximately 15% of the histamine release was stimulated by 14-3-3zeta at 2.5 microM, and half-maximal stimulation occurred at 1 microM. Treatment of the mast cells with wortmannin or staurosporine completely inhibited the stimulatory effect on histamine release caused by Ca(2+) or Ca(2+)/14-3-3zeta, and genistein partially inhibited both stimulatory effects. PD 98059, however, had little effect on the histamine release. These results suggest the possibility that 14-3-3zeta is associated with signal transduction for degranulation of the mast cells.

  10. Continuous Hyperthermic Peritoneal Perfusion (CHPP) With Cisplatin for Children With Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-03-29

    Peritoneal Neoplasms; Retroperitoneal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Adenocarcinoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Neoplasms; Sarcoma; Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

  11. Vitamin D Can Ameliorate Chlorhexidine Gluconate-Induced Peritoneal Fibrosis and Functional Deterioration through the Inhibition of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Che; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Tsai, Chu-Hung; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Chang, Min-Yu; Wang, Hsi-Hao; Ho, Li-Chun; Chen, Yi-Ting; Wu, Ching-Fang; Chen, Ho-Ching; Chen, Hsin-Pao; Liu, Kuang-Wen; Chen, Chih-I.; She, Kuan Min; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Lin, Chi-Wei; Chiou, Yuan-Yow

    2015-01-01

    Background. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) can induce fibrosis and functional alterations in PD patients' peritoneal membranes, due to long-term unphysiological dialysate exposure, partially occurring via triggering of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in peritoneal mesothelial cells (MCs). Vitamin D can ameliorate these negative effects; however, the mechanism remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated its possible links to MCs EMT inhibition. Methods. Peritoneal fibrosis was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by chlorhexidine gluconate (CG) intraperitoneal injection for 21 days, with and without 1α,25(OH)2D3 treatment. Morphological and functional evaluation and western blot analysis of EMT marker were performed upon peritoneum tissue. In vitro study was also performed in a primary human peritoneal MC culture system; MCs were incubated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the absence or presence of 1α,25(OH)2D3. EMT marker expression, migration activities, and cytoskeleton redistribution of MCs were determined. Results. 1α,25(OH)2D3 ameliorated CG-induced morphological and functional deterioration in animal model, along with CG-induced upregulation of α-SMA and downregulation of E-cadherin expression. Meanwhile, 1α,25(OH)2D3 also ameliorated TGF-β1-induced decrease in E-cadherin expression, increase in Snai1 and α-SMA expression, intracellular F-actin redistribution, and migration activity in vitro. Conclusion. 1α,25(OH)2D3 can ameliorate CG-induced peritoneal fibrosis and attenuate functional deterioration through inhibiting MC EMT. PMID:26495304

  12. Evaluation of PLGA containing anti-CTLA4 inhibited endometriosis progression by regulating CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid of mouse endometriosis model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Ma, Pingchuan; Liu, Lanxia; Ma, Guilei; Ma, Jingjing; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Yijin; Lin, Wanjun; Zhu, Yingjun

    2017-01-01

    Our study investigated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as protein delivery vehicles encapsulate CTLA-4-antibody (anti-CTLA-4) which is essential for CD4+CD25+Treg cells suppressive function exposing superior potential for inhibiting endometriosis progress in mouse model than single anti-CTLA-4. Anti-CTLA-4 loaded PLGA combined to ligands CTLA-4 in surface of CD4+CD25+Treg cells which distributed in peritoneal fluid of mouse endometriosis model. The particle size, zeta potential of the anti-CTLA-4 loaded nanoparticles was detected by dynamic light scattering. Morphology of nanoparticles was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) indicated distribution of anti-CTLA-4 with PLGA or without in peritoneal fluid. Cumulative anti-CTLA-4 release from nanoparticles was evaluated by Micro BCA assay. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid was demonstrated by flow cytometer. In vitro experiment we co-culture ectopic endometrial cells (EEC) with isolated CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid (PF), proliferation and invasion of ectopic endometrial cells (EEC) was measured by BrdU ELISA assay and Matrigel invasion assay. In comparison with anti-CTLA-4 without nanoparticles, the bioconjugates PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 were tolerated in peritoneal fluid with a controlled release of anti-CTLA-4 in 3, 7, 14days. Moreover, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 had superior protective regulation ability to reduce level of CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid. Most strikingly, in vitro experiment, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 exhibited better ability in inhibiting proliferation and invasion of ectopic endometrial cells in co-culture system compared with anti-CTLA-4. Progressively, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 had better suppressive activity to inhibited IL-10 and TGF-beta secreted by CD4+CD25+Treg cells which indicating that PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 suppressed cells proliferation and invasion through reduced IL-10 and TGF-beta production. Thus, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 may

  13. Laboratory diagnostics of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Montagnana, Martina

    2014-03-20

    The term peritonitis indicates an inflammatory process involving the peritoneum that is most frequently infectious in nature. Primary or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) typically occurs when a bacterial infection spreads to the peritoneum across the gut wall or mesenteric lymphatics or, less frequently, from hematogenous transmission in combination with impaired immune system and in absence of an identified intra-abdominal source of infection or malignancy. The clinical presentation of SBP is variable. The condition may manifest as a relatively insidious colonization, without signs and symptoms, or may suddenly occur as a septic syndrome. Laboratory diagnostics play a pivotal role for timely and appropriate management of patients with bacterial peritonitis. It is now clearly established that polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) in peritoneal fluid is the mainstay for the diagnosis, whereas the role of additional biochemical tests is rather controversial. Recent evidence also suggests that automatic cell counting in peritoneal fluid may be a reliable approach for early screening of patients. According to available clinical and laboratory data, we have developed a tentative algorithm for efficient diagnosis of SBP, which is based on a reasonable integration between optimization of human/economical resources and gradually increasing use of invasive and expensive testing. The proposed strategy entails, in sequential steps, serum procalcitonin testing, automated cell count in peritoneal fluid, manual cell count in peritoneal fluid, peritoneal fluid culture and bacterial DNA testing in peritoneal fluid.

  14. Phototransistor-based optoelectronic tweezers for dynamic cell manipulation in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsan-yin; Ohta, Aaron T; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Jamshidi, Arash; Neale, Steven L; Wu, Ming C

    2010-01-21

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET), based on light-induced dielectrophoresis, has been shown as a versatile tool for parallel manipulation of micro-particles and cells (P. Y. Chiou, A. T. Ohta and M. C. Wu, Nature, 2005, 436, 370-372). However, the conventional OET device cannot operate in cell culture media or other high-conductivity physiological buffers due to the limited photoconductivity of amorphous silicon. In this paper, we report a new phototransistor-based OET (Ph-OET). Consisting of single-crystalline bipolar junction transistors, the Ph-OET has more than 500x higher photoconductivity than amorphous silicon. Efficient cell trapping of live HeLa and Jurkat cells in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) has been demonstrated using a digital light projector, with a cell transport speed of 33 microm/sec, indicating a force of 14.5 pN. Optical concentration of cells and real-time control of individually addressable cell arrays have also been realized. Precise control of separation between two cells has also been demonstrated. We envision a new platform for single cell studies using Ph-OET.

  15. Pleiotrophin triggers inflammation and increased peritoneal permeability leading to peritoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Hideki; Kasahara, Masato; Mori, Kiyoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihisa; Kuwabara, Takashige; Imamaki, Hirotaka; Kawanishi, Tomoko; Koga, Kenichi; Ishii, Akira; Kato, Yukiko; Mori, Keita P; Toda, Naohiro; Ohno, Shoko; Muramatsu, Hisako; Muramatsu, Takashi; Sugawara, Akira; Mukoyama, Masashi; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2012-01-01

    Long-term peritoneal dialysis induces peritoneal fibrosis with submesothelial fibrotic tissue. Although angiogenesis and inflammatory mediators are involved in peritoneal fibrosis, precise molecular mechanisms are undefined. To study this, we used microarray analysis and compared gene expression profiles of the peritoneum in control and chlorhexidine gluconate (CG)-induced peritoneal fibrosis mice. One of the 43 highly upregulated genes was pleiotrophin, a midkine family member, the expression of which was also upregulated by the solution used to treat mice by peritoneal dialysis. This growth factor was found in fibroblasts and mesothelial cells within the underlying submesothelial compact zones of mice, and in human peritoneal biopsy samples and peritoneal dialysate effluent. Recombinant pleiotrophin stimulated mitogenesis and migration of mouse mesothelial cells in culture. We found that in wild-type mice, CG treatment increased peritoneal permeability (measured by equilibration), increased mRNA expression of TGF-β1, connective tissue growth factor and fibronectin, TNF-α and IL-1β expression, and resulted in infiltration of CD3-positive T cells, and caused a high number of Ki-67-positive proliferating cells. All of these parameters were decreased in peritoneal tissues of CG-treated pleiotrophin-knockout mice. Thus, an upregulation of pleiotrophin appears to play a role in fibrosis and inflammation during peritoneal injury.

  16. Dynamic manipulation and patterning of microparticles and cells by using TiOPc-based optoelectronic dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Mo; Yu, Tung-Ming; Huang, Hang-Ping; Ku, Meng-Yen; Hsu, Long; Liu, Cheng-Hsien

    2010-06-15

    We develop light-driven optoelectronic tweezers based on the organic photoconductive material titanium oxide phthalocyanine. These tweezers function based on negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP). The dynamic manipulation of a single microparticle and cell patterning are demonstrated by using this light-driven optoelectronic DEP chip. The adaptive light patterns that drive the optoelectronic DEP onchip are designed by using Flash software to approach appropriate dynamic manipulation. This is also the first reported demonstration, to the best of our knowledge, for successfully patterning such delicate cells from human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line HepG2 by using any optoelectronic tweezers.

  17. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jozaki, K.; Kuriu, A.; Hirota, S.; Onoue, H.; Ebi, Y.; Adachi, S.; Ma, J.Y.; Tarui, S.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1991-03-01

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity.

  18. Isolated tumor cells are frequently detectable in the peritoneal cavity of gastric and colorectal cancer patients and serve as a new prognostic marker.

    PubMed Central

    Schott, A; Vogel, I; Krueger, U; Kalthoff, H; Schreiber, H W; Schmiegel, W; Henne-Bruns, D; Kremer, B; Juhl, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic significance of isolated tumor cells detected by a panel of various monoclonal antibodies. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Previously, we showed by using immunocytology that cancer cells are frequently found in bone marrow and peritoneal cavity samples of gastrointestinal cancer patients. METHODS: Findings in bone marrow and peritoneal cavity samples were compared and correlated with the 4-year survival rate of 84 gastric and 109 colorectal patients with cancer. RESULTS: Although positive results in the bone marrow showed little prognostic significance, the peritoneal cavity results correlated with the 4-year survival rate (gastric cancer: p = 0.0038; colorectal cancer: p = 0.0079). Additionally, in subgroups of patients with early (gastric cancer: p = 0.02, colorectal cancer: p = 0.48) and advanced (gastric cancer: p = 0.02, colorectal cancer: p < 0.0001) tumor stages, a correlation of immunocytologic findings and the survival rate was seen. CONCLUSIONS: The detection of minimal residual disease in the peritoneal cavity serves as a new prognostic marker. Images Figure 5. PMID:9527060

  19. Isolation and manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giachino, Claudio; Basak, Onur; Taylor, Verdon

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells are potentially a source of cells not only for replacement therapy but also as drug vectors, bringing bioactive molecules into the brain. Stem cell-like cells can be isolated readily from the human brain, thus, it is important to find culture systems that enable expansion in a multipotent state to generate cells that are of potential use for therapy. Currently, two systems have been described for the maintenance and expansion of multipotent progenitors, an adhesive substrate bound and the neurosphere culture. Both systems have pros and cons, but the neurosphere may be able to simulate the three-dimensional environment of the niche in which the cells reside in vivo. Thus, the neurosphere, when used and cultured appropriately, can expand and provide important information about the mechanisms that potentially control neural stem cells in vivo.

  20. Stem cell maintenance by manipulating signaling pathways: past, current and future

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Ye, Shoudong; Ying, Qi-Long

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells only exist in a narrow window during early embryonic development, whereas multipotent stem cells are abundant throughout embryonic development and are retainedin various adult tissues and organs. While pluripotent stem cell lines have been established from several species, including mouse, rat, and human, it is still challenging to establish stable multipotent stem cell lines from embryonic or adult tissues. Based on current knowledge, we anticipate that by manipulating extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways, most if not all types of stem cells can be maintained in a long-term culture. In this article, we summarize current culture conditions established for the long-term maintenance of authentic pluripotent and multipotent stem cells and the signaling pathways involved. We also discuss the general principles of stem cell maintenance and propose several strategies on the establishment of novel stem cell lines through manipulation of signaling pathways. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(12): 668-676] PMID:26497581

  1. Multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer for non-invasive cell/organism manipulation and tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Ying; Li, Yang; Lim, Hae Gyun; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, Koping Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Non-contact precise manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms has attracted considerable interest in biophysics and biomedical engineering. Similar to optical tweezers, acoustic tweezers have been proposed to be capable of manipulating microparticles and even cells. Although there have been concerted efforts to develop tools for non-contact manipulation, no alternative to complex, unifunctional tweezer has yet been found. Here we report a simple, low-cost, multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer (SBAT) that is capable of manipulating an individual micrometer scale non-spherical cell at Rayleigh regime and even a single millimeter scale organism at Mie regime, and imaging tissue as well. We experimentally demonstrate that the SBAT with an ultralow f-number (f# = focal length/aperture size) could manipulate an individual red blood cell and a single 1.6 mm-diameter fertilized Zebrafish egg, respectively. Besides, in vitro rat aorta images were collected successfully at dynamic foci in which the lumen and the outer surface of the aorta could be clearly seen. With the ultralow f-number, the SBAT offers the combination of large acoustic radiation force and narrow beam width, leading to strong trapping and high-resolution imaging capabilities. These attributes enable the feasibility of using a single acoustic device to perform non-invasive multi-functions simultaneously for biomedical and biophysical applications. PMID:27874052

  2. Multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer for non-invasive cell/organism manipulation and tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kwok Ho; Li, Ying; Li, Yang; Lim, Hae Gyun; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, Koping Kirk

    2016-11-01

    Non-contact precise manipulation of single microparticles, cells, and organisms has attracted considerable interest in biophysics and biomedical engineering. Similar to optical tweezers, acoustic tweezers have been proposed to be capable of manipulating microparticles and even cells. Although there have been concerted efforts to develop tools for non-contact manipulation, no alternative to complex, unifunctional tweezer has yet been found. Here we report a simple, low-cost, multifunctional single beam acoustic tweezer (SBAT) that is capable of manipulating an individual micrometer scale non-spherical cell at Rayleigh regime and even a single millimeter scale organism at Mie regime, and imaging tissue as well. We experimentally demonstrate that the SBAT with an ultralow f-number (f# = focal length/aperture size) could manipulate an individual red blood cell and a single 1.6 mm-diameter fertilized Zebrafish egg, respectively. Besides, in vitro rat aorta images were collected successfully at dynamic foci in which the lumen and the outer surface of the aorta could be clearly seen. With the ultralow f-number, the SBAT offers the combination of large acoustic radiation force and narrow beam width, leading to strong trapping and high-resolution imaging capabilities. These attributes enable the feasibility of using a single acoustic device to perform non-invasive multi-functions simultaneously for biomedical and biophysical applications.

  3. Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis due to Halomonas hamiltonii

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Se Hwan; Kwak, Jae Hoon; Kim, Yeo Un; Lee, Jin Suk; Kim, Hyo Jin; Park, Kyoung Hwa; Lee, Jung Sook; Ha, Gyoung Yim; Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jun Yeop; Yoo, Kyung Don

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Halomonas hamiltonii is a Gram-negative, halophilic, motile, and nonspore-forming rod bacterium. Although most Halomonas sp. are commonly found in saline environments, it has rarely been implicated as a cause of human infection. Herein, the authors present a case report of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)-related peritonitis attributed to H hamiltonii. Case presentation: An 82-year-old male patient who had been receiving CAPD therapy presented to an emergency department with complaints of abdominal pain and cloudy dialysate that had persisted for 2 days. The peritoneal dialysate was compatible with CAPD peritonitis, with white blood cell count of peritoneal effluent of 810/mm3 and neutrophils predominated (60%). Two days after culture on blood agar medium, nonhemolytic pink mucoid colonies showed, with cells showing Gram-negative, nonspore-forming rods with a few longer and larger bacilli than usual were found. We also performed biochemical tests and found negative responses in K/K on the triple sugar iron test and H2S and equivocal (very weak) response in the motility test, but positive responses to catalase, oxidase, and urease tests. The partial sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of a bacterium detected by peritoneal fluid culture was utilized for a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool search, which revealed that the organism was H hamiltonii. Intraperitoneal antibiotics were administered for 21 days, and the patient was discharged without clinical problems. Conclusion: We present here the first case report of CAPD-related peritonitis caused by H hamiltonii, which was identified using molecular biological techniques. Although guidelines do not exist for the treatment of infections caused by this organism, conventional treatment for Gram-negative organisms could be effective. PMID:27893682

  4. Upregulation of endothelial cell adhesion molecules characterizes veins close to granulomatous infiltrates in the renal cortex of cats with feline infectious peritonitis and is indirectly triggered by feline infectious peritonitis virus-infected monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Acar, Delphine D; Olyslaegers, Dominique A J; Dedeurwaerder, Annelike; Roukaerts, Inge D M; Baetens, Wendy; Van Bockstael, Sebastiaan; De Gryse, Gaëtan M A; Desmarets, Lowiese M B; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2016-10-01

    One of the most characteristic pathological changes in cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a multifocal granulomatous phlebitis. Although it is now well established that leukocyte extravasation elicits the inflammation typically associated with FIP lesions, relatively few studies have aimed at elucidating this key pathogenic event. The upregulation of adhesion molecules on the endothelium is a prerequisite for stable leukocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion that necessarily precedes leukocyte diapedesis. Therefore, the present work focused on the expression of the EC adhesion molecules and possible triggers of EC activation during the development of FIP. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the endothelial expression of P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) was elevated in veins close to granulomatous infiltrates in the renal cortex of FIP patients compared to non-infiltrated regions and specimens from healthy cats. Next, we showed that feline venous ECs become activated when exposed to supernatant from feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV)-infected monocytes, as indicated by increased adhesion molecule expression. Active viral replication seemed to be required to induce the EC-stimulating activity in monocytes. Finally, adhesion assays revealed an increased adhesion of naive monocytes to ECs treated with supernatant from FIPV-infected monocytes. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that FIPV activates ECs to increase monocyte adhesion by an indirect route, in which proinflammatory factors released from virus-infected monocytes act as key intermediates.

  5. Laser microbeam manipulation of cell morphogenesis growing in fungal hyphae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracker, Charles E.; Murphy, Douglas J.; Lopez-Franco, Rosamaria

    1997-05-01

    Laser microbeam irradiation at 820 nm predictably and reproducibly altered morphogenetic patterns in fungal cells. Optical tweezers were highly effective as localized, noninvasive, and largely nondestructive probes under precise spatial and temporal control. In growing hyphae, the position of the Spitzenkorper (a multicomponent complex containing mainly secretory vesicles in the hyphal apex), is correlated with the site of maximum cell expansion during tip growth. The Spitzenkorper was not trapped by the laser, but moved away from the trap, and could be `chased' around the cell by the laser beam. Consequently, the direction of cell elongation was readily changed by moving the Spitzenkorper. When the laser was held steady at the cytoplasmic surface immediately beside the Spitzenkorper, an adventitious branch hypha was initiated on the same side of the hypha, suggesting that unilateral disturbance of vesicle traffic initiated a new lateral Spitzenkorper and hyphal branch near the original hyphal apex. If moving vesicles were trapped by the laser beam and transported to a different area of the cytoplasm near the cell surface, the cell profile bulged where the vesicles were newly concentrated. Variations in the mode of vesicle transfer caused: (1) single and multiple bulges, (2) adventitious branch hyphae, (3) increased cell diameter, and (4) changing directions of hyphal elongation. Thus, laser tweezers emerge as a powerful tool for controlling patterns of cell morphogenesis. The findings strongly support the hypothesis that sites of vesicle concentration and release to the cell surface are important determinants of cell morphogenesis in fungi. This conclusion lends support to the basic premises of a modern mathematical model of hyphal tip growth (the hyphoid/VSC model) but does not in itself provide the information needed for a comprehensive and integrated explanation of the mechanism of cell growth in fungi.

  6. High accuracy indirect optical manipulation of live cells with functionalized microtools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Aekbote, Badri L.; Buzás, András.; Grexa, István.; Ormos, Pál.; Kelemen, Lóránd

    2016-09-01

    Optical micro manipulation of live cells has been extensively used to study a wide range of cellular phenomena with relevance in basic research or in diagnostics. The approaches span from manipulation of many cells for high throughput measurement or sorting, to more elaborated studies of intracellular events on trapped single cells when coupled with modern imaging techniques. In case of direct cell trapping the damaging effects of light-cell interaction must be minimized, for instance with the choice of proper laser wavelength. Microbeads have already been used for trapping cells indirectly thereby reducing the irradiation damage and increasing trapping efficiency with their high refractive index contrast. We show here that such intermediate objects can be tailor-made for indirect cell trapping to further increase cell-to-focal spot distance while maintaining their free and fast maneuverability. Carefully designed structures were produced with two-photon polymerization with shapes optimized for effective manipulation and cell attachment. Functionalization of the microstructures is also presented that enables cell attachment to them within a few seconds with strength much higher that the optical forces. Fast cell actuation in 6 degrees of freedom is demonstrated with the outlook to possible applications in cell imaging.

  7. Different antiviral activity and cell specificity of interferon preparations produced by mouse peritoneal cells at 37 degrees C and at 26 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Cembrzyńska-Nowak, M

    1989-01-01

    Three sublines of mouse L cells and mouse embryo fibroblasts were used for determination of the antiviral activity of mouse interferons produced by nonadherent peritoneal exudate cells incubated either at 37 degrees C or at 26 degrees C. IFN produced at 37 degrees C or at 26 degrees C had the same antiviral activity in L Borgen, L929 cells. However, in MEC IFN-37 degrees had relatively higher activity than IFN-26 degrees. Of the interferon investigated only IFN-37 degrees exhibited antiviral activity in the established line of rat kidney cells. The IFN preparations showed no activity in the human and chicken cells. The studies on the sensitivity of viruses to both forms of IFN revealed that EMC and VSV viruses were equally sensitive to IFN-26 degrees C. However, the replication of EMC virus was more strongly inhibited by IFN-37 degrees than the multiplication of VSV virus.

  8. Mouse models of fear-related disorders: Cell-type-specific manipulations in amygdala.

    PubMed

    Gafford, G M; Ressler, K J

    2016-05-03

    Fear conditioning is a model system used to study threat responses, fear memory and their dysregulation in a variety of organisms. Newly developed tools such as optogenetics, Cre recombinase and DREADD technologies have allowed researchers to manipulate anatomically or molecularly defined cell subtypes with a high degree of temporal control and determine the effect of this manipulation on behavior. These targeted molecular techniques have opened up a new appreciation for the critical contributions different subpopulations of cells make to fear behavior and potentially to treatment of fear and anxiety disorders. Here we review progress to date across a variety of techniques to understand fear-related behavior through the manipulation of different cell subtypes within the amygdala.

  9. Dynamic ray tracing for modeling optical cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Sraj, Ihab; Szatmary, Alex C; Marr, David W M; Eggleton, Charles D

    2010-08-02

    Current methods for predicting stress distribution on a cell surface due to optical trapping forces are based on a traditional ray optics scheme for fixed geometries. Cells are typically modeled as solid spheres as this facilitates optical force calculation. Under such applied forces however, real and non-rigid cells can deform, so assumptions inherent in traditional ray optics methods begin to break down. In this work, we implement a dynamic ray tracing technique to calculate the stress distribution on a deformable cell induced by optical trapping. Here, cells are modeled as three-dimensional elastic capsules with a discretized surface with associated hydrodynamic forces calculated using the Immersed Boundary Method. We use this approach to simulate the transient deformation of spherical, ellipsoidal and biconcave capsules due to external optical forces induced by a single diode bar optical trap for a range of optical powers.

  10. ES cell technology: an introduction to genetic manipulation, differentiation and therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Hook, Lilian; O'Brien, Carmel; Allsopp, Timothy

    2005-12-12

    ES cells are extraordinary cells, capable of proliferating in a pluripotent state indefinitely and of differentiating spontaneously into all cell types in vivo and many in vitro. However, the manipulation and modification of ES cells by processes such as directed differentiation and genetic modification have placed ES cells at the forefront of many biological studies and could lead to their application in biopharmaceutical areas such as cellular therapy and drug screening. Here we describe some of the ES cell based technologies that have lead to this realisation of ES cell potential.

  11. Sodium-cromoglycate (Cromolyn) selectively increases the binding and phagocytosis of unsensitized target cells by rat peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Miklós, K; Tolnay, M; Medgyesi, G A

    1996-09-01

    The influence of sodium-cromoglycate (cromolyn) on the binding and ingestion of sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) by elicited rat peritoneal macrophages (M phi) was studied using unsensitized SRBC. SRBC sensitized by homologous IgG or by IgM and complement as target cells. Preincubation of M phi with the drug (1 nM/1-2 mM/1) markedly enhanced both binding and ingestion of uncoated SRBC. The IgG-related increment in binding and phagocytosis was not significantly influenced by the drug. When target cells were coated by IgM and complement cromolyn pretreatment was ineffective. Preincubation of M phi by bovine brain gangliosides (BBG) diminished the cromolyn-induced enhancement of target cell binding and phagocytosis. When SRBC were pretreated by BBG, an increase of binding and phagocytosis was observed. These data suggest that cromoglycate may enhance the capacity of M phi to bind erythrocytes via ganglioside structures. Coating SRBC by complement components appears to interfere with binding of erythrocytes to M phi ganglioside receptors.

  12. Bactericidal Activity of Ceragenin CSA-13 in Cell Culture and in an Animal Model of Peritoneal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Byfield, Fitzroy J.; Piktel, Ewelina; Wątek, Marzena; Janmey, Paul A.; Savage, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Ceragenins constitute a novel family of cationic antibiotics characterized by a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activities, which have mostly been assessed in vitro. Using a polarized human lung epithelial cell culture system, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of the ceragenin CSA-13 against two strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1 and Xen5). Additionally, the biodistribution and bactericidal activity of a CSA-13–IRDye 800CW derivate were assessed using an animal model of peritoneal infection after PAO1 challenge. In cell culture, CSA-13 bactericidal activities against PAO1 and Xen5 were higher than the activities of the human cathelicidin peptide LL-37. Increased CSA-13 activity was observed in polarized human lung epithelial cell cultures subjected to butyric acid treatment, which is known to increase endogenous LL-37 production. Eight hours after intravenous or intraperitoneal injection, the greatest CSA-13–IRDye 800CW accumulation was observed in mouse liver and kidneys. CSA-13–IRDye 800CW administration resulted in decreased bacterial outgrowth from abdominal fluid collected from animals subjected to intraperitoneal PAO1 infection. These observations indicate that CSA-13 may synergistically interact with antibacterial factors that are naturally present at mucosal surfaces and it maintains its antibacterial activity in the infected abdominal cavity. Cationic lipids such as CSA-13 represent excellent candidates for the development of new antibacterial compounds. PMID:26248361

  13. Morphological and biochemical changes during formocresol induced cell death in murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptotic and necrotic features.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, María Lorena; Todaro, Juan Santiago; Aguirre, María Victoria; Juaristi, Julián Antonio; Brandan, Nora Cristina

    2010-10-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the role of Formocresol (FC)-induced apoptosis and necrotic cell death in murine peritoneal macrophages (pMø). Macrophages were cultured with 1:100 FC for 2 to 24 h. The viability (trypan blue assay), cell morphology (scanning electronic microscope), and apoptotic and necrotic indexes (light and fluorescent microscopy) were determined at different scheduled times. Simultaneously, the expressions of proteins related to stress, survival, and cell death were measured by western blotting. FC-exposed macrophages exhibited maximal apoptosis from 2 to 6 h, coincident with Bax overexpression (P < 0.001). Additionally, Bcl-x(L) showed maximal expression between 12 and 24 h suggesting its survival effect in pMø. The lowest pMø viability and the increment of the necrotic rate from 4 to 12 h were observed in accordance to Fas and Hsp60 overexpressions. In summary, all the experimental data suggest that two different pathways emerge in pMø exposed to FC, one leading Bax-dependent apoptosis (2-6 h) and the other one favoring necrosis (4-18 h), related to Fas-receptor and Hsp60 stress signal.

  14. Manipulating biological agents and cells in micro-scale volumes for applications in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Wang, ShuQi

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances provide new tools to manipulate cells and biological agents in micro/nano-liter volumes. With precise control over small volumes, the cell microenvironment and other biological agents can be bioengineered; interactions between cells and external stimuli can be monitored; and the fundamental mechanisms such as cancer metastasis and stem cell differentiation can be elucidated. Technological advances based on the principles of electrical, magnetic, chemical, optical, acoustic, and mechanical forces lead to novel applications in point-of-care diagnostics, regenerative medicine, in vitro drug testing, cryopreservation, and cell isolation/purification. In this review, we first focus on the underlying mechanisms of emerging examples for cell manipulation in small volumes targeting applications such as tissue engineering. Then, we illustrate how these mechanisms impact the aforementioned biomedical applications, discuss the associated challenges, and provide perspectives for further development. PMID:23575660

  15. Manipulation of hematopoietic stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nakajima-Takagi, Yaeko; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iwama, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by their capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into all blood cell lineages while retaining robust capacity to regenerate hematopoiesis. Based on these characteristics, they are widely used for transplantation and gene therapy. However, the dose of HSCs available for use in treatments is limited. Therefore, extensive work has been undertaken to expand HSCs in culture and to produce HSCs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to improve the efficiency and outcome of HSC-based therapies. Various surface markers have been characterized to improve the purification of HSCs and a huge number of cytokines and small-molecule compounds have been screened for use in the expansion of HSCs. In addition, attempts to generate not only HSCs but also mature blood cells from ESCs and iPSCs are currently ongoing. This review covers recent approaches for the purification, expansion or production of human HSCs and provides insight into problems that need to be resolved.

  16. Development of an optimum end-effector with a nano-scale uneven surface for non-adhesion cell manipulation using a micro-manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horade, M.; Kojima, M.; Kamiyama, K.; Kurata, T.; Mae, Y.; Arai, T.

    2015-11-01

    In order to realize effective micro-manipulation using a micro-manipulator system, an optimum end-effector is proposed. Cell-manipulation experiments using mouse fibroblast cells are conducted, and the usability of the proposed end-effector is confirmed. A key advantage of the micro-manipulator is high-accuracy, high-speed 3D micro- and nano-scale positioning. Micro-manipulation has often been used in research involving biological cells. However, there are two important concerns with the micro-manipulator system: gripping efficiency and the release of gripped objects. When it is not possible to grip a micro-object, such as a cell, near its center, the object may be dropped during manipulation. Since the acquisition of exact position information for a micro-object in the vertical direction is difficult using a microscope, the gripping efficiency of the end-effector should be improved. Therefore, technical skill or operational support is required. Since, on the micro-scale, surface forces such as the adsorption force are greater than body forces, such as the gravitational force, the adhesion force between the end-effector and the object is strong. Therefore, manipulation techniques without adhesion are required for placed an object at an arbitrary position. In the present study, we consider direct physical contact between the end-effector and objects. First, the design and materials of the end-effector for micro-scale manipulation were optimized, and an end-effector with an optimum shape to increase the grip force was fabricated. Second, the surface of the end-effector tip was made uneven, and the adhesion force from increasing on the micro-scale was prevented. When an end-effector with an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 85.0% of the time. On the other hand, when an end-effector without an uneven surface was used, release without adhesion was successful 6.25% of the time. Therefore, the superiority of a structure with an uneven

  17. Magnetic tweezers for manipulation of magnetic particles in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimian, H.; Giesguth, M.; Dietz, K.-J.; Reiss, G.; Herth, S.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic tweezers gain increasing interest for applications in biology. Here, a setup of magnetic tweezers is introduced using micropatterned conducting lines on transparent glass slides. Magnetic particles of 1 μm diameter were injected in barley cell vacuoles using a microinject system under microscopic control. Time dependent tracking of the particles after application of a magnetic field was used to determine the viscosity of vacuolar sap in vivo relative to water and isolated vacuolar fluid. The viscosity of vacuolar sap in cells was about 2-fold higher than that of extracted vacuolar fluid and 5 times higher than that of water.

  18. Electrochemically controlled stiffness of multilayers for manipulation of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-xin; Ren, Ke-feng; Wang, Jin-lei; Chang, Guo-xun; Ji, Jian

    2013-06-12

    Stimuli-responsive thin films attract considerable attention in different fields. Herein, an electrochemical redox multilayers with tunable stiffness is constructed through the layer-by-layer self-assembly method. The redox ferrocene modified poly(ethylenimine) play an essential role to induce multilayers' swelling/shrinking under an electrochemical stimulus, resulting reversible change of elastic modulus of the multilayers. The adhesion of fibroblast cells can be thus controlled from well spreading to round shape. Such soft multilayers with electrochemically controlled stiffness could have potentials for cell-based applications.

  19. Aquaporin-1 in the peritoneal membrane: Implications for water transport across capillaries and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier; Ni, Jie

    2006-08-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an established mode of renal replacement therapy, based on the exchange of fluid and solutes between blood in peritoneal capillaries and a dialysate that has been introduced in the peritoneal cavity. The dialysis involves diffusive and convective transports and osmosis through the highly vascularized peritoneal membrane. Computer simulations predicted that the membrane contains ultrasmall pores (radius < 3 A) responsible for the transport of solute-free water across the capillary endothelium during crystalloid osmosis. The distribution of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1), as well as its molecular structure ensuring an exquisite selectivity for water perfectly fit with the characteristics of the ultrasmall pore. Treatment with corticosteroids induces the expression of AQP1 in peritoneal capillaries and increases water permeability and ultrafiltration in rats, without affecting the osmotic gradient and the permeability for small solutes. Studies in knockout mice provided further evidence that osmotically-driven water transport across the peritoneal membrane is mediated by AQP1. AQP1 and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) show a distinct regulation within the endothelium lining peritoneal capillaries. In acute peritonitis, the upregulation of eNOS and increased release of NO dissipate the osmotic gradient and result in ultrafiltration failure, despite the unchanged expression of AQP1. These data illustrate the potential of the peritoneal membrane to investigate the role and regulation of AQP1 in the endothelium. They also emphasize the critical role of AQP1 during peritoneal dialysis and suggest that manipulating AQP1 expression may be used to increase water permeability across the peritoneal membrane.

  20. Hepatic cells' mitotic and peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activities during Trypanosoma musculi infection in zinc-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, P. A.; Ashraf, M.; Lee, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of zinc deficiency on hepatic cell mitotic and peritoneal macrophage phagocytic activities were examined in mice infected with Trypanosoma musculi or immunized with parasitic products. On a full-complement or pair-fed diet, infected and homogenate-inoculated mice showed mitotic activity gains of 7.9% to 80.3% and 6.5% to 99.0%, respectively. Infected and homogenate-inoculated mice on a zinc-deficient diet showed 21.8% to 95.7% and 17.2% to 65.2%, respectively, more dividing liver cells compared with controls. In comparison to controls, macrophages isolated from infected and homogenate-immunized mice on full-complement or pair-fed diets had phagocytized 13.4% to 31.4% more latex particles from day 50 to 80. In the zinc-deficient group, macrophages isolated from infected mice had significant numbers of phagocytized latex particles (1.8% to 38.5%) from day 20 to day 80 compared with controls. The homogenate-immunized mice also had increased numbers (18.6 to 30.8%) of phagocytized latex particles. PMID:9145631

  1. Chapter 16: Magnetic manipulation for force measurements in cell biology.

    PubMed

    Tim O'Brien, E; Cribb, Jeremy; Marshburn, David; Taylor, Russell M; Superfine, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Life is a mechanical process. Cells, tissues, and bodies must act within their environments to grow, divide, move, communicate, and defend themselves. The stiffness and viscosity of cells and biologic materials will vary depending upon a wide variety of variables including for example environmental conditions, activation of signaling pathways, stage of development, gene expression. By pushing and pulling cells or materials such as mucus or extracellular matrix, one can learn about their mechanical properties. By varying the conditions, signaling pathways or genetic background, one can also assess how the response of the cell or material is modulated by that pathway. Magnetic particles are available commercially in many useful sizes, magnetic contents, and surface chemistries. The variety of surface chemistries allow forces to be applied to a specimen through specific linkages such as receptors or particular proteins, allowing the biologist to ask fundamental questions about the role of those linkages in the transduction of force or motion. In this chapter, we discuss the use of a magnetic system designed to apply a wide range of forces and force patterns fully integrated into a high numerical aperture inverted fluorescence microscope. Fine, thin and flat magnetic poles allow the use of high magnification microscope objectives, and flexible software to control the direction and pattern of applied forces supports a variety of experimental situations. The system can be coupled with simple video acquisition for medium-bandwidth, two-dimensional particle tracking. Alternatively, the system can be coupled with a laser tracking and position feedback system for higher resolution, high bandwidth, three-dimensional tracking.

  2. Potential for pharmacological manipulation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Stuart P; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is vast, allowing disease modelling, drug discovery and testing and perhaps most importantly regenerative therapies. However, problems abound; techniques for cultivating self-renewing hESCs tend to give a heterogeneous population of self-renewing and partially differentiated cells and general include animal-derived products that can be cost-prohibitive for large-scale production, and effective lineage-specific differentiation protocols also still remain relatively undefined and are inefficient at producing large amounts of cells for therapeutic use. Furthermore, the mechanisms and signalling pathways that mediate pluripotency and differentiation are still to be fully appreciated. However, over the recent years, the development/discovery of a range of effective small molecule inhibitors/activators has had a huge impact in hESC biology. Large-scale screening techniques, coupled with greater knowledge of the pathways involved, have generated pharmacological agents that can boost hESC pluripotency/self-renewal and survival and has greatly increased the efficiency of various differentiation protocols, while also aiding the delineation of several important signalling pathways. Within this review, we hope to describe the current uses of small molecule inhibitors/activators in hESC biology and their potential uses in the future. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Regenerative Medicine and Pharmacology: A Look to the Future. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-2 PMID:22515554

  3. Naturally occurring regulatory T cells: markers, mechanisms, and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Schmetterer, Klaus G; Neunkirchner, Alina; Pickl, Winfried F

    2012-06-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) are key mediators of immunity, which orchestrate and maintain tolerance to self and foreign antigens. In the recent 1.5 decades, a multitude of studies have aimed to define the phenotype and function of nTregs and to assess their therapeutic potential for modulating immune mediated disorders such as autoimmunity, allergy, and episodes of transplant rejection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of nTregs. We address the exact definition of nTregs by specific markers and combinations thereof, which is a prerequisite for the state-of-the-art isolation of defined nTreg populations. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism by which nTregs mediate immunosuppression and how this knowledge might translate into novel therapeutic modalities. With first clinical studies of nTreg-based therapies being finished, questions concerning the reliable sources of nTregs are becoming more and more eminent. Consequently, approaches allowing conversion of CD4(+) T cells into nTregs by coculture with antigen-presenting cells, cytokines, and/or pharmacological agents are discussed. In addition, genetic engineering approaches for the generation of antigen-specific nTregs are described.

  4. B-cell activation in cats with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) by FIP-virus-induced B-cell differentiation/survival factors.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Azuma, Natsuko; Hashida, Yoshikiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that antibody overproduction plays a role in the pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). However, only a few studies on the B-cell activation mechanism after FIP virus (FIPV) infection have been reported. The present study shows that: (1) the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cells was higher in cats with FIP than in SPF cats, (2) the albumin-to-globulin ratio has negative correlation with the ratio of peripheral blood sIg(+) CD21(-) B-cell, (3) cells strongly expressing mRNA of the plasma cell master gene, B-lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1), were increased in peripheral blood in cats with FIP, (4) mRNA expression of B-cell differentiation/survival factors, IL-6, CD40 ligand, and B-cell-activating factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF), was enhanced in macrophages in cats with FIP, and (5) mRNAs of these B-cell differentiation/survival factors were overexpressed in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE)-induced macrophages. These data suggest that virus-infected macrophages overproduce B-cell differentiation/survival factors, and these factors act on B-cells and promote B-cell differentiation into plasma cells in FIPV-infected cats.

  5. Femtosecond laser fabricated integrated chip for manipulation of single cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keloth, Anusha; Jimenez, Melanie; Bridle, H.; Paterson, Lynn; Markx, Gerard H.; Kar, Ajoy K.

    2016-03-01

    Optical micromanipulation techniques and microfluidic techniques can be used in same platform for manipulating biological samples at single cell level. Novel microfluidic devices with integrated channels and waveguides fabricated using ultrafast laser inscription combined with selective chemical etching can be used to enable sorting and isolation of biological cells. In this paper we report the design and fabrication of a three dimensional chip that can be used to manipulate single cells in principle with a higher throughput than is possible using optical tweezers. The capability of ultrafast laser inscription followed by selective chemical etching to fabricate microstructures and waveguides have been utilised to fabricate the device presented in this paper. The complex three dimensional microfluidic structures within the device allow the injected cell population to focus in a hydrodynamic flow. A 1064 nm cw laser source, coupled to the integrated waveguide, is used to exert radiation pressure on the cells to be manipulated. As the cells in the focussed stream flow past the waveguide, optical scattering force induced by the laser beam pushes the cell from out of the focussed stream to the sheath fluid, which can be then collected at the outlet. Thus cells can be controllably deflected from the focussed flow to the side channel for downstream analysis or culture.

  6. System-Level Biochip for Impedance Sensing and Programmable Manipulation of Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Cheng-Hsin; Huang, Yao-Wei; Wu, Yao-Tung

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with multi-layer electrodes and a micro-cavity array for programmable manipulations of cells and impedance measurement. The DEP chip consists of an ITO top electrode, flow chamber, middle electrode on an SU-8 surface, micro-cavity arrays of SU-8 and distributed electrodes at the bottom of the micro-cavity. Impedance sensing of single cells could be performed as follows: firstly, cells were trapped in a micro-cavity array by negative DEP force provided by top and middle electrodes; then, the impedance measurement for discrimination of different stage of bladder cancer cells was accomplished by the middle and bottom electrodes. After impedance sensing, the individual releasing of trapped cells was achieved by negative DEP force using the top and bottom electrodes in order to collect the identified cells once more. Both cell manipulations and impedance measurement had been integrated within a system controlled by a PC-based LabVIEW program. In the experiments, two different stages of bladder cancer cell lines (grade III: T24 and grade II: TSGH8301) were utilized for the demonstration of programmable manipulation and impedance sensing; as the results show, the lower-grade bladder cancer cells (TSGH8301) possess higher impedance than the higher-grade ones (T24). In general, the multi-step manipulations of cells can be easily programmed by controlling the electrical signal in our design, which provides an excellent platform technology for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) or a micro-total-analysis-system (Micro TAS). PMID:22346685

  7. Analysis of TRPV channel activation by stimulation of FCεRI and MRGPR receptors in mouse peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Solís-López, A.; Kriebs, U.; Marx, A.; Mannebach, S.; Liedtke, W. B.; Caterina, M. J.; Freichel, M.; Tsvilovskyy, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The activation of mast cells (MC) is part of the innate and adaptive immune responses and depends on Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane, leading to the release of preformed inflammatory mediators by degranulation or by de novo synthesis. The calcium conducting channels of the TRPV family, known by their thermo and osmotic sensitivity, have been proposed to be involved in the MC activation in murine, rat, and human mast cell models. So far, immortalized mast cell lines and nonspecific TRPV blockers have been employed to characterize the role of TRPV channels in MC. The aim of this work was to elucidate the physiological role of TRPV channels by using primary peritoneal mast cells (PMCs), a model of connective tissue type mast cells. Our RT-PCR and NanoString analysis identified the expression of TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 channels in PMCs. For determination of the functional role of the expressed TRPV channels we performed measurements of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations and beta-hexosaminidase release in PMCs obtained from wild type and mice deficient for corresponding TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV4 in response to various receptor-mediated and physical stimuli. Furthermore, substances known as activators of corresponding TRPV-channels were also tested using these assays. Our results demonstrate that TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 do not participate in activation pathways triggered by activation of the high-affinity receptors for IgE (FcεRI), Mrgprb2 receptor, or Endothelin-1 receptor nor by heat or osmotic stimulation in mouse PMCs. PMID:28158279

  8. Analysis of TRPV channel activation by stimulation of FCεRI and MRGPR receptors in mouse peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Solís-López, A; Kriebs, U; Marx, A; Mannebach, S; Liedtke, W B; Caterina, M J; Freichel, M; Tsvilovskyy, V V

    2017-01-01

    The activation of mast cells (MC) is part of the innate and adaptive immune responses and depends on Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane, leading to the release of preformed inflammatory mediators by degranulation or by de novo synthesis. The calcium conducting channels of the TRPV family, known by their thermo and osmotic sensitivity, have been proposed to be involved in the MC activation in murine, rat, and human mast cell models. So far, immortalized mast cell lines and nonspecific TRPV blockers have been employed to characterize the role of TRPV channels in MC. The aim of this work was to elucidate the physiological role of TRPV channels by using primary peritoneal mast cells (PMCs), a model of connective tissue type mast cells. Our RT-PCR and NanoString analysis identified the expression of TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 channels in PMCs. For determination of the functional role of the expressed TRPV channels we performed measurements of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations and beta-hexosaminidase release in PMCs obtained from wild type and mice deficient for corresponding TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV4 in response to various receptor-mediated and physical stimuli. Furthermore, substances known as activators of corresponding TRPV-channels were also tested using these assays. Our results demonstrate that TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 do not participate in activation pathways triggered by activation of the high-affinity receptors for IgE (FcεRI), Mrgprb2 receptor, or Endothelin-1 receptor nor by heat or osmotic stimulation in mouse PMCs.

  9. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS AWAIT ATTACHMENT TO HAND CONTROLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9001. Unknown Photographer, photo is identified as taken 10/28/1953, but it may be an error as it shows progress since ID-33-G-266 of same date. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. INSTRUMENT FITTINGS, MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATOR, "POT LID ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. INSTRUMENT FITTINGS, MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATOR, "POT LID CRANE." IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE MTR-632-IDO-16, 11/1952. INL INDEX NO. 531-0632-40-396-110574, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Inflammation and the Peritoneal Membrane: Causes and Impact on Structure and Function during Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Gilberto; Schuinski, Adriana; de Moraes, Thyago P.; Meyer, Fernando; Pecoits-Filho, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis therapy has increased in popularity since the end of the 1970s. This method provides a patient survival rate equivalent to hemodialysis and better preservation of residual renal function. However, technique failure by peritonitis, and ultrafiltration failure, which is a multifactorial complication that can affect up to 40% of patients after 3 years of therapy. Encapsulant peritoneal sclerosis is an extreme and potentially fatal manifestation. Causes of inflammation in peritoneal dialysis range from traditional factors to those related to chronic kidney disease per se, as well as from the peritoneal dialysis treatment, including the peritoneal dialysis catheter, dialysis solution, and infectious peritonitis. Peritoneal inflammation generated causes significant structural alterations including: thickening and cubic transformation of mesothelial cells, fibrin deposition, fibrous capsule formation, perivascular bleeding, and interstitial fibrosis. Structural alterations of the peritoneal membrane described above result in clinical and functional changes. One of these clinical manifestations is ultrafiltration failure and can occur in up to 30% of patients on PD after five years of treatment. An understanding of the mechanisms involved in peritoneal inflammation is fundamental to improve patient survival and provide a better quality of life. PMID:22547910

  12. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.

  13. Novel Endothelial Cell-Specific AQP1 Knockout Mice Confirm the Crucial Role of Endothelial AQP1 in Ultrafiltration during Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Freichel, Marc; van der Hoeven, Frank; Nawroth, Peter Paul; Katus, Hugo; Kälble, Florian; Zitron, Edgar; Schwenger, Vedat

    2016-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) mediates about 50% ultrafiltration during a 2-hour hypertonic dwell in global AQP1 knockout (AQP1-/-) mice. Although AQP1 is widely expressed in various cell types including mesothelial cells, the ultrafiltration has been assumed to be mediated via endothelial AQP1 of the peritoneum. The partial embryonic lethality and reduced body weight in AQP1-/- mice may reflect potential confounding phenotypic effects evoked by ubiquitous AQP1 deletion, which may interfere with functional analysis of endothelial AQP1. Using a Cre/loxP approach, we generated and characterised endothelial cell- and time-specific AQP1 knockout (AQP1fl/fl; Cdh5-Cre+) mice. Compared to controls, AQP1fl/fl; Cdh5-Cre+ mice showed no difference in an initial clinical and biological analysis at baseline, including body weight and survival. During a 1-hour 3.86% mini-peritoneal equilibration test (mini-PET), AQP1fl/fl; Cdh5-Cre+ mice exhibited strongly decreased indices for AQP1-related transcellular water transport (43.0% in net ultrafiltration, 93.0% in sodium sieving and 57.9% in free water transport) compared to controls. The transport rates for small solutes of urea and glucose were not significantly altered. Our data provide the first direct experimental evidence for the functional relevance of endothelial AQP1 to the fluid transport in peritoneal dialysis and thereby further validate essential predictions of the three-pore model of peritoneal transport.

  14. [A case of peritonitis carcinomatosa from goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix treated by intraperitoneal paclitaxel and systemic S-1 chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shingen; Kimura, Shigeaki; Kashima, Masahiro; Shichijo, Kana; Yoshida, Sumiko; Harada, Eiji; Matsushita, Takaya; Oshima, Yasushi; Tamaki, Yasutami; Horiuchi, Noriaki; Takeichi, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Hiroshi; Masuda, Kazuhiko; Iwasaka, Naohito; Shinomiya, Sadao

    2008-12-01

    Goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix is a rare neoplasm and clinically tends to take a malignant course. Most cases are young and early stage, and the surgical strategy is available. But appropriate chemotherapy for inoperable cases with peritoneal dissemination is not established. A 77-year-old woman with a past history of appendectomy was admitted to our hospital complaining of abdominal fullness. Abdominal computed tomography showed massive ascites and slight contrast enhancement of appendix. A tumor was found by colonoscopic examination at the orifice of vermiform and was diagnosed pathologically as goblet cell carcinoid of the appendix. Laparoscopy showed multiple peritoneal dissemination. We performed intraperitoneal paclitaxel(PTX)administration at 70 mg/m(2) week without any resection of the tumor. Ascites were reduced immediately, but drug-induced interstitial pneumonia occurred due to PTX. After steroid therapy, we switched to systemic S-1 therapy. For about one year, her tumor was controlled but became worse thirteen months after diagnosis and died. It is thought that intraabdominal paclitaxel administration and systemic S-1 therapy can be one of appropriate forms of chemotherapy for inoperable peritoneal carcinomatosis from goblet cell carcinoid of appendix.

  15. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  16. Peritoneal fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... based on more than just the peritoneal fluid culture (which may be negative even if you have ...

  17. Membrane-Tethered Ligands: Tools for Cell-Autonomous Pharmacological Manipulation of Biological Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Detection of secreted signaling molecules by cognate cell surface receptors is a major intercellular communication pathway in cellular circuits that control biological processes. Understanding the biological significance of these connections would allow us to understand how cellular circuits operate as a whole. Membrane-tethered ligands are recombinant transgenes with structural modules that allow them to act on cell-surface receptors and ion channel subtypes with pharmacological specificity in a cell-autonomous manner. Membrane-tethered ligands have been successful in the specific manipulation of ion channels as well as G-protein-coupled receptors, and, in combination with cell-specific promoters, such manipulations have been restricted to genetically defined subpopulations within cellular circuits in vivo to induce specific phenotypes controlled by those circuits. These studies establish the membrane-tethering approach as a generally applicable method for dissecting neural and physiological circuits. PMID:23636262

  18. Surface-modified complex SU-8 microstructures for indirect optical manipulation of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Aekbote, Badri L.; Fekete, Tamás; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Ormos, Pál; Kelemen, Lóránd

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a method that combines two-photon polymerization (TPP) and surface functionalization to enable the indirect optical manipulation of live cells. TPP-made 3D microstructures were coated specifically with a multilayer of the protein streptavidin and non-specifically with IgG antibody using polyethylene glycol diamine as a linker molecule. Protein density on their surfaces was quantified for various coating methods. The streptavidin-coated structures were shown to attach to biotinated cells reproducibly. We performed basic indirect optical micromanipulation tasks with attached structure-cell couples using complex structures and a multi-focus optical trap. The use of such extended manipulators for indirect optical trapping ensures to keep a safe distance between the trapping beams and the sensitive cell and enables their 6 degrees of freedom actuation. PMID:26819816

  19. In vitro immune toxicity of polybrominated diphenyl ethers on murine peritoneal macrophages: apoptosis and immune cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi-Yan; Wan, Bin; Guo, Liang-Hong; Zhao, Lixia; Yang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants and are often detected in the environment, wildlife, and humans, presenting potential threats to ecosystem and human health. PBDEs can cause neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and endocrine disruption. However, data on PBDE immunotoxicity are limited, and the toxicity mechanisms remain largely unknown. Both immune cell death and dysfunction can modulate the responses of the immune system. This study examined the toxic effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on the immune system by using peritoneal macrophages as the model. The macrophages were exposed to PBDEs, and cell death was determined through flow cytometry and immunochemical blot. The results showed that after 24h of exposure, BDE-47 (>5 μM) and BDE-209 (>20 μM) induced cell apoptosis, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and depleted glutathione. BDE-47 was more potent than BDE-209; the cytotoxic concentrations for BDE-47 and BDE-209 were determined to be 5 μM and 20 μM, respectively, during 24h of exposure. However, pretreatment with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (ROS scavenger) partially reversed the cytotoxic effects. Further gene expression analyses on Caspase-3,-8,-9, TNFR1, and Bax revealed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. More importantly, non-cytotoxic concentrations BDE-47 (<2 μM) and BDE-209 (<10 μM) could impair macrophage accessory cell function in a concentration-dependent manner, but no effects were observed on phagocytic responses. These revealed effects of PBDEs on macrophages may shed light on the toxicity mechanisms of PBDEs and suggest the necessity of evaluating cellular functionality during the risk assessment of PBDE immunotoxicity.

  20. Acoustic cavity transducers for the manipulation of cells and biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovar, Armando; Patel, Maulik; Lee, Abraham P.

    2010-02-01

    A novel fluidic actuator that is simple to fabricate, integrate, and operate is demonstrated for use within microfluidic systems. The actuator is designed around the use of trapped air bubbles in lateral cavities and the resultant acoustic streaming generated from an outside acoustic energy source. The orientation of the lateral cavities to the main microchannel is used to control the bulk fluid motion within the device. The first order flow generated by the oscillating bubble is used to develop a pumping platform that is capable of driving fluid within a chip. This pump is integrated into a recirculation immunoassay device for enhanced biomolecule binding through fluid flow for convection limited transport. The recirculation system showed an increase in binding site concentration when compared with traditional passive and flow-through methods. The acoustic cavity transducer has also been demonstrated for application in particle switching. Bursts of acoustic energy are used to generate a second order streaming pattern near the cavity interface to drive particles away or towards the cavity. The use of this switching mechanism is being extended to the application of sorting cells and other particles within a microfluidic system.

  1. Whole exome sequencing of independent lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant peritoneal mesothelioma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Irene; Coco, Simona; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Cittaro, Davide; Genova, Carlo; Biello, Federica; Mora, Marco; Rossella, Valeria; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Truini, Anna; Banelli, Barbara; Lazarevic, Dejan; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Grossi, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    The presence of multiple primary tumors (MPT) in a single patient has been identified with an increasing frequency. A critical issue is to establish if the second tumor represents an independent primary cancer or a metastasis. Therefore, the assessment of MPT clonal origin might help understand the disease behavior and improve the management/prognosis of the patient.Herein, we report a 73-year-old male smoker who developed 2 primary lung cancers (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and a malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (PM).Whole exome sequencing (WES) of the 3 tumors and of germline DNA was performed to determine the clonal origin and identify genetic cancer susceptibility.Both lung cancers were characterized by a high mutational rate with distinct mutational profiles and activation of tumor-specific pathways. Conversely, the PM harbored a relative low number of genetic variants and a novel mutation in the WT1 gene that might be involved in the carcinogenesis of nonasbestos-related mesothelioma. Finally, WES of the germinal DNA displayed several single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair genes likely conferring higher cancer susceptibility.Overall, WES did not disclose any somatic genetic variant shared across the 3 tumors, suggesting their clonal independency; however, the carcinogenic effect of smoke combined with a deficiency in DNA repair genes and the patient advanced age might have been responsible for the MPT development. This case highlights the WES importance to define the clonal origin of MPT and susceptibility to cancer.

  2. Adaptive tuning of a 2DOF controller for robust cell manipulation using IPMC actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaid, A. J.; Aw, K. C.; Haemmerle, E.; Shahinpoor, M.; Xie, S. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Rapid advancement in medicine and bioscience is causing demand for faster, more accurate and dexterous as well as safer and more reliable micro-manipulators capable of handling biological cells. Current micro-manipulation techniques commonly damage cell walls and membranes due to their stiffness and rigidity. Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators have inherent compliance and with their ability to operate well in fluid and cellular environments they present a unique solution for safe cell manipulation. The reason for the downfall of IPMCs is that their complex behaviour makes them hard to control precisely in unknown environments and in the presence of sizeable external disturbances. This paper presents a novel scheme for adaptively tuning IPMC actuators for precise and robust micro-manipulation of biological cells. A two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) controller is developed to allow optimal performance for both disturbance rejection (DR) and set point (SP) tracking. These criteria are optimized using a proposed IFT algorithm which adaptively updates the controller parameters, with no model or prior knowledge of the operating conditions, to achieve a compliant manipulation system which can precisely track targets in the presence of large external disturbances, as will be encountered in real biological environments. Experiments are presented showing the performance optimization of an IPMC actuator in the presence of external mechanical disturbances as well as the optimization of the SP tracking. The IFT algorithm successfully tunes the DR and SP to an 85% and 69% improvement, respectively. Results are also presented for a one-degree-of-freedom (1DOF) controller tuned first for DR and then for SP, for a comparison with the 2DOF controller. Validation has been undertaken to verify that the 2DOF controller does indeed outperform both 1DOF controllers over a variety of operating conditions.

  3. Activation of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells following histamine release: a possible role in cell recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, T.; Ferjan, I.; Johansen, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. The activity of the Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells was measured at various time intervals after induction of cellular histamine release by compound 48/80 or by the antigen-antibody reaction. The Na+/K(+)-pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive potassium uptake of the cells using 86Rb+ as a tracer for potassium (K+(86Rb+)-uptake). 2. Stimulation of the cells with compound 48/80 induced a time and concentration dependent increase of the Na+/K(+)-pump activity. The pump activity was maximal 2 min after stimulation of the cells. Then, the activity gradually decreased and reached a level not significantly different from the controls after 2 h of incubation. 3. When the cells were stimulated by the antigen-antibody reaction, there was also a rapid (within 5 min) stimulation of the Na+/K(+)-pump. In contrast to the stimulation with compound 48/80, the pump activity returned to the control level after 60 min of incubation with antigen. 4. The ouabain-resistant potassium uptake of the cells was increased after stimulation of the cells, regardless of the secretagogue used. This probably reflects the increased surface area of the cells present after the histamine release. 5. On the basis of the present results, we suggest a role for the Na+/K(+)-pump in the recovery process of the mast cell following histamine release. PMID:7679025

  4. The outwardly rectifying chloride channel in rat peritoneal mast cells is regulated by serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Jörg; Tritschler, Stefan; Roloff, Tim; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Ziegler, Albrecht

    2002-02-01

    A slowly activating, outwardly rectifying Cl- channel (ORCC) has been described in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). This channel is activated by intracellular application of cAMP, an effect that might be mediated by a PKA-type serine/threonine protein kinase. To test this hypothesis, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments (nystatin-perforated patch) were performed and 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate, Sp-enantiomer (Sp-8Br-cAMPS), a cell membrane-permeable activator of PKA, and three inhibitors of different serine/threonine protein phosphatases (okadaic acid, cantharidin, calyculin A), were tested. In RPMCs application of repetitive series of step hyper- and depolarizations (holding potential 0 mV, test potentials -80 to +80 mV, step size +20 mV) induced a slowly increasing, [half-maximal activation time ( t0.5) 11.0+/-1.1 min, Imax (at +80 mV) 18.7+/-3.1 pA pF-1], DIDS-sensitive, outwardly rectifying Cl- current I(Cl,OR). The activation of this current could be accelerated by Sp-8Br-cAMPS, okadaic acid or cantharidin in the extracellular solution. Co-application of Sp-8Br-cAMPS and okadaic acid increased Imax supra-additively. Calyculin A and higher concentrations of cantharidin inhibited the Cl- current via unknown mechanisms. Our findings suggest that I(Cl,OR) in RPMCs is activated by a PKA-type protein kinase, a process which is antagonized functionally by okadaic acid- and cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases.

  5. Inhibition of PRL-3 gene expression in gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 via microRNA suppressed reduces peritoneal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhengrong; Zhan Wenhua . E-mail: wcywk@hotmail.com; Wang Zhao; Zhu Baohe; He Yulong; Peng Junsheng; Cai Shirong; Ma Jinping

    2006-09-15

    High expression of PRL-3, a protein tyrosine phosphatase, is proved to be associated with lymph node metastasis in gastric carcinoma from previous studies. In this paper, we examined the relationship between PRL-3 expression and peritoneal metastasis in gastric carcinoma. We applied the artificial miRNA (pCMV-PRL3miRNA), which is based on the murine miR-155 sequence, to efficiently silence the target gene expression of PRL-3 in SGC7901 gastric cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Then we observed that, in vitro, pCMV-PRL3miRNA significantly depressed the SGC7901 cell invasion and migration independent of cellular proliferation. In vivo, PRL-3 knockdown effectively suppressed the growth of peritoneal metastases and improved the prognosis in nude mice. Therefore, we concluded that artificial miRNA can depress the expression of PRL-3, and that PRL-3 might be a potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer peritoneal metastasis.

  6. Programmable manipulation of motile cells in optoelectronic tweezers using a grayscale image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Nam, Seong-Won; Hwang, Hyundoo; Park, Sungsu; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a grayscale optoelectronic tweezers (OET) which allows adjustment of the electric field strength at each position of OET. A grayscale light image was used to pattern vertical electric field strength on an OET. As an electric field depends on the brightness at each point, the brighter light patterns generate the stronger electric field in the OET. Its feasibility for application to cell manipulation was demonstrated by aligning highly motile protozoan cells in vertical direction. Depending on the brightness of each pixel, the behaviors of aligned cells varied due to the different electric field strength to each cell.

  7. Holographic optical manipulation of motor-driven membranous structures in living NG-108 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Arnau; López-Quesada, Carol; Andilla, Jordi; Martín-Badosa, Estela; Montes-Usategui, Mario

    2010-08-01

    Optical tweezer experiments have partially unveiled the mechanical properties of processive motor proteins while driving polystyrene or silica microbeads in vitro. However, the set of forces underlying the more complex transport mechanisms in living samples remains poorly understood. Several studies have shown that optical tweezers are capable of trapping vesicles and organelles in the cytoplasm of living cells, which can be used as handles to mechanically interact with engaged (active) motors, or other components regulating transport. This may ultimately enable the exploration of the mechanics of this trafficking mechanism in vivo. These cell manipulation experiments have been carried out using different strategies to achieve dynamic beam steering capable of trapping these subcellular structures. We report here the first trapping and manipulation, to our knowledge, of such small motor-propelled cargos in living cells using holographic technology.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Peritoneal EMT and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Strippoli, Raffaele; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; Battistelli, Cecilia; Cicchini, Carla; Noce, Valeria; Amicone, Laura; Marchetti, Alessandra; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Tripodi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is a form of renal replacement alternative to the hemodialysis. During this treatment, the peritoneal membrane acts as a permeable barrier for exchange of solutes and water. Continual exposure to dialysis solutions, as well as episodes of peritonitis and hemoperitoneum, can cause acute/chronic inflammation and injury to the peritoneal membrane, which undergoes progressive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and vasculopathy, eventually leading to discontinuation of the peritoneal dialysis. Among the different events controlling this pathological process, epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mesothelial cells plays a main role in the induction of fibrosis and in subsequent functional deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. Here, the main extracellular inducers and cellular players are described. Moreover, signaling pathways acting during this process are elucidated, with emphasis on signals delivered by TGF-β family members and by Toll-like/IL-1β receptors. The understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying fibrosis of the peritoneal membrane has both a basic and a translational relevance, since it may be useful for setup of therapies aimed at counteracting the deterioration as well as restoring the homeostasis of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:26941801

  9. Permeabilization and cell surgery using femtosecond laser pulses: an emerging tool for cellular manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Vikram; Acker, Jason P.; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y.

    2006-02-01

    Non-invasive manipulation of live cells is important for cell-based therapeutics. Herein, we report on the application of femtosecond laser pulses for cellular manipulation, and the generation of optical pores for cytoplasmic delivery of non-reducing cryoprotectants. Under precise laser focusing, we demonstrate membrane surgery on live mammalian cells, and ablation of focal adhesions adjoining fibroblast cells. In both studies, the morphology of the cell post-laser treatment was maintained with no visible collapse or disassociation. When mammalian cells were suspended in a hyperosmotic cryoprotectant solution, focused femtosecond laser pulses were used to transiently permeabilize live cells for sucrose uptake. To verify the cytoplasmic uptake, the volumetric response of cells in 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 M cryoprotective sucrose was measured using video microscopy. From membrane integrity assays, we determined that optimal cell survival of 91.5 +/- 8% is achieved using 0.2 M sucrose, with a decline in survival at higher concentrations. Using diffusion analysis for a porous membrane, the intracellular accumulation of cryoprotective sucrose was theoretically determined. At a diffusion length of 10 um, > 70% of the extracellular osmolarity was estimated to be intracellularly delivered following closure of the transient pore. We anticipate that our study will have important applications for biopresevation, and profound implications for surgery and cell-isolation.

  10. Single-cell manipulation and DNA delivery technology using atomic force microscopy and nanoneedle.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung-Woong; Nakamura, Chikashi; Miyake, Jun; Chang, Sang-Mok; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-01-01

    The recent single-cell manipulation technology using atomic force microscopy (AFM) not only allows high-resolution visualization and probing of biomolecules and cells but also provides spatial and temporal access to the interior of living cells via the nanoneedle technology. Here we review the development and application of single-cell manipulations and the DNA delivery technology using a nanoneedle. We briefly describe various DNA delivery methods and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Fabrication of the nanoneedle, visualization of nanoneedle insertion into living cells, DNA modification on the nanoneedle surface, and the invasiveness of nanoneedle insertion into living cells are described. Different methods of DNA delivery into a living cell, such as lipofection, microinjection, and nanoneedles, are then compared. Finally, single-cell diagnostics using the nanoneedle and the perspectives of the nanoneedle technology are outlined. The nanoneedle-based DNA delivery technology provides new opportunities for efficient and specific introduction of DNA and other biomolecules into precious living cells with a high spatial resolution within a desired time frame. This technology has the potential to be applied for many basic cellular studies and for clinical studies such as single-cell diagnostics.

  11. Living cell manipulation, manageable sampling, and shotgun picoliter electrospray mass spectrometry for profiling metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Yousef; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    A modified cell pressure probe and an online Orbitrap mass spectrometer were used to sample in situ plant single cells without any additional manipulation. The cell pressure probe, a quartz capillary tip filled with an oil mixture, was penetrated to various depths into parenchyma cells of tulip bulb scale, followed by a hydraulic continuity test to determine the exact location of the tip inside target cells. The operation was conducted under a digital microscope, and the capillary tip was photographed to calculate the volume of the cell sap sucked. The cell sap sample was then directly nebulized/ionized under high-voltage conditions at the entrance of the mass spectrometer. Several sugars, amino acids, organic acids, vitamins, fatty acids, and secondary metabolites were detected. Because picoliter solutions can be accurately handled and measured, known volumes of standard solutions can be added to cell sap samples inside the capillary tip to be used as references for metabolite characterization and relative quantitation. The high precision and sensitivity of the cell pressure probe and Orbitrap mass spectrometer allow for the manipulation and analysis of both femtoliter cell sap samples and standard solutions.

  12. Photothermally triggered actuation of hybrid materials as a new platform for in vitro cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Amy; Shirman, Tanya; Timonen, Jaakko V. I.; England, Grant T.; Kim, Philseok; Kolle, Mathias; Ferrante, Thomas; Zarzar, Lauren D.; Strong, Elizabeth; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical forces in the cell's natural environment have a crucial impact on growth, differentiation and behaviour. Few areas of biology can be understood without taking into account how both individual cells and cell networks sense and transduce physical stresses. However, the field is currently held back by the limitations of the available methods to apply physiologically relevant stress profiles on cells, particularly with sub-cellular resolution, in controlled in vitro experiments. Here we report a new type of active cell culture material that allows highly localized, directional and reversible deformation of the cell growth substrate, with control at scales ranging from the entire surface to the subcellular, and response times on the order of seconds. These capabilities are not matched by any other method, and this versatile material has the potential to bridge the performance gap between the existing single cell micro-manipulation and 2D cell sheet mechanical stimulation techniques.

  13. Effects of melanin-induced free radicals on the isolated rat peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ranadive, N.S.; Shirwadkar, S.; Persad, S.; Menon, I.A.

    1986-03-01

    Pheomelanin from human red hair (RHM) produces considerably more cellular damage in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells when subjected to radiations of wavelength 320-700 nm than eumelanin from black hair (BHM). Irradiation of RHM generated large amounts of superoxide while BHM did not produce detectable amounts of superoxide. The present investigations describe the effects of irradiation of mast cells in the presence of various natural and synthetic melanins. Irradiation of mast cells in the presence of RHM and red hair melanoprotein released large amounts of histamine while BHM and synthetic melanins prepared from dopa, cysteinyldopa, or a mixture of dopa and cysteinyldopa did not release histamine. The release of histamine at lower concentrations of RHM was not accompanied by the release of /sup 51/Cr from chromium-loaded cells, suggesting that this release was of noncytotoxic nature. On the other hand, the release of histamine at higher concentrations of RHM was due to cell lysis since both histamine and cytoplasmic marker /sup 51/Cr were released to the same extent. The release evoked by large concentration RHM was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase or catalase. This suggests that the cell lysis under these conditions was not due to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ or O-2. The finding that mast cells release histamine when irradiated in the presence of RHM suggests that the immediate and late-phase reactions seen in sunburn may in part be due to the release of mediators from these cells.

  14. Polymeric optical fiber tweezers as a tool for single cell micro manipulation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Soppera, O.; Guerreiro, A.; Jorge, P. A...

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new type of polymeric fiber optic tweezers for single cell manipulation is reported. The optical trapping of a yeast cell using a polymeric micro lens fabricated by guided photo polymerization at the fiber tip is demonstrated. The 2D trapping of the yeast cells is analyzed and maximum optical forces on the pN range are calculated. The experimental results are supported by computational simulations using a FDTD method. Moreover, new insights on the potential for simultaneous sensing and optical trapping, are presented.

  15. Mobile magnetic traps for manipulation of magnetically labeled and unlabeled cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henighan, Thomas; Chen, Aaron; Vieira, Greg; Hauser, Adam; Yang, Fengyuan; Chalmers, Jeffrey; Sooryakumar, Ratnasingham

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic forces are frequently used for the manipulation of biological cells because magnetic fields are typically easier to use and have fewer effects on the cells than optical or electrical fields. While magnetic forces are typically used for bulk separation, it is considerably harder to magnetically manipulate a single cell, or a small number of cells. In this study we employ reprogrammable magnetization profiles created through lithographically patterned ferromagnetic disks as a template for producing highly localized trapping fields. The resulting magnetic field gradients can be modulated by an external magnetic field enabling directed forces to be applied on, (a) single, or a small number of immunomagnetically labeled biological cells and, (b) magnetic microspheres that act as magnetically actuated force transmitting probes to navigate fluid-borne unlabeled cells with micrometer precision. We demonstrate the mobile traps by remotely transporting and arranging, with programmed routines (a la joystick), T-lymphocyte and leukemia cells on the platform. Without producing damage, the forces transport the cells with speeds up to 20 microns/sec across a silicon platform to predetermined sites.

  16. Methods for human embryonic stem cells derived cardiomyocytes cultivation, genetic manipulation, and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arbel, Gil; Caspi, Oren; Huber, Irit; Gepstein, Amira; Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Gepstein, Lior

    2010-01-01

    A decade has passed since the initial derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). The ensuing years have witnessed a significant progress in the development of methodologies allowing cell cultivation, differentiation, genetic manipulation, and in vivo transplantation. Specifically, the potential to derive human cardiomyocytes from the hESC lines, which can be used for several basic and applied cardiovascular research areas including in the emerging field of cardiac regenerative medicine, attracted significant attention from the scientific community. This resulted in the development of protocols for the cultivation of hESC and their successful differentiation toward the cardiomyocyte lineage fate. In this chapter, we will describe in detail methods related to the cultivation, genetic manipulation, selection, and in vivo transplantation of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes.

  17. Specification for movable manipulator system for use in radiochemical engineering cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dixson, G.E.

    1998-07-13

    This specification was prepared to identify requirements for a movable manipulator for use in B-Ccl 1 and the REC Airlock at 324 Building. This manipulator could also be used in other hot cells at the 324 Building. This work involves retrieval, inspection, reduction and decontamination of material on the Airlock and Cell floors, in the pipe trench and on the walls. B and W Hanford Company (BWHC) recognizes that not all of the requirements are compatible and some may need to be changed, subject to agreement between the parties involved. BWHC also recognizes that in order to perform the tasks described two or more different machines with significantly different layout may be necessary. These requirements are the starting point for any proposal.

  18. Investigation of Biophysical Mechanisms in Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Manipulation of Cells Using a Multimodal Holographic and Fluorescence Imaging Setup

    PubMed Central

    Rakoski, Mirko S.; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy. PMID:25909631

  19. Investigation of biophysical mechanisms in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation of cells using a multimodal holographic and fluorescence imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Kalies, Stefan; Antonopoulos, Georgios C; Rakoski, Mirko S; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Laser based cell manipulation has proven to be a versatile tool in biomedical applications. In this context, combining weakly focused laser pulses and nanostructures, e.g. gold nanoparticles, promises to be useful for high throughput cell manipulation, such as transfection and photothermal therapy. Interactions between laser pulses and gold nanoparticles are well understood. However, it is still necessary to study cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation. While parameters like cell viability or perforation efficiency are commonly addressed, the influence of the manipulation process on other essential cell parameters is not sufficiently investigated yet. Thus, we set out to study four relevant cell properties: cell volume and area, ion exchange and cytoskeleton structure after gold nanoparticle based laser manipulation. For this, we designed a multimodal imaging and manipulation setup. 200 nm gold nanoparticles were attached unspecifically to canine cells and irradiated by weakly focused 850 ps laser pulses. Volume and area change in the first minute post laser manipulation was monitored using digital holography. Calcium imaging and cells expressing a marker for filamentous actin (F-actin) served to analyze the ion exchange and the cytoskeleton, respectively. High radiant exposures led to cells exhibiting a tendency to shrink in volume and area, possibly due to outflow of cytoplasm. An intracellular raise in calcium was observed and accompanied by an intercellular calcium wave. This multimodal approach enabled for the first time a comprehensive analysis of the cell behavior in gold nanoparticle mediated cell manipulation. Additionally, this work can pave the way for a better understanding and the evaluation of new applications in the context of cell transfection or photothermal therapy.

  20. Kinetic of magnetic nanoparticles uptake evaluated by morphometry of mice peritoneal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, L. P.; Kuckelhaus, S.; Guedes, M. H. A.; Lacava, Z. G. M.; Tedesco, A. C.; Morais, P. C.; Azevedo, R. B.

    2005-03-01

    The development of magnetic fluids (MFs) has led to a wide range of new biomedical applications. Nevertheless, few studies have examined the kinetics of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) internalization by phagocytes. In this study, we present morphometry as a method to quantify the cell surface covered by MNPs. The maximum cell surface covered by MNPs aggregates was 32.5% (8.5 min), 18.3% (24.1 min), and 18.0% (20.2 min) in DMSA, citric acid and dextran-coated MNPs, respectively. We concluded that the phagocytosis process of MNPs is strongly dependent upon the coating species.

  1. Effects of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) on Ca2+ concentration and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukugasako, Sanae; Ito, Shinichi; Ikemoto, Yoshimi

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) action in allergic reactions were investigated by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). In the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, methyl paraben (0.1–10 mM) increased [Ca2+]i, in a concentration-dependent manner. Under both the conditions, methyl paraben alone did not evoke histamine release. In RPMCs pretreated with a protein kinase C (PKC) activator (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) 3 and 10 nM), methyl paraben (0.3–3 mM) induced histamine release. However, a high concentration (10 mM) of the agent did not increase the histamine release. U73122 (0.1 and 0.5 μM), an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), significantly inhibited the methyl paraben-induced histamine release in PMA-pretreated RPMCs. U73343 (0.5 μM), an inactive analogue of U73122, did not inhibit the histamine release caused by methyl paraben. In Ca2+-free solution, PLC inhibitors (U73122 0.1 and 0.5 μM, D609 1–10 μM) inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas U73343 (0.5 μM) did not. Xestospongin C (2–20 μM) and 2 aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (30 and 100 μM), blockers of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in Ca2+-free solution. In conclusion, methyl paraben causes an increase in [Ca2+]i, which may be due to release of Ca2+ from storage sites by IP3 via activation of PLC in RPMCs. In addition, methyl paraben possibly has some inhibitory effects on histamine release via unknown mechanisms. PMID:12770943

  2. Extracellular mass/body cell mass ratio is an independent predictor of survival in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Avram, Morrell M; Fein, Paul A; Borawski, Cezary; Chattopadhyay, Jyotiprakas; Matza, Betty

    2010-08-01

    Malnutrition is a strong predictor of mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Extracellular mass (ECM) contains all the metabolically inactive, whereas body cell mass (BCM) contains all the metabolically active, tissues of the body. ECM/BCM ratio is a highly sensitive index of malnutrition. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between ECM/BCM ratio and survival in PD patients. We enrolled 62 patients from November 2000 to July 2008. On enrollment, demographic, clinical, and biochemical data were recorded. Bioimpedance analysis (BIA) was used to determine ECM and BCM in PD patients. Patients were followed up to November 2008. Mean age was 54+/-16 (s.d.) years; female, 55%; African Americans, 65%; diabetic, 24%. Mean ECM/BCM ratio was 1.206+/-0.197 (range: 0.73-1.62). Diabetics had higher ECM/BCM ratio than nondiabetics (1.29 vs 1.18, P=0.04). ECM/BCM ratio correlated directly with age (r=0.38, P=0.002) and inversely with serum albumin (r=-0.43, P=0.001), creatinine (-0.24, P=0.08), blood urea nitrogen (r=-0.26, P=0.06), and total protein (r=-0.31, P=0.026). Using multivariate Cox regression analysis, adjusting for age, race, gender, diabetes, and human immunodeficiency virus status, enrollment ECM/BCM ratio was a significant independent predictor of mortality (relative risk=1.035, P=0.018). For every 10% increase in the ECM/BCM ratio, the relative risk of death was increased by about 35%. In conclusion, BIA-derived enrollment ECM/BCM ratio, a marker of malnutrition, was an independent predictor of long-term survival in PD patients.

  3. MicroRNA manipulation in colorectal cancer cells: from laboratory to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Muhammad Imran; Patel, Maleene; Singh, Baljit; Jameson, John Stuart; Pringle, James Howard

    2012-06-20

    The development of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) follows a sequential progression from adenoma to the carcinoma. Therefore, opportunities exist to interfere with the natural course of disease development and progression. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer cells indirectly results in higher levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) specific to tumour promoter genes or tumour suppressor genes. This narrative review aims to provide a comprehensive review of the literature about the manipulation of oncogenic or tumour suppressor miRNAs in colorectal cancer cells for the purpose of development of anticancer therapies. A literature search identified studies describing manipulation of miRNAs in colorectal cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. Studies were also included to provide an update on the role of miRNAs in CRC development, progression and diagnosis. Strategy based on restoration of silenced miRNAs or inhibition of over expressed miRNAs has opened a new area of research in cancer therapy. In this review article different techniques for miRNA manipulation are reviewed and their utility for colorectal cancer therapy has been discussed in detail. Restoration of normal equilibrium for cancer related miRNAs can result in inhibition of tumour growth, apoptosis, blocking of invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Furthermore, drug resistant cancer cells can be turned into drug sensitive cells on alteration of specific miRNAs in cancer cells. MiRNA modulation in cancer cells holds great potential to replace current anticancer therapies. However, further work is needed on tissue specific delivery systems and strategies to avoid side effects.

  4. Pentraxin 3 as a new biomarker of peritoneal injury in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Reo; Hamada, Chieko; Kaneko, Kayo; Nakano, Takanori; Wakabayashi, Keiichi; Io, Hiroaki; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-03-01

    It is well known that bioincompatible peritoneal dialysate plays a central role in the development of peritoneal fibrosis. Peritoneal inflammation continues even after the cessation of peritoneal dialysate stimulation. It is important to establish the definition of persistent inflammation in the peritoneal cavity at the cessation of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The objective of the present study was to determine whether pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in peritoneal effluent (PE) may be a new biomarker in PD patients. Serum, PE, and peritoneal specimens were obtained from 50 patients with end-stage kidney disease at Juntendo University Hospital. Samples of 19 patients were obtained at the initiation of PD and those of 31 patients at the cessation of PD. PTX3, high-sensitivity CRP, and MMP-2 and IL-6 were analyzed. An immunohistological examination using an anti-PTX3 antibody was performed. Expressions of PTX3 were observed in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesothelial cells in the peritoneum. The PTX3 level in PE at the cessation of PD was significantly higher than that at the initiation of PD. Effluent PTX3 levels in patients with a history of peritonitis or a PD duration of more than 8 years were significantly higher than those in patients without peritonitis or patients with a PD duration of <8 years. The PTX3 level was significantly correlated with MMP-2 and IL-6 levels in PE, as well as the thickness of the submesothelial compact zone and the vasculopathy. It appears that PTX3 may be a new biomarker of peritoneal inflammation and progressive fibrosis.

  5. Live-cell analysis of plant reproduction: live-cell imaging, optical manipulation, and advanced microscopy technologies.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Daisuke; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2013-05-01

    Sexual reproduction ensures propagation of species and enhances genetic diversity within populations. In flowering plants, sexual reproduction requires complicated and multi-step cell-to-cell communications among male and female cells. However, the confined nature of plant reproduction processes, which occur in the female reproductive organs and several cell layers of the pistil, limits our ability to observe these events in vivo. In this review, we discuss recent live-cell imaging in in vitro systems and the optical manipulation techniques that are used to capture the dynamic mechanisms representing molecular and cellular communications in sexual plant reproduction.

  6. Femtosecond optical transfection as a tool for genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mapa, M. L.; Gardner, J.; Bradburn, H.; King, J.; Dholakia, K.; Gunn-Moore, F.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate the use of femtosecond optical transfection for the genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells. Using a system with an SLM combined with a scanning mirror allows poration of both single-cell and colony-formed human embryonic stem cells in a rapid and targeted manner. In this work, we show successful transfection of plasmid DNA tagged with fluorescent reporters into human embryonic stem cells using three doses of focused femtosecond laser. A significant number of transfected cells retained their undifferentiated morphological feature of large nucleus with high nucleus to cytoplasmic ratio, 48h after photoporation. Furthermore, DNA constructs driven by different types of promoters were also successfully transfected into human embryonic stem cells using this technique.

  7. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-02-09

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving "acoustic tweezers" in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner.

  8. Detection, manipulation and post processing of circulating tumor cells using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiaridoost, Somayyeh; Habibiyan, Hamidreza; Ghafoorifard, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are malignant cells that are derived from a solid tumor in the metastasis stage and are shed into the blood stream. These cells hold great promise to be used as liquid biopsy that is less aggressive than traditional biopsy. Recently, detection and enumeration of these cells has received ever-increasing attention from researchers as a way of early detection of cancer metastasis, determining the effectiveness of treatment and studying the mechanism of formation of secondary tumors. CTCs are found in blood at low concentration, which is a major limitation of isolation and detection of these cells. Over the last few years, multifarious research studies have been conducted on accurate isolation and detection and post processing of CTCs. Among all the proposed systems, microfluidic systems seem to be more attractive for researchers due to their numerous advantages. On the other hand, recent developments in optical methods have made the possibility of cellular studies at single-cell level. Thus, accuracy and efficiency of separation, detection and manipulation of CTCs can be improved using optical techniques. In this review, we describe optical methods that have been used for CTC detection, manipulation and post processing.

  9. Three-dimensional manipulation of single cells using surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Xie, Zhiwei; Lata, James P.; Li, Peng; Ren, Liqiang; Liu, Jiayang; Yang, Jian; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-01-01

    The ability of surface acoustic waves to trap and manipulate micrometer-scale particles and biological cells has led to many applications involving “acoustic tweezers” in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Here, we present 3D acoustic tweezers, which use surface acoustic waves to create 3D trapping nodes for the capture and manipulation of microparticles and cells along three mutually orthogonal axes. In this method, we use standing-wave phase shifts to move particles or cells in-plane, whereas the amplitude of acoustic vibrations is used to control particle motion along an orthogonal plane. We demonstrate, through controlled experiments guided by simulations, how acoustic vibrations result in micromanipulations in a microfluidic chamber by invoking physical principles that underlie the formation and regulation of complex, volumetric trapping nodes of particles and biological cells. We further show how 3D acoustic tweezers can be used to pick up, translate, and print single cells and cell assemblies to create 2D and 3D structures in a precise, noninvasive, label-free, and contact-free manner. PMID:26811444

  10. Detection of disseminated peritoneal tumors by fluorescein diacrylate in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Yoshinori; Furuta, Hirokazu; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Dai, Ping; Fujikawa, Yuta; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Morishita, Koki; Hasegawa, Akira; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2009-02-01

    Tumor invasion to the peritoneum is a poor prognostic factor in cancer patients. Accurate diagnosis of disseminated peritoneal tumors is essential to accurate cancer staging. To date, peritoneal washing cytology during laparotomy has been used for diagnosis of peritoneal dissemination of gastrointestinal cancer, but its sensitivity has not been satisfactory. Thus, a more direct approach is indispensable to detect peritoneal dissemination in vivo. Fluorescein diacrylate (FDAcr) is an esterase-sensitive fluorescent probe derived from fluorescein. In cancer cells, fluorescent fluorescein generated by exogenous application of FDAcr selectively deposits owing to its stronger hydrolytic enzyme activity and its lower leakage rate. We examined whether FDAcr can specifically detect disseminated peritoneal tumors in athymic nude mouse models. Intraperitoneally administered FDAcr revealed disseminated peritoneal microscopic tumors not readily recognized on white-light imaging. These results suggest that FDAcr is a useful probe for detecting disseminated peritoneal tumors.

  11. Tuberculous peritonitis in a case receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Garip; Kiraz, Nuri; Sahin, Ilknur; Soydan, Mehmet; Akgün, Yurdanur

    2004-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis continues to be an important health problem in the world. Besides pulmonary involvement extrapulmonary involvement becomes an affair in developing countries, even in developed countries. Case presentation A thirty-six year old male patient was admitted with abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and fever which had started one week before. The patient had been followed up with predialisis Chronic Renal Failure(CRF) diagnosis for 4 years and receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment for 4 months. In peritoneal fluid, 1600/mm3 cells were detected and 70% of them were polymorphonuclear leukocytosis. The patient begun nonspesific antibiotherapy but no benefit was obtained after 12 days and peritoneal fluid bacterial cultures remained negative. Peritoneal smear was positive for Asid-fast basilli (AFB), and antituberculosis therapy was started with isoniazid, rifampicine, ethambutol and pyrazinamide. After 15 days his peritoneal fluid cell count was decreased and his symptoms were relieved. Peritoneal fluid tuberculosis culture was found positive. Conclusion Considering this case, we think that in patients with CAPD catheter and peritonitis; when peritoneal fluid leukocytes are high and PMNL are dominant, AFB and tuberculosis culture must be investigated besides bacterial culture routinely. PMID:15461815

  12. Manipulation of a Single Circulating Tumor Cell Using Visualization of Hydrogel Encapsulation toward Single-Cell Whole-Genome Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Seita; Negishi, Ryo; Hosokawa, Masahito; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2016-07-19

    Genetic characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could guide the choice of therapies for individual patients and also facilitate the development of new drugs. We previously developed a CTC recovery system using a microcavity array, which demonstrated highly efficient CTC recovery based on differences in cell size and deformability. However, the CTC recovery system lacked an efficient cell manipulation tool suitable for subsequent genetic analysis. Here, we resolve this issue and present a simple and rapid manipulation method for single CTCs using a photopolymerized hydrogel, polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA), which is useful for subsequent genetic analysis. First, PEGDA was introduced into the cells entrapped on the microcavity array. Then, excitation light was projected onto the target single cells for encapsulation of each CTC by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. The encapsulated single CTCs could be visualized by the naked eye and easily handled with tweezers. The single CTCs were only partially encapsulated on the PEGDA hydrogel, which allowed for sufficient whole-genome amplification and accurate genotyping. Our proposed methodology is a valuable tool for the rapid and simple manipulation of single CTCs and is expected to become widely utilized for analyses of mammalian cells and microorganisms in addition to CTCs.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DOSE RATES DURING REPLACEMENT OF MANIPULATORS IN THE FFTF INTERIM EXAMINATION & MAINTENANCE (IEM) CELL

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, J.V.

    2002-01-23

    Replacement of a master-slave manipulator in the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility was carried out in August 2001. This operation created a 178-mm opening in the thick concrete wall of the hot cell. To aid in radiological work planning, dose rates outside the penetration in the wall were predicted using MCNP{trademark} photon transport calculations. The predicted dose rate was 7.7 mrem/h, which was reasonably close to the value of 10.4 mrem/h inferred from measurements.

  14. A20 overexpression inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation, TRAF6 and CD40 expression in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xun-Liang; Pei, De-An; Yan, Ju-Zhen; Xu, Gang; Wu, Ping

    2014-04-17

    Zinc finger protein A20 is a key negative regulator of inflammation. However, whether A20 may affect inflammation during peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis is still unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of A20 overexpression on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells (RPMCs). Isolated and cultured RPMCs in vitro. Plasmid pGEM-T easy-A20 was transfected into RPMCs by Lipofectamine™2000. The protein expression of A20, phospho-IκBα, IκBα, TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 6 and CD40 were analyzed by Western blot. The mRNA expression of TRAF6, CD40, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by real time-PCR. NF-κB p65 DNA binding activity, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in cells culture supernatant were determined by ELISA. Our results revealed that RPMCs overexpression of A20 lead to significant decrease of LPS-induced IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB DNA binding activity (all p<0.01). In addition, A20 also attenuated the expression of TRAF6, CD40, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in cells culture supernatant (all p<0.05). However, A20 only partly inhibited CD40 expression. Our study indicated that A20 overexpression may depress the inflammatory response induced by LPS in cultured RPMCs through negatively regulated the relevant function of adaptors in LPS signaling pathway.

  15. Manipulating mammalian cell by phase transformed titanium surface fabricated through ultra-short pulsed laser synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chinnakkannu Vijayakumar, Sivaprasad; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Developing cell sensitive indicators on interacting substrates that allows specific cell manipulation by a combination of physical, chemical or mechanical cues is a challenge for current biomaterials. Hence, various fabrication approaches have been created on a variety of substrates to mimic or create cell specific cues. However, to achieve cell specific cues a multistep process or a post-chemical treatment is often necessitated. So, a simple approach without any chemical or biological treatment would go a long way in developing bio-functionalized substrates to effectively modulate cell adhesion and interaction. The present investigation is aimed to study the manipulative activity induced by phase transformed titanium surface. An ultra-short laser is used to fabricate the phase transformed titanium surface where a polymorphic titanium oxide phases with titanium monoxide (TiO), tri-titanium oxide (Ti3O) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) have been synthesized on commercially pure titanium. Control over oxide phase transformed area was demonstrated via a combination of laser scanning time (laser pulse interaction time) and laser pulse widths (laser pulse to pulse separation time). The interaction of phase transformed titanium surface with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells developed a new bio-functionalized platforms on titanium based biomaterials to modulate cell migration and adhesion. The synthesized phase transformed titanium surface on the whole appeared to induce directional cues for cell migration with unique preferential cell adhesion unseen by other fabrication approaches. The precise bio-functionalization controllability exhibited during fabrication offers perceptible edge for developing a variety of smart bio-medical devices, implants and cardiovascular stents where the need in supressing specific cell adhesion and proliferation is of great demand.

  16. Activation of p38 MAPK by feline infectious peritonitis virus regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production in primary blood-derived feline mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Regan, Andrew D; Cohen, Rebecca D; Whittaker, Gary R

    2009-02-05

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is an invariably fatal disease of cats caused by systemic infection with a feline coronavirus (FCoV) termed feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). The lethal pathology associated with FIP (granulomatous inflammation and T-cell lymphopenia) is thought to be mediated by aberrant modulation of the immune system due to infection of cells such as monocytes and macrophages. Overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines occurs in cats with FIP, and has been suggested to play a significant role in the disease process. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unknown. Here we show that infection of primary blood-derived feline mononuclear cells by FIPV WSU 79-1146 and FIPV-DF2 leads to rapid activation of the p38 MAPK pathway and that this activation regulates production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta). FIPV-induced p38 MAPK activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production was inhibited by the pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors SB 203580 and SC 409 in a dose-dependent manner. FIPV-induced p38 MAPK activation was observed in primary feline blood-derived mononuclear cells individually purified from multiple SPF cats, as was the inhibition of TNF-alpha production by pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors.

  17. Optical manipulation of a single human virus for study of viral-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ximiao; DeSantis, Michael C; Tian, Chunjuan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Although Ashkin and Dziedzic first demonstrated optical trapping of individual tobacco mosaic viruses in suspension as early as 1987, this pioneering work has not been followed up only until recently. Using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a model virus, we have recently demonstrated that a single HIV-1 virion can be stabled trapped, manipulated and measured in physiological media with high precision. The capability to optically trap a single virion in suspension not only allows us to determine, for the first time, the refractive index of a single virus with high precision, but also quantitate the heterogeneity among individual virions with single-molecule resolution, the results of which shed light on the molecular mechanisms of virion infectivity. Here we report the further development of a set of microscopic techniques to physically deliver a single HIV-1 virion to a single host cell in solution. Combined with simultaneous epifluorescence imaging, the attachment and dissociation events of individual manipulated virions on host cell surface can be measured and the results help us understand the role of diffusion in mediating viral attachment to host cells. The establishment of these techniques opens up new ways for investigation of a wide range of virion-cell interactions, and should be applicable for study of B cell interactions with particulate antigens such as viruses.

  18. Optical manipulation of a single human virus for study of viral-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ximiao; DeSantis, Michael C.; Tian, Chunjuan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although Ashkin and Dziedzic first demonstrated optical trapping of individual tobacco mosaic viruses in suspension as early as 1987, this pioneering work has not been followed up only until recently. Using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a model virus, we have recently demonstrated that a single HIV-1 virion can be stabled trapped, manipulated and measured in physiological media with high precision. The capability to optically trap a single virion in suspension not only allows us to determine, for the first time, the refractive index of a single virus with high precision, but also quantitate the heterogeneity among individual virions with single-molecule resolution, the results of which shed light on the molecular mechanisms of virion infectivity. Here we report the further development of a set of microscopic techniques to physically deliver a single HIV-1 virion to a single host cell in solution. Combined with simultaneous epifluorescence imaging, the attachment and dissociation events of individual manipulated virions on host cell surface can be measured and the results help us understand the role of diffusion in mediating viral attachment to host cells. The establishment of these techniques opens up new ways for investigation of a wide range of virion-cell interactions, and should be applicable for study of B cell interactions with particulate antigens such as viruses. PMID:27746582

  19. Optical manipulation of a single human virus for study of viral-cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ximiao; DeSantis, Michael C.; Tian, Chunjuan; Cheng, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Although Ashkin and Dziedzic first demonstrated optical trapping of individual tobacco mosaic viruses in suspension as early as 1987, this pioneering work has not been followed up only until recently. Using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as a model virus, we have recently demonstrated that a single HIV-1 virion can be stabled trapped, manipulated and measured in physiological media with high precision. The capability to optically trap a single virion in suspension not only allows us to determine, for the first time, the refractive index of a single virus with high precision, but also quantitate the heterogeneity among individual virions with single-molecule resolution, the results of which shed light on the molecular mechanisms of virion infectivity. Here we report the further development of a set of microscopic techniques to physically deliver a single HIV-1 virion to a single host cell in solution. Combined with simultaneous epifluorescence imaging, the attachment and dissociation events of individual manipulated virions on host cell surface can be measured and the results help us understand the role of diffusion in mediating viral attachment to host cells. The establishment of these techniques opens up new ways for investigation of a wide range of virion-cell interactions, and should be applicable for study of B cell interactions with particulate antigens such as viruses.

  20. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  1. Peritoneal Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests for viruses, mycobacteria ( AFB testing in identifying tuberculosis ), and parasites Adenosine deaminase – rarely ordered for detecting tuberculosis in peritoneal fluid ^ Back to top When is ...

  2. Effect of Prolyl-Glycyl-Proline (PGP) and Its Acetylated Form (N-AcPGP) on Calcium Level in the Cytoplasm of Rat Peritoneal Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, N S; Kurenkova, A D; Nikishin, D A; Umarova, B A

    2016-08-01

    Tripeptide glycyl-prolyl-proline (PGP), a regulatory peptide of the glyproline family, possesses a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect primarily due to its ability to prevent secretion of the proinflammatory mediator histamine by rat peritoneal mast cells. Activation of mast cell with synacthen (ACTH1-24) and substance 48/80 leads to an increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Pretreatment of mast cells with PGP prevented calcium entry into the cytoplasm from both intercellular space and intracellular stores. Acetylated peptide (N-AcPGP) produced a similar effect on histamine release and intracellular calcium content in mast cells activated with synacthen. These findings indicate that both forms of the peptide can stabilize mast cells and prevent intracellular calcium increase.

  3. Turning Diamagnetic Microbes into Multinary Micro-Magnets: Magnetophoresis and Spatio-Temporal Manipulation of Individual Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hojae; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Ji Yup; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Choi, Insung S.

    2016-12-01

    Inspired by the biogenic magnetism found in certain organisms, such as magnetotactic bacteria, magnetic nanomaterials have been integrated into living cells for bioorthogonal, magnetic manipulation of the cells. However, magnetized cells have so far been reported to be only binary system (on/off) without any control of magnetization degree, limiting their applications typically to the simple accumulation or separation of cells as a whole. In this work, the magnetization degree is tightly controlled, leading to the generation of multiple subgroups of the magnetized cells, and each subgroup is manipulated independently from the other subgroups in the pool of heterogeneous cell-mixtures. This work will provide a strategic approach to tailor-made fabrication of magnetically functionalized living cells as micro-magnets, and open new vistas in biotechnological and biomedical applications, which highly demand the spatio-temporal manipulation of living cells.

  4. Turning Diamagnetic Microbes into Multinary Micro-Magnets: Magnetophoresis and Spatio-Temporal Manipulation of Individual Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojae; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Ji Yup; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.; Choi, Insung S.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the biogenic magnetism found in certain organisms, such as magnetotactic bacteria, magnetic nanomaterials have been integrated into living cells for bioorthogonal, magnetic manipulation of the cells. However, magnetized cells have so far been reported to be only binary system (on/off) without any control of magnetization degree, limiting their applications typically to the simple accumulation or separation of cells as a whole. In this work, the magnetization degree is tightly controlled, leading to the generation of multiple subgroups of the magnetized cells, and each subgroup is manipulated independently from the other subgroups in the pool of heterogeneous cell-mixtures. This work will provide a strategic approach to tailor-made fabrication of magnetically functionalized living cells as micro-magnets, and open new vistas in biotechnological and biomedical applications, which highly demand the spatio-temporal manipulation of living cells. PMID:27917922

  5. Turning Diamagnetic Microbes into Multinary Micro-Magnets: Magnetophoresis and Spatio-Temporal Manipulation of Individual Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hojae; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Kim, Ji Yup; Park, Ji Hun; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Choi, Insung S

    2016-12-05

    Inspired by the biogenic magnetism found in certain organisms, such as magnetotactic bacteria, magnetic nanomaterials have been integrated into living cells for bioorthogonal, magnetic manipulation of the cells. However, magnetized cells have so far been reported to be only binary system (on/off) without any control of magnetization degree, limiting their applications typically to the simple accumulation or separation of cells as a whole. In this work, the magnetization degree is tightly controlled, leading to the generation of multiple subgroups of the magnetized cells, and each subgroup is manipulated independently from the other subgroups in the pool of heterogeneous cell-mixtures. This work will provide a strategic approach to tailor-made fabrication of magnetically functionalized living cells as micro-magnets, and open new vistas in biotechnological and biomedical applications, which highly demand the spatio-temporal manipulation of living cells.

  6. Ascitic fluid drainage using a peritoneal dialysis catheter to prevent and treat multi-organ dysfunction in veno-occlusive disease in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Vijal; Lewis, Malcolm; Shenoy, Mohan; Bonney, Denise; Wynn, Robert

    2017-02-28

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD), or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, is a well-recognised, serious complication associated with the chemotherapy conditioning therapy used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fluid management is typically challenging in children with this condition. We describe effective early use of peritoneal dialysis catheters to drain extravascular, intra-abdominal fluid in children with VOD, allowing intravascular fluid administration to preserve renal perfusion and function, preventing multi-organ dysfunction. All but one of the children are long-term survivors, both of their significant VOD and their HSCT. The child that did not survive died from their underlying metabolic illness, not VOD.

  7. Can manipulation of differentiation conditions eliminate proliferative cells from a population of ES cell-derived forebrain cells?

    PubMed Central

    Precious, Sophie V.; Kelly, Claire M.; Allen, Nicholas D.; Rosser, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is preliminary evidence that implantation of primary fetal striatal cells provides functional benefit in patients with Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative condition resulting in loss of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN) of the striatum. Scarcity of primary fetal tissue means it is important to identify a renewable source of cells from which to derive donor MSNs. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which predominantly default to telencephalic-like precursors in chemically defined medium (CDM), offer a potentially inexhaustible supply of cells capable of generating the desired neurons. Using an ES cell line, with the forebrain marker FoxG1 tagged to the LacZ reporter, we assessed effects of known developmental factors on the yield of forebrain-like precursor cells in CDM suspension culture. Addition of FGF2, but not DKK1, increased the proportion of FoxG1-expressing cells at day 8 of neural induction. Oct4 was expressed at day 8, but was undetectable by day 16. Differentiation of day 16 precursors generated GABA-expressing neurons, with few DARPP32 positive MSNs. Transplantation of day 8 precursor cells into quinolinic acid-lesioned striata resulted in generation of teratomas. However, transplantation of day 16 precursors yielded grafts expressing neuronal markers including NeuN, calbindin and parvalbumin, but no DARPP32 6 weeks post-transplantation. Manipulation of fate of ES cells requires optimization of both concentration and timing of addition of factors to culture systems to generate the desired phenotypes. Furthermore, we highlight the value of increasing the precursor phase of ES cell suspension culture when directing differentiation toward forebrain fate, so as to dramatically reduce the risk of teratoma formation. PMID:27606335

  8. Dielectrophoretic lab-on-CMOS platform for trapping and manipulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungchul; Kabiri, Shideh; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of cells are essential operations in numerous studies in biology and life sciences. We discuss the realization of a Lab-on-a-Chip platform for dielectrophoretic trapping and repositioning of cells and microorganisms on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, which we define here as Lab-on-CMOS (LoC). The LoC platform is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) which is the force experienced by any dielectric particle including biological entities in non-uniform AC electrical field. DEP force depends on the permittivity of the cells, its size and shape and also on the permittivity of the medium and therefore it enables selective targeting of cells based on their phenotype. In this paper, we address an important matter that of electrode design for DEP for which we propose a three-dimensional (3D) octapole geometry to create highly confined electric fields for trapping and manipulation of cells. Conventional DEP-based platforms are implemented stand-alone on glass, silicon or polymers connected to external infrastructure for electronics and optics, making it bulky and expensive. In this paper, the use of CMOS as a platform provides a pathway to truly miniaturized lab-on-CMOS or LoC platform, where DEP electrodes are designed using built-in multiple metal layers of the CMOS process for effective trapping of cells, with built-in electronics for in-situ impedance monitoring of the cell position. We present electromagnetic simulation results of DEP force for this unique 3D octapole geometry on CMOS. Experimental results with yeast cells validate the design. These preliminary results indicate the promise of using CMOS technology for truly compact miniaturized lab-on-chip platform for cell biotechnology applications.

  9. 3D Nanochannel Array Platform for High-throughput Cell Manipulation and Nano-electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lingqian

    Electroporation is one of the most common non-viral methods for gene delivery. Recent progress in gene therapy has offered special opportunities to electroporation for in vitro and in vivo applications. However, conventional bulk electroporation (BEP) inevitably causes serious cell damage and stochastic transfection between cells. Microfluidic electroporation (MEP) has been claimed to provide benign single cell transfection for the last decade. Nevertheless, the intracellular transport in both MEP and BEP systems is highly diffusion-dominant, which prevents precise dose control and high uniformity. In this Ph.D. research, we developed a 3D nanochannel-electroporation (3D NEP) platform for mass cell transfection. A silicon-based nanochannel array (3D NEP) chip was designed and fabricated for cell manipulation and electroporation. The chip, designed as Z-directional microchannel - nanochannel array, was fabricated by clean room techniques including projection photolithography and deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE). The fabricated 3D NEP chip is capable of handling 40,000 cells per 1 cm2, up to 1 million per wafer (100 mm diameter). High-throughput cell manipulation technologies were investigated for precise alignment of individual cells to the nanochannel array, a key step for NEP to achieve dose control. We developed three techniques for cell trapping in this work. (1) Magnetic tweezers (MTs) were integrated on the chip to remotely control cells under a programmed magnetic field. (2) A positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) power system was built as an alternative to trap cells onto the nanochannel array using DEP force. (3) A novel yet simple 'dipping-trap' method was used to rapidly trap cells onto a nanochannel array, aligned by a micro-cap array pattern on the 3D NEP chip, which eventually offered 70 - 90 % trapping efficiency and 90 % specificity. 3D NEP platforms were assembled for cell transfection based on the Si-based nanochannel array chip and cell manipulation

  10. The stem of sinomenium acutum inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, H M; Moon, P D; Chae, H J; Kim, H R; Chung, J G; Kim, J J; Lee, E J

    2000-05-01

    The aqueous extract of Sinomenium acutum stem (SSAE) (0.1-1000 mg/kg) dose-dependently inhibited systemic anaphylactic reaction induced by compound 48/80 in mice. In particular, SSAE reduced compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic reaction with 50% at the dose of 1000 mg/kg. SSAE (100-1000 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited local anaphylactic reaction activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE. When mice were pretreated with SSAE at a concentration ranging from 0.1 to 1000 mg/kg, the plasma histamine levels were reduced in a dose-dependent manner. SSAE (1-1000 microg/ml) dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from the rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. In addition, SSAE (0.1 microg/ml) had a significant inhibitory effect on anti-DNP IgE-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. These results indicate that SSAE inhibits mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reactions and TNF-alpha production from mast cells.

  11. Manipulating Neuronal Circuits with Endogenous and Recombinant Cell-Surface Tethered Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Holford, Mandë; Auer, Sebastian; Laqua, Martin; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal circuits depend on the precise regulation of cell-surface receptors and ion channels. An ongoing challenge in neuroscience research is deciphering the functional contribution of specific receptors and ion channels using engineered modulators. A novel strategy, termed “tethered toxins”, was recently developed to characterize neuronal circuits using the evolutionary derived selectivity of venom peptide toxins and endogenous peptide ligands, such as lynx1 prototoxins. Herein, the discovery and engineering of cell-surface tethered peptides is reviewed, with particular attention given to their cell-autonomy, modular composition, and genetic targeting in different model organisms. The relative ease with which tethered peptides can be engineered, coupled with the increasing number of neuroactive venom toxins and ligand peptides being discovered, imply a multitude of potentially innovative applications for manipulating neuronal circuits and tissue-specific cell networks, including treatment of disorders caused by malfunction of receptors and ion channels. PMID:19915728

  12. A Mammalian enhancer trap resource for discovering and manipulating neuronal cell types

    PubMed Central

    Shima, Yasuyuki; Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris Martin; Shima, Masami; Taneja, Praveen; Bullis, James B; Mehta, Sonam; Lois, Carlos; Nelson, Sacha B

    2016-01-01

    There is a continuing need for driver strains to enable cell-type-specific manipulation in the nervous system. Each cell type expresses a unique set of genes, and recapitulating expression of marker genes by BAC transgenesis or knock-in has generated useful transgenic mouse lines. However, since genes are often expressed in many cell types, many of these lines have relatively broad expression patterns. We report an alternative transgenic approach capturing distal enhancers for more focused expression. We identified an enhancer trap probe often producing restricted reporter expression and developed efficient enhancer trap screening with the PiggyBac transposon. We established more than 200 lines and found many lines that label small subsets of neurons in brain substructures, including known and novel cell types. Images and other information about each line are available online (enhancertrap.bio.brandeis.edu). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13503.001 PMID:26999799

  13. Precise manipulation of cell behaviors on surfaces for construction of tissue/organs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-12-01

    The use of micro/nanotechnology has become an indispensable strategy to manipulating cell microenvironments. By employing key elements of soft lithographical technologies including self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), microcontact printing (μCP), and microfluidic pattering (μFP) and a number of switchable surfaces such as electrochemical active, photosensitive, and thermosensitive surfaces, scientists can control the adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. By combining essential in vivo conditions, various physical or pathological processes such as cell-cell interaction in wound healing and tumor metastasis could be studied on well-defined surfaces and interfaces. By integrating key elements in live tissues, in vitro models mimicking basic structure and function of vital organs such as lung, heart, blood vessel, liver, kidney, and brain have been developed and greatly increased our knowledge of these important life processes. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of these interfacial methods and their application in fundamental biology research.

  14. A microfluidic device for continuous manipulation of biological cells using dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Das, Debanjan; Biswas, Karabi; Das, Soumen

    2014-06-01

    The present study demonstrates the design, simulation, fabrication and testing of a label-free continuous manipulation and separation micro-device of particles/biological cells suspended on medium based on conventional dielectrophoresis. The current dielectrophoretic device uses three planner electrodes to generate non-uniform electric field and induces both p-DEP and n-DEP force simultaneously depending on the dielectric properties of the particles and thus influencing at least two types of particles at a time. Numerical simulations were performed to predict the distribution of non-uniform electric field, DEP force and particle trajectories. The device is fabricated utilizing the advantage of bonding between PDMS and SU8 polymer. The p-DEP particles move away from the center of the streamline, while the n-DEP particles will follow the central streamline along the channel length. Dielectrophoretic effects were initially tested using polystyrene beads followed by manipulation of HeLa cells. In the experiment, it was observed that polystyrene beads in DI water always response as n-DEP up to 1MHz frequency, whereas HeLa cells in PBS medium response as n-DEP up to 400kHz frequency and then it experiences p-DEP up to 1MHz. Further, the microscopic observations of DEP responses of HeLa cells were verified by performing trapping experiment at static condition.

  15. Large-conductance channel formation mediated by P2X7 receptor activation is regulated through distinct intracellular signaling pathways in peritoneal macrophages and 2BH4 cells.

    PubMed

    Faria, R X; Cascabulho, C M; Reis, R A M; Alves, Luiz Anastácio

    2010-07-01

    The P2X(7) receptor (P2X7R) is a ligand-gated ATP receptor that acts as a low- and large-conductance channel (pore) and is known to be coupled to several downstream effectors. Recently, we demonstrated that the formation of a large-conductance channel associated with the P2X(7) receptor is induced by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration (Faria et al., Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 297:C28-C42, 2005). Here, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways associated with P2X(7) large-conductance channel formation using the patch clamp technique in conjunction with fluorescent imaging and flow cytometry assays in 2BH4 cells and peritoneal macrophages. Different antagonists were applied to investigate the following pathways: Ca(2+)-calmodulin, phospholipase A, phospholipase D, phospholipase C, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and cytoskeletal proteins. Macroscopic ionic currents induced by 1 mM ATP were reduced by 85% in the presence of PKC antagonists. The addition of antagonists for MAPK, PI3K, and the cytoskeleton (actin, intermediary filament, and microtubule) blocked 92%, 83%, and 95% of the ionic currents induced by 1 mM ATP, respectively. Our results show that PKC, MAPK, PI3K, and cytoskeletal components are involved in P2X(7) receptor large-channel formation in 2BH4 cells and peritoneal macrophages.

  16. [Pathophysiology of peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Beyer, K; Menges, P; Keßler, W; Heidecke, C-D

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts peritonitis leading to subsequent sepsis remains associated with a high mortality. The initial effector cells are the locally residing cells of the peritoneum, such as mesothelial cells, mast cells, macrophages and lymphocytes. Through the secretion of chemokines, an influx of neutrophils initially takes place followed by monocytes. The latter can differentiate into inflammatory macrophages. The non-directed activity of neutrophilic granulocytes is limited by the induction of apoptotic programs. Through the breaching of cytokines, bacteria and microbial products into the circulation, a systemic reaction in the sense of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis arises. This is viewed as a concomitant derailing of inflammatory as well as anti-inflammatory responses, which leads to extensive apoptosis of lymphocytes. The presentation of apoptotic cells leads to a strong immunosuppression. Due to the coexistence of hyperinflammation and immunosuppression, exact knowledge of the current immune status of the patient is a prerequisite in the development of immunotherapies for the treatment of sepsis.

  17. Design and experimental demonstration of low-power CMOS magnetic cell manipulation platform using charge recycling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Yoshida, Kohei; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    We present the world’s first charge-recycling-based low-power technique of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) magnetic cell manipulation. CMOS magnetic cell manipulation associated with magnetic beads is a promissing tool for on-chip biomedical-analysis applications such as drug screening because CMOS can integrate control electronics and electro-chemical sensors. However, the conventional CMOS cell manipulation requires considerable power consumption. In this work, by concatenating multiple unit circuits and recycling electric charge among them, power consumption is reduced by a factor of the number of the concatenated unit circuits (1/N). For verifying the effectiveness, test chip was fabricated in a 0.6-µm CMOS. The chip successfully manipulates magnetic microbeads with achieving 49% power reduction (from 51 to 26.2 mW). Even considering the additional serial resistance of the concatenated inductors, nearly theoretical power reduction effect can be confirmed.

  18. Minireview: beta-cell replacement therapy for diabetes in the 21st century: manipulation of cell fate by directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell failure underlies type 1 diabetes; it also contributes in an essential way to type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell replacement is an important component of any cure for diabetes. The current options of islet and pancreas transplantation are not satisfactory as definitive forms of therapy. Here, we review strategies for induced de novo pancreatic beta-cell formation, which depend on the targeted differentiation of cells into pancreatic beta-cells. With this objective in mind, one can manipulate the fate of three different types of cells: 1) from terminally differentiated cells, e.g. exocrine pancreatic cells, into beta-cells; 2) from multipotent adult stem cells, e.g. hepatic oval cells, into pancreatic islets; and 3) from pluripotent stem cells, e.g. embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, into beta-cells. We will examine the pros and cons of each strategy as well as the hurdles that must be overcome before these approaches to generate new beta-cells will be ready for clinical application.

  19. Manipulation and Motion of Organelles and Single Molecules in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Norregaard, Kamilla; Metzler, Ralf; Ritter, Christine M; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Oddershede, Lene B

    2017-03-08

    The biomolecule is among the most important building blocks of biological systems, and a full understanding of its function forms the scaffold for describing the mechanisms of higher order structures as organelles and cells. Force is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of biomolecular interactions driving many cellular processes. The forces on a molecular scale are exactly in the range that can be manipulated and probed with single molecule force spectroscopy. The natural environment of a biomolecule is inside a living cell, hence, this is the most relevant environment for probing their function. In vivo studies are, however, challenged by the complexity of the cell. In this review, we start with presenting relevant theoretical tools for analyzing single molecule data obtained in intracellular environments followed by a description of state-of-the art visualization techniques. The most commonly used force spectroscopy techniques, namely optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers, and atomic force microscopy, are described in detail, and their strength and limitations related to in vivo experiments are discussed. Finally, recent exciting discoveries within the field of in vivo manipulation and dynamics of single molecule and organelles are reviewed.

  20. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Mechanobiology: Manipulating the Biophysical Microenvironment for Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Applications.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Ronald G; Simmons, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    A stem cell in its microenvironment is subjected to a myriad of soluble chemical cues and mechanical forces that act in concert to orchestrate cell fate. Intuitively, many of these soluble and biophysical factors have been the focus of intense study to successfully influence and direct cell differentiation in vitro. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been of considerable interest in these studies due to their great promise for regenerative medicine. Culturing and directing differentiation of hPSCs, however, is currently extremely labor-intensive and lacks the efficiency required to generate large populations of clinical-grade cells. Improved efficiency may come from efforts to understand how the cell biophysical signals can complement biochemical signals to regulate cell pluripotency and direct differentiation. In this concise review, we explore hPSC mechanobiology and how the hPSC biophysical microenvironment can be manipulated to maintain and differentiate hPSCs into functional cell types for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications.

  1. Manipulation and Immobilization of a Single Fluorescence Nanosensor for Selective Injection into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Hairulazwan; Maruyama, Hisataka; Masuda, Taisuke; Arai, Fumihito

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation and injection of single nanosensors with high cell viability is an emerging field in cell analysis. We propose a new method using fluorescence nanosensors with a glass nanoprobe and optical control of the zeta potential. The nanosensor is fabricated by encapsulating a fluorescence polystyrene nanobead into a lipid layer with 1,3,3-trimethylindolino-6′-nitrobenzopyrylospiran (SP), which is a photochromic material. The nanobead contains iron oxide nanoparticles and a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye, Rhodamine B. The zeta potential of the nanosensor switches between negative and positive by photo-isomerization of SP with ultraviolet irradiation. The positively-charged nanosensor easily adheres to a negatively-charged glass nanoprobe, is transported to a target cell, and then adheres to the negatively-charged cell membrane. The nanosensor is then injected into the cytoplasm by heating with a near-infrared (NIR) laser. As a demonstration, a single 750 nm nanosensor was picked-up using a glass nanoprobe with optical control of the zeta potential. Then, the nanosensor was transported and immobilized onto a target cell membrane. Finally, it was injected into the cytoplasm using a NIR laser. The success rates of pick-up and cell immobilization of the nanosensor were 75% and 64%, respectively. Cell injection and cell survival rates were 80% and 100%, respectively. PMID:27916931

  2. The time for surgery of peritonitis associated with peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Mihalache, O; Bugă, C; Doran, H; Catrina, E; Bobircă, F; Andreescu, A; Mustățea, P; Pătrașcu, T

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is the main complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and also an important factor for raising the cost of the method to the level of hemodialysis. Associated with PD, peritonitis is responsible for the increase of morbidity and mortality of the procedure and, at the same time, the main cause of the technique failure. Severe and prolonged peritonitis or repeated episodes of peritonitis lead to ultrafiltration failure. Peritonitis treatment should aim for a rapid remission of inflammation in order to preserve the peritoneal membrane functional integrity. The treatment of PD peritonitis consists mainly of antibiotic therapy, surgical intervention not being usually required. However, it is of outmost importance to differentiate the so-called "catheter related" peritonitis from secondary peritonitis due to visceral lesions, in which the surgical treatment comes first. The confusion between secondary and "catheter related" peritonitis may lead to serious errors in choosing the correct treatment, endangering the patient's life. The differential diagnosis between a refractory or secondary peritonitis in a peritoneal dialyzed patient may be very difficult. In front of a refractory PD peritonitis, surgical exploration must not be delayed. Also we have to keep in mind that the aim of peritonitis treatment is the saving of the peritoneal membrane and not the catheter.

  3. Primary small intestinal natural killer/T cell lymphoma mimicking tuberculous peritonitis: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Nien; Chou, Jen-Wei; Chuang, Po-Heng; Cheng, Ken-Sheng; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Chiang, I-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphoma is very rarely encountered in clinical practice. It has a high mortality rate and very short median survival. Early diagnosis of these rare tumors, especially those originating from the small intestine, is usually difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms. Herein, we describe a case of a primary small intestinal natural killer/T cell lymphoma in a 52-year-old man who presented with abdominal fullness and weight loss. The clinical symptoms, elevation of serum levels of cancer antigen-125, and presence of ascites initially led to the suspicion of tuberculous peritonitis. Abdominal computed tomography scan demonstrated a hypodense tumor in the jejunum. Finally, the tumor was surgically confirmed to be a natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. Although aggressive chemotherapy was prescribed, the patient subsequently died of disease progression. In addition, we also review the English literature on this rare disease.

  4. Tamoxifen Ameliorates Peritoneal Membrane Damage by Blocking Mesothelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    del Peso, Gloria; Gónzalez-Mateo, Guadalupe; Fernández-Millara, Vanessa; Santamaria, Beatríz; Bajo, Maria Auxiliadora; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Guerra-Azcona, Gonzalo; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo I.

    2013-01-01

    Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) is an auto-regulated physiological process of tissue repair that in uncontrolled conditions such as peritoneal dialysis (PD) can lead to peritoneal fibrosis. The maximum expression of peritoneal fibrosis induced by PD fluids and other peritoneal processes is the encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) for which no specific treatment exists. Tamoxifen, a synthetic estrogen, has successfully been used to treat retroperitoneal fibrosis and EPS associated with PD. Hence, we used in vitro and animal model approaches to evaluate the efficacy of Tamoxifen to inhibit the MMT as a trigger of peritoneal fibrosis. In vitro studies were carried out using omentum-derived mesothelial cells (MCs) and effluent-derived MCs. Tamoxifen blocked the MMT induced by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, as it preserved the expression of E-cadherin and reduced the expression of mesenchymal-associated molecules such as snail, fibronectin, collagen-I, α-smooth muscle actin, and matrix metalloproteinse-2. Tamoxifen-treatment preserved the fibrinolytic capacity of MCs treated with TGF-β1 and decreased their migration capacity. Tamoxifen did not reverse the MMT of non-epitheliod MCs from effluents, but it reduced the expression of some mesenchymal molecules. In mice PD model, we demonstrated that MMT progressed in parallel with peritoneal membrane thickness. In addition, we observed that Tamoxifen significantly reduced peritoneal thickness, angiogenesis, invasion of the compact zone by mesenchymal MCs and improved peritoneal function. Tamoxifen also reduced the effluent levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and leptin. These results demonstrate that Tamoxifen is a therapeutic option to treat peritoneal fibrosis, and that its protective effect is mediated via modulation of the MMT process. PMID:23637793

  5. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT’s stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility.

  6. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT’s stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility. PMID:26940301

  7. Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers for Single-Cell and Microparticle Manipulation across a Large Area in High Conductivity Media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yajia; Mao, Yufei; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Chui, Chi On; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2016-03-04

    Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) has advanced within the past decade to become a promising tool for cell and microparticle manipulation. Its incompatibility with high conductivity media and limited throughput remain two major technical challenges. Here a novel manipulation concept and corresponding platform called Self-Locking Optoelectronic Tweezers (SLOT) are proposed and demonstrated to tackle these challenges concurrently. The SLOT platform comprises a periodic array of optically tunable phototransistor traps above which randomly dispersed single cells and microparticles are self-aligned to and retained without light illumination. Light beam illumination on a phototransistor turns off the trap and releases the trapped cell, which is then transported downstream via a background flow. The cell trapping and releasing functions in SLOT are decoupled, which is a unique feature that enables SLOT's stepper-mode function to overcome the small field-of-view issue that all prior OET technologies encountered in manipulation with single-cell resolution across a large area. Massively parallel trapping of more than 100,000 microparticles has been demonstrated in high conductivity media. Even larger scale trapping and manipulation can be achieved by linearly scaling up the number of phototransistors and device area. Cells after manipulation on the SLOT platform maintain high cell viability and normal multi-day divisibility.

  8. Selective manipulation of the human T-cell receptor repertoire expressed by thymocytes in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Merkenschlager, M; Fisher, A G

    1992-01-01

    A recently described organ culture system for human thymocytes is shown to support the generation of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire in vitro: thymocytes of the alpha beta lineage, including representatives of the V beta families 5.2/5.3, 6.7, and 8, accounted for the majority of T-cell receptor-positive cells throughout a 3-week culture period. Thymocytes bearing gamma delta receptors were also identified, particularly among the CD4 CD8 double-negative subset. The T-cell receptor repertoire expressed in organ culture responded to experimental manipulation with staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (a powerful activator of human peripheral T cells expressing V beta 5.2/5.3 receptors) caused a marked reduction of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression, as determined with the V beta-specific antibody 42/1C1. Evidence is presented that this loss of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression resulted from the selective deletion of activated thymocytes by apoptosis, in concert with T-cell receptor modulation. These effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin D were specific (since staphylococcal enterotoxin E did not influence V beta 5.2/5.3 expression) and V beta-selective (since expression of V beta 6.7 remained unaffected by staphylococcal enterotoxin D). On the basis of these observations, we suggest that thymic organ culture provides a powerful approach to study the generation of the human T-cell repertoire. Images PMID:1584760

  9. Glycemic control in diabetes is restored by therapeutic manipulation of cytokines that regulate beta cell stress.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z; Borg, Danielle J; Harcourt, Brooke E; Tong, Hui; Sheng, Yonghua H; Ng, Choa Ping; Das, Indrajit; Wang, Ran; Chen, Alice C-H; Loudovaris, Thomas; Kay, Thomas W; Thomas, Helen E; Whitehead, Jonathan P; Forbes, Josephine M; Prins, Johannes B; McGuckin, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    In type 2 diabetes, hyperglycemia is present when an increased demand for insulin, typically due to insulin resistance, is not met as a result of progressive pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. This defect in beta cell activity is typically characterized by impaired insulin biosynthesis and secretion, usually accompanied by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We demonstrate that multiple inflammatory cytokines elevated in diabetic pancreatic islets induce beta cell oxidative and ER stress, with interleukin-23 (IL-23), IL-24 and IL-33 being the most potent. Conversely, we show that islet-endogenous and exogenous IL-22, by regulating oxidative stress pathways, suppresses oxidative and ER stress caused by cytokines or glucolipotoxicity in mouse and human beta cells. In obese mice, antibody neutralization of IL-23 or IL-24 partially reduced beta cell ER stress and improved glucose tolerance, whereas IL-22 administration modulated oxidative stress regulatory genes in islets, suppressed ER stress and inflammation, promoted secretion of high-quality efficacious insulin and fully restored glucose homeostasis followed by restitution of insulin sensitivity. Thus, therapeutic manipulation of immune regulators of beta cell stress reverses the hyperglycemia central to diabetes pathology.

  10. Wood Formation in Trees Is Increased by Manipulating PXY-Regulated Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Etchells, J Peter; Mishra, Laxmi S; Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon R

    2015-04-20

    The woody tissue of trees is composed of xylem cells that arise from divisions of stem cells within the cambial meristem. The rate of xylem cell formation is dependent upon the rate of cell division within the cambium and is controlled by both genetic and environmental factors. In the annual plant Arabidopsis, signaling between a peptide ligand CLE41 and a receptor kinase PXY controls cambial cell divisions; however, the pathway regulating secondary growth in trees has not been identified. Here, we show that an aspen receptor kinase PttPXY and its peptide ligand PttCLE41 are functional orthologs and act to control a multifunctional pathway that regulates both the rate of cambial cell division and woody tissue organization. Ectopic overexpression of PttPXY and PttCLE41 genes in hybrid aspen resulted in vascular tissue abnormalities and poor plant growth. In contrast, precise tissue-specific overexpression generated trees that exhibited a 2-fold increase in the rate of wood formation, were taller, and possessed larger leaves compared to the controls. Our results demonstrate that the PXY-CLE pathway has evolved to regulate secondary growth and manipulating this pathway can result in dramatically increased tree growth and productivity.

  11. Rapid formation of cell-particle complexes via dielectrophoretic manipulation for the detection of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuma; Yamamoto, Masashi; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio

    2014-11-15

    A rapid and simple method for the fabrication of the island patterns with particles and cells was applied to detect the presence of specific antigens on the cell surface. An upper interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrode was mounted on a lower substrate with the same design to fabricate a microfluidic-channel device for dielectrophoretic manipulation. The electrode grid structure was fabricated by rotating the upper template IDA by 90° relative to the lower IDA. A suspension of anti-CD33 modified particles and HL-60 cells was introduced into the channel. An AC electrical signal (typically 20 V peak-to-peak, 100 kHz) was then applied to the bands of the upper and lower IDAs, resulting in the formation of island patterns at the intersections with low electric fields. Immunoreactions between the antibodies immobilized on the accumulated particles and the CD33 present on the surface of the cells led to the formation of complexes comprising corresponding antigen-antibody pairs. Non-specific pairs accumulated at the intersection, which did not form complexes, were then dispersed after removal of the applied field. The time required for the detection of the formation/dispersion of the complexes is as short as 6 min in the present procedure. Furthermore, this novel cell binding assay does not require pretreatment such as target labeling or washing of the unbound cells.

  12. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  13. Optoelectronic tweezers integrated with lensfree holographic microscopy for wide-field interactive cell and particle manipulation on a chip.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Wei; Su, Ting-Wei; Ozcan, Aydogan; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-06-21

    We demonstrate an optoelectronic tweezer (OET) coupled to a lensfree holographic microscope for real-time interactive manipulation of cells and micro-particles over a large field-of-view (FOV). This integrated platform can record the holographic images of cells and particles over the entire active area of a CCD sensor array, perform digital image reconstruction to identify target cells, dynamically track the positions of cells and particles, and project light beams to trigger light-induced dielectrophoretic forces to pattern and sort cells on a chip. OET technology has been previously shown to be capable of performing parallel single cell manipulation over a large area. However, its throughput has been bottlenecked by the number of cells that can be imaged within the limited FOV of a conventional microscope objective lens. Integrating lensfree holographic imaging with OET solves this fundamental FOV barrier, while also creating a compact on-chip cell/particle manipulation platform. Using this unique platform, we have successfully demonstrated real-time interactive manipulation of thousands of single cells and micro-particles over an ultra-large area of e.g., 240 mm(2) (i.e. 17.96 mm × 13.52 mm).

  14. Transdiaphragmatic peritoneal hernia complicating peritoneal dialysis: demonstration with spiral computed tomography peritoneography and peritoneal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Coche, Emmanuel; Lonneux, Max; Goffin, Eric

    2005-08-01

    The authors describe a rare case of peritoneal transdiaphragmatic hernia discovered immediately after a car accident in a young male patient on peritoneal dialysis. The potential role of CT peritoneography and peritoneal scintigraphy to demonstrate and understand thoracic complications of ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is discussed.

  15. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  16. Low-frequency spatial wave manipulation via phononic crystals with relaxed cell symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Celli, Paolo; Gonella, Stefano

    2014-03-14

    Phononic crystals enjoy unique wave manipulation capabilities enabled by their periodic topologies. On one hand, they feature frequency-dependent directivity, which allows directional propagation of selected modes even at low frequencies. However, the stellar nature of the propagation patterns and the inability to induce single-beam focusing represent significant limitations of this functionality. On the other hand, one can realize waveguides by defecting the periodic structure of a crystal operating in bandgap mode along some desired path. Waveguides of this type are only activated in the relatively high and narrow frequency bands corresponding to total bandgaps, which limits their potential technological applications. In this work, we introduce a class of phononic crystals with relaxed cell symmetry and we exploit symmetry relaxation of a population of auxiliary microstructural elements to achieve spatial manipulation of elastic waves at very low frequencies, in the range of existence of the acoustic modes. By this approach, we achieve focusing without modifying the default static properties of the medium and by invoking mechanisms that are well suited to envision adaptive configurations for semi-active wave control.

  17. Combined single cell AFM manipulation and TIRFM for probing the molecular stability of multilayer fibrinogen matrices

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, W.; Yermolenko, I.; Plochberger, B.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Ugarova, T.P.; Ros, R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of fibrinogen on various surfaces produces a nanoscale multilayer matrix, which strongly reduces the adhesion of platelets and leukocytes with implications for hemostasis and blood compatibility of biomaterials. The nonadhesive properties of fibrinogen matrices are based on their extensibility, ensuing the inability to transduce strong mechanical forces via cellular integrins and resulting in weak intracellular signaling. In addition, reduced cell adhesion may arise from the weaker associations between fibrinogen molecules in the superficial layers of the matrix. Such reduced stability would allow integrins to pull fibrinogen molecules out of the matrix with comparable or smaller forces than required to break integrin–fibrinogen bonds. To examine this possibility, we developed a method based on the combination of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, single cell manipulation with an atomic force microscope and microcontact printing to study the transfer of fibrinogen molecules out of a matrix onto cells. We calculated the average fluorescence intensities per pixel for wild-type HEK 293 (HEK WT) and HEK 293 cells expressing leukocyte integrin Mac-1 (HEK Mac-1) before and after contact with multilayered matrices of fluorescently labeled fibrinogen. For contact times of 500 s, HEK Mac-1 cells show a median increase of 57% of the fluorescence intensity compared to 6% for HEKWT cells. The results suggest that the integrin Mac-1-fibrinogen interactions are stronger than the intermolecular fibrinogen interactions in the superficial layer of the matrix. The low mechanical stability of the multilayer fibrinogen surface may contribute to the reduced cell adhesive properties of fibrinogen-coated substrates. We anticipate that the described method can be applied to various cell types to examine their integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrices with a variable protein composition. PMID:24239757

  18. Isolation and In Vitro Generation of Gene-Manipulated Human Plasmacytoid and Conventional Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Remko; Schmidlin, Heike; Nagasawa, Maho; Dontje, Wendy; Karrich, Julien J.; Uittenbogaart, Christel; Spits, Hergen; Blom, Bianca

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of human lymphocyte development has increased significantly over the past 20 years. In particular, our insight into human T- and B-cell development has improved (1, 2). Nonetheless, there are many gaps in our understanding, particularly regarding the early stages of development of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into downstream lineage-biased and lineage-restricted precursors and the molecular mechanisms underlying these activities. The same holds true for our knowledge of human dendritic cell (DC) development. While the amount of data on the different subsets of conventional DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) rapidly increases in mice (3, 4), the developmental stages of different DC subsets in humans remain poorly defined (2). The relatively easy access to patient material and therefore human precursor cells that can be isolated from these tissues combined with the availability of in vitro and in vivo differentiation assays allows studies in the field of human hematopoietic development, including that of DCs. In addition, the opportunities to manipulate gene expression, by stable overexpression of a gene of interest or RNA interference-mediated knockdown, generate valuable information about the mechanisms underlying lineage commitment and differentiation. PMID:19941106

  19. Nanoparticle-Based Manipulation of Antigen-Presenting Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ronnie H; Kroll, Ashley V; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-11-04

    Immunotherapeutic approaches for treating cancer overall have been receiving a considerable amount of interest due to the recent approval of several clinical formulations. Among the different modalities, anticancer vaccination acts by training the body to endogenously generate a response against tumor cells. However, despite the large amount of work that has gone into the development of such vaccines, the near absence of clinically approved formulations highlights the many challenges facing those working in the field. The generation of potent endogenous anticancer responses poses unique challenges due to the similarity between cancer cells and normal, healthy cells. As researchers continue to tackle the limited efficacy of vaccine formulations, fresh and novel approaches are being sought after to address many of the underlying problems. Here the application of nanoparticle technology towards the development of anticancer vaccines is discussed. Specifically, there is a focus on the benefits of using such strategies to manipulate antigen presenting cells (APCs), which are essential to the vaccination process, and how nanoparticle-based platforms can be rationally engineered to elicit appropriate downstream immune responses.

  20. Genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells in serum and feeder-free media.

    PubMed

    Braam, Stefan R; Denning, Chris; Mummery, Christine L

    2010-01-01

    Generic methods for genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are important for both present research and future commercial applications. To date, differences in cell derivation and culture have required independent optimization of transfection and transduction protocols and some lines have remained refractile to all methods. Here we describe a culture protocol that has been extensively tested in 12 different hESC lines (1, 2) and shown to support efficient gene transfer independent of the method of gene delivery or history of the cell line. The system is based on Matrigel monolayer culture and conditioned medium from mouse embryonic feeder cells (MEFs) and entails transient high-density culture followed by rapid adaptation to low density for gene transfer. Under these conditions, plasmid transfection, virus infection, and siRNA transfection are highly effective. Stable genetically modified hESC lines can be generated with plasmid transfection, viral infection, or electroporation without loss of pluripotency or differentiation potential. The majority of lines generated in this system display a normal karyotype.

  1. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-11-01

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems.

  2. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-01-01

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:27853191

  3. Thermal gradient induced tweezers for the manipulation of particles and cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajie; Cong, Hengji; Loo, Fong-Chuen; Kang, Zhiwen; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Haixi; Wu, Shu-Yuen; Kong, Siu-Kai; Ho, Ho-Pui

    2016-11-17

    Optical tweezers are a well-established tool for manipulating small objects. However, their integration with microfluidic devices often requires an objective lens. More importantly, trapping of non-transparent or optically sensitive targets is particularly challenging for optical tweezers. Here, for the first time, we present a photon-free trapping technique based on electro-thermally induced forces. We demonstrate that thermal-gradient-induced thermophoresis and thermal convection can lead to trapping of polystyrene spheres and live cells. While the subject of thermophoresis, particularly in the micro- and nano-scale, still remains to be fully explored, our experimental results have provided a reasonable explanation for the trapping effect. The so-called thermal tweezers, which can be readily fabricated by femtosecond laser writing, operate with low input power density and are highly versatile in terms of device configuration, thus rendering high potential for integration with microfluidic devices as well as lab-on-a-chip systems.

  4. On-chip actuation transmitter for enhancing the dynamic response of cell manipulation using a macro-scale pump

    PubMed Central

    Monzawa, Takumi; Kaneko, Makoto; Tsai, Chia-Hung Dylan; Sakuma, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    An on-chip actuation transmitter for achieving fast and accurate cell manipulation is proposed. Instead of manipulating cell position by a directly connected macro-scale pump, polydimethylsiloxane deformation is used as a medium to transmit the actuation generated from the pump to control the cell position. This actuation transmitter has three main advantages. First, the dynamic response of cell manipulation is faster than the conventional method with direct flow control based on both the theoretical modeling and experimental results. The cell can be manipulated in a simple harmonic motion up to 130 Hz by the proposed actuation transmitter as opposed to 90 Hz by direct flow control. Second, there is no need to fill the syringe pump with the sample solution because the actuation transmitter physically separates the fluids between the pump and the cell flow, and consequently, only a very small quantity of the sample is required (<1 μl). In addition, such fluid separation makes it easy to keep the experiment platform sterilized because there is no direct fluid exchange between the sample and fluid inside the pump. Third, the fabrication process is simple because of the single-layer design, making it convenient to implement the actuation transmitter in different microfluidic applications. The proposed actuation transmitter is implemented in a lab-on-a-chip system for red blood cell (RBC) evaluation, where the extensibility of red blood cells is evaluated by manipulating the cells through a constriction channel at a constant velocity. The application shows a successful example of implementing the proposed transmitter. PMID:25713696

  5. An unusual case of posttransplant peritoneal primary effusion lymphoma with T-cell phenotype in a HIV-negative female, not associated with HHV-8.

    PubMed

    Venizelos, Ioannis; Tamiolakis, Demetrio; Lambropoulou, Maria; Nikolaidou, Sylva; Bolioti, Sophia; Papadopoulos, Hlias; Papadopoulos, Nikolas

    2005-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a recently individualized form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (WHO classification) that mainly develops in HIV infected males, more frequently in homosexuals and advanced stages of the disease (total CD4+ lymphocyte count below 100-200/microL). Occasionally, it appears in other immunodepressive states (such as solid organs transplant period) and even, although very rarely, in immunocompetent patients. From a pathogenetic point of view, PEL has been related to Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpes virus (also named human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8), an etiological factor of Kaposi's sarcoma. The relative infrequency of this disease, the absence of wide casuistics allowing a better characterization, and its unfavorable outcome support the need of a deeper knowledge. We present here the clinical-biological findings of a patient, HIV seronegative, who was diagnosed with peritoneal PEL of T-cell origin, and not HHV-8-associated, five years after renal transplantation.

  6. Spatial, Temporal, and Quantitative Manipulation of Intracellular Hydrogen Peroxide in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alim, Ishraq; Haskew-Layton, Renee E.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Guo, Hengchang; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced endogenously in a number of cellular compartments, including the mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, and at the plasma membrane, and can play divergent roles as a second messenger or a pathological toxin. It is assumed that the tuned production of H2O2 within neuronal and non-neuronal cells regulates a discreet balance between survival and death. However, a major challenge in understanding the physiological versus pathological role of H2O2 in cells has been the lack of validated methods that can spatially, temporally, and quantitatively modulate H2O2 production. A promising means of regulating endogenous H2O2 is through the expression of peroxide-producing enzyme D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO from Rhodotorula gracilis lacking a peroxisomal targeting sequence). Using viral vectors to express DAAO in distinct cell types and using targeting sequences to target DAAO to distinct subcellular sites, we can manipulate H2O2 production by applying the substrate D-alanine or permeable analogs of D-alanine. In this chapter, we describe the use of DAAO to produce H2O2 in culture models and the real-time visual validation of this technique using two-photon microscopy and chemoselective fluorescent probes. PMID:25416362

  7. Grafting of genetically manipulated cells into adult brain: toward graft-gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Toya, S

    1996-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that functional recoveries in various kinds of animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can be achieved by grafting fetal neurons into the brain. On the basis of these successful results, clinical trials are under way to determine whether human fetal mesencephalic tissue can ameliorate motor functions in patients with Parkinson's disease. Recent autopsy findings of parkinsonian patient implanted with human fetal mesencephalic tissue clearly revealed that the fetal neuronal graft can survive for extended period of time in the human brain and densely reinnervate the surrounding host striatal tissue. It is, however, still important to obtain more practical, effective and ethically justifiable donor material for the future clinical application of the procedures. Desirable properties for the donor cells include long-term survival in the host brain, neuronal cell type for the reconstruction of damaged neural circuits, and susceptibility to genetic manipulation for the practical use. With the development of molecular biology techniques, genetic modification and transplantation of the donor neuronal cells might be a feasible way to cure many kinds of central nervous system diseases toward a "graft-gene therapy".

  8. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  9. (1→3)-β-D-glucan and galactomannan testing for the diagnosis of fungal peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients, a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Worasilchai, Navaporn; Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak; Thongbor, Nisa; Lorvinitnun, Pichet; Sukhontasing, Kanya; Finkelman, Malcolm; Chindamporn, Ariya

    2015-05-01

    Fungal peritonitis is an uncommon but serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) due to the fact that routine culture to recovered the etiologic agents are time consuming and KOH staining has very low sensitivity. Peritoneal (1→3)-β-D-glucan (BG) or galactomannan (GM), both fungal cell wall components, are candidate biomarkers of fungal peritonitis. Hence, a comparative cross-sectional analysis of peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF) BG (Fungitell, Cape Cod, MA, USA) and GM (Platelia Aspergillus Ag kits, Bio-rad, France) from all PD patients with and without fungal peritonitis (13 cases, identified by culture), over a 1 year period, was performed. PDF of the fungal peritonitis group showed very high BG (494 ± 19 pg/ml) and high GM (3.41 ± 1.24) similar results were noted in specimens from cases of peritonitis with other causes, especially gram negative bacterial peritonitis. A BG cut-off value at 240 pg/ml and GM at 0.5 showed sensitivity/ specificity at 100%/ 83% and 77%/ 58%, respectively. A concomitantly positive GM reduced the false positive rate of BG from nonfungal peritonitis. In conclusion, BG and GM in peritoneal fluid with provisional cut-off values were applicable as surrogate biomarkers for the diagnosis of fungal peritonitis in PD patients.

  10. Influence of Bicarbonate/Low-GDP Peritoneal Dialysis Fluid (Bicavera) on In Vitro and Ex Vivo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition of Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández–Perpén, Antonio; Pérez–Lozano, María Luisa; Bajo, María–Auxiliadora; Albar–Vizcaino, Patricia; Correa, Pilar Sandoval; del Peso, Gloria; Castro, María–José; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ossorio, Marta; Peter, Mirjam E.; Passlick–Deetjen, Jutta; Aroeira, Luiz S.; Selgas, Rafael; López–Cabrera, Manuel; Sánchez–Tomero, J. Antonio

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: Peritoneal membrane damage induced by peritoneal dialysis (PD) is largely associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of mesothelial cells (MCs), which is believed to be a result mainly of the glucose degradation products (GDPs) present in PD solutions. ♦ Objectives: This study investigated the impact of bicarbonate-buffered, low-GDP PD solution (BicaVera: Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany) on EMT of MCs in vitro and ex vivo. ♦ Methods: In vitro studies: Omentum-derived MCs were incubated with lactate-buffered standard PD fluid or BicaVera fluid diluted 1:1 with culture medium. Ex vivo studies: From 31 patients randomly distributed to either standard or BicaVera solution and followed for 24 months, effluents were collected every 6 months for determination of EMT markers in effluent MCs. ♦ Results: Culturing of MCs with standard fluid in vitro resulted in morphology change to a non-epithelioid shape, with downregulation of E-cadherin (indicative of EMT) and strong induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. By contrast, in vitro exposure of MCs to bicarbonate/low-GDP solution had less impact on both EMT parameters. Ex vivo studies partially confirmed the foregoing results. The BicaVera group, with a higher prevalence of the non-epithelioid MC phenotype at baseline (for unknown reasons), showed a clear and significant trend to gain and maintain an epithelioid phenotype at medium- and longer-term and to show fewer fibrogenic characteristics. By contrast, the standard solution group demonstrated a progressive and significantly higher presence of the non-epithelioid phenotype. Compared with effluent MCs having an epithelioid phenotype, MCs with non-epithelioid morphology showed significantly lower levels of E-cadherin and greater levels of fibronectin and VEGF. In comparing the BicaVera and standard solution groups, MCs from the standard solution group showed significantly higher secretion of

  11. Prostaglandin D2 generation by rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with Datura stramonium agglutinin and its inhibition by haptenic sugar and wheat germ agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Nishimura, Tamiko; Uchida, Masaatsu K

    2002-09-01

    The production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) by rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomer-specific Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) for 10 min in the presence of 0.3 mM Ca2+ was examined. Previously, our group reported that the incubation of rat mast cells with DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) under similar conditions resulted in a calcium influx and histamine release via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein pathway of the mast cells, and the histamine release was inhibited by haptenic sugar chitooligosaccharides or GlcNAc-specific lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (K. Matsuda et al., Jpn J Pharmacol 66, 195 - 204 (1994)). DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) dose-dependently stimulated the mast cells to generate PGD2. Chitooligosaccharides (1% w/v) and WGA (100 microg/ml) inhibited the production of PGD2 induced by 100 microg/ml of DSA, suggesting that the effect of DSA is sugar-specific. A prostaglandin G/H synthase inhibitor NS-398 (N-[cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl] methanesulfonamide) (10 microM) inhibited the formation of PGD2 induced by DSA (20 microg/ml). These results suggest that the binding of DSA to the corresponding sugar residues on the mast cell surface mediates the signaling of the prostaglandin G/H synthase pathway.

  12. Vaccine efficacy of a cell lysate with recombinant baculovirus-expressed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) virus nucleocapsid protein against progression of FIP.

    PubMed

    Hohdatsu, Tsutomu; Yamato, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Tasuku; Kaneko, Miyuki; Motokawa, Kenji; Kusuhara, Hajime; Kaneshima, Takashi; Arai, Setsuo; Koyama, Hiroyuki

    2003-12-02

    The Type II feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection of feline macrophages is enhanced by a monoclonal antibody (MAb) to the S protein of FIPV. This antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) activity increased with the MAb that showed a neutralizing activity with feline kidney cells, suggesting that there was a distinct correlation between ADE activity and the neutralizing activity. The close association between enhancing and neutralizing epitopes is an obstacle to developing a vaccine containing only neutralizing epitopes without enhancing epitopes. In this study, we immunized cats with cell lysate with recombinant baculovirus-expressed N protein of the Type I FIPV strain KU-2 with an adjuvant and investigated its preventive effect on the progression of FIP. Cats immunized with this vaccine produced antibodies against FIPV virion-derived N protein but did not produce virus-neutralizing antibodies. A delayed type hypersensitivity skin response to N protein was observed in these vaccinated cats, showing that cell mediated immunity against the FIPV antigen was induced. When these vaccinated cats were challenged with a high dose of heterologous FIPV, the survival rate was 75% (6/8), while the survival rate in the control group immunized with SF-9 cell-derived antigen was 12.5% (1/8). This study showed that immunization with the cell lysate with baculovirus-expressed N protein was effective in preventing the progression of FIP without inducing ADE of FIPV infection in cats.

  13. Electrochemical manipulation of cell populations supported by biodegradable polymeric nanosheets for cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Jin; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Abe, Toshiaki; Kaji, Hirokazu

    2017-01-31

    We describe an electrochemical method of harvesting cells cultured on a biodegradable polymeric nanosheet (cell/nanosheet construct), which is stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of thiol molecules. A poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanosheet was attached by hydrophobic interactions onto the surface of a SAM of l-cysteine coated onto a gold electrode. Retinal pigment epithelial cell lines (RPE-J cells) were cultured on the nanosheet to form a monolayer. An AA-size dry battery was used to apply a negative electrical potential, causing reductive desorption of the SAM from the gold surface. Within one minute of application of the voltage, the cell/nanosheet of several mm in diameter was successfully detached without the loss of cell viability in a gentle stream of the electrolyte solution. The use of a porous electrode shortened the detachment time due to the more efficient permeation of the electrolyte solution to the electrode surface. Cell transplantation following the harvesting process was demonstrated by the local delivery of RPE-J cell/nanosheet constructs into the subretinal space of rat eyes through a capillary needle. This nanosheet-based approach that allows the on-demand harvesting of cell/nanosheet constructs and their subsequent transplantation in a minimally-invasive manner could play an important role in cell transplantation therapy.

  14. Recurrent peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis caused by Microbacterium resistens.

    PubMed

    Gallois, Emmanuelle; Lamy, Thomas; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Lobbedez, Thierry; Cattoir, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of a recurrent peritonitis due to Microbacterium resistens in a 71-year-old male patient undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). Importantly, this Gram-positive rod was intrinsically resistant to cephalosporins and vancomycin, classically used in PD-related peritonitis treatment. His infection resolved after several weeks of appropriate therapy (amoxicillin plus gentamicin) and PD catheter removal.

  15. [Characteristics of peritoneal exudate microflora in children with appendicular peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Bodnar, B M

    1997-01-01

    Bacteriological investigation of peritoneal exudate was conducted in 131 children with peritonitis. The greatest quantity of pathogenic and conventionally pathogenic Escherichias and bacteroids was revealed in March, April and September. In summer peritonitis was caused by pathogenic and conventionally pathogenic Escherichias in association with enterobacterias, staphylococci and other microorganisms.

  16. Laser-driven gel microtool for single-cell manipulation based on temperature control with a photothermal conversion material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Kikukawa, M.; Maruyama, H.; Arai, F.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a laser-driven hybrid gel microtool for stable single-cell manipulation. The microtool is made of a microbead dyed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) and thermosensitive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) gel coating. The gel adheres to cells at high temperatures but not at low temperatures. We can manipulate single cells without direct laser irradiation by adhering the cells to the gel on the microtool using the cell-adhesion property of the gel. The microtool is heated by trapping it with optical tweezers to make its surface cell-adhesive during the manipulation. Furthermore, we can control the optical heating property of the microtool by dyeing the microbeads with MWNT ink. The laser-heating-induced temperature increase of the microtool can be controlled from 4.2 °C to 23.5 °C by varying the concentration of MWNT ink. We succeeded in fabricating the proposed microtool and demonstrated single-cell transportation using the microtool without direct laser irradiation of the cell.

  17. Temperature regulation during ultrasonic manipulation for long-term cell handling in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svennebring, J.; Manneberg, O.; Wiklund, M.

    2007-12-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous micromanipulation and temperature regulation by the use of ultrasonic standing wave technology in a microfluidic chip. The system is based on a microfabricated silicon structure sandwiched between two glass layers, and an external ultrasonic transducer using a refractive wedge placed on top of the chip for efficient coupling of ultrasound into the microchannel. The chip is fully transparent and compatible with any kind of high-resolution optical microscopy. The temperature regulation method uses calibration data of the temperature increase due to the ultrasonic actuation for determining the temperature of the surrounding air and microscope table, controlled by a warm-air heating unit and a heatable mounting frame. The heating methods are independent of each other, resulting in a flexible choice of ultrasonic actuation voltage and flow rate for different cell and particle manipulation purposes. Our results indicate that it is possible to perform stable temperature regulation with an accuracy of the order of ±0.1 °C around any physiologically relevant temperature (e.g., 37 °C) with high temporal stability and repeatability. The purpose is to use ultrasound for long-term cell and/or particle handling in a microfluidic chip while controlling and maintaining the biocompatibility of the system.

  18. Understanding Solvent Manipulation of Morphology in Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuxia; Zhan, Chuanlang; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-10-06

    Film morphology greatly influences the performance of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)-structure-based solar cells. It is known that an interpenetrating bicontinuous network with nanoscale-separated donor and acceptor phases for charge transfer, an ordered molecular packing for exciton diffusion and charge transport, and a vertical compositionally graded structure for charge collection are prerequisites for achieving highly efficient BHJ organic solar cells (OSCs). Therefore, control of the morphology to obtain an ideal structure is a key problem. For this solution-processing BHJ system, the solvent participates fully in film processing. Its involvement is critical in modifying the nanostructure of BHJ films. In this review, we discuss the effects of solvent-related methods on the morphology of BHJ films, including selection of the casting solvent, solvent mixture, solvent vapor annealing, and solvent soaking. On the basis of a discussion on interaction strength and time between solvent and active materials, we believe that the solvent-morphology-performance relationship will be clearer and that solvent selection as a means to manipulate the morphology of BHJ films will be more rational.

  19. Hijacking Host Cell Highways: Manipulation of the Host Actin Cytoskeleton by Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems. A subset of effectors contains eukaryotic-like motifs that mimic host proteins to exploit signaling and modify specific cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. Cytoskeletal rearrangement promotes numerous events that are beneficial to the pathogen, including internalization of bacteria, structural support for bacteria-containing vacuoles, altered vesicular trafficking, actin-dependent bacterial movement, and pathogen dissemination. This review highlights a diverse group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that manipulate the host cytoskeleton to thrive within eukaryotic cells and discusses underlying molecular mechanisms that promote these dynamic host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27713866

  20. Effect of hormonal manipulation and doxorubicin administration on cell cycle kinetics of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bontenbal, M.; Sieuwerts, A. M.; Klijn, J. G.; Peters, H. A.; Krijnen, H. L.; Sonneveld, P.; Foekens, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Dual-parameter flow cytometry, following bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation and propidium iodide (PI) uptake into DNA, was used to study the effects of oestradiol and/or insulin on cell cycle kinetics of human breast cancer cells in vitro. After a lag-period of 6-12 h, an optimum in the percentage of S-phase cells was reached between 18 and 24 h after hormone administration. A 1 h pulse of oestradiol was as effective as the continuous presence of oestradiol in pushing the cells from quiescent growing cultures into the cell cycle. A 1 h pulse of insulin was less effective than continuous administration. The addition of doxorubicin resulted in an accumulation of the cells in the late S/G2M-phases. It is concluded that dual-parameter flow cytometry allows accurate assessment of the effects of hormones and chemotherapy on the cell cycle. Therefore this method is very suitable for studying the interaction of hormones and chemotherapy on cell growth. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2679851

  1. Bioeffective Ultrasound at Very Low Doses: Reversible Manipulation of Neuronal Cell Morphology and Function in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine; Szulman, Erin; Kalisz, M. S. Andrew; Lamprecht, Michael; Simon, M. S. Melissa; Yu, M. S. Zhe; Xu, Nina; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-04-01

    Direct and safe manipulation of neurons by external means is an increasingly studied therapeutic modality with the potential to treat many neurological diseases. Anticipating such future applications, we investigated reversible bioeffects of very low dose focused ultrasound on neuronal cell morphology and function in vitro. To test morphological changes, undifferentiated PC12 cells were serum-cultured. The culture plates were placed on an inverted optical microscope. An f/1.1 ultrasound transducer with a water-filled coupling cone was focused on the culture and excited with 30-ms 4.67-MHz 100-kPa pulses. To test functional changes, rat hippocampal slices were cultured and individually transferred to the well of a 60-channel multi electrode array. An f/2.1 ultrasound transducer with a water-filled coupling cone was focused on a culture and excited with 100-μs 4.04-MHz 77-kPa pulses. The culture was stimulated before and after the ultrasonic stimulus with a 100-μs 100-μA biphasic electrical stimulus. Optical microscopy of PC12 cultures under insonification revealed that cells that were clustered near the ultrasound focal region elongated by approximately 2 μm during insonification and returned to approximately their original shapes following insonification. We conclude that the acoustic radiation force is capable of reversibly deforming cultured cells. In the rat hippocampal cultures, the ultrasonically and electrically evoked responses exhibited similar biphasic waveforms. In addition, robust electrically evoked responses following insonification indicated that the insonified cultures remained viable. We conclude that low-dose ultrasound can stimulate neurons; the mechanism is currently under investigation.

  2. Multifunctional, inexpensive, and reusable nanoparticle-printed biochip for cell manipulation and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; DiDonato, Matthew J; Yang, Yuxin; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Harris, James S; Davis, Ronald W

    2017-02-21

    Isolation and characterization of rare cells and molecules from a heterogeneous population is of critical importance in diagnosis of common lethal diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and cancer. For the developing world, point-of-care (POC) diagnostics design must account for limited funds, modest public health infrastructure, and low power availability. To address these challenges, here we integrate microfluidics, electronics, and inkjet printing to build an ultra-low-cost, rapid, and miniaturized lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platform. This platform can perform label-free and rapid single-cell capture, efficient cellular manipulation, rare-cell isolation, selective analytical separation of biological species, sorting, concentration, positioning, enumeration, and characterization. The miniaturized format allows for small sample and reagent volumes. By keeping the electronics separate from microfluidic chips, the former can be reused and device lifetime is extended. Perhaps most notably, the device manufacturing is significantly less expensive, time-consuming, and complex than traditional LOC platforms, requiring only an inkjet printer rather than skilled personnel and clean-room facilities. Production only takes 20 min (vs. up to weeks) and $0.01-an unprecedented cost in clinical diagnostics. The platform works based on intrinsic physical characteristics of biomolecules (e.g., size and polarizability). We demonstrate biomedical applications and verify cell viability in our platform, whose multiplexing and integration of numerous steps and external analyses enhance its application in the clinic, including by nonspecialists. Through its massive cost reduction and usability we anticipate that our platform will enable greater access to diagnostic facilities in developed countries as well as POC diagnostics in resource-poor and developing countries.

  3. Structure-activity relationship of a series of 17 parabens and related compounds for histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells and skin allergic reaction in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Uramaru, Naoto; Inoue, Toshio; Watanabe, Yoko; Shigematsu, Hidenari; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Parabens, which are a homologous series of esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, have been used as preservatives in cosmetics, medicines and foods because of their antimicrobial activity. However, parabens in cosmetics have been suspected to cause allergic contact dermatitis. In this study, we examined paraben-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and skin reaction in guinea pigs using a series of 17 parabens with different alcohol side chains, ranging from methylparaben to dodecylparaben. Octylparaben showed the greatest histamine release-inducing activity from mast cells, and the activity was decreased in shorter- and longer-side-chain parabens. Octyl benzoate, octyl o-hydroxybenzoate and phenyloctane caused no significant degranulation of mast cells, whereas octyl m-hydroxybenzoate, octyl p-hydroxybenzoate and octyl phenol induced concentration-related degranulation. Metabolites of these parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) did not show histamine release-inducing activity. In the guinea pig skin reaction test, heptylparaben induced a typical strong skin reaction, while butylparaben induced a typical weak skin reaction, and methylparaben and dodecylparaben were inactive. Metabolites of parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols) were also inactive. These results indicate that interaction of parabens with rat mast cells requires a minimum length and adequate lipophilicity of the alkyl side chain. Since metabolites of parabens were inactive, parabens appear to be direct-acting allergens.

  4. Genetic Manipulation of Mammary Stem Cells to Reconcile Tumor Stem Cell Theory with Breast Cancer Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    subpopulations from transgene-bearing and wild-type siblings. RNA was isolated from these cells and analyzed by reverse transcription- polymerase chain...resistance gene. The cells were then infected with an adenovirus bearing a gene for Cre- recombinase . Successful genomic recombination was detected...by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA. RT-PCR analysis was used to determine expression of transgenic c-myc RNA. No such RNA was

  5. Targeting colon cancer cell NF-κB promotes an anti-tumour M1-like macrophage phenotype and inhibits peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A E; Colleran, A; O'Gorman, A; O'Flynn, L; Pindjacova, J; Lohan, P; O'Malley, G; Nosov, M; Mureau, C; Egan, L J

    2015-03-19

    In a model of peritoneal metastasis in immune-competent mice, we show that nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibition in CT26 colon cancer cells prevents metastasis. NF-κB inhibition, by stable overexpression of IκB-α super-repressor, induced differential polarization of co-cultured macrophages to an M1-like anti-tumour phenotype in vitro. NF-κB-deficient cancer cell-conditioned media (CT26/IκB-α SR) induced interleukin (IL)-12 and nitric oxide (NO) synthase (inducible NO synthase (iNOS)) expression in macrophages. Control cell (CT26/EV) conditioned media induced high levels of IL-10 and arginase in macrophages. In vivo, this effect translated to reduction in metastasis in mice injected with CT26/ IκB-α SR cells and was positively associated with increased CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) and CD4(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effector T cells. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activity induced high levels of NO in infiltrating immune cells and decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, simultaneous with increases in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 and 2 within tumours. CT26/IκB-α SR tumours displayed increased pro-inflammatory gene expression, low levels of angiogenesis and extensive intratumoral apoptosis, consistent with the presence of an anti-tumour macrophage phenotype. Macrophage depletion reduced tumour size in CT26/EV-injected animals and increased tumour size in CT26/IκB-α SR cells compared with untreated tumours. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that an important implication of targeting tumour cell NF-κB is skewing of macrophage polarization to an anti-tumour phenotype. This knowledge offers novel therapeutic opportunities for anticancer treatment.

  6. A biocompatibility study on peritoneal dialysis solution bags for CAPD.

    PubMed

    Carozzi, S; Nasini, M G; Schelotto, C; Caviglia, P M; Santoni, O; Pietrucci, A

    1993-01-01

    Numerous factors related to the composition of peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDS) contribute to the pathogenesis of peritoneal fibrosis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). They include high osmolarity, low pH, and the presence of lactate, which may be responsible for stimulating the proliferation of peritoneal fibroblasts (PF) and for the toxicity on the peritoneal mesothelial cells (PMC). Similar effects could be hypothesized for the plasticizers released from the PDS bags, usually made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), such as the acid esters of phthalic acid, particularly bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEHP). Recently, however, new BEHP-free bags (Clear-Flex, Bieffe, Italy) made of three layers (polyethylene, nylon, and polypropylene) have been introduced. The aim of this work is to evaluate in vitro the effects of samples of PDS contained in PVC bags (Bieffe) and in Clear-Flex bags on the proliferative capacity of peritoneal fibroblasts and peritoneal mesothelial cells, and the release of interferon gamma (IFN gamma), interleukin-1 (IL-1) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from peritoneal T lymphocytes (PTLs) and macrophages (PM phi s). Results have shown that in the presence of PDS samples contained in PVC bags, the proliferative capacity of peritoneal fibroblasts was higher than in Clear-Flexbags. There was also an increased release of IFN-gamma and IL-1 from PTLs and PM phi s (cytokines that stimulate the collagen synthesis) and a decreased release of PGE2 (cytokines which inhibit the collagen synthesis). An inhibiting action on peritoneal mesothelial cells was also seen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Manipulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by coculture on human bone marrow stromal cells: potential utility for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ohishi, Kohshi; Orito, Yuki; Nakamori, Yoshiki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ino, Kazuko; Suzuki, Kei; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Masuya, Masahiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Mineno, Junichi; Ono, Ryoichi; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Shiku, Hiroshi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2013-04-01

    T cell precursors are an attractive target for adoptive immunotherapy. We examined the regulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by human bone marrow stromal cells to explore in vitro manipulation of human T cell precursors in a human-only coculture system. The generation of CD7(+)CD56(-)cyCD3(-) proT cells from human hematopoietic progenitors on telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells was enhanced by stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, but these stimulatory effects were suppressed by interleukin 3. Expression of Notch ligands Delta-1 and -4 on stromal cells additively promoted T cell differentiation into the CD7(+)cyCD3(+) pre-T cell stage, while cell growth was strongly inhibited. By combining these coculture systems, we found that initial coculture with telomerized stromal cells in the presence of stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, followed by coculture on Delta-1- and -4-coexpressing stromal cells led to a higher percentage and number of pre-T cells. Adoptive immunotherapy using peripheral blood T cells transduced with a tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) is a promising strategy but has several limitations, such as the risk of forming a chimeric TCR with the endogenous TCR. We demonstrated that incubation of TCR-transduced hematopoietic progenitors with the combination of coculture systems gave rise to CD7(+)TCR(+)CD3(+)CD1a(-) T cell precursors that rapidly proliferated and differentiated under the culture condition to induce mature T cell differentiation. These data show the regulatory mechanism of early T lymphopoiesis on human stromal cells and the potential utility of engineered human stromal cells to manipulate early T cell development for clinical application.

  8. Chromatibody, a novel non-invasive molecular tool to explore and manipulate chromatin in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Denis; Vignard, Julien; Fedor, Yoann; Béry, Nicolas; Olichon, Aurélien; Crozatier, Michèle; Erard, Monique; Cassard, Hervé; Ducommun, Bernard; Salles, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chromatin function is involved in many cellular processes, its visualization or modification being essential in many developmental or cellular studies. Here, we present the characterization of chromatibody, a chromatin-binding single-domain, and explore its use in living cells. This non-intercalating tool specifically binds the heterodimer of H2A–H2B histones and displays a versatile reactivity, specifically labeling chromatin from yeast to mammals. We show that this genetically encoded probe, when fused to fluorescent proteins, allows non-invasive real-time chromatin imaging. Chromatibody is a dynamic chromatin probe that can be modulated. Finally, chromatibody is an efficient tool to target an enzymatic activity to the nucleosome, such as the DNA damage-dependent H2A ubiquitylation, which can modify this epigenetic mark at the scale of the genome and result in DNA damage signaling and repair defects. Taken together, these results identify chromatibody as a universal non-invasive tool for either in vivo chromatin imaging or to manipulate the chromatin landscape. PMID:27206857

  9. A disposable emulsion droplet generation lab chips driven by vacuum module for manipulation of blood cells.

    PubMed

    Chia-Hung Lee; Chien-Chong Hong

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel disposable emulsion droplet generation lab chip driven by vacuum module for monodisperse emulsions generation and blood cell encapsulation. Emulsion droplet is a powerful tool in miniaturized analysis systems for high throughput processing. It shows great potential in chemical and biological reactions like speeding up the reaction and reducing the cost of reagents. Most research groups use syringe pumps providing positive pressure to drive the fluids. However, the long tubing connection and high cost make the microfluidic systems complicate and unsuitable for lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device. In this paper, our emulsion droplet generation lab chip with disposable vacuum module, made of shape memory polymer, provides a negative pressure to drive the fluids. This lab chip could achieve creating monodisperse emulsion droplets by manipulating two-phase microfluidic within 1 set of vacuum module and mini-heater. In the meantime, the waste is gathered into the cavity of vacuum module. This makes this lab chip safe while using biological samples. The vacuum module shows the advantages of compact, simple structure, and east-to-attach with the microfluidic device and great performance in the experiments.

  10. Characterization of Glial Cell Models and In Vitro Manipulation of the Neuregulin1/ErbB System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The neuregulin1/ErbB system plays an important role in Schwann cell behavior both in normal and pathological conditions. Upon investigation of the expression of the neuregulin1/ErbB system in vitro, we explored the possibility to manipulate the system in order to increase the migration of Schwann cells, that play a fundamental role in the peripheral nerve regeneration. Comparison of primary cells and stable cell lines shows that both primary olfactory bulb ensheathing cells and a corresponding cell line express ErbB1-ErbB2 and neuregulin1, and that both primary Schwann cells and a corresponding cell line express ErbB2-ErbB3, while only primary Schwann cells express neuregulin1. To interfere with the neuregulin1/ErbB system, the soluble extracellular domain of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB4 (ecto-ErbB4) was expressed in vitro in the neuregulin1 expressing cell line, and an unexpected increase in cell motility was observed. In vitro experiments suggest that the back signaling mediated by the transmembrane neuregulin1 plays a role in the migratory activity induced by ecto-ErbB4. These results indicate that ecto-ErbB4 could be used in vivo as a tool to manipulate the neuregulin1/ErbB system. PMID:25177687

  11. Characterization of glial cell models and in vitro manipulation of the neuregulin1/ErbB system.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Davide; Giovannelli, Alessia; Gnavi, Sara; Hoyng, Stefan Adriaan; de Winter, Fred; Morano, Michela; Fregnan, Federica; Dell'Albani, Paola; Zaccheo, Damiano; Perroteau, Isabelle; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Gambarotta, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    The neuregulin1/ErbB system plays an important role in Schwann cell behavior both in normal and pathological conditions. Upon investigation of the expression of the neuregulin1/ErbB system in vitro, we explored the possibility to manipulate the system in order to increase the migration of Schwann cells, that play a fundamental role in the peripheral nerve regeneration. Comparison of primary cells and stable cell lines shows that both primary olfactory bulb ensheathing cells and a corresponding cell line express ErbB1-ErbB2 and neuregulin1, and that both primary Schwann cells and a corresponding cell line express ErbB2-ErbB3, while only primary Schwann cells express neuregulin1. To interfere with the neuregulin1/ErbB system, the soluble extracellular domain of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB4 (ecto-ErbB4) was expressed in vitro in the neuregulin1 expressing cell line, and an unexpected increase in cell motility was observed. In vitro experiments suggest that the back signaling mediated by the transmembrane neuregulin1 plays a role in the migratory activity induced by ecto-ErbB4. These results indicate that ecto-ErbB4 could be used in vivo as a tool to manipulate the neuregulin1/ErbB system.

  12. Effect of 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet (PUVA) radiation on mast cells. II. In vitro PUVA inhibits degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells induced by compound 48/80

    SciTech Connect

    Toda, K.; Danno, K.; Tachibana, T.; Horio, T.

    1986-07-01

    Rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with a histamine liberator, compound 48/80, showed a significantly reduced capacity for releasing histamine following in vitro treatment with 0.1 micrograms/ml of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) plus 1-5 J/cm2 of long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) irradiation (PUVA). No remarkable inhibition in histamine release was observed in the cells treated with 8-MOP only. Irradiation with 5 J/cm2 of UVA alone exerted an inhibitory effect on histamine release, to a lesser extent than PUVA. PUVA irradiation did not bring any decrease in cell viability or any spontaneous release of histamine from irradiated cells as shown by phase-contrast microscopy and by histamine assay, respectively. These results suggest that PUVA treatment may cause a noncytotoxic disturbance at mast cell membranes or on surface receptors, leading to a decreased capacity for secreting chemical mediators.

  13. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Indication URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100159.htm Diagnostic peritoneal lavage - series—Indication To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  14. Brevibacillus brevis peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Najma; Cornelius, Lisa K; Fader, Robert

    2009-04-01

    We present what we believe is the first case of Brevibacillus (Bacillus) brevis peritonitis in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma, possibly caused by the ingestion of fermented foods containing B. brevis spores. This case also demonstrates a pattern of antibiotic susceptibility with differing in vitro and in vivo bactericidal efficacy.

  15. Genetic Manipulation Of Mammary Stem Cells to Reconcile Tumor Stem Cell Theory with Breast Cancer Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    analyzed by reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR). GFP mRNA was not found in ΔN-p63-eGFPcre mammary gland. In the K14...transgene were selected by exploiting a neomycin resistance gene. The cells were then infected with an adenovirus bearing a gene for Cre- recombinase ...Successful genomic recombination was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of genomic DNA. RT-PCR analysis was used to determine

  16. Isolation, genetic manipulation, and transplantation of canine spermatogonial stem cells: progress toward transgenesis through the male germ-line.

    PubMed

    Harkey, Michael A; Asano, Atsushi; Zoulas, Mary Ellen; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Nagashima, Jennifer; Travis, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    The dog is recognized as a highly predictive model for preclinical research. Its size, life span, physiology, and genetics more closely match human parameters than do those of the mouse model. Investigations of the genetic basis of disease and of new regenerative treatments have frequently taken advantage of canine models. However, full utility of this model has not been realized because of the lack of easy transgenesis. Blastocyst-mediated transgenic technology developed in mice has been very slow to translate to larger animals, and somatic cell nuclear transfer remains technically challenging, expensive, and low yield. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) transplantation, which does not involve manipulation of ova or blastocysts, has proven to be an effective alternative approach for generating transgenic offspring in rodents and in some large animals. Our recent demonstration that canine testis cells can engraft in a host testis, and generate donor-derived sperm, suggests that SSC transplantation may offer a similar avenue to transgenesis in the canine model. Here, we explore the potential of SSC transplantation in dogs as a means of generating canine transgenic models for preclinical models of genetic diseases. Specifically, we i) established markers for identification and tracking canine spermatogonial cells; ii) established methods for enrichment and genetic manipulation of these cells; iii) described their behavior in culture; and iv) demonstrated engraftment of genetically manipulated SSC and production of transgenic sperm. These findings help to set the stage for generation of transgenic canine models via SSC transplantation.

  17. An online coupled peritoneal macrophage/cell membrane chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method to screen for anti-inflammatory components from the Chinese traditional medicine Chloranthus multistachys Pei.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Xing, Wei; Wang, Sicen; Fan, Ting; Huang, Huimin; Niu, Xiaofeng; He, Langchong

    2013-11-01

    Cell membrane chromatography (CMC) is a chromatographic biological affinity method that uses specific cell membranes as the stationary phase. In this study, a novel peritoneal macrophage/cell membrane chromatography (PM/CMC)-online-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) method was established to screen for the anti-inflammatory components from traditional Chinese medicines using hydrocortisone and dexamethasone as standards. The stationary phase of the CMC employed mouse peritoneal macrophage cell membranes. This method was applied to the purification and identification of components in extracts of Chloranthus multistachys Pei. The major component retained by CMC was identified as isofraxidin by HPLC/MS. In vitro experiments revealed that IF was able to inhibit the production of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mice and peritoneal macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. The results demonstrated that the PM/CMC-online-HPLC/MS is an effective screening system for the rapid detection, enrichment, and identification of target components from complex samples.

  18. Pathophysiology of colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis: Role of the peritoneum

    PubMed Central

    Lemoine, Lieselotte; Sugarbaker, Paul; Van der Speeten, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Besides the lymphatic and haematogenous routes of dissemination, CRC frequently gives rise to transcoelomic spread of tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity, which ultimately leads to peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). PC is associated with a poor prognosis and bad quality of life for these patients in their terminal stages of disease. A loco-regional treatment modality for PC combining cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal peroperative chemotherapy has resulted in promising clinical results. However, this novel approach is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular events involved in peritoneal disease spread is paramount in avoiding unnecessary toxicity. The emergence of PC is the result of a molecular crosstalk between cancer cells and host elements, involving several well-defined steps, together known as the peritoneal metastatic cascade. Individual or clumps of tumor cells detach from the primary tumor, gain access to the peritoneal cavity and become susceptible to the regular peritoneal transport. They attach to the distant peritoneum, subsequently invade the subperitoneal space, where angiogenesis sustains proliferation and enables further metastatic growth. These molecular events are not isolated events but rather a continuous and interdependent process. In this manuscript, we review current data regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of colorectal PC, with a special focus on the peritoneum and the role of the surgeon in peritoneal disease spread. PMID:27678351

  19. Expression of human aldo-keto reductase 1C2 in cell lines of peritoneal endometriosis: potential implications in metabolism of progesterone and dydrogesterone and inhibition by progestins.

    PubMed

    Beranič, Nataša; Brožič, Petra; Brus, Boris; Sosič, Izidor; Gobec, Stanislav; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea

    2012-05-01

    The human aldo-keto reductase AKR1C2 converts 5α-dihydrotestosterone to the less active 3α-androstanediol and has a minor 20-ketosteroid reductase activity that metabolises progesterone to 20α-hydroxyprogesterone. AKR1C2 is expressed in different peripheral tissues, but its role in uterine diseases like endometriosis has not been studied in detail. Some progestins used for treatment of endometriosis inhibit AKR1C1 and AKR1C3, with unknown effects on AKR1C2. In this study we investigated expression of AKR1C2 in the model cell lines of peritoneal endometriosis, and examined the ability of recombinant AKR1C2 to metabolise progesterone and progestin dydrogesterone, as well as its potential inhibition by progestins. AKR1C2 is expressed in epithelial and stromal endometriotic cell lines at the mRNA level. The recombinant enzyme catalyses reduction of progesterone to 20α-hydroxyprogesterone with a 10-fold lower catalytic efficiency than the major 20-ketosteroid reductase, AKR1C1. AKR1C2 also metabolises progestin dydrogesterone to its 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone, with 8.6-fold higher catalytic efficiency than 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Among the progestins that are currently used for treatment of endometriosis, dydrogesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate and 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone act as AKR1C2 inhibitors with low μM K(i) values in vitro. Their potential in vivo effects should be further studied.

  20. Molecular characterization of feline infectious peritonitis virus strain DF-2 and studies of the role of ORF3abc in viral cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Ádám; Farsang, Attila; Zádori, Zoltán; Hornyák, Ákos; Dencso, László; Almazán, Fernando; Enjuanes, Luis; Belák, Sándor

    2012-06-01

    The full-length genome of the highly lethal feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) strain DF-2 was sequenced and cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to study the role of ORF3abc in the FIPV-feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) transition. The reverse genetic system allowed the replacement of the truncated ORF3abc of the original FIPV DF-2 genome with the intact ORF3abc of the canine coronavirus (CCoV) reference strain Elmo/02. The in vitro replication kinetics of these two viruses was studied in CrFK and FCWF-4 cell lines, as well as in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Both viruses showed similar replication kinetics in established cell lines. However, the strain with a full-length ORF3 showed markedly lower replication of more than 2 log(10) titers in feline peripheral blood monocytes. Our results suggest that the truncated ORF3abc plays an important role in the efficient macrophage/monocyte tropism of type II FIPV.

  1. Manipulation of Human Primary Endothelial Cell and Osteoblast Coculture Ratios to Augment Vasculogenesis and Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amita R; Wenke, Joseph C; Agrawal, Chandra Mauli

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-engineering scaffolds are often seeded with a single type of cell, but there has been more focus on cocultures to improve angiogenesis and bone formation for craniofacial applications. Investigation of bone-derived osteoblasts (OBs) is important because of the use of bone grafts and migration of OBs from native bone into constructs in vivo and therefore, their contribution to bone formation in vivo. The limitation of primary OBs has been their inability to mineralize without osteogenic factors in vitro. Through coculture of OBs and endothelial cells (ECs) and manipulation of the coculture ratio, mineralization can be achieved without osteogenic media or additional growth factors, thus enhancing their utility for tissue-engineering applications. An optimal ratio of EC/OB for vasculogenesis and mineralization has not been determined for human primary cells. Human umbilical vein ECs were cultured with normal human primary OBs in different EC/OB ratios, namely, 10:1, 5:1, 1:1, 1:5, and 1:10 with EC and OB monocultures as controls. The number of vasculogenic networks in a collagen matrix was highest in ratios of 5:1 and 1:1. ECs lined up and formed capillary-like networks by day 10, which was not seen in the other groups. On polystyrene, cells were cocultured with ECs and OBs in direct contact (direct coculture) or separated by a transwell membrane (indirect coculture). At day 21, Alizarin Red staining showed mineralization on the 1:5 and 1:10 direct coculture ratios, with 1:5 having more mineralization nodules present than 1:10. No mineralization was seen in other direct coculture ratios or in any of the indirect coculture ratios. Alkaline phosphatase secretion was highest in the 1:5 direct coculture group. Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from OBs was present in the 1:5 and 1:10 direct coculture ratios at all time points and inhibited after day 1 in other coculture groups. To improve vasculogenesis, cocultures of primary human ECs and OBs in ratios

  2. Peritonitis-induced antitumor activity of peritoneal macrophages from uremic patients.

    PubMed

    Turyna, Bohdan; Jurek, Aleksandra; Gotfryd, Kamil; Siaśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Kubit, Piotr; Klein, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    The macrophages belong to the effector cells of both nonspecific and specific immune response. These cells generally express little cytotoxicity unless activated. The present work was intended to determine if peritoneal macrophages collected from patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) during episodes of peritonitis were active against human tumor cell lines without further in vitro stimulation. We also compared macrophage antitumor potential with effectiveness of drugs used in cancer therapy (taxol and suramin). Conditioned medium (CM) of macrophages collected during inflammation-free periods did not exhibit cytostatic and cytotoxic activity against both tumor (A549 and HTB44) and non-transformed (BEAS-2B and CRL2190) cells. Exposure of tumor cells to CM of macrophages harvested during peritonitis resulted in significant suppression of proliferation, impairment of viability and induction of apoptosis, in contrast to non-transformed cells, which remained unaffected. The efficacy of CM of inflammatory macrophages as an antitumor agent appeared to be comparable to cytostatic and cytotoxic potency of taxol and suramin or, in the case of HTB44 cells, even higher. The results obtained suggest that activated human macrophages might represent a useful tool for cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Laser Nano-Neurosurgery from Gentle Manipulation to Nano-Incision of Neuronal Cells and Scaffolds: An Advanced Neurotechnology Tool

    PubMed Central

    Soloperto, Alessandro; Palazzolo, Gemma; Tsushima, Hanako; Chieregatti, Evelina; Vassalli, Massimo; Difato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Current optical approaches are progressing far beyond the scope of monitoring the structure and function of living matter, and they are becoming widely recognized as extremely precise, minimally-invasive, contact-free handling tools. Laser manipulation of living tissues, single cells, or even single-molecules is becoming a well-established methodology, thus founding the onset of new experimental paradigms and research fields. Indeed, a tightly focused pulsed laser source permits complex tasks such as developing engineered bioscaffolds, applying calibrated forces, transfecting, stimulating, or even ablating single cells with subcellular precision, and operating intracellular surgical protocols at the level of single organelles. In the present review, we report the state of the art of laser manipulation in neuroscience, to inspire future applications of light-assisted tools in nano-neurosurgery. PMID:27013962

  4. Laser Nano-Neurosurgery from Gentle Manipulation to Nano-Incision of Neuronal Cells and Scaffolds: An Advanced Neurotechnology Tool.

    PubMed

    Soloperto, Alessandro; Palazzolo, Gemma; Tsushima, Hanako; Chieregatti, Evelina; Vassalli, Massimo; Difato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Current optical approaches are progressing far beyond the scope of monitoring the structure and function of living matter, and they are becoming widely recognized as extremely precise, minimally-invasive, contact-free handling tools. Laser manipulation of living tissues, single cells, or even single-molecules is becoming a well-established methodology, thus founding the onset of new experimental paradigms and research fields. Indeed, a tightly focused pulsed laser source permits complex tasks such as developing engineered bioscaffolds, applying calibrated forces, transfecting, stimulating, or even ablating single cells with subcellular precision, and operating intracellular surgical protocols at the level of single organelles. In the present review, we report the state of the art of laser manipulation in neuroscience, to inspire future applications of light-assisted tools in nano-neurosurgery.

  5. Ovarian cancer ascites enhance the migration of patient-derived peritoneal mesothelial cells via cMet pathway through HGF-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Matte, Isabelle; Lane, Denis; Laplante, Claude; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Rancourt, Claudine; Piché, Alain

    2015-07-15

    Ovarian cancer ascites consist of a proinflammatory environment that is characterized by the presence of abundant human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). Cytokines and growth factors in ascites modulate cell activities of tumor cells. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in ascites is associated with a more aggressive tumor phenotype. The effect of ascites on HPMCs is for the most part unknown but this interplay is thought to be important for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) progression. Here, we examine the components of ascites, which stimulate patient-derived HPMC migration, from women with advanced EOC. We show that ovarian cancer ascites enhanced the migration of HPMCs. This effect was inhibited by heat treatment, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) blocking antibodies and a HGF receptor (cMet) inhibitor. In ovarian cancer ascites, HGF is present at high concentration compared to benign fluids. Ascites-mediated activation of cMet was associated with Akt and EKR1/2 phosphorylation. This response was partly inhibited by heat treatment and cMet inhibitor. Ascites-induced migration and a cMet phosphorylation were strongly inhibited by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor PD153035, suggesting the transactivation of cMet by EGFR. Our study suggests that HGF and ligands of EGFR are factors that mediate ovarian cancer ascites-mediated migration of HPMCs by activating cMet and possibly downstream ERK1/2 and Akt pathways. The study provides evidence for the first time that ascites not only support tumor growth but also enhance the migratory potential of cancer-associated mesothelial cells, which in turn may support cancer progression.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of peritoneal dissemination in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dissemination represents a devastating form of gastric cancer (GC) progression with a dismal prognosis. There is no effective therapy for this condition. The 5-year survival rate of patients with peritoneal dissemination is 2%, even including patients with only microscopic free cancer cells without macroscopic peritoneal nodules. The mechanism of peritoneal dissemination of GC involves several steps: detachment of cancer cells from the primary tumor, survival in the free abdominal cavity, attachment to the distant peritoneum, invasion into the subperitoneal space and proliferation with angiogenesis. These steps are not mutually exclusive, and combinations of different molecular mechanisms can occur in each process of peritoneal dissemination. A comprehensive understanding of the molecular events involved in peritoneal dissemination is important and should be systematically pursued. It is crucial to identify novel strategies for the prevention of this condition and for identification of markers of prognosis and the development of molecular-targeted therapies. In this review, we provide an overview of recently published articles addressing the molecular mechanisms of peritoneal dissemination of GC to provide an update on what is currently known in this field and to propose novel promising candidates for use in diagnosis and as therapeutic targets. PMID:27570420

  7. Transgenic manipulation of plant embryo sacs tracked through cell-type-specific fluorescent markers: cell labeling, cell ablation, and adventitious embryos.

    PubMed

    Lawit, Shai J; Chamberlin, Mark A; Agee, April; Caswell, Eric S; Albertsen, Marc C

    2013-06-01

    Expression datasets relating to the Arabidopsis female gametophyte have enabled the creation of a tool set which allows simultaneous visual tracking of each specific cell type (egg, synergids, central cell, and antipodals). This cell-specific, fluorescent labeling tool-set functions from gametophyte cellularization through fertilization and early embryo development. Using this system, cell fates were tracked within Arabidopsis ovules following molecular manipulations, such as the ablation of the egg and/or synergids. Upon egg cell ablation, it was observed that a synergid can switch its developmental fate to become egg/embryo-like upon loss of the native egg. Also, manipulated was the fate of the somatic ovular cells, which can become egg- and embryo-like, reminiscent of adventitious embryony. These advances represent initial steps toward engineering synthetic apomixis resulting in seed derived wholly from the maternal plant. The end goal of applied apomixis research, fixing important agronomic traits such as hybrid vigor, would be a key benefit to agricultural productivity.

  8. Characterization and genetic manipulation of primed stem cells into a functional naïve state with ESRRB

    PubMed Central

    Rossello, Ricardo Antonio; Pfenning, Andreas; Howard, Jason T; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify differences between primed mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and fully functional naive ESCs; to manipulate primed cells into a naive state. METHODS We have cultured 3 lines of cells from different mouse strains that have been shown to be naive or primed as determined by generating germline-transmitting chimeras. Cells were put through a battery of tests to measure the different features. RNA from cells was analyzed using microarrays, to determine a priority list of the differentially expressed genes. These were later validated by quantificational real-time polymerase chain reaction. Viral cassettes were created to induce expression of differentially expressed genes in the primed cells through lentiviral transduction. Primed reprogrammed cells were subjected to in-vivo incorporation studies. RESULTS Most results show that both primed and naive cells have similar features (morphology, proliferation rates, stem cell genes expressed). However, there were some genes that were differentially expressed in the naïve cells relative to the primed cells. Key upregulated genes in naïve cells include ESRRB, ERAS, ATRX, RNF17, KLF-5, and MYC. After over-expressing some of these genes the primed cells were able to incorporate into embryos in-vivo, re-acquiring a feature previously absent in these cells. CONCLUSION Although there are no notable phenotypic differences, there are key differences in gene expression between these naïve and primed stem cells. These differences can be overcome through overexpression. PMID:27822342

  9. Cytoskeletal studies on Lowicryl K4M embedded and Affi-Gel 731 attached rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, E H; Jahn, H

    1984-01-01

    The subplasmalemmal network in mast cells consists of irregularly arranged 6-7 nm filaments (actin) connected by thinner filaments. In places oblique filaments with crossbridges or short, perpendicular filaments (11-12 nm) connect cell and granule membrane. Filaments attaching subplasmalemmal network to cell membrane divide like a Y and attach cell membrane end-on with a conical, hook-like bending. Each granule is surrounded by a regular network of filaments.

  10. Tissue response to peritoneal implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal implants were fabricated from poly 2-OH, ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polyetherurethane (polytetramethylene glycol 1000 MW, 1,4 methylene disocynate, and ethyl diamine), and untreated and sputter treated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The sputter treated PTFE implants were produced by an 8 cm diameter argon ion source. The treated samples consisted of ion beam sputter polished samples, sputter etched samples (to produce a microscopic surface cone texture) and surface pitted samples (produced by ion beam sputtering to result in 50 microns wide by 100 microns deep square pits). These materials were implanted in rats for periods ranging from 30 minutes to 14 days. The results were evaluated with regard to cell type and attachment kinetics onto the different materials. Scanning electron microscopy and histological sections were also evaluated. In general the smooth hydrophobic surfaces attracted less cells than the ion etched PTFE or the HEMA samples. The ion etching was observed to enhance cell attachment, multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) formation, cell to cell contact, and fibrous capsule formation. The cell responsed in the case of ion etched PTFE to an altered surface morphology. However, equally interesting was the similar attachment kinetics of HEMA verses the ion etched PTFE. However, HEMA resulted in a markedly different response with no MNGC's formation, minimal to no capsule formation, and sample coverage by a uniform cell layer.

  11. Histopathology and enhanced detection of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jey-Hsin; Borges, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion of the peritoneal membrane may have an adverse prognostic significance, but its histopathologic features can be diagnostically difficult to recognize. We observed that local peritoneal injury associated with tumor invasion is characterized by activation and proliferation of serosal stromal cells that express cytokeratin, a characteristic property of injured serosal membranes that may have diagnostic utility. To explore this, we examined 120 primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreaticobiliary system using cytokeratin and elastic stains to assess for tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes. Peritoneal invasion by tumor was associated with retraction, splaying, and destruction of the elastic lamina and proliferation of keratin-expressing stromal cells of serosal membranes. All 82 peritoneal invasive tumors were characterized by neoplastic cells that invaded the elastic lamina and the serosal connective tissue with neoplastic cells that abutted or were surrounded by keratin-positive stromal cells, whereas all 38 tumors limited to the subserosa showed none of these features. The diagnosis of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes is enhanced by the combined use of cytokeratin and elastic stains, which in turn would enable better histopathologic correlation with patient treatment and outcome.

  12. Histopathology and enhanced detection of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion of the peritoneal membrane may have an adverse prognostic significance, but its histopathologic features can be diagnostically difficult to recognize. We observed that local peritoneal injury associated with tumor invasion is characterized by activation and proliferation of serosal stromal cells that express cytokeratin, a characteristic property of injured serosal membranes that may have diagnostic utility. To explore this, we examined 120 primary tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreaticobiliary system using cytokeratin and elastic stains to assess for tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes. Peritoneal invasion by tumor was associated with retraction, splaying, and destruction of the elastic lamina and proliferation of keratin-expressing stromal cells of serosal membranes. All 82 peritoneal invasive tumors were characterized by neoplastic cells that invaded the elastic lamina and the serosal connective tissue with neoplastic cells that abutted or were surrounded by keratin-positive stromal cells, whereas all 38 tumors limited to the subserosa showed none of these features. The diagnosis of tumor invasion of peritoneal membranes is enhanced by the combined use of cytokeratin and elastic stains, which in turn would enable better histopathologic correlation with patient treatment and outcome. PMID:28282462

  13. Aliskiren Prevents the Toxic Effects of Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids during Chronic Dialysis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, Juan; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco C.; Carrión, Blanca; Masiá, Jesús; Ortega, Agustín; Simarro, Esther; Nam-Cha, Syong H.; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with end-stage renal failure are short-lived due to structural and functional changes in the peritoneal membrane. In this report, we provide evidence for the in vitro and in vivo participation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in the signaling pathway leading to peritoneal fibrosis during PD. Exposure to high-glucose PD fluids (PDFs) increases damage and fibrosis markers in both isolated rat peritoneal mesothelial cells and in the peritoneum of rats after chronic dialysis. In both cases, the addition of the RAAS inhibitor aliskiren markedly improved damage and fibrosis markers, and prevented functional modifications in the peritoneal transport, as measured by the peritoneal equilibrium test. These data suggest that inhibition of the RAAS may be a novel way to improve the efficacy of PD by preventing inflammation and fibrosis following peritoneal exposure to high-glucose PDFs. PMID:22558414

  14. Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman O.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a rare chronic inflammatory condition of the peritoneum with an unknown aetiology. Also known as abdominal cocoon, the condition occurs when loops of the bowel are encased within the peritoneal cavity by a membrane, leading to intestinal obstruction. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical features, it is often misdiagnosed. The condition presents with recurrent episodes of small bowel obstruction and can be idiopathic or secondary; the latter is associated with predisposing factors such as peritoneal dialysis or abdominal tuberculosis. In the early stages, patients can be managed conservatively; however, surgical intervention is necessary for those with advanced stage intestinal obstruction. A literature review revealed 118 cases of SEP; the mean age of these patients was 39 years and 68.0% were male. The predominant presentation was abdominal pain (72.0%), distension (44.9%) or a mass (30.5%). Almost all of the patients underwent surgical excision (99.2%) without postoperative complications (88.1%). PMID:27226904

  15. Pyrazinoic acid decreases peritoneal transfer rates.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewska, A E; Czyzewska, K; Szary, B

    1995-01-01

    It was shown elsewhere that in a peritoneally dialyzed woman with pulmonary tuberculosis, oral treatment with rifampicin and pyrazinamide (11 and 25 mg/kg/day, respectively) caused a decrease in the peritoneal transport of sodium, potassium, urea, uric acid, protein, and ultrafiltration rate by 48% to 75% compared to the pretreatment values. Pyrazinoic acid (PA), a metabolite of pyrazinamide, may account for these changes, because rifampicin was also previously used in this patient without peritoneal function impairment. Thus in the present study the influence of PA on the human peritoneum is examined using the modified Ussing-type chamber. PA (1 mg/dL) was introduced into the medium on the interstitial side of the membrane. After the introduction of PA, uric acid transfer from the interstitial to the mesothelial side decreased by about 50%. There were no significant changes in the urea and albumin transfer rates. In conclusion, PA induces changes in uric acid transfer acting directly on mesothelial cells, whereas a decrease in the peritoneal transfer of other solutes may be caused by a decrease in convective transfer rates due to impaired ultrafiltration.

  16. MV-NIS or Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. The Dnmt3b splice variant is specifically expressed in in vitro-manipulated blastocysts and their derivative ES cells.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuro; Suetake, Isao; Yanagisawa, Eikichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Imai, Hiroshi; Tajima, Shoji; Hatada, Izuho

    2011-10-01

    Manipulation of preimplantation embryos in vitro, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF), in vitro culture (IVC), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and other assisted reproduction technologies (ART), has contributed to the development of infertility treatment and new animal reproduction methods. However, such embryos often exhibit abnormal DNA methylation patterns in imprinted genes and centromeric satellite repeats. These DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by three DNA methyltransferases: Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Dnmt3b is responsible for the creation of methylation patterns during the early stage of embryogenesis and consists of many alternative splice variants that affect methylation activity; nevertheless, the roles of these variants have not yet been identified. In this study, we found an alternatively spliced variant of Dnmt3b lacking exon 6 (Dnmt3bΔ6) that is specific to mouse IVC embryos. Dnmt3bΔ6 also showed prominent expression in embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from in vitro manipulated embryos. Interestingly, IVC blastocysts were hypomethylated in centromeric satellite repeat regions that could be susceptible to methylation by Dnmt3b. In vitro methylation activity assays showed that Dnmt3bΔ6 had lower activity than normal Dnmt3b. Our findings suggest that Dnmt3bΔ6 could induce a hypomethylation status especially in in vitro manipulated embryos.

  18. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids (‘adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids’) are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29–84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n =3) and lung (n =1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed ‘other’ carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular (‘carcinoid pattern’) was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, ‘adenocarcinoma ex

  19. Adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid (appendiceal-type crypt cell adenocarcinoma) is a morphologically distinct entity with highly aggressive behavior and frequent association with peritoneal/intra-abdominal dissemination: an analysis of 77 cases.

    PubMed

    Reid, Michelle D; Basturk, Olca; Shaib, Walid L; Xue, Yue; Balci, Serdar; Choi, Hye-Jeong; Akkas, Gizem; Memis, Bahar; Robinson, Brian S; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Staley, Charles A; Staley, Christopher A; Winer, Joshua H; Russell, Maria C; Knight, Jessica H; Goodman, Michael; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Adsay, Volkan

    2016-10-01

    High-grade versions of appendiceal goblet cell carcinoids ('adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoids') are poorly characterized. We herein document 77 examples. Tumors occurred predominantly in females (74%), mean age 55 years (29-84), most with disseminated abdominal (77% peritoneal, 58% gynecologic tract involvement) and stage IV (65%) disease. Many presented to gynecologic oncologists, and nine had a working diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. Metastases to liver (n=3) and lung (n=1) were uncommon and none arose in adenomatous lesions. Tumors had various histologic patterns, in variable combinations, most of which were fairly specific, making them recognizable as appendiceal in origin, even at metastatic sites: I: Ordinary goblet cell carcinoid/crypt pattern (rounded, non-luminal acini with well-oriented goblet cells), in variable amounts in all cases. II: Poorly cohesive goblet cell pattern (diffusely infiltrative cords/single files of signet ring-like/goblet cells). III: Poorly cohesive non-mucinous cell (diffuse-infiltrative growth of non-mucinous cells). IV: Microglandular (rosette-like glandular) pattern without goblet cells. V: Mixed 'other' carcinoma foci (including ordinary intestinal/mucinous). VI: goblet cell carcinoid pattern with high-grade morphology (marked nuclear atypia). VII: Solid sheet-like pattern punctuated by goblet cells/microglandular units. Ordinary nested/trabecular ('carcinoid pattern') was very uncommon. In total, 33(52%) died of disease, with median overall survival 38 months and 5-year survival 32%. On multivariate analysis perineural invasion and younger age (<55) were independently associated with worse outcome while lymph-vascular invasion, stage, and nodal status trended toward, but failed to reach, statistical significance. Worse behavior in younger patients combined with female predilection and ovarian-affinity raise the possibility of hormone-assisted tumor progression. In conclusion, 'adenocarcinoma ex-goblet cell carcinoid' is

  20. Detection value of free cancer cells in peritoneal washing in gastric cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tustumi, Francisco; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Roncon Dias, Andre; Kodama Pertille Ramos, Marcus Fernando; Cecconello, Ivan; Zilberstein, Bruno; Ribeiro-Júnior, Ulysses

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal free cancer cells in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with a poor outcome. However, the true prognostic value of intraperitoneal free cancer cells is still unclear, leading to a lack of consensus in the management of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze intraperitoneal free cancer cells-positive patients with regard to tumor oncologic stage, recurrence, grade of cellular differentiation, and survival rates and to analyze the clinical significance of intraperitoneal free cancer cells with regard to prognosis. Databases were searched up to January 2016 for prognostic factors associated with intraperitoneal free cancer cells, including oncologic stage, depth of neoplasm invasion, lymph nodal spread, differentiation grade of the tumor, and recurrence and survival rates. A total of 100 studies were identified. Meta-analysis revealed a clear association between intraperitoneal free cancer cells and a poor prognosis. intraperitoneal free cancer cells -positive patients had higher rates of nodal spread (risk difference: 0.29; p<0.01), serosal invasion (risk difference: 0.43; p<0.01), recurrence (after 60 months of follow-up, risk difference: 0.44; p<0.01), and mortality (after 60 months of follow-up, risk difference: 0.34; p<0.01). Intraperitoneal free cancer cells are associated with a poor outcome in gastric cancer. This surrogate biomarker should be used to guide therapy both prior to and after surgery. PMID:28076519

  1. Chemical manipulation of the mTORC1 pathway in industrially relevant CHOK1 cells enhances production of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Dadehbeigi, Nazanin; Dickson, Alan J

    2015-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is known as a central coordinator of protein synthesis and cell growth in response to the cellular environment. In this work, chemical manipulation of mTORC1 pathway was employed to enhance mAb production as well as increase understanding of intracellular pathways in GS-CHOK1 cells. Using the phosphorylation status of mTORC1 downstream targets, S6K1 and 4E-BP1, as read-outs of mTORC1 activity, we investigated the contribution of each target protein to growth and/or productivity. Inoculation of cultures in the presence of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTORC1, increased viability and final titer. The initial increase in specific productivity and inhibition of growth by rapamycin correlated with diminished phospho-S6K1. However, inhibition was transient and cells recovered by unknown mechanisms. In contrast, phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 was preserved in response to rapamycin. Finally, we examined the activity of mTORC1 after addition of a custom-designed feed. Feeding led to substantial increase in growth and productivity and the phosphorylation of both targets was elevated. Though many details of mTORC1 signaling in CHO cells remain to be clarified, we have provided evidence that environmental manipulation of the mTORC1 pathway correlates with changes in cell growth and recombinant protein production.

  2. Ultrasonic manipulation of yeast cells in suspension for absorption spectroscopy with an immersible mid-infrared fiberoptic probe.

    PubMed

    Koch, Cosima; Brandstetter, Markus; Lendl, Bernhard; Radel, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Recent advances in combining ultrasonic particle manipulation with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy of yeast suspensions are presented. Infrared spectroscopy provides highly specific molecular information about the sample. It has not been applicable to in-line monitoring of cells during fermentation, however, because positioning cells in the micron-thin measurement region of the attenuated total reflection probe was not possible. Ultrasonic radiation forces exerted on suspended particles by an ultrasonic standing wave can result in the buildup of agglomerates in the nodal planes, hence enabling the manipulation of suspended cells on the microscopic scale. When a chamber setup and a prototype in-line applicable probe were used, successful control over the position of the yeast cells relative to the attenuated total reflection sensor surface could be proven. Both rate of increase and maximum mid-infrared absorption of yeast-specific bands during application of a pushing frequency (chamber setup: 1.863 MHz, in-line probe: 1.990 MHz) were found to correlate with yeast cell concentration.

  3. Microbiological aspects of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    von Graevenitz, A; Amsterdam, D

    1992-01-01

    The process of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has provided a useful, relatively inexpensive, and safe alternative for patients with end-stage renal disease. Infectious peritonitis, however, has limited a more widespread acceptance of this technique. The definition of peritonitis in this patient population is not universally accepted and does not always include the laboratory support of a positive culture (or Gram stain). In part, the omission of clinical microbiological findings stems from the lack of sensitivity of earlier microbiological efforts. Peritonitis results from decreased host phagocytic efficiency with depressed phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity of peritoneal macrophages. During episodes of peritonitis, fluid movement is reversed, away from the lymphatics and peritoneal membrane and toward the cavity. As a result, bloodstream infections are rare. Most peritonitis episodes are caused by bacteria. Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most frequently isolated organisms, usually originating from the skin flora, but a wide array of microbial species have been documented as agents of peritonitis. Clinical microbiology laboratories need to be cognizant of the diverse agents so that appropriate primary media can be used. The quantity of dialysate fluid that is prepared for culture is critical and should constitute at least 10 ml. The sensitivity of the cultural approach depends on the volume of dialysate, its pretreatment (lysis or centrifugation), the media used, and the mode of incubation. The low concentration of microorganisms in dialysate fluids accounts for negative Gram stain results. Prevention of infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients is associated with the socioeconomic status of the patient, advances in equipment (catheter) technology, and, probably least important, the application of prophylactic antimicrobial agents. PMID:1735094

  4. Biocompatibility versus peritoneal mesothelial cells of polypropylene prostheses for hernia repair, coated with a thin silica/silver layer.

    PubMed

    Muzio, Giuliana; Perero, Sergio; Miola, Marta; Oraldi, Manuela; Ferraris, Sara; Vernè, Enrica; Festa, Federico; Canuto, Rosa Angela; Festa, Valentino; Ferraris, Monica

    2016-04-29

    Hernias are generally repaired using synthetic prostheses. Infection may already be present or develop during implantation. Based on the increasing resistance to antibiotics, and the well-known antimicrobial properties of silver (Ag), the possibility of coating hernia prostheses with a nanostructured layer containing Ag was explored. Prostheses (Clear Mesh Composite [CMC]) made up of two polypropylene layers (macroporous light mesh and thin transparent film) were tested with human mesothelial cells from omentum biopsies. Mesotheliocytes modulate abdominal wall healing producing cytokines, growth factors, and adhesion molecules. Evaluating the growth of these cells on CMC or film alone showed that cell numbers on CMC increased over time, and were higher than those on film alone. Vimentin immunostaining confirmed the cells to be mesotheliocytes. Subsequently, the biocompatibility of mesh layer, coated or not with a thin layer of Ag/SiO2 -nanoclusters, was analyzed, showing no difference in absence or presence of Ag/SiO2 . Differently, TGF-β2 production, involved in tissue repair and fibrosis, increased in the presence of Ag/SiO2 . Moreover, Ag/SiO2 -coated mesh showed antibacterial properties. In conclusion, the mesh layer coated with Ag/SiO2 afforded cell growth, and showed antibacterial activity. Coating only the mesh layer did not decrease film transparency, and did not favor the formation of adhesions on the visceral side. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  5. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Teresa; Randell, Susan; Moore, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) frequently results in death in cats. It is caused by a mutated, highly contagious coronavirus, and it is more common in indoor cats in multicat households. A complex interaction between the coronavirus and the feline immune system causes disseminated vasculitis, which is the hallmark of FIP. New tests are being developed, but the antemortem diagnosis of FIP continues to be difficult and frustrating. Current treatments are crude and involve supportive care and immunosuppression. Minimizing exposure is the best method of preventing infection.

  6. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  7. The exocytotic signaling pathway induced by nerve growth factor in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine in rat peritoneal mast cells involves a type D phospholipase.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Westenberger, K; Elgeti, T; Ziegler, A; Schütze, S

    2001-12-15

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been previously shown to induce exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) in the presence of lyso-phosphatidylserine (lysoPS) by interacting with high-affinity NGF receptors of the TrkA-type. In RPMCs, type D phosphatidylcholine-selective phospholipases (PLDs) have been postulated to be involved in some exocytotic signaling pathways induced by different agonists. The aim of the present study was to assess a putative functional role of PLD for NGF/lysoPS-induced exocytosis in RPMCs. In 1-[14C]palmitoyl-2-lyso-3-phosphatidylcholine-labelled RPMCs, NGF/lysoPS stimulated the formation of diacylglycerol (DAG) and, in the presence of ethanol (1% [v/v]), phosphatidylethanol (PEtOH). These data indicate PLD-activation by NGF/lysoPS in RPMCs. Preincubation of RPMCs for 2 min with ethanol, an inhibitor of PLD-derived DAG-formation, dose-dependently (IC(50): 0.6% [v/v]) and agonist-selectively inhibited the NGF/lysoPS induced release of [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) in [3H]5-HT-loaded RPMCs, confirming the functional importance of PLD-action. Exocytosis and PEtOH-production was potently inhibited by the broad-spectrum serine/threonine kinase inhibitor staurosporine and activated by the protein kinase C(PKC)-activator PMA (phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate) suggesting a role for PKC as mediator for NGF/lysoPS-induced activation of PLD.

  8. Peritoneal catheters and related infections.

    PubMed

    Thodis, Elias; Passadakis, Ploumis; Lyrantzopooulos, Nikolaos; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios

    2005-01-01

    Catheter related infectious complications (exit-site infections, tunnel infections, and peritonitis) remain the major reasons for technique failure during the three decades since, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatment has been first established. Despite improvements in catheter's survival rates, catheter related complications result in an increase in the cumulative patients' morbidity and often leading to the catheter removal. The ideal catheter provides reliable and rapid dialysate flow rates without leaks or infections. Among several types, the double-cuff straight Tenckhoff catheter, developed in 1968, is still the most widely used, although its use is decreasing in favour of swanneck catheters. Although there are only few well-designed trials comparing catheters and catheters related infectious complications, controlling for all other important variables, no difference in these complications among the main types of catheters was seen. The single cuff catheters have been associated with a shorter survival rate and time to the first peritonitis episode than the double-cuff catheters. Also exit-site infections were found to be more frequent and significantly more resistant to treatment with single-cuff compared to double-cuff ones. Finally, better results have been reported with the latest developed presternal peritoneal dialysis catheter both regarding survival rates and exit-site infection and peritonitis rates. Recently a renewed interest in continuous flow peritoneal dialysis stimulated inventions of imaginative, double-lumen catheters since a suitable peritoneal access is a sine qua non condition for the development of this new technique of peritoneal dialysis.

  9. Paecilomyces variotii in peritoneal dialysate.

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, A; Heron, L G; Pritchard, R C; Butcher, R H; Powell, H R; Disney, A P; Tosolini, F A

    1993-01-01

    Four cases of peritonitis caused by the filamentous fungus Paecilomyces variotii in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis are reported. Removal of the Tenckhoff catheter and antifungal chemotherapy led to resolution of symptoms in all cases. Possible contaminating events are discussed, and reported infections with P. variotii are reviewed. PMID:8408561

  10. In Vivo Conditions Enable IFNAR-Independent Type I Interferon Production by Peritoneal CD11b+ Cells upon Thogoto Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kochs, Georg; Anzaghe, Martina; Kronhart, Stefanie; Wagner, Valentina; Gogesch, Patricia; Scheu, Stefanie; Lienenklaus, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Type I interferons (IFNs) crucially contribute to host survival upon viral infections. Robust expression of type I IFNs (IFN-α/β) and induction of an antiviral state critically depend on amplification of the IFN signal via the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR). A small amount of type I IFN produced early upon virus infection binds the IFNAR and activates a self-enhancing positive feedback loop, resulting in induction of large, protective amounts of IFN-α. Unexpectedly, we found robust, systemic IFN-α expression upon infection of IFNAR knockout mice with the orthomyxovirus Thogoto virus (THOV). The IFNAR-independent IFN-α production required in vivo conditions and was not achieved during in vitro infection. Using replication-incompetent THOV-derived virus-like particles, we demonstrate that IFNAR-independent type I IFN induction depends on viral polymerase activity but is largely independent of viral replication. To discover the cell type responsible for this effect, we used type I IFN reporter mice and identified CD11b+ F4/80+ myeloid cells within the peritoneal cavity of infected animals as the main source of IFNAR-independent type I IFN, corresponding to the particular tropism of THOV for this cell type. IMPORTANCE Type I IFNs are crucial for the survival of a host upon most viral infections, and, moreover, they shape subsequent adaptive immune responses. Production of protective amounts of type I IFN critically depends on the positive feedback amplification via the IFNAR. Unexpectedly, we observed robust IFNAR-independent type I IFN expression upon THOV infection and unraveled molecular mechanisms and determined the tissue and cell type involved. Our data indicate that the host can effectively use alternative pathways to induce type I IFN responses if the classical feedback amplification is not available. Understanding how type I IFN can be produced in large amounts independently of IFNAR-dependent enhancement will identify mechanisms which might

  11. Formation of stable cell-cell contact without a solid/gel scaffold: Non-invasive manipulation by laser under depletion interaction with a polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shu; Yoshida, Aoi; Ohta, Taeko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Sadakane, Koichiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We report a novel method for constructing a stable three-dimensional cellular assembly in the absence of a solid or gel scaffold. A targeted cell was transferred to another cell, and the two were kept in contact for a few minutes by optical manipulation in an aqueous medium containing a hydrophilic polymer. Interestingly, this cell-cell adhesion was maintained even after elimination of the polymer. We discuss the mechanism of the formation of stable multi-cellular adhesion in terms of spontaneous rearrangement of the components embedded in the pair of facing membranes.

  12. IgE and IgGa antibody-mediated release of histamine from rat peritoneal cells. II. Interaction of IgGa and IgE at the targe cell.

    PubMed

    Bach, M K; Block, K J; Austen, K F

    1971-04-01

    IgGa, in contrast to IgE, antibodies mediated the antigen-induced release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells without a requirement for a latent period and without the capacity to bind firmly to the target cell. Nonetheless, IgGa anti-DNP antibody interfered with the capacity of rat anti-N. brasiliensis antiserum rich in IgE antibodies to prepare the target cells for histamine release by worm antigen. Further, interaction of IgE antibody-prepared cells with IgGa anti-DNP antibody and DNP-BSA at 0 degrees C so as to achieve sterile activation, or at 30 degrees C to permit histamine release, inactivated such cells as determined by the subsequent failure to release histamine upon challenge with worm antigen. Thus, although IgE and IgGa antibodies are immunochemically distinct homologous immunoglobulins and exhibit different functional characteristics, their interaction at the target cell involves a common receptor and at least one common point in the pathway to the release of pharmacologic agents from the cell.

  13. Understanding and exploiting nanoscale surface heterogeneity for particle and cell manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalasin, Surachate

    signatures. Following the approach taken by biophysicists for describing the interactions of leukocytes with the endothelial vasculature near an injury, the state spaces in this thesis map regimes of free particle motion, immediate firm arrest, and persistent rolling against macroscopic average patch density, Debye length, particle size, and shear rate. Surprisingly, the electrostatic heterogeneity state space resembles that for selectin-mediated leukocyte motion, and reasons are put forth. This finding is important because it demonstrates how synthetic nanoscale constructs can be exploited to achieve the selective cell capture mechanism previously attributed only to specialized cell adhesion molecules. This thesis initiates studies that extend these fundamental principles, developed for a tunable and well-characterized synthetic model to biological systems. For instance, it is demonstrated that general behaviors seen with the electrostatic model are observed when fibrinogen proteins are substituted for the electrostatic patches. This shows that the nature of the attractions is immaterial to adhesion, and that the effect of added salt primarily alters the range of the electrostatic repulsion and, correspondingly, the contact area. Also, studies with Staphylococcus aureus run parallel to those employing 1 mum silica spheres, further translating the concepts. Inaugural studies with mammalian cells, in the future work section, indicate that application of the surface heterogeneity approach to cell manipulation holds much future promise.

  14. Magnetic-based purification of untouched mouse germinal center B cells for ex vivo manipulation and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Cato, Matthew H; Yau, Irene W; Rickert, Robert C

    2011-06-09

    Detailed biochemical analysis of unmanipulated germinal center (GC) B cells has not been achieved. Previously, we designed and used a simple, economical and new magnetic bead separation scheme for the purification of 'untouched' mature GC and non-GC B cells from the spleens of immunized mice and reported the first biochemical assessment of the signaling cascades that contribute to cyclin D stability and GC B cell proliferation. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the method we used, which involves preparing single-cell suspension from the spleens of immunized mice, followed by labeling of nontarget cells with biotinylated antibodies specific for CD43, CD11c and IgD (for GC enrichment) or GL7 (for non-GC enrichment); these steps are followed by cell depletion using standard magnetic bead technology. This protocol can yield GC and non-GC B cells with purities exceeding 90%. The sorting process can be carried out in ∼1 h and provides a population of GC B cells of sufficient purity and quantity to allow ex vivo manipulation, including biochemical and genetic analysis as well as cell culture.

  15. Sensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen Deprivation and Radiation via Manipulation of the MDM2 Pathway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Sikes C, Hasegawa M, Terry NH, 1061-1069. White RA, Zagars GK, Meistrich ML. Quiescence in R3327-G 20. Wang H, Nan L, Yu D, Agrawal S , Zhang R...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and...Sensitization of Prostate Cancer Cells to Androgen DAMD17-03-1-0083 Deprivation and Radiation via Manipulation of the MDM2 Pathway 6. AUTHOR( S ) Alan

  16. Pembrolizumab, Bevacizumab, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Peritoneal Phosphate Clearance is Influenced by Peritoneal Dialysis Modality, Independent of Peritoneal Transport Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Badve, Sunil V.; Zimmerman, Deborah L.; Knoll, Greg A.; Burns, Kevin D.; McCormick, Brendan B.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperphosphatemia is an independent risk factor for mortality in ESRD, but factors regulating phosphate clearance on peritoneal dialysis (PD) are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that peritoneal phosphate clearance is better with continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) as compared with continuous cyclic PD (CCPD) after adjusting for membrane transport status. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: In this cross-sectional and retrospective study, measurements of peritoneal phosphate clearance of 129 prevalent PD patients were reviewed. Patients were divided according to membrane transport status (high, high average, low average-low categories) and PD modality (CAPD or CCPD). Results: Among high transporters, peritoneal phosphate clearances were comparable in both modalities. However, treatment with CAPD was associated with increased peritoneal phosphate clearance compared with CCPD among high-average transporters (42.4 ± 11.4 versus 36.4 ± 8.3 L/wk/1.73 m2, P = 0.01), and low-average-low transporters (35.6 ± 5.9 versus 28.9 ± 11 L/wk/1.73 m2, P = 0.034). On multivariate linear regression, PD modality, membrane transport category, and peritoneal creatinine clearance, but not Kt/V urea, were independently associated with peritoneal phosphate clearance. Conclusions: Peritoneal phosphate clearance is determined by PD modality and membrane transport category, suggesting that PD regimes with longer dwell times may help control hyperphosphatemia in lower transporters. PMID:18815242

  18. Label-free 3D refractive-index acquisition by micro-manipulations of cells in suspension (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.

    2016-03-01

    Our latest methods for non-invasive label-free acquisition of the three-dimensional (3-D) refractive-index maps of live cells in suspension are reviewed. These methods are based on the acquisition of off-axis interferograms of single or multiple cells in suspension from different angles using an external interferometric module, while fully rotating each cell using micro-manipulations. The interferometric projections are processed via computed tomographic phase microscopy reconstruction technique, which considers optical diffraction effects, into the 3-D refractive-index structure of the suspended cell. Till now, tomographic phase microscopy was obtained by acquiring a series of interferograms of the light transmitted through the sample in different angles by either using an entire sample rotation, or patch clamping a single cell, which is invasive to the cells, or alternatively, using various angles of illumination, which causes a limited acceptance angle, and an incomplete 3-D Fourier spectrum. In contrast, our methods allow fast acquisition with full angular range, and thus obtain an accurate 3-D refractive-index map of the imaged cell. By inspection of the 3-D refractive-index distribution of cells in suspension, the proposed methods can be useful for high-throughput, label-free characterization of biological processes and cellular transformations from healthy to pathological conditions.

  19. Repeated Burkholderia cepacia Peritonitis in a Patient Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Apostolovic, B L; Velickovic-Radovanovic, R M; Andjelkovic-Apostolovic, M R; Cvetkovic, T P; Dinic, M M; Radivojevic, J D

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B cepacia) is a rare opportunistic pathogen in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis. We describe the first case of repeated B cepacia CAPD peritonitis, occurring in an outpatient environment, treated with antimicrobial medication without peritoneal catheter removal. B cepacia may lead to repeat infection, therefore, we should insist on catheter removal during each peritonitis episode.

  20. Repeated Burkholderia cepacia Peritonitis in a Patient Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Apostolovic, BL; Velickovic-Radovanovic, RM; Andjelkovic-Apostolovic, MR; Cvetkovic, TP; Dinic, MM; Radivojevic, JD

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia cepacia (B cepacia) is a rare opportunistic pathogen in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis. We describe the first case of repeated B cepacia CAPD peritonitis, occurring in an outpatient environment, treated with antimicrobial medication without peritoneal catheter removal. B cepacia may lead to repeat infection, therefore, we should insist on catheter removal during each peritonitis episode. PMID:26426187

  1. Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reveals that green light protection against UV irradiation is favored by low Ca2+ and requires intact UPR pathway.

    PubMed

    Farcasanu, Ileana C; Mitrica, Radu; Cristache, Ligia; Nicolau, Ioana; Ruta, Lavinia L; Paslaru, Liliana; Comorosan, Sorin

    2013-11-01

    Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high density green photons conferred protection against the deleterious effects of UV radiation. Combining chemical screening with UV irradiation of yeast cells, it was noted that the high density green photons relied on the presence of intact unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway to exert their protective effect and that the low Ca(2+) conditions boosted the effect. UPR chemical inducers tunicamycin, dithiotreitol and calcium chelators augmented the green light effect in a synergic action against UV-induced damage. Photo-manipulation of cells was a critical factor since the maximum protection was achieved only when cells were pre-exposed to green light.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Dialysate-Induced Alterations of the Peritoneal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Aroeira, Luiz S.; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Loureiro, Jesús; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ramírez-Huesca, Marta; González-Mateo, Guadalupe; Pérez-Lozano, M. Luisa; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Bajo, M-Auxiliadora; del Peso, Gloria; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), exposure of the peritoneal membrane to nonphysiologic solutions causes inflammation, ultimately leading to altered structure and function. Myofibroblasts, one of the cell types that contribute to dysfunction of the peritoneal membrane, can originate from mesothelial cells (MCs) by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that has been associated with an increased rate of peritoneal transport. Because cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced by inflammation, we studied the role of COX-2 in the deterioration of the peritoneal membrane. We observed that nonepithelioid MCs found in peritoneal effluent expressed higher levels of COX-2 than epithelioid MCs. The mass transfer coefficient for creatinine correlated with MC phenotype and with COX-2 levels. Although COX-2 was upregulated during EMT of MCs in vitro, COX-2 inhibition did not prevent EMT. In a mouse model of PD, however, COX-2 inhibition with Celecoxib resulted in reduced fibrosis and in partial recovery of ultrafiltration, outcomes that were associated with a reduction of inflammatory cells. Furthermore, PD fluid with a low content of glucose degradation products did not induce EMT or COX-2; the peritoneal membranes of mice treated with this fluid showed less worsening than mice exposed to standard fluid. In conclusion, upregulation of COX-2 during EMT may mediate peritoneal inflammation, suggesting COX-2 inhibition as a potential strategy to ameliorate peritoneal deterioration in PD patients. PMID:19158357

  3. Dielectrophoresis for Bioparticle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cheng; Huang, Haibo; Chen, Liguo; Li, Xiangpeng; Ge, Zunbiao; Chen, Tao; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2014-01-01

    As an ideal method to manipulate biological particles, the dielectrophoresis (DEP) technique has been widely used in clinical diagnosis, disease treatment, drug development, immunoassays, cell sorting, etc. This review summarizes the research in the field of bioparticle manipulation based on DEP techniques. Firstly, the basic principle of DEP and its classical theories are introduced in brief; Secondly, a detailed introduction on the DEP technique used for bioparticle manipulation is presented, in which the applications are classified into five fields: capturing bioparticles to specific regions, focusing bioparticles in the sample, characterizing biomolecular interaction and detecting microorganism, pairing cells for electrofusion and separating different kinds of bioparticles; Thirdly, the effect of DEP on bioparticle viability is analyzed; Finally, the DEP techniques are summarized and future trends in bioparticle manipulation are suggested. PMID:25310652

  4. Controlling acoustic streaming in an ultrasonic heptagonal tweezers with application to cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Glynne-Jones, P; Gesellchen, F; Riehle, M; Hill, M; Cumming, D R S

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force has been demonstrated as a method for manipulating micron-scale particles, but is frequently affected by unwanted streaming. In this paper the streaming in a multi-transducer quasi-standing wave acoustic particle manipulation device is assessed, and found to be dominated by a form of Eckart streaming. The experimentally observed streaming takes the form of two main vortices that have their highest velocity in the region where the standing wave is established. A finite element model is developed that agrees well with experimental results, and shows that the Reynolds stresses that give rise to the fluid motion are strongest in the high velocity region. A technical solution to reduce the streaming is explored that entails the introduction of a biocompatible agar gel layer at the bottom of the chamber so as to reduce the fluid depth and volume. By this means, we reduce the region of fluid that experiences the Reynolds stresses; the viscous drag per unit volume of fluid is also increased. Particle Image Velocimetry data is used to observe the streaming as a function of agar-modified cavity depth. It was found that, in an optimised structure, Eckart streaming could be reduced to negligible levels so that we could make a sonotweezers device with a large working area of up to 13 mm × 13 mm.

  5. Bacterial Manipulation of NK Cell Regulatory Activity Increases Susceptibility to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Brandon S.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Jamieson, Amanda; Merkel, Patricia; Knight, Vijaya; Cole, Caroline M.; Raulet, David H.; Lenz, Laurel L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells produce interferon (IFN)-γ and thus have been suggested to promote type I immunity during bacterial infections. Yet, Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) and some other pathogens encode proteins that cause increased NK cell activation. Here, we show that stimulation of NK cell activation increases susceptibility during Lm infection despite and independent from robust NK cell production of IFNγ. The increased susceptibility correlated with IL-10 production by responding NK cells. NK cells produced IL-10 as their IFNγ production waned and the Lm virulence protein p60 promoted induction of IL-10 production by mouse and human NK cells. NK cells consequently exerted regulatory effects to suppress accumulation and activation of inflammatory myeloid cells. Our results reveal new dimensions of the role played by NK cells during Lm infection and demonstrate the ability of this bacterial pathogen to exploit the induction of regulatory NK cell activity to increase host susceptibility. PMID:27295349

  6. Evaluation of the single yeast cell's adhesion to ITO substrates with various surface energies via ESEM nanorobotic manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2011-12-01

    Cell-surface adhesion force is important for cell activities and the development of bio materials. In this paper, a method for in situ single cell (W303) adhesion force measurement was proposed based on nanorobotic manipulation system inside an environment scanning electron microscope (ESEM). An end effector was fabricated from a commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever by focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The spring constant of it was calibrated by nanomanipulation approach. Three kinds of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ITO plates were prepared by using VUV-irradiation and OTS coating techniques. The shear adhesion strength of the single yeast cell to each substrate was measured based on the deflection of the end effector. The results demonstrated that the cell adhesion force was larger under the wet condition in the ESEM environment than in the aqueous condition. It also showed that the cell adhesion force to hydrophilic surface was larger than that to the hydrophobic surface. Studies of single cell's adhesion on various plate surfaces and environments could give new insights into the tissue engineering and biological field.

  7. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10 cm-1 was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12 ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background.

  8. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10  cm⁻¹ was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12  ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background.

  9. Robot Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Space Shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (Canadarm) is a 50 foot robot arm used to deploy, retrieve or repair satellites in orbit. Initial spinoff version is designed to remove, inspect and replace large components of Ontario Hydro's CANDU nuclear reactors, which supply 50 percent of Ontario Hydro's total power reduction. CANDU robot is the first of SPAR's Remote Manipulator Systems intended for remote materials handling operations in nuclear servicing, chemical processing, smelting and manufacturing. Inco Limited used remote manipulator for remote control mining equipment to enhance safety and productivity of Inco's hardrock mining operations. System not only improves safety in a hazardous operation that costs more than a score of lives annually, it also increases productivity fourfold. Remote Manipulator System Division is also manufacturing a line of industrial robots and developing additional system for nuclear servicing, mining, defense and space operations.

  10. Myeloid cell-specific inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase type I knockout mice impair bacteria clearance in a murine peritonitis model.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Shin; Nigorikawa, Kiyomi; Sasaki, Junko; Hazeki, Kaoru; Kasuu, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Takehiko; Hazeki, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling has been implicated in the anti-inflammatory response in a mouse model of endotoxemia and sepsis. The present study focused on the role of inositol polyphosphate-4-phosphatase type I (Inpp4a), which dephosphorylates PtdIns(3,4)P2 to PtdIns(3)P, in bacterial infections. We prepared myeloid cell-specific Inpp4a-conditional knockout mice. Macrophages from these mice showed increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced production of inflammatory cytokines in response to LPS or Escherichia coli in vitro The Inpp4a knockout mice survived for a shorter time than wild type mice after i.p. infection with E. coli, with less production of inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, E. coli clearance from blood and lung was significantly impaired in the knockout mice. A likely mechanism is that the Inpp4a-catalyzed dephosphorylation of PtdIns(3,4)P2 down-regulates Akt pathways, which, in turn, increases the production of inflammatory mediators. This mechanism at least fits the decreased E. coli clearance and short survival in the Inpp4a knockout mice.

  11. Manipulation of Human Primary Endothelial Cell and Osteoblast Coculture Ratios to Augment Vasculogenesis and Mineralization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    primary cells , bone regeneration , vasculogenesis (Ann Plast Surg 2014;00: 00 00) There are many types of cells involved with the formation, repair...cocultures, the culture of 2 or more types of cells , in in vitro and in vivo studies to more closely model the natural regeneration of bone and gain more...insight into what cell cell in teractions can improve on the limited success of bone tissue engi neering thus far. The gold standard for regeneration of

  12. Peritoneal mucormycosis in a patient receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Polo, J R; Luño, J; Menarguez, C; Gallego, E; Robles, R; Hernandez, P

    1989-03-01

    A 48-year-old man receiving maintenance hemodialysis for 3 years and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for 1 year developed a clinical picture compatible with peritonitis. Three successive fluid cultures were negative, and only after filtration of a large volume of peritoneal fluid a fungus identified as a Rhizopus sp was isolated in cultures of the filtering devices. The same fungus was also isolated from the peritoneal catheter cuff. Intravenous amphotericin B was administered and both the abdominal and general conditions of the patient improved transiently. Twenty days after initiation of antifungal treatment, a clinical suspicion of intestinal perforation arose and an exploratory laparotomy was scheduled, but the patient died during the anesthetic induction. The patient never received deferoxamine; any conditions predisposing to mucormycosis, such as diabetes or immunosuppression, were also absent.

  13. Tuberculous peritonitis in a child undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T C; Hsu, J C; Chou, L H; Lee, M L

    1994-01-01

    We present a 13-year-old girl with Arnold-Chiari syndrome and uremia secondary to neurogenic bladder. She had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 13 months prior to the development of peritonitis. The patient demonstrated no improvement with a 3-day therapy of intraperitoneal vancomycin and netilmicin. Meanwhile, smear of centrifuged dialysate revealed acid fast bacilli on two occasions. We, then, started anti-TB therapy with oral isoniazid (INAH), rifampin and ethambutal. The symptoms subsided within three days. In the first week, the patient lost her peritoneal ultrafiltration and needed daytime automatic peritoneal dialysis. At the last follow-up examination, 12 months after treatment, she remained well on standard CAPD.

  14. Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Munkholm-Larsen, Stine; Cao, Christopher Q; Yan, Tristan D

    2009-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a highly aggressive neoplasm. The incidence of malignant mesothelioma is increasing worldwide. Diffuse malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (DMPM) represents one-fourth of all mesotheliomas. Association of asbestos exposure with DMPM has been observed, especially in males. The great majority of patients present with abdominal pain and distension, caused by accumulation of tumors and ascitic fluid. In the past, DMPM was considered a pre-terminal condition; therefore attracted little attention. Patients invariably died from their disease within a year. Recently, several prospective trials have demonstrated a median survival of 40 to 90 mo and 5-year survival of 30% to 60% after combined treatment using cytoreductive surgery and perioperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This remarkable improvement in survival has prompted new search into the medical science related to DMPM, a disease previously ignored as uninteresting. This review article focuses on the key advances in the epidemiology, diagnosis, staging, treatments and prognosis of DMPM that have occurred in the past decade. PMID:21160794

  15. Peritoneal dialysis solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gault, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Certain preventable complications in the treatment of renal failure, in part related to the composition of commercially prepared peritoneal dialysis solutions, continue to occur. Solutions are advocated which would contain sodium 132, calcium 3.5, magnesium 1.5, chloride 102 and lactate or acetate 35 mEq./1., and dextrose 1.5% or about 4.25%. Elimination of 7% dextrose solutions and a reduction of the sodium and lactate concentrations should reduce complications due to hypovolemia, hyperglycemia, hypernatremia and alkalosis. Reduction in the number of solutions should simplify the procedure and perhaps reduce costs. It is anticipated that some of the changes discussed will soon be introduced by industry. PMID:4691094

  16. Approaches to Validate and Manipulate RNA Targets with Small Molecules in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA has become an increasingly important target for therapeutic interventions and for chemical probes that dissect and manipulate its cellular function. Emerging targets include human RNAs that have been shown to directly cause cancer, metabolic disorders, and genetic disease. In this review, we describe various routes to obtain bioactive compounds that target RNA, with a particular emphasis on the development of small molecules. We use these cases to describe approaches that are being developed for target validation, which include target-directed cleavage, classic pull-down experiments, and covalent cross-linking. Thus, tools are available to design small molecules to target RNA and to identify the cellular RNAs that are their targets. PMID:26514201

  17. On-chip magnetically actuated robot with ultrasonic vibration for single cell manipulations.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Masaya; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Yamanishi, Yoko; Masuda, Taisuke; Feng, Lin; Arai, Fumihito

    2011-06-21

    This paper presents an innovative driving method for an on-chip robot actuated by permanent magnets in a microfluidic chip. A piezoelectric ceramic is applied to induce ultrasonic vibration to the microfluidic chip and the high-frequency vibration reduces the effective friction on the MMT significantly. As a result, we achieved 1.1 micrometre positioning accuracy of the microrobot, which is 100 times higher accuracy than without vibration. The response speed is also improved and the microrobot can be actuated with a speed of 5.5 mm s(-1) in 3 degrees of freedom. The novelty of the ultrasonic vibration appears in the output force as well. Contrary to the reduction of friction on the microrobot, the output force increased twice as much by the ultrasonic vibration. Using this high accuracy, high speed, and high power microrobot, swine oocyte manipulations are presented in a microfluidic chip.

  18. Approaches to Validate and Manipulate RNA Targets with Small Molecules in Cells.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    RNA has become an increasingly important target for therapeutic interventions and for chemical probes that dissect and manipulate its cellular function. Emerging targets include human RNAs that have been shown to directly cause cancer, metabolic disorders, and genetic disease. In this review, we describe various routes to obtain bioactive compounds that target RNA, with a particular emphasis on the development of small molecules. We use these cases to describe approaches that are being developed for target validation, which include target-directed cleavage, classic pull-down experiments, and covalent cross-linking. Thus, tools are available to design small molecules to target RNA and to identify the cellular RNAs that are their targets.

  19. Manipulation of cell membrane using carbon nanotube scaffold as a photoresponsive stimuli generator

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Takao; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-01-01

    We describe, for the first time, the perforation of the cell membrane in the targeted single cell based on the nanosecond pulsed near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation of a thin film of carbon nanotubes that act as an effective photon absorber as well as stimuli generator. When the power of NIR laser is over 17.5 μJ/pulse, the cell membrane after irradiation is irreversibly disrupted and results in cell death. In sharp contrast, the perforation of the cell membrane occurs at suitable laser power (∼15 μJ/pulse) without involving cell termination. PMID:27877703

  20. Attenuated Toxoplasma gondii Stimulates Immunity to Pancreatic Cancer by Manipulation of Myeloid Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kiah L; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2015-08-01

    Suppressive myeloid cells represent a significant barrier to the generation of productive antitumor immune responses to many solid tumors. Eliminating or reprogramming suppressive myeloid cells to abrogate tumor-associated immune suppression is a promising therapeutic approach. We asked whether treatment of established aggressive disseminated pancreatic cancer with the immunotherapeutic attenuated Toxoplasma gondii vaccine strain CPS would trigger tumor-associated myeloid cells to generate therapeutic antitumor immune responses. CPS treatment significantly decreased tumor-associated macrophages and markedly increased dendritic cell infiltration of the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. Tumor-resident macrophages and dendritic cells, particularly cells actively invaded by CPS, increased expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and concomitantly boosted their production of IL12. CPS treatment increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment, activated tumor-resident T cells, and increased IFNγ production by T-cell populations. CPS treatment provided a significant therapeutic benefit in pancreatic tumor-bearing mice. This therapeutic benefit depended on IL12 and IFNγ production, MyD88 signaling, and CD8(+) T-cell populations. Although CD4(+) T cells exhibited activated effector phenotypes and produced IFNγ, CD4(+) T cells as well as natural killer cells were not required for the therapeutic benefit. In addition, CD8(+) T cells isolated from CPS-treated tumor-bearing mice produced IFNγ after re-exposure to pancreatic tumor antigen, suggesting this immunotherapeutic treatment stimulated tumor cell antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. This work highlights the potency and immunotherapeutic efficacy of CPS treatment and demonstrates the significance of targeting tumor-associated myeloid cells as a mechanism to stimulate more effective immunity to pancreatic cancer.

  1. Manipulation of PrPres production in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Langeveld, Jan; Williams, Alun

    2004-09-30

    In the present study the accumulation of protease resistant prion protein (PrPres) in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells (ScN2a cells) was shown to be dependent on culture conditions. The highest levels of PrPres were found in slow growing cells. Further increases in PrPres accumulation were observed in ScN2a cells treated with retinoic acid, a compound that is associated with neuronal differentiation. The effects of retinoic acid were dose-dependent with a maximal effect at 200 ng/ml. A similar increase in PrPres was observed in another prion-infected cell line, scrapie-mouse brain (SMB) cells, treated with retinoic acid while retinoic acid increased the amount of PrPC in non-infected cells. Other drugs reported to cause neuronal differentiation, such as phorbol esters, did not increase the PrPres content of ScN2a cells. The survival of retinoic acid-treated ScN2a cells co-cultured with microglia was significantly reduced when compared to untreated ScN2a cells and an inverse correlation was demonstrated between the PrPres content of cells and their survival when co-cultured with microglia. The production of interleukin-6 by microglia cultured with retinoic acid-treated ScN2a cells was significantly higher than that of microglia cultured with untreated ScN2a cells.

  2. Genetic Manipulation of NK Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Techniques and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Carlsten, Mattias; Childs, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Given their rapid and efficient capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells, natural killer (NK) cells represent a unique immune cell to genetically reprogram in an effort to improve the outcome of cell-based cancer immunotherapy. However, technical and biological challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. Recent advances in viral transduction and electroporation have now allowed detailed characterization of genetically modified NK cells and provided a better understanding for how these cells can be utilized in the clinic to optimize their capacity to induce tumor regression in vivo. Improving NK cell persistence in vivo via autocrine IL-2 and IL-15 stimulation, enhancing tumor targeting by silencing inhibitory NK cell receptors such as NKG2A, and redirecting tumor killing via chimeric antigen receptors, all represent approaches that hold promise in preclinical studies. This review focuses on available methods for genetic reprograming of NK cells and the advantages and challenges associated with each method. It also gives an overview of strategies for genetic reprograming of NK cells that have been evaluated to date and an outlook on how these strategies may be best utilized in clinical protocols. With the recent advances in our understanding of the complex biological networks that regulate the ability of NK cells to target and kill tumors in vivo, we foresee genetic engineering as an obligatory pathway required to exploit the full potential of NK-cell based immunotherapy in the clinic. PMID:26113846

  3. Unusual causes of peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient: Alcaligenes faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans.

    PubMed

    Kahveci, Arzu; Asicioglu, Ebru; Tigen, Elif; Ari, Elif; Arikan, Hakki; Odabasi, Zekaver; Ozener, Cetin

    2011-04-10

    An 87 -year-old female who was undergoing peritoneal dialysis presented with peritonitis caused by Alcaligenes faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans in consecutive years. With the following report we discuss the importance of these unusual microorganisms in peritoneal dialysis patients.

  4. Epidemic of Chemical Peritonitis in Patients on Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis: A Report from Western India.

    PubMed

    Jamale, Tukaram; Dhokare, Aniruddha; Satpute, Kushal; Kulkarni, Renu; Usulumarty, Deepa; Vishwanath, Billa; Noronha, Santosh; Hase, Niwrutti

    2016-01-01

    While non-infectious etiologies like chemical irritants are rare causes of epidemics of peritonitis, this possibility should be considered when one encounters an unusual clustering of peritonitis cases. We describe here an epidemic of chemical peritonitis at our center.

  5. The Spectrum of Podoplanin Expression in Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Niko; Alscher, M. Dominik; Fritz, Peter; Latus, Joerg; Edenhofer, Ilka; Reimold, Fabian; Alper, Seth L.; Kimmel, Martin; Biegger, Dagmar; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Cohen, Clemens D.; Wüthrich, Rudolf P.; Segerer, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a life threatening complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Podoplanin is a glycoprotein expressed by mesothelial cells, lymphatic endothelial cells, and myofibroblasts in peritoneal biopsies from patients with EPS. To evaluate podoplanin as a marker of EPS we measured podoplanin mRNA and described the morphological patterns of podoplanin-positive cells in EPS. Included were 20 peritoneal biopsies from patients with the diagnosis of EPS (n = 5), patients on PD without signs of EPS (n = 5), and control patients (uremic patients not on PD, n = 5, non-uremic patients n = 5). EPS patient biopsies revealed significantly elevated levels of podoplanin mRNA (p<0.05). In 24 peritoneal biopsies from patients with EPS, podoplanin and smooth muscle actin (SMA) were localized by immunohistochemistry. Four patterns of podoplanin distribution were distinguishable. The most common pattern (8 of 24) consisted of organized, longitudinal layers of podoplanin-positive cells and vessels in the fibrotic zone (“organized” pattern). 7 of 24 biopsies demonstrated a diffuse distribution of podoplanin-positive cells, accompanied by occasional, dense clusters of podoplanin-positive cells. Five biopsies exhibited a mixed pattern, with some diffuse areas and some organized areas ("mixed"). These contained cuboidal podoplanin-positive cells within SMA-negative epithelial structures embedded in extracellular matrix. Less frequently observed was the complete absence of, or only focal accumulations of podoplanin-positive fibroblasts outside of lymphatic vessels (podoplanin “low”, 4 of 24 biopsies). Patients in this group exhibited a lower index of systemic inflammation and a longer symptomatic period than in EPS patients with biopsies of the "mixed" type (p<0.05). In summary we confirm the increased expression of podoplanin in EPS, and distinguish EPS biopsies according to different podoplanin expression patterns which are

  6. Pancreatic cell tracing, lineage tagging and targeted genetic manipulations in multiple cell types using pancreatic ductal infusion of adeno-associated viral vectors and/or cell-tagging dyes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Guo, Ping; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Peirish, Lauren; Fischbach, Shane; Song, Zewen; Gaffar, Iljana; Wiersch, John; El-Gohary, Yousef; Husain, Sohail Z; Gittes, George K

    2014-12-01

    Genetic manipulations, with or without lineage tracing for specific pancreatic cell types, are very powerful tools for studying diabetes, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Nevertheless, the use of Cre/loxP systems to conditionally activate or inactivate the expression of genes in a cell type- and/or temporal-specific manner is not applicable to cell tracing and/or gene manipulations in more than one lineage at a time. Here we report a technique that allows efficient delivery of dyes for cell tagging into the mouse pancreas through the duct system, and that also delivers viruses carrying transgenes or siRNA under a specific promoter. When this technique is applied in genetically modified mice, it enables the investigator to perform either double lineage tracing or cell lineage tracing combined with gene manipulation in a second lineage. The technique requires <40 min.

  7. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. Combination of IGF-1 gene manipulation and 5-AZA treatment promotes differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHU, KAI; WANG, YULIN; ZHENG, JIAYU; GUO, CHANGFA; LAI, HAO; WANG, CHUNSHENG

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been proposed as a promising therapeutic strategy for ischemic myocardium repair following myocardial infarction. Differentiation of MSCs into cardiomyocyte-like cells prior to cell transplantation is advantageous in improving their potential clinical benefits for cardiac repair. In the present study, we isolated and cultured porcine MSCs and evaluated the synergistic effect of 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) treatment and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) gene manipulation on MSC differentiation into cardiomyocyte-like cells. Our results demonstrated that 5-AZA treatment alone induced a limited cardiomyocyte-like differentiation effect in vitro. Overexpression of the IGF-1 gene in MSCs improved the induction effect of 5-AZA, while knockdown of the IGF-1 gene attenuated the differentiation. These results suggest that IGF-1 is a significant stimulus affecting the cardiomyocyte-like differentiation of porcine MSCs. In addition, the combination of IGF-1 gene manipulation and 5-AZA treatment provides a new strategy to obtain more committed differentiated cardiomyocyte-like cells from porcine MSCs prior to cell transplantation. PMID:25351395

  9. Direct laser manipulation reveals the mechanics of cell contacts in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Clément, Raphaël; Blanc, Olivier; Chardès, Claire; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2015-01-01

    Cell-generated forces produce a variety of tissue movements and tissue shape changes. The cytoskeletal elements that underlie these dynamics act at cell–cell and cell–ECM contacts to apply local forces on adhesive structures. In epithelia, force imbalance at cell contacts induces cell shape changes, such as apical constriction or polarized junction remodeling, driving tissue morphogenesis. The dynamics of these processes are well-characterized; however, the mechanical basis of cell shape changes is largely unknown because of a lack of mechanical measurements in vivo. We have developed an approach combining optical tweezers with light-sheet microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of epithelial cell junctions in the early Drosophila embryo. We show that optical trapping can efficiently deform cell–cell interfaces and measure tension at cell junctions, which is on the order of 100 pN. We show that tension at cell junctions equilibrates over a few seconds, a short timescale compared with the contractile events that drive morphogenetic movements. We also show that tension increases along cell interfaces during early tissue morphogenesis and becomes anisotropic as cells intercalate during germ-band extension. By performing pull-and-release experiments, we identify time-dependent properties of junctional mechanics consistent with a simple viscoelastic model. Integrating this constitutive law into a tissue-scale model, we predict quantitatively how local deformations propagate throughout the tissue. PMID:25605934

  10. Control & manipulation of femtoliter droplets for the study of single cell reactions & nanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Gavin D. M.

    This dissertation reports on new discoveries and advancements in the control and manipulation of pico and femtoliter droplets, using a combination of microfluidics and laser beam shaping. First, we describe the use of a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam to generate an optical vortex trap, with the intent to dynamically alter the concentration of dissolved species within individual aqueous droplets. These droplets, which have volumes in the femtoliter range, are surrounded by an immiscible continuous phase with slight solubility for water, and an aqueous-organic interface which is impenetrable to the encapsulated chemical species. Next, we further investigate the shrinkage and expansion of individually trapped aqueous droplets by constructing and experimentally verifying a heat and mass transfer model. We were able to conclude that an evaporation mechanism sufficiently describes the shrinkage of aqueous droplets held in a vortex trap, while a mechanism based on the aqueous supersaturation of the organic phase, adequately explains the expansion of the shrunk droplet. We continue with a technique comparison of an LG10 beam and a Gaussian beam for use in optical tweezers. The ability to manipulate nanometer-sized subcellular structures with optical tweezers has widespread applications in biology, but has a limitation of maintaining the functionality of the transported subcellular organelles. This difficulty arises because of the propensity of optical tweezers to photodamage the trapped object. To address this issue, we describe the use of a polarization-shaped optical vortex trap, which exerts less photodamage on the trapped particle and has a higher trapping efficiency than conventional optical tweezers. Finally, we look at optimization and control of LG beams, with attention to beams containing a non-integer azimuthal phase step. Our approach is based on a fluidic-hologram concept, whereby the properties of the LG beam can be finely controlled by varying the refractive

  11. Outcome of accidental peritoneal dialysis catheter holes or tip exposure.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Douglas M; Wilcox, Jennifer E

    2010-06-01

    Pediatric peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are at risk for acute peritonitis. One risk factor is accidental exposure of the catheter to a non-sterile surface. We studied catheter exposures in 17 pediatric patients receiving PD who developed 16 holes and 12 other accidental exposures. The rate of exposures was 3.7 events/100 patient-months. After exposure, the mean counts (+ or - standard error) of white blood cells (WBC), red blood cells, and neutrophils were 39.8 + or - 19.3, 9.5 + or - 7.1, and 24.2 + or - 5.3/mm(3), respectively. There was a trend towards higher peritoneal fluid WBC in patients with holes than in those with exposures (60.1 + or - 34.8 vs. 15.4 + or - 5.1/mm(3), respectively; p = 0.2). The initial peritoneal fluid WBC count was significantly higher if there was a positive culture than a negative culture (165.0 + or - 132.6 vs. 20.3 + or - 6.4/mm(3), respectively; p = 0.01). The percentage of neutrophils was higher in patients with a positive culture than in those with a negative culture (54.7 + or - 14.1 vs. 19.1 + or - 4.9%, respectively; p = 0.01). Of the 28 patients, 27 received a single dose of intravenous antibiotics, as per the protocol at that time. Among those treated, 7% developed a positive culture (all staphylococcal species) while 93% had a negative culture. We conclude that following accidental exposure of the peritoneal dialysis catheter: (1) the prevalence of peritonitis is low; (2) measuring peritoneal fluid WBC provides treatment guidance; (3) if treatment is initiated, it should be applied intraperitoneally and include activity against Gram-positive organisms.

  12. Cellular Aspects of Shigella Pathogenesis: Focus on the Manipulation of Host Cell Processes

    PubMed Central

    Killackey, Samuel A.; Sorbara, Matthew T.; Girardin, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for shigellosis. Over the years, the study of Shigella has provided a greater understanding of how the host responds to bacterial infection, and how bacteria have evolved to effectively counter the host defenses. In this review, we provide an update on some of the most recent advances in our understanding of pivotal processes associated with Shigella infection, including the invasion into host cells, the metabolic changes that occur within the bacterium and the infected cell, cell-to-cell spread mechanisms, autophagy and membrane trafficking, inflammatory signaling and cell death. This recent progress sheds a new light into the mechanisms underlying Shigella pathogenesis, and also more generally provides deeper understanding of the complex interplay between host cells and bacterial pathogens in general. PMID:27066460

  13. Cellular Aspects of Shigella Pathogenesis: Focus on the Manipulation of Host Cell Processes.

    PubMed

    Killackey, Samuel A; Sorbara, Matthew T; Girardin, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for shigellosis. Over the years, the study of Shigella has provided a greater understanding of how the host responds to bacterial infection, and how bacteria have evolved to effectively counter the host defenses. In this review, we provide an update on some of the most recent advances in our understanding of pivotal processes associated with Shigella infection, including the invasion into host cells, the metabolic changes that occur within the bacterium and the infected cell, cell-to-cell spread mechanisms, autophagy and membrane trafficking, inflammatory signaling and cell death. This recent progress sheds a new light into the mechanisms underlying Shigella pathogenesis, and also more generally provides deeper understanding of the complex interplay between host cells and bacterial pathogens in general.

  14. Manipulating Antigenic Ligand Strength to Selectively Target Myelin-Reactive CD4+ T Cells in EAE

    PubMed Central

    Sabatino, Joseph J.; Rosenthal, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of antigen-specific therapies for the selective tolerization of autoreactive T cells remains the Holy Grail for the treatment of T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This quest remains elusive, however, as the numerous antigen-specific strategies targeting myelin-specific T cells over the years have failed to result in clinical success. In this review, we revisit the antigen-based therapies used in the treatment of myelin-specific CD4+ T cells in the context of the functional avidity and the strength of signal of the encephalitogenic CD4+ T cell repertoire. In light of differences in activation thresholds, we propose that autoreactive T cells are not all equal, and therefore tolerance induction strategies must incorporate ligand strength in order to be successful in treating EAE and ultimately the human disease MS. PMID:19904613

  15. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1993-04-20

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  16. Underwater manipulator

    DOEpatents

    Schrum, Phillip B.; Cohen, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer .+-.45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer .+-.10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  17. Underwater manipulator

    SciTech Connect

    Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer {plus_minus} 45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer {plus_minus} 10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

  18. A pharmacologic perspective on newly emerging T-cell manipulation technologies

    PubMed Central

    Smethurst, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    T cells are a multifaceted family pivotal in the operations of the immune system and many of its associated diseases. The pathway to understanding T cells has been marked by several pharmacological advances including the discoveries of ciclosporin, tacrolimus and the mTOR inhibitors which revolutionized transplant therapy along with providing relief for severe eczema, asthma and other immunological disorders towards the end of the last century. This article will revisit the current understanding and new developments in T cell pharmacology 10 years on from the TeGenero (TGN 1412) debacle and look at more recent successes with ex vivo antigen presenting cell incubation technologies; T cell receptor (TCR) engineering and adoptive T cell therapy both with chimaeric antibodies and also with modified T cell receptors themselves. Features of T cell biology will be explored and processes often highly unique to humans will be used to highlight what many are beginning to see as an exciting new monoclonal (T cell) frontier for drug development. PMID:23039307

  19. Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in a peritoneal dialysis patient presenting with complicated Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Simbli, Mohammed Amin; Niaz, Faraz A; Al-Wakeel, Jamal S

    2012-05-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare but serious complication seen in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) or automated peritoneal dialysisAPD after prolonged duration on dialysis. Patients usally present with vague complaints of abdominal pain, vomitting, diarrhea, weight loss and change in peritoneal transport characte-ristics. High degree of suspicion is needed in PD patients who have been on dialysis for prolonged duration and have been using high-concentrated dialysis fluid. Mycobacterium fortuitum (MF) is a rapidly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacterium that has rarely been reported as a pathogen causing peritonits in patients on PD. We report a case of CAPD presenting with culture-negative peritonits, which, on specific culture, grew MF and, on radiological evaluation, showed diagnostic features of EPS.

  20. Manipulating Light to Understand and Improve Solar Cells (494th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Eisaman, Matthew

    2014-04-16

    Energy consumption around the world is projected to approximately triple by the end of the century, according to the 2005 Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization. Much will change in those next 86 years, but for all the power the world needs—for everything from manufacturing and transportation to air conditioning and charging cell phone batteries—improved solar cells will be crucial to meet this future energy demand with renewable energy sources. At Brookhaven Lab, scientists are probing solar cells and exploring variations within the cells—variations that are so small they are measured in billionths of a meter—in order to make increasingly efficient solar cells and ultimately help reduce the overall costs of deploying solar power plants. Dr. Eisaman will discuss DOE's Sunshot Initiative, which aims to reduce the cost of solar cell-generated electricity by 2020. He will also discuss how he and collaborators at Brookhaven Lab are probing different material compositions within solar cells, measuring how efficiently they collect electrical charge, helping to develop a new class of solar cells, and improving solar-cell manufacturing processes.

  1. Emergence of anthrax edema toxin as a master manipulator of macrophage and B cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gnade, Bryan T; Moen, Scott T; Chopra, Ashok K; Peterson, Johnny W; Yeager, Linsey A

    2010-07-01

    Anthrax edema toxin (ET), a powerful adenylyl cyclase, is an important virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis. Until recently, only a modest amount of research was performed to understand the role this toxin plays in the organism's immune evasion strategy. A new wave of studies have begun to elucidate the effects this toxin has on a variety of host cells. While efforts have been made to illuminate the effect ET has on cells of the adaptive immune system, such as T cells, the greatest focus has been on cells of the innate immune system, particularly the macrophage. Here we discuss the immunoevasive activities that ET exerts on macrophages, as well as new research on the effects of this toxin on B cells.

  2. Manipulation of cells with laser microbeam scissors and optical tweezers: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greulich, Karl Otto

    2017-02-01

    The use of laser microbeams and optical tweezers in a wide field of biological applications from genomic to immunology is discussed. Microperforation is used to introduce a well-defined amount of molecules into cells for genetic engineering and optical imaging. The microwelding of two cells induced by a laser microbeam combines their genetic outfit. Microdissection allows specific regions of genomes to be isolated from a whole set of chromosomes. Handling the cells with optical tweezers supports investigation on the attack of immune systems against diseased or cancerous cells. With the help of laser microbeams, heart infarction can be simulated, and optical tweezers support studies on the heartbeat. Finally, laser microbeams are used to induce DNA damage in living cells for studies on cancer and ageing.

  3. Independent prognostic value of peritoneal immunocytodiagnosis in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, M; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Vasselli, S; Natali, P G; Mottolese, M

    2000-02-01

    Among the clinical parameters that play a pivotal role in predicting the outcome of patients with endometrial carcinoma, intraperitoneal microscopic dissemination represents an important cause of recurrences. To date, peritoneal cytology has been incorporated into the current surgical staging system (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics 88), although its predictive value remains a controversial issue. In this study the authors investigated the possibility of applying immunocytochemistry (ICC) to the diagnosis of peritoneal washing (PW) aimed at improving conventional cytology and verifying the prognostic value of peritoneal malignant cells. The authors analyzed 182 PWs sampled from endometrial cancer patients. The ICC analysis was performed using two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs)--AR-3 and B72.3--that in combination recognize more than 95% of endometrial carcinomas. The presence of peritoneal-free cancer cells was identified morphologically in 27 of 182 lavages (14.8%) and ICC in 50 of 182 (27.5%), with a significant improvement (p <0.0001). Five-year survival analysis, comparing results of ICC and cytodiagnosis, demonstrated a significant decrease of disease-free survival in patients with peritoneal microscopic disease. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that ICC diagnosis of PWs is an independent prognostic factor. Data indicate that the use of selected MAbs allows one to identify cytologically false-negative cases, providing results that are highly predictive of a worse clinical outcome.

  4. Click-crosslinkable and photodegradable gelatin hydrogels for cytocompatible optical cell manipulation in natural environment.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Masato; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-09

    This paper describes the generation of "click-crosslinkable" and "photodegaradable" gelatin hydrogels from the reaction between dibenzocycloctyl-terminated photoclevable tetra-arm polyethylene glycol and azide-modified gelatin. The hydrogels were formed in 30 min through the click-crosslinking reaction. The micropatterned features in the hydrogels were created by micropatterned light irradiation; the minimum resolution of micropatterning was 10-μm widths for line patterns and 20-μm diameters for circle patterns. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the hydrogels without any loss of viability across a wide concentration range of crosslinker. In contrast, an activated-ester-type photocleavable crosslinker, which we previously used to prepare photodegradable gelatin hydrogels, induced a decrease in cell viability at crosslinker concentrations greater than 1.8 mM. We also observed morphology alteration and better growth of cancer cells in the click-crosslinked photodegradable gelatin hydrogels that included matrigel than in the absence of matrigel. We also demonstrated micropatterning of the hydrogels encapsulating cells and optical cell separation. Both of the cells that remained in the non-irradiated area and the cells collected from the irradiated area maintained their viability.

  5. Click-crosslinkable and photodegradable gelatin hydrogels for cytocompatible optical cell manipulation in natural environment

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masato; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Sugiura, Shinji; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sumaru, Kimio; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the generation of “click-crosslinkable“ and “photodegaradable“ gelatin hydrogels from the reaction between dibenzocycloctyl-terminated photoclevable tetra-arm polyethylene glycol and azide-modified gelatin. The hydrogels were formed in 30 min through the click-crosslinking reaction. The micropatterned features in the hydrogels were created by micropatterned light irradiation; the minimum resolution of micropatterning was 10-μm widths for line patterns and 20-μm diameters for circle patterns. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the hydrogels without any loss of viability across a wide concentration range of crosslinker. In contrast, an activated-ester-type photocleavable crosslinker, which we previously used to prepare photodegradable gelatin hydrogels, induced a decrease in cell viability at crosslinker concentrations greater than 1.8 mM. We also observed morphology alteration and better growth of cancer cells in the click-crosslinked photodegradable gelatin hydrogels that included matrigel than in the absence of matrigel. We also demonstrated micropatterning of the hydrogels encapsulating cells and optical cell separation. Both of the cells that remained in the non-irradiated area and the cells collected from the irradiated area maintained their viability. PMID:26450015

  6. A Case Report of Neisseria Mucosa Peritonitis in a Chronic Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Awdisho, Alan; Bermudez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a leading complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. However, very rarely does Neisseria mucosa cause peritonitis. We describe an unusual case of N. mucosa peritonitis in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient. A 28-year-old Hispanic male presents with diffuse abdominal pain exacerbated during draining of the peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal fluid examination was remarkable for leukocytosis and gramnegative diplococci. Bacterial cultures were positive for N. mucosa growth. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with preservation of the dialysis catheter. This case highlights the rarity and importance of Neisseria mucosa causing peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. There seems to be a unique association between N. mucosa peritonitis and chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. The patient was successfully managed with ciprofloxacin along with salvaging of the dialysis catheter. PMID:28191300

  7. Subcellular control of Rac-GTPase signalling by magnetogenetic manipulation inside living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoc, F.; Lisse, D.; Bellaiche, Y.; Piehler, J.; Coppey, M.; Dahan, M.

    2013-03-01

    Many cell functions rely on the coordinated activity of signalling pathways at a subcellular scale. However, there are few tools capable of probing and perturbing signalling networks with a spatial resolution matching the intracellular dimensions of their activity patterns. Here we present a generic magnetogenetic approach based on the self-assembly of signalling complexes on the surface of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles inside living cells. The nanoparticles act as nanoscopic hot spots that can be displaced by magnetic forces and trigger signal transduction pathways that bring about a cell response. We applied this strategy to Rho-GTPases, a set of molecular switches known to regulate cell morphology via complex spatiotemporal patterns of activity. We demonstrate that the nanoparticle-mediated activation of signalling pathways leads to local remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton and to morphological changes.

  8. Establishment of novel detection system for embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells based on nongenetic manipulation with indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Susumu; Ito, Jun; Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Fujimura, Yuu; Takeda, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Ken; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are expected to be useful for basic research and clinical applications. However, in several studies, genetic methods used to detect and obtain them are difficult and pose major safety problems. Therefore, in this study, we established a novel detection system for hepatocytes by using indocyanine green (ICG), which is selectively taken up by hepatocytes, based on nongenetic manipulation. ICG has maximum light absorption near 780 nm, and it fluoresces between 800 and 900 nm. Making use of these properties, we developed flow cytometry equipped with an excitation lazer of 785 nm and specific bandpass filters and successfully detected ESC-derived ICG-positive cells that were periodic acid-Schiff positive and expressed hepatocyte phenotypic mRNAs. These results demonstrate that this detection system based on nongenetic manipulation with ICG will lead to isolate hepatocytes generated from ESCs and provide the appropriate levels of stability, quality, and safety required for cell source for cell-based therapy and pharmaceutical studies such as toxicology.

  9. Chlorogenic Acids Biosynthesis in Centella asiatica Cells Is not Stimulated by Salicylic Acid Manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ncube, E N; Steenkamp, P A; Madala, N E; Dubery, I A

    2016-07-01

    Exogenous application of synthetic and natural elicitors of plant defence has been shown to result in mass production of secondary metabolites with nutraceuticals properties in cultured cells. In particular, salicylic acid (SA) treatment has been reported to induce the production of phenylpropanoids, including cinnamic acid derivatives bound to quinic acid (chlorogenic acids). Centella asiatica is an important medicinal plant with several therapeutic properties owing to its wide spectrum of secondary metabolites. We investigated the effect of SA on C. asiatica cells by monitoring perturbation of chlorogenic acids in particular. Different concentrations of SA were used to treat C. asiatica cells, and extracts from both treated and untreated cells were analysed using an optimised UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS method. Semi-targeted multivariate data analyses with the aid of principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed a concentration-dependent metabolic response. Surprisingly, a range of chlorogenic acid derivatives were found to be downregulated as a consequence of SA treatment. Moreover, irbic acid (3,5-O-dicaffeoyl-4-O-malonilquinic acid) was found to be a dominant CGA in C. asiatica cells, although the SA treatment also had a negative effect on its concentration. Overall SA treatment was found to be an ineffective elicitor of CGA production in cultured C. asiatica cells.

  10. Pharmacological manipulation of the akt signaling pathway regulates myxoma virus replication and tropism in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Werden, Steven J; McFadden, Grant

    2010-04-01

    Viruses have evolved an assortment of mechanisms for regulating the Akt signaling pathway to establish a cellular environment more favorable for viral replication. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a rabbit-specific poxvirus that encodes many immunomodulatory factors, including an ankyrin repeat-containing host range protein termed M-T5 that functions to regulate tropism of MYXV for rabbit lymphocytes and certain human cancer cells. MYXV permissiveness in these human cancer cells is dependent upon the direct interaction between M-T5 and Akt, which has been shown to induce the kinase activity of Akt. In this study, an array of compounds that selectively manipulate Akt signaling was screened and we show that only a subset of Akt inhibitors significantly decreased the ability of MYXV to replicate in previously permissive human cancer cells. Furthermore, reduced viral replication efficiency was correlated with lower levels of phosphorylated Akt. In contrast, the PP2A-specific phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid promoted increased Akt kinase activation and rescued MYXV replication in human cancer cells that did not previously support viral replication. Finally, phosphorylation of Akt at residue Thr308 was shown to dictate the physical interaction between Akt and M-T5, which then leads to phosphorylation of Ser473 and permits productive MYXV replication in these human cancer cells. The results of this study further characterize the mechanism by which M-T5 exploits the Akt signaling cascade and affirms this interaction as a major tropism determinant that regulates the replication efficiency of MYXV in human cancer cells.

  11. Molecular genetic manipulation of Pichia pastoris SEC4 governs cell growth and glucoamylase secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.-H.; Chou, W.-I; Lin, S.-C.; Sheu, C.-C.; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr . E-mail: dtchang@life.nthu.edu.tw

    2005-11-04

    We have previously engineered a recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 transformant, MSPGA-7, harboring seven copies of glucoamylase (GA) fused with modified signal peptide. High yield secretion of GA was achieved as an extra copy of SEC4 was integrated to the transformant. To elucidate the physiological role of SEC4, a dominant-negative mutant of SEC4, SEC4 {sub S28N}, was overexpressed under the control of alchohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter in P. pastoris strain MSPGA-7 as well as a set of host cells harboring multi-copy of wild type SEC4. We found that SEC4 {sub S28N} mutation in the key guanine nucleotide binding domain reduced guanine nucleotide binding affinity, hence it blocked the transport of vesicles required for targeting and fusion to the plasma membrane. The inhibitory levels of cell growth and GA secretion were correlated with the dosage of SEC4 {sub S28N} gene. In addition, overexpression of SEC4 driven by AOX1 promoter in MSPGA-7 improved the secretory production of GA, but demonstrated the delay of cell growth by increased gene dosage of SEC4. Interestingly, a limited level of Sec4p did not disturb the cell growth. It was because expression of only one copy of SEC4 resulted in delay of cell growth at an early stage while still maintaining high level Sec4p at long-term incubation. Accordingly, as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter was used to substitute AOX1 promoter to drive the SEC4 expression, enhanced GA secretion but not inhibition of cell growth was achieved. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SEC4 is essential for P. pastoris in regulating cell growth and heterologous protein secretion in a dosage-dependent manner.

  12. Noninvasive and real-time monitoring of molecular targeting therapy for lymph node and peritoneal metastasis in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colorectal cancer cells tagged with GFP and DsRed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Hayao; Hara, Masayasu; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-02-01

    We have developed an in vivo imaging system consisting of GFP- and DsRed-tagged human colonic cancer cell line, which has peritoneal and lymph node metastatic potential and show high sensitivity to EGFR targeting drugs, and convenient detection devices for GFP and DsRed. The latter includes a small handy fluorescence detection device for external monitoring of the therapeutic effect of the drug and a convenient stereo fluorescent microscope for internal visualization of micrometastases. We applied this imaging system to investigate anti-metastatic effects of EGFR targeting drugs such as gefitinib (Iressa). This system allowed sensitive detection of the development of peritoneal and lymph node metastases from the micrometastasis stage at the cellular level and also permited noninvasive, non-anesthetic monitoring of anti-metastatic effect of the drug in an animal facility without any pretreatment. Significant decreases in the intraabdominal metastatic tumor growth and prevention of inguinal lymph node metastasis by gefitinib treatment could be clearly monitored. These results suggest that convenient, low-cost, true real-time monitoring of therapeutic effect using such a fluorescence-mediated whole body imaging system seems to enhance the speed of preclinical study for novel anti-cancer agents and will allow us to understand the action mechanism of molecular targeting drugs.

  13. Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene targeting enables rapid and precise genetic manipulation of mammalian neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Dewari, Pooran Singh; Kalantzaki, Maria; Gangoso, Ester; Matjusaitis, Mantas; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Blin, Carla; Grant, Vivien; Bulstrode, Harry; Gogolok, Sabine; Skarnes, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cell (NSC) lines provide a tractable model for discovery across stem cell and developmental biology, regenerative medicine and neuroscience. They can be derived from foetal or adult germinal tissues and continuously propagated in vitro as adherent monolayers. NSCs are clonally expandable, genetically stable, and easily transfectable – experimental attributes compatible with targeted genetic manipulations. However, gene targeting, which is crucial for functional studies of embryonic stem cells, has not been exploited to date in NSC lines. Here, we deploy CRISPR/Cas9 technology to demonstrate a variety of sophisticated genetic modifications via gene targeting in both mouse and human NSC lines, including: (1) efficient targeted transgene insertion at safe harbour loci (Rosa26 and AAVS1); (2) biallelic knockout of neurodevelopmental transcription factor genes; (3) simple knock-in of epitope tags and fluorescent reporters (e.g. Sox2-V5 and Sox2-mCherry); and (4) engineering of glioma mutations (TP53 deletion; H3F3A point mutations). These resources and optimised methods enable facile and scalable genome editing in mammalian NSCs, providing significant new opportunities for functional genetic analysis. PMID:28096221

  14. Genetic manipulation of periostin expression in the heart does not affect myocyte content, cell cycle activity or cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Lorts, Angela; Schwanekamp, Jennifer A.; Elrod, John W.; Sargent, Michelle A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2009-01-01

    Following a pathologic insult, the adult mammalian heart undergoes hypertrophic growth and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. While a small sub-population of cardiomyocytes can re-enter the cell cycle following cardiac injury, the myocardium is largely thought to be incapable of significant regeneration. Periostin, an extracellular matrix protein, has recently been proposed to induce re-entry of differentiated cardiomyocytes back into the cell cycle and promote meaningful repair following myocardial infarction. Here, we show that while periostin is induced in the heart following injury, it does not stimulate DNA synthesis, mitosis or cytokinesis of cardiomyocytes in vitro or in vivo. Mice lacking the gene encoding periostin and mice with inducible overexpression of full-length periostin were analyzed at baseline and after myocardial infarction. There was no difference in heart size or a change in cardiomyocyte number in either periostin transgenic or gene-targeted mice at baseline. Quantification of proliferating myocytes in the peri-infarct area showed no difference between periostin overexpressing and null mice compared with strain-matched controls. In support of these observations, neither overexpression of periostin in cell culture, via an adenoviral vector, nor stimulation with recombinant protein induced DNA synthesis, mitosis or cytokinesis. Periostin is a regulator of cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy and may be a reasonable pharmacological target to mitigate heart failure, but manipulation of this protein appears to have no obvious effect on myocardial regeneration. PMID:19038863

  15. Phosphorylated DegU Manipulates Cell Fate Differentiation in the Bacillus subtilis Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Victoria L.; Porter, Michael; Hobley, Laura; Kiley, Taryn B.; Swedlow, Jason R.; Davidson, Fordyce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cell differentiation is ubiquitous and facilitates division of labor and development. Bacteria are capable of multicellular behaviors that benefit the bacterial community as a whole. A striking example of bacterial differentiation occurs throughout the formation of a biofilm. During Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation, a subpopulation of cells differentiates into a specialized population that synthesizes the exopolysaccharide and the TasA amyloid components of the extracellular matrix. The differentiation process is indirectly controlled by the transcription factor Spo0A that facilitates transcription of the eps and tapA (tasA) operons. DegU is a transcription factor involved in regulating biofilm formation. Here, using a combination of genetics and live single-cell cytological techniques, we define the mechanism of biofilm inhibition at high levels of phosphorylated DegU (DegU∼P) by showing that transcription from the eps and tapA promoter regions is inhibited. Data demonstrating that this is not a direct regulatory event are presented. We demonstrate that DegU∼P controls the frequency with which cells activate transcription from the operons needed for matrix biosynthesis in favor of an off state. Subsequent experimental analysis led us to conclude that DegU∼P functions to increase the level of Spo0A∼P, driving cell fate differentiation toward the terminal developmental process of sporulation. PMID:24123822

  16. Photocurrent enhancement from diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer solar cells through alkyl-chain branching point manipulation.

    PubMed

    Meager, Iain; Ashraf, Raja Shahid; Mollinger, Sonya; Schroeder, Bob C; Bronstein, Hugo; Beatrup, Daniel; Vezie, Michelle S; Kirchartz, Thomas; Salleo, Alberto; Nelson, Jenny; McCulloch, Iain

    2013-08-07

    Systematically moving the alkyl-chain branching position away from the polymer backbone afforded two new thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPPTT-T) polymers. When used as donor materials in polymer:fullerene solar cells, efficiencies exceeding 7% were achieved without the use of processing additives. The effect of the position of the alkyl-chain branching point on the thin-film morphology was investigated using X-ray scattering techniques and the effects on the photovoltaic and charge-transport properties were also studied. For both solar cell and transistor devices, moving the branching point further from the backbone was beneficial. This is the first time that this effect has been shown to improve solar cell performance. Strong evidence is presented for changes in microstructure across the series, which is most likely the cause for the photocurrent enhancement.

  17. Acute dialysis-associated peritonitis in children with D+ hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Adragna, Marta; Balestracci, Alejandro; García Chervo, Laura; Steinbrun, Silvina; Delgado, Norma; Briones, Liliana

    2012-04-01

    Acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the preferred therapy for renal replacement in children with post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS), but peritonitis remains a frequent complication of this procedure. We reviewed data from 149 patients with D+ HUS who had undergone acute PD with the aim of determining the prevalence and risk factors for the development of peritonitis. A total of 36 patients (24.2%) presented peritonitis. The median onset of peritonitis manifestations was 6 (range 2-18) days after the initiation of dialysis treatment, and Gram-positive microorganisms were the predominant bacterial type isolated (15/36 patients). The patients were divided into two groups: with or without peritonitis, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that a longer duration of the oligoanuric period, more days of dialysis, catheter replacement, stay in the intensive care unit, and hypoalbuminemia were significantly associated to the development of peritonitis. The multivariate analysis, controlled by duration of PD, identified the following independent risk factors for peritonitis: catheter replacement [p = 0.037, odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.73], stay in intensive care unit (p = 0.0001, OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.65-4.19), and hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.0076, OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.10-1.91). Based on these findings, we conclude that the optimization of the aseptic technique during catheter manipulation and early nutritional support are targets for the prevention of peritonitis, especially in critically ill patients.

  18. A cell-permeable tool for analysing APP intracellular domain function and manipulation of PIKfyve activity

    PubMed Central

    Guscott, Benjamin; Balklava, Zita; Safrany, Stephen T.; Wassmer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms for regulating PIKfyve complex activity are currently emerging. The PIKfyve complex, consisting of the phosphoinositide kinase PIKfyve (also known as FAB1), VAC14 and FIG4, is required for the production of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2]. PIKfyve function is required for homoeostasis of the endo/lysosomal system and is crucially implicated in neuronal function and integrity, as loss of function mutations in the PIKfyve complex lead to neurodegeneration in mouse models and human patients. Our recent work has shown that the intracellular domain of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a molecule central to the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease binds to VAC14 and enhances PIKfyve function. In the present study, we utilize this recent advance to create an easy-to-use tool for increasing PIKfyve activity in cells. We fused APP intracellular domain (AICD) to the HIV TAT domain, a cell-permeable peptide allowing proteins to penetrate cells. The resultant TAT–AICD fusion protein is cell permeable and triggers an increase in PI(3,5)P2. Using the PI(3,5)P2 specific GFP-ML1Nx2 probe, we show that cell-permeable AICD alters PI(3,5)P2 dynamics. TAT–AICD also provides partial protection from pharmacological inhibition of PIKfyve. All three lines of evidence show that the AICD activates the PIKfyve complex in cells, a finding that is important for our understanding of the mechanism of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26934981

  19. Peritoneal mesothelioma in a jaguar (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Souza, Francisco de Assis Leite; de Carvalho, Ciro José Sousa; de Almeida, Hatawa M; Pires, Lidiany Viana; Silva, Lucilene dos Santos; Costa, Francisco Assis Lima; Silva, Silvana M Medeiros de Sousa

    2013-09-01

    A 21-yr-old female jaguar (Panthera onca) died in a zoo in Teresina, Piaui, Brazil, following a history of abdominal distension, ascites, anorexia, and dyspnea. At necropsy, a dark red, watery, blood-tinged serous fluid was present in the abdominal cavity. The peritoneum was thick with firm, yellow, villous projections. Histologically, the tumors were composed of a biphasic population of cells, which reacted to anti-cytokeratin and anti-vimentin antibodies, consistent with a biphasic benign mesothelioma of peritoneal origin. This is the first reported case of mesothelioma in a captive jaguar.

  20. Outcomes of single organism peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis: gram negatives versus gram positives in the Network 9 Peritonitis Study.

    PubMed

    Bunke, C M; Brier, M E; Golper, T A

    1997-08-01

    The use of the "peritonitis rate" in the management of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis is assuming importance in comparing the prowess of facilities, care givers and new innovations. For this to be a meaningful outcome measure, the type of infection (causative pathogen) must have less clinical significance than the number of infections during a time interval. The natural history of Staphylococcus aureus, pseudomonas, and fungal peritonitis would not support that the outcome of an episode of peritonitis is independent of the causative pathogen. Could this concern be extended to other more frequently occurring pathogens? To address this, the Network 9 Peritonitis Study identified 530 episodes of single organism peritonitis caused by a gram positive organism and 136 episodes caused by a single non-pseudomonal gram negative (NPGN) pathogen. Coincidental soft tissue infections (exit site or tunnel) occurred equally in both groups. Outcomes of peritonitis were analyzed by organism classification and by presence or absence of a soft tissue infection. NPGN peritonitis was associated with significantly more frequent catheter loss, hospitalization, and technique failure and was less likely to resolve regardless of the presence or absence of a soft tissue infection. Hospitalization and death tended to occur more frequently with enterococcal peritonitis than with other gram positive peritonitis. The outcomes in the NPGN peritonitis group were significantly worse (resolution, catheter loss, hospitalization, technique failure) compared to coagulase negative staphylococcal or S. aureus peritonitis, regardless of the presence or absence of a coincidental soft tissue infection. Furthermore, for the first time, the poor outcomes of gram negative peritonitis are shown to be independent of pseudomonas or polymicrobial involvement or soft tissue infections. The gram negative organism appears to be the important factor. In addition, the outcome of peritonitis caused by S. aureus

  1. Uremic toxins and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lameire, N; Vanholder, R; De Smet, R

    2001-02-01

    Uremic toxicity is related in part to the accumulation of toxic substances, the nature of which has only partly been characterized. Because of the use of a highly permeable membrane and better preservation of the residual renal function, it could be anticipated that some of these uremic toxins are more efficiently cleared across the peritoneal membrane, and that the plasma and tissue levels of these compounds are lower than in hemodialysis patients. This article analyzes the generation and removal of several uremic toxins in peritoneal dialysis patients. The following uremic toxins are discussed: beta2-microglobulin, advanced glycation end products, advanced oxidation protein products, granulocyte inhibitory proteins, p-Cresol, and hyperhomocysteinemia. Some recent studies are reviewed suggesting that uremic toxins are involved in the progression of renal failure and are at least partially removed by peritoneal dialysis. We conclude that, although the plasma levels of some of these compounds are lower in peritoneal dialysis versus hemodialysis patients, it does not mean that the peritoneal dialysis patient is "better" protected against the numerous disturbances caused by these toxins.

  2. Manipulation of plant cells by cyst and root-knot nematode effectors.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Baum, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes is the release of effector proteins from their esophageal gland cells through their stylets into host roots. These proteinaceous stylet secretions have been shown to be crucial for successful parasitism by mediating the transition of normal root cells into specialized feeding sites and by negating plant defenses. Recent technical advances of purifying mRNA from esophageal gland cells of plant-parasitic nematodes coupled with emerging sequencing technologies is steadily expanding our knowledge of nematode effector repertoires. Host targets and biological activities of a number of nematode effectors are continuously being reported and, by now, a first picture of the complexity of sedentary nematode parasitism at the molecular level is starting to take shape. In this review, we highlight effector mechanisms that recently have been uncovered by studying the host-pathogen interaction. These mechanisms range from mediating susceptibility of host plants to the actual triggering of defense responses. In particular, we portray and discuss the mechanisms by which nematode effectors modify plant cell walls, negate host defense responses, alter auxin and polyamine signaling, mimic plant molecules, regulate stress signaling, and activate hypersensitive responses. Continuous molecular characterization of newly discovered nematode effectors will be needed to determine how these effectors orchestrate host signaling pathways and biological processes leading to successful parasitism.

  3. PLGA nanometer surface features manipulate fibronectin interactions for improved vascular cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Miller, Derick C; Haberstroh, Karen M; Webster, Thomas J

    2007-06-01

    The largest cause of mortality in the Western world is atherosclerotic vascular disease. Many of these diseases require synthetic vascular grafts; however, their patency rate is only 30% in small (<6 mm) diameter vascular grafts after 5 years of implantation. In an effort to increase small diameter vascular graft success, researchers have been designing random nanostructured surface features which enhance vascular cell functions. However, for the present study, highly-controllable, nanostructured features on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces were formulated. To create ordered nanostructured roughness on PLGA surfaces, either 500, 200, or 100 nm polystyrene nanospheres were separately placed onto mica. These were then used as a template for creating an inverse poly(dimethylsiloxane) mold which was utilized to cast PLGA. Compared to all other PLGA films formulated, AFM results demonstrated greater initial fibronectin spreading on PLGA which possessed spherical 200 nm features. Compared to smooth PLGA, PLGA with 500 or 100 nm surface features, results further showed that PLGA with 200 nm spherical features promoted vascular cell (specifically, endothelial, and smooth muscle cell) adhesion. In this manner, the present study demonstrated a specific nanometer surface feature size that promoted fibronectin spreading and subsequent vascular cell adhesion; criteria critical to vascular graft success.

  4. Patients with Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis Have Increased Peritoneal Expression of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2), Transforming Growth Factor-β1, and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, Alferso C.; Habib, Sayed M.; Dendooven, Amélie; Riser, Bruce L.; van der Veer, Jan Willem; Toorop, Raechel J.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Watson, Christopher J. E.; Nguyen, Tri Q.; Boer, Walther H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a devastating complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The pathogenesis is not exactly known and no preventive strategy or targeted medical therapy is available. CCN2 has both pro-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic actions and appears an attractive target. Therefore, we studied peritoneal expression of CCN2, as well as TGFβ1 and VEGF, in different stages of peritoneal fibrosis. Materials and methods Sixteen PD patients were investigated and compared to 12 hemodialysis patients and four pre-emptively transplanted patients. Furthermore, expression was investigated in 12 EPS patients in comparison with 13 PD and 12 non-PD patients without EPS. Peritoneal tissue was taken during kidney transplantation procedure or during EPS surgery. In a subset of patients, CCN2 protein levels in peritoneal effluent and plasma were determined. Samples were examined by qPCR, histology, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. Results Peritoneal CCN2 expression was 5-fold higher in PD patients compared to pre-emptively transplanted patients (P<0.05), but did not differ from hemodialysis patients. Peritoneal expression of TGFβ1 and VEGF were not different between the three groups; neither was peritoneal thickness. Peritoneum of EPS patients exhibited increased expression of CCN2 (35-fold, P<0.001), TGFβ1 (24-fold, P<0.05), and VEGF (77-fold, P<0.001) compared to PD patients without EPS. In EPS patients, CCN2 protein was mainly localized in peritoneal endothelial cells and fibroblasts. CCN2 protein levels were significantly higher in peritoneal effluent of EPS patients compared to levels in dialysate of PD patients (12.0±4.5 vs. 0.91±0.92 ng/ml, P<0.01), while plasma CCN2 levels were not increased. Conclusions Peritoneal expression of CCN2, TGFβ1, and VEGF are significantly increased in EPS patients. In early stages of peritoneal fibrosis, only CCN2 expression is slightly increased. Peritoneal CCN2 overexpression in EPS patients is a

  5. Peritoneal lavage cells of Indonesian thin-tail sheep mediate antibody-dependent superoxide radical cytotoxicity in vitro against newly excysted juvenile Fasciola gigantica but not juvenile Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, David; Estuningsih, Endah; Pleasance, Jill; Prowse, Rhoda; Raadsma, Herman W; Meeusen, Els N T; Spithill, Terry W

    2007-04-01

    Indonesian thin-tail (ITT) sheep resist infection by Fasciola gigantica by an immunological mechanism within 2 to 4 weeks of infection yet are susceptible to F. hepatica infection. Studies of ITT sheep show that little liver damage occurs following F. gigantica infection, suggesting that the invading parasites are killed within the peritoneum or shortly after reaching the liver. We investigated whether cells isolated from the peritoneums of ITT sheep could kill newly excysted juvenile F. gigantica in vitro and act as a potential mechanism of resistance against F. gigantica infection. Peritoneal cells from F. gigantica-infected sheep, rich in macrophages and eosinophils, mediated antibody-dependent cytotoxicity against juvenile F. gigantica in vitro. Cytotoxicity was dependent on contact between the parasite and effector cells. Isolated mammary gland eosinophils of F. gigantica-infected sheep, or resident peritoneal monocytes/macrophages from uninfected sheep, also killed the juvenile parasites in vitro. By using inhibitors, we show that the molecular mechanism of killing in these assays was dependent on the production of superoxide radicals by macrophages and eosinophils. In contrast, this cytotoxic mechanism was ineffective against juvenile F. hepatica parasites in vitro. Analysis of superoxide dismutase activity and mRNA levels showed that activity and gene expression were higher in F. hepatica than in F. gigantica, suggesting a possible role for this enzyme in the resistance of F. hepatica to superoxide-mediated killing. We suggest that ovine macrophages and eosinophils, acting in concert with a specific antibody, may be important effector cells involved in the resistance of ITT sheep to F. gigantica.

  6. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s-1 and 20 µm s-1.

  7. Micro/nano-particles and Cells: Manipulation, Transport, and Self-assembly

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    formation of magnetic colloidal rotor pumps actuated within microfluidic channels, and the high-throughput transfection of genes into living cells...tunability of cluster sizes with approaches such as evaporation of colloidal suspensions, as well as promoting dipolar interactions through external fields...are some of their benefits. Patterned templates further permit “ colloidal epitaxy” to create nearly perfect crystals of tailored lattice structure

  8. Sustained expression of alpha1-antitrypsin after transplantation of manipulated hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Hovav, Avi-Hai; Ohle, Sarah J; Little, Frederic F; Fine, Alan; Kotton, Darrell N

    2008-08-01

    Inherited mutations in the human alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) gene lead to deficient circulating levels of AAT protein and a predisposition to developing emphysema. Gene therapy for individuals deficient in AAT is an attractive goal, because transfer of a normal AAT gene into any cell type able to secrete AAT should reverse deficient AAT levels and attenuate progression of lung disease. Here we present an approach for AAT gene transfer based on the transplantation of lentivirally transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We develop a novel dual-promoter lentiviral system to transfer normal human AAT cDNA as well as a fluorescent tracking "reporter gene" into murine HSCs. After transplantation of 3,000 transduced HSCs into irradiated mouse recipients, we demonstrate simultaneous and sustained systemic expression of both genes in vivo for at least 31 weeks. The stem cells transduced with this protocol maintain multipotency, self-renewal potential, and the ability to reconstitute the hematopoietic systems of both primary and secondary recipients. This lentiviral-based system may be useful for investigations requiring the systemic secretion of anti-proteases or cytokines relevant to the pathogenesis of a variety of lung diseases.

  9. Potential manipulation of endothelial progenitor cells in diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Fadini, G P; Avogaro, A

    2010-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus increases cardiovascular risk through its negative impact on vascular endothelium. Although glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity account for endothelial cell damage, endothelial repair is also affected by diabetes. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are involved in the maintenance of endothelial homoeostasis and in the process of new vessel formation. For these reasons, EPCs are thought to have a protective impact within the cardiovascular system. In addition, EPCs appear to modulate the functioning of other organs, providing neurotropic signals and promoting repair of the glomerular endothelium. The exact mechanisms by which EPCs provide cardiovascular protection are unknown and the definition of EPCs is not standardized. Notwithstanding these limitations, the literature consistently indicates that EPCs are altered in type 1 and type 2 diabetes and in virtually all diabetic complications. Moreover, experimental models suggest that EPC-based therapies might help prevent or reverse the features of end-organ complications. This identifies EPCs as having a novel pathogenic role in diabetes and being a potential therapeutic target. Several ways of favourably modulating EPCs have been identified, including lifestyle intervention, commonly used medications and cell-based approaches. Herein, we provide a comprehensive overview of EPC pathophysiology and the potential for EPC modulation in diabetes.

  10. Manipulation of the Host Cell Membrane during Plasmodium Liver Stage Egress

    PubMed Central

    Caldelari, Reto; Heussler, Volker T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A crucial step in the life cycle of Plasmodium parasites is the transition from the liver stage to the blood stage. Hepatocyte-derived merozoites reach the blood vessels of the liver inside host cell-derived vesicles called merosomes. The molecular basis of merosome formation is only partially understood. Here we show that Plasmodium berghei liver stage merozoites, upon rupture of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, destabilize the host cell membrane (HCM) and induce separation of the host cell actin cytoskeleton from the HCM. At the same time, the phospholipid and protein composition of the HCM appears to be substantially altered. This includes the loss of a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) reporter and the PIP2-dependent actin-plasma membrane linker ezrin from the HCM. Furthermore, transmembrane domain-containing proteins and palmitoylated and myristoylated proteins, as well as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, lose their HCM localization. Collectively, these findings provide an explanation of HCM destabilization during Plasmodium liver stage egress and thereby contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that lead to merosome formation.

  11. Intraperitoneal therapy for peritoneal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ze; Wang, Jie; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2011-01-01

    Cancers originating from organs in the peritoneal cavity (e.g., ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal, gastric and liver) account for approximately 250,000 new cancer cases annually in the USA. Peritoneal metastases are common owing to locoregional spread and distant metastases of extraperitoneal cancers. A logical treatment is intraperitoneal therapy, as multiple studies have shown significant targeting advantage for this treatment, including significant survival benefits in stage III, surgically debulked ovarian cancer patients. However, the clinical use of intraperitoneal therapy has been limited, in part, by toxicity, owing to the use of indwelling catheters or high drug exposure, by inadequate drug penetration into bulky tumors (>1 cm) and by the lack of products specifically designed and approved for intraperitoneal treatments. This article provides an overview on the background of peritoneal metastasis, clinical research on intraperitoneal therapy, the pharmacokinetic basis of drug delivery in intraperitoneal therapy and our development of drug-loaded tumor-penetrating microparticles. PMID:21062160

  12. History of peritoneal access development.

    PubMed

    Twardowski, Zbylut J

    2006-01-01

    The first peritoneal accesses were devices that had been used in other fields (general surgery, urology, or gynecology): trocars, rubber catheters, and sump drains. In the period after World War II, numerous papers were published with various modifications of peritoneal dialysis. The majority of cases were treated with the continuous flow technique; rubber catheters for inflow and sump drains for outflow were commonly used. At the end of the 1940s, intermittent peritoneal dialysis started to be more frequently used. Severe complications of peritoneal accesses created incentive to design accesses specifically for peritoneal dialysis. The initial three, in the late 1940s, were modified sump drains; however, Ferris and Odel for the first time designed a soft, polyvinyl intraperitoneal tube with metal weights to keep the catheter tip in the pelvic gutter where the conditions for drain are the best. In the 1950s, intermittent peritoneal dialysis was established as the preferred technique; polyethylene and nylon catheters became commercially available and peritoneal dialysis was established as a valuable method for treatment of acute renal failure. The major breakthrough came in the 1960s. First of all, it was discovered that the silicone rubber was less irritating to the peritoneal membrane than other plastics. Then, it was found that polyester velour allowed an excellent tissue ingrowth creating a firm bond with the tissue. When a polyester cuff was glued to the catheter, it restricted catheter movement and created a closed tunnel between the integument and the peritoneal cavity. In 1968, Tenckhoff and Schechter combined these two features and designed a silicone rubber catheter with a polyester cuff for treatment of acute renal failure and two cuffs for treatment of chronic renal failure. This was the most important development in peritoneal access. Technological evolution never ends. Multiple attempts have been made to eliminate remaining complications of the

  13. [Exploration of ultrafiltration failure in peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Salvatore; Coche, Emmanuel; Goffin, Eric

    2008-12-01

    Ultrafiltration failure (UFF) is a common complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). It may be due to a technical problem (PD catheter obstruction or migration, peritoneal leaks or intraperitoneal adhesions) or because of a peritoneal membrane alteration (hyperpermeability, aquaporin dysfunction, peritoneal sclerosis or enhanced lymphatic reabsorption). We, here, present the case of a patient who developed several consecutive PD complications that eventually led to UFF. We also present an algorithm, which may help clinicians to establish a precise etiological diagnosis of UFF.

  14. Peritoneal culture alters Streptococcus pneumoniae protein profiles and virulence properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Janssen, R.; Robb, C. W.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    We have examined the properties of Streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in the murine peritoneal cavity and compared its virulence-associated characteristics to those of cultures grown in vitro. Analysis of mRNA levels for specific virulence factors demonstrated a 2.8-fold increase in ply expression and a 2.2-fold increase in capA3 expression during murine peritoneal culture (MPC). Two-dimensional gels and immunoblots using convalescent-phase patient sera and murine sera revealed distinct differences in protein production in vivo (MPC). MPC-grown pneumococci adhered to A549 epithelial cell lines at levels 10-fold greater than those cultured in vitro.

  15. Trapping and dynamic manipulation with magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging of targeted microspheres mimicking metastatic cancer cells trafficking in the vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenwei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of micro-scale objects mimicking metastatic cancer cells in a flow field have been demonstrated with magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging. Coupled contrast agents combining gold nanorods (15 nm × 50 nm; absorption peak around 730 nm) with 15 nm diameter magnetic nanospheres were targeted to 10 μm polystyrene beads recirculating in a 1.6 mm diameter tube mimicking a human peripheral vessel. Targeted objects were then trapped by an external magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system consisting of two disc magnets separated by 6 cm to form a polarizing field (0.04 Tesla in the tube region) to magnetize the magnetic contrast agents, and a custom designed cone magnet array with a high magnetic field gradient (about 0.044 Tesla/mm in the tube region) producing a strong trapping force to magnetized contrast agents. Results show that polystyrene beads linked to nanocomposites can be trapped at flow rates up to 12 ml/min. It is shown that unwanted background in a photoacoustic image can be significantly suppressed by changing the position of the cone magnet array with respect to the tube, thus creating coherent movement of the trapped objects. This study makes mmPA imaging very promising for differential visualization of metastatic cells trafficking in the vasculature.

  16. Portable microsystem integrates multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations and a surface stress biosensor to detect red blood cells for hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shengbo; Feng, Qiliang; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Huiming; Ji, Jianlong; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Tao

    2016-09-20

    Hemolytic anemia intensity has been suggested as a vital factor for the growth of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease. However, there is no effective and rapid diagnostic method. As a powerful platform for bio-particles testing, biosensors integrated with microfluidics offer great potential for a new generation of portable point of care systems. In this paper, we describe a novel portable microsystem consisting of a multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations (MDM) device and a surface stress biosensor to separate and detect red blood cells (RBCs) for diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The peripheral circuit to power the interdigitated electrode array of the MDM device and the surface stress biosensor test platform were integrated into a portable signal system. The MDM includes a preparing region, a focusing region, and a sorting region. Simulation and experimental results show the RBCs trajectories when they are subjected to the positive DEP force, allowing the successful sorting of living/dead RBCs. Separated RBCs are then transported to the biosensor and the capacitance values resulting from the variation of surface stress were measured. The diagnosis of hemolytic anemia can be realized by detecting RBCs and the portable microsystem provides the assessment to the hemolytic anemia patient.

  17. Portable microsystem integrates multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations and a surface stress biosensor to detect red blood cells for hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Shengbo; Feng, Qiliang; Jian, Aoqun; Li, Huiming; Ji, Jianlong; Duan, Qianqian; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia intensity has been suggested as a vital factor for the growth of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease. However, there is no effective and rapid diagnostic method. As a powerful platform for bio-particles testing, biosensors integrated with microfluidics offer great potential for a new generation of portable point of care systems. In this paper, we describe a novel portable microsystem consisting of a multifunctional dielectrophoresis manipulations (MDM) device and a surface stress biosensor to separate and detect red blood cells (RBCs) for diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The peripheral circuit to power the interdigitated electrode array of the MDM device and the surface stress biosensor test platform were integrated into a portable signal system. The MDM includes a preparing region, a focusing region, and a sorting region. Simulation and experimental results show the RBCs trajectories when they are subjected to the positive DEP force, allowing the successful sorting of living/dead RBCs. Separated RBCs are then transported to the biosensor and the capacitance values resulting from the variation of surface stress were measured. The diagnosis of hemolytic anemia can be realized by detecting RBCs and the portable microsystem provides the assessment to the hemolytic anemia patient. PMID:27647457

  18. In vivo X-ray elemental imaging of single cell model organisms manipulated by laser-based optical tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Vergucht, Eva; Brans, Toon; Beunis, Filip; Garrevoet, Jan; De Rijcke, Maarten; Bauters, Stephen; Deruytter, David; Vandegehuchte, Michiel; Van Nieuwenhove, Ine; Janssen, Colin; Burghammer, Manfred; Vincze, Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    We report on a radically new elemental imaging approach for the analysis of biological model organisms and single cells in their natural, in vivo state. The methodology combines optical tweezers (OT) technology for non-contact, laser-based sample manipulation with synchrotron radiation confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microimaging for the first time. The main objective of this work is to establish a new method for in vivo elemental imaging in a two-dimensional (2D) projection mode in free-standing biological microorganisms or single cells, present in their aqueous environment. Using the model organism Scrippsiella trochoidea, a first proof of principle experiment at beamline ID13 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) demonstrates the feasibility of the OT XRF methodology, which is applied to study mixture toxicity of Cu-Ni and Cu-Zn as a result of elevated exposure. We expect that the new OT XRF methodology will significantly contribute to the new trend of investigating microorganisms at the cellular level with added in vivo capability. PMID:25762511

  19. Update on the challenging role of biofilms in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Margarida; Rodrigues, Anabela; Pedrosa, Jorge M; Carvalho, Maria J; Cabrita, António; Oliveira, Rosário

    2013-09-01

    Biofilms are commonly associated with an increased risk of patient infection. In peritoneal dialysis (PD), catheter associated infection, especially peritonitis, remains a clinically relevant problem. Although the presence of a biofilm is recognized in relapsing, repeat, and catheter-related peritonitis, it remains poorly characterized. In this review, an update on the role of biofilms in PD infections is presented. The emerging concept that host cells and tissue associated biofilms, in addition to the biofilms on the catheters themselves, contribute to the recalcitrance of infections is discussed. Furthermore, the evidence of biofilms on PD catheters, their developmental stages, and the possible influence of the PD environment are reviewed. The focus is given to ex vivo and in vitro studies that contribute to the elucidation of the interplay between host, microbial, and dialysis factors. The key issues that are still to be answered and the challenges to clinical practice are discussed.

  20. Driving Cells to the Desired State in a Bimodal Distribution through Manipulation of Internal Noise with Biologically Practicable Approaches.

    PubMed

    Shu, Che-Chi; Yeh, Chen-Chao; Jhang, Wun-Sin; Lo, Shih-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic nature of gene regulatory networks described by Chemical Master Equation (CME) leads to the distribution of proteins. A deterministic bistability is usually reflected as a bimodal distribution in stochastic simulations. Within a certain range of the parameter space, a bistable system exhibits two stable steady states, one at the low end and the other at the high end. Consequently, it appears to have a bimodal distribution with one sub-population (mode) around the low end and the other around the high end. In most cases, only one mode is favorable, and guiding cells to the desired state is valuable. Traditionally, the population was redistributed simply by adjusting the concentration of the inducer or the stimulator. However, this method has limitations; for example, the addition of stimulator cannot drive cells to the desired state in a common bistable system studied in this work. In fact, it pushes cells only to the undesired state. In addition, it causes a position shift of the modes, and this shift could be as large as the value of the mode itself. Such a side effect might damage coordination, and this problem can be avoided by applying a new method presented in this work. We illustrated how to manipulate the intensity of internal noise by using biologically practicable methods and utilized it to prompt the population to the desired mode. As we kept the deterministic behavior untouched, the aforementioned drawback was overcome. Remarkably, more than 96% of cells has been driven to the desired state. This method is genetically applicable to biological systems exhibiting a bimodal distribution resulting from bistability. Moreover, the reaction network studied in this work can easily be extended and applied to many other systems.

  1. Driving Cells to the Desired State in a Bimodal Distribution through Manipulation of Internal Noise with Biologically Practicable Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Che-Chi; Yeh, Chen-Chao; Jhang, Wun-Sin; Lo, Shih-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic nature of gene regulatory networks described by Chemical Master Equation (CME) leads to the distribution of proteins. A deterministic bistability is usually reflected as a bimodal distribution in stochastic simulations. Within a certain range of the parameter space, a bistable system exhibits two stable steady states, one at the low end and the other at the high end. Consequently, it appears to have a bimodal distribution with one sub-population (mode) around the low end and the other around the high end. In most cases, only one mode is favorable, and guiding cells to the desired state is valuable. Traditionally, the population was redistributed simply by adjusting the concentration of the inducer or the stimulator. However, this method has limitations; for example, the addition of stimulator cannot drive cells to the desired state in a common bistable system studied in this work. In fact, it pushes cells only to the undesired state. In addition, it causes a position shift of the modes, and this shift could be as large as the value of the mode itself. Such a side effect might damage coordination, and this problem can be avoided by applying a new method presented in this work. We illustrated how to manipulate the intensity of internal noise by using biologically practicable methods and utilized it to prompt the population to the desired mode. As we kept the deterministic behavior untouched, the aforementioned drawback was overcome. Remarkably, more than 96% of cells has been driven to the desired state. This method is genetically applicable to biological systems exhibiting a bimodal distribution resulting from bistability. Moreover, the reaction network studied in this work can easily be extended and applied to many other systems. PMID:27911933

  2. Sulfatase‐mediated manipulation of the astrocyte‐Schwann cell interface