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Sample records for mannose binding lectin

  1. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  2. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  3. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein contains a canonical collagen-like domain, a carbohydrate recognition d...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... MBL2 gene. Mannose-binding lectin plays an important role in the body's immune response by attaching to foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, or yeast and turning on (activating) the complement system . The complement system is a group of immune system proteins that work together to ...

  5. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  6. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  7. Mannose-binding lectin may affect pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Çalkavur, Şebnem; Erdemir, Gülin; Onay, Hüseyin; Altun Köroğlu, Özge; Yalaz, Mehmet; Zekioğlu, Osman; Aksu, Güzide; Özkınay, Ferda; Akercan, Fuat; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2015-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system and acts as a complement activator through the lectin pathway. Genetic variations of MBL and low MBL levels cause several infection problems, which may also be related to pregnancy problems. We aimed to investigate the role of MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels in pregnancy problems and premature delivery. In this prospective study, MBL gene codon 54 polymorphism and serum MBL levels were studied in 45 mothers who delivered earlier than 35 gestational weeks. The frequency of MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B was much higher (homozygous 4.4% and heterozygous 33.3%) in the study group mothers than the previously reported frequency in the healthy Turkish population (homozygous 2-6%, heterozygous 12-20%). MBL variant allele B frequency was closely related to low MBL levels (<0.1 μg/ml), vaginitis and increased IL-6 levels. The median MBL levels were lower than the critical level of 0.1 μg/ ml in study mothers who had recurrent miscarriage, infertility, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm premature rupture of membranes with duration of longer than 72 hours, tocolysis, histological chorioamnionitis, urinary tract infection and vaginitis. MBL gene codon 54 variant allele B is related to low serum MBL levels, increased IL-6 levels, genitourinary infections and may cause pregnancy-related problems such as infertility, recurrent miscarriage and preterm delivery.

  8. Mannose-Binding Lectin Serum Levels in Patients With Candiduria

    PubMed Central

    Moslem, Maryam; Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Fatahinia, Mahnaz; Kheradmand, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candida species are normal mycoflora of human body which are capable to cause urinary tract infection (UTI). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a kind of innate immune system and decreasing plasma levels of MBL may disrupt the natural immune response and increase susceptibility to infections. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess MBL in the serum of patients with candiduria and compare them with control. Patients and Methods: The blood and urine samples were collected from 335 patients (hospitalized in Golestan hospital, Ahvaz) using standard methods and the growing colonies on CHROMagar were identified using routine diagnostic tests. MBL activity in the serum of 45 patients with candiduria and 45 controls was measured using Eastbiopharm enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results: In this study, 45 (13.4 %) urine samples were positive for Candida species (17 males and 28 females). The most common isolated yeast was Candida albicans (34%), followed by C. glabrata (32.1%), C. tropicalis (9.4%), other Candida species (22.6%), and Rhodotorula species (1.9%). The mean serum levels of MBL were 0.85 ± 0.01 ng/mL and 1.02 ± 0.03 ng/mL among candiduric patients and controls, respectively, and there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.6). Conclusions: Our results showed that there was no significant relationship between MBL serum levels and candiduria. PMID:26870314

  9. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, M W

    1998-08-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is the most intensively studied human collectin. It is recognized to be a versatile macro-molecule with many of the functional characteristics of IgM, IgG and Clq. In the presence of calcium the protein can bind to a wide spectrum of oligosaccharides through multiple lectin domains. Such binding to the repeating sugar arrays on microbial surfaces may result in direct uptake by one or more collectin receptors on phagocyte surface or may trigger the activation of a pro-serine protease complex (MASP 1 and MASP 2) leading to cleavage of C4 and C2 of the classical complement pathway. Although serum levels of MBL are normally rather low (1500 micrograms/litre) there is increasing evidence that the protein plays an important role in immune defence, particularly during the phase of primary contact with a microorganism. This is suggested by the observed association of an increased incidence of infections in individuals with structural mutations in exon 1 of the MBL gene. A cluster of such mutations in codons 52, 54 and 57 lead to secondary structural abnormalities of the collagenous triple helix and a failure to form biologically functional higher order oligomers. The codon 54 mutation has been identified in several Eurasian populations whereas the codon 57 mutation is characteristic of sub-Saharan populations. One intriguing paradox arising from the MBL genotyping studies is the observation that in many populations there are surprisingly high frequencies of either the codon 54 or codon 57 mutation, suggesting that there may be some biological advantage associated with absence of the protein. Nevertheless, various groups have reported either low serum levels of MBL or an increased frequency of the structural gene mutations in patients with suspected immunodeficiencies, those with frequent unexplained infections and those with systemic lupus erythematosus. There is also evidence that the rate of progression of AIDS in HIV positive men is faster

  10. Interaction of linear manno-oligosaccharides with three mannose-specific bulb lectins. Comparison with mannose/glucose-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J

    1992-05-22

    Three new mannose-binding lectins, isolated from daffodil (NPA), amaryllis (HHA), and snowdrop (GNA) bulbs, are capable of precipitating with a linear mannopentaose (Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-2Man). NPA and HHA reacted strongly with the mannopentaose whereas GNA gave a precipitate only at concentrations greater than 500 microM. A phosphate group at C-6 of the nonreducing terminal mannosyl group prevented precipitation in all three cases. The reduced (NaBH4) mannopentaose, Man4Man-ol, did not precipitate with GNA or NPA, but was active with HHA. This activity was lost when Man4Man-ol was converted (NaIO4 then NaBH4; mild acid hydrolysis of the reduced product) into trisaccharide derivatives. With alpha-D-Manp-OMe the three lectins gave UV difference spectra having large positive peaks at 292-293 and 283-284 nm, and a small positive peak at 275 nm, characteristic of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues. The association constants for the interaction with alpha-D-Manp-OMe were very low (NPA, 86; HHA, 66; and GNA, 41 M-1), but the lectins bound methyl (1----3)-alpha-mannobioside with increased affinity (K for NPA 540, for HHA 2400, and for GNA 200 M-1). The bulb lectins lack binding sites for hydrophobic ligands, as judged by their failure to interact with the fluorescent probes 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (TNS).

  11. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  12. An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts.

    PubMed

    Kvennefors, E Charlotte E; Leggat, William; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Degnan, Bernard M; Barnes, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    Corals form the framework of the world's coral reefs and are under threat from increases in disease and bleaching (symbiotic dysfunction), yet the mechanisms of pathogen and symbiont recognition remain largely unknown. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of an ancient mannose-binding lectin in the coral Acropora millepora, which is likely to be involved in both processes. The lectin ('Millectin') was isolated by affinity chromatography and was shown to bind to bacterial pathogens as well as coral symbionts, dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. cDNA analysis of Millectin indicate extensive sequence variation in the binding region, reflecting its ability to recognise various mannose-like carbohydrate structures on non-self cells, including symbionts and pathogens. This is the first mannose-binding lectin to show extensive sequence variability as observed for pattern recognition proteins in other invertebrate immune systems and, given that invertebrates rely on non-adaptive immunity, is a potential keystone component of coral defence mechanisms.

  13. New mannose-binding lectin isolated from the rhizome of Sarsaparilla Smilax glabra Roxb. (Liliaceae).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Sun, Samuel S M; Wang, Hua; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2004-10-06

    A new mannose-binding lectin, designated SGM2, was isolated from the rhizome of a Chinese medicinal herb Smilax glabra (also known as sarsaparilla in general) by saline extraction, ammonium sulfate precipitation and fractionation, and affinity chromatography on fetuin- and mannose-agarose. SGM2 is shown to have a molecular mass of 37 kDa on gel filtration and 12.5 kDa on SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a trimeric protein composed of three identical subunits. When the first 30 amino acid residues at the N-terminal were compared, SGM2 had approximately 40% homology with those of some other monocots. SGM2 had the property of hemagglutinating activity toward rabbit erythrocytes, which could be reversed by mannose and mannose polymers. SGM2 exhibited antiviral activities against both herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with the same EC(50) of 8.1 microM.

  14. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm.

  15. Characterization and molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata, Epipactis helleborine and Cymbidium hybrid.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-04-15

    Mannose-binding lectins were purified from the leaves of three Orchidaceae species, namely Listera ovata (twayblade), Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine) and Cymbidium hybrid, using affinity chromatography on Mannose - Sepharose-4B. Apparently, the Orchidaceae lectins are dimeric proteins composed of lectin subunits of 12-13 kDa. All of the isolated lectins exhibit exclusive specificity towards mannose. A cDNA library constructed from poly(A) rich RNA isolated from leaves of L. ovata was screened for cDNA clones encoding the lectin using colony hybridization. Since N-terminal sequence analysis of the twayblade lectin revealed some sequence similarity to the previously cloned mannose-binding lectin Hippeastrum hybrid (amaryllis) ovaries, the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone was used as a probe to screen the L. ovata library. Subsequently, the cDNA clone encoding the L. ovata lectin was used to screen the cDNA libraries from the taxonomically related orchid species Cymbidium hybrid and E. helleborine. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from different Orchidaceae species revealed approximately 50% sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The Orchidaceae lectins are apparently translated from mRNAs consisting of approximately 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins which are converted into the mature lectins following post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  16. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Sánchez-Velasco, Pablo; Guerrero-Alonso, M.-Ángeles; Ausín, Fernando; Fariñas, M.-Carmen; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population. PMID:23304495

  17. Efficiency of mannose-binding plant lectins in controlling a homopteran insect, the red cotton bug.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anita; Banerjee, Santanu; Majumder, Pralay; Das, Sampa

    2002-11-06

    Yield losses of different crops due to the attack of various classes of insects are a worldwide problem. Sucking type homopteran pests causing damage to many crop species are not controlled by commonly known insecticidal proteins, namely, Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin (Bt). This study describes the purification of mannose-binding lectins from three different monocotyledonous plants (Allium sativum, Colocasia esculenta, and Diffenbachia sequina) and their effects on a homopteran insect, the red cotton bug. All of them had a detrimental effect on the growth and development of the insect, where A. sativum bulb lectin showed the highest mortality of all, in particular. The same bulb lectin not only affected the growth and fecundity of the insect but also imparted drastic changes in the color, weight, and size, even on the second generation of the insects which have been reared on artificial diet supplemented with a sublethal dose of the lectin. Thus, this finding opens up a possibility of using this lectin as an important component in crop management.

  18. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  19. Mycobacterial antigen 85 complex (Ag85) as a target for ficolins and mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Świerzko, Anna S; Bartłomiejczyk, Marcin A; Brzostek, Anna; Łukasiewicz, Jolanta; Michalski, Mateusz; Dziadek, Jarosław; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    The pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) able to activate complement via the lectin pathway are suspected to be involved in the interaction between pathogenic Mycobacteria and the host immune response. Recently, we have found strong interactions between 25 and 35kDa mycobacterial cell fractions and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and ficolins. Here we demonstrate that two biologically important mycobacterial structures, mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and the antigen 85 (Ag85) complex, induce activation of the lectin pathway of complement. The strong interaction of recombinant MBL with purified ManLAM was confirmed, but no binding of recombinant ficolins (ficolin-1, -2, -3) with this structure was observed. Interestingly, all PRMs tested reacted with the mycobacterial antigen 85 (Ag85) complex. Based on the use of specific inhibitors (mannan for MBL, acetylated bovine serum albumin for ficolin-1 and -2, Hafnia alvei PCM 1200 lipopolysaccharide for ficolin-3), we concluded that carbohydrate-recognition (MBL) and fibrinogen-like domains (ficolins) were involved in these interactions. Our results indicate that the mycobacterial antigen 85 complex is a target for ficolins and MBL. Furthermore, those PRMs also bound to fibronectin and therefore might influence the Ag85 complex-dependent interaction of Mycobacterium with the extracellular matrix.

  20. Direct Complement Restriction of Flavivirus Infection Requires Glycan Recognition by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Beasley, David W.; Stover, Cordula M.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY An intact complement system is crucial for limiting West Nile virus (WNV) dissemination. Herein, we define how complement directly restricts flavivirus infection in an antibody-independent fashion. Mannose binding lectin (MBL) recognized N-linked glycans on the structural proteins of WNV and Dengue virus (DENV), resulting in neutralization through a C3 and C4-dependent mechanism that utilized both the canonical and bypass lectin activation pathways. For WNV, neutralization occurred with virus produced in insect cells, whereas for DENV, neutralization of insect and mammalian cell-derived virus was observed. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the MBL-dependent neutralization occurred in part, by blocking viral fusion. Experiments in mice showed an MBL-dependent accelerated intravascular clearance of DENV or a WNV mutant with two N-linked glycans on its E protein, but not with wild type WNV. Our studies show that MBL recognizes terminal mannose containing carbohydrates on flaviviruses, resulting in neutralization and efficient clearance in vivo. PMID:20709295

  1. Interaction of human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) with Yersinia enterocolitica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Swierzko, Anna S; Bartlomiejczyk, Marcin A; Cedzynski, Maciej; Noszczynska, Magdalena; Duda, Katarzyna A; Michalski, Mateusz; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-09-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is involved in the interaction between Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and host. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), complement-activating soluble pattern-recognition receptor targets microbial glycoconjugates, including LPS. We studied its interactions with a set of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 LPS mutants. The wild-type strain LPS consists of lipid A (LA) substituted with an inner core oligosaccharide (IC) which in turn is substituted either with the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) or the outer core hexasaccharide (OC), and sometimes also with the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA). The LPS mutants produced truncated LPS, missing OPS, OC or both, or, in addition, different IC constituents or ECA. MBL bound to LA-IC, LA-IC-OPS and LA-IC-ECA but not LA-IC-OC structures. Moreover, LA-IC substitution with both OPS and ECA prevented the lectin binding. Sequential truncation of the IC heptoses demonstrated that the MBL targets the IC heptose region. Furthermore, microbial growth temperature influenced MBL binding; binding was stronger to bacteria grown at room temperature (22°C) than to bacteria grown at 37°C. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that MBL can interact with Y. enterocolitica LPS, however, the in vivo significance of that interaction remains to be elucidated.

  2. Mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis: A short review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Epp Boschmann, Stefanie; Goeldner, Isabela; Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Schiel, Wagner; Aoyama, Fernanda; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement system. MBL binds to carbohydrates on microorganism's surfaces leading to complement activation, opsonization and phagocytosis. Polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) are associated with variations on MBL serum levels and with the susceptibility to various infectious and autoimmune diseases. The involvement of the lectin pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been demonstrated by several studies and although MBL has been considered to have a dual role in the pathogenesis of the disease, the association between MBL and RA remains inconclusive. In an attempt to clarify this relationship, we developed this short review summarizing accumulated evidences in regard to MBL and RA and a meta-analysis to evaluate the influence of MBL2 polymorphisms on the susceptibility to RA. Among a total of 217 articles that were identified following a predefined search strategy on PubMed, Scopus, Scielo, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, only 13 met all inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Data assessment was conducted by three independent investigators and presented in odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using forest plot charts. Both heterogeneity and publication bias were analyzed. The results of the meta-analysis evidenced that MBL2 low producing OO and XX genotypes do not confer higher risk to RA, even when data were analyzed according to cohort's ethnicity. Further studies are needed in order to clarify the importance of other genes of the lectin pathway in the pathogenesis of RA.

  3. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  4. Intracellular Mannose Binding Lectin Mediates Subcellular Trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, CL; Kaul, M; Singh, KK

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus -1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons. PMID:24825317

  5. Lack of association between genetic variants in the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene and HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Paola; Seripa, Davide; Matera, Maria G; Rinaldi, Monica; Signori, Emanuela; Gravina, Carolina; Gallo, Antonietta P; Prencipe, Maria; Grandone, Elvira; Mariani, Luciano; Cordiali, Paola; Di Carlo, Aldo; Stentella, Patrizia; Pachì, Antonio; Fazio, Vito M

    2007-01-01

    Genetic variants in the immunomodulatory gene mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), were associated with risk, severity, and frequency of viral infections. In a case-control setting, we investigated the association of MBL2 functional polymorphisms with Human Papillomas Virus (HPV) infection. No differences between cases (HPV(+)) and controls (HPV(-)) were found in the distribution of each single genotypes or allele. Haplotype analysis did not show any difference between HPV+ and HPV(-) groups.

  6. Plasma mannose-binding lectin is stimulated by PPARα in humans.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Stienstra, Rinke; de Wit, Nicole J; Bragt, Marjolijn C E; Haluzik, Martin; Mensink, Ronald P; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2012-03-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a major transcriptional regulator of lipid metabolism in liver and represents the molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrate drugs. Effects of PPARα on lipid metabolism are partially mediated by circulating proteins such as FGF21 and ANGPTL4. The present study was undertaken to screen for and identify circulating proteins produced by human liver that are under the control of PPARα. Toward that aim, primary human hepatocytes were treated with the synthetic PPARα agonist Wy-14643 and whole genome expression data selected for secreted proteins. Expression of FGF21, ANGPTL4, and mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a soluble mediator of innate immunity and primary component of the lectin branch of the complement system, was markedly upregulated by Wy-14643 in primary human hepatocytes. Mice express two MBL isomers, Mbl1 and Mbl2. Mbl1 mRNA was weakly induced by Wy-14643 in primary mouse hepatocytes and remained unaltered by Wy-14643 in mouse liver. Mbl2 mRNA was unchanged by Wy-14643 in primary mouse hepatocytes and was strongly reduced by Wy-14643 in mouse liver. Remarkably, plasma Mbl1 levels were increased by chronic PPARα activation in lean and obese mice. Importantly, in two independent clinical trials, treatment with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate at 200 mg/day for 6 wk and 3 mo increased plasma MBL levels by 73 (P = 0.0016) and 86% (P = 0.017), respectively. It is concluded that hepatocyte gene expression and plasma levels of MBL are stimulated by PPARα and fenofibrate in humans, linking PPARα to regulation of innate immunity and complement activation in humans and suggesting a possible role of MBL in lipid metabolism.

  7. Frequent IgG subclass and mannose binding lectin deficiency in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabrina; Loebel, Madlen; Mooslechner, Agnes A; Knops, Michael; Hanitsch, Leif G; Grabowski, Patricia; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a severe disease characterized by various symptoms of immune dysfunction. CFS onset is typically with an infection and many patients suffer from frequently recurrent viral or bacterial infections. Immunoglobulin and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency are frequent causes for increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we retrospectively analysed 300 patients with CFS for immunoglobulin and MBL levels, and B-cell subset frequencies. 25% of the CFS patients had decreased serum levels of at least one antibody class or subclass with IgG3 and IgG4 subclass deficiencies as most common phenotypes. However, we found elevated immunoglobulin levels with an excess of IgM and IgG2 in particular in another 25% of patients. No major alteration in numbers of B cells and B-cell subsets was seen. Deficiency of MBL was found in 15% of the CFS patients in contrast to 6% in a historical control group. In a 2nd cohort of 168 patients similar frequencies of IgG subclass and MBL deficiency were found. Thus, humoral immune defects are frequent in CFS patients and are associated with infections of the respiratory tract.

  8. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes: potential role in tubal damage and adverse IVF outcome.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Triin; Peters, Maire; Salumets, Andres

    2011-12-01

    The innate immune system provides the first-line defence against genital tract pathogens and is also involved in establishing and maintaining a successful pregnancy. Genetic variation of factors regulating immune response can be associated with complications after genital tract infections and may lead to unfavourable pregnancy outcomes. This study focused on four polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin gene (MBL2) and assessed their significance in tubal damage and female fertility by comparing genotype frequencies among 388 controls and women with tubal factor infertility (n=155) or previous ectopic pregnancy (n=178). The high-producing MBL2 genotype HYA/LYA was found to have a protective effect, while the hyper-producing MBL2 genotype HYA/HYA and low-producing MBL2 genotypes were associated with susceptibility to tubal factor infertility. Also, the low-producing genotypes showed association with early pregnancy loss in IVF treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that certain MBL2 genotypes can be associated with tubal damage in patients with evidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and additionally may contribute to the pathogenesis of early pregnancy loss.

  9. Elevated Serum Levels of Mannose-Binding Lectin and Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ling-Zhi; Tong, Qiang; Xu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammation and complement activation initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) may be implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. We investigated serum MBL levels in type 2 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy (DN) and with persistent normoalbuminuria. Method Serum MBL levels were determined in 242 type 2 diabetes with overt nephropathy and 242 type 2 diabetes with persistent normoalbuminuria matched for age, sex, and duration of diabetes, as well as in 100 healthy control subjects. The prediction value of MBL was compared with HbA1c, Hs-CRP and with other known predictors. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Results The serum MBL levels were significantly higher in diabetes with DN as compared to with persistent normoalbuminuria (P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common factors showed that serum MBL levels≥2950ug/L was an independent indictor of DN (OR=7.55; 95%CI: 3.44–19.04). Based on the ROC curve, the optimal cutoff value of serum MBL levels as an indicator for diagnosis of DN was projected to be 2950ug/L, which yielded a sensitivity of 77.2 % and a specificity of 80.8%, with the area under the curve at 0.809 (95%CI, 0.769—0.848). Conclusion Our findings suggested that MBL may be involved in the pathogenesis of DN in type 2 diabetes, and that determination of MBL status might be used to identify patients at increased risk of developing nephropathy complications. PMID:25803807

  10. Secondary Cell Wall Polymers of Enterococcus faecalis Are Critical for Resistance to Complement Activation via Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Geiss-Liebisch, Stefan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Beczala, Agnieszka; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Kruszynska, Karolina; Repp, Christian; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes; Theilacker, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is part of our first line of defense against invading pathogens. The strategies used by Enterococcus faecalis to evade recognition by human complement are incompletely understood. In this study, we identified an insertional mutant of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthesis gene tagB in E. faecalis V583 that exhibited an increased susceptibility to complement-mediated killing by neutrophils. Further analysis revealed that increased killing of the mutant was due to a higher rate of phagocytosis by neutrophils, which correlated with higher C3b deposition on the bacterial surface. Our studies indicated that complement activation via the lectin pathway was much stronger on the tagB mutant compared with wild type. In concordance, we found an increased binding of the key lectin pathway components mannose-binding lectin and mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on the mutant. To understand the mechanism of lectin pathway inhibition by E. faecalis, we purified and characterized cell wall carbohydrates of E. faecalis wild type and V583ΔtagB. NMR analysis revealed that the mutant strain lacked two WTAs with a repeating unit of →6)[α-l-Rhap-(1→3)]β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P and →6) β-d-Glcp-(1→3) [α-d-Glcp-(1→4)]-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P→, respectively (Rbo, ribitol). In addition, compositional changes in the enterococcal rhamnopolysaccharide were noticed. Our study indicates that in E. faecalis, modification of peptidoglycan by secondary cell wall polymers is critical to evade recognition by the complement system. PMID:22908219

  11. Deficiency in Mannose-Binding Lectin-Associated Serine Protease-2 Does Not Increase Susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carolina H.; Lynch, Nicholas J.; Stover, Cordula M.; Ali, Youssif M.; Valck, Carolina; Noya-Leal, Francisca; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a chronic illness affecting 10 million people around the world. The complement system plays an important role in fighting microbial infections. The recognition molecules of the lectin pathway of complement activation, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins, and CL-11, bind to specific carbohydrates on pathogens, triggering complement activation through MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2). Previous in vitro work showed that human MBL and ficolins contribute to T. cruzi lysis. However, MBL-deficient mice are only moderately compromised in their defense against the parasite, as they may still activate the lectin pathway through ficolins and CL-11. Here, we assessed MASP-2-deficient mice, the only presently available mouse line with total lectin pathway deficiency, for a phenotype in T. cruzi infection. Total absence of lectin pathway functional activity did not confer higher susceptibility to T. cruzi infection, suggesting that it plays a minor role in the immune response against this parasite. PMID:25548381

  12. Conidiogenic effects of mannose-binding lectins isolated from cotyledons of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) on Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Hossein; Leung, David W M; Cole, Anthony L J

    2011-01-01

    Effect of proteinaceous extracts from red kidney bean cotyledons on mycelium of Alternaria alternata growing on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates was investigated. Unexpectedly, conidia formation was induced in response to applied crude extracts. A PDA disc method was developed to quantify conidia formed. A purified fraction retaining conidiation inducing effect (CIE) was obtained following several protein purification procedures including the last step of eluting bound proteins from an Affi-gel blue gel column. Based on MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization) mass spectrometric analysis, a previously identified mannose-binding lectin (MBL) called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3-receptor interacting lectin) was present in this conidiation inducing fraction. The PvFRIL was subsequently purified using a single step mannose-agarose affinity column chromatography. When the lectin was applied exogenously to A. alternata, increased conidiation resulted. The conidia produced in response to the MBL were similar to those induced by other methods and their germ tubes were longer after 12 h growth than those induced under white light. To our knowledge this is the first report of exogenous application of a PvFRIL or another purified protein from a plant inducing conidia formation in a fungus.

  13. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents myocardial injury and arterial thrombogenesis in a novel animal model.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Vasile I; Tan, Ying S; McClure, Erin E; La Bonte, Laura R; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2(+/+)Mbl1(-/-)Mbl2(-/-) [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride-induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications.

  14. Human Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibitor Prevents Myocardial Injury and Arterial Thrombogenesis in a Novel Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Vasile I.; Tan, Ying S.; McClure, Erin E.; La Bonte, Laura R.; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2+/+Mbl1−/−Mbl2−/− [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride–induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications. PMID:25482922

  15. High levels of serum mannose-binding lectin are associated with the severity of clinical signs of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, K A; Vasconcelos, L R S; Coelho, L C B B; Lima Filho, J L; Cavalcanti, M S M; Moura, P

    2009-04-01

    The clinical heterogeneity observed in leptospirosis may be associated with host factors or bacteria virulence. Human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) recognizes many pathogens, and low levels of this lectin are associated with susceptibility to infection. MBL is also implicated in the modulation of the inflammatory process. We determined the levels of serum MBL during leptospirosis infection. A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was used to detect the immunoreactive serum MBL. The ELISA plates were coated with monoclonal antibody to MBL and bound MBL or recombinant human MBL were detected by rabbit anti-human MBL serum. HRPO-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibody was used for detection of the reaction. Two groups of patients seen at referral hospitals in Recife, PE, Brazil, were divided according to the year of infection, 2001 (N = 61) or 2002 (N = 57) and compared in terms of disease severity and levels of serum MBL. A group of healthy volunteers (N = 97) matched by age, gender, and ethnic background was used as control. Patients infected in 2001 had more severe outcomes than those infected in 2002, including jaundice, hemorrhage, respiratory alteration, and renal complication (P = 0.0009; chi-square test). The frequency of patients producing serum MBL >1000 ng/mL was higher in the 2001 group than in the 2002 and control groups (P < 0.01), suggesting an association of MBL level with disease severity. The involvement of MBL and genetic variation of the MBL2 gene should be further evaluated to establish the role of this lectin in the pathogenesis of leptospirosis.

  16. Rapid Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus Pathogens from Infected Clinical Samples Using Magnetic Beads Coated with Fc-Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, B.; Gamini, N.; Rodas, M.; Penary, M.; Giordano, G.; Oswald, E.; Super, M.; Ingber, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe how Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can be rapidly isolated from clinical samples of articular fluid and synovial tissue using magnetic beads coated with the engineered chimeric human opsonin protein, Fc-mannose-binding lectin (FcMBL). The FcMBL-beads were used to capture and magnetically remove bacteria from purified cultures of 12 S. aureus strains, and from 8 articular fluid samples and 4 synovial tissue samples collected from patients with osteoarthritis or periprosthetic infections previously documented by positive S. aureus cultures. While the capture efficiency was high (85%) with purified S. aureus strains grown in vitro, direct FcMBL-bead capture from the clinical samples was initially disappointing (< 5% efficiency). Further analysis revealed that inhibition of FcMBL binding was due to coating of the bacteria by immunoglobulins and immune cells that masked FcMBL binding sites, and to the high viscosity of these complex biological samples. Importantly, capture of pathogens using the FcMBL-beads was increased to 76% efficiency by pretreating clinical specimens with hypotonic washes, hyaluronidase and a protease cocktail. Using this approach, S. aureus bacteria could be isolated from infected osteoarthritic tissues within 2 hours after sample collection. This FcMBL-enabled magnetic method for rapid capture and concentration of pathogens from clinical samples could be integrated upstream of current processes used in clinical microbiology laboratories to identify pathogens and perform antibiotic sensitivity testing when bacterial culture is not possible or before colonies can be detected. PMID:27275840

  17. High mannose-binding lectin with preference for the cluster of alpha1-2-mannose from the green alga Boodlea coacta is a potent entry inhibitor of HIV-1 and influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Makoto; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2011-06-03

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lectin from the green alga Boodlea coacta (BCA), which was determined by a combination of Edman degradation of its peptide fragments and cDNA cloning, revealed the following: 1) B. coacta used a noncanonical genetic code (where TAA and TAG codons encode glutamine rather than a translation termination), and 2) BCA consisted of three internal tandem-repeated domains, each of which contains the sequence motif similar to the carbohydrate-binding site of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins. Carbohydrate binding specificity of BCA was examined by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC assay using 42 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides. BCA bound to high mannose-type N-glycans but not to the complex-type, hybrid-type core structure of N-glycans or oligosaccharides from glycolipids. This lectin had exclusive specificity for α1-2-linked mannose at the nonreducing terminus. The binding activity was enhanced as the number of terminal α1-2-linked mannose substitutions increased. Mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannopentaose were incapable of binding to BCA. Thus, BCA preferentially recognized the nonreducing terminal α1-2-mannose cluster as a primary target. As predicted from carbohydrate-binding propensity, this lectin inhibited the HIV-1 entry into the host cells at a half-maximal effective concentration of 8.2 nm. A high association constant (3.71 × 10(8) M(-1)) of BCA with the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Moreover, BCA showed the potent anti-influenza activity by directly binding to viral envelope hemagglutinin against various strains, including a clinical isolate of pandemic H1N1-2009 virus, revealing its potential as an antiviral reagent.

  18. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  19. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  20. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O.; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations. PMID:25313559

  1. Levels of mannose-binding lectin in individuals with visceral leishmaniasis in the northeast region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E L; Campos Júnior, M; Monteiro, S G; Costa, G C; Magalhães, A L P; Santos, M D C; Caldas, A J M; Pimentel, M M G

    2015-12-29

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the seven priority endemic diseases in the world. The clinical outcome of many infections is not only dependent on the pathogenic organism, but also on the genetic variability of the host susceptibility to infection. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a protein that plays an important role in the innate immune system. The aim of this study was to compare the serum levels of MBL between healthy controls and carriers of VL. The VL cases were recruited randomly from the main hospitals and referral outpatient clinics for VL in São Luís, and from home visits. Determination of MBL protein levels was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of the 161 patients with VL and the 161 healthy controls, 60.9 and 67.1% had high levels of MBL, respectively. There was no significant difference in MBL levels between cases and controls. Low socioeconomic status and living conditions are conducive to the occurrence of VL. Owing to the small number of existing studies, it is extremely important to conduct further studies on MBL levels and susceptibility to VL, especially in regions where the disease is endemic, such as Maranhão, Brazil.

  2. Association between mannose-binding lectin variants, haplotypes and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chenghao; Lin, Yong; Cai, Lin; Mao, Qianguo; Niu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    The innate immunity gene mannose-binding lectin2 (MBL2) has played an important role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and the relationship between MBL2 variants and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk has not yet been identified. In total, 315 HCC cases and 315 healthy controls were enrolled and blood samples were acquired. High resolution melt analysis (HRM) was employed to genotype 6 polymorphisms in MBL2 gene. Increased HCC risk in carriers of LL genotype of −550 polymorphism with an adjusted OR (AOR) of 1.61 (95%CI = 1.00–2.57) was observed but no significant association detected in HL genotype. Both YX and XX genotype demonstrated a significantly elevated HCC risk in the analysis of −221 polymorphism. The B variants in codon 54 was also significantly associated with elevated HCC risk. HYB was identified as the protective factor of HCC while LXB was significantly associated with increase HCC risk. ELISA technique revealed that the MBL2 protein was significantly reduced in HCC cases. Moreover, both IL-1β and IL-6 were inversely associated with plasma MBL2 level.The mutations in MBL2 could lead to compromised innate immunity, and possibly lead to elevated HCC risk, and a novel haplotype HXB has been identified with a rate of 12.5%. PMID:27557564

  3. A C-type lectin (AiCTL-3) from bay scallop Argopecten irradians with mannose/galactose binding ability to bind various bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Song, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jianmin; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Xiaolin; Song, Linsheng

    2013-11-15

    C-type lectins are a family of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins playing crucial roles in innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, the cDNA of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of 127 amino acids was cloned from bay scallop Argopecten irradians (designated AiCTL-3) by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) techniques based on expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. The mRNA transcripts of AiCTL-3 could be detected in all the tested tissues including hepatopancreas, gonad, adductor muscle, heart, hemocytes, mantle and gill, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. After the challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, the mRNA expression level of AiCTL-3 was obviously up-regulated and reached the maximum level at 9h (11.87fold, P<0.01, and 20.02-fold, P<0.05, respectively). The recombinant AiCTL-3 (designated as rAiCTL-3) could bind LPS, PGN, and glucan in vitro, but could not bind mannan. And it also bound Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus as well as Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. anguillarum. With a Ca(2+) binding site 2 EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, rAiCTL-3 could bind both mannose and galactose which was quite different from those in vertebrate. Meanwhile, it could significantly enhance the phagocytosis of scallop hemocytes in vitro. The results clearly suggested that AiCTL-3 could serve not only as a PRR participated in the immune response against various PAMPs and bacteria in non-self recognition via mannose/galactose binding specificity but an opsonin playing an important part in clearance of invaders.

  4. Mannose-binding dietary lectins induce adipogenic differentiation of the marrow-derived mesenchymal cells via an active insulin-like signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Manmohan; Hinge, Ashwini; Limaye, Lalita S; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Surolia, Avadhesha; Kale, Vaijayanti P

    2011-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mannose-binding lectins, namely banana lectin (BL) and garlic lectin (GL), interacted with the insulin receptors on M210B4 cells--an established mesenchymal cell line of murine marrow origin--and initiate mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in them. In this study, we show that this lectin-mediated active ERK signaling culminates into an adipogenic differentiation of these cells. Gene expression studies indicate that the effect takes place at the transcriptional level. Experiments carried out with pharmacological inhibitors show that MEK-dependent ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent AKT pathways are positive regulators of the lectin- and insulin-mediated adipogenic differentiation, while stress-activated kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway acts as a negative one. Since both lectins could efficiently substitute for insulin in the standard adipogenic induction medium, they may perhaps serve as molecular tools to study the mechanistic aspects of the adipogenic process that are independent of cell proliferation. Our study clearly demonstrates the ability of BL and GL to activate insulin-like signaling in the mesenchymal cells in vitro leading to their adipocytic differentiation. The dietary origin of these lectins underscores an urgent need to examine their in vivo effects on tissue homeostasis.

  5. Entry Inhibition of Influenza Viruses with High Mannose Binding Lectin ESA-2 from the Red Alga Eucheuma serra through the Recognition of Viral Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Nishizono, Akira; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2015-05-29

    Lectin sensitivity of the recent pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1-2009) was screened for 12 lectins with various carbohydrate specificity by a neutral red dye uptake assay with MDCK cells. Among them, a high mannose (HM)-binding anti-HIV lectin, ESA-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra, showed the highest inhibition against infection with an EC50 of 12.4 nM. Moreover, ESA-2 exhibited a wide range of antiviral spectrum against various influenza strains with EC50s of pico molar to low nanomolar levels. Besides ESA-2, HM-binding plant lectin ConA, fucose-binding lectins such as fungal AOL from Aspergillus oryzae and AAL from Aleuria aurantia were active against H1N1-2009, but the potency of inhibition was of less magnitude compared with ESA-2. Direct interaction between ESA-2 and a viral envelope glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), was demonstrated by ELISA assay. This interaction was effectively suppressed by glycoproteins bearing HM-glycans, indicating that ESA-2 binds to the HA of influenza virus through HM-glycans. Upon treatment with ESA-2, no viral antigens were detected in the host cells, indicating that ESA-2 inhibited the initial steps of virus entry into the cells. ESA-2 would thus be useful as a novel microbicide to prevent penetration of viruses such as HIV and influenza viruses to the host cells.

  6. Entry Inhibition of Influenza Viruses with High Mannose Binding Lectin ESA-2 from the Red Alga Eucheuma serra through the Recognition of Viral Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Nishizono, Akira; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    Lectin sensitivity of the recent pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1-2009) was screened for 12 lectins with various carbohydrate specificity by a neutral red dye uptake assay with MDCK cells. Among them, a high mannose (HM)-binding anti-HIV lectin, ESA-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra, showed the highest inhibition against infection with an EC50 of 12.4 nM. Moreover, ESA-2 exhibited a wide range of antiviral spectrum against various influenza strains with EC50s of pico molar to low nanomolar levels. Besides ESA-2, HM-binding plant lectin ConA, fucose-binding lectins such as fungal AOL from Aspergillus oryzae and AAL from Aleuria aurantia were active against H1N1-2009, but the potency of inhibition was of less magnitude compared with ESA-2. Direct interaction between ESA-2 and a viral envelope glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), was demonstrated by ELISA assay. This interaction was effectively suppressed by glycoproteins bearing HM-glycans, indicating that ESA-2 binds to the HA of influenza virus through HM-glycans. Upon treatment with ESA-2, no viral antigens were detected in the host cells, indicating that ESA-2 inhibited the initial steps of virus entry into the cells. ESA-2 would thus be useful as a novel microbicide to prevent penetration of viruses such as HIV and influenza viruses to the host cells. PMID:26035023

  7. A Secreted Protein with Plant-Specific Cysteine-Rich Motif Functions as a Mannose-Binding Lectin That Exhibits Antifungal Activity1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Suwa, You-ichi; Sawano, Yoriko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a variety of mechanisms for defending against plant pathogens and tolerating environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Ginkbilobin2 (Gnk2) is a seed storage protein in gymnosperm that possesses antifungal activity and a plant-specific cysteine-rich motif (domain of unknown function26 [DUF26]). The Gnk2-homologous sequence is also observed in an extracellular region of cysteine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that function in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the lectin-like molecular function of Gnk2 and the structural basis of its monosaccharide recognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments showed that mannan was the only yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell wall polysaccharide that interacted with Gnk2. Gnk2 also interacted with mannose, a building block of mannan, with a specificity that was similar to those of mannose-binding legume lectins, by strictly recognizing the configuration of the hydroxy group at the C4 position of the monosaccharide. The crystal structure of Gnk2 in complex with mannose revealed that three residues (asparagine-11, arginine-93, and glutamate-104) recognized mannose by hydrogen bonds, which defined the carbohydrate-binding specificity. These interactions were directly related to the ability of Gnk2 to inhibit the growth of fungi, including the plant pathogenic Fusarium spp., which were disrupted by mutation of arginine-93 or the presence of yeast mannan in the assay system. In addition, Gnk2 did not inhibit the growth of a yeast mutant strain lacking the α1,2-linked mannose moiety. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of the DUF26 protein family. PMID:25139159

  8. Conformations, dynamics and interactions of di-, tri- and pentamannoside with mannose binding lectin: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Parichita; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2012-02-15

    The binding of serum mannose-binding protein A (MBP-A) to high mannose N-linked glycoproteins, present on the surface of microorganism, activates the complement system. It is very important to explore the overall conformations of these ligands in the binding site of the MBP-A, which is very much dependent on the conformation of the manno-di-, tri- and the penta-saccharides that represent the component structures of these high-mannose type oligosaccharides. Herein, we report the possible conformations of α-(1→6)-linked dimannoside, benzyl-substituted trimannoside and core pentamannoside of the N-linked glycan in the binding site of MBP-A, with the help of molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that for all three ligands in addition to the non-reducing terminal mannose moiety the reducing moieties also interact with protein. Binding free energy calculations also indicate that the benzyl-substituted trisaccharide has higher affinity in comparison to the methyl substituted one. We have also found some conformers of the pentasaccharide, which have higher binding affinity than the monosaccharide.

  9. The Lipopolysaccharide Structures of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Determine the Attachment of Human Mannose-Binding Lectin to Intact Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Devyatyarova-Johnson, Marina; Rees, Ian H.; Robertson, Brian D.; Turner, Malcolm W.; Klein, Nigel J.; Jack, Dominic L.

    2000-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of the innate immune system. It binds to the arrays of sugars commonly presented by microorganisms and activates the complement system independently of antibody. Despite detailed knowledge of the stereochemical basis of MBL binding, relatively little is known about how bacterial surface structures influence binding of the lectin. Using flow cytometry, we have measured the binding of MBL to a range of mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae which differ in the structure of expressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For both organisms, the possession of core LPS structures led to avid binding of MBL, which was abrogated by the addition of O antigen (Salmonella serovar Typhimurium) or sialic acid (N. gonorrhoeae). Truncation of the LPS within the core led to lower levels of MBL binding. It was not possible to predict the magnitude of MBL binding from the identity of the LPS terminal sugar alone, indicating that the three-dimensional disposition of LPS molecules is probably also of importance in determining MBL attachment. These results further support the hypothesis that LPS structure is a major determinant of MBL binding. PMID:10858200

  10. Comparison of immunomodulatory properties of mannose-binding lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis and Cratylia argentea in a mice model of Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ayrles F B; Matos, Mayara P V; Ralph, Maria T; Silva, Daiane L; de Alencar, Nylane M; Ramos, Márcio V; Lima-Filho, José V

    2016-02-01

    The immunomodulatory properties of mannose-binding lectins ConBr (Canavalia brasiliensis) and CFL (Cratylia argentea) were investigated comparatively in a model of Salmonella infection. The lectins were intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered to mice daily for three days before the bacterial challenge with Salmonella enterica Ser. Typhimurium (0.2 mL i.p.; 10(7) CFU/mL). In vivo assays have shown that both lectins induced a significant leukocyte infiltration into the peritoneal cavity of uninfected mice, which was higher in the CFL group 3 days post-infection. Total and differential cell counts in the bloodstreams have shown uninfected animals pretreated with ConBr and CFL exhibited accentuated lymphopenia. Conversely, there was an increasing population of lymphocytes following 3 days post-infection in mice pretreated with both lectins. In addition, the bacterial burden was significantly reduced into the peritoneal cavity, bloodstreams, spleen and the liver in these mice. The lectins did not induce the release of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines into the peritoneal fluid of uninfected animals. However, following infection, the release of TNF-α and IL-10 in the peritoneal fluid were down-regulated in mice pretreated with both lectins whereas IL-1 was only reduced in mice pretreated with ConBr. Uninfected animals pretreated with CFL exhibited high nitric oxide (NO) content in the peritoneal fluid, which was decreased after infection in comparison to ConBr group. The lectins did not alter the serum levels of NO in uninfected mice but treatments with ConBr significantly reduced the NO content in infected animals in comparison to CFL group 24h after the bacterial challenge. Survival experiments have shown survival rates ranging from 70% to 100% in mice that received CFL or ConBr. On the other hand, untreated mice (PBS group) died 1-6 days after infection. We conclude that ConBr and CFL are prospective phytotherapeutics capable of modulate the cascade of pro

  11. Murine Hyperglycemic Vasculopathy and Cardiomyopathy: Whole-Genome Gene Expression Analysis Predicts Cellular Targets and Regulatory Networks Influenced by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chenhui; La Bonte, Laura R.; Pavlov, Vasile I.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL)-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole-genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure, and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies. PMID:22375142

  12. Mannose-Binding Lectin: Biologic Characteristics and Role in the Susceptibility to Infections and Ischemia-Reperfusion Related Injury in Critically Ill Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Moriondo, Maria; Bertaina, Chiara; Mondì, Vito; Inglese, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a member of the collectin family, belonging to the innate immunity system. Genetic, biologic, and clinical properties of MBL have been widely investigated throughout the last decades, although some interesting aspects of its potential clinical relevance are still poorly understood. Low circulating concentrations of MBL have been associated with increased risk of infection and poor neurologic outcome in neonates. On the other hand, an excessive and uncontrolled inflammatory response by the neonatal intestine after the exposure to luminal bacteria, leading to an increased production of MBL, may be involved in the onset of necrotizing enterocolitis. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge about genetic and biologic characteristics of MBL and its role in the susceptibility to infections and to ischemia-reperfusion related tissue injuries to better explore its clinical relevance during the perinatal period and the possible future therapeutic applications. PMID:28246614

  13. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and cDNA cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per a litter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide-binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48-1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  14. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per liter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48 - 1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  15. A rice jacalin-related mannose-binding lectin gene, OsJRL, enhances Escherichia coli viability under high salinity stress and improves salinity tolerance of rice.

    PubMed

    He, X; Li, L; Xu, H; Xi, J; Cao, X; Xu, H; Rong, S; Dong, Y; Wang, C; Chen, R; Xu, J; Gao, X; Xu, Z

    2017-03-01

    Salinity, which is one of the most common abiotic stresses, may severely affect plant productivity and quality. Although plant lectins are thought to play important roles in plant defense signaling during pathogen attack, little is known about the contribution of plant lectins to stress resistance. We cloned and functionally characterized a rice jacalin-related mannose-binding lectin gene, OsJRL, from rice 'Nipponbare'. We analyzed the expression patterns of OsJRL under various stress conditions in rice. Furthermore, we overexpressed OsJRL in Escherichia coli and rice. The cDNA of OsJRL contained a 438 bp open reading frame, which encodes a polypeptide of 145 amino acids. OsJRL was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Real time PCR analyses revealed that OsJRL expression showed tissue specificity in rice and was upregulated under diverse stresses, namely salt, drought, cold, heat and abscisic acid treatments. Overexpression of OsJRL in E. coli enhanced cell viability and dramatically improved tolerance of high salinity. Overexpression of OsJRL in rice also enhanced salinity tolerance and increased the expression levels of a number of stress-related genes, including three LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins) genes (OsLEA19a, OsLEA23 and OsLEA24), three Na(+) transporter genes (OsHKT1;3, OsHKT1;4 and OsHKT1;5) and two DREB genes (OsDREB1A and OsDREB2B). Based on these results, we suggest that OsJRL plays an important role in cell protection and stress signal transduction.

  16. Limited effect of recombinant human mannose-binding lectin on the infection of novel influenza A (H7N9) virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinlei; Cao, Yang; Qin, Kun; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Donghong; Li, Zi; Xin, Li; Shu, Yuelong; Zhou, Jianfang

    2015-02-27

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern-recognition molecule in serum, recognizes specific hexose sugars rich in mannose and N-acetylglucosamine on bacterium, yeasts, viruses as well as apoptotic cells. It has been well-identified that MBL has antiviral effects via binding to seasonal influenza H1 and H3 subtype viruses. Influenza A (H7N9) virus, a novel reassortant virus to human population, possesses the surface hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from duck and wild-bird influenza viruses and internal genes from poultry H9N2 viruses. As of Dec 7th, 2014, a total of 467 human infections and 183 fatal cases have been identified. Here, recombinant human (rh) MBL was tested for its binding and effects on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and NA activity inhibition (NAI) of avian H7N9, H9N2 and human H3N2 viruses. We discovered that rhMBL exhibited a strong binding to H7N9 virus as human H3N2 did at high virus titers. However, it performed a significantly weaker HI activity effect on H7N9 comparing to those of H3N2 and H9N2, even at a much higher concentration (3.67 ± 0.33 vs. 0.026 ± 0.001 and 0.083 ± 0.02 μg/mL, respectively). Similarly, minor NAI effect of rhMBL, even at up to 10 μg/mL, was found on H7N9 virus while it displayed significant effects on both H3N2 and H9N2 at a lowest concentration of 0.0807 ± 0.009 and 0.0625 μg/mL, respectively. The HI and NAI effects of rhMBL were calcium-dependent and mediated by lectin domain. Our findings suggest that MBL, the host innate molecule, has differential interference effects with human and avian influenza virus and limited antiviral effect against H7N9 virus.

  17. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, J. C.; De Oliveira, P. S.; Garratt, R.; Beltramini, L.; Resing, K.; Roque-Barreira, M. C.; Greene, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature. PMID:10210179

  18. Genetic and Phenotypic Screening of Mannose-Binding Lectin in Relation to Risk of Recurrent Vulvovaginal Infections in Women of North India: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Namarta; Singh, Jatinder; Sharma, Sujata; Arora, Hardesh; Kaur, Manpreet

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent Vulvovaginal Infections (RVVI) is common problem associated with women of reproductive age. The function and deleterious effect of Mannose Binding Lectin 2 (MBL2) common polymorphisms are reported to be associated with various diseases. However, the role of MBL2 promoter gene polymorphisms and their combined effect with structural variant along with Serum Mannose Binding Lectin (sMBL) levels in RVVI has not been investigated. The study included 258 RVVI cases and 203 age matched healthy controls. These were investigated for the distribution of MBL2 codon 54 and promoter polymorphisms by Amplification Refractory Mutation System-Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR). sMBL levels were quantified by Enzyme Linked Immnosorbent Assay (ELISA). The frequency of X allele and its genotypes was significantly high in cases than controls conferring risk toward RVVI and its types (p < 0.05). The HXPA (OR; 2.0), LXQB (OR; 1.43) haplotypes were associated with susceptibility to RVVI cases while haplotype LYQB significantly protected against RVVI (OR; 0.58), Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) (OR; 0.27) and Mixed Infections (MI) cases (OR; 0.62) with high frequency observed in controls (p < 0.05). Mean sMBL levels were significantly low in RVVI, BV, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (VVC), and MI cases compared to controls (p < 0.05). VVC patient showed significantly low sMBL levels than RVVI and MI cases (p < 0.05). The mean sMBL levels segregated based on MBL2 genotypes and haplotypes showed significant difference in different cases groups with controls. The findings of the present study suggested that MBL2 Y/X polymorphism and low sMBL levels were associated with susceptibility to RVVI either it is BV, VVC, or MI. Thus MBL deficiency in women with RVVI may contribute to decreased efficiency in clearing of pathogens. Hence, specific measures like administration of purified or recombinant MBL might decrease the incidence of vaginal infections recurrences and more-effective treatment. PMID

  19. A two-nucleotide deletion renders the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene nonfunctional in Danish Landrace and Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Bergman, I M; Edman, K; van As, P; Huisman, A; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2014-03-01

    The mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are central components of innate immunity, facilitating phagocytosis and inducing the lectin activation pathway of the complement system. Previously, it has been found that certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MBL1 and MBL2 (pMBL1, pMBL2) affect mRNA expression, serum concentration, and susceptibility to disease, but the combinatory effect of pMBL1 and pMBL2 genotypes needs further elucidation. In the present study, pMBL1 and pMBL2 alleles, combined pMBL haplotypes, and MBL-A concentration in serum were analyzed in purebred Landrace (N = 30) and Duroc (N = 10) pigs. Furthermore, the combined pMBL haplotypes of 89 Piètrain × (Large White × Landrace) crossbred pigs were studied, and the genotypes of 67 crossbreds challenged with Escherichia coli were compared to their individual disease records. In the purebred animals, three non-synonymous SNPs and a two-nucleotide deletion were detected in the coding sequence of pMBL2. The two-nucleotide deletion was present at a frequency of 0.88 in the Landrace pigs and 0.90 in the Duroc pigs, respectively. In the crossbreds, the T allele of the SNP G949T in pMBL1-previously shown to have profound effect on MBL-A concentration even in the heterozygote condition-was detected in 47 % of the animals. Finally, an association was found between low-producing MBL genotypes and low body weight on the day of weaning in the same animals.

  20. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) codon 54 (rs1800450) polymorphism predisposes towards medium vessel vasculitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Negi, Vir Singh; Devaraju, Panneer; Misra, Durga Prasanna; Jain, Vikramraj K; Usdadiya, Jignesh Babulal; Antony, Paul T; Gulati, Reena

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease with multiple etiological factors. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in innate immunity by activating antibody-independent lectin complement pathway, opsonisation, phagocytosis, and immune complex (IC) clearance. Genetic polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions of MBL gene affect the circulatory levels and biological activity of MBL. Defects in MBL can lead to defective opsonisation and, hence, hamper clearance of apoptotic debris, the persistence of which can drive autoantibody formation in lupus. The exon1 variants at codon 52, 54, and 57 have been reported to augment the risk of SLE in different ethnic populations. Three hundred South Indian Tamil patients with SLE and 460 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched controls were genotyped for three polymorphisms at codon 52, 54, and 57 in exon1 of MBL gene by Taqman real-time PCR. The three polymorphisms in exon1 of MBL were observed not to confer risk of developing SLE. However, MBL codon 54 rs1800450 polymorphism was associated with the development of medium vessel vasculitis and gangrene (OR-2.29, CI 95% 1.08-4.83, p = 0.02), whereas, the ancestral allele G conferred protection (OR-0.44, CI 95% 0.21-0.93, p = 0.02). Genetic variants in the exon1 of MBL gene per se are not risk factors for SLE in South Indian Tamils. However, the association of codon 54 (rs1800450) with medium vessel vasculitis suggests that it may be a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in SLE.

  1. Association of mannose-binding lectin levels and invasive fungal disease in hematologic malignancy patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Riwes, M M; Leather, H; Neal, D; Bennett, C; Sugrue, M; Cline, C; Stokes, J; Hiemenz, J; Hsu, J; Wingard, J R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have suggested an association of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency with infections. In this study, we investigated the association between MBL deficiency and invasive fungal disease (IFD) in hematologic malignancy patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. MBL levels were quantified at the start of treatment in 152 patients who were followed for 6 months and scored as developing IFD or not. Forty-five patients (29.6%) developed IFD, of which 21 (46.7% of IFD cases and 13.8% of patients) were proven or probable IFD. Fifty-nine (38.8%) had MBL levels <1000 ng/mL. The rates of all IFD in patients with MBL levels below and above 1000 ng/mL were 33.9% and 26.9%, respectively (P=0.356). The rates of proven or probable IFD in patients with MBL levels below and above 1000 ng/mL were 11.9% and 15.1%, respectively (P=0.579). MBL levels <1000 ng/mL were not predictors of death (P=0.233). As expected, IFD was associated with death (P<0.0001). Our findings indicate that MBL levels <1000 ng/mL were not associated with an increased risk of developing IFD or overall survival.

  2. Association study between mannose-binding lectin haplotypes and X gene mutation of hepatitis B virus from treatment naïve patients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chenghao; Lin, Yong; Mao, Qianguo; Wu, Daitze; Zhu, Lina; Najera, Isabel; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Niu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin (MBL) plays important role in the innate immunity of human. Mutations in the MBL2 gene can significantly change the serum level of MBL, and consequently alter the susceptibility and progression of infectious disease. However, the association between the MBL2 profile and the HBV mutation and quasispecies complexity has not yet been reported. Our approach includes the study of the MBL2 gene genotype as well as ultra-deep sequencing of the HBV viruses obtained from the plasma of 50 treatment naïve patients with chronic HBV infection. We found that the liver function was better among patients within the high MBL2 group with respect to those within the medium/low MBL2 group. Likewise, the number of mutations in the HBV X gene as well as the viral quasispecies complexity were significantly higher in medium/low MBL2 production group. Nucleotide substitution rates were also higher within the medium/low MBL2 production group in all positions described to have an influence in liver cancer development, except for A1499G. In this work we show that the MBL2 profile may have an impact on the HBV X gene mutations as well as on viral quasispecies complexity. PMID:27824315

  3. Mannose-binding lectin 2 (Mbl2) gene polymorphisms are related to protein plasma levels, but not to heart disease and infection by Chlamydia

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, M.A.F.; Gomes, S.T.M.; Almeida, N.C.C.; Souza, M.I.M.; Costa, S.R.C.F.; Hermes, R.B.; Lima, S.S.; Zaninotto, M.M.; Fossa, M.A.A.; Maneschy, M.A.; Martins-Feitosa, R.N.; Azevedo, V.N.; Machado, L.F.A.; Ishak, M.O.G.; Ishak, R.; Vallinoto, A.C.R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in exon 1 of the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene was evaluated in a sample of 159 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (71 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery and 300 control subjects) to investigate a possible association between polymorphisms and heart disease with Chlamydia infection. The identification of the alleles B and D was performed using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of the allele C was accomplished through PCR assays followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme. The comparative analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies between the three groups did not reveal any significant difference, even when related to previous Chlamydia infection. Variations in the MBL plasma levels were influenced by the presence of polymorphisms, being significantly higher in the group of cardiac patients, but without representing a risk for the disease. The results showed that despite MBL2 gene polymorphisms being associated with the protein plasma levels, the polymorphisms were not enough to predict the development of heart disease, regardless of infection with both species of Chlamydia. PMID:27982280

  4. Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene, MBL2, Polymorphisms Do Not Increase Susceptibility to Invasive Meningococcal Disease in a Population of Danish Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neisseria meningitidis is the cause of meningococcal bacteremia and meningitis, and nasopharyngeal colonization with this pathogen is common. The incidence of invasive disease is highest in infants, whereas adolescents more often are carriers. Altered regulation or dysfunction of the innate immune system may predispose to invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). In this study, we investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, and its promoter on susceptibility to IMD and IMD-associated mortality among children. Methods. Children (<5 years) diagnosed during 1982–2007 with IMD and controls were identified through Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The associations between MBL2 diplotypes and IMD susceptibility and 30- and 90-day mortality were investigated using logistic regression analysis. Results. We included 1351 children: 406 with meningitis, 272 with bacteremia, and 673 age- and sex-matched controls. Of the children studied, 1292 (96%) were successfully genotyped and assigned MBL2 diplotypes. The median age in IMD cases was 19.1 months (interquartile range [IQR], 8.8–32.2 months). Children with defective MBL2 diplotypes were not at higher risk for meningococcal meningitis than children with intermediate and normal diplotypes (odds ratio [OR] = 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], .47–1.02). Similar results were found for children with bacteremia and defective diplotypes (OR = 0.84; 95% CI, .53–1.32) as well as for all cases (OR = 0.75; 95% CI, .56–1.01). There was no association between MBL2 diplotypes and mortality. Conclusions. Defective MBL2 diplotypes did not predict either an increased IMD susceptibility or mortality in a Danish population of children. PMID:26464842

  5. Smoking status interacts with the association between mannose-binding lectin serum levels and gene polymorphism and the carriage of oropharyngeal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jounio, Ulla; Rantala, Aino; Bloigu, Aini; Juvonen, Raija; Lajunen, Taina; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, Sylvi; Peitso, Ari; Vainio, Olli; Harju, Terttu; Saukkoriipi, Annika; Leinonen, Maija

    2010-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) role in the carriage of oropharyngeal bacteria is not known. We investigated the association of smoking, MBL2 polymorphisms, and MBL concentrations with oropharyngeal carriage of respiratory bacteria in young men. Oropharyngeal specimens, MBL concentrations, and MBL2 gene polymorphisms were measured in 124 asthmatic and 394 nonasthmatic Finnish military recruits. The carriage rates of S. pneumoniae (p = 0.002), N. meningitidis (p = 0.005), and beta-hemolytic streptococci (p < 0.001) throughout the military service were significantly higher among smokers than in nonsmokers. An MBL level below the median proved to be a significant risk factor for the carriage of N. meningitidis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.6) and beta-hemolytic streptococci (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.2) in the nonsmokers and a borderline significant risk factor for the carriage of S. pneumoniae (OR = 1.5; 95% CI 0.9-2.6), whereas low MBL levels producing MBL2 haplotypes (LXA/LXA, LXA/O, HYA/O, LYA/O, O/O) seemed to be associated with the carriage of N. meningitidis (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.0-3.4) and S. pneumoniae (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 0.9-2.7). Thus, MBL deficiency may predispose nonsmokers to oropharyngeal carriage of these bacteria. We hypothesize that the major factor contributing to elevated bacterial carriage in smokers might be increased bacterial adherence to epithelial cells, which obscures the effect of MBL.

  6. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on growth performance, susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brian C; Peatman, E; Ourth, D D; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-05-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE; containing the essential oils carvacrol, thymol, anethol, and limonene) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (floating diet) and EO (floating diet supplemented with essential oils). The fish were fed their respective diets for 6 weeks. At the end of the study, all fish were exposed to virulent E. ictaluri by bath immersion (1.9 × 10(7) cfu/mL; final concentration). Plasma and tissue samples were taken to quantify protein and mRNA expression levels of mannose binding lectin (MBL). Weight gain and food conversion ratio were similar between treatments. After exposing fish to virulent E. ictaluri and monitoring mortality for 21 days, survival was 43% higher (69.5 vs 48.4%) in fish fed EO compared to fish not treated with EO (P < 0.05). One day after challenge, plasma MBL levels were down-regulated in the non-treated fish compared to non-challenged fish. In the EO fish, MBL levels were similar to non-challenged fish but significantly higher than non-treated fed fish (P < 0.001). By d 7, plasma MBL levels increased in non-treated fed fish to levels observed in the EO and non-challenged fish. On d 14, MBL mRNA levels were upregulated 15-fold in fish fed EO compared to non-treated fed fish and non-challenged fish (P < 0.001). The results demonstrate that essential oils improved survival of channel catfish challenged with E. ictaluri. Mechanisms through which essential oils improve survival may involve MBL.

  7. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    Human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p = 0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%, respectively; p = 0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients.

  8. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage. 2007.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Human mannose- binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p=0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%,respectively; p=0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV- positive patients.

  9. Early Changes of Mannose-Binding Lectin, H-Ficolin, and Procalcitonin in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Işlak Mutcal, Sibel; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Balkan, İlker İnanç; Özaras, Reşat; Yemişen, Mücahit; Mete, Bilgül; Tabak, Fehmi; Mert, Ali; Öztürk, Recep; Öngören, Şeniz; Başlar, Zafer; Aydın, Yıldız; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The significance of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and H-ficolin deficiency in febrile neutropenic (FN) patients and the correlation of these markers along with consecutive C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels during the infectious process are investigated. Materials and Methods: Patients with any hematological malignancies who were defined to have “microbiologically confirmed infection”, “clinically documented infection”, or “fever of unknown origin” were included in this single-center prospective observational study. Serum levels of CRP, PCT, MBL, and H-ficolin were determined on 3 separate occasions: at baseline (between hospital admission and chemotherapy), at the onset of fever, and at the 72nd hour of fever. Results: Forty-six patients (54% male, mean age 41.7 years) with 61 separate episodes of FN were evaluated. Eleven patients (23.9%) had “microbiologically confirmed infection”, 17 (37%) had “clinically documented infection”, and 18 (39.1%) had “fever of unknown origin”. Fourteen (30.4%) patients had low (<500 ng/mL) initial MBL levels and 7 (15.21%) had low (<12,000 ng/mL) H-ficolin levels. Baseline MBL and H-ficolin levels did not significantly change on the first and third days of fever (p=0.076). Gram-negative bacteremia more frequently occurred in those with low initial MBL levels (p=0.006). PCT levels were significantly higher in those with microbiologically documented infections. Mean and median PCT levels were significantly higher in cases with bacteremia. There was no significant difference between hemoculture-positive and-negative patients in terms of CRP levels. Conclusion: Monitoring serum H-ficolin levels was shown to be of no benefit in terms of predicting severe infection. Low baseline MBL levels were correlated with high risk of gram-negative bacteremia; however, no significant correlation was shown in the follow-up. Close monitoring of PCT levels is warranted to provide more accurate and

  10. [Can mannose-binding lectin and plasma level of soluble urokinase receptor be used in diagnosis and treatment monitorization of brucellosis patients?].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Cesur, Salih; Karaağaç, Leman; Binici, Irfan; Fidan, Yasemin; Oğüş, Elmas; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (SuPAR) levels in monitoring the treatment in patients with brucellosis, by comparing their levels before and after treatment with the values obtained from healthy control group. Thirty brucellosis patients (mean age: 25.8 ± 12.2 years; 15 were male) and 28 healthy controls (mean age: 29.3 ± 12.3 years; 15 were male) were included in the study. Patients were diagnosed with brucellosis according to the characteristic clinical findings and by brucella standard tube agglutination test (SAT) titer ≥ 1/160 and/or blood culture positivity. Serum MBL (Antibodyshop, Denmark) and plasma SuPAR (Virogates, Denmark) levels were investigated with commercial ELISA kits. In our study, no statistical significance was observed between the pre-treatment (13.8 ± 13.4 ng/ml) and post-treatment (12.4 ± 13.1 ng/ml) MBL levels of the patient group and MBL levels of the control group (16.5 ± 14.8 ng/ml) (p> 0.05). Moreover, the mean SuPAR levels measured in pre-treatment and post-treatment plasma samples of the brucellosis patients was 5.1 ± 1.9 ng/ml and 2.9 ± 1.3 ng/ml, respectively, while the mean SuPAR level was 1.8 ± 0.5 ng/ml in the control group. The difference between mean SuPAR levels of patients in pre- and post-treatment samples was found statistically significant (p< 0.001). In addition SuPAR levels were significantly higher in patients before and after treatment than the control group (p> 0.001). In conclusion, plasma SuPAR level would be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment follow up of the patients with brucellosis.

  11. The mannose-specific lectins from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) are encoded by three sets of genes.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Lectin cDNA clones encoding the two mannose-binding lectins from ramsons (allium ursinum L.) bulbs, AUAI and AUAII (AUA, Allium ursinum agglutinin), were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparison of the different cDNA clones isolated revealed three types of lectin clones called LECAUAG0, LECAUAG1 and LECAUAG2, which besides the obvious differences in their sequences also differ from each other in the number of potential glycosylation sites within the C-terminal peptide of the lectin precursor. In vivo biosynthesis studies of the ramson lectins have shown that glycosylated lectin precursors occur in the organelle fraction of radioactively labeled ramson bulbs. Despite the similarities between the A. ursinum and the A. sativum (garlic) lectins at the protein level, molecular cloning of the two ramson lectins has shown that the lectin genes in A. ursinum are organized differently. Whereas in A. sativum the lectin polypeptides of the heterodimeric ASAI are encoded by one large precursor, those of the heterodimeric AUAI lectin are derived from two different precursors. These results are confirmed by Northern blot hybridization of A. ursinum RNA which, after hybridization with a labeled lectin cDNA, reveals only one band of 800 nucleotides in contrast to A. sativum RNA which yields two bands of 1400 and 800 nucleotides. Furthermore it is shown that the two mannose-binding lectins are differentially expressed.

  12. New mannose-specific lectins from garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1992-05-22

    Two new mannose-binding lectins were isolated from garlic (Allium sativum, ASA) and ramsons (Allium ursinum, AUA) bulbs, of the family Alliaceae, by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of these two lectins was studied by quantitative precipitation and hapten-inhibition assay. ASA reacted strongly with a synthetic linear (1----3)-alpha-D-mannan and S. cerevisiae mannan, weakly with a synthetic (1----6)-alpha-D-mannan, and failed to precipitate with galactomannans from T. gropengiesseri and T. lactis-condensi, a linear mannopentaose, and murine IgM. On the other hand, AUA gave a strong reaction of precipitation with murine IgM, and good reactions with S. cerevisiae mannan and both synthetic linear mannans, suggesting that the two lectins have somewhat different binding specificities for alpha-D-mannosyl units. Of the saccharides tested as inhibitors of precipitation, those with alpha-(1----3)-linked mannosyl units were the best inhibitors of ASA, the alpha-(1----2)-, alpha-(1----4)-, and alpha-(1----6)-linked mannobioses and biosides having less than one eighth the affinity of the alpha-(1----3)-linked compounds. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of ASA exhibits 79% homology with that of AUA, and moderately high homology (53%) with that of snowdrop bulb lectin, also an alpha-D-mannosyl-binding lectin.

  13. High mannose-specific lectin Msl mediates key interactions of the vaginal Lactobacillus plantarum isolate CMPG5300

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shweta; Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Noppen, Sam; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the interaction potential of the human vaginal isolate Lactobacillus plantarum CMPG5300, its genome was mined for genes encoding lectin-like proteins. cmpg5300.05_29 was identified as the gene encoding a putative mannose-binding lectin. Phenotypic analysis of a gene knock-out mutant of cmpg5300.05_29 showed that expression of this gene is important for auto-aggregation, adhesion to the vaginal epithelial cells, biofilm formation and binding to mannosylated glycans. Purification of the predicted lectin domain of Cmpg5300.05_29 and characterization of its sugar binding capacity confirmed the specificity of the lectin for high- mannose glycans. Therefore, we renamed Cmpg5300.05_29 as a mannose-specific lectin (Msl). The purified lectin domain of Msl could efficiently bind to HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 and Candida albicans, and showed an inhibitory activity against biofilm formation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium. Thus, using a combination of molecular lectin characterization and functional assays, we could show that lectin-sugar interactions play a key role in host and pathogen interactions of a prototype isolate of the vaginal Lactobacillus microbiota. PMID:27853317

  14. Synthesis of high-mannose oligosaccharide analogues through click chemistry: true functional mimics of their natural counterparts against lectins?

    PubMed

    François-Heude, Marc; Méndez-Ardoy, Alejandro; Cendret, Virginie; Lafite, Pierre; Daniellou, Richard; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Moreau, Vincent; Djedaïni-Pilard, Florence

    2015-01-26

    Terminal "high-mannose oligosaccharides" are involved in a broad range of biological and pathological processes, from sperm-egg fusion to influenza and human immunodeficiency virus infections. In spite of many efforts, their synthesis continues to be very challenging and actually represents a major bottleneck in the field. Whereas multivalent presentation of mannopyranosyl motifs onto a variety of scaffolds has proven to be a successful way to interfere in recognition processes involving high-mannose oligosaccharides, such constructs fail at reproducing the subtle differences in affinity towards the variety of protein receptors (lectins) and antibodies susceptible to binding to the natural ligands. Here we report a family of functional high-mannose oligosaccharide mimics that reproduce not only the terminal mannopyranosyl display, but also the core structure and the branching pattern, by replacing some inner mannopyranosyl units with triazole rings. Such molecular design can be implemented by exploiting "click" ligation strategies, resulting in a substantial reduction of synthetic cost. The binding affinities of the new "click" high-mannose oligosaccharide mimics towards two mannose specific lectins, namely the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and the human macrophage mannose receptor (rhMMR), have been studied by enzyme-linked lectin assays and found to follow identical trends to those observed for the natural oligosaccharide counterparts. Calorimetric determinations against ConA, and X-ray structural data support the conclusion that these compounds are not just another family of multivalent mannosides, but real "structural mimics" of the high-mannose oligosaccharides.

  15. Purification and characterization of a mannose-specific lectin from Shallot (Allium ascalonicum) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1993-11-01

    A new mannose-binding lectin was isolated from shallot (Allium ascalonicum) bulbs by affinity chromatography on an immobilized D-mannose column. The lectin (A. ascalonicum agglutinin, AAA) appeared homogeneous by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4.3 and gave a single protein band with an apparent M(r) of 11 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a single symmetrical peak of 11 kDa by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-200 HR column, indicating that AAA exists as a monomeric protein at neutral pH under the gel filtration condition employed. However, chemical cross-linking studies revealed that some degree of self-association of the lectin molecules occurs and that the lectin exists in solution as a mixture of monomers and oligomers. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium dialysis data showed the presence of one carbohydrate binding site for Man (alpha 1-3) Man-alpha-O-Me per monomer, with Ka = 1.62 x 10(4) M-1. The carbohydrate-binding properties of the purified AAA were investigated by quantitative precipitation and hapten inhibition assays. Purified AAA precipitated asialofetuin, asialotransferrin, asialothyroglobulin, asialoorosomucoid, as well as their agalacto derivatives, but did not precipitate either sialylated glycoproteins or mucins. AAA also reacted strongly with the highly branched yeast mannan obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of the monosaccharides tested only D-mannose was a hapten inhibitor of the AAA-asialofetuin precipitation system, whereas D-glucose, D-altrose, D-talose, N-acetyl-D-mannosamine, and derivatives of D-mannose, including 2-deoxy-, 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-, 3-deoxy-, and 6-deoxy-D-mannose were noninhibitors. These results suggest that the presence of equatorial hydroxyl groups at the C-3 and C-4 positions, an axial hydroxyl group at the C-2 position, and a free hydroxyl group at the C-6 position of the pyranose ring are the most important loci for the binding of D-mannose to AAA. Of the oligosaccharides

  16. High-mannose N-glycan-specific lectin from the red alga Kappaphycus striatum (Carrageenophyte).

    PubMed

    Hung, Le Dinh; Sato, Yuichiro; Hori, Kanji

    2011-06-01

    From a fresh sample (1 kg) of cultivated red alga Kappaphycus striatum, three isolectins, KSA-1 (15.1 mg), KSA-2 (58.0 mg) and KSA-3 (6.9 mg), were isolated by a combination of extraction with aqueous ethanol, ethanol precipitation, and ion exchange chromatography. Isolated KSAs were monomeric proteins of about 28kDa having identical 20N-terminal amino acid sequences to each other. Their hemagglutination activities were not inhibited by monosaccharides, but inhibited by glycoproteins bearing high-mannose N-glycans. In a binding experiment with pyridylaminated oligosaccharides by centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC assay, the isolectin KSA-2 was exclusively bound to high-mannose type N-glycans, but not to other glycans. Including complex types and a pentasaccharide core of N-glycans, indicating that it recognized branched oligomannosides. The binding activity of KSA-2 was slightly different among high-mannose N-glycans examined, indicating that the lectin has a higher affinity for those having the exposed (α1-3) Man in the D2 arm. On the other hand, KSA-2 did not bind to a free oligomannose that is a constituent of the branched oligomannosides, implying that the portion of the core GlcNAc residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, KSA-2 appears to recognize the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimal length of a tetrasaccharide, Man(α1-3)Man(α1-6)Man(β1-4)GlcNAc. This study indicates that K. striatum, which has extensively been cultivated as a source of carrageenan, is a good source of a valuable lectin(s) that is strictly specific for high-mannose N-glycans.

  17. ERGIC-53 is a functional mannose-selective and calcium-dependent human homologue of leguminous lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Itin, C; Roche, A C; Monsigny, M; Hauri, H P

    1996-01-01

    Based on sequence homologies with leguminous lectins, the intermediate compartment marker ERGIC-53 was proposed to be a member of a putative new class of animal lectins associated with the secretory pathway. Independent, a promyelocytic protein, MR60, was purified by mannose-column chromatography, and a cDNA was isolated that matched MR60 peptide sequences. This cDNA was identical to that of ERGIC-53 and homologies with the animal lectin family of the galectins were noticed. Not all peptide sequences of MR60, however, were found in ERGIC-53, raising the possibility that another protein associated with ERGIC-53 may possess the lectin activity. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for a lectin function of ERGIC-53. Overexpressed ERGIC-53 binds to a mannose column in a calcium-dependent manner and also co-stains with mannosylated neoglycoprotein in a morphological binding assay. By using a sequential elution protocol we show that ERGIC-53 has selectivity for mannose and low affinity for glucose and GlcNAc, but no affinity for galactose. To experimentally address the putative homology of ERGIC-53 to leguminous lectins, a highly conserved protein family with an invariant asparagine essential for carbohydrate binding, we substituted the corresponding asparagine in ERGIC-53. This mutation, as well as a mutation affecting a second site in the putative carbohydrate recognition domain, abolished mannose-column binding and co-staining with mannosylated neoglycoprotein. These findings establish ERGIC-53 as a lectin and provide functional evidence for its relationship to leguminous lectins. Based on its monosaccharide specificity, domain organization, and recycling properties, we propose ERGIC-53 to function as a sorting receptor for glyco-proteins in the early secretory pathway. Images PMID:8868475

  18. Purification and primary structure of a novel mannose-specific lectin from Centrolobium microchaete Mart seeds.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves de; Alves, Ana Cecília; Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Dias, Artur Hermano Sampaio; Martins, Francisco William Viana; Cajazeiras, João Batista; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago do; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to purify and characterize a novel mannose-binding lectin from the seeds of Centrolobium microchaete. Centrolobium microchaete lectin (CML) was purified by affinity chromatography in mannose-Sepharose-4B column. CML agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes and was inhibited by D-mannose, α-methyl-D-mannoside, D-glucose, N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine and sucrose. The lectin was stable at pH 7.0 and 8.0 and temperatures up to 60°C. The monomeric form of CML showed approximately 28kDa, and its native form is probably a homodimer, as determined by gel filtration chromatography. The primary structure of CML was determined by tandem mass spectrometry that showed CML as a protein with two distinct forms (isolectins CML-1 and CML-2) with 246 and 247 residues, respectively. CML-2 possesses one residue of Asn more than CML-1 in C-terminal. The primary structure of CML agrees with the molecular weights found by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: 27,224 and 27,338Da for CML-1 and CML-2, respectively. CML is a metal-dependent glycoprotein. Moreover, the glycan composition of CML and its structure were predicted.

  19. The x-ray crystal structure of mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteinase-3 reveals the structural basis for enzyme inactivity associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G; Reeve, Shane B; Coetzer, Theresa H; Smith, A Ian; Whisstock, James C; Pike, Robert N; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C

    2013-08-02

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome.

  20. The X-ray Crystal Structure of Mannose-binding Lectin-associated Serine Proteinase-3 Reveals the Structural Basis for Enzyme Inactivity Associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G.; Reeve, Shane B.; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Smith, A. Ian; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.

    2013-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome. PMID:23792966

  1. Comparative study of the post-translational processing of the mannose-binding lectins in the bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1994-08-01

    The biosynthesis and processing of the homodimeric and heterodimeric lectins from the bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (wild garlic; Allium ursinum) were studied using pulse and pulse-chase labelling experiments on developing bulbs. By combining the results of the in vivo biosynthesis studies and the cDNA cloning of the respective lectins, the sequence of events leading from the primary translation products into the mature lectin polypeptides could be reconstructed. From this it is demonstrated that garlic and ramsons use different schemes of post-translational modifications in order to synthesize apparently similar lectins from totally different precursors. Both the homomeric garlic lectin (ASAII) and its homologue in ramsons (AUAII) are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as nonglycosylated 13.5 kDa precursors, which, after their transport out of the ER are converted into the mature 12.0 kDa lectin polypeptides by the cleavage of a C-terminal peptide. The heterodimeric garlic lectin ASAI is synthesized on the ER as a single glycosylated precursor of 38 kDa, which after its transport out of the ER undergoes a complex processing which gives rise to two mature lectin subunits of 11.5 and 12.5 kDa. In contrast, both subunits of the heterodimeric ramsons lectin AUAI are synthesized separately on the ER as glycosylated precursors, which after their transport out of the ER are deglycosylated and further processed into the mature lectin polypeptides by the cleavage of a C-terminal peptide.

  2. How a Plant Lectin Recognizes High Mannose Oligosaccharides1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Wyns, Lode; Imberty, Anne; Loris, Remy

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of Pterocarpus angolensis seed lectin is presented in complex with a series of high mannose (Man) oligosaccharides ranging from Man-5 to Man-9. Despite that several of the nine Man residues of Man-9 have the potential to bind in the monosaccharide-binding site, all oligomannoses are bound in the same unique way, employing the tetrasaccharide sequence Manα(1–2)Manα(1–6)[Manα(1–3)]Manα(1–. Isothermal titration calorimetry titration experiments using Man-5, Man-9, and the Man-9-containing glycoprotein soybean (Glycine max) agglutinin as ligands confirm the monovalence of Man-9 and show a 4-times higher affinity for Man-9 when it is presented to P. angolensis seed lectin in a glycoprotein context. PMID:17556509

  3. Multivalent presentation of mannose on hyperbranched polyglycerol and their interaction with concanavalin A lectin.

    PubMed

    Papp, Ilona; Dernedde, Jens; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Roy, René; Haag, Rainer

    2011-05-02

    We describe the synthesis of multivalent mannose derivatives by using hyperbranched polyglycerols (hPG) as a scaffold with different linker structures. Grafting of protected mannose (Man) units is achieved by using Cu(I) -catalyzed Huisgen click chemistry with either an anomeric azide or propargyl ether onto complementarily functionalized alkyne or azido polymer surfaces. NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), IR spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), and elemental analysis have been used to characterize the hPG-Man compounds. The surface availability and bioactivity of Man-modified polymers were evaluated by using a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based binding assay by interactions of the glycopolymers with concanavalin A (Con A), a lectin that binds mannose containing molecules. The results indicated that the novel glycoarchitectures presented in this work are efficient inhibitors of Con A-mannose recognition and resulted in inhibitor concentrations (mean IC(50)) from the micro- to the nanomolar range, whereas the corresponding monovalent mannoside (methyl-Man) requires millimolar concentrations. The results provide an interesting structure-activity relationship for libraries of materials that differ in the linkage of the sugar moiety presented on a biocompatible polyglycerol scaffold.

  4. Biodiversity of mannose-specific lectins within Narcissus species.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Susanna; Codina, Carlos; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Davidson, Elaine; Stewart, Derek

    2002-04-24

    Mannose-specific lectins (MSLs) were isolated from the bulbs of 27 species of wild Spanish Narcissi and compared to the commercially available MSL from daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, NPA). Molecular weight analysis showed the monomers of all the MSLs were at, or around, 12.5 kD. Haemagglutination assays showed that the MSLs exhibited activities at up to four times greater than that displayed by NPA and other MSLs derived from other species such as Galanthus nivalus (snowdrop) and Allium ursinum (ramson). Elution profiles from ion exchange chromatography exhibited similarities for species within the same taxonomic section suggesting that this method could aid in species classification. Further analysis by isoelectric focusing showed many isolectins are present in vivo and that even within a single peak from ion exchange chromatography there are numerous isolectins present. The basis of the isolectin heterogeneity is suggested to reside in the tetraploidy (sometime triploidy) nature of Narcissus genes.

  5. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphic variants predispose to the development of bronchopulmonary complications but have no influence on other clinical and laboratory symptoms or signs of common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Litzman, J; Freiberger, T; Grimbacher, B; Gathmann, B; Salzer, U; Pavlík, T; Vlček, J; Postránecká, V; Trávníčková, Z; Thon, V

    2008-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), activating protein of the lectin pathway of the complement system, is an important component of the non-specific immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms, both in the coding and promoter regions, lead to low or deficient serum MBL levels. Low serum MBL levels were shown to be associated with serious infectious complications, mainly in patients in whom other non-specific immune system barriers were disturbed (granulocytopenia, cystic fibrosis). We have analysed two promoter (−550 and −221) and three exon (codons 52, 54 and 57) MBL2 polymorphisms in a total of 94 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) from two immunodeficiency centres. Low-producing genotypes were associated with the presence of bronchiectasis (P = 0·009), lung fibrosis (P = 0·037) and also with respiratory insufficiency (P = 0·029). We could not demonstrate any association of MBL deficiency with age at onset of clinical symptoms, age at diagnosis, the number of pneumonias before diagnosis or serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and IgM levels before initiation of Ig treatment. No association with emphysema development was observed, such as with lung function test abnormalities. No effect of MBL2 genotypes on the presence of diarrhoea, granuloma formation, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, frequency of respiratory tract infection or the number of antibiotic courses of the patients was observed. Our study suggests that low MBL-producing genotypes predispose to bronchiectasis formation, and also fibrosis and respiratory insufficiency development, but have no effect on other complications in CVID patients. PMID:18637104

  6. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin. PMID:11988090

  7. Mannose Binding Lectin and Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Children with Cardiomyopathy: No Association with MBL2 Codon 54 A/B Genotype, but an Association between MIF -173 CC Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Col-Araz, Nilgun; Oguzkan-Balci, Sibel; Baspinar, Osman; Sever, Tugce; Balat, Ayse; Pehlivan, Sacide

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial inflammation is one of the commonest mechanisms in cardiomyopathy (CMP). Mannose binding lectin (MBL) is a key molecule in innate immunity, while macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a constitutive element of the host defenses. We investigated the possible association between polymorphisms of MBL2 and MIF genes and CMP in Turkish children. Twenty-children with CMP and 30 healthy controls were analyzed for codon 54 A/B polymorphism in MBL, and -173 G/C polymorphism in MIF genes by using PCR-RFLP methods. No significant difference was found between genotypes and alleles of MBL2 gene codon 54 A/B polymorphism in patients and controls (p>0.05). However, serum uric acid levels was found higher in dilated CMP patients with AA genotype. Frequency of MIF -173 CC genotype was significantly higher in patients (p<0.05), and sodium levels were higher in patients with MIF -173 CC genotype. This study is the first to investigate the MBL and MIF gene polymorphisms in Turkish children with CMP. We conclude that CC genotype of MIF (-173) polymorphism may be a risk factor for CMP patients. However, further studies with larger samples are needed to address the exact role of this polymorphism in CMP. PMID:22927777

  8. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  9. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, plays a potent adjuvant and immunostimulatory role in immunization against Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Mariana R D; Mota, Caroline M; Ribeiro, Dâmaso P; Santiago, Fernanda M; Carvalho, Julianne V; Araujo, Ester C B; Silva, Neide M; Mineo, Tiago W P; Roque-Barreira, Maria C; Mineo, José R; Silva, Deise A O

    2011-11-15

    ArtinM and Jacalin (JAC) are lectins from the jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) that have important role in modulation of immune responses to pathogens. Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and reproductive disorders in cattle, with economic impact on the livestock industry. Hence, we evaluated the adjuvant effect of ArtinM and JAC in immunization of mice against neosporosis. Six C57BL/6 mouse groups were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA) associated with lectins (NLA+ArtinM and NLA+JAC), NLA, ArtinM and JAC alone, and PBS (infection control). Animals were challenged with lethal dose of Nc-1 isolate and evaluated for morbidity, mortality, specific antibody response, cytokine production by spleen cells, brain parasite burden and inflammation. Our results demonstrated that ArtinM was able to increase NLA immunogenicity, inducing the highest levels of specific total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, ex vivo Th1 cytokine production, increased survival, the lowest brain parasite burden, along with the highest inflammation scores. In contrast, NLA+JAC immunized group showed intermediate survival, the highest brain parasite burden and the lowest inflammation scores. In conclusion, ArtinM presents stronger immunostimulatory and adjuvant effect than Jacalin in immunization of mice against neosporosis, by inducing a protective Th1-biased pro-inflammatory immune response and higher protection after parasite challenge.

  10. Structure of the native (unligated) mannose-specific bulb lectin from Scilla campanulata (bluebell) at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J

    1999-07-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of native Scilla campanulata agglutinin, a mannose-specific lectin from bluebell bulbs and a member of the Liliaceae family, has been determined by molecular replacement and refined to an R value of 0.186 at 1.7 A resolution. The lectin crystallizes in space group P21212 with unit-cell parameters a = 70. 42, b = 92.95, c = 46.64 A. The unit cell contains eight protein molecules of Mr = 13143 Da (119 amino-acid residues). The asymmetric unit comprises two chemically identical molecules, A and B, related by a non-crystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to c. This dimer further associates by crystallographic twofold symmetry to form a tetramer. The fold of the polypeptide backbone closely resembles that found in the lectins from Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) and Hippeastrum (amaryllis) and contains a threefold symmetric beta-prism made up of three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets. Each of the four-stranded beta-sheets (I, II and III) possesses a potential saccharide-binding site containing conserved residues; however, site II has two mutations relative to sites I and III which may prevent ligation at this site. Our study provides the first accurate and detailed description of a native (unligated) structure from this superfamily of mannose-specific bulb lectins and will allow comparisons with a number of lectin-saccharide complexes which have already been determined or are currently under investigation.

  11. Lectin binding to cystic stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R M; Williams, J F

    1984-10-01

    Studies of membrane glycoconjugates of Taenia taeniaeformis were initiated by assays of the lectin binding characteristics of 35-day-old cysticerci. Parasites fixed in glutaraldehyde were incubated with one of the following FITC-labelled lectins: Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), fucose binding protein (FBP) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and either their specific or a nonspecific sugar. Ultraviolet microscopy revealed that only Con A and LCA bound in large amounts to the surface of cysticerci. This binding was partly inhibited by the specific sugar, but the nonspecific sugar had little effect. The lectin not removed by either of the sugars may have been bound nonspecifically to the charged glycocalyx. Lectins were primarily bound on the anterior third of the parasite around the scolex invagination. Kinetic studies of lectin interactions were carried out with LCA and RCA by spectrophotofluorometric analysis of the amount bound specifically or nonspecifically over a range of lectin concentrations. Lens culinaris lectin binding was found to be specific and involve 2 receptors which showed large differences in their affinity for lectin and prevalence on the surface. Ricinus communis lectin did not bind specifically but nonspecific interactions were observed. Adherence of small numbers of host cells was shown to have no measurable effect on the lectin binding characteristics. The results suggest that the major surface carbohydrates exposed are D-mannose and/or D-glucose residues with the other sugar groups poorly represented. This relatively homogeneous surface may have implications for the antigenicity of the parasite in its host.

  12. Identification, Characterization, and X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of a Novel Type of Mannose-Specific Lectin CGL1 from the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Hideaki; Matsuyama, Kazuki; Tsuji, Yoshiteru; Goda, Shuichiro; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2016-01-01

    A novel mannose-specific lectin, named CGL1 (15.5 kDa), was isolated from the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Characterization of CGL1 involved isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), glycoconjugate microarray, and frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). This analysis revealed that CGL1 has strict specificity for the mannose monomer and for high mannose-type N-glycans (HMTGs). Primary structure of CGL1 did not show any homology with known lectins but did show homology with proteins of the natterin family. Crystal structure of the CGL1 revealed a unique homodimer in which each protomer was composed of 2 domains related by a pseudo two-fold axis. Complex structures of CGL1 with mannose molecules showed that residues have 8 hydrogen bond interactions with O1, O2, O3, O4, and O5 hydroxyl groups of mannose. The complex interactions that are not observed with other mannose-binding lectins revealed the structural basis for the strict specificity for mannose. These characteristics of CGL1 may be helpful as a research tool and for clinical applications. PMID:27377186

  13. Interactions of five D-mannose-specific lectins with a series of synthetic branched trisaccharides.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Oscarson, S

    1991-06-25

    The interaction of a series of synthetic, branched trisaccharides with five D-mannose-specific lectins was studied by precipitation-inhibition assay. The branched methyl alpha-D-mannotrioside, alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe, the best inhibitor of the Con A-Dextran interaction, was 42 times more potent than alpha-D-ManpOMe, and 3-6 times more potent than the two trisaccharides substituted with D-glucosyl groups, and 8-15 times those with D-galactosyl groups. Surprisingly, methyl O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside was bound to Con A 8-fold more avidly than methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. However, the related pea lectin (PSA) was singularly different from Con A in its carbohydrate-binding activity, showing no significantly enhanced binding to any of the sugars examined. The trisacchrides containing terminal, nonreducing, (1----3)-linked alpha-D-mannopyranosyl groups, i.e., alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Glep-(1----6)]alpha-D-Manp OMe, alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)]-alpha-D-Galp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-ManpOMe++ +, and alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe, were the best inhibitors of the snowdrop lectin (GNA)-D-mannan precipitation system. On the other hand, all branched trisaccharides exhibited very similar inhibitory potencies toward the daffodil lectin (NPA)-D-mannan interaction, whereas alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Galp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-ManpOMe++ + and alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe were somewhat better inhibitors than the other branched trisaccharides of the amaryllis lectin (HHA)-D-mannan precipitation reaction. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Gliadins bind to reticulin in a lectin-like manner.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, D J; Leonard, J N; Hobday, C M; Griffiths, C E; Powles, A V; Haffenden, G P; Fry, L

    1987-01-01

    It has previously been reported that gliadins bind to reticulin in tissue sections. Three lines of evidence are reported in this study which indicate that the gliadins bind to reticulins because they are lectins which bind to sugars expressed on glycoproteins in reticulin and other sites. First, immunofluorescence studies on tissue sections showed that although gliadin binding is largely confined to areas rich in reticulin, it is, nonetheless, also seen in one or two other sites devoid of reticulin. Second, by using fluorescein-labelled lectins of known specificity, it has been shown that the areas to which gliadins bind in tissue sections (including those sites devoid of reticulin) are rich in particular sugars. Third, it has been shown that one of these sugars, alpha-D-mannose, partially inhibited gliadin binding to tissue sections.

  15. Strict specificity for high-mannose type N-glycans and primary structure of a red alga Eucheuma serra lectin.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kanji; Sato, Yuichiro; Ito, Kaori; Fujiwara, Yoshifumi; Iwamoto, Yasumasa; Makino, Hiroyuki; Kawakubo, Akihiro

    2007-05-01

    We have elucidated the carbohydrate-binding profile of a non-monosaccharide-binding lectin named Eucheuma serra lectin (ESA)-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra using a lectin-immobilized column and a centrifugal ultrafiltration-high performance liquid chromatography method with a variety of fluorescence-labeled oligosaccharides. In both methods, ESA-2 exclusively bound with high-mannose type (HM) N-glycans, but not with any of other N-glycans including complex type, hybrid type and core pentasaccharides, and oligosaccharides from glycolipids. These findings indicate that ESA-2 recognizes the branched oligomannosides of the N-glycans. However, ESA-2 did not bind with any of the free oligomannoses examined that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides implying that the portion of the core N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, the algal lectin was strictly specific for HM N-glycans and recognized the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimum size of the pentasaccharide, Man(alpha1-3)Man(alpha1-6)Man(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-4) GlcNAc. Kinetic analysis of binding with a HM heptasaccharide (M5) showed that ESA-2 has four carbohydrate-binding sites per polypeptide with a high association constant of 1.6x10(8) M-1. Sequence analysis, by a combination of Edman degradation and mass analyses of the intact protein and of peptides produced by its enzymic digestions, showed that ESA-2 is composed of 268 amino acids (molecular weight 27950) with four tandemly repeated domains of 67 amino acids. The number of repeats coincided with the number of carbohydrate-binding sites in the monomeric molecule. Surprisingly, the marine algal lectin was homologous to hemagglutinin from the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

  16. Lectin binding patterns and carbohydrate mediation of sperm binding to llama oviductal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Apichela, Silvana A; Valz-Gianinet, Jorge N; Schuster, Stefanie; Jiménez-Díaz, María A; Roldán-Olarte, Eugenia M; Miceli, Dora C

    2010-04-01

    Sperm binding to oviductal epithelium would be involved in sperm reservoir formation in the utero tubal junction (UTJ). Although in other mammals sperm-oviduct interaction has been proved to be mediated by carbohydrate-recognition mechanisms, the factors implicated in the sperm adhesion to oviductal epithelium of llama are still unknown. In order to assess the role of carbohydrates present in the mucosa surface, we examined the distribution of glycoconjugates in the llama oviduct by confocal lectin-histochemistry. Mannosyl, glucosyl, N-acetylglucosaminyl, galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosaminyl and sialic acid residues were detected in the oviductal mucose glycocalyx. By incubation of UTJ oviductal explants with LCA, DBA, UEA-1 or PNA lectin previous to co-culture with sperm, we observed a significant decrease in sperm binding only with LCA lectin. In the mucosa surface there were numerous d-glucosyl and D-manosyl residues, which were spotted by this lectin. Probably, this fact promotes the whole covering of the oviduct luminal surface by the sugar-lectin complex, preventing sperm access and adhesion of further residues. However, sperm incubation with mannose or glucose does not significantly prevent binding, which means that glucose and mannose would not be involved in a specific sperm-oviduct interaction. On the other hand, we observed a high reduction in sperm binding to UTJ explants with N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose (p<0.001). Coincidentally, binding sites for N-acetylgalactosamine-PAA-FITC conjugate were observed on the whole surface of the sperm, supporting the concept that llama sperm have lectin-like molecules in their surface, as is the case in other mammals. Probably, these lectin-like molecules, by means of N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose recognition, could link the sperm to the oviductal mucosa with the purpose of forming storing sites in the UTJ. Our results support the idea that more than one carbohydrate could participate in sperm reservoir

  17. Mannose glycoconjugates functionalized at positions 1 and 6. Binding analysis to DC-SIGN using biosensors.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Maldonado, Olivia S; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2007-01-01

    The design of glycoconjugates to allow the generation of multivalent ligands capable of interacting with the receptor DC-SIGN is a topic of high interest due to the role played by this lectin in pathogen infections. Mannose, a ligand of this lectin, could be conjugated at two different positions, 1 and 6, not implicated in the binding process. We have prepared mannose conjugates at these two positions with a long spacer to allow their attachment to a biosensor chip surface. Analysis of the interaction between these surfaces and the tetravalent extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN by SPR biosensor has demonstrated that both positions are available for this conjugation without affecting the protein binding process. These results emphasize the possibility to conjugate mannose at position 6, allowing the incorporation of hydrophobic groups at the anomeric position to interact with hydrophobic residues in the carbohydrate recognition domain of DC-SIGN, increasing binding affinities. This fact is relevant for the future design of new ligands and the corresponding multivalent systems for DC-SIGN.

  18. Differences in the mannose oligomer specificities of the closely related lectins from Galanthus nivalis and Zea mays strongly determine their eventual anti-HIV activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a recent report, the carbohydrate-binding specificities of the plant lectins Galanthus nivalis (GNA) and the closely related lectin from Zea mays (GNAmaize) were determined by glycan array analysis and indicated that GNAmaize recognizes complex-type N-glycans whereas GNA has specificity towards high-mannose-type glycans. Both lectins are tetrameric proteins sharing 64% sequence similarity. Results GNAmaize appeared to be ~20- to 100-fold less inhibitory than GNA against HIV infection, syncytia formation between persistently HIV-1-infected HuT-78 cells and uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte SupT1 cells, HIV-1 capture by DC-SIGN and subsequent transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virions to uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte cells. In contrast to GNA, which preferentially selects for virus strains with deleted high-mannose-type glycans on gp120, prolonged exposure of HIV-1 to dose-escalating concentrations of GNAmaize selected for mutant virus strains in which one complex-type glycan of gp120 was deleted. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that GNA and GNAmaize interact with HIV IIIB gp120 with affinity constants (KD) of 0.33 nM and 34 nM, respectively. Whereas immobilized GNA specifically binds mannose oligomers, GNAmaize selectively binds complex-type GlcNAcβ1,2Man oligomers. Also, epitope mapping experiments revealed that GNA and the mannose-specific mAb 2G12 can independently bind from GNAmaize to gp120, whereas GNAmaize cannot efficiently bind to gp120 that contained prebound PHA-E (GlcNAcβ1,2man specific) or SNA (NeuAcα2,6X specific). Conclusion The markedly reduced anti-HIV activity of GNAmaize compared to GNA can be explained by the profound shift in glycan recognition and the disappearance of carbohydrate-binding sites in GNAmaize that have high affinity for mannose oligomers. These findings underscore the need for mannose oligomer recognition of therapeutics to be endowed with anti-HIV activity and that mannose, but not complex-type glycan

  19. Solubility-insolubility interconversion of sophoragrin, a mannose/glucose-specific lectin in Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) bark, regulated by the sugar-specific interaction.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Haruko; Fukushima, Hisako; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Ogawa, Haruko

    2004-09-15

    Sophoragrin, a mannose/glucose-specific lectin in Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) bark, was the first lectin found to show self-aggregation that is dependent on the sugar concentration accompanying the interconversion between solubility and insolubility [Ueno, Ogawa, Matsumoto and Seno (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 3146-3153]. The interconversion is regulated by the concentrations of Ca(2+) and specific sugars: mannose, glucose or sucrose. The specific glycotopes for sophoragrin were found in the sophoragrin subunit and an endogenous galactose-specific lectin, B-SJA-I (bark S. japonica agglutinin I), and the lectin subunit that binds to the glycotope was identified by photoaffinity glycan probes. Remarkably, the insoluble polymer of sophoragrin is dissociated by interaction with B-SJA-I into various soluble complexes. Based on these results, self-aggregation of sophoragrin was shown to be a unique homopolymerization due to the sugar-specific interaction. An immunostaining study indicated that sophoragrin localizes mainly in vacuoles of parenchymal cells coincidently with B-SJA-I. These results indicate that sophoragrin can sequester endogenous glycoprotein ligands via sugar-specific interactions, thus providing new insights into the occurrence and significance of the intravacuolar interaction shown by a legume lectin.

  20. N-glycan analysis of mannose/glucose specific lectin from Dolichos lablab seeds.

    PubMed

    B S, Gnanesh Kumar; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Schulte, Mona; Mormann, Michael; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar

    2014-08-01

    An affinity purified mannose/glucose specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab (Indian bean/lablab bean) resolves into five subunits upon SDS-PAGE in the range of Mr 12-20kDa. Partial de novo sequencing of subunits resulted in 88% and 73% sequence coverage for α and β subunits of the cDNA derived FRIL (Flt3 receptor interacting lectin) sequence, respectively and suggested that four bands correspond to the α-subunits while the band of lowest molecular mass is designated as β. It was proposed in an earlier study on FRIL that the difference in molecular mass of α-subunits is due to differences in C-terminal processing and differential N-glycosylation i.e. numbers of N-glycans present (Colucci et al., 1999). Thus, differential N-glycosylation of the purified mannose/glucose specific lectin was unravelled by in-gel trypsin/chymotrypsin digestion of the α-subunits followed by desalting and ZIC-HILIC enrichment of N-glycopeptides. Subsequently, analyses by nano electrospray ionisation quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and low-energy collision-induced dissociation experiments revealed the presence of a typical paucimannose type N-glycan (Man2(Xyl)GlcNAc2(Fuc)) in α subunits 2-4.

  1. Lectin binding pattern and proteoglycan distribution in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Sames, K; Moll, I; van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Schumacher, U

    1999-11-01

    The distribution pattern of glycoconjugates in human eccrine sweat glands has been studied by the binding of newly discovered lectins and by antibodies against a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and chondroitin sulphate glycosaminoglycans. Mannose-specific lectins labelled large intracellular granules, part of which could be extended cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. In contrast, lectins specific for terminal mannose/glucose residues predominantly labelled basement membranes and the glycocalyx. Lectins recognizing terminal N-acetylgalactosamine groups left most parts of the glands unstained, but stained some dark cells intensely. These last cells were also intensively labelled by N-acetylglucosamine-specific and by fucose-specific lectins. Sialic acid residues were preferentially located in luminal borders of secretory coils. No terminal galactose residues were detected. All antibodies against chondroitin glycoconjugates stained large granules similar to those revealed by the mannose-specific lectins in the secretory cells. The basement membrane is only stained by the proteoglycan antibody and the chondroitin-6-sulphate antibody. Thus, a complex composition of glycoconjugates exists not only in matrix elements but also in the cells of eccrine glands of the human skin. A possible secretion of glycoconjugates is discussed.

  2. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  3. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  4. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  5. Influence of ligand presentation density on the molecular recognition of mannose-functionalised glyconanoparticles by bacterial lectin BC2L-A.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Michael; Marradi, Marco; Imberty, Anne; Penadés, Soledad; Pérez, Serge

    2013-11-01

    Polyvalent carbohydrate-protein interactions play a key role in bio- and pathological processes, including cell-cell communication and pathogen invasion. In order to study, control and manipulate these interactions gold nanoparticles have been employed as a 3D scaffold, presenting carbohydrate ligands in a multivalent fashion for use as high affinity binding partners and a model system for oligosaccharide presentation at biomacromolecular surfaces. In this study, the binding of a series of mannose-functionalised gold nanoparticles to the dimeric BC2L-A lectin from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been evaluated. BC2L-A is known to exhibit a high specificity for (oligo)mannosides. Due to the unique structure and binding nature of this lectin, it provides a useful tool to study (oligo)saccharides presented on multivalent scaffolds. Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetric assays were used to investigate the effect of ligand presentation density towards binding to the bacterial lectin. We show how a combination of structural complementarities between ligand presentation and lectin architecture and statistical re-binding effects are important for increasing the avidity of multivalent ligands for recognition by their protein receptors; further demonstrating the application of glyconanotechnology towards fundamental glycobiology research as well as a potential towards biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic treatments.

  6. Biosensor for selective detection of E. coli in spinach using the strong affinity of derivatized mannose with fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed

    Yazgan, Idris; Noah, Naumih M; Toure, Ousmane; Zhang, Siyi; Sadik, Omowunmi A

    2014-11-15

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination in foods and water resources represents a major threat for human health and the environment. This work exploits the strong affinity of mannose-containing oligosaccharides with the fimbrial lectin of E. coli to design novel biosensors. Modified carbohydrate ligands were synthesized by introducing phenyl residues and aliphatic chains to mannose via reductive amination in order to increase both the affinity and selectivity to E. coli compared to other pathogenic bacteria. The synthesized ligands include p-thiolphenyl aminomannose (PTAM), p-carboxyphenyl aminomannose (PCAM), 1-deoxy-1-aminomannopyranoside (DAMP), glucosamine and low molecular weight chitosan bonded to mercapto undecanoic acid. The structures of the ligands were confirmed using (1)H NMR and 1H, (13)C, COZY NMR, and ESI/MS. The ligands were immobilized onto gold electrodes and SPR surfaces using-mercaptoundecanoic acid with glycine as deactivating agent. Two detection mechanisms were tested: (i) metal-enhanced electrochemical detection (MED) and (ii) label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection. The introduction of phenyl residues and aliphatic side groups to the mannose-containing oligosaccharides produced extremely high affinity for E. coli with detection limit of 1 cfu/mL. The relative selectivity of these ligands for E. coli, Citrobacter freundii, Staphylococcus epidermidis were 100%, 2.6% and 8.6% respectively. The biosensors were validated using spinach leaves at 3.0 cfu/mL. The work provides a generic biosensor for other pathogenic bacteria by enabling multivalent binding, immediate recognition for pathogens as well as inhibition of bacterial growth.

  7. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  8. Endocytosis of lysosomal acid phosphatase; involvement of mannose receptor and effect of lectins.

    PubMed

    Imai, K; Yoshimura, T

    1994-08-01

    Acid phosphatase and beta-glucosidase are unique among lysosomal enzymes in that they have both high mannose and complex type sugasr chains, whereas oligosaccharide chains of lysosomal enzymes in matrix are of high mannose type. We have previously shown that beta-glucosidase was endocytosed into macrophages via an unidentified receptor different from a mannose/fucose receptor (K. Imai, Cell Struct. Funct. 13, 325-332, 1988). Here, we show that uptake of acid phosphatase purified from rat liver lysosomes into rat macrophages was inhibited by ligands for a mannose/fucose receptor and was mediated via an apparently single binding site with Kuptake of 24.7 nM. These results indicate that acid phosphatase and beta-glucosidase recognize different types of receptors even if they have similar sugar chains. Polyvalent concanavalin A which binds both to the enzyme and to macrophages specifically stimulated the uptake in a dose dependent manner, whereas wheat germ agglutinin and phytohaemagglutinin did not.

  9. Investigating the effects of point mutations on the affinity between the cyanobacterial lectin microvirin and high mannose-type glycans present on the HIV envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Conceição de Souza, Rafael; de Medeiros Muniz, Gabriela; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; de Melo Lima, Adonis; da Silva, Alessandra Pereira; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez Júnior, João Lídio

    2016-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to exert an enormous impact on global human health. This led experts to emphasize the importance of new measures for preventing HIV infections, including the development of vaccines and novel drugs. In this context, a promising approach involves the use of lectins that can bind the surface envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV with high affinity, preventing viral entry. The cyanobacterial lectin microvirin (MVN) has been proposed as a candidate for development as a topical microbicide because of its ability to bind to high mannose-type glycans, potently inhibiting HIV-1 entry. Thus, the aim of this computational study was to investigate the effects of four point mutations (D53Q, D53E, D53K, and D53W) on the structure and affinity of MVN with di-mannose (MAN). Molecular dynamics simulations followed by binding free energy calculations using MM-GBSA were employed. The calculated binding free energy of ligand-receptor complexation of MVN with MAN was -26.02 kcal mol(-1). We identified in the wild-type protein that residues I45, T59, and Q81 have a major contribution to the binding free energy of di-mannose. Among the investigated mutants, the most promising one was the D53W mutation, with a theoretical binding free energy value of -29.16 kcal mol(-1). We suggest that this increased stability is due to the introduction of extra rigidity on the hinge region connecting two key structural elements of the MVN binding site.

  10. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  11. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  12. High mannose-specific lectin (KAA-2) from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii potently inhibits influenza virus infection in a strain-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2011-02-11

    The carbohydrate binding profile of the red algal lectin KAA-2 from Kappaphycus alvarezii was evaluated by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method using pyridylaminated oligosaccharides. KAA-2 bound exclusively to high mannose type N-glycans, but not to other glycans such as complex type, hybrid type, or the pentasaccharide core of N-glycans. This lectin exhibited a preference for an exposed α1-3 Man on a D2 arm in a similar manner to Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA-2), which shows various biological activities, such as anti-HIV and anti-carcinogenic activity. We tested the anti-influenza virus activity of KAA-2 against various strains including the recent pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza virus. KAA-2 inhibited infection of various influenza strains with EC50s of low nanomolar levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy using an anti-influenza antibody demonstrated that the antiviral activity of KAA-2 was exerted by interference with virus entry into host cells. This mechanism was further confirmed by the evidence of direct binding of KAA-2 to a viral envelope protein, hemagglutinin (HA), using an ELISA assay. These results indicate that this lectin would be useful as a novel antiviral reagent for the prevention of infection.

  13. Concanavalin A binds to a mannose-containing ligand in the cell wall of some lichen phycobionts.

    PubMed

    Fontaniella, Blanca; Millanes, Ana-María; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, María-Estrella

    2004-12-01

    Concanavalin A, the lectin from Canavalia ensiformis, develops arginase activity depending on Mn(2+). The cation cannot be substituted by Ca(2+) which, in addition, inhibits Mn(2+)-supported activity. Fluorescein-labeled Concanavalin A is able to bind to the cell wall of algal cells recently isolated from Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina thalli. This binding involves a ligand, probably a glycoprotein containing mannose, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography. Analysis by SDS-PAGE reveals that the ligand is a dimeric protein composed by two monomers of 54 and 48 kDa. This ligand shows to be different from the receptor for natural lichen lectins, previously identified as a polygalactosylated urease.

  14. γ-Tilmanocept, a New Radiopharmaceutical Tracer for Cancer Sentinel Lymph Nodes, Binds to the Mannose Receptor (CD206)

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Metz, Wendy L.; Cope, Frederick O.; Blue, Michael S.; Vera, David R.

    2015-01-01

    γ-Tilmanocept (99mTc-labeled-tilmanocept or [99mTc]-tilmanocept) is the first mannose-containing, receptor-directed, radiolabeled tracer for the highly sensitive imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in solid tumor staging. To elucidate the mannose-binding receptor that retains tilmanocept in this microenvironment, human macrophages were used that have high expression of the C-type lectin mannose receptor (MR; CD206). Cy3-labeled tilmanocept exhibited high specificity binding to macrophages that was nearly abolished in competitive inhibition experiments. Furthermore, Cy3-tilmanocept binding was markedly reduced on macrophages deficient in the MR by small interfering RNA treatment and was increased on MR-transfected HEK 293 cells. Finally, confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of Cy3-tilmanocept with the macrophage membrane MR and binding of labeled tilmanocept to MR+ cells (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) in human sentinel lymph node tissues. Together these data provide strong evidence that CD206 is a major binding receptor for γ-tilmanocept. Identification of CD206 as the γ-tilmanocept–binding receptor enables opportunities for designing receptor-targeted advanced imaging agents and therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. PMID:26202986

  15. Cloning and characterization of a novel mannose-binding protein of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Garate, Marco; Cao, Zhiyi; Bateman, Erik; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2004-07-09

    Acanthamoebae produce a painful, blinding infection of the cornea. The mannose-binding protein (MBP) of Acanthamoeba is thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of the infection by mediating the adhesion of parasites to the host cells. We describe here the isolation and molecular cloning of Acanthamoeba MBP. The MBP was isolated by chromatography on the mannose affinity gel. Gel filtration experiments revealed that the Acanthamoeba lectin is a approximately 400-kDa protein that is constituted of multiple 130-kDa subunits. Cloning and sequencing experiments indicated that the Acanthamoeba MBP gene is composed of 6 exons and 5 introns that span 3.6 kb of the amoeba genome and that MBP cDNA codes for a precursor protein of 833 amino acids. That the cloned cDNA encodes authentic MBP was demonstrated by showing that: (i). recombinant MBP possesses mannose binding activity, and (ii). polyclonal antibodies prepared against Acanthamoeba MBP bound to the recombinant protein. Sequence analysis revealed that the MBP contains a large N-terminal extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a short C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. Despite extensive BLAST searches using the MBP sequence, no significant matches were retrieved. The most striking feature of the Acanthamoeba MBP sequence is the presence of a cysteine-rich region containing 14 CXCXC motifs within the extracellular domain. In summary, we have isolated, cloned, and characterized a novel MBP from Acanthamoeba. Because the presence of antibodies to MBP in tears provides protection against infection, the availability of the MBP cDNA sequence and rMBP should help develop: (i). a tear-based test to identify individuals who are at risk of developing the keratitis and (ii). strategies to immunize high-risk individuals.

  16. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  17. Carbohydrate binding properties of banana (Musa acuminata) lectin I. Novel recognition of internal alpha1,3-linked glucosyl residues.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Winter, H C; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Misaki, A; Goldstein, I J

    2001-05-01

    Examination of lectins of banana (Musa acuminata) and the closely related plantain (Musa spp.) by the techniques of quantitative precipitation, hapten inhibition of precipitation, and isothermal titration calorimetry showed that they are mannose/glucose binding proteins with a preference for the alpha-anomeric form of these sugars. Both generate precipitin curves with branched chain alpha-mannans (yeast mannans) and alpha-glucans (glycogens, dextrans, and starches), but not with linear alpha-glucans containing only alpha1,4- and alpha1,6-glucosidic bonds (isolichenan and pullulan). The novel observation was made that banana and plantain lectins recognize internal alpha1,3-linked glucosyl residues, which occur in the linear polysaccharides elsinan and nigeran. Concanavalin A and lectins from pea and lentil, also mannose/glucose binding lectins, did not precipitate with any of these linear alpha-glucans. This is, the authors believe, the first report of the recognition of internal alpha1,3-glucosidic bonds by a plant lectin. It is possible that these lectins are present in the pulp of their respective fruit, complexed with starch.

  18. Affinity Separation of Lectins Using Porous Membranes Immobilized with Glycopolymer Brushes Containing Mannose or N-Acetyl-d-Glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yutaro; Seto, Hirokazu; Murakami, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Yu; Miura, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Porous membranes with glycopolymer brushes were prepared as biomaterials for affinity separation. Glycopolymer brushes contained acrylic acid and D-mannose or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and were formed on substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The presence of glycopolymer brush was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry measurements. The interaction between lectin and the glycopolymer immobilized on glass slides was confirmed using fluorescent-labeled proteins. Glycopolymer-immobilized surfaces exhibited specific adsorption of the corresponding lectin, compared with bovine serum albumin. Lectins were continuously rejected by the glycopolymer-immobilized membranes. When the protein solution was permeated through the glycopolymer-immobilized membrane, bovine serum albumin was not adsorbed on the membrane surface. In contrast, concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin were rejected by membranes incorporating D-mannose or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, respectively. The amounts of adsorbed concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was increased five- and two-fold that of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, respectively. PMID:24956944

  19. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of chitin-binding lectin from Canna limbata seeds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Theolyta S; Teixeira, Claudener S; Falcão, Maria A P; Junior, Vanir R Pinto; Santiago, Mayara Quiroz; Benevides, Raquel G; Delatorre, Plínio; Martins, Jorge L; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Cavada, Benildo S; Campesatto, Eliane A; Rocha, Bruno A M

    2013-12-01

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of proteins or glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to a specific mono- or oligosaccharide. Monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. In this study, we evaluated anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of monocot lectin from the Canna limbata seeds (CLL). To accomplish this, CLL was purified and subjected to pharmacological assays: abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and Zymosan A-induced peritonitis tests. The CLL was purified by chromatographic chitin column, and the relative mass of 21 kDa observed in electrophoresis was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry, which also revealed that purified CLL consists of a dimer having a weight of 49,676 Da. The CLL showed nociceptive activity in the acetic acid test as well as peripheral antinociceptive response. The CLL also showed anti-inflammatory effect with the reduction of inflammation in the formalin test and neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity. This is the first report of anti-inflammatory activity for a monocot lectin, and it suggests a new pharmacological tool to understand inflammatory and antinociceptive processes mediated through lectins.

  20. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  1. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  2. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  3. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins.

  4. C-Type Lectin Receptor Dectin-2 Binds to an Endogenous Protein β-Glucuronidase on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daiki; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Sho

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize pathogen-derived ligands and abnormal self that trigger protective immune responses. However, the precise nature of self ligands recognized by CLRs remains to be determined. Here, we found that Dectin-2 recognizes bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) using Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. This activity was inhibited by an excessive amount of mannose, and by the mutation of mannose-binding motif in Dectin-2. β-glucuronidase (Gusb) was identified as a protein bound to Dectin-2 and mutations of N-glycosylation sites in Gusb impaired the binding of Gusb to Dectin-2. Overexpression of Gusb in a macrophage cell line conferred an ability to stimulate Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. Our study suggests that a glycosylated protein with mannose-related structure is recognized by Dectin-2. PMID:28046067

  5. Distribution of lectin-bindings in the testis of the lesser mouse deer, Tragulus javanicus.

    PubMed

    Agungpriyono, S; Kurohmaru, M; Kimura, J; Wahid, A H; Sasaki, M; Kitamura, N; Yamada, J; Fukuta, K; Zuki, A B

    2009-06-01

    The distribution of lectin bindings in the testis of the smallest ruminant, lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus), was studied using 12 biotinylated lectins specific for d-galactose (peanut agglutinin PNA, Ricinus communis agglutinin RCA I), N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin DBA, Vicia villosa agglutinin VVA, Soybean agglutinin SBA), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic acid (wheat germ agglutinin WGA, s-WGA), D-mannose and d-glucose (Lens culinaris agglutinin LCA, Pisum sativum agglutinin PSA, Concanavalin A Con A), L-fucose (Ulex europaeus agglutinin UEA I), and oligosaccharide (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin PHA-E) sugar residues. In Golgi-, cap-, and acrosome-phase spermatids, lectin-bindings were found in the acrosome (PNA, RCA I, VVA, SBA, WGA and s-WGA), and in the cytoplasm (PNA, RCA I, VVA, SBA, WGA, LCA, PSA, Con A and PHA-E). s-WGA binding was confined to the spermatid acrosome, but other lectins were also observed in spermatocytes. In spermatogonia, VVA, WGA, Con A, and PHA-E bindings were observed. Sertoli cells were intensely stained with DBA and Con A, and weakly with PHA-E. In interstitial Leydig cells, RCA I, DBA, VVA, Con A, PSA, LCA, WGA and PHA-E were positive. UEA I was negative in all cell types including spermatogenic cells. Unusual distribution of lectin-bindings noted in the testis of lesser mouse deer included the limited distribution of s-WGA only in the spermatid acrosome, the distribution of DBA in Sertoli cells, Leydig cells and lamina propria, and the absence of UEA I in all type cells. The present results were discussed in comparison with those of other animals and their possible functional implications.

  6. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  7. Carbohydrate-binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.) bulb lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1990-06-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus; NPA) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.; HHA) lectins, isolated from extracts of their bulbs by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose, was studied by quantitative precipitation, sugar hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on the immobilized lectins. These lectins gave strong precipitation reactions with several yeast mannans, but did not precipitate with alpha-D-glucans (e.g., dextrans and glycogen). Interestingly, both lectins reacted strongly with yeast galactomannans having multiple nonreducing terminal alpha-D-galactosyl groups, a synthetic linear alpha-1,6-mannan, and an alpha-1,3-mannan (DP = 30). Treatment of the linear alpha-1,3-mannan with periodate, resulting in oxidation of the terminal, nonreducing mannosyl group, did not reduce its reactivity with NPA or HHA. Taken together, these observations suggest that NPA and HHA react not only with terminal but also with internal alpha-D-mannosyl residues. Sugar hapten inhibition studies showed these lectins to possess the greatest specific activity for alpha-D-mannosyl units whereas D-Glc and D-GlcNAc did not inhibit either lectin precipitation system. Of the oligosaccharides tested, the best inhibitor of NPA interaction was alpha-1,6-linked mannotriose, which was twice as good an inhibitor as Man alpha 1,6Man alpha-O-Me and 10 times better than methyl alpha-D-mannoside. On the other hand, oligosaccharides containing either 1,3- or 1,6-linked mannosyl units were good inhibitors of the HHA-mannan precipitation system (6- to 20-fold more active than D-Man). These results indicate that both lectins appear to possess an extended binding site(s) complementary to at least three 1,6-linked alpha-mannosyl units. Various glycosylasparagine glycopeptides which contain alpha-1,6-Man units were retarded on the immobilized NPA column. On the other hand, those containing either alpha-1,3- or alpha-1,6-mannosyl residues were

  8. Isolation and analysis of mannose/trehalose/maltose specific lectin from jack bean with antibruchid activity.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Velayutham, Veeramani; Kamalanathan, Tamilarasan; Periasamy, Mullainadhan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2016-10-01

    A lectin with insecticidal property against the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus was successfully isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using standard affinity chromatography. The isolated molecule typically behaved like a lectin in its characteristics. It agglutinated indicator red blood cells (RBC) in its native as well as enzyme treated conditions. The enzyme treated RBC types exhibited a very high hemagglutination (HA) titre values and this property of isolated molecule behaved like arcelin, the lectin-like molecules reported from several species of Phaseolus. As a characteristic feature of a lectin, the isolated molecule effectively inhibited the agglutination of indicator RBC types with simple and complex carbohydrates including glycoproteins. This nature of the isolated molecule also relate with characteristic feature of arcelin isoforms in inhibiting HA activity with complex glycoproteins as reported in many studies. Most interestingly, the present study disclosed trehalose as a potent inhibitor of C. virosa lectin. Therefore, feeding insect pests on the lectin like arcelin could serve as antibiosis factor/anti-insect activity. The molecular characteristics of this isolated molecule and its mass studies too revealed its homology with arcelin, arcelin-1, 2 and 6 isoforms of P. vulgaris and lectin from Canavalia cathartica, C. lineata and C. brasiliensis.

  9. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  10. A conserved flagellar pocket exposed high mannose moiety is used by African trypanosomes as a host cytokine binding molecule.

    PubMed

    Magez, S; Radwanska, M; Stijlemans, B; Xong, H V; Pays, E; De Baetselier, P

    2001-09-07

    Trypanosomes use antigenic variation of their variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat as defense against the host immune system. However, in order to sustain their growth, they need to expose conserved epitopes, allowing host macromolecule binding and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that Trypanosoma brucei uses the conserved chitobiose-oligomannose (GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9)) moieties of its VSG as a binding ligand for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a host cytokine with lectin-like properties. As endocytosis in trypanosomes is restricted to the flagellar pocket, we show that soluble flagellar pocket extracts, and in particular soluble VSG, inhibit the binding of (125)I-TNF to trypanosomes. The interaction between TNF and VSG is confirmed by affinity chromatography, biosensor, and dot-blot affinity measurements, and soluble VSG inhibition of TNF-mediated trypanolysis. In all approaches, removal of N-linked carbohydrates abrogates the TNF-VSG interaction. In addition, synthetic high mannose oligosaccharides can block TNF-VSG interactions, and a VSG glycopeptide carrying the GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9) moiety is shown to inhibit TNF-mediated trypanosome killing in mixed parasite/macrophage cell cultures. Together, these results support the observation that TNF plays a role in growth control of trypanosomes and, moreover, suggest that, by the use of conserved VSG carbohydrates as lectin-binding epitopes, trypanosomes can limit the necessity to express large numbers of invariant surface exposed receptors.

  11. Structural analysis and binding properties of isoforms of tarin, the GNA-related lectin from Colocasia esculenta.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia R; Winter, Harry C; Verícimo, Mauricio A; Meagher, Jennifer L; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T

    2015-01-01

    The lectins, a class of proteins that occur widely in animals, plants, fungi, lichens and microorganisms, are known for their ability to specifically bind to carbohydrates. Plant lectins can be classified into 12 families including the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin superfamily, which is widespread among monocotyledonous plants and binds specifically to mannose, a behavior that confers remarkable anti-tumor, anti-viral and insecticidal properties on these proteins. The present study characterized a mitogenic lectin from this family, called tarin, which was purified from the crude extract from taro (Colocasia esculenta). The results showed that tarin is a glycoprotein with 2-3% carbohydrate content, composed of least 10 isoforms with pIs ranging from 5.5 to 9.5. The intact protein is a heterotetramer of 47kDa composed of two non-identical and non-covalently associated polypeptides, with small subunits of 11.9kDa and large subunits of 12.6kDa. The tarin structure is stable and recovers or maintains its functional structure following treatments at different temperatures and pH. Tarin showed a complex carbohydrate specificity, binding with high affinity to high-mannose and complex N-glycans. Many of these ligands can be found in viruses, tumor cells and insects, as well as in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Chemical modifications confirmed that both conserved and non-conserved amino acids participate in this interaction. This study determined the structural and ligand binding characteristics of a GNA-related lectin that can be exploited for several different purposes, particularly as a proliferative therapeutic molecule that is able to enhance the immunological response.

  12. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies on the mannose-specific lectin from Amaryllis bulbs.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D; Reynolds, C D; Lambert, S; McMichael, P A; Allen, A K; Rizkallah, P J

    1994-01-01

    Affinity-purified amaryllis lectin was used to grow single crystals using the hanging-drop method. The space group was found to be C2 with unit-cell dimensions a = 73.4 (1), b = 100.3 (1), c = 62.2 (1) A and beta = 137.3 (2) degrees. Data to 2.25 A resolution have been recorded and solution of the structure is currently underway by means of molecular-replacement techniques.

  14. Switchable binding affinity of mannose tethered to collagen peptide by temperature-dependent triple-helix formation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomoko; Isobe, Chika; Wada, Takeaki; Ezaki, Sumiyo; Minoura, Norihiko

    2013-06-19

    Novel glycopeptides were created with a view to regulate the bindings of carbohydrates to lectins as a means of controlling biological function. We synthesized glycopeptides containing mannose (Man) tethered to a collagen peptide moiety (MPOG10: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10- or MGPP10: -(Gly-Pro-Pro)10-). Circular dichroism spectra showed formation of a triple helical structure for MPOG10, and the melting temperature indicates that MPOG10 forms a more stable triple helical structure than MGPP10 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). At 25 °C, fluorescence polarization (FP) values of MPOG10 and MGPP10 increased following the addition of concanavalin A (ConA), and the addition of α-methyl-mannose (MeMan) to a mixed solution of each glycopeptide with ConA resulted in a decrease in FP values. These results confirm that the previous increase in FP values observed was caused by ConA binding to Man on MPOG10 or MGPP10. The binding affinity of MPOG10 was higher than that of MGPP10, and the dissociation constant of MPOG10 to ConA was 1.9 × 10(-5) (mol/L). The observed binding of MPOG10 to ConA at 25 °C was reduced at higher temperature (50 °C). Therefore, the enhanced binding affinity of MPOG10 to ConA could be accounted for by formation of a clustered Man moiety triggered by the formation of a more stable triple helical structure of MPOG10 compared with MGPP10.

  15. Mannose-specific plant lectins from the Amaryllidaceae family qualify as efficient microbicides for prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Princen, Katrien; Aquaro, Stefano; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Egberink, Herman; Vanden Mooter, Guy; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Schols, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    The plant lectins derived from Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) selectively inhibited a wide variety of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 strains and clinical (CXCR4- and CCR5-using) isolates in different cell types. They also efficiently inhibited infection of T lymphocytes by a variety of mutant virus strains. GNA and HHA markedly prevented syncytium formation between persistently infected HUT-78/HIV cells and uninfected T lymphocytes. The plant lectins did not measurably affect the antiviral activity of other clinically approved anti-HIV drugs used in the clinic when combined with these drugs. Short exposure of the lectins to cell-free virus particles or persistently HIV-infected HUT-78 cells markedly decreased HIV infectivity and increased the protective (microbicidal) activity of the plant lectins. Flow cytometric analysis and monoclonal antibody binding studies and a PCR-based assay revealed that GNA and HHA do not interfere with CD4, CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN and do not specifically bind with the membrane of uninfected cells. Instead, GNA and HHA likely interrupt the virus entry process by interfering with the virus envelope glycoprotein. HHA and GNA are odorless, colorless, and tasteless, and they are not cytotoxic, antimetabolically active, or mitogenic to human primary T lymphocytes at concentrations that exceed their antivirally active concentrations by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. GNA and HHA proved stable at high temperature (50 degrees C) and low pH (5.0) for prolonged time periods and can be easily formulated in gel preparations for microbicidal use; they did not agglutinate human erythrocytes and were not toxic to mice when administered intravenously.

  16. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  17. Shigella flexneri transformants expressing type 1 (mannose-specific) fimbriae bind to, activate, and are killed by phagocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gbarah, A; Mirelman, D; Sansonetti, P J; Verdon, R; Bernhard, W; Sharon, N

    1993-01-01

    Shigella flexneri M90T (invasive) and BS176 (noninvasive) are typical nonfimbriated organisms that do not bind to or activate phagocytic cells. We demonstrate that S. flexneri M90Tp and BS176p, obtained by transformation of the strains named above with the cluster of genes encoding type 1 (mannose-specific) fimbriae of Escherichia coli, express the functional fimbriae, as shown by electron microscopy, by binding of antifimbria antibodies and by yeast cell aggregation. The transformants, but not the parental strains, bound to human granulocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages. This binding was inhibited by methyl alpha-D-mannoside but not by methyl alpha-D-galactoside. The bound bacteria induced oxidative burst activation and degranulation of the granulocytes in vitro. With mouse peritoneal macrophages, the binding of the fimbriated bacteria induced degranulation in vitro. Injection of the bacteria into mouse peritoneum also induced degranulation of the macrophages in vivo; no such effect was observed with the nonfimbriated strains. The bound fimbriated transformants were effectively killed by the human granulocytes in vitro in the absence of opsonins or after opsonization with human anti-S. flexneri antiserum. The nonfimbriated strains were killed only after opsonization. These results provide further evidence for the role of type 1 fimbriae in lectin-mediated nonopsonic phagocytosis. Images PMID:8097492

  18. Mutation of Tyr137 of the universal Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin FimH relaxes the tyrosine gate prior to mannose binding

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Said; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Roos, Goedele; Zalewski, Adam; Preston, Roland; Eid, Sameh; Zihlmann, Pascal; Prévost, Martine; Lensink, Marc F.; Thompson, Andrew; Ernst, Beat; Bouckaert, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The most prevalent diseases manifested by Escherichia coli are acute and recurrent bladder infections and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease. E. coli clinical isolates express the FimH adhesin, which consists of a mannose-specific lectin domain connected via a pilin domain to the tip of type 1 pili. Although the isolated FimH lectin domain has affinities in the nanomolar range for all high-mannosidic glycans, differentiation between these glycans is based on their capacity to form predominantly hydrophobic interactions within the tyrosine gate at the entrance to the binding pocket. In this study, novel crystal structures of tyrosine-gate mutants of FimH, ligand-free or in complex with heptyl α-d-O-mannopyranoside or 4-biphenyl α-d-O-mannopyranoside, are combined with quantum-mechanical calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations. In the Y48A FimH crystal structure, a large increase in the dynamics of the alkyl chain of heptyl α-d-O-mannopyranoside attempts to compensate for the absence of the aromatic ring; however, the highly energetic and stringent mannose-binding pocket of wild-type FimH is largely maintained. The Y137A mutation, on the other hand, is the most detrimental to FimH affinity and specificity: (i) in the absence of ligand the FimH C-terminal residue Thr158 intrudes into the mannose-binding pocket and (ii) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid interacts strongly with Glu50, Thr53 and Asn136, in spite of multiple dialysis and purification steps. Upon mutation, pre-ligand-binding relaxation of the backbone dihedral angles at position 137 in the tyrosine gate and their coupling to Tyr48 via the interiorly located Ile52 form the basis of the loss of affinity of the FimH adhesin in the Y137A mutant. PMID:28250938

  19. Anomer-Specific Recognition and Dynamics in a Fucose-Binding Lectin.

    PubMed

    Antonik, Paweł M; Volkov, Alexander N; Broder, Ursula N; Re, Daniele Lo; van Nuland, Nico A J; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-03-01

    Sugar binding by a cell surface ∼29 kDa lectin (RSL) from the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum was characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The complexes formed with four monosaccharides and four fucosides were studied. Complete resonance assignments and backbone dynamics were determined for RSL in the sugar-free form and when bound to l-fucose or d-mannose. RSL was found to interact with both the α- and the β-anomer of l-fucose and the "fucose like" sugars d-arabinose and l-galactose. Peak splitting was observed for some resonances of the binding site residues. The assignment of the split signals to the α- or β-anomer was confirmed by comparison with the spectra of RSL bound to methyl-α-l-fucoside or methyl-β-l-fucoside. The backbone dynamics of RSL were sensitive to the presence of ligand, with the protein adopting a more compact structure upon binding to l-fucose. Taking advantage of tryptophan residues in the binding sites, we show that the indole resonance is an excellent reporter on ligand binding. Each sugar resulted in a distinct signature of chemical shift perturbations, suggesting that tryptophan signals are a sufficient probe of sugar binding.

  20. Binding specificity of mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding protein from the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Molina, R; Fresno, M

    2001-09-01

    The sugar binding specificity of the recently described mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBP) isolated to homogeneity from both the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi has been studied by quantitative hapten inhibition of the biotinylated CBPs to immobilized thyroglobulin using model oligosaccharides. The results clearly show a differential specificity toward high-mannose glycans between the CBPs from the two developmental stages. Thus, the isolated CBP from epimastigotes exhibited stronger affinity for higher mannose oligomers containing the Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-6Manalpha1-6 structure. Its affinity decreased, as did the number of mannose residues on the oligomer or removal of the terminal Manalpha1-2-linked mannose. By contrast the CBP isolated from the trypomastigote stage showed about 400-fold lower avidity than the epimastigote form, and contrary to it, it was slightly more specific toward Man5GlcNAc than Man9GlcNAc. Analysis of the interaction of epimastigote-Man-CBP with its ligands by UV difference spectroscopy indicates the existence of an extended binding site in that protein with a large enthalpic contribution to the binding. The thermodynamic parameters of binding were obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry and been found that the DeltaH values to be in good agreement with the van't Hoff values. The binding reactions are mainly enthalpically driven and exhibit enthalpy-enthropy compensation. In addition, analysis of the high-mannose glycans from different parts of the digestive tract of the reduviid insect vector of T. cruzi suggest a role of the CBP in the retention of the epimastigote stage in the anterior portion of the gut.

  1. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia.

  2. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  3. Lectin Binding to Radopholus citrophilus and R. similis Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Gottwald, T R

    1992-06-01

    Lectin-binding glycoproteins in seven populations of two burrowing nematode sibling species were probed with five different biotinylated lectins on Western blots, and differences were correlated with nematode ability to parasitize citrus and to overcome citrus rootstock resistance. Banding patterns of molecular weight standards were fit best by an exponential decay function, and a predictive equation was used to estimate molecular weights (r(2) = 0.999). A band (131 kDa) that labeled with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) occurred in extracts from cuticles and egg shells of populations of Radopholus citrophilus that parasitize citrus. Wheat germ agglutin labeled a band (58 kDa) in aqueous homogenates of populations that reproduce in roots of citrus rootstock normally resistant to burrowing nematodes. The two sibling species R. citrophilus and R. similis were distinguished by a high molecular weight Con A-labeled band (608 kDa) from cuticle and egg shells. Probing blots with the lectin Limulus polyphemus agglutinin indicated that each population contained a band (12-16 kDa) specifically inhibited by the addition of 25 mM neuraminic acid, suggesting that glycoproteins with sialic acid moieties are present in burrowing nematodes.

  4. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  5. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS.

  6. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins.

    PubMed

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells.

  7. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells. PMID:27711121

  8. Pradimicin A, a D-mannose-binding antibiotic, binds pyranosides of L-fucose and L-galactose in a calcium-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yu; Watanabe, Yasunori; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige; Ojika, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    Pradimicin A (PRM-A) is a unique antibiotic with a lectin-like ability to bind D-mannose (D-Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ion. Although accumulated evidences suggest that PRM-A recognizes the 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxyl groups of D-Man, BMY-28864, an artificial PRM-A derivative, was shown not to bind L-fucose (L-Fuc) and L-galactose (lLGal), both of which share the characteristic array of the three hydroxyl groups with D-Man. To obtain a plausible explanation for this inconsistency, we performed co-precipitation experiments of PRM-A with L-Fuc, L-Gal, and their methyl pyranosides (L-Fuc-OMe, L-Gal-OMe) by taking advantage of aggregate-forming propensity of the binary [PRM-A/Ca(2+)] complex. While L-Fuc and L-Gal were hardly incorporated into the aggregate, L-Fuc-OMe and L-Gal-OMe were found to exhibit significant binding to PRM-A. However, increased Ca(2+) concentration abolished this binding, raising the possibility that poor binding of L-Fuc and L-Gal to PRM-A is attributed to their chelation with Ca(2+) ion. This possibility was partly supported by (1)H NMR analysis that detected interaction of L-Fuc and L-Gal with Ca(2+) ion in aqueous solution. These results collectively indicate that PRM-A binds pyranosides of L-Fuc and L-Gal when Ca(2+) concentration is not excessive to trap these sugars by chelation but sufficient to form the [PRM-A/Ca(2+)] complex.

  9. Histochemical characterization of the lectin-binding sites in the equine vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-young; Kang, Tae-young; Lee, Yong-duk; Shin, Tae-kyun

    2003-04-01

    The binding specificities of various lectins, such as the Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), and the Bandeiraea simplicifolia BS-1 (Isolectin B4), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) lectins, were studied in the vomeronasal organ of the horse. The microvilli of the vomeronasal sensory epithelium were positive for DBA, SBA, Isolectin B4, WGA, PNA, and UEA-I. The receptor cells showed intense reactivity for DBA and WGA. Lectins were not detected in the supporting cells or basal cells. The Jacobson's glands were positive for WGA and UEA-I, but lectins were absent from the nerve bundles. From these results, we postulate that several lectin-binding carbohydrates on the microvilli and neurosensory cells are associated with chemoreception in the horse. In addition, the differential lectin-binding patterns in the horse suggest that the carbohydrates present in this particular sense organ are species-specific.

  10. Altered binding of Ulex europaeus I lectin to psoriatic epidermis.

    PubMed

    Kariniemi, A L; Holthöfer, H; Miettinen, A; Virtanen, I

    1983-11-01

    We have used Ulex europaeus I (UEA I) lectin, specific for alpha-L-fucose-containing glycoconjugates, in fluorescence microscopy to stain cryostat sections of human skin from normal persons and patients with psoriasis and lichen simplex. In normal skin the upper layers of the stratum spinosum and the stratum granulosum were strongly reactive with UEA I, whereas the lower layers of the epidermis did not react. The staining intensity of the upper epidermis was similar to that of the endothelium of dermal blood vessels. Biopsies of the lesional skin of lichen simplex showed an intense UEA I-specific staining throughout the whole epidermis, similar in intensity to that seen in the upper epidermis of normal skin. In psoriatic lesions positive UEA I-specific fluorescence was seen throughout the whole epidermis, but the fluorescence was more faint and often granular. In uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients the whole epidermis showed a diffuse UEA I-specific fluorescence, differing in this respect from normal skin. In normal skin UEA I binds to epidermal cells which are at a certain state of differentiation. The results with psoriatic epidermis confirm that both uninvolved and lesional epidermis have a defect in epidermal maturation, as shown by the altered binding of UEA I lectin.

  11. Characterization of Caenorhabditis Elegans Lectin-Binding Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Link, C. D.; Silverman, M. A.; Breen, M.; Watt, K. E.; Dames, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have identified 45 mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans that show ectopic surface binding of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA). These mutations are all recessive and define six genes: srf-2, srf-3, srf-4, srf-5, srf-8 and srf-9. Mutations in these genes fall into two phenotypic classes: srf-2, -3, -5 mutants are grossly wild-type, except for their lectin-binding phenotype; srf-4, -8, -9 mutants have a suite of defects, including uncoordinated movement, abnormal egg laying, and defective copulatory bursae morphogenesis. Characterization of these pleiotropic mutants at the cellular level reveals defects in the migration of the gonadal distal tip cell and in axon morphology. Unexpectedly, the pleiotropic mutations also interact with mutations in the lin-12 gene, which encodes a putative cell surface receptor involved in the control of cell fate. We propose that the underlying defect in the pleiotropic mutations may be in the general processing or secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:1516818

  12. Roles for mannose binding lectin and rhamnose binding lectin in channel catfish fed essential oils and challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in the catfish farming industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri. Methods to control this disease include vaccination, antibiotic therapy, and restricted feeding. Another method that has been examined i...

  13. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  14. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  15. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif

    PubMed Central

    Alenton, Rod Russel R.; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation. PMID:28374848

  16. Isolation of two novel mannan- and L-fucose-binding lectins from the green alga Enteromorpha prolifera: biochemical characterization of EPL-2.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Sanz, Libia; Sánchez, Eduardo I; Wolfenstein-Todel, Carlota; Calvete, Juan J

    2003-07-15

    EPL-1 and EPL-2 represent lectins isolated from the green alga Enteromorpha prolifera. Both lectins are 20- to 22-kDa single-chain, nonglycosylated proteins. N-terminal sequence analysis of peptides representing over 70% of their primary structures shows that EPL-1 and EPL-2 represent novel proteins. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium experiments showed that EPL-1 and EPL-2 had average apparent molecular masses of 60000+/-6000 Da (EPL-1) and 59500+/-3000 Da (EPL-2), indicating that EPL-1 and EPL-2 have a tendency to self-associate into higher order aggregates, possibly homodimers and homotetramers, in equilibrium. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of EPL-2 was studied by enzyme-linked lectin assay and intrinsic fluorescence measurements. The results show that the combining site of EPL-2 is capable of accommodating both D-mannose and L-fucose, which share the conformation of the hydroxyl groups at positions 2 (axial) and 4 (equatorial), and includes subsites for the substituents at O1 and for branched mannose residues.

  17. The bovine mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. The role of arginine residues in mannose 6-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Dahms, N M; Rose, P A; Molkentin, J D; Zhang, Y; Brzycki, M A

    1993-03-15

    The extracytoplasmic region of the bovine cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF-II receptor) consists of 15 homologous repeating domains, each of which is approximately 147 residues in length. The receptor contains two high affinity mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites and our recent studies (Westlund, B., Dahms, N. M., and Kornfeld, S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 23233-23239) have localized these two binding sites to domains 1-3 and 7-11. To further define the location of the Man-6-P binding sites and to determine the role of specific arginine residues in Man-6-P binding, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create truncated soluble forms of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in conjunction with either conservative (Lys) or nonconservative (Ala) replacement of arginine residues. These mutants were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells and assayed for their ability to bind phosphomannosyl residues by affinity chromatography. Analysis of the ligand binding activity of carboxyl-terminal truncated forms of the receptor's extracytoplasmic region demonstrated that the second Man-6-P binding site is contained within domains 7-9. Substitution of Arg435 in domain 3 of the amino-terminal binding site and Arg1334 in domain 9 of the second binding site results in a dramatic loss of ligand binding activity. However, substitutions at positions 435 and/or 1334 did not affect the secretion, glycosylation, or immunoreactivity of these truncated proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Arg435 and Arg1334 are essential components of the M6P/IGF-II receptor's high affinity Man-6-P binding sites.

  18. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  19. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins.

  20. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of carbohydrate binding to the basic lectin from winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus).

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-03-05

    A basic lectin (pI approximately 10.0) was purified to homogeneity from the seeds of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) by affinity chromatography on Sepharose 6-aminocaproyl-D-galactosamine. The lectin agglutinated trypsinized rabbit erythrocytes and had a relative molecular mass of 58,000 consisting of two subunits of Mr 29,000. The lectin binds to N-dansylgalactosamine, leading to a 15-fold increase in dansyl fluorescence with a concomitant 25-nm blue shift in the emission maximum. The lectin has two binding sites/dimer for this sugar and an association constant of 4.17 X 10(5) M-1 at 25 degrees C. The strong binding to N-dansylgalactosamine is due to a relatively positive entropic contribution as revealed by the thermodynamic parameters: delta H = -33.62 kJ mol-1 and delta S0 = -5.24 J mol-1 K-1. Binding of this sugar to the lectin shows that it can accommodate a large hydrophobic substituent on the C-2 carbon of D-galactose. Studies with other sugars indicate that a hydrophobic substituent in alpha-conformation at the anomeric position increases the affinity of binding. The C-4 and C-6 hydroxyl groups are critical for sugar binding to this lectin. Lectin difference absorption spectra in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine indicate perturbation of tryptophan residues on sugar binding. The results of stopped flow kinetics with N-dansylgalactosamine and the lectin are consistent with a simple one-step mechanism for which k+1 = 1.33 X 10(4) M-1 s-1 and k-1 = 3.2 X 10(-2) s-1 at 25 degrees C. This k-1 is slower than any reported for a lectin-monosaccharide complex so far. The activation parameters indicate an enthalpically controlled association process.

  2. Assessment of weak sugar-binding ability using lectin tetramer and membrane-based glycans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To consider biological significance of glycosylation of proteins, it is necessary to evaluate the importance of sugar-recognition processes mediated by lectins. Though the interaction between sugars and proteins, especially animal lectins, is quite weak with K d approximately 10(-4) M, cellular and molecular recognitions mediated via sugar-protein interaction increase their avidity by 1-3 orders of magnitude by the self-association of both receptors and their ligands on cell surfaces. To assess the weak interaction between lectins and their sugar ligands, we established lectin tetramer binding to cell surface glycans using flow cytometry. This strategy is highly sensitive, and useful to determine whether or not a putative lectin domain may have sugar-binding ability.

  3. Binding of live conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus activates in vitro-generated human Langerhans cells via a lectin of galactomannan specificity

    PubMed Central

    PERSAT, F; NOIREY, N; DIANA, J; GARIAZZO, M-J; SCHMITT, D; PICOT, S; VINCENT, C

    2003-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common aetiological fungus responsible for human pulmonary aspergilloses. This study investigated the primary contact between Langerhans cells (LC), corresponding to dendritic cells present in pulmonary mucosa and live conidia of A. fumigatus. LC play a key role in antigen presentation for initiation of the primary T cell response. In vitro-generated LC (iLC) were differentiated from cultured human cord blood CD34+ cells and incubated at 4°C or 37°C with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-stained conidia or control latex beads. In vitro, conidia were shown by microscopy and cytometry to adhere to iLC in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This adhesion was not limited to iLC because interstitial dendritic and other cells also fluoresced in the presence of conidia-FITC. A lectin other than mannose receptor-type lectin was demonstrated to be responsible of conidial binding. Inhibition of binding was observed with heterologous galactomannan and EDTA, indicating a C-lectin-like receptor with galactomannan structure specificity. After binding only a few conidia were internalized in acidic vesicles, as indicated by the cessation of conidial fluorescence. Conidial binding was followed by activation and maturation of iLC, suggesting that LC present in the lung may play a role in cellular host defence against aspergilloses. PMID:12930363

  4. Receptor mobility and the binding of cells to lectin-coated fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ability of cells to bind to nylon fibers coated with lectin molecules interspaced with varying numbers of albumin molecules has been analyzed. The cells used were lymphoma cells, normal lymphocytes, myeloid leukemia cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, and the fibers were coated with different densities of concanavalin A or the lectins from soybean or wheat germ. Cells fixed with glutaraldehyde did not bind to lectin-coated fibers. The number of cells bound to fibers could be increased by increasing the density of lectin molecules on the fiber, the density of specific receptors on the cell, or the mobility of the receptors. It is suggested that binding of cells to fibers involves alignment and binding of specific cell surface receptors with lectin molecules immobilized on the fibers, and that this alignment requires short-range rapid lateral mobility (RLM) of the receptors. The titration of cell binding to fibers coated with different densities of lectin and albumin has been used to measure the relative RLM of unoccupied cell surface receptors for the lectin. The results indicate a relationship of RLM to lectin-induced cell-to-cell binding. The RLM or receptors for concanavalin A (Con A) was generally found to be higher than that of receptors for the lectins from wheat germ or soybean. Receptor RLM could be decreased by use of metabolic inhibitors or by lowering the temperature. Receptors for Con A had a lower RLM on normal fibroblasts than on SV40-transformed fibroblasts, and trypsinization of normal fibroblasts increased Con A receptor RLM. Normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and lines of myeloid leukemia cells that can be induced to differentiate had a high receptor RLM, whereas lines of myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate had a low receptor RLM. These results suggest that the RLM of Con A receptors is related to the transformation of fibroblasts and the ability of myeloid leukemia cells to undergo differentiation PMID

  5. Seasonal lectin binding variations of thumb pad in the frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2014-01-01

    The thumb pad is one of the most common secondary sexual characteristics in frogs. Although it is known that amphibian skin has affinity for several lectins, there is no report regarding lectin-binding affinity of the thumb pad or its structural components. This study investigated localization and seasonal variation of specific carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates in both the epidermal and dermal components of the frog thumb pad at the light microscopic level using lectin histochemistry. The study consisted of four seasonal groups of the frog species, Pelophylax ridibundus (Synonym of Rana ridibunda): active, prehibernating, hibernating and posthibernating. Four horseradish peroxidase conjugated lectins were employed. It was found that dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and ulex europaeus (UEAI) gave positive reactions in both epidermal layers and breeding glands. These three lectins bound specific secretory cells in the breeding glands, and the distribution of the cells and epithelial lectin reactions exhibited seasonal changes. In addition, UEA-I and peanut agglutinin (PNA) showed an affinity in granular glands and the granular zone of mixed glands. Generally, epidermal lectin binding showed dense affinity during the posthibernation period. DBA, UEA-I, and WGA-specific cells in the mucous gland decreased gradually until the posthibernation period. These findings suggest that differences of lectin binding in the thumb pad may be related to functional activities and, thus, seasonal adaptations. Moreover, the presence of specific lectin-binding cells in the breeding glands indicated that they consisted of heterogeneous secretory cell composition or that the cells were at different secretory stages.

  6. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties.

  7. Is mannan-binding lectin (MBL) detectable on monocytes and monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shirley L; Downing, Ian; Turner, Marc; Kilpatrick, David C

    2008-12-01

    MBL (mannan-binding lectin; also called mannose-binding lectin) is a circulating C-type lectin with a collagen-like region synthesized mainly by the liver. MBL may influence susceptibility to infection in recipients of stem cell transplants, and it has even been suggested that the MBL status of a donor can influence the recipient's susceptibility to post-transplant infections. We have previously reported that MBL can be detected on human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, based on detection using biotinylated anti-MBL, suggesting that those cells could synthesize MBL. If true, permanent MBL replacement therapy could be achieved by stem cell infusions. However, two other groups independently failed to find mbl-2-derived mRNA in monocytes. Therefore, to confirm or refute our previous observations, we used an alternative experimental strategy. Instead of using biotinylated antibody and labelled streptavidin, detection of surface MBL was attempted using MBL-specific primary antibodies (131-1, 131-10 and 131-11) followed by fluorescein-labelled anti-IgG, and controlled by the use of non-specific IgG as primary antibody. Monocytes were counterstained with anti-CD14-PE before FACS analysis. Adherent monocytes were also cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium or converted into immature dendritic cells by culture with IL-4 (interleukin-4) and GM-CSF (granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor). During FACS analysis, the dendritic cells were gated after counter-staining with anti-CD1a-PE. MBL was readily detected on the surface of fresh monocytes using all three specific anti-MBL monoclonal antibodies, but specific anti-MBL binding was greatly diminished after monocytes had been cultured for 2 days in serum-free medium. Moreover, we could not detect any MBL present on the surface of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. We therefore conclude that MBL is indeed present on the surface of fresh human monocytes. However, in view of the mRNA findings of others and our

  8. Preparation and biological properties of a melibiose binding lectin from Bauhinia variegata seeds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2008-11-26

    A dimeric 64-kDa melibiose-binding lectin was isolated from the seeds of Bauhinia variegata. The isolation procedure comprised affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on the first two chromatographic media. Its hemagglutinating activity was stable after 30-min exposure to temperatures up to 70 degrees C. Since lectins may demonstrate biological activities such as antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, antifungal, antiviral, and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities, the isolated lectin was tested for these activities. It was found that the lectin inhibited proliferation in hepatoma HepG2 cells and breast cancer MCF7 cells with an IC(50) of 1.4 microM and 0.18 microM, respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity was inhibited with an IC(50) of 1.02 microM. The lectin and concanavalin A (Con A) evoked maximal mitogenic response from mouse splenocytes at similar concentrations, but the maximal response to B. variegata lectin was only 1/5 of that induced by Con A in magnitude. B. variegata lectin was devoid of antifungal activity.

  9. Mechanisms of the insecticidal action of TEL (Talisia esculenta lectin) against Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; de Castro, Márcia Mota; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado

    2004-06-01

    Plant lectins have insecticidal activity that is probably mediated through their ability to bind carbohydrates. To examine the influence of sugars on the insecticidal activity of a lectin from Talisia esculenta seeds (TEL), the lectin was mixed with mannose, glucose, or mannose plus glucose. Mannose abolished the insecticidal activity. Affinity chromatography showed that TEL bound to midgut proteins of the insect Callosobruchus maculatus. Immunoblotting showed that TEL recognized some proteins, probably glycoproteins, present in the midgut membrane of this insect. The principal proteases responsible for digestive proteolysis in fourth instar larvae of C. maculatus were purified by chromatography on activated thiol-Sepharose. These purified proteases were unable to digest TEL after a 15-h incubation. These results suggest that the insecticidal activity of TEL involves a specific carbohydrate-lectin interaction with glycoconjugates on the surface of digestive tract epithelial cells, as well as binding to assimilatory glycoproteins present in midgut extracts and resistance to enzymatic digestion by cysteine proteinases.

  10. Metal ions in sugar binding, sugar specificity and structural stability of Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Joseph; Dileep, Kalarickal Vijayan; Palanimuthu, Muthusamy; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkotu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakath

    2013-08-01

    Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin (SPL) is a heterotetrameric lectin, with two α and two β monomers. In the crystal structure of SPL α monomer, two residues at positions 240 and 241 are missing. This region was modeled based on the positional and sequence similarities. The role of metal ions in SPL structure was analyzed by 10 ns molecular dynamics simulation. MD simulations were performed in the presence and absence of metal ions to explain the loss of haemagglutinating property of the lectin due to demetallization. Demetallized structure was found to deviate drastically at the metal binding loop region. Affinity of different sugars like N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc), D-galactose and lactose towards the native and demetallized protein was calculated by molecular docking studies. It was found that the sugar binding site got severely distorted in demetallized lectin. Consequently, sugar binding ability of lectin might be decreasing in the demetallized condition. Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis of the sugars in the presence of native and demetallized protein confirmed the in silico results. It was observed after molecular dynamics simulations, that significant structural deviations were not caused in the quaternary structure of demetallized lectin. It was confirmed that the structural changes modified the sugar binding ability, as well as sugar specificity of the present lectin. The role of metal ions in sugar binding is described based on the in silico studies and ITC analysis. A comprehensive analysis of the ITC data suggests that the sugar specificity of the metal bound lectin and the loss of sugar specificity due to metal chelation are not linear.

  11. Purification and some characteristics of a beta-galactoside binding soluble lectin from amphibian ovary.

    PubMed

    Fink de Cabutti, N E; Caron, M; Joubert, R; Elola, M T; Bladier, D; Herkovitz, J

    1987-11-02

    Soluble extracts of Bufo ovaries agglutinate sialidase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. Unlike other amphibian lectins this agglutination activity does not require the presence of calcium ions. It is specifically inhibited by D-galactose and its derivatives. Thiodi-D-galactoside is the most potent saccharide inhibitor followed by lactose and methyl-beta-D-galactoside, respectively. D-Fucose, D-glucose and D-mannose do not inhibit the activity at concentrations at or above 100 mM. The lectin has been purified 500-fold to apparent homogeneity from the ovaries by salt extraction and affinity chromatography on lactose-aminophenyl-agarose, with a yield of about 0.2%. The molecular mass determined by gel filtration under native conditions was 30 kDa; polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in SDS gave a molecular mass of 15 kDa, suggesting that the lectin is a dimer. The lectin has an isoelectric point of 40 and contains a high proportion of acidic amino acids.

  12. Purification, partial characterization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a mannose-specific lectin from Cymbosema roseum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Cavada, Benildo S.; Marinho, Emmanuel S.; Souza, Emmanuel P.; Benevides, Raquel G.; Delatorre, Plínio; Souza, Luis A. G.; Nascimento, Kyria S.; Sampaio, Alexandre H.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Rustiguel, Joane K. R.; Canduri, Fernanda; de Azevedo, Walter F.; Debray, Henri

    2006-01-01

    A lectin from Cymbosema roseum seeds (CRL) was purified, characterized and crystallized. The best crystals grew in a month and were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method using a precipitant solution consisting of 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.8, 8%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M proline at a constant temperature of 293 K. A data set was collected to 1.77 Å resolution at a synchrotron-radiation source. CRL crystals are orthorhombic, belonging to space group P212121. Crystallographic refinement and full amino-acid sequence determination are in progress. PMID:16511310

  13. Different bindings to lectin in human submandibular gland after enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Takai, Y; Noda, Y; Sumitomo, S; Sagara, S; Mori, M

    1986-01-01

    Lectin binding affinities were described in human submandibular gland (SMG) in the paraffin sections following alpha-amylase, sialidase, and trypsin digestions. Lectins in the present study were used Con A (Glc, Man binding lectins), PNA, and SBA(Gal, GalNAc), RCA-1(Gal), DBA(GalNAc), WGA(GlcNAc), and UEA-1(Fuc). Lectin stainings in serous and mucous acinar cells and ductal epithelia were reported to compare enzyme treated and nontreated sections. Amylase treatment showed increasing Con A staining in connective tissue fibers and no marked changes in SMG to lectin bindings. Sialidase digestion was characteristically intense in PNA and SBA bindings in SMG cells, and also enhanced staining to UEA-1 in serous and duct cells and to WGA in mucous and duct cells were noted. Trypsin digestion indicated a slight increase to Con A binding, and was relatively strong to UEA-1 in serous and duct cells and a little strong to WGA. The results suggested that SMG serous cells contain higher amounts of Gal, GalNAc, and Fuc residues; and mucous cells were also abundant in Gal, GalNAc, and GlcNAc residues.

  14. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  15. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications.

  16. Isolation, characterization, molecular cloning and molecular modelling of two lectins of different specificities from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, L M; Van Damme, E J; Barre, A; Allen, A K; Van Leuven, F; Reynolds, C D; Rouge, P; Peumans, W J

    1999-01-01

    Two lectins have been isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs. From their isolation by affinity chromatography, they are characterized as a mannose-binding lectin (SCAman) and a fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet). SCAman preferentially binds oligosaccharides with alpha(1,3)- and alpha(1,6)-linked mannopyranosides. It is a tetramer of four identical protomers of approx. 13 kDa containing 119 amino acid residues; it is not glycosylated. The fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet), which is not inhibited by any simple sugars, is also unglycosylated. It is a tetramer of four identical subunits of approx. 28 kDa containing 244 residues. Each 28 kDa subunit is composed of two 14 kDa domains. Both lectins have been cloned from a cDNA library and sequenced. X-ray crystallographic analysis and molecular modelling studies have demonstrated close relationships in sequence and structure between these lectins and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. A refined model of the molecular evolution of the monocot mannose-binding lectins is proposed. PMID:10229686

  17. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  18. High-Dose Mannose-Binding Lectin Therapy for Ebola Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Ezekowitz,1 Emmett V. Schmidt,5 and Gene G. Olinger2 1Programs of Developmental Immunology , Department of Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard...Maryland; 3Enzon Pharmaceuticals, Bridgewater, New Jersey; 4Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois...analogues to well over 40 drugs [13]. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus ( HCV ) epidemics particularly drove antiviral

  19. A putative carbohydrate-binding domain of the lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin has a similar amino acid sequence to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus anti-H(O) lectin.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1995-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin II (CSA-II) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSA-II with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSA-II with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid sequence of a putative carbohydrate-binding domain of CSA-II was found to be similar to those of several anti-H(O) leguminous lectins, especially to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I).

  20. Purification and characterization of a new dimeric mannose/glucose-binding isolectin from Vicia tetrasperma (L.) Schreber.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sanjenbam Kunjeshwori; Devi, Langoljam Inaotombi; Singh, Laishram Rupachandra

    2009-01-01

    A new mannose/glucose specific isolectin VTL-II has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from the seeds of Vicia tetrasperma (L.) Schreber through successive steps of (i) lectin extraction, (ii) ammonium sulfate fractionation (30-50%), and (iii) affinity chromatography on a column of Sephadex G-50 covalently coupled with D-mannose. The isolectin was found to be a dimeric protein of molecular weight 62 kDa made up of apparently chemically identical subunits unlike the tetrameric isolectins reported earlier from the same plant source. It was found to exhibit (i) 8-16 times higher specificity for rabbit RBC than human RBC, though it showed unspecificity with respect to the different human blood groups, (ii) non-dependence on divalent metal ion for its hemagglutinating activity, (iii) relatively broad pH optimum ranging from pH 7.0 to 8.0, and (iv) thermal inactivation behavior characterized by t(1/2) of 50 degrees C.

  1. Structural characterization of novel chitin-binding lectins from the genus Artocarpus and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Melissa B; Lopes, José L S; Soares-Costa, Andréa; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina; Moreira, Renato A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Beltramini, Leila M

    2006-01-01

    Two novel chitin-binding lectins from seeds of Artocarpus genus were described in this paper, one from A. integrifolia (jackfruit) and one from A. incisa (breadfruit). They were purified from saline crude extract of seeds using affinity chromatography on chitin column, size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography on the C-18 column. Both are 14 kDa proteins, made up of 3 chains linked by disulfide bonds. The partial amino acid sequences of the two lectins showed they are homologous to each other but not to other plant chitin-binding proteins. Thus, they cannot be classified in any known plant chitin-binding protein family, particularly because of their inter-chain covalent bonds. Their circular dichroism spectra and deconvolution showed a secondary structure content of beta-sheet and unordered elements. The lectins were thermally stable until 80 degrees C and structural changes were observed below pH 6. Both lectins inhibited the growth of Fusarium moniliforme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and presented hemagglutination activity against human and rabbit erythrocytes. These lectins were denoted jackin (from jackfruit) and frutackin (from breadfruit).

  2. Energetics of carbohydrate binding to Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) lectin: an isothermal titration calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil Ali Mohammed; Swamy, Musti J

    2005-05-01

    Physico-chemical and carbohydrate binding studies have been carried out on the Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) seed lectin (MCL). The lectin activity is maximal in the pH range 7.4-11.0, but decreases steeply below pH 7.0. The lectin activity is mostly unaffected in the temperature range 4-50 degrees C, but a sharp decrease is seen between 50 and 60 degrees C, which could be correlated to changes in the structure of the protein as seen by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies show that the tetrameric MCL binds two sugar molecules and the binding constants (Kb), determined at 288.15 K, for various saccharides were found to vary between 7.3 x 10(3) and 1.52 x 10(4)M(-1). The binding reactions for all the saccharides investigated were essentially enthalpy driven, with the binding enthalpies (DeltaHb) at 288.15 K being in the range of -50.99 and -43.39 kJ mol(-1), whereas the contribution to the binding reaction from the entropy of binding was negative, with values of binding entropy (DeltaSb) ranging between -99.2 and -72.0 J mol(-1)K(-1) at 288.15 K. Changes in heat capacity (DeltaCp) for the binding of disaccharides, lactose and lactulose, were significantly larger in magnitude than those obtained for the monosaccharides, methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, and methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside, and could be correlated reasonably well with the surface areas of these ligands. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for all the sugars studied, suggesting that water structure plays an important role in the overall binding reaction. CD spectroscopy indicates that carbohydrate binding does not lead to significant changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of MCL, suggesting that the carbohydrate binding sites on this lectin are mostly preformed.

  3. Rapid assays for lectin toxicity and binding changes that reflect altered glycosylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-06-03

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids, or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, as well as those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also generate spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed

  4. Optimizing the Multivalent Binding of the Bacterial Lectin LecA by Glycopeptide Dendrimers for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Benjamin

    2016-06-27

    Bacterial lectins are nonenzymatic sugar-binding proteins involved in the formation of biofilms and the onset of virulence. The weakness of individual sugar-lectin interactions is compensated by the potentially large number of simultaneous copies of such contacts, resulting in high overall sugar-lectin affinities and marked specificities. Therapeutic compounds functionalized with sugar residues can compete with the host glycans for binding to lectins only if they are able to take advantage of this multivalent binding mechanism. Glycopeptide dendrimers, featuring treelike topologies with sugar moieties at their leaves, have already shown great promise in this regard. However, optimizing the dendrimers' amino acid sequence is necessary to match the dynamics of the lectin active sites with that of the multivalent ligands. This work combines long-time-scale coarse-grained simulations of dendrimers and lectins with a reasoned exploration of the dendrimer sequence space in an attempt to suggest sequences that could maximize multivalent binding to the galactose-specific bacterial lectin LecA. These candidates are validated by simulations of mixed dendrimer/lectin solutions, and the effects of the dendrimers on lectin dynamics are discussed. This approach is an attractive first step in the conception of therapeutic compounds based on the dendrimer scaffold and contributes to the understanding of the various classes of multivalency that underpin the ubiquitous "sugar code".

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptors on PC12 cells: alteration of binding properties by lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The PC12 cell line displays cell surface receptors for both nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). It has been previously shown that the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) alters the properties of NGF receptors on these cells. We now report that preincubations with either WGA or concanavalin A (Con A) decrease the binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to PC12 cells by greater than 50%. The inhibition of binding occurred at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C and could be blocked or reversed by the addition of sugars which bind specifically to WGA or Con A. Scatchard analysis revealed that these lectins decreased binding primarily by lowering the affinity of the receptor and to a lesser extent by decreasing receptor number. Succinylation of Con A (sCon A) produced a derivative that was less effective than the native lectin in decreasing EGF binding; however, addition of an antibody against Con A restored the ability of sCon A to decrease binding. Similar to results obtained with /sup 125/I-NGF binding, WGA but not Con A was found to increase, by severalfold, the proportion of /sup 125/I-EGF binding that is resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 detergent. A potential association of the EGF receptor with cytoskeletal elements is discussed which could account for such results.

  6. Epithelial repair is inhibited by an alpha(1,6)-fucose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Adam, Elizabeth C; Holgate, Stephen T; Lackie, Peter M

    2007-02-01

    The effective repair of damage to the airway epithelium is essential to maintain the ability to exclude airborne particulates and protect against potential pathogens. Carbohydrates on the cell surface have an important role in cell-cell and cell substrate interactions. Using a model of repair with airway epithelial-derived cells of the 16HBE 14o(-) cell line, we have examined the effect of the Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), which binds very selectively to alpha(1,6)-linked fucose residues. Addition of unconjugated or FITC-labeled AAL reduced the rate of epithelial repair to approximately one-third of control values as measured by image analysis while cell viability was maintained. Pulse labeling with AAL-FITC for 30 min followed by incubation in AAL-free medium caused similar inhibition of repair but could be reversed by addition of fucose up to 7 h after AAL removal. By confocal microscopy, AAL binding was found to be on the apical, but not basolateral, surfaces of cells, and internalization of the labeled lectin was seen. Preincubation of the lectin with fucose prevented this effect. Ulex europeaus I lectin, which is also fucose specific, resulted in similar binding to the cells and internalization, but it did not affect the speed of the repair process. We conclude that alpha(1,6)-fucose binding sites play an important role in epithelial repair. Better understanding of this process will provide a deeper insight into the crucial mechanisms of epithelial repair.

  7. Lectin binding patterns in hyperplastic and metaplastic bullock prostate tissues after diethylstilbestrol administration.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P E; Barbeito, C G; Portiansky, E L; Gimeno, E J

    2004-03-06

    Hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the prostatic epithelium are conditions induced by oestrogens. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been banned from cattle used for beef production because of the health risks. The potential use of molecular markers for the detection of illegal oestrogen administration was evaluated by taking samples of prostatic tissue from control bullocks, bullocks which had been treated with oestrogens, and bullocks sacrificed 21 and 90 days after a single dose of DES. The expression of the glycoconjugates was examined by lectinhistochemistry and the lectin binding pattern was characterised in epithelium and connective tissue. In the animals sacrificed after 21 days there was an increase in the binding of one lectin (JAC) and there was an increase in the binding of one of the other lectins (DBA) in the animals sacrificed after 90 days. An increase in SWGA lectin staining was observed in the bullocks that had probably been treated with oestrogen and in the animals sacrificed 90 days after the inoculation with DES. There were also differences between the binding of SWGA in the control bullocks and the other groups.

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of porphyrin binding to Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) lectin.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil A M; Maiya, Bhaskar G; Swamy, Musti J

    2004-08-01

    Owing to the use of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of malignant tumors, and the preferential interaction of lectins with tumor cells, studies on lectin-porphyrin interaction are of significant interest. In this study, the interaction of several free-base and metalloporphyrins with Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) lectin (MCL) was investigated by absorption spectroscopy. Difference absorption spectra revealed that significant changes occur in the Soret band region of the porphyrins on binding to MCL. These changes were monitored to obtain association constants (Ka) and stoichiometry of binding. The tetrameric MCL binds four porphyrin molecules, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, lactose. In addition, the agglutination activity of MCL was unaffected by the presence of the porphyrins used in this study, clearly indicating that porphyrin and carbohydrate ligands bind at different sites. Both cationic and anionic porphyrins bind to the lectin with comparable affinity (Ka =10(3)-10(5) m(-1)). The thermodynamic parameters associated with the interaction of several porphyrins, obtained from the temperature dependence of the Ka values, were found to be in the range: DeltaH degrees = -98.1 to -54.4 kJ.mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees =-243.9 to -90.8 J.mol(-1).K(-1). These results indicate that porphyrin binding to MCL is governed by enthalpic forces and that the contribution from binding entropy is negative. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed in the interaction of different porphyrins with MCL, underscoring the role of water structure in the overall binding process. Analysis of CD spectra of MCL indicates that this protein contains about 13%alpha-helix, 36%beta-sheet, 21%beta-turn, and the rest unordered structures. Binding of porphyrins does not significantly alter the secondary and tertiary structures of MCL.

  9. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  10. Characterization and sugar-binding properties of arcelin-1, an insecticidal lectin-like protein isolated from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. RAZ-2) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, C; Causse, H; Mourey, L; Koninkx, J; Rivière, M; Hendriks, H; Puzo, G; Samama, J P; Rougé, P

    1998-01-01

    Arcelin-1 is a lectin-like protein found in the seeds of wild varieties of the kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). This protein displays insecticidal properties, but the mechanism of action is as yet unknown. In the present study we investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of arcelin-1 from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. RAZ-2. Native arcelin-1 is a dimeric glycoprotein of 60 kDa, built from the non-covalent association of two identical monomers. This dimer resists dissociation by chaotropic agents and is highly resistant to proteolytic enzymes. Each subunit contains 10% (w/w) neutral sugars which belong to the high-mannose and complex-type glycans attached to three glycosylation sites. No interaction of the protein with simple sugars could be detected, but arcelin-1 displays an intrinsic specificity in binding complex glycans. Arcelin-1 therefore differs from the closely related phytohaemagglutinin lectins and alpha-amylase inhibitor in several respects: oligomerization states, sugar-binding affinities and the type and number of glycan chains. These features may be related to the toxicity of arcelin-1. PMID:9445382

  11. Organogel-assisted topochemical synthesis of multivalent glyco-polymer for high-affinity lectin binding.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Baiju P; Raghu, Sreedevi; Mukherjee, Somnath; Sureshan, Kana M

    2016-12-01

    An organogelator, 2,4-undeca-diynyl-4',6'-O-benzylidene-β-d-galactopyranoside, which aligns its diacetylene upon gelation, has been synthesized. UV irradiation of its gel resulted in topochemical polymerization of the gelator forming polydiacetylene (PDA). We have used this gel-state reaction for the synthesis of surface-immobilized multi-valent glycoclusters, which showed 1000-fold enhanced binding, compared to monomers, with various galactose-binding lectins.

  12. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  13. Hemagglutinating activity and conformation of a lactose-binding lectin from mushroom Agrocybe cylindracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhao, Xi; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Li, Ling-Rui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhong, Shao-Dong; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2008-03-01

    A lactose-binding lectin (Agrocybe cylindracea Lectin, ACL) purified from fruiting bodies of the mushroom A. cylindracea was investigated to determine the hemagglutinating activity and conformation changes after chemical modification, removal of metal ion and treatment at different temperatures and pH. ACL agglutinated both rabbit and human erythrocytes and its hemagglutinating activity could be inhibited by lactose. This lectin was stable in the pH range of 6-9 and temperature up to 60 degrees C. Fluorescence quenching and modification of tryptophan residues indicated that there were about two tryptophan residues in ACL molecule and one of them might be located on the surface, while the other was buried in the hydrophobic shallow groove near the surface. Chemical modification of serine/threonine and histidine showed that the partial necessity of these residues for the hemagglutinating activity of ACL. However, modifications of arginine, tyrosine and cysteine residues had no effect on its agglutinating activity.

  14. Mannose reduces hyaluronan and leukocytes in wound granulation tissue and inhibits migration and hyaluronan-dependent monocyte binding.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Tiina A; Kuokkanen, Jukka; Kärnä, Riikka; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna; Rilla, Kirsi; Kössi, Jyrki; Laato, Matti; Tammi, Raija H; Tammi, Markku I

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a highly regulated process starting from coagulation and ending in tissue remodeling. The end result varies from perfectly restored tissue, such as in early fetal skin, to scars in adults. The balanced repair process is frequently disturbed by local or systemic factors, like infections and diabetes. A rapid increase of hyaluronan is an inherent feature of wounds and is associated with tissue swelling, epithelial and mesenchymal cell migration and proliferation, and induction of cytokine signaling. Hyaluronan extending from cell surface into structures called cables can trap leukocytes and platelets and change their functions. All these features of hyaluronan modulate inflammation. The present data show that mannose, a recently described inhibitor of hyaluronan synthesis, inhibits dermal fibroblast invasion and prevents the enhanced leukocyte binding to hyaluronan that takes place in cells treated with an inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β. Mannose also reduced hyaluronan in subcutaneous sponge granulation tissue, a model of skin wound, and suppressed its leukocyte recruitment and tissue growth. Mannose thus seems to suppress wounding-induced inflammation in skin by attenuating hyaluronan synthesis.

  15. Impact of Mannose-Binding Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Omani Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Mathew; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Bashir, Wafa; Al Ambusaidi, Rahma; Misquith, Rhea; Wali, Yasser; Pathare, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to study mannose-binding protein (MBP) polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate it with associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC) episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O) and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q) of the MBL2 gene, in SCD patients as an increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (healthy voluntary blood donors). Results In SCD patients, the frequency of the genotype related to the high production of MBL was 0.35 (YA/YA) and for intermediate/low production was 0.65 (YA/XA, XA/XA, YA/YO, XA/YO, YO/YO). The observed frequencies of MBL2 gene promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X) were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X) respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O) genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 gene polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without VOC attacks (p=0.16; OR −0.486; CI=0.177 −1.33), however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR −3.55; CI 1.25–10.04). Conclusions Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05). However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. PMID:26977272

  16. Binding and cytotoxicity of Ricinus communis lectins to HeLa cells, Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Aizono, Y; Funatsu, G

    1984-08-01

    The binding of Ricinus communis lectins to HeLa cells, Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells and human erythrocytes was studied in detail. Scatchard plots of binding of 125I-lectins to these cells gave biphasic lines except for HeLa cells at 0 degree C. The association constants of lectins for the three cell types at 37 degrees C were lower than those at 0 degree C. The numbers of total binding sites were estimated to be 7 to 16 X 10(7) per HeLa cell, 3 to 4 X 10(7) per Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cell and 0.4 to 1 X 10(6) per erythrocyte. A fraction, 16 to 27% of the total amount of cell-bound lectin at 37 degrees C, appeared to be bound irreversibly as judged by non-removal on washing with 0.1 M lactose, whereas no lectin was irreversibly bound at 0 degree C. In the case of erythrocytes, no lectin became irreversibly bound even at 37 degrees C. The toxicity of lectins on HeLa cells and Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells was investigated. The toxicity of ricin D was 50 times for Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells and 140 times for HeLa cells as much as that for castor bean hemagglutinin. As to the sensitivities of both cell types to these lectins, it became apparent that Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells were more susceptible than HeLa cells.

  17. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  18. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mikeska, Ruth; Arni, Raghuvir; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  19. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olejnik, Beata; Jarząb, Anna; Kratz, Ewa M.; Zimmer, Mariusz; Gamian, Andrzej; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate–protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers. PMID:26147424

  20. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  1. Identification of structural and secretory lectin-binding glycoproteins of normal and cancerous human prostate.

    PubMed

    Lad, P M; Cooper, J F; Learn, D B; Olson, C V

    1984-12-07

    We have utilized the technique of lectin-loading of SDS gels with iodinated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin to identify glycoproteins in prostatic and seminal fluids as well as in prostate tissue fractions. The following subunits which bound both lectins were detected: (a) 50, 43 and 38 kDa subunits common to prostatic and seminal fluids, and an additional 55 kDa subunit which predominates only in prostatic fluid; (b) 78, 55, 50 and 43 kDa subunits in prostatic tissue cytosol and (c) 195, 170, 135, 116 and 95 kDa subunits present in the particulate fractions of prostatic tissue. Immunoblotting using specific rabbit antibodies revealed the 50 kDa band to be prostatic acid phosphatase and the 38 kDa band to be prostate-specific antigen. Interestingly, antibodies directed toward prostatic acid phosphatase were found to cross-react with the 43 kDa band. Fractionation on sucrose gradients showed that several of these particulate glycoproteins were associated with a vesicle fraction enriched in adenylate cyclase activity, implying that they are plasma membrane glycoproteins. Comparison of soluble and particulate fractions of normal and cancerous tissue homogenates was made by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms of lectin-loaded gels. Similar relative intensities of lectin-binding were obtained for corresponding proteins in normal and cancerous tissue fractions. Also, immunoblotting showed no differences in prostatic acid phosphatase or prostate-specific antigen between normal and cancerous soluble homogenate fractions. Our results suggest that major lectin-binding proteins are conserved in the transition from normal to cancerous tissue. These results may be useful in developing a multiple-marker profile of metastatic prostate cancer and for the design of imaging agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, to prominent soluble and particulate prostate glycoproteins.

  2. Molecular cloning of a lectin cDNA from Alocasia macrorrhiza and prediction of its characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Ran; Wang, Jie; Huang, Bing-Qiu; Hou, Xue-Wen

    2006-12-01

    The cDNA of Alocasia macrorrhiza lectin (aml, GenBank accession number: DQ340864) was cloned by RACE-PCR and its characteristics were predicted by various bioinformatics tools. GSPs (Gene Specific Primers) were designed according to the conserved regions of the genes encoded for lectins and similar proteins from the same family Araceae. Total RNAs were extracted from the tubers of A macrorrhiza by Qiagen RNeasy mini kit. The 3'- and 5'-RACE-PCRs were performed with the isolated total RNAs by SMART(TM)RACE cDNA amplification kit from BD Biosciences Clontech Company, respectively. The purified PCR products were ligated with pMD 18-T vector, and the confirmed clones were sequenced. The full-length cDNA of aml was obtained by combination of 3'- and 5'-end sequences, and was then confirmed by full-length 3'-RACE-PCR. The aml cDNA is 1 124 bp long. The deduced amino acid length of AML lectin is 270 aa. Its relative molecular weight is 29.7 kD. The results of homologous analysis showed a high similarity between AML and other mannose-binding lectins and similar proteins from Araceae family. Two typical B-lectin domains and three mannose- binding motifs were found in the sequence of AML. With all these taken together, it can be concluded that this newly cloned aml cDNA encodes for a mannose-binding lectin.

  3. Developmental changes affecting lectin binding in the vomeronasal organ of domestic pigs, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Park, Junwoo; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Chanwoo; Kim, Hwangryong; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Shin, Taekyun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the developmental changes of glycoconjugate patterns in the porcine vomeronasal organs (VNOs) and associated glands (Jacobson's glands) from prenatal (9 weeks of gestation) and postnatal (2 days after birth) to the sexually mature stage (6 months old). The VNO of pigs (Sus scrofa) was examined using the following: Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin isolectin B4 (BSI-B4), Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). At the fetal stage, all lectins examined were detected mainly in the free border of the vomeronasal epithelium, but few (WGA and UEA-I) and or absent in the VNO cell bodies. At the postnatal and sexually mature stages, the reactivity of some lectins, including WGA, UEA-I, DBA and SBA, were shown to increase in the VNO sensory epithelium as well as the free border. The increased reactivity of lectins as development progressed was also observed in Jacobson's gland acini. These findings suggest that binding sites of lectins, including those of WGA, UEA-I, DBA, and SBA, increase during development from fetal to postnatal growth, possibly contributing to the increased ability of chemoreception in the pig.

  4. Galactose-binding lectins as markers of pregnancy-related glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Horvat, B

    1993-01-01

    Protein extracts from pregnant mouse endometria were compared with those obtained from non-pregnant and pseudopregnant mice to detect early pregnancy-specific galactose-rich glycoproteins. Gradient gel electrophoresis combined with lectin overlay and lectin histochemistry were used to identify Ricinus communis I (RCA-I), R. communis II (RCA-II) and Cytisus scoparius (CSA) lectin binding glycoproteins. Using this approach, galactose-rich glycoproteins were identified that were maximally expressed in the estrus phase of non-pregnant endometria and also those that had peak expression in pregnancy. Lectin histochemistry revealed pregnancy related changes in three portions of mouse endometrium: endometrial glands, luminal epithelium and its basement membrane. Two major glycoproteins (RCA-I reactive 64 kDa and RCA-II reactive 35 kDa) were specifically expressed in peri-implantation endometrium on days 3 and 4 of pregnancy. The appearance of these glycoproteins during the period of the implantation window in mouse suggests that they could serve as markers of uterine receptivity to the implanting blastocyst.

  5. Fucose-binding lectin from opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia ambifaria binds to both plant and human oligosaccharidic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Audfray, Aymeric; Claudinon, Julie; Abounit, Saïda; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Larson, Göran; Smith, David F; Wimmerová, Michaela; Le Pendu, Jacques; Römer, Winfried; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2012-02-03

    Burkholderia ambifaria is generally associated with the rhizosphere of plants where it has biocontrol effects on other microorganisms. It is also a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related bacteria that cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients as well as in patients with granulomatous disease or cystic fibrosis. Our previous work indicated that fucose on human epithelia is a frequent target for lectins and adhesins of lung pathogens (Sulák, O., Cioci, G., Lameignère, E., Balloy, V., Round, A., Gutsche, I., Malinovská, L., Chignard, M., Kosma, P., Aubert, D. F., Marolda, C. L., Valvano, M. A., Wimmerová, M., and Imberty, A. (2011) PLoS Pathog. 7, e1002238). Analysis of the B. ambifaria genome identified BambL as a putative fucose-binding lectin. The 87-amino acid protein was produced recombinantly and demonstrated to bind to fucosylated oligosaccharides with a preference for αFuc1-2Gal epitopes. Crystal structures revealed that it associates as a trimer with two fucose-binding sites per monomer. The overall fold is a six-bladed β-propeller formed by oligomerization as in the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin and not by sequential domains like the fungal fucose lectin from Aleuria aurantia. The affinity of BambL for small fucosylated glycans is very high as demonstrated by microcalorimetry (K(D) < 1 μM). Plant cell wall oligosaccharides and human histo-blood group oligosaccharides H-type 2 and Lewis Y are bound with equivalent efficiency. Binding to artificial glycosphingolipid-containing vesicles, human saliva, and lung tissues confirmed that BambL could recognize a wide spectrum of fucosylated epitopes, albeit with a lower affinity for biological material from nonsecretor individuals.

  6. Fucose-binding Lectin from Opportunistic Pathogen Burkholderia ambifaria Binds to Both Plant and Human Oligosaccharidic Epitopes*

    PubMed Central

    Audfray, Aymeric; Claudinon, Julie; Abounit, Saïda; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Larson, Göran; Smith, David F.; Wimmerová, Michaela; Le Pendu, Jacques; Römer, Winfried; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia ambifaria is generally associated with the rhizosphere of plants where it has biocontrol effects on other microorganisms. It is also a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related bacteria that cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients as well as in patients with granulomatous disease or cystic fibrosis. Our previous work indicated that fucose on human epithelia is a frequent target for lectins and adhesins of lung pathogens (Sulák, O., Cioci, G., Lameignère, E., Balloy, V., Round, A., Gutsche, I., Malinovská, L., Chignard, M., Kosma, P., Aubert, D. F., Marolda, C. L., Valvano, M. A., Wimmerová, M., and Imberty, A. (2011) PLoS Pathog. 7, e1002238). Analysis of the B. ambifaria genome identified BambL as a putative fucose-binding lectin. The 87-amino acid protein was produced recombinantly and demonstrated to bind to fucosylated oligosaccharides with a preference for αFuc1–2Gal epitopes. Crystal structures revealed that it associates as a trimer with two fucose-binding sites per monomer. The overall fold is a six-bladed β-propeller formed by oligomerization as in the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin and not by sequential domains like the fungal fucose lectin from Aleuria aurantia. The affinity of BambL for small fucosylated glycans is very high as demonstrated by microcalorimetry (KD < 1 μm). Plant cell wall oligosaccharides and human histo-blood group oligosaccharides H-type 2 and Lewis Y are bound with equivalent efficiency. Binding to artificial glycosphingolipid-containing vesicles, human saliva, and lung tissues confirmed that BambL could recognize a wide spectrum of fucosylated epitopes, albeit with a lower affinity for biological material from nonsecretor individuals. PMID:22170069

  7. Binding of isolated plant lectin by rhizobia during episodes of reduced gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. L.; Green, P. D.; Wong, P. P.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Development of a legume root nodule is a complex process culminating in a plant/bacterial symbiosis possessing the capacity for biological dinitrogen fixation. Formation of root nodules is initiated by the binding and stabilization of rhizobia to plant root hairs, mediated in part by a receptor/ligand recognition system composed of lectins on the plant root surface and lectin-binding sites on the rhizobial cell surface. The dinitrogen fixation activity of these root nodules may be an important feature of enclosed, space-based life support systems, and may provide an ecological method to recycle nitrogen for amino acid production. However, the effects on nodule development of varied gravitational fields, or of root nutrient delivery hardware, remain unknown. We have investigated the effects of microgravity on root nodule formation, with preliminary experiments focused upon the receptor/ligand component. Microgravity, obtained during parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, has no apparent effect on the binding of purified lectin to rhizobia, a result that will facilitate forthcoming experiments using intact root tissues.

  8. Lectin binding to cutaneous malignant melanoma: HPA is associated with metastasis formation

    PubMed Central

    Thies, A; Moll, I; Berger, J; Schumacher, U

    2001-01-01

    Changes in protein glycosylation of tumour cells, as detected by lectin histochemistry, have been associated with metastasis formation in several human malignancies. This study analysed the association between lectin binding and metastasis in cutaneous malignant melanoma. In a 10-year retrospective study, sections of 100 primary cutaneous malignant melanomas were histochemically stained for the following 5 lectins: HPA, SNA-I, MAA, WGA and PHA-L, differing in their carbohydrate specificity. Since differences in the results of HPA binding depending on methodology have been reported, an indirect and a biotinylated method were employed for HPA. Kaplan–Meier analysis of time to first metastasis revealed a positive correlation between HPA binding and metastasis for both methods, with the biotinylated HPA method (P< 0.0001) being superior to the ‘indirect’ method (P = 0.0006). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that even after adjustment for stage, HPA positivity is an independent predictor for metastasis. The results of the present study indicate that N -acetyl-galactosamine/-glucosamine residues, recognized by HPA, are linked to metastasis in malignant melanoma. In contrast, β1-6 branched oligosaccharides or sialic acid residues, both of which were correlated with metastasis in other malignancies, are of no functional importance for metastasis formation in malignant melanoma. Thus, HPA proved to be a useful and independent prognostic marker for the metastatic phenotype of melanoma. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11259098

  9. Reduced binding and phagocytosis of Pneumocystis carinii by alveolar macrophages from persons infected with HIV-1 correlates with mannose receptor downregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Koziel, H; Eichbaum, Q; Kruskal, B A; Pinkston, P; Rogers, R A; Armstrong, M Y; Richards, F F; Rose, R M; Ezekowitz, R A

    1998-01-01

    The macrophage mannose receptor, a pattern recognition molecule and component of innate immunity, mediates binding and phagocytosis of Pneumocystis carinii and likely represents an important clearance mechanism in the lungs of immunocompetent hosts. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected individuals to bind and phagocytose P. carinii, and to investigate the role of the macrophage mannose receptor in mediating this interaction. Compared with healthy individuals, alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of P. carinii from HIV+ persons was reduced up to 74% (P = 0.02), primarily reflecting a reduction in the number of organisms associated with each macrophage (P = 0.019). Furthermore, macrophages from HIV+ individuals demonstrated up to an 80% (P < 0.05) reduction in mannose receptor surface expression and endocytosis. Mannose receptor affinity was unaltered, and mRNA levels were modestly reduced (P < 0.05). Cells from HIV+ individuals with CD4(+) counts < 200 cells/mm3 (representing individuals at high clinical risk for P. carinii pneumonia) demonstrated the lowest levels of P. carinii phagocytosis and mannose receptor endocytosis. In vitro HIV infection of alveolar macrophages from healthy individuals reduced mannose receptor endocytosis to 53.2% (P < 0.05) and P. carinii binding and phagocytosis to 67.4% (P < 0.05) of control. Our studies suggest that HIV infection may alter innate immunity in the lungs, and that impaired alveolar macrophage mannose receptor-mediated binding and phagocytosis of P. carinii may contribute to the susceptibility of HIV-infected individuals to this opportunistic pulmonary pathogen. PMID:9769325

  10. [The significance of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin binding fibers in various muscular diseases].

    PubMed

    Yatabe, K; Hiraguri, M; Sueishi, M; Takeuchi, M; Nonaka, I; Kawai, M

    1998-05-01

    In the present study, we have reported that Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectin labeled muscle fibers in distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV). UEA I binding to muscle fibers was also observed in a small number of biopsies with inflammatory myopathy, but not in other diseases, including neurogenic muscular atrophies and muscular dystrophies. In order to elucidate the relationship between this UEA I binding, rimmed vacuole formation and active autophagocytosis, we examined the UEA I binding fibers in other myopathies which frequently showed rimmed vacuoles, including adult onset acid maltase deficiency, oculo-pharyngo-distal type myopathy and oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. No UEA I lectin labeling fiber was observed in the diseases examined. We then studied UEA I binding behavior on 70 biopsies of inflammatory myopathy to characterize the clinical features of UEA I binding positive patients. UEA I binding fibers were observed in 3 of 28 patients (11%) with other collagen diseases, 11 of 36 (31%) without these disorders, and 2 of 6 (33%) with inclusion body myositis. There were no common clinical histories, complications or laboratory findings among the UEA I binding positive patients. In conclusion, a common process may exist between the muscle fiber degeneration in DMRV and subgroups of inflammatory myopathy patients, but the basic mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  11. Isolation and characterization of lectins and lectin-alliinase complexes from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-04-01

    A procedure developed to separate the homodimeric and heterodimeric mannose-binding lectins from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) also enabled the isolation of stable lectin-alliinase complexes. Characterization of the individual lectins indicated that, in spite of their different molecular structure, the homomeric and heteromeric lectins resemble each other reasonably well with respect to their agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity. However, a detailed analysis of the lectin-alliinase complexes from garlic and ramsons bulbs demonstrated that only the heterodimeric lectins are capable of binding to the glycan chains of the alliinase molecules (EC 4.4.1.4). Moreover, it appears that only a subpopulation of the alliinase molecules is involved in the formation of lectin-alliinase complexes and that the complexed alliinase contains more glycan chains than the free enzyme. Finally, some arguments are given that the lectin-alliinase complexes do not occur in vivo but are formed in vitro after homogenization of the tissue.

  12. The primary structure of the Cytisus scoparius seed lectin and a carbohydrate-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-09-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose-binding Cytisus scoparius seed lectin II (CSII) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSII with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSII with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid residues of concanavalin A (Con A) involved in the metal binding site are highly conserved among those of CSII. A carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSII was obtained from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSII by affinity chromatography on a column of GalNAc-Gel. This peptide was retained on the GalNAc-Gel column and was presumed to have affinity for the column. The amino acid sequence of the retarded peptide was determined using a protein sequencer. The retarded peptide was found to correspond to the putative metal-binding region of Con A. These results strongly suggest that this peptide represents the carbohydrate-binding and metal ion-binding sites of CSII.

  13. Chelating agents inhibit activity and prevent expression of streptococcal glucan-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Lü-Lü; Singh, J S; Galperin, M Y; Drake, D; Taylor, K G; Doyle, R J

    1992-01-01

    Several of the cariogenic mutans streptococci produce cell wall-associated glucan-binding lectins (GBLs). The lectins bind alpha-1,6-linked glucans and have no affinity for other polysaccharides or anomeric linkages. When citrate or lactate was included in the growth medium, expression of the activities of the GBLs of Streptococcus cricetus and S. sobrinus was prevented. Furthermore, chelating agents, including citrate, lactate, EDTA, and acetylacetone, were able to reversibly inhibit glucan-induced aggregation of GBL+ streptococci. In addition, the chelating agents prevented sucrose-dependent streptococcal adhesion to glass surfaces and dispersed preformed adherent masses of the streptococci. Neither citrate nor other chelating agents modified the activities of glucosyltransferases. Expression of the lectin could only be achieved by the addition of manganous ion to the growth medium. Chloramphenicol and other metabolic inhibitors prevented synthesis of GBL in cells obtained from manganese-deficient medium and shifted to manganous ion-sufficient medium. The GBL may be a manganoprotein, the manganese of which may be perturbed, but not removed, by chelating agents. During synthesis of the GBL, manganous ion may be required in order for the protein to achieve an active conformation. Citrate or other chelating agents may have promise as anticaries agents. Images PMID:1500189

  14. Purification, physico-chemical characterization and thermodynamics of chitooligosaccharide binding to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) phloem lectin.

    PubMed

    Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Swamy, Musti J

    2017-02-01

    A chitooligosaccharide-specific lectin has been purified from the phloem exudate of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) by affinity chromatography on chitin. The molecular weight of the cucumber phloem lectin (CPL) was determined as 51912.8Da by mass spectrometry whereas SDS-PAGE yielded a single band with a subunit mass of 26kDa, indicating that the protein is a homodimer. Peptide mass fingerprinting studies strongly suggest that CPL is identical to the 26kDa phloem protein 2 (PP2) from cucumber. CD spectroscopy indicated that CPL is a predominantly β-sheets protein. Hemagglutination activity of CPL was mostly unaffected between 4 and 90°C and between pH 4.0 and 10.0, indicating functional stability of the protein. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies indicate that the CPL dimer binds to two chitooligosaccharide ((GlcNAc)2-6) molecules with association constants ranging from 1.0×10(3) to 17.5×10(5)M(-1). The binding reaction was strongly enthalpy driven (ΔHb=-ve) with negative contribution from binding entropy (ΔSb=-ve). The enthalpy-driven nature of binding reactions suggests that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions stabilize the CPL-chitooligosaccharide association. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the CPL-chitooligosaccharide interaction, indicating that water molecules play an important role in the binding process.

  15. A galactose-binding lectin isolated from Aplysia kurodai (sea hare) eggs inhibits streptolysin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Watanabe, Miharu; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Suzuki, Jun; Dogasaki, Chikaku; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujii, Yuki; Iriko, Hideyuki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-05

    A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO), an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA), T-antigen (PNA), and Tn-antigen (ABA) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL) and a mushroom (ABA), but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA). Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth.

  16. Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding lectin under different urea concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kameel, Nurul Iman Ahamed; Wong, Yin How; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding (CGB) lectin under different urea concentrations was studied in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2) using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (far-UV CD), tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence and ANS fluorescence. In all cases, CGB lectin displayed a two-step, three-state transition. The first transition (from the native state to the intermediate state) started at ∼2.0 M urea and ended at ∼4.5 M urea, while the second transition (from the intermediate state to the completely denatured state) was characterized by the start- and end-points at ∼5.75 M and ∼7.5 M urea, respectively, when analyzed by the emission maximum of Trp fluorescence. A marked increase in the Trp fluorescence, ANS fluorescence and -CD values at 218 nm (-CD218 nm) represented the first transition, whereas a decrease in these parameters defined the second transition. On the other hand, emission maximum of the Trp fluorescence showed a continuous increase throughout the urea concentration range. Transformation of tetramer into monomer represented the first transition, whereas the second transition reflected the unfolding of monomer. Far-UV CD, Trp fluorescence and ANS fluorescence spectra were used to characterize the native, the intermediate and the completely denatured states of CGB lectin, obtained at 0.0 M, 5.0 M and 9.0 M urea, respectively. The intermediate state was characterized by the presence of higher secondary structures, increased ANS binding as well as increased Trp fluorescence intensity. A gradual decrease in the hemagglutination activity of CGB lectin was observed with increasing urea concentrations, showing complete loss at 4.0 M urea.

  17. Evidence that a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin is encoded by a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, M A; Barondes, S H

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated by immunoscreening a human hepatoma cDNA library with an antiserum that bound specifically to a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin with Mr of approximately 14,000. The deduced amino acid sequences of the inserts of these two clones show considerable homology with each other, the sequence of chicken skin beta-galactoside-binding lectin, and eight peptides derived from purified human lung lectin of Mr approximately 14,000. However, the sequence differences between the two hepatoma clones as well as among each clone and the lung peptides suggest that at least three variants of the gene encoding this lectin are expressed in human tissue. Images PMID:3020551

  18. Correlation between carbohydrate-binding specificity and amino acid sequence of carbohydrate-binding regions of Cytisus-type anti-H(O) lectins.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-06-15

    A carbohydrate-binding peptide of the di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin I (CSA-I) was isolated from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSA-I by affinity chromatography on a column of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine oligomer-Sepharose (GlcNAc oligomer-Sepharose). The amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSA-I was determined to be DTYFGKTYNPW using a gas-phase protein sequencer. This sequence corresponds to the sequence from Asp-129 to Trp-139 based on the primary structure of CSA-I, and shows a high degree of homology to those of the putative carbohydrate-binding peptide of the Laburnum alpinum lectin I (LAA-I) (DTYFGKAYNPW) and of the Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II) (DSYFGKTYNPW). The binding of these three anti-H(O) lectins is known to be inhibited by di-N-acetylchitobiose but not by L-fucose. These results strongly suggest that there is a good correlation between the carbohydrate-binding specificity and the amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding regions of di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding lectins.

  19. Analysis of unconventional approaches for the rapid detection of surface lectin binding ligands on human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Welty, Lily Anne Y; Heinrich, Eileen L; Garcia, Karina; Banner, Lisa R; Summers, Michael L; Baresi, Larry; Metzenberg, Stan; Coyle-Thompson, Cathy; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    For over a decade our laboratory has developed and used a novel histochemical assay using derivatized agarose beads to examine the surface properties of various cell types. Most recently, we have used this assay to examine lectin binding ligands on two human cell types, CCL-220, a colon cancer cell line, and CRL-1459, a non-cancer colon cell line. We found that CCL-220 cells bound specific lectins better than CRL-1459, and this information was used to test for possible differential toxicity of these lectins in culture, as a possible approach in the design of more specific anti-cancer drugs. Although we have examined the validity of the bead-binding assay in sea urchin cell systems, we have not previously validated this technique for mammalian cells. Here the binding results of the bead assay are compared with conventional fluorescence assays, using lectins from three species (Triticum vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Lens culinaris) on the two colon cell lines. These lectins were chosen because they seemed to interact with the two cell lines differently. Binding results obtained using both assays were compared for frozen, thawed and fixed; cultured and fixed; and live cells. Both qualitative and quantitative fluorescence results generally correlated with those using the bead assay. Similar results were also obtained with all of the three different cell preparation protocols. The fluorescence assay was able to detect lower lectin binding ligand levels than the bead assay, while the bead assay, because it can so rapidly detect cells with large numbers of lectin binding ligands, is ideal for initial screening studies that seek to identify cells that are rich in surface binders for specific molecules. The direct use of frozen, thawed and fixed cells allows rapid mass screening for surface molecules, without the requirement for costly and time consuming cell culture.

  20. Variation in the saccharide lectin binding pattern from different isolates of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Doumecq, María Laura; Soto, Pedro; Casalini, María Belén; Gimeno, Eduardo Juan; Barbeito, Claudio Gustavo; Monteavaro, Cristina Esther

    2014-12-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) is the causal agent of bovine tritrichomonosis (BT), a venereal disease that causes significant economic losses in the bovine livestock industry. The structural organization of T. foetus presents a cell membrane, an undulating membrane which extends along the parasite, three anterior flagella and a recurrent posterior flagellum. The interaction between the superficial glycoconjugates of the parasite and the host cell is one of the most relevant pathogenic mechanisms. In the present study, we analyzed the saccharide pattern through lectincytochemistry of the cell membrane, undulating membrane, cytoplasm and flagella of 28 isolates of T. foetus. Lectins that labeled most of the isolates were WGA, Con-A, RCA-I, LCA, GS-II and PHA-E showing the presence of D-mannose, D-glucose, N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid. On the other hand, no labeling was observed in any of the structures with VVA, STA, LEA, Jacalin, GS-I, SJA, PHA-L, DSA, and weak labeling was observed with DBA, PNA, SBA and UEA I, showing therefore a low expression of N-acetylgalactosamine, L-fucose and galactose. In addition, GS II labeled in a granular pattern when lectincytochemistry was positive, whereas LCA strongly labeled the membranes and weakly the cytoplasms. The labeling variations observed among the isolates analyzed in the present work, could be related to differences in the pathogenic behavior of the isolates.

  1. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  2. Computer simulation of protein—carbohydrate complexes: application to arabinose-binding protein and pea lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. S. R.; Biswas, Margaret; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Balaji, P. V.

    1989-03-01

    The CCEM method (Contact Criteria and Energy Minimisation) has been developed and applied to study protein-carbohydrate interactions. The method uses available X-ray data even on the native protein at low resolution (above 2.4 Å) to generate realistic models of a variety of proteins with various ligands. The two examples discussed in this paper are arabinose-binding protein (ABP) and pea lectin. The X-ray crystal structure data reported on ABP-β- L-arabinose complex at 2.8, 2.4 and 1.7 Å resolution differ drastically in predicting the nature of the interactions between the protein and ligand. It is shown that, using the data at 2.4 Å resolution, the CCEM method generates complexes which are as good as the higher (1.7 Å) resolution data. The CCEM method predicts some of the important hydrogen bonds between the ligand and the protein which are missing in the interpretation of the X-ray data at 2.4 Å resolution. The theoretically predicted hydrogen bonds are in good agreement with those reported at 1.7 Å resolution. Pea lectin has been solved only in the native form at 3 Å resolution. Application of the CCEM method also enables us to generate complexes of pea lectin with methyl-α- D-glucopyranoside and methyl-2,3-dimethyl-α- D-glucopyranoside which explain well the available experimental data in solution.

  3. Multivalent 3D Display of Glycopolymer Chains for Enhanced Lectin Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M

    2015-08-19

    Synthetic glycoprotein conjugates were synthesized through the polymerization of glycomonomers (mannose and/or galactose acrylate) directly from a protein macroinitiator. This design combines the multivalency of polymer structures with 3D display of saccharides randomly arranged around a central protein structure. The conjugates were tested for their interaction with mannose binding lectin (MBL), a key protein of immune complement. Increasing mannose number (controlled through polymer chain length) and density (controlled through comonomer feed ratio of mannose versus galactose) result in greater interaction with MBL. Most significantly, mannose glycopolymers displayed in a multivalent and 3D configuration from the protein exhibit dramatically enhanced interaction with MBL compared to linear glycopolymer chains with similar total valency but lacking 3D display. These findings demonstrate the importance of the 3D presentation of ligand structures for designing biomimetic materials.

  4. Mechanism of entomotoxicity of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-09-01

    Plant lectins have received a lot of attention because of their insecticidal properties. When orally administered in artificial diet or in transgenic plants, lectins provoke a wide range of detrimental effects, including alteration of the digestive enzyme machinery, fecundity drop, reduced feeding, changes in oviposition behavior, growth and development inhibition and mortality. Although many studies reported the entomotoxicity of lectins, only a few of them investigated the mode of action by which lectins exert toxicity. In the present paper we have studied for the first time the insecticidal potential of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) bulbs against the larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). Bioassays on neonate larvae showed that this mannose-specific lectin affected larval growth, causing a development retardation and larval weight decrease. Using primary cell cultures from S. littoralis midguts and confocal microscopy we have elucidated FITC-HHA binding and internalization mechanisms. We found that HHA did not exert a toxic effect on S. littoralis midgut cells, but HHA interaction with the brush border of midgut cells interfered with normal nutrient absorption in the S. littoralis midgut, thereby affecting normal larval growth in vivo. This study thus confirms the potential of mannose-specific lectins as pest control agents and sheds light on the mechanism underlying lectin entomotoxicity.

  5. Application of Lectin Array Technology for Biobetter Characterization: Its Correlation with FcγRIII Binding and ADCC

    PubMed Central

    Roucka, Markus; Zimmermann, Klaus; Fido, Markus; Nechansky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Lectin microarray technology was applied to compare the glycosylation pattern of the monoclonal antibody MB311 expressed in SP2.0 cells to an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic effector function (ADCC)-optimized variant (MB314). MB314 was generated by a plant expression system that uses genetically modified moss protoplasts (Physcomitrella patens) to generate a de-fucosylated version of MB311. In contrast to MB311, no or very low interactions of MB314 with lectins Aspergillus oryzae l-fucose (AOL), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) were observed. These lectins are specific for mono-/biantennary N-glycans containing a core fucose residue. Importantly, this fucose indicative lectin-binding pattern correlated with increased MB314 binding to CD16 (FcγRIII; receptor for the constant region of an antibody)—whose affinity is mediated through core fucosylation—and stronger ADCC. In summary, these results demonstrate that lectin microarrays are useful orthogonal methods during antibody development and for characterization. PMID:28029136

  6. Effect of leguminous lectins on the growth of Rhizobium tropici CIAT899.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Cunha, Cláudio Oliveira; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Bastos, Rafaela Mesquita; Mercante, Fábio Martins; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2013-05-17

    Rhizobium tropici is a Gram-negative bacterium that induces nodules and fixed atmospheric nitrogen in symbiotic association with Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and some other leguminous species. Lectins are proteins that specifically bind to carbohydrates and, consequently, modulate different biological functions. In this study, the d-glucose/ d-mannose-binding lectins (from seeds of Dioclea megacarpa, D. rostrata and D. violacea) and D-galactose-binding lectins (from seeds of Bauhinia variegata, Erythina velutina and Vatairea macrocarpa) were purified using chromatographic techniques and evaluated for their effect on the growth of R. tropici CIAT899. All lectins were assayed with a satisfactory degree of purity according to SDS-PAGE analysis, and stimulated bacterial growth; in particular, the Dioclea rostrata lectin was the most active among all tested proteins. As confirmed in the present study, both d-galactose- and d-glucose/d-mannose-binding lectins purified from the seeds of leguminous plants may be powerful biotechnological tools to stimulate the growth of R. tropici CIAT99, thus improving symbiotic interaction between rhizobia and common bean and, hence, the production of this field crop.

  7. A rhamnose-binding lectin from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) plasma agglutinates and opsonizes pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Matteo; Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Benenati, Gigliola; Vasta, Gerardo R; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in teleost fish eggs led to the identification of a novel lectin family characterized by a unique sequence motif and a structural fold, and initially proposed to modulate fertilization. Further studies of the RBL tissue localization and gene organization were also suggestive of role(s) in innate immunity. Here we describe the purification, and biochemical and functional characterization of a novel RBL (DlRBL) from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) serum. The purified DlRBL had electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to 24 kDa and 100 kDa under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively, suggesting that in plasma the DlRBL is present as a physiological homotetramer. DlRBL subunit transcripts revealed an open reading frame encoding 212 amino acid residues that included two tandemly-arrayed carbohydrate-recognition domains, and an 18-residue signal sequence at the N-terminus. The deduced size of 24.1 kDa for the mature protein was in good agreement with the subunit size of the isolated lectin. Binding activity of DlRBL for rabbit erythrocytes could be inhibited in the presence of rhamnose or galactose, did not require calcium, and was optimal at around 20°C and within the pH 6.5-8.0 range. DlRBL agglutinated Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and exposure of formalin-killed Escherichia coli to DlRBL enhanced their phagocytosis by D. labrax peritoneal macrophages relative to the unexposed controls. Taken together, the results suggest that plasma DlRBL may play a role in immune recognition of microbial pathogens and facilitate their clearance by phagocytosis.

  8. Lectin interactions with the Jurkat leukemic T-cell line: quantitative binding studies and interleukin-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, G.; Bastin, B.

    1988-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pea lectin, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) have been used to investigate their binding properties to Jurkat 77 6.8 leukemic human T cells and their ability to induce these cells to produce interleukin-2 (IL-2). Binding studies showed that the Jurkat cells fixed 0.82 +/- 0.11 microgram pea lectin, 2.02 +/- 0.17 micrograms Con A, 1.85 +/- 0.07 micrograms PHA and 8.88 +/- 0.61 micrograms WGA. Scatchard plots were linear, indicating that the binding process was homogeneous with respect to the binding constant. PHA and Con A bound with the highest affinity (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 9 x 10(9) M-1), followed by pea lectin and WGA (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 3 x 10(9) M-1). The number of lectin binding sites was in agreement with the results of saturation experiments. We also evaluated the effect of the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the binding process. Results show that there were no gross alterations in the value of (apparent) Kass in the case of PHA and WGA. In contrast, the presence of TPA decreased the affinity of Con A and modified the Scatchard profile for pea lectin, which was curvilinear with a concavity turned upward. In this case, data were (apparent) K1 = 17.7 x 10(9) M-1 (high-affinity sites) and (apparent) K2 = 2.6 x 10(9) M-1 (low-affinity sites). The four lectins shared the ability to stimulate Jurkat 77 6.8 cells to secrete IL-2. Optimal lectin concentrations were 20 micrograms/ml (PHA) and 50 micrograms/ml (WGA and Con A). Pea lectin failed to display a dose-response relationship, and IL-2 production increased proportionally with lectin concentration. Con A was the most efficient stimulator (250 U/ml), followed by WGA (160 U/ml) and PHA (108 U/ml).

  9. Physiochemical studies on achatininH, a novel sialic acid-binding lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, C; Basu, S; Mandal, C

    1989-01-01

    We have purified a sialic acid-binding lectin, achatininH, in a single step by affinity chromatography, having high affinity for 9-O-acetylneuraminic acid. The physicochemical characterization of the interaction of achatininH with bivalent metal ions and sialic acid derivatives by the use of spectrofluorimetry, spectropolarimetry and precipitin reaction is reported. From fluorescence quenching studies the binding of Ca2+ (Ka = 251 +/- 9 M-1) and of Mn2+ (Ka = 86 +/- 5 M-1) was found to be weak, but their presence is absolutely necessary for sugar binding as well as biological activity. The nature and position of the substituent group play a very important role in the binding affinity. AchatininH shows a high affinity for 9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Ka = 1.20 x 10(3) +/- 0.07 x 10(3) M-1) compared with that for the 4-O-acetyl derivative. In oligomers the binding strength increases in the order monosaccharide less than disaccharide less than trisaccharide. The binding affinity of achatininH for the disaccharide was found to reach a peak around pH 8. From c.d. spectral studies achatininH was found to have a high beta-sheet content (46%) and a low alpha-helix content (24%). From precipitin analysis at least one sugar-binding site on each of the 16 monomer subunits of the protein is indicated. PMID:2920028

  10. Diabetes Is Associated with Increased Autoreactivity of Mannan-Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) has been reported to be involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. MBL is a pattern-recognition molecule of the innate immune system that initiates the lectin pathway of the complement system upon recognition of evolutionary conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns or to altered self-tissue. Our group have previously shown direct effects of MBL on diabetes-induced kidney damage, and we hypothesized that MBL may cause autoactivation of the complement system via binding to neoepitopes induced by hyperglycemia. In the present study, we induced diabetes in MBL knockout mice and in wild type C57BL/6J mice by low-dose streptozotocin injection and measured blood glucose and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio to monitor development of diabetes. After 24 weeks, fluorescently labelled recombinant MBL was injected intravenously in diabetic MBL knockout mice after which the distribution was investigated using in vivo fluorescence imaging. Mice were subjected to in vivo and ex vivo imaging 24 hours after injection. MBL was found to accumulate in the kidneys of diabetic mice as compared to healthy control mice (p < 0.0001). These findings support the hypothesis of a significant role of MBL and the complement system in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:28349070

  11. A new LDLa domain-containing C-type lectin with bacterial agglutinating and binding activity in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Qu, Baozhen; Yang, Shuangshuang; Ma, Zengyu; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-12-15

    Over 1200 C-type lectin gene models have been identified in amphioxus, but only a few of them have been functionally characterized. In this study, we identified a C-type lectin, BjCTL, with domain structure of LDLa-CTLD-EGF_Lam, the first such data in chordates. It was expressed mainly in the notochord and ovary in a tissue-dependent fashion. Recombinant BjCTL was characterized as a typical Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein capable of agglutinating and binding to both Gram-negative and positive bacteria we tested. In addition, it specifically bound to insoluble lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan, which can be inhibited by galactose. We also showed that the interaction of BjCTL with the bacteria is primarily attributable to CTLD domain. Thus, BjCTL is a novel pattern recognition protein involved in lectin-mediated innate immunity.

  12. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs.

  13. The three-dimensional structure of codakine and related marine C-type lectins.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Markiv, Anatoly; Smith-Ravin, Juliette

    2007-10-01

    Codakine is a new Ca(2+)-dependent mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) isolated from the gill tissue of the tropical clam, Codakia orbicularis. Bioinformatic analyses with the BLAST program have revealed similarities with marine lectins involved in immunity whose three-dimensional (3D) structures were unknown up until recently. In this article, we present bioinformatic analyses of marine lectins that are homologous to codakine, in particular lectins from the sea worm Laxus oneistus, named mermaid. These lectins are involved in the symbiotic association with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria which are closely related to the C. orbicularis gill symbiont. Using homology modelling, folding that is characteristic of C-type lectins was observed in all the marine Ca(2+)-dependent lectins studied, with conservation of random coiled structures of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and Ca(2+)-binding sites. Like codakine, the marine lectins analysed contain a signal peptide commonly found in secreted and transmembrane proteins. The majority of the predictive 3D models established from the lectins exhibit a common feature, namely the involvement in invertebrate and vertebrate immunity (dendritic cell receptor, macrophage receptor, etc.). These bioinformatic analyses and the literature data support the hypothesis that codakine, like the L. oneistus mermaids, is probably involved in the cellular mediation of symbiosis and defence against pathogenic microorganisms.

  14. Stability of Curcuma longa rhizome lectin: Role of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Himadri; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2016-04-01

    Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, a mannose-binding protein of non-seed portions of turmeric, is known to have antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. We studied the role of complex-type glycans attached to asparagine (Asn) 66 and Asn 110 to elucidate the role of carbohydrates in lectin activity and stability. Apart from the native lectin, the characteristics of a deglycosylated Escherichia coli expressed lectin, high-mannose oligosaccharides at both asparagines and its glycosylation mutants N66Q and N110Q expressed in Pichia pastoris, were compared to understand the relationship between glycosylation and activity. Far UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence emission maximum, hemagglutination assay show no change in secondary or tertiary structures or sugar-binding properties between wild-type and aforementioned recombinant lectins under physiological pH. But reduced agglutination activity and loss of tertiary structure are observed in the acidic pH range for the deglycosylated and the N110Q protein. In thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnCl)-induced unfolding, the wild-type and high-mannose lectins possess higher stability compared with the deglycosylated recombinant lectin and both mutants, as measured by a higher Tm of denaturation or a greater free energy change, respectively. Reversibility experiments after thermal denaturation reveal that deglycosylated proteins tend to aggregate during thermal inactivation but the wild type shows a much greater recovery to the native state upon refolding. These results suggest that N-glycosylation in turmeric lectin is important for the maintenance of its proper folding upon changes in pH, and that the oligosaccharides help in maintaining the active conformation and prevent aggregation in unfolded or partially folded molecules.

  15. Recognition of the galactose- or N-acetylgalactosamine-binding lectin of Entamoeba histolytica by human immune sera.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Joyce, M P; Broman, J; Smith, R D; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Cure of amebic liver abscess is associated with resistance to recurrent invasive amebiasis and the development of a humoral and cell-mediated immune response. We determined whether human immune sera contain blocking antibody for the 170-kilodalton (kDa) galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc)-binding lectin of Entamoeba histolytica. By Western blot (immunoblot) of whole amebae subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, all eight immune sera studied here prominently recognized a 170-kDa amebic protein. Western blot of the purified Gal/GalNAc lectin with pooled human immune sera (PHIS) confirmed that the 170-kDa band was the adherence lectin. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-metabolically-labeled amebae with the antilectin monoclonal antibody H8-5 and with PHIS demonstrated that the 170-kDa lectin was the major antigen recognized by PHIS. The in vitro adherence of E. histolytica trophozoites to CHO cells at 4 degrees C was inhibited by prior exposure of amebae to greater than or equal to 1.0% PHIS. The humoral response to the Gal/GalNAc-binding lectin of the parasite may contribute to the development of protective immunity against invasive amebiasis. Images PMID:2888730

  16. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  17. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Mona; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Abolhasani, Mandan; Charedar, Soroor; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed) were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups). Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+) glucose, D (+) galactose, D (+) mannose, D (−) fructose, D (−) arabinose, L (−) fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin. Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose. Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules) in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins. PMID:23785692

  18. Preferential lectin binding of cancer cells upon sialic acid treatment under nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; Elsayed, Abdelaleim I; Ahmed, Hafiz; Dwek, Miriam V; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B

    2013-10-01

    The terminal monosaccharide of glycoconjugates on a eukaryotic cell surface is typically a sialic acid (Neu5Ac). Increased sialylation usually indicates progression and poor prognosis of most carcinomas. Here, we utilize two human mammary epithelial cell lines, HB4A (breast normal cells) and T47D (breast cancer cells), as a model system to demonstrate differential surface glycans when treated with sialic acid under nutrient deprivation. Under a starved condition, sialic acid treatment of both cells resulted in increased activities of α2→3/6 sialyltransferases as demonstrated by solid phase assay using lectin binding. However, a very strong Maackia amurensis agglutinin I (MAL-I) staining on the membrane of sialic acid-treated T47D cells was observed, indicating an increase of Neu5Acα2→3Gal on the cell surface. To our knowledge, this is a first report showing the utility of lectins, particularly MAL-I, as a means to discriminate between normal and cancer cells after sialic acid treatment under nutrient deprivation. This method is sensitive and allows selective detection of glycan sialylation on a cancer cell surface.

  19. Interaction of lectins with proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi system of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Winqvist, L; Eriksson, L C; Dallner, G

    1979-10-01

    The interaction of glycoproteins of rough and smooth microsomal and Golgi membranes with Sepharose-bound lectins has been studied. One of these lectins was a crude preparation from wheat germ lipase which was found to bind primarily to N-acetyl neuraminic acid. Rough microsomes, smooth microsomes and Golgi membranes contain glycoproteins which bind to Concanavalin A (Con A specific for mannose residues) in decreasing amounts in the order indicated (rough, smooth and Golgi) and to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, glucosamine-specific) and to the crude lipase preparation in increasing amounts in the order indicated. The small amount of binding of rough microsomes and Golgi membranes to Crotalaria (galactose-specific) increases substantially after neuraminidase treatment. Three submicrosomal particle preparations enriched either in AMPase or in NADH- or NADPH-oxidizing electron-transport enzymes contain glycoproteins which bind Con A and wheat germ agglutinin. The latter binding is sensitive to neuraminidase treatment. Two other submicrosomal particle preparations, both enriched in glucose-6-phosphatase activity, bind preferentially to WGA. This binding is, however, not sensitive to neuraminidase. Prolonged incubation with Ervilia lectin (mannose-specific) inhibits NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, while the electron-transport chain involving cytochrome b5 is also inhibited by Crotalaria, indicating that both the flavoprotein and the cytochrome b5 are glycoproteins whose oligosaccharide chains have terminal mannose or galactose residues.

  20. Bivalent Carbohydrate Binding Is Required for Biological Activity of Clitocybe nebularis Lectin (CNL), the N,N′-Diacetyllactosediamine (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc, LacdiNAc)-specific Lectin from Basidiomycete C. nebularis*

    PubMed Central

    Pohleven, Jure; Renko, Miha; Magister, Špela; Smith, David F.; Künzler, Markus; Štrukelj, Borut; Turk, Dušan; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that exert their biological activity by binding to specific cell glycoreceptors. We have expressed CNL, a ricin B-like lectin from the basidiomycete Clitocybe nebularis in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lectin, rCNL, agglutinates human blood group A erythrocytes and is specific for the unique glycan N,N′-diacetyllactosediamine (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc, LacdiNAc) as demonstrated by glycan microarray analysis. We here describe the crystal structures of rCNL in complex with lactose and LacdiNAc, defining its interactions with the sugars. CNL is a homodimeric lectin, each of whose monomers consist of a single ricin B lectin domain with its β-trefoil fold and one carbohydrate-binding site. To study the mode of CNL action, a nonsugar-binding mutant and nondimerizing monovalent CNL mutants that retain carbohydrate-binding activity were prepared. rCNL and the mutants were examined for their biological activities against Jurkat human leukemic T cells and the hypersensitive nematode Caenorhabditis elegans mutant strain pmk-1. rCNL was toxic against both, although the mutants were inactive. Thus, the bivalent carbohydrate-binding property of homodimeric CNL is essential for its activity, providing one of the rare pieces of evidence that certain activities of lectins are associated with their multivalency. PMID:22298779

  1. L-rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: Characterization and expression profiling in mucosal tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhamnose binding-lectins (RBLs) have recently emerged as important molecules in the context of innate immunity in teleost fishes. Previously, using RNA-seq technology, we observed marked up-regulation of a RBL in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) gill following a challenge with the bacterial pat...

  2. Glycodendritic structures based on Boltorn hyperbranched polymers and their interactions with Lens culinaris lectin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Eva; Nieto, Pedro M; Díaz, Vicente; Castro, Rossana García; Bernad, Antonio; Rojo, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Multivalent scaffolds bearing carbohydrates have been prepared to mediate biological processes where carbohydrates are involved. These systems consist of dendritic structures based on Boltorn H20 and H30 hyperbranched polymers to which carbohydrates are linked through a convenient spacer. Mannose has been chosen as a sugar unit to test the viability of this strategy. These glycodendritic compounds have been prepared in a few steps with good yields, showing a high solubility in physiological media and low toxicity. The binding of these dendritic polymers to the mannose-binding lectin Lens culinaris (LCA) was studied using STD-NMR experiments and quantitative precipitation assays. The results demonstrate the existence of a clear interaction between the mannose derivative systems and the Lens lectin where the dendritic scaffold does not have an important role in mannose binding but supplies the necessary multivalence for lectin cluster formation. These glycodendritic structures are able to interact with a receptor, and therefore they can be considered as promising tools for biological studies.

  3. Human CLEC18 Gene Cluster Contains C-type Lectins with Differential Glycan-binding Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Lang; Pai, Feng-Shuo; Tsou, Yun-Ting; Mon, Hsien-Chen; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chou, Teh-Ying; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wong, Chi-Huey; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The human C-type lectin 18 (clec18) gene cluster, which contains three clec18a, clec18b, and clec18c loci, is located in human chromosome 16q22. Although the amino acid sequences of CLEC18A, CLEC18B, and CLEC18C are almost identical, several amino acid residues located in the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) and the sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) domain, also known as the cysteine-rich secretory proteins/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) domain, are distinct from each other. Genotyping by real-time PCR and sequencing further shows the presence of multiple alleles in clec18a/b/c loci. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that CLEC18 (CLEC18A, -B, and -C) are expressed abundantly in human peripheral blood cells. Moreover, CLEC18 expression is further up-regulated when monocytes differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells. Immunofluorescence staining reveals that CLEC18 are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and endosome. Interestingly, CLEC18 are also detectable in human sera and culture supernatants from primary cells and 293T cells overexpressing CLEC18. Moreover, CLEC18 bind polysaccharide in Ca2+-independent manner, and amino acid residues Ser/Arg339 and Asp/Asn421 in CTLD domain contribute to their differential binding abilities to polysaccharides isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPS-F3). The Ser339 (CLEC18A) → Arg339 (CLEC18A-1) mutation completely abolishes CLEC18A-1 binding to GLPS-F3, and a sugar competition assay shows that CLEC18 preferentially binds to fucoidan, β-glucans, and galactans. Because proteins with the SCP/TAPS/CAP domain are able to bind sterol and acidic glycolipid, and are involved in sterol transport and β-amyloid aggregation, it would be interesting to investigate whether CLEC18 modulates host immunity via binding to glycolipids, and are also involved in glycolipid transportation and protein aggregation in the future. PMID:26170455

  4. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycocluster to lectin and tetanus toxin c-fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster as a powerful molecular probe for evaluating a binding event between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analysis. The fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycoclusters, [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] and [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3], possess clustered galactose and glucose surrounding the ruthenium center. Changes in FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters were measured by adding each lectin (Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA), Concanavalin A (ConA), or Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)) or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). Following the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy- 2Gal)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increased. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value increased following the addition of ConA. Since other combinations of the metalloglycoclusters and lectin caused little change, specific bindings of galactose to PNA and glucose to ConA were proved by the FE and FP measurement. From nonlinear least-squares fitting, dissociation constants (Kd) of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to PNA was 6.1 μM, while the Kd values of [Ru(bpy)2(bpy-2Gal)] to PNA was ca. 10-4 M. Therefore, the clustered carbohydrates were proved to increase affinity to lectins. Furthermore, the FP measurements proved specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF.

  5. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycoclusters to lectins and tetanus toxin C-fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2011-03-01

    We develop a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster for use as a powerful molecular probe in evaluating the binding between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analyses. Changes in the FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters are measured following the addition of lectin [peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120, Concanavalin A (ConA), or wheat germ agglutinin] or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). After the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increases. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value increases on addition of ConA. Because other combinations of metalloglycoclusters and lectins show little change, specific binding of galactose to PNA and that of glucose to ConA are confirmed by the FE and FP measurements. Resulting dissociation constants (Kd) prove that the metalloglycoclusters with highly clustered carbohydrates show higher affinity for the respective lectins than those with less clustered carbohydrates. Furthermore, specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF was confirmed by the FP measurement.

  6. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (float...

  7. Role of Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency in HIV-1 and Schistosoma Infections in a Rural Adult Population in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B. L.; Chasela, Charles; Madsen, Hans O.; Rusakaniko, Simbarashe; Kallestrup, Per; Christiansen, Michael; Gomo, Exnevia; Ullum, Henrik; Erikstrup, Christian; Munyati, Shungu; Kurewa, Edith N.; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Garred, Peter; Mduluza, Takafira

    2015-01-01

    Background Polymorphism in the MBL2 gene lead to MBL deficiency, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to various bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. We assessed role of MBL deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in Zimbabwean adults enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV Cohort (MUSH Cohort). Methods HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were determined at baseline. Plasma MBL concentration was measured by ELISA and MBL2 genotypes determined by PCR. We calculated and compared the proportions of plasma MBL deficiency, MBL2 structural variant alleles B (codon 54A>G), C (codon 57A>G), and D (codon 52T>C) as well as MBL2 promoter variants -550(H/L), -221(X/Y) and +4(P/Q) between HIV-1 and schistosoma co-infection and control groups using Chi Square test. Results We assessed 379 adults, 80% females, median age (IQR) 30 (17–41) years. HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni prevalence were 26%, 43% and 18% respectively in the MUSH baseline survey. Median (IQR) plasma MBL concentration was 800μg/L (192-1936μg/L). Prevalence of plasma MBL deficiency was 18% with high frequency of the C (codon 57G>A) mutant allele (20%). There was no significant difference in median plasma MBL levels between HIV negative (912μg/L) and HIV positive (688μg/L), p = 0.066. However plasma MBL levels at the assay detection limit of 20μg/L were more frequent among the HIV-1 infected (p = 0.007). S. haematobium and S. mansoni infected participants had significantly higher MBL levels than uninfected. All MBL2 variants were not associated with HIV-1 infection but promoter variants LY and LL were significantly associated with S. haematobium infection. Conclusion Our data indicate high prevalence of MBL deficiency, no evidence of association between MBL deficiency and HIV-1 infection. However, lower plasma MBL levels were protective against both S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections and MBL2 promoter and variants LY and LL increased susceptibility to S. haematobium infection. PMID:25830474

  8. Applications of immunocolloids in light microscopy. III. Demonstration of antigenic and lectin-binding sites in semithin resin sections.

    PubMed

    Lucocq, J M; Roth, J

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigens or lectin-binding sites can be localized in sections from paraffin-embedded tissues with protein A or lectins bound to colloidal gold or colloidal silver (Roth J: J Histochem Cytochem 30:691, 1982 and 31:547, 1983). In the present study the protein A-gold technique and lectin-gold complexes have been applied to semithin sections (0.5-1.5 micron) of Epon- or low temperature Lowicryl K4M-embedded rat pancreas, kidney and submandibular gland. The results show that an increase in resolution and, therefore, in amount of information can be obtained. The optimal mode of imaging was determined on sections without counterstaining. Bright-field illumination gives the maximum information about the staining signal, while phase-contrast and Nomarski differential interference contrast give predominantly structural and, to a lesser extent, staining information. Polarization epi- and transillumination microscopy is inferior in all aspects. The application of a battery of lectin-gold complexes to rat submandibular gland revealed a specific staining pattern for each lectin in acinar and excretory duct cells.

  9. PstS-1, the 38-kDa Mycobacterium tuberculosis glycoprotein, is an adhesin, which binds the macrophage mannose receptor and promotes phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Esparza, M; Palomares, B; García, T; Espinosa, P; Zenteno, E; Mancilla, R

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the primary causative agent of tuberculosis, infects macrophages and transforms the hostile intracellular environment into a permissive niche. M. tuberculosis infects macrophages using a variety of microbial ligand/cell receptor systems. In this study, binding assays with biotin-labelled mycobacterial cell wall proteins revealed five Concanavalin A-reactive proteins that bind macrophages. Among these proteins, we identified PstS-1, a 38-kDa M. tuberculosis mannosylated glycolipoprotein, and characterized it as an adhesin. Inhibition assays with mannan and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that PstS-1 binds the mannose receptor. We purified PstS-1 to 95.9% purity using ion exchange chromatography. The presence of mannose in purified PstS-1 was demonstrated by Concanavalin A interaction, which was abolished in the presence of sodium m-periodate and α-D-mannosidase. Gas chromatography revealed that purified PstS-1 contained 1% of carbohydrates by weight, which was mainly mannose. Finally, we used fluorescent microbeads coated with purified PstS-1 in phagocytosis assays and discovered that microbead uptake was inhibited by the pre-incubation of cells with GlcNAc, mannan and α-methyl mannoside. The interaction of PstS-1 coated beads with the mannose receptor was confirmed by confocal colocalization studies that showed high Pearson and Manders's colocalization coefficients. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the strategies M. tuberculosis uses to infect host cells, the critical first step in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  10. Isolation of a lectin binding rhamnogalacturonan-I containing pectic polysaccharide from pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Fuming; Liu, Xinyue; St Ange, Kalib; Zhang, Anqiang; Li, Quanhong; Linhardt, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) containing pectic polysaccharide (PPc) was isolated from pumpkin following a low-temperature alkali treatment and a combination of gradual alcohol precipitation and ion-exchange. Monosaccharide compositional analysis of PPc revealed the presence of rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose, and arabinose in a molar ratio of 7.4: 25: 28: 2.6. Structural and linkage analysis by 1D NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR), and 2D NMR (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and elevated temperature HMBC) suggested that PPc was a RG-I-like pectic polysaccharide, branched at the C-4 of some of the (about 29% of) rhamnosyl units, with relatively long β-1,4-d-galactan side chains to which were attached, through the C-3 of β-d-Gal, terminal non reducing α-Araf units. The results of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) show that PPc binds to two types of lectin, Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA120) and Galectin-3 (Gal-3). These binding studies show quick association and slow dissociation with a moderate binding affinity between PPc and Gal-3 of 1.26μM. The interaction between PPc and Gal-3 suggest the potential use of pumpkin pectic polysaccharide as a Gal-3 inhibitor in functional food or drug development applications.

  11. Meningococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Failure in a Patient with C7 Deficiency and a Decreased Anticapsular Antibody Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    assay; Ig, immunoglobulin ; MASP2, mannose binding lectin associated serine protease; MBL, mannose binding lectin; TCCD, terminal complement...in orange. Abbreviations: MBL, mannose binding lectin; MASP2, mannose binding lectin associated serine protease 2; lg, immunoglobulin

  12. A histochemical study of the distribution of lectin binding sites in the developing branchial area of the trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, M C; Blánquez, M J; González, M E

    1996-01-01

    A histochemical study of the branchial area of brown trout embryos from 35 to 71 d of incubation is reported. A battery of 6 different horseradish peroxidase-labelled lectins, the PAS reaction and Alcian blue staining were used to study the distribution of carbohydrate residues in glycoconjugates along the pharyngeal and branchial epithelia. Con A and WGA reacted at every site of the branchial region thus showing the ubiquitous presence of alpha-D-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. WGA, DBA and SBA were good markers for the hatching gland cells (HGCs) and mucous cells. Other lectins, such as PNA and UEA I, reacted only for a short time at some sites during the considered period of incubation. From 35 d until posthatching stages, a manifest strong reaction was noted both in the dorsal epithelium of branchial arches and the HGCs as shown by SBA reactivity. This may be significant with regard to the controversial origin of HGCs, which is thought to be endodermal. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8982837

  13. The cell recognition model in chlorolichens involving a fungal lectin binding to an algal ligand can be extended to cyanolichens.

    PubMed

    Vivas, M; Sacristán, M; Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    2010-07-01

    Leptogium corniculatum, a cyanolichen containing Nostoc as photobiont, produces and secretes arginase to culture medium containing arginine. This secreted arginase was pre-purified by affinity chromatography on beads of activated agarose to which a polygalactosylated urease, purified from Evernia prunastri, was attached. Arginase was eluted from the beads with 50 mm alpha-d-galactose. The eluted arginase binds preferentially to the cell surface of Nostoc isolated from this lichen thallus, although it is also able to bind, to some extent, to the cell surface of the chlorobiont isolated from E. prunastri. Previous studies in chlorolichens have shown that a fungal lectin that develops subsidiary arginase activity can be a factor in recognition of compatible algal cells through binding to a polygalactosylated urease, which acts as a lectin ligand in the algal cell wall. Our experiments demonstrate that this model can now be extended to cyanolichens.

  14. Lectin binding properties of liver, small intestine and tail of metamorphosing marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus Pallas 1771).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Sengezer Inceli, Meliha; Sancar Bas, Serap

    2013-07-01

    In this present study, localization and variations of specific sugar moieties in the terminal carbohydrate chains of glycoconjugates in the small intestine, liver and tail have been investigated during the metamorphosis of Pelophylax ridibundus larvae. For this purpose, four lectins were used: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), in different larval stages of the frog. Some cells stained specifically in the intestinal mucosa and in tail epidermal cells with the lectins and their affinity changed during metamorphic transformation. For the most part, they decreased in the climax and postmetamorphic periods. It was also found that WGA, DBA and UEA-I lectins exhibited strong affinity to white blood cells in the liver and their binding affinities were the highest in prometamorphosis and they gradually decreased until the end of metamorphosis. These results suggest that the changes of lectin binding in metamorphosis may be an indication of some cellular events occurring in larval metamorphosis such as cell differentiation and damage of cell adhesion between death and differentiating cells. They also can be useful markers for detection of white blood cells in amphibian hematopoietic organs.

  15. Targeting the Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii cell wall using lectins: study of the carbohydrate-binding domain.

    PubMed

    de Brito Ximenes, Pamella; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Buonafina, Maria Daniela Silva; de Lima-Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-02-25

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is considered to be the major cause of cryptococcosis in immunosuppressed patients. Understanding cell wall glycoproteins using lectins is of medical interest and can contribute to specific therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carbohydrates on the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii clinical isolates, using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-lectin binding protocol. Thirty yeast strains stocked in the culture collection were cultivated for 2 days at 30 °C with shaking. Cells were obtained by centrifugation, washed in phosphate-buffered saline, and a suspension of 107 cells/mL was obtained. To determine the binding profile of lectins, concanavalin A (Con A), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and peanut agglutinin (PNA) conjugated to fluorescein were used. All the tested clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were intensely stained by WGA, moderately stained by Con A, and weakly stained by PNA and UEA-I. Thus, Cryptococcus can be detected in clinical specimens such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid using the fluorescent lectin WGA, which may be considered as an option for detection in cases of suspected cryptococcosis with low laboratory sensitivity. Future applications may be developed using this basic tool.

  16. Transduction of Glycan-Lectin Binding using Near Infrared Fluorescent Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Glycan Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuel, Nigel; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Zhang, Jingqing; Boghossian, Ardemis; Mahal, Lara; Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a sensor array employing recombinant lectins as glycan recognition sites tethered via Histidine tags to Ni2+ complexes that act as fluorescent quenchers for semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a chitosan to measure binding kinetics of model glycans. Two higher-affined glycan-lectin pairs are explored: fucose (Fuc) to PA-IIL and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to GafD. The dissociation constants (KD) for these pairs as free glycans (106 and 19 μM respectively) and streptavidin-tethered (142 and 50 μM respectively) were found. The absolute detection limit for the current platform was found to be 2 μg of glycosylated protein or 100 ng of free glycan to 20 μg of lectin. Glycan detection is demonstrated at the single nanotube level (GlcNAc to GafD). Over a population of 1000 nanotubes, 289 of the SWNT sensors had signals strong enough to yield kinetic information (KD of 250 ± 10 μM). We are also able to identify the locations of ``strong-transducers'' on the basis of dissociation constant (4 sensors with KD < 10 μM) or overall signal modulation (8 sensors with > 5% quench response). The ability to pinpoint strong-binding, single sensors is promising to build a nanoarray of glycan-lectin transducers as a method to profile glycans without protein labeling or glycan liberation pretreatment steps.

  17. Terminal N-Acetylgalactosamine-Specific Leguminous Lectin from Wisteria japonica as a Probe for Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Keisuke; Teruya, Futaba; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Millettia japonica was recently reclassified into the genus Wisteria japonica based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences. Because the seed of Wisteria floribunda expresses leguminous lectins with unique N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity, we purified lectin from Wisteria japonica seeds using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis demonstrated that unlike Wisteria floribunda and Wisteria brachybotrys lectins, which bind to both terminal N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose residues, Wisteria japonica lectin (WJA) specifically bound to both α- and β-linked terminal N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose residues on oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. Further, frontal affinity chromatography using more than 100 2-aminopyridine-labeled and p-nitrophenyl-derivatized oligosaccharides demonstrated that the ligands with the highest affinity for Wisteria japonica lectin were GalNAcβ1-3GlcNAc and GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, with Ka values of 9.5 × 104 and 1.4 × 105 M-1, respectively. In addition, when binding was assessed in a variety of cell lines, Wisteria japonica lectin bound specifically to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells while other Wisteria lectins bound equally to all of the cell lines tested. Wisteria japonica lectin binding to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells was dramatically decreased in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose, mannose, or N-acetylglucosamine, and was completely abrogated by β-hexosaminidase-digestion of these cells. These results clearly demonstrate that Wisteria japonica lectin binds to terminal N-acetylgalactosamine but not galactose. In addition, histochemical analysis of human squamous cell carcinoma tissue sections demonstrated that Wisteria japonica lectin specifically bound to differentiated cancer tissues but not normal tissue. This novel binding characteristic of Wisteria japonica lectin has the potential to become a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:24349556

  18. Localization of binding sites for concanavalin A, Ricinus communis I and Helix pomatia lectin in the Golgi apparatus of rat small intestinal absorptive cells.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, M; Ellinger, A

    1985-09-01

    Binding sites for concanvalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis I agglutinin (RCA I), and Helix pomatia lectin (HPA) were localized in the Golgi apparatus of rat small intestinal absorptive cells. A preembedment technique, a modification of the one originally used by Bernhard and Avrameas (Exp Cell Res 64:232, 1971), was employed, with horse-radish peroxidase being used for cytochemical visualization. Incubations were performed on 10 microns thick cryosections of duodenal segments that were fixed in a mixture of 4% formaldehyde and 0.5% glutaraldehyde; fixation was preceded by a 2-min rinse in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate and followed by storage in the same buffer for up to 7 days. Incubation with Con A, which binds preferably to alpha-D-mannose and alpha-D-glucose residues, caused intense reaction of the dilated cisternae of the cis Golgi side; staining was variable in intermediate and trans cisternae. RCA I, recognizing beta-D-galactose residues, could only be demonstrated in intermediate cisternae. Reaction for HPA, which indicates alpha-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues, stained intensely 1 to 2 cisternae of the cis Golgi side, as well as being localized in the peripheral regions of the cisternae of the intermediate compartment of the stacks. Deposits of reaction product covered the luminal surface of the cisternal membranes, but usually left the lumen itself, as well as lipid particles, devoid of reaction. The differences in Con A, RCA I, and HPA reactivity between cis, intermediate, and trans cisternae suggest compositional and structural differences of the carbohydrates in the respective compartments; they may reflect conversion processes that are known to occur in the oligosaccharide side chains of glycoconjugates at the Golgi complex level.

  19. Specific Endocytosis Blockade of Trypanosoma cruzi Exposed to a Poly-LAcNAc Binding Lectin Suggests that Lectin-Sugar Interactions Participate to Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Brosson, Sébastien; Fontaine, Frédéric; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne; Bousbata, Sabrina; Salmon, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite transmitted by a triatomine insect, and causing human Chagas disease in South America. This parasite undergoes a complex life cycle alternating between non-proliferative and dividing forms. Owing to their high energy requirement, replicative epimastigotes of the insect midgut display high endocytic activity. This activity is mainly restricted to the cytostome, by which the cargo is taken up and sorted through the endosomal vesicular network to be delivered to reservosomes, the final lysosomal-like compartments. In African trypanosomes tomato lectin (TL) and ricin, respectively specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine (poly-LacNAc) and β-D-galactose, allowed the identification of giant chains of poly-LacNAc in N-glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway. We show that in T. cruzi epimastigote forms also, glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway are characterized by the presence of N-linked glycans binding to both ricin and TL. Affinity chromatography using both TL and Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSLII), specific to non-reducing terminal residue of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), led to an enrichment of glycoproteins of the trypanosomal endocytic pathway. Incubation of live parasites with TL, which selectively bound to the cytostome/cytopharynx, specifically inhibited endocytosis of transferrin (Tf) but not dextran, a marker of fluid endocytosis. Taken together, our data suggest that N-glycan modification of endocytic components plays a crucial role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of T. cruzi. PMID:27685262

  20. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  1. Purification of Two Novel Sugar Acid-binding Lectins from Haplomitrium Mnioides (bryophyte, Plantae) and their Preliminary Characterization.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Two novel sugar acid-binding lectins were purified from Haplomitrium mnioides (Lindb.) Schust. using a procedure consisting of ammonium sulfate precipitation, G-50 gel filtration, hydroxyapatite chromatography, and HW-50 gel filtration. We reported their partial physicochemical properties: molecular weight, affinity for carbohydrates and organic acids, pH stability, and dependence of their hemagglutination activity on metal ions. We also determined their N-terminal amino acid sequences. H. mnioides lectins (HMLs) were monomers (one with a molecular weight of approximately 27 kDa, and the other with a molecular weight of approximately 105 kDa) under both nonreducing and reducing conditions. They were named HML27 and HML105, respectively. Both HMLs had an affinity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, D-glucuronic acid, D-glucaric acid, bovine submaxillary mucin, heparin, and organic acids, such as citrate, 2-oxoglutaric acid, and D-2-hydroxyglutarate. Furthermore, HML27 had an affinity for α-D-galacturonic acid, D-malate, L-malate, and pyruvate, while HML105 had an affinity for D-gluconic acid. HML27 and HML105 are novel plant lectins: they have an affinity for sugar acids and organic acids and specifically recognize the carboxyl group, and there is no homology between their N-terminal amino acid sequences and those of the previously described lectins and agglutinins.

  2. Probing lectin and sperm with carbohydrate-modified quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Anandakathir; Fang, Jim-Min; Chou, Pi-Tai; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Chu, Rea-Min; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2005-10-01

    We report the encapsulation of quantum dots with biologically important beta-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in different ratios, together with studies of their specific/sensitive multivalent interactions with lectins and sperm by fluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering microscopy, confocal imaging techniques, and flow cytometry. These GlcNAc-encapsulated quantum dots (QDGLNs) specifically bind to wheat germ agglutinin, and cause fluorescence quenching and aggregation. Further studies of QDGLNs and the mannose-encapsulated QDs (QDMANs) with sperm revealed site-specific interactions, in which QDGLNs bind to the head of the sperm, while QDMANs spread over the whole sperm body.

  3. L-Rhamnose-binding lectin from eggs of the Echinometra lucunter: Amino acid sequence and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; de Melo, Arthur Alves; de Almeida, Alexandra Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; de Sousa, Oscarina Viana; da Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2015-01-01

    An L-rhamnose-binding lectin named ELEL was isolated from eggs of the rock boring sea urchin Echinometra lucunter by affinity chromatography on lactosyl-agarose. ELEL is a homodimer linked by a disulfide bond with subunits of 11 kDa each. The new lectin was inhibited by saccharides possessing the same configuration of hydroxyl groups at C-2 and C-4, such as L-rhamnose, melibiose, galactose and lactose. The amino acid sequence of ELEL was determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The ELEL subunit has 103 amino acids, including nine cysteine residues involved in four conserved intrachain disulfide bonds and one interchain disulfide bond. The full sequence of ELEL presents conserved motifs commonly found in rhamnose-binding lectins, including YGR, DPC and KYL. A three-dimensional model of ELEL was created, and molecular docking revealed favorable binding energies for interactions between ELEL and rhamnose, melibiose and Gb3 (Galα1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1-Cer). Furthermore, ELEL was able to agglutinate Gram-positive bacterial cells, suggesting its ability to recognize pathogens.

  4. Characterization of the oligomer structure of recombinant human mannan-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia H; Weilguny, Dietmar; Matthiesen, Finn; McGuire, Kirsten A; Shi, Lei; Højrup, Peter

    2005-03-25

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) belongs to a family of proteins called the collectins, which show large differences in their ultrastructures. These differences are believed to be determined by different N-terminal disulfide-bonding patterns. So far only the bonding pattern of two of the simple forms (recombinant rat MBL-C and bovine CL-43) have been determined. Recombinant MBL expressed in human cells was purified, and the structure of the N-terminal region was determined. Preliminary results on human plasma-derived MBL revealed high similarity to the recombinant protein. Here we report the structure of the N-terminal part of recombinant human MBL and present a model to explain the oligomerization pattern. Using a strategy of consecutive enzymatic digestions and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, we succeeded in identifying a number of disulfide-linked peptides from the N-terminal cysteine-rich region. Based on these building blocks, we propose a model that can explain the various oligomeric forms found in purified MBL preparations. Furthermore, the model was challenged by the production of cysteine to serine mutants of the three N-terminally situated cysteines. The oligomerization patterns of these mutants support the proposed model. The model indicates that the polypeptide dimer is the basic unit in the oligomerization.

  5. Purification of a novel chitin-binding lectin with antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities from a bangladeshi cultivar of potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Ozeki, Yasuhiro; Kabir, Syed Rashel

    2014-04-01

    A new chitin-binding lectin was purified from a Bangladeshi cultivar 'Deshi' of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) through anion-exchange and affinity chromatographies using a chitin column. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed the molecular mass of the lectin as 20,000 Daltons. This molecular mass was almost half of the molecular masses of chitin-binding lectins derived from other potatoes. The lectin showed both bactericidal and growth-inhibiting activities against Gram-positive (Listeria monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis and Shigella boydii) pathogenic bacteria. It also showed antifungal activity against Rhizopus spp., Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus niger. Biofilm produced by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa was dose-dependently reduced by 5-20% in 24 h after administration of the lectin, which was attributed to the glycan-binding property of the lectin having affinity to GlcNAc polymers. It was the first observation that any potato lectin prevented biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa and, therefore, could have possible applications in clinical microbiology and biomedical science.

  6. Localization of binding sites of Ulex europaeus I, Helix pomatia and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 lectins and analysis of their backbone structures by several glycosidases and poly-N-acetyllactosamine-specific lectins in human breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ito, N; Imai, S; Haga, S; Nagaike, C; Morimura, Y; Hatake, K

    1996-09-01

    Several studies have shown the deletion of blood group A or B antigens and the accumulation of H antigens in human breast carcinomas. Other studies have independently demonstrated that the binding sites of lectins such as Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) and Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I-B4 (GSAI-B4) are highly expressed in these cells. In order to clarify the molecular mechanisms of malignant transformation and metastasis of carcinoma cells, it is important to understand the relationship between such phenotypically distinct events. For this purpose, we examined whether the binding sites of these lectins and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) are expressed concomitantly in the same carcinoma cells and analyzed their backbone structures. The expression of the binding sites of these lectins was observed independently of the blood group (ABO) of the patients and was not affected by the histological type of the carcinomas. Observation of serial sections stained with these lectins revealed that the distribution of HPA binding sites was almost identical to that of GSAI-B4 in most cases. Furthermore, in some cases, UEA-I binding patterns were similar to those of HPA and GSAI-B4 but in other cases, mosaic staining patterns with these lectins were also observed, i.e., some cell clusters were stained with both HPA and GSAI-B4 but not with UEA-I and adjacent cell clusters were stained only with UEA-I. Digestion with endo-beta-galactosidase or N-glycosidase F markedly reduced the staining intensity of these lectins. Together with the reduction of staining by these lectins, reactivity with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II appeared in carcinoma cells following endo-beta-galactosidase digestion. Among the lectins specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine, Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (LEA) most vividly and consistently stained the cancer cells. Next to LEA, pokeweed mitogen agglutinin was also effective in staining these cells. Carcinoma cells reactive with these

  7. Crystal structure of native and Cd/Cd-substituted Dioclea guianensis seed lectin. A novel manganese-binding site and structural basis of dimer-tetramer association.

    PubMed

    Wah, D A; Romero, A; Gallego del Sol, F; Cavada, B S; Ramos, M V; Grangeiro, T B; Sampaio, A H; Calvete, J J

    2001-07-20

    Diocleinae legume lectins are a group of oligomeric proteins whose subunits display a high degree of primary structure and tertiary fold conservation but exhibit considerable diversity in their oligomerisation modes. To elucidate the structural determinants underlaying Diocleinae lectin oligomerisation, we have determined the crystal structures of native and cadmium-substituted Dioclea guianensis (Dguia) seed lectin. These structures have been solved by molecular replacement using concanavalin (ConA) coordinates as the starting model, and refined against data to 2.0 A resolution. In the native (Mn/Ca-Dguia) crystal form (P4(3)2(1)2), the asymmetric unit contains two monomers arranged into a canonical legume lectin dimer, and the tetramer is formed with a symmetry-related dimer. In the Cd/Cd-substituted form (I4(1)22), the asymmetric unit is occupied by a monomer. In both crystal forms, the tetrameric association is achieved by the corresponding symmetry operators. Like other legume lectins, native D. guianensis lectin contains manganese and calcium ions bound in the vicinity of the saccharide-combining site. The architecture of these metal-binding sites (S1 and S2) changed only slightly in the cadmium/cadmium-substituted form. A highly ordered calcium (native lectin) or cadmium (Cd/Cd-substituted lectin) ion is coordinated at the interface between dimers that are not tetrameric partners in a similar manner as the previously identified Cd(2+) in site S3 of a Cd/Ca-ConA. An additional Mn(2+) coordination site (called S5), whose presence has not been reported in crystal structures of any other homologous lectin, is present in both, the Mn/Ca and the Cd/Cd-substituted D. guianensis lectin forms. On the other hand, comparison of the primary and quaternary crystal structures of seed lectins from D. guianensis and Dioclea grandiflora (1DGL) indicates that the loop comprising residues 117-123 is ordered to make interdimer contacts in the D. grandiflora lectin structure

  8. Binding of different monosaccharides by lectin PA-IIL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: thermodynamics data correlated with X-ray structures.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Charles; Mitchell, Edward P; Pokorná, Martina; Gautier, Catherine; Utille, Jean-Pierre; Wimmerová, Michaela; Imberty, Anne

    2006-02-06

    The lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IIL) is involved in host recognition and biofilm formation. Lectin not only displays an unusually high affinity for fucose but also binds to L-fucose, L-galactose and D-arabinose that differ only by the group at position 5 of the sugar ring. Isothermal calorimetry experiments provided precise determination of affinity for the three methyl-glycosides and revealed a large enthalpy contribution. The crystal structures of the complexes of PA-IIL with L-galactose and Met-beta-D-arabinoside have been determined and compared with the PA-IIL/fucose complex described previously. A combination of the structures and thermodynamics provided clues for the role of the hydrophobic group in affinity.

  9. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier.

  10. Binding of navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectin to the intestinal cells of the rat and its effect on the absorption of glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Donatucci, D.A.; Liener, I.E.; Gross, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    The main objectives of this investigation were to study the binding of a lectin from navy beans with the epithelial cells of the rat intestine and to assess the effect of such binding on the ability of the intestine to absorb glucose. A Scatchard plot, based on the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled lectin to isolated intestinal epithelial cells, was used to calculate an association constant (Ka) of 15 x 10(6)M-1 and the number of binding sites per cell, 12 x 10(6). Metabolic studies were conducted over a period of 5 d on groups of rats fed raw or autoclaved navy bean flour and casein with or without the purified lectin. Growth, protein digestibility, biological value and net protein utilization were significantly lower in animals that had been fed raw navy bean flour or casein plus lectin than in control groups fed diets containing autoclaved navy bean flour or casein alone. Vascular perfusion was used to measure the rate of uptake of glucose by the intestines of rats that had received the various dietary treatments. The rate of absorption of (/sup 14/C)glucose by intestines from rats fed raw navy bean flour or casein plus lectin was approximately one-half that of their counterparts fed the autoclaved flour or casein alone. These results provide evidence that the lectin, by virtue of its interference with intestinal absorption, is responsible, at least in part, for the nutritional inferiority of raw navy beans.

  11. Monomerization of the viral entry inhibitor griffithsin yields insights into the relationship between multivalent binding to high mannose oligosaccharides and antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B.; Dauter, Zbigniew; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer. PMID:20826337

  12. A glucuronic acid binding leguminous lectin with mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-02-01

    A dimeric 64-kDa lectin was purified from seeds of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) cultivar number 1. The purification protocol entailed Q-Sepharose, Affi-gel blue gel, Mono S and Superdex 75. The lectin-enriched fraction was adsorbed on Q-Sepharose and Affi-gel blue gel and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Hemagglutinating activity was adsorbed on Mono S and eluted with a linear 0.3-1 M NaCl gradient. Gel filtration on Superdex 75 yielded a single absorbance peak which appeared as a single 32-kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate poylacylamide gel electrophoresis. Full hemagglutinating activity was observed when the lectin was exposed to a pH ranging from 3 to 11. About 50% activity remained at pH 12, and about 25% at pH 0 to pH 2. Activity was totally abolished at pH 13-14. The activity was completely preserved when the ambient temperature was 20 °C-60 °C. However, only 50% and 12.5% of the activity remained at 65 °C and 70 °C, respectively. Activity was barely discernible at 75 °C and completely abrogated at and above 80 °C. Hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by glucuronic acid. Maximum mitogenic activity of the lectin toward murine splenocytes occurred at a lectin concentration of 0.488 µM. The mitogenic activity was nearly eliminated in the presence of 250 mM glucuronic acid. The lectin did not exhibit antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) cells, breast cancer (MCF7) cells, and nasopharynegeal carcinoma CNE stage 1 and stage 2 cells. It was also devoid of significant anti-HIV reverse transcriptase activity.

  13. Docking, synthesis, and NMR studies of mannosyl trisaccharide ligands for DC-SIGN lectin.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Díaz, Irene; Nieto, Pedro M; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2008-08-07

    DC-SIGN, a lectin, which presents at the surface of immature dendritic cells, constitutes nowadays a promising target for the design of new antiviral drugs. This lectin recognizes highly glycosylated proteins present at the surface of several pathogens such as HIV, Ebola virus, Candida albicans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, etc. Understanding the binding mode of this lectin is a topic of tremendous interest and will permit a rational design of new and more selective ligands. Here, we present computational and experimental tools to study the interaction of di- and trisaccharides with DC-SIGN. Docking analysis of complexes involving mannosyl di- and trisaccharides and the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN have been performed. Trisaccharides Manalpha1,2[Manalpha1,6]Man 1 and Manalpha1,3[Manalpha1,6]Man 2 were synthesized from an orthogonally protected mannose as a common intermediate. Using these ligands and the soluble extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN, NMR experiments based on STD and transfer-NOE were performed providing additional information. Conformational analysis of the mannosyl ligands in the free and bound states was done. These studies have demonstrated that terminal mannoses at positions 2 or 3 in the trisaccharides are the most important moiety and present the strongest contact with the binding site of the lectin. Multiple binding modes could be proposed and therefore should be considered in the design of new ligands.

  14. Isolation and biochemical characterization of a galactoside binding lectin from Bauhinia variegata candida (BvcL) seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, José A; Damico, Daniela C S; Baldasso, Paulo A; Mattioli, Marcelo A; Winck, Flávia V; Fraceto, Leonardo F; Novello, José C; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2007-04-01

    A new lectin (BvcL) from seeds of a primitive Brazilian Caesalpinoideae, the Bauhinia variegata candida was purified and biochemical characterized. BvcL was isolated by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G75 and affinity chromatography on immobilized D: -lactose column. SDS-PAGE showed that BvcL under non-reducing condition presents two bands of 68 and 32 kDa and a single band of 32 kDa in reducing condition. However, only one band was seen in native PAGE. The hemagglutination activity of BvcL was not specific for any human blood group trypsin-treated erythrocytes. Carbohydrate inhibition analysis indicated that BvcL is inhibited by lactose, galactose, galactosamine and other galactoside derivates. Amino acid analysis revealed a large content of Ser, Gly, Thr, Asp and Glu and low concentrations of Met, Cys and His. Intrinsic fluorescence of BvcL was not significantly affected by sugar binding galactose; and aromatic-region CD is unusually high for plant lectins. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of 17 residues showed 90% sequential homology to galactose-specific legume lectins of the subfamily Caesalpinoideae.

  15. The D-galactose-binding lectin of the octocoral Sinularia lochmodes: characterization and possible relationship to the symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, M; Yanohara, T; Koike, K; Koike, K; Sakai, R; Muramoto, K; Kamiya, H

    2000-02-01

    A D-galactose binding lectin (SLL-2) was isolated from Sinularia lochmodes, an octocoral, by a combination of affinity chromatography on acid-treated agarose and FPLC on Superdex 200. SLL-2 agglutinated rabbit and horse erythrocytes while SLL-1, a minor component, reacted only with rabbit erythrocytes. SLL-2 is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 122 kDa and is composed of eight identical subunits (15 kDa). The sequence of the amino terminal region of SLL-2 did not show any apparent homology to the sequences of other animal and plant lectins. D-Galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, lactose, and melibiose were moderate inhibitors to the agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes. In contrast, horse erythrocytes were much more susceptible to agglutination by SLL-2, which was inhibited by sugars and glycoproteins such as D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, lactose, melibiose, and porcine stomach mucin. SLL-2 showed considerable tolerance to heating and kept its activity after heating at 80 degrees C for 60 min. In immuno-histochemical studies using an anti-SLL-2 antiserum and protein A gold conjugate, SLL-2 was found to be present in high amounts in the nematocysts. SLL-2 was also detected on the surface of symbiotic dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium sp. cells irrespective whether they were surrounded with or without host cells. These observations suggest the presence of lectin-mediated interaction between symbiotic dinoflagellates and S. lochmodes.

  16. Determining the binding affinities of prostate-specific antigen to lectins: SPR and microarray approaches.

    PubMed

    Damborský, Pavel; Zámorová, Martina; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common newly diagnosed cancers among men and we focused on its traditional biomarker, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), using targeted glycomics-based strategies. The aberrant glycosylation pattern of PSA may serve as a valuable tool for improving PCa diagnosis including its early-stage. In this study, we evaluated the usability of two techniques, surface plasmon resonance and protein microarray assay, for the study and characterization of interactions of PSA (both free and complexed) with six lectins (SNA, ConA, RCA, AAL, WGA and MAA II). The information on the character of such interactions is important for the application of lectins as prospective bioreceptors for biomarker glycoprofiling in a follow-up biosensing assays. SPR as well as established bioanalytical techniques allowed determination of KD values of PSA-lectin interactions in a more reliable way than protein microarray. The protein microarray method did not allow accurate quantification of KD values. However, the features of a microarray approach, such as speed and costs, enabled the screening and estimation of the nature of lectin-glycan biomarker interaction in an effective and time-saving way. All of the tested lectins interacted with commercial PSA standard isolated from healthy persons, except MAA II which reacted only very weakly.

  17. Putative roles for a rhamnose binding lectin in Flavobacterium columnare pathogenesis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Beck, Benjamin H; Farmer, Bradley D; Straus, David L; Li, Chao; Peatman, Eric

    2012-10-01

    Columnaris disease, caused by the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare, continues to be a major problem worldwide and commonly leads to tremendous losses of both wild and cultured freshwater fish, particularly in intensively farmed aquaculture species such as channel catfish. Despite its ecologic and economic impacts, the fundamental molecular mechanisms of the host immune response to this pathogen remain unclear. While F. columnare can induce marked pathologic changes in numerous ectopic tissues, the adhesion of F. columnare to the gill in particular is strongly associated with pathogen virulence and host susceptibility. Recently, in this regard, using RNA-seq expression profiling we found that a rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) was dramatically upregulated in the gill of fish infected with F. columnare (as compared to naïve fish). Thus, in the present study we sought to further characterize and understand the RBL response in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). We first identified two distinct catfish families with differential susceptibilities to columnaris disease; one family was found to be completely resistant while the other was susceptible (0% mortality versus 18.3% respectively, P < 0.001). Exclusively, in the susceptible family, we observed an acute and robust upregulation in catfish RBL that persisted for at least 24 h (P < 0.05). To elucidate whether RBL play a more direct role in columnaris pathogenesis, we exposed channel catfish to different doses of the putative RBL ligands l-rhamnose and d-galactose, and found that these sugars, protected channel catfish against columnaris disease, likely through competition with F. columnare binding of host RBL. Finally, we examined the role of nutritional status on RBL regulation and found that RBL expression was upregulated (>120-fold; P < 0.05) in fish fasted for 7 d (as compared to fish fed to satiation daily), yet expression levels returned to those of satiated fish within 4 h after re

  18. Characterization of Glycoconjugates of Extracellular Polymeric Substances in Tufa-Associated Biofilms by Using Fluorescence Lectin-Binding Analysis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zippel, B.; Neu, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater tufa deposits are the result of calcification associated with biofilms dominated by cyanobacteria. Recent investigations highlighted the fact that the formation of microbial calcium carbonates is mainly dependent on the saturation index, which is determined by pH, the ion activity of Ca2+ and CO32−, and the occurrence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by microorganisms. EPS, which contain carboxyl and/or hydroxyl groups, can strongly bind cations. This may result in inhibition of CaCO3 precipitation. In contrast, the formation of templates for crystal nucleation was reported by many previous investigations. The purposes of this study were (i) to characterize the in situ distribution of EPS glycoconjugates in tufa-associated biofilms of two German hard-water creeks by employing fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA), (ii) to verify the specific lectin-binding pattern by competitive-inhibition assays, and (iii) to assess whether carbonates are associated with structural EPS domains. Three major in situ EPS domains (cyanobacterial, network-like, and cloud-like structures) were detected by FLBA in combination with laser scanning microscopy (LSM). Based on lectin specificity, the EPS glycoconjugates produced by cyanobacteria contained mainly fucose, amino sugars (N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-galactosamine), and sialic acid. Tufa deposits were irregularly covered by network-like EPS structures, which may originate from cyanobacterial EPS secretions. Cloud-like EPS glycoconjugates were dominated by sialic acid, amino sugars, and galactose. In some cases calcium carbonate crystals were associated with cyanobacterial EPS glycoconjugates. The detection of amino sugars and calcium carbonate in close association with decaying sheath material indicated that microbially mediated processes might be important for calcium carbonate precipitation in freshwater tufa systems. PMID:21097578

  19. Isothermal titration calorimetric and computational studies on the binding of chitooligosaccharides to pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Singla, Hitesh; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Swamy, Musti J

    2011-04-14

    The interaction of chitooligosaccharides [(GlcNAc)(2-6)] with pumpkin phloem exudate lectin (PPL) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry and computational methods. The dimeric PPL binds to (GlcNAc)(3-5) with binding constants of 1.26-1.53 × 10(5) M(-1) at 25 °C, whereas chitobiose exhibits approximately 66-fold lower affinity. Interestingly, chitohexaose shows nearly 40-fold higher affinity than chitopentaose with a binding constant of 6.16 × 10(6) M(-1). The binding stoichiometry decreases with an increase in the oligosaccharide size from 2.26 for chitobiose to 1.08 for chitohexaose. The binding reaction was essentially enthalpy driven with negative entropic contribution, suggesting that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' interactions are the main factors that stabilize PPL-saccharide association. The three-dimensional structure of PPL was predicted by homology modeling, and binding of chitooligosaccharides was investigated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, which showed that the protein binding pocket can accommodate up to three GlcNAc residues, whereas additional residues in chitotetraose and chitopentaose did not exhibit any interactions with the binding pocket. Docking studies with chitohexaose indicated that the two triose units of the molecule could interact with different protein binding sites, suggesting formation of higher order complexes by the higher oligomers of GlcNAc by their simultaneous interaction with two protein molecules.

  20. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  1. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M; Ryan, Christopher M; Johnson, Patricia J; O'Keefe, Barry R; Secor, W Evan; Anderson, Deborah J; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas.

  2. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  3. Isolation and determination of the primary structure of a lectin protein from the serum of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Merchant, Mark E; Maccha, Venkata; Siddavarapu, Vivekananda Reddy; Hasan, Azeem; Murray, Kermit K

    2012-02-01

    Mass spectrometry in conjunction with de novo sequencing was used to determine the amino acid sequence of a 35kDa lectin protein isolated from the serum of the American alligator that exhibits binding to mannose. The protein N-terminal sequence was determined using Edman degradation and enzymatic digestion with different proteases was used to generate peptide fragments for analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS). Separate analysis of the protein digests with multiple enzymes enhanced the protein sequence coverage. De novo sequencing was accomplished using MASCOT Distiller and PEAKS software and the sequences were searched against the NCBI database using MASCOT and BLAST to identify homologous peptides. MS analysis of the intact protein indicated that it is present primarily as monomer and dimer in vitro. The isolated 35kDa protein was ~98% sequenced and found to have 313 amino acids and nine cysteine residues and was identified as an alligator lectin. The alligator lectin sequence was aligned with other lectin sequences using DIALIGN and ClustalW software and was found to exhibit 58% and 59% similarity to both human and mouse intelectin-1. The alligator lectin exhibited strong binding affinities toward mannan and mannose as compared to other tested carbohydrates.

  4. A lectin-based gold nanoparticle assay for probing glycosylation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pomales, Germarie; Morris, Todd A; Falabella, James B; Tarlov, Michael J; Zangmeister, Rebecca A

    2012-09-01

    We report a glycoanalysis method in which lectins are used to probe the glycans of therapeutic glycoproteins that are adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. A model mannose-presenting glycoprotein, ribonuclease B (RNase B), and the therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab, were found to adsorb spontaneously and non-specifically to bare gold nanoparticles such that glycans were accessible for lectin binding. Addition of a multivalent binding lectin, such as concanavalin A (Con A), to a solution of the modified gold nanoparticles resulted in cross-linking of the nanoparticles. This phenomenon was evidenced within 1 min by a change in the hydrodynamic diameter, D(H), measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and a shift and increase in absorbance of the plasmon resonance band of the gold nanoparticles. By combining the sugar-binding specificity and the cross-linking capabilities of lectins, the non-specific adsorption of glycoproteins to gold surfaces, and the unique optical reporting properties of gold nanoparticles, a glycosylation pattern of rituximab could be generated. This assay provides advantages over currently used glycoanalysis methods in terms of short analysis time, simplicity of the conjugation method, convenience of simple spectroscopic detection, and feasibility of providing glycan characterization of the protein drug product by using a variety of binding lectins.

  5. Developmental regulation of neuraminidase-sensitive lectin-binding glycoproteins during myogenesis of rat L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, P C; Pena, S D; Guerin, C W

    1984-01-01

    Intact monolayers of L6 myoblasts were treated with neuraminidase, with the aim of selectively removing sialic acid residues of cell-surface glycoproteins. Neuraminidase treatment unmasked binding sites for Ricinus communis agglutinin I and peanut agglutinin, thus allowing the identification of the major binding proteins for these lectins. For Ricinus communis agglutinin I these neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins had apparent Mr values of 136000, 115000, 87000, 83000 and 49000. For peanut agglutinin the major neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins had apparent Mr values of 200000, 136000, 87000 and 83000. We found highly reproducible, developmentally regulated, changes in the lectin-binding capacity of certain of these glycoproteins as L6 myoblasts differentiated into myotubes. Coincident with myoblast fusion there was a co-ordinate decrease in Ricinus communis agglutinin I binding by glycoproteins of apparent Mr of 136000 and 49000. There was also a co-ordinate shift in mobility of the broad band of glycoprotein, centred at an apparent Mr of 115000 in myoblasts, to a new average apparent Mr of 107000 in mid-fusion cultures and myotube cultures. Peanut agglutinin binding by the major protein of apparent Mr 136000 also decreased at the mid-fusion stage of myogenesis, and was barely detectable in 7-day-old fused cultures. These developmentally regulated changes in neuraminidase-sensitive glycoproteins were all inhibited by growth of myoblasts in 6.4 microM-5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, indicating that they are associated with myoblast differentiation. In contrast, an increase in fibronectin was seen in mid-fusion cultures, which was not inhibited by growth of myoblasts in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. This initial increase in fibronectin is, therefore, unlikely to be directly related to myoblast fusion or differentiation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6712625

  6. HIV-1 gp120 Mannoses Induce Immunosuppressive Responses from Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Meimei; Klasse, Per Johan; Banerjee, Kaustuv; Dey, Antu K; Iyer, Sai Prasad N; Dionisio, Robert; Charles, Dustin; Campbell-Gardener, Lila; Olson, William C; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P

    2007-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is a vaccine immunogen that can signal via several cell surface receptors. To investigate whether receptor biology could influence immune responses to gp120, we studied its interaction with human, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) in vitro. Gp120 from the HIV-1 strain JR-FL induced IL-10 expression in MDDCs from 62% of donors, via a mannose C-type lectin receptor(s) (MCLR). Gp120 from the strain LAI was also an IL-10 inducer, but gp120 from the strain KNH1144 was not. The mannose-binding protein cyanovirin-N, the 2G12 mAb to a mannose-dependent gp120 epitope, and MCLR-specific mAbs inhibited IL-10 expression, as did enzymatic removal of gp120 mannose moieties, whereas inhibitors of signaling via CD4, CCR5, or CXCR4 were ineffective. Gp120-stimulated IL-10 production correlated with DC-SIGN expression on the cells, and involved the ERK signaling pathway. Gp120-treated MDDCs also responded poorly to maturation stimuli by up-regulating activation markers inefficiently and stimulating allogeneic T cell proliferation only weakly. These adverse reactions to gp120 were MCLR-dependent but independent of IL-10 production. Since such mechanisms might suppress immune responses to Env-containing vaccines, demannosylation may be a way to improve the immunogenicity of gp120 or gp140 proteins. PMID:17983270

  7. Comparison of the antimicrobial adhesion potential of human body fluid glycoconjugates using fucose-binding lectin (PA-IIL) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEA-I).

    PubMed

    Lerrer, Batia; Lesman-Movshovich, Efrat; Gilboa-Garber, Nechama

    2005-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a fucose-binding lectin (PA-IIL) which strongly binds to human cells. This lectin was shown to be highly sensitive to inhibition by fucose-bearing human milk glycoproteins. Since the glycans of these glycoproteins mimic human cell receptors, they may function as decoys in blocking lectin-dependent pathogen adhesion to the host cells. Human saliva and seminal fluid also contain such compounds, and body fluids of individuals who are "secretors" express additional fucosylated (alpha 1,2) residues. The latter are selectively detected by Ulex europaeus lectin UEA-I. The aim of the present research was to compare the PA-IIL and UEA-I interactions with human salivas and seminal fluids of "secretors" and "nonsecretors" with those obtained with the respective milks. Using hemagglutination inhibition and Western blot analyses, we showed that PA-IIL interactions with the saliva and seminal fluid glycoproteins were somewhat weaker than those obtained with the milk and that "nonsecretor" body fluids were not less efficient than those of "secretors" in PA-IIL blocking. UEA-I, which interacted only with the "secretors" glycoproteins, was most sensitive to those of the seminal fluids.

  8. A lectin isolated from bananas is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Michael D; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Markovitz, David M

    2010-03-19

    BanLec is a jacalin-related lectin isolated from the fruit of bananas, Musa acuminata. This lectin binds to high mannose carbohydrate structures, including those found on viruses containing glycosylated envelope proteins such as human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Therefore, we hypothesized that BanLec might inhibit HIV-1 through binding of the glycosylated HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. We determined that BanLec inhibits primary and laboratory-adapted HIV-1 isolates of different tropisms and subtypes. BanLec possesses potent anti-HIV activity, with IC(50) values in the low nanomolar to picomolar range. The mechanism for BanLec-mediated antiviral activity was investigated by determining if this lectin can directly bind the HIV-1 envelope protein and block entry of the virus into the cell. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed direct binding of BanLec to gp120 and indicated that BanLec can recognize the high mannose structures that are recognized by the monoclonal antibody 2G12. Furthermore, BanLec is able to block HIV-1 cellular entry as indicated by temperature-sensitive viral entry studies and by the decreased levels of the strong-stop product of early reverse transcription seen in the presence of BanLec. Thus, our data indicate that BanLec inhibits HIV-1 infection by binding to the glycosylated viral envelope and blocking cellular entry. The relative anti-HIV activity of BanLec compared favorably to other anti-HIV lectins, such as snowdrop lectin and Griffithsin, and to T-20 and maraviroc, two anti-HIV drugs currently in clinical use. Based on these results, BanLec is a potential component for an anti-viral microbicide that could be used to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1.

  9. Defensins, lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A: microbe-binding biomolecules that contribute to mucosal immunity in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors - enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A - that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes.

  10. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and mannan-binding lectin (MBL): on constant alert in a hostile environment.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Ingrid-Maria

    2011-05-01

    In the beginning were neither B cells nor T cells nor antibodies, but innate immune defense alone. The primary functional theme of innate immunity is the distinction between self and non-self, which is maintained by a vast number of cellular and subcellular components. In this context, the immense importance of the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is well established. Positive (Darwinian) selection seems to be acting on the ligand-binding domains of these molecules, suggesting a selection pattern similar to that previously observed in the MHC proteins. In sharp contrast to TLRs, the biological significance of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is controversial, and, concerning humans, it has been suggested that low concentration of MBL in serum represents a selective advantage. In this mini-review, based on a doctoral thesis, evolutionary aspects of TLRs and MBL are discussed.

  11. Defensins, Lectins, Mucins and Secretory Immunoglobulin A: Microbe-Binding Biomolecules that Contribute to Mucosal Immunity in the Human Gut

    PubMed Central

    Chairatana, Phoom; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    In the intestine, the mucosal immune system plays essential roles in maintaining homeostasis between the host and microorganisms, and protecting the host from pathogenic invaders. Epithelial cells produce and release a variety of biomolecules into the mucosa and lumen that contribute to immunity. In this review, we focus on a subset of these remarkable host-defense factors – enteric α-defensins, select lectins, mucins, and secretory immunoglobulin A – that have the capacity to bind microbes and thereby contribute to barrier function in the human gut. We provide an overview of the intestinal epithelium, describe specialized secretory cells named Paneth cells, and summarize our current understanding of the biophysical and functional properties of these select microbe-binding biomolecules. We intend for this compilation to complement prior reviews on intestinal host-defense factors, highlight recent advances in the field, and motivate investigations that further illuminate molecular mechanisms as well as the interplay between these molecules and microbes. PMID:27841019

  12. Histochemical specificity of beta-galactose binding lectins from Arachis hypogaea (peanut) and Ricinus communis (castor bean).

    PubMed

    Hennigar, L M; Hennigar, R A; Schulte, B A

    1987-09-01

    Previous histochemical studies have demonstrated disparities in the binding of two lectins with a nominal specificity for terminal beta-D-galactose. Biochemical studies have shown that the most complementary structure for binding peanut agglutinin (PNA) is the terminal disaccharide Gal-(beta 1----3)-GalNAc, whereas the most complementary structure for binding Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I) is the terminal disaccharide Gal-(beta 1----4)-GlcNAc. However, it is not known if only these differences in affinity account for the different histochemical staining reactions observed on tissue sections. In the present study we compared the staining patterns of PNA and RCA I by inhibiting in situ the binding of each lectin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with increasing concentrations of unlabeled PNA or RCA I. The PNA-HRP conjugate did not stain most tissue sites suspected of containing an abundance of glycoconjugates with terminal Gal-(beta 1----4)-GlcNAc. Moreover, unlabeled PNA failed to significantly inhibit strong RCA I-HRP staining in these sites. In loci thought to contain variable amounts of glycoconjugates with terminal Gal-(beta 1----3)-GalNAc, unlabeled RCA I decreased PNA-HRP reactivity only slightly or not at all, whereas weak to strong RCA I-HRP staining was diminished or abolished by unlabeled PNA. The results suggest that PNA staining is restricted to glycoconjugates with terminal Gal-(beta 1----3)-GalNAc. RCA I apparently reacts most strongly with glycoconjugates having the terminal disaccharide Gal-(beta 1----4)-GlcNAc, but also stains sites containing a moderate to abundant amount of glycoconjugates with the terminal Gal-(beta 1----3)-GalNAc sequence.

  13. First evidence of protein G-binding protein in the most primitive vertebrate: serum lectin from lamprey (Lampetra japonica).

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuang; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Zhen; Xiao, Rong; Jin, Minli; Han, Yinglun; Su, Peng; Lv, Li; Wang, Jihong; Li, QingWei

    2013-12-01

    The intelectins, a recently identified subgroup of extracellular animal lectins, are glycan-binding receptors that recognize glycan epitopes on foreign pathogens in host systems. Here, we have described NPGBP (novel protein G-binding protein), a novel serum lectin found in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. RT-PCR yielded a 1005 bp cDNA sequence from the lamprey liver encoding a 334 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and aquatic organism intelectins. Gene expression analyses showed that the NPGBP gene was expressed in the blood, intestines, kidney, heart, gill, liver, adipose tissue and gonads. NPGBP was isolated by protein G-conjugated agarose immunoprecipitation, and SDS-PAGE analyses showed that NPGBP migrated as a specific band (∼35 and ∼124 kDa under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively). These results suggested that NPGBP forms monomers and tetramers. NPGBP gene expression was induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, and NPGBP showed different agglutination activities against pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The induction of NPGBP suggested that it plays an important role in defense against microorganisms in the internal circulation system of the lamprey. When incubated with an unrelated antibody, the specific binding between NPGBP and protein G was competitively inhibited, indicating that NPGBP and the Fc region of Ig bind to the same site on protein G. We thus assume that the tertiary structure of NPGBP is similar to that of the Fc region of Ig. Additionally, NPGBP can effectively promote endothelial cell mitosis. These findings suggest that NPGBP plays a role in the immune defense against microorganisms, and this study represents one of the few examples of the characterization and functional analysis of an aquatic organism intelectin.

  14. A novel thyroglobulin-binding lectin from the brown alga Hizikia fusiformis and its antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingjiang; Tong, Changqing; Wu, Yue; Liu, Shuai; Li, Wei

    2016-06-15

    A lectin (HFL) was isolated from the brown alga, Hizikia fusiformis, through ion exchange on cellulose DE52 and HPLC with a TSK-gel G4000PWXL column. SDS-PAGE showed that HFL had a molecular mass of 16.1 kDa. The HPLC (with a TSK-gel G4000PWXL column) indicated that HFL is a tetramer in its native state. The total carbohydrate content was 41%. Glucose, galactose and fucose were the monosaccharide units of HFL, and the normalized mol% values were 6, 14 and 80, respectively. HFL contains a large amount of the acidic amino acid, Asx. The β-elimination reaction suggested that the oligosaccharide and peptide moieties of HFL may belong to the N-glucosidic linkage. The amino acid sequences, of about five segments of HFL, were acquired by MALDI-TOF/TOF, and the sequences have no homology with other lectins. HFL was found to agglutinate sheep erythrocytes. The hemagglutination activity was inhibited by thyroglobulin, from bovine thyroid, but not by any of the monosaccharides tested. The lectin reaction was independent of the presence of the divalent cation Ca(2+). HFL showed free radical scavenging activity against hydroxyl, DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals.

  15. Structural Investigation of a Novel N-Acetyl Glucosamine Binding Chi-Lectin Which Reveals Evolutionary Relationship with Class III Chitinases

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Dipak N.; Datta, Manali; Dev, Aditya; Dhindwal, Sonali; Singh, Nirpendra; Dasauni, Pushpanjali; Kundu, Suman; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Tomar, Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2013-01-01

    The glycosyl hydrolase 18 (GH18) family consists of active chitinases as well as chitinase like lectins/proteins (CLPs). The CLPs share significant sequence and structural similarities with active chitinases, however, do not display chitinase activity. Some of these proteins are reported to have specific functions and carbohydrate binding property. In the present study, we report a novel chitinase like lectin (TCLL) from Tamarindus indica. The crystal structures of native TCLL and its complex with N-acetyl glucosamine were determined. Similar to the other CLPs of the GH18 members, TCLL lacks chitinase activity due to mutations of key active site residues. Comparison of TCLL with chitinases and other chitin binding CLPs shows that TCLL has substitution of some chitin binding site residues and more open binding cleft due to major differences in the loop region. Interestingly, the biochemical studies suggest that TCLL is an N-acetyl glucosamine specific chi-lectin, which is further confirmed by the complex structure of TCLL with N-acetyl glucosamine complex. TCLL has two distinct N-acetyl glucosamine binding sites S1 and S2 that contain similar polar residues, although interaction pattern with N-acetyl glucosamine varies extensively among them. Moreover, TCLL structure depicts that how plants utilize existing structural scaffolds ingenuously to attain new functions. To date, this is the first structural investigation of a chi-lectin from plants that explore novel carbohydrate binding sites other than chitin binding groove observed in GH18 family members. Consequently, TCLL structure confers evidence for evolutionary link of lectins with chitinases. PMID:23717482

  16. cDNA cloning, characterization, and pharmacologic evaluation of anticancer activity of a lectin gene in Pinellia integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Liu, L L; Yang, Z J; Peng, Z S

    2016-08-12

    Plant lectins are proteins that possess at least one non-catalytic domain, which could reversibly bind to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. The important roles played by plant lectins in immune regulation, signaling pathways, and plant defense could be attributed to their specific binding activities with carbohydrates. In this study, a Pinellia integrifolia lectin gene, designated pia, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The open reading frame (ORF) of pia was constructed into the pET-28a vector, and a 33-kDa recombinant protein was induced in Escherichia coli BL21. The hemagglutination and anticancer properties of the purified recombinant protein were assayed in vitro. The results indicated that the full-length cDNA of pia was 1210 bp long, containing an 807-bp ORF encoding a 268-amino acid peptide. The putative P. integrifolia lectin protein (PIA) contained three mannose-binding sites. The agglutinating activity exhibited by PIA was inhibited by D-mannose. PIA was also shown to exert an anti-proliferative activity against nasopharyngeal carcinoma, human cervical carcinoma, and human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. These results could be applied to determine the function of PIA in the future.

  17. Population heterogeneity in the surface expression of Ulex europaeus I-lectin (UEA I)-binding sites in cultured malignant and transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, I; Lehtonen, E; Närvänen, O; Leivo, I; Lehto, V P

    1985-11-01

    We studied the binding of fluorochrome-coupled Ulex europaeus I-lectin (UEA-I) to cultured malignant cells: all human malignant and transformed cells and also mouse teratocarcinoma cells examined gave a homogeneous cell membrane-type of surface staining only in some of the cells. Such a population heterogeneity appeared to be independent of the cell cycle. Instead, other lectin conjugates used bound homogeneously to all cells. In permeabilized cells, a juxtanuclear reticular staining of the Golgi apparatus was seen in the UEA-I-positive cells. No staining of the pericellular matrix components, produced by malignant cells grown in serum-free culture medium, could be obtained with TRITC-UEA-I. UEA-I-lectin recognized most polypeptides from A8387 fibrosarcoma cells and HeLa cells, metabolically labeled with [3H]fucose. Furthermore, surface labelling of these cells with the neuraminidase-galactose oxidase/sodium borohydride method disclosed that both UEA-I and Ricinus communis agglutinin I revealed the same major surface glycoproteins. Results with metabolically labelled cells showed, in addition, that UEA-I-lectin did not bind to secreted glycoproteins produced by A8387 cells and recognized by other lectins. The results indicate that transformed and malignant cells show a distinct population heterogeneity in their expression of some cell surface-associated fucosyl glycoconjugates. The results also suggest that malignant cells can glycosylate their membrane and secreted glycoproteins in a different manner.

  18. An N-linked high-mannose type oligosaccharide, expressed at the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia trachomatis, mediates attachment and infectivity of the microorganism to HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, C; Takahashi, N; Swanson, A F; Ozeki, Y; Hakomori, S

    1996-12-15

    The structure of the carbohydrate of the 40-kD major outer membrane component of Chlamydia trachomatis and its role in defining infectivity of the organism were investigated. The oligosaccharides were released from the glycoprotein by N-glycanase digestion, coupled to a 2-aminopyridyl residue, and subjected to two-dimensional sugar mapping technique. The major fractions consisted of "high-mannose type" oligosaccharides containing 8-9 mannose residues. Bi- and tri-antennary "complex type" oligosaccharides having terminal galactose were detected as minor components. These oligosaccharides were N-linked and contained no sialic acid. This structural profile is consistent with our previous characterization based on lectin-binding and glycosidase digestion. Functional specificity of identified chlamydial oligosaccharides was analyzed using glycopeptides fractionated from ovalbumin and structurally defined oligosaccharides from other sources. The glycopeptide fraction having high-mannose type oligosaccharide, as compared to those having complex or hybrid-type, showed a stronger inhibitory effect on attachment and infectivity of chlamydial organisms to HeLa cells. Among high-mannose type oligosaccharides, the strongest inhibition was observed with mannose 8 as compared with mannose 6, 7, or 9. These results indicate that a specific high-mannose type oligosaccharide linked to the major outer membrane protein of C. trachomatis mediates attachment and infectivity of the organism to HeLa cells.

  19. Single-chain antibody-fragment M6P-1 possesses a mannose 6-phosphate monosaccharide-specific binding pocket that distinguishes N-glycan phosphorylation in a branch-specific manner†

    PubMed Central

    Blackler, Ryan J; Evans, Dylan W; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Brooks, Cory L; Braulke, Thomas; Liu, Xinyu; Evans, Stephen V; Müller-Loennies, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P) on N-linked glycans of lysosomal enzymes is a structural requirement for their transport from the Golgi apparatus to lysosomes mediated by the mannose 6-phosphate receptors, 300 kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR300) and 46 kDa cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR46). Here we report that the single-chain variable domain (scFv) M6P-1 is a unique antibody fragment with specificity for Man6P monosaccharide that, through an array-screening approach against a number of phosphorylated N-glycans, is shown to bind mono- and diphosphorylated Man6 and Man7 glycans that contain terminal αMan6P(1 → 2)αMan(1 → 3)αMan. In contrast to MPR300, scFv M6P-1 does not bind phosphodiesters, monophosphorylated Man8 or mono- or diphosphorylated Man9 structures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to 2.7 Å resolution of Fv M6P-1 in complex with Man6P reveals that specificity and affinity is achieved via multiple hydrogen bonds to the mannose ring and two salt bridges to the phosphate moiety. In common with both MPRs, loss of binding was observed for scFv M6P-1 at pH values below the second pKa of Man6P (pKa = 6.1). The structures of Fv M6P-1 and the MPRs suggest that the change of the ionization state of Man6P is the main driving force for the loss of binding at acidic lysosomal pH (e.g. lysosome pH ∼ 4.6), which provides justification for the evolution of a lysosomal enzyme transport pathway based on Man6P recognition. PMID:26503547

  20. Advances in lectin microarray technology: Optimized protocols for piezoelectric print conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pilobello, Kanoelani T.; Agrawal, Praveen; Rouse, Richard; Mahal, Lara K.

    2015-01-01

    Lectin microarray technology has been used to profile the glycosylation of a multitude of biological and clinical samples, leading to new clinical biomarkers and advances in glycobiology. Lectin microarrays, which include over 90 plant lectins, recombinant lectins, and selected antibodies, are used to profile N-linked, O-linked, and glycolipid glycans. The specificity and depth of glycan profiling depends upon the carbohydrate-binding proteins arrayed. Our current set targets mammalian carbohydrates including fucose, high mannose, branched and complex N-linked, α- and β- Galactose and GalNAc, α-2,3- and α-2,6- sialic acid, LacNAc and Lewis X epitopes. In previous protocols, we have described the use of a contact microarray printer for lectin microarray manufacture. Herein, we present an updated protocol using a non-contact, piezoelectric printer, which leads to increased lectin activity on the array. We describe optimization of print conditions and sample hybridization, and methods of analysis. PMID:23788322

  1. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  2. Effects of temperature, pH and sugar binding on the structures of lectins ebulin f and SELfd.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Celia; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Girbés, Tomás; Jiménez, Pilar

    2017-04-01

    Ebulin f and SELfd are two lectins of Sambucus ebulus L. that show different stability and digestibility properties in gastric fluid due to their structural differences which may explain their different toxicological profiles. The main aim was to determine the effects of pH, temperature and sugar binding on the intrinsic structures of both proteins by fluorescence analyses. Quenching experiments were conducted, under different pH and temperature conditions, with acrylamide (uncharged) and iodide (charged), to study the possible changes of their intrinsic fluorescence. Results revealed that the native structure of SELfd is more folded than that of ebulin f. At pH 2.0, ebulin f displayed a more open structure than at neutral pH. It can be concluded that this is the main reason why ebulin f is accessible to pepsin action and more sensitive to degradation, in contrast to SELfd as we reported previously.

  3. Isolation and characterization of BanLec-I, a mannoside-binding lectin from Musa paradisiac (banana).

    PubMed Central

    Koshte, V L; van Dijk, W; van der Stelt, M E; Aalberse, R C

    1990-01-01

    A lectin (BanLec-I) from banana (Musa paradisiac) with a binding specificity for oligomannosidic glycans of size classes higher than (Man)6GlcNAc was isolated and purified by affinity chromatography on a Sephadex G-75 column. It did not agglutinate untreated human or sheep erythrocytes, but it did agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes. BanLec-I stimulated T-cell proliferation. On size-exclusion chromatography, BanLec-I has a molecular mass of approx. 27 kDa, and on SDS/PAGE the molecular mass is approx. 13 kDa. The isoelectric point is 7.2-7.5. BanLec-I was found to be very effective as a probe in detecting glycoproteins, e.g. on nitrocellulose blots. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2268297

  4. High molecular weight polyglycerol-based multivalent mannose conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Creagh, A Louise; Shenoi, Rajesh A; Rossi, Nicholas A A; Brooks, Donald E; Chan, Timmy; Lam, Jonathan; Dandepally, Srinivasa R; Haynes, Charles A

    2010-10-11

    We report the synthesis and characterization of multivalent mannose conjugates based on high molecular weight hyperbranched polyglycerols (HPG). A range of glycoconjugates were synthesized from high molecular weight HPGs (up to 493 kDa) and varying mannose units (22-303 per HPG). Hemagglutination assays using fresh human red blood cells and concanavalin A (Con A) showed that HPG-mannose conjugates exhibited a large enhancement in the relative potency of conjugates (as high as 40000) along with a significant increment in relative activity per sugar (up to 255). The size of the HPG scaffold and the number of mannose residues per HPG were all shown to influence the enhancement of binding interactions with Con A. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments confirmed the enhanced binding affinity and showed that both molecular size and ligand density play important roles. The enhancement in Con A binding to the high molecular weight HPG-mannose conjugates is due to a combination of inter- and intramolecular mannose binding. A few fold increments in the binding constant were obtained over mannose upon covalent attachment to HPG. The binding enhancement is due to the highly favorable entropic contribution to the multiple interactions of Con A to mannose residues on HPG. The high molecular weight HPG-mannose conjugates showed positive cooperativity in binding to Con A. Although carbohydrate density has less of an effect on functional valency of the conjugate compared to the molecular size, it determines the binding affinity.

  5. C-type Lectin Binds to β-Integrin to Promote Hemocytic Phagocytosis in an Invertebrate*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Phagocytosis is a conserved cellular response among metazoans. Opsonins are some molecules that label targets to increase their susceptibility to phagocytosis. Opsonins are usually captured by receptors on the surface of phagocytes. Our previous study found the C-type lectin FcLec4 from Chinese white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis might function as an opsonin to facilitate bacterial clearance. In the present study we purified the native FcLec4 protein and confirmed its opsonic activity in the near relation, kuruma shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus. The possible receptor of FcLec4 was identified as β-integrin by panning a T7 phage display library of shrimp hemocytes and then confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation assay. We further proved that the interaction between FcLec4 and β-integrin did not rely on the carbohydrate recognition domain but on the N terminus of FcLec4. In addition, inhibition of FcLec4 expression using RNAi delayed bacterial clearance, and β-integrin knockdown suppressed the opsonic activity of FcLec4. This study is the first to show the direct interaction between an opsonin and its receptor in crustaceans. Our study provides new insights into invertebrate phagocytosis and the functions of C-type lectins. PMID:24324258

  6. Cytochemical analysis of alkaline phosphatase and esterase activities and of lectin-binding and anionic sites in rat and mouse Peyer's patch M cells.

    PubMed

    Owen, R L; Bhalla, D K

    1983-10-01

    M cells in Peyer's patch follicle epithelium endocytose and transport luminal materials to intraepithelial lymphocytes. We examined (1) enzymatic characteristics of the epithelium covering mouse and rat Peyer's patches by using cytochemical techniques, (2) distribution of lectin-binding sites by peroxidase-labeled lectins, and (3) anionic site distribution by using cationized ferritin to develop a profile of M cell surface properties. Alkaline phosphatase activity resulted in deposits of dense reaction product over follicle surfaces but was markedly reduced over M cells, unlike esterase which formed equivalent or greater product over M cells. Concanavalin A, ricinus communis agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin and peanut agglutinin reacted equally with M cells and with surrounding enterocytes over follicle surfaces. Cationized ferritin distributed in a random fashion along microvillus membranes of both M cells and enterocytes, indicating equivalent anionic site distribution. Staining for alkaline phosphatase activity provides a new approach for distinguishing M cells from enterocytes at the light microscopic level. Identical binding of lectins indicates that M cells and enterocytes share common glycoconjugates even though molecular groupings may differ. Lectin binding and anionic charge similarities of M cells and enterocytes may facilitate antigen sampling by M cells of particles and compounds that adhere to intestinal surfaces in non-Peyer's patch areas.

  7. Binding sites of Ulex europaeus-lectin I in human parotid gland. A light-microscopic and ultrastructural study using the immunoperoxidase technique and immunocryoultramicrotomy.

    PubMed

    Born, I A; Zimmer, K P; Schwechheimer, K; Maier, H; Möller, P

    1987-05-01

    Twenty non-neoplastic parotid glands (removed during neck dissection for regional tumours) were examined for cellular and subcellular binding sites of Ulex europaeus-lectin I (UEA-I), a lectin reported to be specific for alpha-L-fucose. For light microscopy, an extended peroxidase-antiperoxidase method was applied; for the evaluation of the subcellular localization of bound lectin, three of these glands were examined following immunocryoultramicrotomy and staining by the protein A-gold technique. In addition to the known cytoplasmic affinity of UEA-I for capillary endothelium, acinar cells bound the lectin within the cytoplasmic compartment; the number and distribution of stained acinar cells varied among individuals. Furthermore, cytomembrane-bound labelling that occurred most markedly at the luminar surface was observed in striated-duct epithelium. Using the electron microscope, protein A-gold particles were seen in zymogen granules and in Golgi cisternae of serous acinar cells; primary saliva secreted in the lumina exhibited strong labelling; serous acinar cells had binding sites on their cell membranes, striated-duct epithelium had binding sites on its surface membrane and in the vicinity of apical vesicles. Our results show that UEA-I is a useful tool for the study of the structure and functional states of the parotid gland epithelium and its associated pathological alterations.

  8. A Lichen Lectin Specifically Binds to the alpha-1,4-Polygalactoside Moiety of Urease Located in the Cell Wall of Homologous Algae.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Mara; Millanes, Ana-María; Legaz, María-Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A lectin from the lichen Evernia prunastri developing arginase activity (EC. 3.5.3.1) binds to the homologous algae that contain polygalactosilated urease (EC. 3.5.1.5) in their cell walls acting as a lectin ligand. The enzyme bound to its ligand shows to be inactive to hydrolyze of arginine. Hydrolysis of the galactoside moiety of urease in intact algae with alpha-1,4-galactosidase (EC. 3.2.1.22) releases high amount of D-galactose and impedes the binding of the lectin to the algal cell wall. However, the use of beta-,4-galactosidase (EC.3.2.1.23) releases low amounts of D-galactose from the algal cell wall and does not change the pattern of binding of the lectin to its ligand. The production of glycosilated urease is restricted to the season in which algal cells divide and this assures the recognition of new phycobiont produced after cell division by its fungal partner.

  9. A Lichen Lectin Specifically Binds to the α-1,4-Polygalactoside Moiety of Urease Located in the Cell Wall of Homologous Algae

    PubMed Central

    Sacristán, Mara; Millanes, Ana-María; Legaz, María-Estrella

    2006-01-01

    A lectin from the lichen Evernia prunastri developing arginase activity (EC. 3.5.3.1) binds to the homologous algae that contain polygalactosilated urease (EC. 3.5.1.5) in their cell walls acting as a lectin ligand. The enzyme bound to its ligand shows to be inactive to hydrolyze of arginine. Hydrolysis of the galactoside moiety of urease in intact algae with α-1,4-galactosidase (EC. 3.2.1.22) releases high amount of D-galactose and impedes the binding of the lectin to the algal cell wall. However, the use of β-,4-galactosidase (EC.3.2.1.23) releases low amounts of D-galactose from the algal cell wall and does not change the pattern of binding of the lectin to its ligand. The production of glycosilated urease is restricted to the season in which algal cells divide and this assures the recognition of new phycobiont produced after cell division by its fungal partner. PMID:19521472

  10. MMBL proteins: from lectin to bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Loris, Remy; De Mot, René

    2012-12-01

    Arguably, bacteriocins deployed in warfare among related bacteria are among the most diverse proteinacous compounds with respect to structure and mode of action. Identification of the first prokaryotic member of the so-called MMBLs (monocot mannose-binding lectins) or GNA (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) lectin family and discovery of its genus-specific killer activity in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas has added yet another kind of toxin to this group of allelopathic molecules. This novel feature is reminiscent of the protective function, on the basis of antifungal, insecticidal, nematicidal or antiviral activity, assigned to or proposed for several of the eukaryotic MMBL proteins that are ubiquitously distributed among monocot plants, but also occur in some other plants, fish, sponges, amoebae and fungi. Direct bactericidal activity can also be effected by a C-type lectin, but this is a mammalian protein that limits mucosal colonization by Gram-positive bacteria. The presence of two divergent MMBL domains in the novel bacteriocins raises questions about task distribution between modules and the possible role of carbohydrate binding in the specificity of target strain recognition and killing. Notably, bacteriocin activity was also demonstrated for a hybrid MMBL protein with an accessory protease-like domain. This association with one or more additional modules, often with predicted peptide-hydrolysing or -binding activity, suggests that additional bacteriotoxic proteins may be found among the diverse chimaeric MMBL proteins encoded in prokaryotic genomes. A phylogenetic survey of the bacterial MMBL modules reveals a mosaic pattern of strongly diverged sequences, mainly occurring in soil-dwelling and rhizosphere bacteria, which may reflect a trans-kingdom acquisition of the ancestral genes.

  11. Novel galactonic acid-binding hexameric lectin from Hibiscus mutabilis seeds with antiproliferative and potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Lam, Sze Kwan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2009-01-01

    A hexameric 150-kDa lectin was isolated from dried Hibiscus mutabilis seeds using a chromatographic protocol that involved ion exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration on Superdex 75 and Superdex 200. The lectin was not adsorbed on SP-Sepharose and was eluted from the Superdex 75 column in the void volume. It was eluted in the first peak from Superdex 200. It was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose and Q-Sepharose and could not be easily desorbed. The hemagglutinating activity of the lectin, which was stable at pH 4-7 and up to 50 degrees C, could be inhibited by 25 mM galactonic acid. This is the first report of a galactonic acid-binding lectin. It potently inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with an IC(50) of 0.2 microM. It exhibited weak antiproliferative activity towards both hepatoma HepG2 cells (40% inhibition) and breast cancer MCF-7 cells (50% inhibition) at 100 microM concentration of the lectin. It did not inhibit mycelial growth of a number of fungi tested.

  12. A new chitooligosaccharide specific lectin from snake gourd (Trichosanthes anguina) phloem exudate. Purification, physico-chemical characterization and thermodynamics of saccharide binding.

    PubMed

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Swamy, Musti J

    2011-10-01

    A new lectin has been purified to homogeneity from the phloem exudate of snake gourd (Trichosanthes anguina) by affinity chromatography on chitin. The snake gourd phloem lectin (SGPL) specifically binds chitooligosaccharides and their inhibitory potency increased with increase in size. PAGE and SDS-PAGE studies indicate that SGPL is a heterodimer, in which the two subunits (48 and 53kDa) are joined by disulfide bonds. Consistent with this, electrospray-ionization mass spectrum yielded the exact mass of the protein as 104,621.8 Daltons. CD studies showed that SGPL contains about 9% α-helix, 39% β-sheet, 20% β-turns and 32% unordered structures and that saccharide binding does not significantly affect its secondary and tertiary structures. Titration calorimetric studies indicate that the dimeric lectin binds two ligand molecules [(GlcNAc)(3-6)] with association constants determined at 25°C being 1.7×10(5) and 3.6×10(5)M(-1), for chitotriose and chitohexaose, respectively. Binding of all the chitooligosaccharides is governed by enthalpic forces, whereas the contribution from binding entropies was unfavorable. These results suggest that the SGPL-saccharide interaction is stabilized by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals' interactions. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the SGPL-chitooligosaccharide interaction, suggesting that water molecules play a key role in the binding process.

  13. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  14. cDNA cloning and characterization of a rhamnose-binding lectin SUL-I from the toxopneustid sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus venom.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ichise, Ayaka; Yonekura, Tomokazu; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro; Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2015-02-01

    The globiferous pedicellariae of the venomous sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus contain several biologically active proteins. Among these, a galactose-binding lectin SUL-I isolated from the venom in the large globiferous pedicellariae shows several activities such as mitogenic, chemotactic, and cytotoxic activities through binding to the carbohydrate chains on the cells. We cloned cDNA encoding SUL-I by reverse transcription-PCR using the degenerate primers designed on the basis of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the protein and expressed the recombinant SUL-I (rSUL-I) in Escherichia coli cells. The SUL-I gene contains an open reading frame of 927 nucleotides corresponding to 308 amino acid residues, including 24 residues of a putative signal sequence. The mature protein with 284 residues is composed of three homologous regions, each showing similarity with the carbohydrate-recognition domains of the rhamnose-binding lectins, which have been mostly found in fish eggs. While rSUL-I exhibited binding activity for several galactose-related sugars, the highest affinity was found for l-rhamnose among carbohydrates tested, confirming that SUL-I is a rhamnose-binding lectin. rSUL-I also showed hemagglutinating activity toward rabbit erythrocytes, indicating the existence of more than one carbohydrate-binding site to cross-link the carbohydrate chains on the cell surface, which may be closely related to its biological activities.

  15. Lectins from opportunistic bacteria interact with acquired variable-region glycans of surface immunoglobulin in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Dunja; Dühren-von Minden, Marcus; Alkhatib, Alabbas; Setz, Corinna; van Bergen, Cornelis A M; Benkißer-Petersen, Marco; Wilhelm, Isabel; Villringer, Sarah; Krysov, Sergey; Packham, Graham; Zirlik, Katja; Römer, Winfried; Buske, Christian; Stevenson, Freda K; Veelken, Hendrik; Jumaa, Hassan

    2015-05-21

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) expression is a key feature of most B-cell lymphomas, but the mechanisms of BCR signal induction and the involvement of autoantigen recognition remain unclear. In follicular lymphoma (FL) B cells, BCR expression is retained despite a chromosomal translocation that links the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 to the regulatory elements of immunoglobulin genes, thereby disrupting 1 heavy-chain allele. A remarkable feature of FL-BCRs is the acquisition of potential N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation. The introduced glycans carry mannose termini, which create potential novel binding sites for mannose-specific lectins. Here, we investigated the effect of N-linked variable-region glycosylation for BCR interaction with cognate antigen and with lectins of different origins. N-glycans were found to severely impair BCR specificity and affinity to the initial cognate antigen. In addition, we found that lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia bind and stimulate FL cells. Human exposure to these bacteria can occur by contact with soil and water. In addition, they represent opportunistic pathogens in susceptible hosts. Understanding the role of bacterial lectins might elucidate the pathogenesis of FL and establish novel therapeutic approaches.

  16. The Structure of the MUR1 GDP-mannose 4,67-deydratase from A. thaliana: Implications for Ligand Binding Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Mulichak, A.M.; Bonin, C.P.; Reiter, W.-D.; Garavito, R.M.

    2010-03-08

    GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase catalyzes the first step in the de novo synthesis of GDP-L-fucose, the activated form of L-fucose, which is a component of glycoconjugates in plants known to be important to the development and strength of stem tissues. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the MUR1 dehydratase isoform from Arabidopsis thaliana complexed with its NADPH cofactor as well as with the ligands GDP and GDP-D-rhamnose. MUR1 is a member of the nucleoside-diphosphosugar modifying subclass of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase enzyme family, having homologous structures and a conserved catalytic triad of Lys, Tyr, and Ser/Thr residues. MUR1 is the first member of this subfamily to be observed as a tetramer, the interface of which reveals a close and intimate overlap of neighboring NADP{sup +}-binding sites. The GDP moiety of the substrate also binds in an unusual syn conformation. The protein-ligand interactions around the hexose moiety of the substrate support the importance of the conserved triad residues and an additional Glu side chain serving as a general base for catalysis. Phe and Arg side chains close to the hexose ring may serve to confer substrate specificity at the O2 position. In the MUR1/GDP-D-rhamnose complex, a single unique monomer within the protein tetramer that has an unoccupied substrate site highlights the conformational changes that accompany substrate binding and may suggest the existence of negative cooperativity in MUR1 function.

  17. High-resolution crystal structures of Colocasia esculenta tarin lectin.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patricia R; Meagher, Jennifer L; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T; Stuckey, Jeanne A

    2017-01-01

    Tarin, the Colocasia esculenta lectin from the superfamily of α-d-mannose-specific plant bulb lectins, is a tetramer of 47 kDa composed of two heterodimers. Each heterodimer possesses homologous monomers of ~11.9 (A chain) and ~12.7 (B chain) kDa. The structures of apo and carbohydrate-bound tarin were solved to 1.7 Å and 1.91 Å, respectively. Each tarin monomer forms a canonical β-prism II fold, common to all members of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) family, which is partially stabilized by a disulfide bond and a conserved hydrophobic core. The heterodimer is formed through domain swapping involving the C-terminal β-strand and the β-sheet on face I of the prism. The tetramer is assembled through the dimerization of the B chains from heterodimers involving face II of each prism. The 1.91 Å crystal structure of tarin bound to Manα(1,3)Manα(1,6)Man reveals an expanded carbohydrate-binding sequence (QxDxNxVxYx4/6WX) on face III of the β-prism. Both monomers possess a similar fold, except for the length of the loop, which begins after the conserved tyrosine and creates the binding pocket for the α(1,6)-terminal mannose. This loop differs in size and amino-acid composition from 10 other β-prism II domain proteins, and may confer carbohydrate-binding specificity among members of the GNA-related lectin family.

  18. Engulfment and clearance of apoptotic cells based on a GlcNAc-binding lectin-like property of surface vimentin.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Goto, Mitsuaki; Komura, Kenta; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2012-06-01

    The clearance of apoptotic cells is important to maintain tissue homeostasis. The engulfment of apoptotic cells is performed by professional phagocytes, such as macrophages, and also by non-professional phagocytes, such as mesenchymal cells. Here, we show that vimentin, a cytoskeletal protein, functions as an engulfment receptor on neighboring phagocytes, which recognize O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc)-modified proteins from apoptotic cells as "eat me" ligands. Previously, we reported that vimentin possesses a GlcNAc-binding lectin-like property on cell surface. However, the physiological relevance of the surface localization and GlcNAc-binding property of vimentin remained unclear. In the present study, we observed that O-GlcNAc proteins from apoptotic cells interacted with the surface vimentin of neighboring phagocytes and that this interaction induced serine 71-phosphorylation and recruitment of vimentin to the cell surface of the neighboring phagocytes. Moreover, tetrameric vimentin that was disassembled by serine 71-phosphorylation possessed a GlcNAc-binding activity and was localized to the cell surface. We demonstrated our findings in vimentin-expressing common cell lines such as HeLa cells. Furthermore, during normal developmental processes, the phagocytic engulfment and clearance of apoptotic footplate cells in mouse embryos was mediated by the interaction of surface vimentin with O-GlcNAc proteins. Our results suggest a common mechanism for the clearance of apoptotic cells, through the interaction of surface vimentin with O-GlcNAc-modified proteins.

  19. Versatile On-Resin Synthesis of High Mannose Glycosylated Asparagine with Functional Handles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Pawlicki, Mark A.; Tolbert, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a synthetic route for solid phase synthesis of N-linked glycoconjugates containing high mannose oligosaccharides which allows the incorporation of useful functional handles on the N-terminus of asparagine. In this strategy, the C-terminus of an Fmoc protected aspartic acid residue is first attached to a solid phase support. The side chain of aspartic acid is protected by a 2-phenylisopropyl protecting group, which allows selective deprotection for the introduction of glycosylation. By using a convergent on-resin glycosylamine coupling strategy, an N-glycosidic linkage is successfully formed on the free side chain of the resin bound aspartic acid with a large high mannose oligosaccharide, Man8GlcNAc2, to yield N-linked high mannose glycosylated asparagine. The use of on-resin glycosylamine coupling provides excellent glycosylation yield, can be applied to couple other types of oligosaccharides, and also makes it possible to recover excess oligosaccharides conveniently after the on-resin coupling reaction. Useful functional handles including an alkene (p-vinylbenzoic acid), an alkyne (4-pentynoic acid), biotin, and 5-carboxyfluorescein are then conjugated onto the N-terminal amine of asparagine on-resin after the removal of the Fmoc protecting group. In this way, useful functional handles are introduced onto the glycosylated asparagine while maintaining the structural integrity of the reducing end of the oligosaccharide. The asparagine side chain also serves as a linker between the glycan and the functional group and preserves the native presentation of N-linked glycan which may aid in biochemical and structural studies. As an example of a biochemical study using functionalized high mannose glycosylated asparagine, a fluorescence polarization assay has been utilized to study the binding of the lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) using 5-carboxyfluorescein labeled high mannose glycosylated asparagine. PMID:24326091

  20. Psychosis in a 15-Year-Old Female with Herpes Simplex Encephalitis in a Background of Mannose-Binding Lecithin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Historically, psychotic disorder has been associated with viral infection. Herpes simplex infections and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) among other viral infections have been implicated in psychotic disorder. Of note in this case report is psychotic disorder that occurred following reactivation of herpes simplex infection in a background of mannose-binding lecithin (MBL) deficiency, childhood EBV infection, and severe psychosocial stress. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality despite advancement in its treatment with intravenous acyclovir. Many studies have reported psychiatric and neurological manifestation of herpes simplex infection following primary or reactivated infection, while others suggest milder clinical course of herpes simplex encephalitis in a background of immunosuppression. Another contributory factor to psychotic disorder in this case is childhood EBV exposure which has been reported to increase the risk of psychosis in adolescence and adulthood. This case report describes a 15-year-old female with MBL deficiency who presented with psychosis caused by reactivated herpes simplex infection and had good clinical recovery. Based on childhood Epstein-Barr virus exposure and psychosis in adolescence (current case), she is at increased risk of psychotic disorder in adulthood, which underscores the importance of long-term monitoring. PMID:28261514

  1. Structural and Biochemical Studies of the C-Terminal Domain of Mouse Peptide-N-glycanase Identify it as a Mannose-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,X.; Zhao, G.; Truglio, J.; Wang, L.; Li, G.; Lennarz, W.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The inability of certain N-linked glycoproteins to adopt their native conformation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to their retrotranslocation into the cytosol and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. In this pathway the cytosolic peptide-N-glycanase (PNGase) cleaves the N-linked glycan chains off denatured glycoproteins. PNGase is highly conserved in eukaryotes and plays an important role in ER-associated protein degradation. In higher eukaryotes, PNGase has an N-terminal and a C-terminal extension in addition to its central catalytic domain, which is structurally and functionally related to transglutaminases. Although the N-terminal domain of PNGase is involved in protein-protein interactions, the function of the C-terminal domain has not previously been characterized. Here, we describe biophysical, biochemical, and crystallographic studies of the mouse PNGase C-terminal domain, including visualization of a complex between this domain and mannopentaose. These studies demonstrate that the C-terminal domain binds to the mannose moieties of N-linked oligosaccharide chains, and we further show that it enhances the activity of the mouse PNGase core domain, presumably by increasing the affinity of mouse PNGase for the glycan chains of misfolded glycoproteins.

  2. Psychosis in a 15-Year-Old Female with Herpes Simplex Encephalitis in a Background of Mannose-Binding Lecithin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Asogwa, Kenneth; Buabeng, Kwame; Kaur, Amarjit

    2017-01-01

    Historically, psychotic disorder has been associated with viral infection. Herpes simplex infections and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) among other viral infections have been implicated in psychotic disorder. Of note in this case report is psychotic disorder that occurred following reactivation of herpes simplex infection in a background of mannose-binding lecithin (MBL) deficiency, childhood EBV infection, and severe psychosocial stress. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality despite advancement in its treatment with intravenous acyclovir. Many studies have reported psychiatric and neurological manifestation of herpes simplex infection following primary or reactivated infection, while others suggest milder clinical course of herpes simplex encephalitis in a background of immunosuppression. Another contributory factor to psychotic disorder in this case is childhood EBV exposure which has been reported to increase the risk of psychosis in adolescence and adulthood. This case report describes a 15-year-old female with MBL deficiency who presented with psychosis caused by reactivated herpes simplex infection and had good clinical recovery. Based on childhood Epstein-Barr virus exposure and psychosis in adolescence (current case), she is at increased risk of psychotic disorder in adulthood, which underscores the importance of long-term monitoring.

  3. Expression of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin-binding sites in squamous cell carcinomas and their absence in basal cell carcinomas. Indicator of tumor type and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Heng, M C; Fallon-Friedlander, S; Bennett, R

    1992-06-01

    Lectins bind tightly to carbohydrate moieties on cell surfaces. Alterations in lectin binding have been reported to accompany epidermal cell differentiation, marking alterations in membrane sugars during this process. The presence of UEA I (Ulex europaeus agglutinin I) L-fucose-specific lectin-binding sites has been used as a marker for terminally differentiated (committed) keratinocytes. In this article, we report the presence of UEA-I-binding sites on squamous keratinocytes of well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, with patchy loss of UEA I positivity on poorly differentiated cells of squamous cell carcinomas, suggesting a possible use for this technique in the rapid assessment of less differentiated areas within the squamous cell tumor. The absence of UEA-I-binding sites on basal cell carcinomas may be related to an inability of cells comprising this tumor to convert the L-D-pyranosyl moiety on basal cells to the L-fucose moiety, resulting in an inability of basal cell carcinoma cell to undergo terminal differentiation into a committed keratinocyte.

  4. Enzyme-linked PNA lectin binding assay compared with CA19-9 and CEA radioimmunoassay as a diagnostic blood test for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ching, C. K.; Rhodes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from patients with pancreatic cancer often contain a mucus glycoprotein that expresses the oncofetal antigen galactose 1-3, N-acetyl galactosamine, which is the T blood group antigen and the binding site for the lectin peanut agglutinin (PNA). An enzyme-linked lectin assay has been developed to quantify PNA-binding glycoproteins in serum and has been evaluated as a serological test for pancreatic cancer. Sera were studied from 53 patients with pancreatic cancer and 154 controls, including benign obstructive jaundice, acute and chronic pancreatitis, chronic liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease. The enzyme-linked peanut lectin assay proved highly reproducible and has 77% sensitivity and 83% specificity for pancreatic cancer, results that are very similar to those achieved in the same sera by CA19-9 radioimmunoassay (75% sensitivity, 82% specificity with the upper limit of normal set at 37 u ml-1). CEA assay proved less useful (60% sensitivity, 47% specificity). In this study better results were obtained if an upper limit of normal of 50 u ml-1 was used for CA19-9 (75% sensitivity, 92% specificity). Combination of CA19-9 assay with the upper limit set at 50 u ml-1 and the peanut lectin assay improved the sensitivity to 85% with only a slight fall in specificity (85%). These results compare well with published results for ultrasound and CT scanning. PMID:2736232

  5. A serum fucose-binding lectin (DlFBL) from adult Dicentrarchus labrax is expressed in larva and juvenile tissues and contained in eggs.

    PubMed

    Parisi, M Giovanna; Cammarata, Matteo; Benenati, Gigliola; Salerno, Giuseppina; Mangano, Valentina; Vizzini, Aiti; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2010-08-01

    The purification, cloning, sequencing, molecular properties and expression of a fucose-binding lectin from the serum of Dicentrarchus labrax (DlFBL) have been previously reported. We now describe the distribution and expression of DlFBL during fish ontogeny. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization assays were carried out at various developmental stages (from 10 days post-hatching larvae to juveniles). Another fucose-binding lectin, similar to DlFBL in biochemical, immunochemical and agglutinating properties, was extracted and purified from eggs and appeared to be localized in the embryo yolk sack residual. DlFBL was found in columnar and goblet cells of the intestinal epithelium of larvae (from 20 days post-hatching) and juveniles and in parenchymal tissue of juveniles. DlFBL mRNA and protein were detected in the intestinal epithelium and in hepatocytes. An amplification product from degenerate primers indicates that lectin isotypes with DlFBL epitopes are expressed in eggs and embryos. Whether the lectin fraction isolated from eggs and embryos includes DlFBL of maternal origin remains unclear.

  6. Differential binding of the lectins Griffonia simplicifolia I and Lycopersicon esculentum to microvascular endothelium: organ-specific localization and partial glycoprotein characterization.

    PubMed

    Porter, G A; Palade, G E; Milici, A J

    1990-02-01

    The lectins Griffonia simplicifolia I and Lycopersicon esculentum were used to assess the presence of endothelium-specific glycoproteins in the microvasculature of the rat myocardium, diaphragm and superficial cerebral cortex. Organs fixed by intravascular perfusion were processed to obtain semithin (0.5 micron) and thin (less than 0.1 micron) frozen sections that were reacted with biotinylated lectin followed by streptavidin conjugated to Texas Red, for semithin sections, or by streptavidin conjugated to 5-nm colloidal gold particles, for thin sections. Lycopersicon esculentum lectin exclusively labeled the endothelium of all small vessels in all three microvascular beds; it did not bind to components of either the parenchyma or the extracellular matrix. Griffonia simplicifolia I lectin exclusively labeled the endothelium of the entire microvasculature in the myocardium and diaphragm, but marked primarily pericytes in the cerebral microvasculature. It did not label any parenchymal or interstitial organ component. At the electron microscope level, the lectin Griffonia simplicifolia I labeling was associated with the plasmalemma proper and especially with plasmalemmal vesicles and their introits, and Lycopersicon esculentum lectin bound primarily to the luminal plasmalemma in the microvascular beds of the myocardium and diaphragm. In the cerebral cortex, labeling of the microvasculature was clearly different: Griffonia simplicifolia I bound primarily to pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells whereas Lycopersicon esculentum labeled only the microvascular endothelium. Lysates prepared from the myocardium, diaphragm and cerebral cortex were processed through Griffonia simplicifolia I lectin affinity separation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the fraction obtained. A number of putative endothelium-specific glycoproteins was detected and found to differ qualitatively and quantitatively from organ to organ

  7. Crystal structure of an enzymatically inactive trans-sialidase-like lectin from Trypanosoma cruzi: the carbohydrate binding mechanism involves residual sialidase activity.

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Pablo; Obal, Gonzalo; Baraibar, Martín A; Pritsch, Otto; Alzari, Pedro M; Buschiazzo, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    Trans-sialidases are surface-located proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi that participate in key parasite-host interactions and parasite virulence. These proteins are encoded by a large multigenic family, with tandem-repeated and individual genes dispersed throughout the genome. While a large number of genes encode for catalytically active enzyme isoforms, many others display mutations that involve catalytic residues. The latter ultimately code for catalytically inactive proteins with very high similarity to their active paralogs. These inactive members have been shown to be lectins, able to bind sialic acid and galactose in vitro, although their cellular functions are yet to be fully established. We now report structural and biochemical evidence extending the current molecular understanding of these lectins. We have solved the crystal structure of one such catalytically inactive trans-sialidase-like protein, after soaking with a specific carbohydrate ligand, sialyl-α2,3-lactose. Instead of the expected trisaccharide, the binding pocket was observed occupied by α-lactose, strongly suggesting that the protein retains residual hydrolytic activity. This hypothesis was validated by enzyme kinetics assays, in comparison to fully active wild-type trans-sialidase. Surface plasmon resonance also confirmed that these trans-sialidase-like lectins are not only able to bind small oligosaccharides, but also sialylated glycoproteins, which is relevant in the physiologic scenario of parasite infection. Inactive trans-sialidase proteins appear thus to be β-methyl-galactosyl-specific lectins, evolved within an exo-sialidase scaffold, thus explaining why their lectin activity is triggered by the presence of terminal sialic acid.

  8. Dynamic changes in cell-surface expression of mannose in the oral epithelium during the development of graft-versus-host disease of the oral mucosa in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of cell-surface glycoconjugates in oral mucosal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is still unclear, even though molecular changes in the oral epithelium are essential for the pathogenesis of these lesions. In this study, we investigated changes in the binding of mannose (Man)-specific Lens culinaris lectin (LCA) in the oral mucosa of rats with GVHD. Methods Lewis rat spleen cells were injected into (Lewis x Brown Norway) F1 rats to induce systemic GVHD, including oral mucosal lesions. Tongue and spleen samples were evaluated using lectin histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, transwell migration assays and Stamper-Woodruff binding assays. Results Binding of Man-specific LCA expanded to the epithelial layers of the tongue in GVHD-rats. An expansion of LCA binding was related to the increased expression of mannosyltransferase in the oral mucosa. CD8+ cells, effector cells of oral mucosal GVHD, expressed mannose-binding protein (MBP) and migrated to the medium containing Man in the transwell migration assay. Adherence of CD8+ cells to the oral epithelium could be inhibited by pretreating CD8+ cells with MBP antibody and/or by pretreating sections with Man-specific LCA. Conclusions Increased expression of Man on keratinocytes leads to the migration and/or adhesion of CD8+ cells in the surface epithelium, which is mediated in part by the MBP/Man-binding pathway during the development of oral mucosal GVHD. PMID:24433462

  9. Lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 3 rs4652 A/C gene variation and the risk for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Atabaki, Mahdi; Hashemi, Mohammad; Daneshvar, Hamid; Alijani, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex genetic disease. The lectin, galactoside-binding, soluble, 3 (LGALS3) gene, encodes a member of the galectin family of carbohydrate binding proteins, and is one of the best examples of a non-human leukocyte antigen gene associated with a risk for RA in various populations. In the current study, the association between LGALS3 rs4652 gene polymorphism and RA was examined. This case-control study was performed on the 120 patients with RA and 120 healthy subjects. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood, and gene polymorphism was tested using a tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that LGALS3 rs4652 AC genotype increased the risk of RA (OR=11.622, 95% CI=4.473–28.656; P=0.001) when compared with the AA genotype. However, the CC genotype and the C allele were not associated with RA. These findings indicated an association between LGALS3 rs4652 variation and the risk of RA in a sample of Iranian individuals. Further studies with larger sample sizes and populations of different ethnicities are required to validate our findings. PMID:28357081

  10. Cell-surface changes in cadmium-resistant Euglena: Studies using lectin-binding techniques and flow cytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaly, J.; Brochiero, E.

    1994-01-01

    Most in vitro studies on contaminants focus on the short-term effects of pollutants on cells, without regard to long-term effects and the ability of cells or microorganisms to develop a specific resistance to a pollutant. Cadmium is ubiquitous environmental contaminant. This heavy metal enters the aquatic environment mainly through vapor emissions and fallout during smelting operations. Diverse mechanisms of algal resistance to toxic metals are known. Among these, the most general mechanism is the development of metal-binding proteins. In cadmium-resistant unicellular Euglena gracilis Z algae cells, the metal did not appear to be sequestered on soluble metal-binding ligands. Previous experiments have shown that resistance development is related to a diminution of cadmium penetration into cells, implicating cell surface or membrane alteration. This research investigates the mechanisms of development of cadmium resistance in Euglena cells at the cell-surface level. Sugar chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids are a predominant feature of the surface of cells. Moreover, the cell-response to environmental changes is often orchestrated through surface macromolecules such as glycoproteins. In this study, we applied this lectin method to investigate surface carbohydrate expression during and after resistance development. Our interest was twofold: (1) to learn more about the carbohydrate composition of the cell-surface of Euglena; and (2) to determine whether transition from wild cells to Cd-resistant cells changes the expression of cell-surface carbohydrates. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Galactose recognition by a tetrameric C-type lectin, CEL-IV, containing the EPN carbohydrate recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-03-25

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. Structural analyses of CEL-IV-melibiose and CEL-IV-raffinose complexes revealed that their galactose residues were recognized in an inverted orientation compared with mannose binding C-type CRDs containing the EPN motif, by the aid of a stacking interaction with the side chain of Trp-79. Changes in the environment of Trp-79 induced by binding to galactose were detected by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence and UV absorption spectra of WT CEL-IV and its site-directed mutants. The binding specificity of CEL-IV toward complex oligosaccharides was analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography using various pyridylamino sugars, and the results indicate preferential binding to oligosaccharides containing Galβ1-3/4(Fucα1-3/4)GlcNAc structures. These findings suggest that the specificity for oligosaccharides may be largely affected by interactions with amino acid residues in the binding site other than those determining the monosaccharide specificity.

  12. Lectin binding and effects in culture on human cancer and non-cancer cell lines: examination of issues of interest in drug design strategies.

    PubMed

    Petrossian, Karineh; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2007-01-01

    By using a non-cancer and a cancer cell line originally from the same tissue (colon), coupled with testing lectins for cell binding and for their effects on these cell lines in culture, this study describes a simple multi-parameter approach that has revealed some interesting results that could be useful in drug development strategies. Two human cell lines, CCL-220/Colo320DM (human colon cancer cells, tumorigenic in nude mice) and CRL-1459/CCD-18Co (non-malignant human colon cells) were tested for their ability to bind to agarose microbeads derivatized with two lectins, peanut agglutinin (Arachis hypogaea agglutinin, PNA) and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and the effects of these lectins were assessed in culture using the MTT assay. Both cell lines bound to DBA-derivatized microbeads, and binding was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but not by L-fucose. Neither cell line bound to PNA-derivatized microbeads. Despite the lack of lectin binding using the rapid microbead method, PNA was mitogenic in culture at some time points and its mitogenic effect displayed a reverse-dose response. This was also seen with effects of DBA on cells in culture. While this is a simple study, the results were statistically highly significant and suggest that: (1) agents may not need to bind strongly to cells to exert biological effects, (2) cell line pairs derived from diseased and non-diseased tissue can provide useful comparative data on potential drug effects and (3) very low concentrations of potential drugs might be initially tested experimentally because reverse-dose responses should be considered.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin PA-IIL as a powerful probe for human and bovine milk analysis.

    PubMed

    Lesman-Movshovich, E; Gilboa-Garber, N

    2003-07-01

    Milk composition exhibits species-specific differences depending on genetic, evolutionary, and environmental factors. In addition, commercial milk preparations are also changed by industrial manipulations, including severe heat processing. Cow milk, used as human food, provides important nutrients but lacks some essential components that are present in raw human milk. The present study, which was aimed at comparing infant breastfeeding to cow-based formula nourishment, shows major differences between the human and the commercial cow milk glycans detectable by the lectins PA-IL (galactose-binding) and PA-IIL (fucose and mannose-binding) isolated from the cells of human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. More than 40 human milk samples, several cow milks, and bovine milk-based infant formulas, were examined using these two lectins. For purposes of comparison, the plant lectins Concanavalin A (Con A), which binds mannose, and Ulex europaeus 1st lectin (UEA-I), which binds fucose, were also used. The most prominent difference was revealed using PA-IIL, which displayed a unique high sensitivity to the human milk fucosylated compounds. PA-IL and UEA-I also exhibited preferential sensitivity to the human milk but considerably lower than that of PA-IIL. Con A was inhibited by human and the other milk preparations examined to the same extent. These findings indicate the superb applicability of PA-IIL for rapid and reliable comparative investigation of milk glycans from human and cow, indicating which glycans could be added to infant formulas in order to enrich them, as well as for verification and quality control of otherwise improved bovine milk-based infant formulas.

  14. Complementary Roles of the Classical and Lectin Complement Pathways in the Defense against Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Stahl, Gregory L.; Garred, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus infections are associated with a high mortality rate for immunocompromised patients. The complement system is considered to be important in protection against this fungus, yet the course of activation is unclear. The aim of this study was to unravel the role of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways under both immunocompetent and immunocompromised conditions to provide a relevant dual-perspective on the response against A. fumigatus. Conidia (spores) from a clinical isolate of A. fumigatus were combined with various human serum types (including serum deficient of various complement components and serum from umbilical cord blood). We also combined this with inhibitors against C1q, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), and ficolin-2 before complement activation products and phagocytosis were detected by flow cytometry. Our results showed that alternative pathway amplified complement on A. fumigatus, but required classical and/or lectin pathway for initiation. In normal human serum, this initiation came primarily from the classical pathway. However, with a dysfunctional classical pathway (C1q-deficient serum), lectin pathway activated complement and mediated opsonophagocytosis through MBL. To model the antibody-decline in a compromised immune system, we used serum from normal umbilical cords and found MBL to be the key complement initiator. In another set of experiments, serum from patients with different kinds of immunoglobulin insufficiencies showed that the MBL lectin pathway contribution was highest in the samples with the lowest IgG/IgM binding. In conclusion, lectin pathway appears to be the primary route of complement activation in the absence of anti-A. fumigatus antibodies, whereas in a balanced immune state classical pathway is the main activator. This suggests a crucial role for the lectin pathway in innate immune protection against A. fumigatus in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27857715

  15. Development of a lectin binding assay to differentiate between recombinant and endogenous proteins in pharmacokinetic studies of protein-biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alfred; Minibeck, Eva; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Turecek, Peter L

    2015-04-10

    Human glycoproteins, expressed in hamster cell lines, show similar glycosylation patterns to naturally occurring human molecules except for a minute difference in the linkage of terminal sialic acid: both cell types lack α2,6-galactosyl-sialyltransferase, abundantly expressed in human hepatocytes and responsible for the α2,6-sialylation of circulating glycoproteins. This minute difference, which is currently not known to have any physiological relevance, was the basis for the selective measurement of recombinant glycoproteins in the presence of their endogenous counterparts. The assay is based on using the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), selectively binding to α2,6-sialylated N-glycans. Using von Willebrand factor (VWF), factor IX (FIX), and factor VIIa (FVIIa), it was demonstrated that (i) the plasma-derived proteins, but not the corresponding recombinant proteins, specifically bind to SNA and (ii) this binding can be used to deplete the plasma-derived proteins. The feasibility of this approach was confirmed in spike-recovery studies for all three recombinant coagulation proteins in human plasma and for recombinant VWF (rVWF) in macaque plasma. Analysis of plasma samples from macaques after administration of recombinant and a plasma-derived VWF demonstrated the suitability and robustness of this approach. Data showed that rVWF could be selectively measured without changing the ELISAs and furthermore revealed the limitations of baseline adjustment using a single measurement of the predose concentration only. The SNA gel-based depletion procedure can easily be integrated in existing procedures as a specific sample pre-treatment step. While ELISA-based methods were used to measure the recombinant coagulation proteins in the supernatants obtained by depletion, this procedure is applicable for all biochemical analyses.

  16. Lectin-Like Bacteriocins from Pseudomonas spp. Utilise D-Rhamnose Containing Lipopolysaccharide as a Cellular Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Josts, Inokentijs; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Waløen, Kai I.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Milner, Joel; Evans, Tom; Kelly, Sharon; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian; Walker, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins consist of tandem monocot mannose-binding domains and display a genus-specific killing activity. Here we show that pyocin L1, a novel member of this family from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, targets susceptible strains of this species through recognition of the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide that is predominantly a homopolymer of d-rhamnose. Structural and biophysical analyses show that recognition of CPA occurs through the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain of pyocin L1 and that this interaction is a prerequisite for bactericidal activity. Further to this, we show that the previously described lectin-like bacteriocin putidacin L1 shows a similar carbohydrate-binding specificity, indicating that oligosaccharides containing d-rhamnose and not d-mannose, as was previously thought, are the physiologically relevant ligands for this group of bacteriocins. The widespread inclusion of d-rhamnose in the lipopolysaccharide of members of the genus Pseudomonas explains the unusual genus-specific activity of the lectin-like bacteriocins. PMID:24516380

  17. Lectin-like bacteriocins from Pseudomonas spp. utilise D-rhamnose containing lipopolysaccharide as a cellular receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Laura C; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Roszak, Aleksander W; Waløen, Kai I; Cogdell, Richard J; Milner, Joel; Evans, Tom; Kelly, Sharon; Tucker, Nicholas P; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian; Walker, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins consist of tandem monocot mannose-binding domains and display a genus-specific killing activity. Here we show that pyocin L1, a novel member of this family from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, targets susceptible strains of this species through recognition of the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide that is predominantly a homopolymer of D-rhamnose. Structural and biophysical analyses show that recognition of CPA occurs through the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding domain of pyocin L1 and that this interaction is a prerequisite for bactericidal activity. Further to this, we show that the previously described lectin-like bacteriocin putidacin L1 shows a similar carbohydrate-binding specificity, indicating that oligosaccharides containing D-rhamnose and not D-mannose, as was previously thought, are the physiologically relevant ligands for this group of bacteriocins. The widespread inclusion of d-rhamnose in the lipopolysaccharide of members of the genus Pseudomonas explains the unusual genus-specific activity of the lectin-like bacteriocins.

  18. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  19. Spectral characters of lectin saccharide interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Deyu; Jiang, Duxiao; Yuan, Chunwei

    1999-09-01

    In this paper we report attempts to directly detect the interaction behavior between erythrocyte and lectin concanavalin a (Con A) as well as phaseolus vulgaris (PHA) on the polystyrene film surface. In the procedure, an optical transducer based reflectance interferometry was set up and used to detect the film thickness change during the lectin adsorption and lectin- erythrocyte interaction. The specific interactions among Con A, PHA and erythrocyte were obtained. The solubility monosaccharide inhibition test confirmed that there is affinity between (alpha) - D-mannose and Con A.

  20. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Marcia Holsbach; Catarino, Sandra Jeremias; Goeldner, Isabela; Boldt, Angelica Beate Winter; de Messias-Reason, Iara José

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of host defense against infection and is comprised of humoral and cellular mechanisms that recognize potential pathogens within minutes or hours of entry. The effector components of innate immunity include epithelial barriers, phagocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as cytokines and the complement system. Complement plays an important role in the immediate response against microorganisms, including Streptococcus sp. The lectin pathway is one of three pathways by which the complement system can be activated. This pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin 11 (CL-K1), and ficolins (Ficolin-1, Ficolin-2, and Ficolin-3) to microbial surface oligosaccharides and acetylated residues, respectively. Upon binding to target molecules, MBL, CL-K1, and ficolins form complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and MASP-2), which cleave C4 and C2 forming the C3 convertase (C4b2a). Subsequent activation of complement cascade leads to opsonization, phagocytosis, and lysis of target microorganisms through the formation of the membrane-attack complex. In addition, activation of complement may induce several inflammatory effects, such as expression of adhesion molecules, chemotaxis and activation of leukocytes, release of reactive oxygen species, and secretion of cytokines and chemokines. In this chapter, we review the general aspects of the structure, function, and genetic polymorphism of lectin-pathway components and discuss most recent understanding on the role of the lectin pathway in the predisposition and clinical progression of Rheumatic Fever. PMID:25654073

  1. Quantitative Characterization of the Activation Steps of Mannan-binding Lectin (MBL)-associated Serine Proteases (MASPs) Points to the Central Role of MASP-1 in the Initiation of the Complement Lectin Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Megyeri, Márton; Harmat, Veronika; Major, Balázs; Végh, Ádám; Balczer, Júlia; Héja, Dávid; Szilágyi, Katalin; Datz, Dániel; Pál, Gábor; Závodszky, Péter; Gál, Péter; Dobó, József

    2013-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine proteases, MASP-1 and MASP-2, have been thought to autoactivate when MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes bind to pathogens triggering the complement lectin pathway. Autoactivation of MASPs occurs in two steps: 1) zymogen autoactivation, when one proenzyme cleaves another proenzyme molecule of the same protease, and 2) autocatalytic activation, when the activated protease cleaves its own zymogen. Using recombinant catalytic fragments, we demonstrated that a stable proenzyme MASP-1 variant (R448Q) cleaved the inactive, catalytic site Ser-to-Ala variant (S646A). The autoactivation steps of MASP-1 were separately quantified using these mutants and the wild type enzyme. Analogous mutants were made for MASP-2, and rate constants of the autoactivation steps as well as the possible cross-activation steps between MASP-1 and MASP-2 were determined. Based on the rate constants, a kinetic model of lectin pathway activation was outlined. The zymogen autoactivation rate of MASP-1 is ∼3000-fold higher, and the autocatalytic activation of MASP-1 is about 140-fold faster than those of MASP-2. Moreover, both activated and proenzyme MASP-1 can effectively cleave proenzyme MASP-2. MASP-3, which does not autoactivate, is also cleaved by MASP-1 quite efficiently. The structure of the catalytic region of proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q was solved at 2.5 Å. Proenzyme MASP-1 R448Q readily cleaves synthetic substrates, and it is inhibited by a specific canonical inhibitor developed against active MASP-1, indicating that zymogen MASP-1 fluctuates between an inactive and an active-like conformation. The determined structure provides a feasible explanation for this phenomenon. In summary, autoactivation of MASP-1 is crucial for the activation of MBL/ficolin·MASP complexes, and in the proenzymic phase zymogen MASP-1 controls the process. PMID:23386610

  2. Diverse lectin-binding specificity of four ZP3 glycoprotein isoforms with a discrete isoelectric point in chicken egg coat.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hiroki; Fukushima, Hideaki; Momoda, Masaki; Ima, Yurie; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Ujita, Minoru

    2012-08-03

    The vertebrate egg coat corresponding to mammalian zona pellucida is a filamentous matrix composed of highly and heterogeneously glycosylated proteins designated ZP glycoproteins including ZP1 to 4, ZPD and ZPAX, and play important roles in species-specific egg-sperm interactions. Recent advance in structural biology of chicken ZP3 provided new insights into molecular mechanisms of the egg-coat function involving its carbohydrate moieties. In this study, chicken ZP3 was separated into four major and distinct isoforms with different pI in 2D-PAGE. To investigate the meanings of the ZP3 heterogeneity in egg-sperm interactions, we preliminary analyzed glycan diversity on the molecules by using lectin-staining assays. The four major ZP3 isoforms 4-7 (from acidic to basic) were recognized equally with PNA (Galβ1-3GalNAc), but the isoforms 5-7 were recognized dominantly with WGA ((β-GlcNAc)n, clustered Sia), PHA-E (bi- and triantennary N-glycan containing Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-2Manα1-6) and RCA I (terminal Galβ1-4GlcNAc), respectively. Despite such sugar chain diversity among the ZP3 isoforms, a partner in the egg coat, ZP1, showed specific binding to each isoform equally. Localization of ZP1 and ZP3 in the egg-coat matrix were also analyzed.

  3. Cloning and transcriptional analysis of two sialic acid-binding lectins (SABLs) from razor clam Solen grandis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialong; Wei, Xiumei; Liu, Xiangquan; Xu, Jie; Yang, Dinglong; Yang, Jianmin; Fang, Jinghui; Hu, Xiaoke

    2012-04-01

    Sialic acid-binding lectin (SABL) plays crucial role in both innate and adaptive immune responses benefiting from its predominant affinity toward glycan. In the present study, two SABLs from razor clam Solen grandis (designated as SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2) were identified, and their expression patterns, both in tissues and towards microorganism glycan stimulation, were then characterized. The cDNA of SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 was 988 and 1281 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 744 and 570 bp, respectively, and deduced amino acid sequences showed high similarity to other invertebrates SABLs. Both SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 encoded a C1q domain. SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 were found to be constitutively expressed in a wide range of tissues with different levels, including mantle, gill, gonad, hemocyte, muscle, and hepatopancreas, and both of them were highly expressed in hepatopancreas. SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 could be significantly induced after razor clams were stimulated by acetylated subunits-containing glycan LPS and PGN, suggesting the two SgSABLs might perform potential function of glycan recognition. In addition, SgSABL-2 could also be induced by β-1,3-glucan. All these results indicated that SgSABL-1 and SgSABL-2 might be involved in the immune response against microbe infection and contributed to the pathogens recognition.

  4. The lectin from Musa paradisiaca binds with the capsid protein of tobacco mosaic virus and prevents viral infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Li, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-05-04

    It has been demonstrated that the lectin from Musa paradisiaca (BanLec-1) could inhibit the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In order to evaluate its effects on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), the banlec-1 gene was cloned and transformed into Escherichia coli and tobacco, respectively. Recombinant BanLec-1 showed metal ions dependence, and higher thermal and pH stability. Overexpression of banlec-1 in tobacco resulted in decreased leaf size, and higher resistance to TMV infection, which includes reduced TMV cellular entry, more stable chlorophyll contents, and enhanced antioxidant enzymes. BanLec-1 was found to bind directly to the TMV capsid protein in vitro, and to inhibit TMV infection in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to limited prevention in vivo, purified rBanLec-1 exhibited more significant effects on TMV infection in vitro. Taken together, our study indicated that BanLec-1 could prevent TMV infection in tobacco, probably through the interaction between BanLec-1 and TMV capsid protein.

  5. Lectin binding as a probe of proliferative and differentiative phases in primary monolayer cultures of cutaneous keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, W.W.; Bernstein, I.A. )

    1988-04-01

    The surface of cells in the cutaneous epidermis of the newborn rat exhibits a discrete change in lectin-binding specificity from Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 (GS I-B4), specific for {alpha}-D-galactosyl residues, to Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA), specific for {alpha}-L-fucose, as the cell leaves the basal layer and differentiates. Primary monolayer cultures of rat keratinocytes maintained in low Ca{sup 2+} medium exhibited a characteristic unimodal pattern in the ratio of bound UEA to bound GS I-B4 (UEA/B4 ratio) over a 7-day culture period as determined by a quantitative fluorometric assay. Estimation of DNA synthesis showed (a) a higher ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation when the UEA/B4 ratio was low and (b) a steady but lower incorporation between Days 3 and 4, coincident with the higher UEA/B4 ratio. Autoradiographic results further showed that cells stained intensely with UEA failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. Overall, the results suggest that (a) the increase in the UEA/B4 ratio between Days 2 and 4 reflects the progression of a proportion of the cells in the monolayer to an early spinous cell stage, the ultimate fate of which is desquamation into the medium and (b) the decrease in the UEA/B4 ratio between Days 5 and 7 reflects a consequent proliferative response to this loss of cells.

  6. L-Rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: Characterization and expression profiling in mucosal tissues.

    PubMed

    Thongda, Wilawan; Li, Chao; Luo, Yupeng; Beck, Benjamin H; Peatman, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) have recently emerged as important molecules in the context of innate immunity in teleost fishes. Previously, using RNA-seq technology, we observed marked up-regulation of a RBL in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) gill following a challenge with the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare. Furthermore, the magnitude of RBL up-regulation positively correlated with disease susceptibility. Moving forward from these findings, we wished to more broadly understand RBL function, diversity, and expression kinetics in channel catfish. Therefore, in the present study we characterized the RBL gene family present in select channel catfish tissues and profiled family member expression after challenge with two different Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Here, six RBLs were identified from channel catfish and were designated IpRBL1a, IpRBL1b, IpRBL1c, IpRBL3a, IpRBL3b, and IpRBL5a. These RBLs contained carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) ranging from one to three domains and each CRD contained the conserved motifs of -YGR- and -DPC-. Despite a level of structural conservation, the catfish RBLs showed low full-length identity with RBLs from outside the order Siluriformes. IpRBL expression after bacterial infection varied depending on both pathogen and tissue type, suggesting that IpRBLs may exert disparate functions or exhibit distinct tissue-selective roles in the host immune response to bacterial pathogens.

  7. Overall carbohydrate-binding properties of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA).

    PubMed

    Nomura, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Hirose, Masaaki; Nakamura, Sachiko; Yagi, Fumio

    2005-09-05

    The carbohydrate-binding properties of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA) were investigated by an enzyme-linked lectin absorbent assay. The binding ability of each carbohydrate was compared using IC(50) values. CCA exhibited mannose/glucose specificity, as observed with many mannose-binding jacalin-related lectins. For oligosaccharides containing glucose, it has been shown that the degree of polymerization and the linkage mode of glucose residues have no effect on CCA-carbohydrate interaction; thus, only the non-reducing end glucose unit in glucooligosaccharides may be involved in the interaction with CCA. Among mannooligosaccharides, CCA strongly recognized alpha-(1-->3)-D-Man-[alpha-D-Man-(1-->6)]-D-Man, which is a core in N-linked carbohydrate chains. By considering the results with glycoproteins, it is likely that CCA binds preferentially to mono- or non-sialylated biantennary carbohydrate chains. We also obtained K(d) values by analysis of the dependency of the IC(50) on CCA concentration, based on the hypothesis that CCA has a single binding site or two equivalent binding sites. The estimated K(d) values for mannose, glucose and alpha-(1-->3)-D-Man-[alpha-D-Man-(1-->6)]-D-Man were 2.39, 7.19 and 0.483 mM, respectively. The relative binding abilities showed good agreement with the relative inhibition intensities. Isothermal calorimetric titration was carried out to directly estimate the dissociation constants of CCA for mannose and for alpha-D-Man-(1-->3)-D-Man. The values were 2.34 mM for mannose and 0.507 mM alpha-D-Man-(1-->3)-D-Man. These results suggest that the relative inhibition intensity represents the ratio of K(d) values and that CCA has a single or two equivalent binding sites.

  8. Adhesion molecules of cultured hematopoietic malignancies. A calcium-dependent lectin is the principle mediator of binding to the high endothelial venule of lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Stoolman, L M; Ebling, H

    1989-01-01

    This study documents that a calcium-dependent phosphomanosyl-binding site on human lymphoid malignancies mediates attachment to the peripheral node high endothelial venule (PNHEV). The phorbol ester PMA coordinately upregulates lectin activity and binding to the PNHEV in the human T-lymphoblastic cell line Jurkat but not in the less phenotypically mature lines HSB2, Molt4, CEM, and HPB-ALL. In contrast, expression of CD18, CD2, and several common epitopes of the putative adhesion receptor gp90Hermes (CD44) did not correlate with attachment to PNHEV in this series of cell lines. Insensitivity to inhibition by the CD18 MAb TS 1.18, temperature and divalent cation requirements further distinguish the Jurkat-PNHEV adhesive interaction from CD11a/18- and CD2-mediated adhesion. The PMA-induced phenotypic changes in the Jurkat line parallel late thymocyte differentiation as well as lymphocyte activation, suggesting that expression of the endothelial-binding lectin may be linked to one or both of these processes. The lectin-like activity on Jurkat cells is functionally indistinguishable from those previously linked to PNHEV recognition in normal human lymphocytes, normal rat lymphocytes and both normal and malignant murine lymphoid cells. In the mouse, this activity is either contained in or functionally linked to a member of the LEC-CAM family gp90Mel14, suggesting that Jurkat cells express the human homologue of the murine nodal homing receptor. Thus cultured T lymphoblastic malignancies express a variety of potential endothelial adhesion molecules but use primarily a highly conserved surface lectin to interact with PNHEV. Images PMID:2794056

  9. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications.

  10. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on growth and susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose and rhamnose binding lectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of essential oils (EO) on growth and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Weight gain and food conversion ratio were similar. After exposing fish to virulent E. ictaluri, survival was higher (69.5 vs 48.4%) in fish fed EO (P < 0.05). In ...

  11. A journey through the lectin pathway of complement-MBL and beyond.

    PubMed

    Garred, Peter; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine; Bayarri-Olmos, Rafael; Rosbjerg, Anne; Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2016-11-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), collectin-10, collectin-11, and the ficolins (ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3) are soluble pattern recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. These proteins act as mediators of host defense and participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis. They bind to conserved pathogen-specific structures and altered self-antigens and form complexes with the pentraxins to modulate innate immune functions. All molecules exhibit distinct expression in different tissue compartments, but all are found to a varying degree in the circulation. A common feature of these molecules is their ability to interact with a set of serine proteases named MASPs (MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3). MASP-1 and -2 trigger the activation of the lectin pathway and MASP-3 may be involved in the activation of the alternative pathway of complement. Furthermore, MASPs mediate processes related to coagulation, bradykinin release, and endothelial and platelet activation. Variant alleles affecting expression and structure of the proteins have been associated with a variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases, most commonly as disease modifiers. Notably, the severe 3MC (Malpuech, Michels, Mingarelli, and Carnevale) embryonic development syndrome originates from rare mutations affecting either collectin-11 or MASP-3, indicating a broader functionality of the complement system than previously anticipated. This review summarizes the characteristics of the molecules in the lectin pathway.

  12. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  13. The fungal-specific β-glucan-binding lectin FGB1 alters cell-wall composition and suppresses glucan-triggered immunity in plants.

    PubMed

    Wawra, Stephan; Fesel, Philipp; Widmer, Heidi; Timm, Malte; Seibel, Jürgen; Leson, Lisa; Kesseler, Leona; Nostadt, Robin; Hilbert, Magdalena; Langen, Gregor; Zuccaro, Alga

    2016-10-27

    β-glucans are well-known modulators of the immune system in mammals but little is known about β-glucan triggered immunity in planta. Here we show by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that the FGB1 gene from the root endophyte Piriformospora indica encodes for a secreted fungal-specific β-glucan-binding lectin with dual function. This lectin has the potential to both alter fungal cell wall composition and properties, and to efficiently suppress β-glucan-triggered immunity in different plant hosts, such as Arabidopsis, barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results hint at the existence of fungal effectors that deregulate innate sensing of β-glucan in plants.

  14. The fungal-specific β-glucan-binding lectin FGB1 alters cell-wall composition and suppresses glucan-triggered immunity in plants

    PubMed Central

    Wawra, Stephan; Fesel, Philipp; Widmer, Heidi; Timm, Malte; Seibel, Jürgen; Leson, Lisa; Kesseler, Leona; Nostadt, Robin; Hilbert, Magdalena; Langen, Gregor; Zuccaro, Alga

    2016-01-01

    β-glucans are well-known modulators of the immune system in mammals but little is known about β-glucan triggered immunity in planta. Here we show by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that the FGB1 gene from the root endophyte Piriformospora indica encodes for a secreted fungal-specific β-glucan-binding lectin with dual function. This lectin has the potential to both alter fungal cell wall composition and properties, and to efficiently suppress β-glucan-triggered immunity in different plant hosts, such as Arabidopsis, barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results hint at the existence of fungal effectors that deregulate innate sensing of β-glucan in plants. PMID:27786272

  15. Fluorinated Carbohydrates as Lectin Ligands: 19F-Based Direct STD Monitoring for Detection of Anomeric Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, João P.; Diercks, Tammo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Cañada, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of the binding of reducing carbohydrates present as mixtures of anomers in solution to a sugar recepor (lectin) poses severe difficulties. In this situation, NMR spectroscopy enables the observation of signals for each anomer in the mixture by applying approaches based on ligand observation. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR allows fast and efficient screening of compound mixtures for reactivity to a receptor. Owing to the exceptionally favorable properties of 19F in NMR spectroscopy and the often complex 1H spectra of carbohydrates, 19F-containing sugars have the potential to be turned into versatile sensors for recognition. Extending the recently established 1H → 1H STDre19F-NMR technique, we here demonstrate its applicability to measure anomeric selectivity of binding in a model system using the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-mannose. Indeed, it is also possible to account for the mutual inhibition between the anomers on binding to the lectin by means of a kinetic model. The monitoring of 19F-NMR signal perturbation disclosed the relative activities of the anomers in solution and thus enabled the calculation of their binding affinity towards ConA. The obtained data show a preference for the α anomer that increases with temperature. This experimental approach can be extended to others systems of biomedical interest by testing human lectins with suitably tailored glycan derivatives. PMID:26580665

  16. Hevea latex lectin binding protein in C-serum as an anti-latex coagulating factor and its role in a proposed new model for latex coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun; Pasitkul, Piyaporn; Jewtragoon, Pattavuth; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos

    2008-02-01

    A distinct protein specifically recognized by its strong interaction with Hevea latex lectin (HLL) was detected in the aqueous C-serum fraction of centrifuged fresh latex. This C-serum lectin binding protein (CS-HLLBP) exhibited strong inhibition of HLL-induced hemagglutination. The CS-HLLBP was purified to homogeneity by a protocol that included ammonium sulfate fractionation, size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. The purified CS-HLLBP had a specific HI titer of 0.23microg ml(-1). Its M(r)s analyzed by SDS-PAGE was ca. 40kDa and that by gel filtration was ca. 204kDa. It has a pI value of 4.7, an optimum activity between pH 6 and10 and was heat stable up to 50 degrees C. The HI activity of CS-HLLBP was abolished upon treatment with chitinase. The CS-HLLBP inhibited HLL-induced rubber particle aggregation in a dose dependent manner. A highly positive correlation between CS-HLLBP activity and rubber yield per tapping was found. The correlations for fresh latex (r=0.98, P<0.01) and dry rubber (r=0.95, P<0.01) were both highly significant. This indicated that the CS-HLLBP might be used as a reliable marker for the mass screening of young seedlings to identify and select clones with potential to be superior producers of rubber. A latex anti-coagulating role of the CS-HLLBP is proposed. The findings described in this 3 paper series have been used to propose a new model of rubber latex coagulation that logically describes roles for the newly characterized latex lectin and the two lectin binding proteins.

  17. Lectin-binding epitopes at the surface of Escherichia coli K-12: examination by electron microscopy, with special reference to the presence of a colanic acid-like polymer.

    PubMed

    Stoitsova, Stoyanka; Ivanova, Radka; Dimova, Ivanka

    2004-01-01

    The presence and distribution of lectin-binding epitopes at the surface of Escherichia coli K-12, strain W1655, was studied by electron microscopy after lectin-gold labeling and negative staining. A comparison was made between the lectin-binding capacity of cells cultivated at 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C (in broth or on agar). A variety of pre-treatment protocols were applied prior to labeling. The gold-conjugated lectins used were wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), soybean agglutinin (SBA) and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEA-I). For all culture conditions, the bacteria had moderate exposure of WGA-binding sites, and this was not changed after pre-treatment. Cells cultivated at 37 degrees C had exposed SBA- and UEA-I-binding epitopes apparently associated with the cell surface. These significantly increased in number after boiling the cells for 10 min. With bacteria cultivated at 20 degrees C these two lectins recognized sites situated on exopolysaccharide filaments. Affino dot-blot experiments with isolated polysaccharides of the strain identified the K-12 lipooligosaccharide as the source of WGA-binding epitopes, and the exopolysaccharide, colanic acid (CA) as the source of SBA- and UEA-I-binding sites. The interaction with these two lectins of bacteria cultivated at 37 degrees C could be due to altered translocation of CA from the cytoplasm to the environment. This suggestion was supported by the demonstration by electron microscopy of SBA and UEA-I binding at the surface of hot phenol-water extracted cell walls.

  18. Mannose-Functionalized Hyperbranched Polyglycerol Loaded with Zinc Porphyrin: Investigation of the Multivalency Effect in Antibacterial Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Staegemann, Michael H; Gitter, Burkhard; Dernedde, Jens; Kuehne, Christian; Haag, Rainer; Wiehe, Arno

    2017-03-17

    The antibacterial photodynamic activity of hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) loaded with zinc porphyrin photosensitizers and mannose units was investigated. hPG, with a MW of 19.5 kDa, was functionalized with about 15 molecules of the photosensitizer {5,10,15-tris(3-hydroxyphenyl)-20-[4-(prop-2-yn-1-ylamino)tetrafluorophenyl]porphyrinato}-zinc(II) by using copper(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC). These nanoparticle conjugates were functionalized systematically with increasing loadings of mannose in the range of approximately 20 to 110 groups. With higher mannose loadings (ca. 58-110 groups) the water-insoluble zinc porphyrin photosensitizer could thus be transferred into a water-soluble form. Targeting of the conjugates was proven in binding studies to the mannose-specific lectin concanavalin A (Con A) by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The antibacterial phototoxicity of the conjugates on Staphylococcus aureus (as a typical Gram-positive germ) was investigated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). It was shown that conjugates with approximately 70-110 mannose units exhibit significant antibacterial activity, whereas conjugates with approximately 20-60 units did not induce bacterial killing at all. These results give an insight into the multivalency effect in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT). On addition of serum to the bacterial cultures, a quenching of this antibacterial phototoxicity was observed. In fluorescence studies with the conjugates in the presence of increasing bovine serum albumin (BSA) concentrations, protein-conjugate associations could be identified as a plausible cause for this quenching.

  19. Siglec-15, a member of the sialic acid-binding lectin, is a novel regulator for osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hiruma, Yoshiharu; Hirai, Takehiro; Tsuda, Eisuke

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Siglec-15 was identified as a gene overexpressed in giant cell tumor. {yields} Siglec-15 mRNA expression increased in association with osteoclast differentiation. {yields} Polyclonal antibody to Siglec-15 inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells derived from monocyte/macrophage-lineage precursors and are critically responsible for bone resorption. In giant cell tumor of bone (GCT), numerous TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells emerge and severe osteolytic bone destruction occurs, implying that the emerged giant cells are biologically similar to osteoclasts. To identify novel genes involved in osteoclastogenesis, we searched genes whose expression pattern was significantly different in GCT from normal and other bone tumor tissues. By screening a human gene expression database, we identified sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 15 (Siglec-15) as one of the genes markedly overexpressed in GCT. The mRNA expression level of Siglec-15 increased in association with osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse primary unfractionated bone marrow cells (UBMC), RAW264.7 cells of the mouse macrophage cell line and human osteoclast precursors (OCP). Treatment with polyclonal antibody to mouse Siglec-15 markedly inhibited osteoclast differentiation in primary mouse bone marrow monocyte/macrophage (BMM) cells stimulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}. The antibody also inhibited osteoclast differentiation in cultures of mouse UBMC and RAW264.7 cells stimulated with active vitamin D{sub 3} and RANKL, respectively. Finally, treatment with polyclonal antibody to human Siglec-15 inhibited RANKL-induced TRAP-positive multinuclear cell formation in a human OCP culture. These results suggest that Siglec-15 plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation.

  20. Improvements on the purification of mannan-binding lectin and demonstration of its Ca(2+)-independent association with a C1s-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, S M; Chung, M C; Kon, O L; Thiel, S; Lee, S H; Lu, J

    1996-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), previously called 'mannan-binding protein' or MBP, is a plasma C-type lectin which, upon binding to carbohydrate structures on micro-organisms, activates the classical pathway of complement. Purification of MBL relies on its Ca(2+)-dependent affinity for carbohydrate, but existing methods are susceptible to contamination by anti-carbohydrate antibodies. In the present study a sequential-sugar-elution method has been developed which can achieve a preparation of virtually pure MBL and its associated serine protease (MBL-associated serine protease, MASP) by two steps of affinity chromatography. In further separation of MASP from MBL, it was found that activated MASP was associated with MBL independent of Ca2+. Since MBL was found to bind to underivatized Sepharose 4B, the MBL-MASP complex was purified using Sepharose 4B and protease inhibitors were included to purify the complex with MASP in its proenzyme form. Analysis of thus-purified MBL-MASP complex by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-300 column at pH 7.8 showed that the proenzyme MASP was also associated with MBL independently of Ca2+, but that the complex could be disrupted at a low pH (5.0). Therefore the mechanism of MBL-MASP-mediated complement activation appears to be significantly different from the C1-mediated classical pathway. PMID:8912663

  1. Human Trefoil Factor 2 Is a Lectin That Binds α-GlcNAc-capped Mucin Glycans with Antibiotic Activity against Helicobacter pylori*

    PubMed Central

    Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Bonar, David; Schloerer, Nils; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of gastric cancer and remains an important health care challenge. The trefoil factor peptides are a family of small highly conserved proteins that are claimed to play essential roles in cytoprotection and epithelial repair within the gastrointestinal tract. H. pylori colocalizes with MUC5AC at the gastric surface epithelium, but not with MUC6 secreted in concert with TFF2 by deep gastric glands. Both components of the gastric gland secretome associate non-covalently and show increased expression upon H. pylori infection. Although blood group active O-glycans of the Lewis-type form the basis of H. pylori adhesion to the surface mucin layer and to epithelial cells, α1,4-GlcNAc-capped O-glycans on gastric mucins were proposed to inhibit H. pylori growth as a natural antibiotic. We show here that the gastric glycoform of TFF2 is a calcium-independent lectin, which binds with high specificity to O-linked α1,4-GlcNAc-capped hexasaccharides on human and porcine stomach mucin. The structural assignments of two hexasaccharide isomers and the binding active glycotope were based on mass spectrometry, linkage analysis, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, glycan inhibition, and lectin competition of TFF2-mucin binding. Neoglycolipids derived from the C3/C6-linked branches of the two isomers revealed highly specific TFF2 binding to the 6-linked trisaccharide in GlcNAcα1-4Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Fucα1-2Galβ1-3)GalNAc-ol(Structure 1). Supposedly, lectin TFF2 is involved in protection of gastric epithelia via a functional relationship to defense against H. pylori launched by antibiotic α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin glycans. Lectin-carbohydrate interaction may have also an impact on more general functional aspects of TFF members by mediating their binding to cell signaling receptors. PMID:25124036

  2. Isolation of a glucosamine binding leguminous lectin with mitogenic activity towards splenocytes and anti-proliferative activity towards tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Pan, Wenliang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-01-01

    A dimeric 64-kDa glucosamine-specific lectin was purified from seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. "brown kidney bean." The simple 2-step purification protocol involved affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel and gel filtration by FPLC on Superdex 75. The lectin was absorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and desorbed using 1M NaCl in the starting buffer. Gel filtration on Superdex 75 yielded a major absorbance peak that gave a single 32-kDa band in SDS-PAGE. Hemagglutinating activity was completely preserved when the ambient temperature was in the range of 20 °C-60 °C. However, drastic reduction of the activity occurred at temperatures above 65 °C. Full hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was observed at an ambient pH of 3 to 12. About 50% activity remained at pH 0-2, and only residual activity was observed at pH 13-14. Hemagglutinating activity of the lectin was inhibited by glucosamine. The brown kidney bean lectin elicited maximum mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes at 2.5 µM. The mitogenic activity was nearly completely eliminated in the presence of 250 mM glucosamine. The lectin also increased mRNA expression of the cytokines IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ. The lectin exhibited antiproliferative activity toward human breast cancer (MCF7) cells, hepatoma (HepG2) cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (CNE1 and CNE2) cells with IC(50) of 5.12 µM, 32.85 µM, 3.12 µM and 40.12 µM respectively after treatment for 24 hours. Flow cytometry with Annexin V and propidum iodide staining indicated apoptosis of MCF7 cells. Hoechst 33342 staining also indicated formation of apoptotic bodies in MCF7 cells after exposure to brown kidney bean lectin. Western blotting revealed that the lectin-induced apoptosis involved ER stress and unfolded protein response.

  3. A lectin-binding glycoprotein of Mr 135,000 associated with basal keratinocytes in pig epidermis.

    PubMed

    King, I A; Tabiowo, A; Pope, F M

    1986-07-15

    Pig epidermis separated by 1 M-CaCl2 treatment was homogenized and separated into three fractions by filtration through nylon mesh and high-speed centrifugation. Lectin-binding glycoproteins were isolated from urea/deoxycholate/mercaptoethanol extracts of the residue fraction that resisted filtration, from deoxycholate extracts of the particulate material in the filtrate and from the soluble fraction. Concanavalin A, Ricinus communis (castor bean) agglutinin 1, peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin and Ulex europaeus (gorse) agglutinin-binding glycoproteins in the three epidermal fractions were analysed by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A major neuraminidase-sensitive glycoprotein component of the particulate fraction of Mr 135,000 was strongly bound by concanavalin A and Ricinus communis agglutinin 1, but only weakly by peanut and Ulex europaeus agglutinins. This glycoprotein was not detected in the residue or soluble fractions of the epidermis, indicating that it had only a limited distribution within the tissue. The 135,000-Mr glycoprotein was one of two major glycoprotein antigens in the particulate fraction. Rabbits immunized with total particulate glycoproteins produced antibodies directed mainly against 135,000- and 110,000-Mr components. Monospecific antibodies were obtained from guinea pigs immunized with the 135,000-Mr glycoprotein band excised from polyacrylamide gels. Indirect immunofluorescence with the use of affinity-purified antibodies showed that the 135,000-Mr glycoprotein was present at the surface of cells in the basal layer of the epidermis as well as at that of other stratified epithelia. It was not present on differentiating cells in the suprabasal layers of the epithelium, suggesting an important role in the attachment or proliferative functions of basal cells in stratified epithelia. Metabolic labelling studies with skin explants cultured in the presence of D-[3H]glucosamine showed that this basal-cell glycoprotein was synthesized

  4. Two jacalin-related lectins from seeds of the African breadfruit (Treculia africana L.).

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Michiko; Nsimba-Lubaki, Shadrack Makuta; Hayashi, Namiko; Minami, Yuji; Yagi, Fumio; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Two jacalin-related lectins (JRLs) were purified by mannose-agarose and melibiose-agarose from seeds of Treculia africana. One is galactose-recognizing JRL (gJRL), named T. africana agglutinin-G (TAA-G), and another one is mannose-recognizing JRL (mJRL), TAA-M. The yields of the two lectins from the seed flour were approximately 7.0 mg/g for gJRL and 7.2 mg/g for mJRL. The primary structure of TAA-G was determined by protein sequencing of lysyl endopeptic peptides and chymotryptic peptides. The sequence identity of TAA-G to other gJRLs was around 70%. Two-residue insertion was found around the sugar-binding sites, compared with the sequences of other gJRLs. Crystallographic studies on other gJRLs have shown that the primary sugar-binding site of gJRLs can accommodate Gal, GalNAc, and GalNAc residue of T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-). However, hemagglutination inhibition and glycan array showed that TAA-G did not recognize GalNAc itself and T-antigen. TAA-G preferred melibiose and core 3 O-glycan.

  5. Novel Lectin-Like Bacteriocins of Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Parret, Annabel H. A.; Temmerman, Koen; De Mot, René

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriocin LlpA, produced by Pseudomonas sp. strain BW11M1, is a peculiar antibacterial protein due to its homology to mannose-binding lectins mostly found in monocots (A. H. A. Parret, G. Schoofs, P. Proost, and R. De Mot, J. Bacteriol. 185:897-908, 2003). Biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 contains two llpA-like genes, named llpA1Pf-5 and llpA2Pf-5. Recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing llpA1Pf-5 or llpA2Pf-5 acquired bacteriocin activity and secreted a 31-kDa protein cross-reacting with LlpABW11M1 antibodies. Antibacterial activity of the recombinant proteins was evidenced by gel overlay assays. Analysis of the antimicrobial spectrum indicated that LlpA1Pf-5 and LlpA2Pf-5 are able to inhibit P. fluorescens strains, as well as the related mushroom pathogen Pseudomonas tolaasii. LlpA-type bacteriocins are characterized by a domain structure consisting of tandem monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. Molecular phylogeny of these MMBL domains suggests that the individual MMBL domains within an LlpA protein have evolved separately toward a specific, as yet unknown, function or, alternatively, were acquired from different ancestral sources. Our observations are consistent with earlier observations, which hinted that MMBL-like bacteriocins represent a new family of antibacterial proteins, probably with a novel mode of action. PMID:16151105

  6. Exposure of Trypanosoma brucei to an N-acetylglucosamine-Binding Lectin Induces VSG Switching and Glycosylation Defects Resulting in Reduced Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M.; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Balzarini, Jan; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) are glycosylated by both paucimannose and oligomannose structures which are involved in the formation of a protective barrier against the immune system. Here, we report that the stinging nettle lectin (UDA), with predominant N-acetylglucosamine-binding specificity, interacts with glycosylated VSGs and kills parasites by provoking defects in endocytosis together with impaired cytokinesis. Prolonged exposure to UDA induced parasite resistance based on a diminished capacity to bind the lectin due to an enrichment of biantennary paucimannose and a reduction of triantennary oligomannose structures. Two molecular mechanisms involved in resistance were identified: VSG switching and modifications in N-glycan composition. Glycosylation defects were correlated with the down-regulation of the TbSTT3A and/or TbSTT3B genes (coding for oligosaccharyltransferases A and B, respectively) responsible for glycan specificity. Furthermore, UDA-resistant trypanosomes exhibited severely impaired infectivity indicating that the resistant phenotype entails a substantial fitness cost. The results obtained further support the modification of surface glycan composition resulting from down-regulation of the genes coding for oligosaccharyltransferases as a general resistance mechanism in response to prolonged exposure to carbohydrate-binding agents. PMID:25746926

  7. Exposure of Trypanosoma brucei to an N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectin induces VSG switching and glycosylation defects resulting in reduced infectivity.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M; Van Damme, Els J M; Balzarini, Jan; González-Pacanowska, Dolores

    2015-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) are glycosylated by both paucimannose and oligomannose structures which are involved in the formation of a protective barrier against the immune system. Here, we report that the stinging nettle lectin (UDA), with predominant N-acetylglucosamine-binding specificity, interacts with glycosylated VSGs and kills parasites by provoking defects in endocytosis together with impaired cytokinesis. Prolonged exposure to UDA induced parasite resistance based on a diminished capacity to bind the lectin due to an enrichment of biantennary paucimannose and a reduction of triantennary oligomannose structures. Two molecular mechanisms involved in resistance were identified: VSG switching and modifications in N-glycan composition. Glycosylation defects were correlated with the down-regulation of the TbSTT3A and/or TbSTT3B genes (coding for oligosaccharyltransferases A and B, respectively) responsible for glycan specificity. Furthermore, UDA-resistant trypanosomes exhibited severely impaired infectivity indicating that the resistant phenotype entails a substantial fitness cost. The results obtained further support the modification of surface glycan composition resulting from down-regulation of the genes coding for oligosaccharyltransferases as a general resistance mechanism in response to prolonged exposure to carbohydrate-binding agents.

  8. Thrombomodulin-mediated cell adhesion: involvement of its lectin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huey-Chun; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Wu, Chun-Mei; Yang, Hsi-Yuan; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2003-11-21

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an integral membrane glycoprotein that is a potent anticoagulant factor. TM may also possess functions distinct from its anticoagulant activity. Here the influence of TM on cell adhesion was studied in TM-negative melanoma A2058 cells transfected with green fluorescent protein-tagged TM (TMG) or lectin domain-deleted TM (TMG(DeltaL)). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that both TMG and TMG(DeltaL) were distributed in the plasma membrane. TMG-expressed cells grew as closely clustered colonies, with TM localized prominently in the intercellular boundaries. TMG(DeltaL)-expressed cells grew singly. Overexpression of TMG, but not TMG(DeltaL), decreased monolayer permeability in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. The cell-to-cell adhesion in TMG-expressed cells was Ca2+-dependent and was inhibited by monoclonal antibody against the lectin-like domain of TM. The effects of TM-mediated cell adhesion were abolished by the addition of mannose, chondroitin sulfate A, or chondroitin sulfate C. In addition, anti-lectin-like domain antibody disrupted the close clustering of the endogenous TM-expressed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line derived from normal human epidermis. Double-labeling immunofluorescence staining revealed similar distributions of TM and actin filament in the cortex region of the TMG-expressed cells. Thus, TM can function as a Ca2+-dependent cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Binding of specific carbohydrates to the lectin-like domain is essential for this specific function.

  9. Annotation and genetic diversity of the chicken collagenous lectins.

    PubMed

    Hamzić, Edin; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Hélène; Bed'Hom, Bertrand; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2015-06-01

    Collectins and ficolins are multimeric proteins present in various tissues and are actively involved in innate immune responses. In chickens, six different collagenous lectins have been characterized so far: mannose-binding lectin (MBL), surfactant protein A (SP-A), collectin 10 (COLEC10), collectin 11 (COLEC11), collectin 12 (COLEC12), lung lectin (LL) and one ficolin (FCN). However, the structural and functional features of the chicken collectins and ficolin are still not fully understood. Therefore, the aims of this study were: (i) to make an overview of the genetic structure and function of chicken collectins and the ficolin, (ii) to investigate the variation in the chicken collectins and the ficolin gene in different chicken populations, and (iii) to assess the presence of MBL gene variants in different chicken populations. We performed comparative genomic analysis using publically available data. The obtained results showed that collectins and ficolins have conserved protein sequences and gene structure across all vertebrate groups and this is especially notable for COLEC10, COLEC11 and COLEC12. For the purpose of studying the genetic variation, 179 animals from 14 populations were genotyped using 31 SNPs covering five genomic regions. The obtained results revealed low level of heterozygosity in the collagenous lectins except for the COLEC12 gene and the LL-SPA-MBL region compared to heterozygosity at neutral microsatellite markers. In addition, the MBL gene variants were assessed in different chicken populations based on the polymorphisms in the promoter region. We observed 10 previously identified MBL variants with A2/A8 and A4 as the most frequent alleles.

  10. Strategies for carbohydrate recognition by the mannose 6-phosphate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dahms, Nancy M; Olson, Linda J; Kim, Jung-Ja P

    2008-01-01

    The two members of the P-type lectin family, the 46 kDa cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR) and the 300 kDa cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR), are ubiquitously expressed throughout the animal kingdom and are distinguished from all other lectins by their ability to recognize phosphorylated mannose residues. The best-characterized function of the MPRs is their ability to direct the delivery of ∼60 different newly synthesized soluble lysosomal enzymes bearing mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) on their N-linked oligosaccharides to the lysosome. In addition to its intracellular role in lysosome biogenesis, the CI-MPR, but not the CD-MPR, participates in a number of other biological processes by interacting with various molecules at the cell surface. The list of extracellular ligands recognized by this multifunctional receptor has grown to include a diverse spectrum of Man-6-P-containing proteins as well as several non-Man-6-P-containing ligands. Recent structural studies have given us a clearer view of how these two receptors use related, but yet distinct, approaches in the recognition of phosphomannosyl residues. PMID:18621992

  11. Glycosylation of the T-cell antigen-specific receptor and its potential role in lectin-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, S.C.; Kranz, D.M.; Longmore, G.D.; Sitkovsky, M.V.; Eisen, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) normally destroy only those cells (target cells) whose surface antigens they recognize. However, in the presence of lectins such as Con A, CTLs destroy virtually any cell, regardless of its antigens. The oligosaccharides of the T-cell antigen-specific receptor, a dimeric surface glycoprotein composed of disulfide-linked ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits, are of interest because of their potential involvement in this lectin-dependent cytotoxic activity. The authors report here that three or four asparagine-linked oligosaccharides could be enzymatically removed from each of the receptor subunits expressed by a cloned line of murine CTLs (clone 2C), consistent with the presence of glycosylation sites deduced from cDNA sequences of the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. genes expressed in this clone. All the N-linked glycans on the ..cap alpha.. subunit were of the complex type, but the ..beta.. subunit carried two or three endoglycosidase H-sensitive oligosaccharides. High-mannose glycans can bind tightly to Con A and, indeed, this lectin was found to bind specifically to solubilized 2C T-cell receptor. The Con A-dependent cytotoxic activity of clone 2C, but not of other CTL clones, was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody (1B2) that is specific for the T-cell receptor of clone 2C. Antibody 1B2 also inhibited clone 2C cytotoxicity mediated by phytohemagglutinin, lentil-lectin, and wheat-germ agglutinin. These results suggest that, although lectin-dependent lysis of target cells by CTLs is antigen nonspecific, the cytolytic activity can be triggered by binding of the lectin to the T-cell antigen-specific receptor.

  12. Alterations in lectin binding to the epidermis following treatment with 8-methoxypsoralen plus long-wave ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Takigawa, M.; Horio, T.

    1984-02-01

    The alterations in lectin fluorescence stainings to the epidermis were examined in guinea pig skin treated with topical application of a 1% 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) solution plus long-wave ultraviolet (UVA) radiation (1.5-3.5 J/cm2) (PUVA). Serial biopsy specimens taken up to 21 days postirradiation were stained with 8 commercially available lectins labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) or biotin (followed by avidin D-FITC): Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin I (BSA), concanavalin A (Con-A), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA), and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). In normal guinea pig skin UEA staining was absent. Following PUVA treatment, UEA and DBA stainings became apparent or stronger in intensity after days 7-14 (UEA) and days 4-7 (DBA), respectively, and returned to negative or weak by days 14-21. Stainings with Con-A, SBA, and WGA gave remarkable decreases in intensity after days 2-4 and recovered to the baseline by days 7-14. Intensity of BSA, PNA, and RCA stainings was decreased to a lesser degree than the other lectins. Such changes were not produced by application of 8-MOP, UVA radiation (less than 10 J/cm2), UVB radiation (900-2700 mJ/cm2), or tape stripping. These results suggest that PUVA treatment perturbs the composition or organization of epidermal cell surface glycoconjugates to induce alterations in lectin stainings.

  13. Lectin affinity electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka

    2014-01-01

    An interaction or a binding event typically changes the electrophoretic properties of a molecule. Affinity electrophoresis methods detect changes in the electrophoretic pattern of molecules (mainly macromolecules) that occur as a result of biospecific interactions or complex formation. Lectin affinity electrophoresis is a very effective method for the detection and analysis of trace amounts of glycobiological substances. It is particularly useful for isolating and separating the glycoisomers of target molecules. Here, we describe a sensitive technique for the detection of glycoproteins separated by agarose gel-lectin affinity electrophoresis that uses antibody-affinity blotting. The technique is tested using α-fetoprotein with lectin (Lens culinaris agglutinin and Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin)-agarose gels.

  14. Differential staining of Western blots of human secreted glycoproteins from serum, milk, saliva, and seminal fluid using lectins displaying diverse sugar specificities.

    PubMed

    Gilboa-Garber, Nechama; Lerrer, Batya; Lesman-Movshovich, Efrat; Dgani, Orly

    2005-12-01

    Human milk, serum, saliva, and seminal fluid glycoproteins (gps) nourish and protect newborn and adult tissues. Their saccharides, which resemble cell membrane components, may block pathogen adhesion and infection. In the present study, they were examined by a battery of lectins from plants, animals, and bacteria, using hemagglutination inhibition and Western blot analyses. The lectins included galactophilic ones from Aplysia gonad, Erythrina corallodendron, Maclura pomifera (MPL), peanut, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IL); fucose-binding lectins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-IIL), Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL), and Ulex europaeus (UEA-I), and mannose/glucose-binding Con A. The results demonstrated the chosen lectin efficiency for differential analysis of human secreted gps as compared to CBB staining. They unveiled the diversity of these body fluid gp glycans (those of the milk and seminal fluid being highest): the milk gps interacted most strongly with PA-IIL, followed by RSL; the saliva gps with RSL, followed by PA-IIL and MPL; the serum gps with Con A and MPL, followed by PA-IIL and RSL, and the seminal plasma gps with RSL and MPL, followed by UEA-I and PA-IIL. The potential usage of these lectins as probes for scientific, industrial, and medical purposes, and for quality control of the desired gps is clearly indicated.

  15. A Lactose-Binding Lectin from the Marine Sponge Cinachyrella Apion (Cal) Induces Cell Death in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luciana; Monteiro, Norberto; Serquiz, Raphael; Santos, Paula; Oliveira, Ruth; Oliveira, Adeliana; Rocha, Hugo; Morais, Ana Heloneida; Uchoa, Adriana; Santos, Elizeu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer represents a set of more than 100 diseases, including malignant tumors from different locations. Strategies inducing differentiation have had limited success in the treatment of established cancers. Marine sponges are a biological reservoir of bioactive molecules, especially lectins. Several animal and plant lectins were purified with antitumor activity, mitogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral, but there are few reports in the literature describing the mechanism of action of lectins purified from marine sponges to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells. In this work, a lectin purified from the marine sponge Cinachyrella apion (CaL) was evaluated with respect to its hemolytic, cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties, besides the ability to induce cell death in tumor cells. The antiproliferative activity of CaL was tested against HeLa, PC3 and 3T3 cell lines, with highest growth inhibition for HeLa, reducing cell growth at a dose dependent manner (0.5–10 µg/mL). Hemolytic activity and toxicity against peripheral blood cells were tested using the concentration of IC50 (10 µg/mL) for both trials and twice the IC50 for analysis in flow cytometry, indicating that CaL is not toxic to these cells. To assess the mechanism of cell death caused by CaL in HeLa cells, we performed flow cytometry and western blotting. Results showed that lectin probably induces cell death by apoptosis activation by pro-apoptotic protein Bax, promoting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cell cycle arrest in S phase and acting as both dependent and/or independent of caspases pathway. These results indicate the potential of CaL in studies of medicine for treating cancer. PMID:22690140

  16. Members of a Novel Protein Family Containing Microneme Adhesive Repeat Domains Act as Sialic Acid-binding Lectins during Host Cell Invasion by Apicomplexan Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Nikolas; Santos, Joana M.; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Leon, Ester; Saouros, Savvas; Kiso, Makoto; Blackman, Michael J.; Matthews, Stephen; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Numerous intracellular pathogens exploit cell surface glycoconjugates for host cell recognition and entry. Unlike bacteria and viruses, Toxoplasma gondii and other parasites of the phylum Apicomplexa actively invade host cells, and this process critically depends on adhesins (microneme proteins) released onto the parasite surface from intracellular organelles called micronemes (MIC). The microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain of T. gondii MIC1 (TgMIC1) recognizes sialic acid (Sia), a key determinant on the host cell surface for invasion by this pathogen. By complementation and invasion assays, we demonstrate that TgMIC1 is one important player in Sia-dependent invasion and that another novel Sia-binding lectin, designated TgMIC13, is also involved. Using BLAST searches, we identify a family of MAR-containing proteins in enteroparasitic coccidians, a subclass of apicomplexans, including T. gondii, suggesting that all these parasites exploit sialylated glycoconjugates on host cells as determinants for enteric invasion. Furthermore, this protein family might provide a basis for the broad host cell range observed for coccidians that form tissue cysts during chronic infection. Carbohydrate microarray analyses, corroborated by structural considerations, show that TgMIC13, TgMIC1, and its homologue Neospora caninum MIC1 (NcMIC1) share a preference for α2–3- over α2–6-linked sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine sequences. However, the three lectins also display differences in binding preferences. Intense binding of TgMIC13 to α2–9-linked disialyl sequence reported on embryonal cells and relatively strong binding to 4-O-acetylated-Sia found on gut epithelium and binding of NcMIC1 to 6′sulfo-sialyl Lewisx might have implications for tissue tropism. PMID:19901027

  17. Human IgE-binding protein: A soluble lectin exhibiting a highly conserved interspecies sequence and differential recognition of IgE glycoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.W.; Albrandt, K.; Keller, D.; Liu, Fu-Tong )

    1990-09-04

    IgE-binding protein ({epsilon}BP) refers to a protein originally identified in rat basophilic leukemia cells by virtue of its affinity for IgE. It is now known to be a {beta}-galactoside-binding lectin equivalent to carbohydrate-binding protein 35 (CBP 35). More recently, its identity to Mac-2, a macrophage cell-surface protein, has been established. cDNA coding for human {epsilon}BP has been cloned from a human HeLa cell cDNA library and contains an open reading frame of 750 base pairs encoding a 250 amino acid protein. Like the rat and murine counterparts, the human {epsilon}BP amino acid sequence can be divided into two domains with the amino-terminal domain consisting of a highly conserved repetitive sequence (YPGXXXPGA) and the carboxyl-terminal domain containing sequences shared by other S-type lectins. The human {epsilon}BP sequence exhibits extensive homology to murine and rat {epsilon}BP with 84% and 82% identity, respectively. The homology is particularly striking in the carboxyl-terminal domain where 95% identity is found between human and murine sequences in a stretch of over 70 amino acids. A survey of {epsilon}BP mRNA expression from several lymphocyte cell lines revealed that the level of {epsilon}BP transcription may reflect a relationship between cell differentiation and {epsilon}BP expression. Finally, human {epsilon}BP was purified from several human cell lines and shown to possess lactose-binding characteristics and cross-species reactivity to murine IgE. Surprisingly, three different human myeloma IgE proteins did not show reactivity to human {epsilon}BP. However, after neuraminidase treatment of each human IgE, pronounced binding to {epsilon}BP was observed, thereby indicating that only specific IgE glycoforms can be recognized by {epsilon}BP.

  18. Amino acid sequence and carbohydrate-binding analysis of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the Holothuroidea, Cucumaria echinata.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Shiba, Kouhei; Nishinohara, Shoichi; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is one of the Ca2+-dependent lectins that has been isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein is composed of two identical subunits held by a single disulfide bond. The complete amino acid sequence of CEL-I was determined by sequencing the peptides produced by proteolytic fragmentation of S-pyridylethylated CEL-I. A subunit of CEL-I is composed of 140 amino acid residues. Two intrachain (Cys3-Cys14 and Cys31-Cys135) and one interchain (Cys36) disulfide bonds were also identified from an analysis of the cystine-containing peptides obtained from the intact protein. The similarity between the sequence of CEL-I and that of other C-type lectins was low, while the C-terminal region, including the putative Ca2+ and carbohydrate-binding sites, was relatively well conserved. When the carbohydrate-binding activity was examined by a solid-phase microplate assay, CEL-I showed much higher affinity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than for other galactose-related carbohydrates. The association constant of CEL-I for p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide (NP-GalNAc) was determined to be 2.3 x 10(4) M(-1), and the maximum number of bound NP-GalNAc was estimated to be 1.6 by an equilibrium dialysis experiment.

  19. Fruit-specific lectins from banana and plantain.

    PubMed

    Peumans, W J; Zhang, W; Barre, A; Houlès Astoul, C; Balint-Kurti, P J; Rovira, P; Rougé, P; May, G D; Van Leuven, F; Truffa-Bachi, P; Van Damme, E J

    2000-09-01

    One of the predominant proteins in the pulp of ripe bananas (Musa acuminata L.) and plantains (Musa spp.) has been identified as a lectin. The banana and plantain agglutinins (called BanLec and PlanLec, respectively) were purified in reasonable quantities using a novel isolation procedure, which prevented adsorption of the lectins onto insoluble endogenous polysaccharides. Both BanLec and PlanLec are dimeric proteins composed of two identical subunits of 15 kDa. They readily agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes and exhibit specificity towards mannose. Molecular cloning revealed that BanLec has sequence similarity to previously described lectins of the family of jacalin-related lectins, and according to molecular modelling studies has the same overall fold and three-dimensional structure. The identification of BanLec and PlanLec demonstrates the occurrence of jacalin-related lectins in monocot species, suggesting that these lectins are more widespread among higher plants than is actually believed. The banana and plantain lectins are also the first documented examples of jacalin-related lectins, which are abundantly present in the pulp of mature fruits but are apparently absent from other tissues. However, after treatment of intact plants with methyl jasmonate, BanLec is also clearly induced in leaves. The banana lectin is a powerful murine T-cell mitogen. The relevance of the mitogenicity of the banana lectin is discussed in terms of both the physiological role of the lectin and the impact on food safety.

  20. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer. PMID:28123516

  1. C-type lectins facilitate tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dongbing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Songbai; Su, Chunjie; Zhang, Yonglian

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis, a life-threatening complication of cancer, leads to the majority of cases of cancer-associated mortality. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of cancer metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. C-type lectins are a large group of proteins, which share structurally homologous carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) and possess diverse physiological functions, including inflammation and antimicrobial immunity. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated the contribution of C-type lectins in different steps of the metastatic spread of cancer. Notably, a substantial proportion of C-type lectins, including selectins, mannose receptor (MR) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial cell C-type lectin, are important molecular targets for the formation of metastases in vitro and in vivo. The present review summarizes what has been found regarding C-type lectins in the lymphatic and hematogenous metastasis of cancer. An improved understanding the role of C-type lectins in cancer metastasis provides a comprehensive perspective for further clarifying the molecular mechanisms of cancer metastasis and supports the development of novel C-type lectins-based therapies the for prevention of metastasis in certain types of cancer.

  2. Functional Interaction of Cockroach Allergens and Mannose Receptor (CD206) in Human Circulating Fibrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ying-Ming; Hsu, Shih-Chang; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Yu-Feng; Plunkett, Beverly; Huang, Shau-Ku; Gao, Pei-Song

    2013-01-01

    Background The innate pattern recognition C-type-lectin receptors (CLRs), including mannose receptor (MRC1; CD206), have been suggested to functionally interact with allergens and are critical in controlling immune response. Fibrocytes have been considered to play a role in allergic asthma. Here we sought to investigate the functional interaction of cockroach allergens with CD206 in fibrocytes. Methods Profiling of N-linked glycans from natural purified cockroach allergen Bla g 2 was accomplished by MALDI-MS. The binding activity of cockroach allergens to CD206 was determined by solid-phase binding assays. Levels of CD206 expression on human fibrocytes and CD206 mediated signaling and cytokine production in Bla g 2 treated fibrocytes were determined. Results Profiling of N-linked glycans from Bla g 2 revealed a predominance of small, mannose-terminated glycans with and without fucose. Significant binding of Bla g 2 to CD206 was observed, which was inhibited by yeast mannan (a known CD206 ligand), free mannose, and a blocking antibody (anti-hMR). Flow cytometric analyses of human fibrocytes (CD45+ and collagen-1+) showed selective expression of CD206 on fibrocytes. Functionally, a concentration-dependent uptake of FITC labeled Bla g 2 by fibrocytes was observed, but was significantly inhibited by anti-hMR. Bla g 2 can stimulate up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-alpha and IL-6 and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB/p65), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), ERK, and JNK in cultured fibrocytes. This increased secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-6 and activation of NF-kB, ERK, and JNK was significantly inhibited by the addition of either mannan or mannose. Furthermore, Bla g 2 induced increase in TNF-alpha and IL-6 production was also inhibited by the use of NF-kB, ERK, and JNK inhibitors. Conclusion These results provide evidence supporting the existence of a functional cockroach allergen-CD206 axis in human fibrocytes, suggesting a role

  3. Structural Studies of an Anti-Inflammatory Lectin from Canavalia boliviana Seeds in Complex with Dimannosides

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Tales Rocha; Delatorre, Plínio; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Figueiredo, Jozi Godoy; Bezerra, Ingrid Gonçalves; Teixeira, Cicero Silvano; Simões, Rafael Conceição; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; de Alencar, Nylane Maria Nunes; Gruber, Karl; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2014-01-01

    Plant lectins, especially those purified from species of the Leguminosae family, represent the best-studied group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Lectins purified from seeds of the Diocleinae subtribe exhibit a high degree of sequence identity notwithstanding that they show very distinct biological activities. Two main factors have been related to this feature: variance in key residues influencing the carbohydrate-binding site geometry and differences in the pH-dependent oligomeric state profile. In this work, we have isolated a lectin from Canavalia boliviana (Cbol) and solved its x-ray crystal structure in the unbound form and in complex with the carbohydrates Man(α1-3)Man(α1-O)Me, Man(α1-4)Man(α1-O)Me and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-α-D-mannose. We evaluated its oligomerization profile at different pH values using Small Angle X-ray Scattering and compared it to that of Concanavalin A. Based on predicted pKa-shifts of amino acids in the subunit interfaces we devised a model for the dimer-tetramer equilibrium phenomena of these proteins. Additionally, we demonstrated Cbol anti-inflammatory properties and further characterized them using in vivo and in vitro models. PMID:24865454

  4. Molecular diversity of the two sugar-binding sites of the β-trefoil lectin HA33/C (HA1) from Clostridium botulinum type C neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshio; Tonozuka, Takashi; Ito, Sakae; Takeda, Yoichi; Sato, Ryutaro; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Oguma, Keiji; Nishikawa, Atsushi

    2011-08-01

    A critical role in internalizing the Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin into gastrointestinal cells is played by nontoxic components complexed with the toxin. One of the components, a β-trefoil lectin has been known as HA33 or HA1. The HA33 from C. botulinum type A (HA33/A) has been predicted to have a single sugar-binding site, while type C HA33 (HA33/C) has two sites. Here we constructed HA33/C mutants and evaluated the binding capacities of the individual sites through mucin-assay and isothermal titration calorimetry. The mutant W176A (site I knockout) had a K(d) value of 31.5mM for galactose (Gal) and 61.3mM for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), while the K(d) value for N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) was too high to be determined. In contrast, the double mutant N278A/Q279A (site II knockout) had a K(d) value of 11.8mM for Neu5Ac. We also determined the crystal structures of wild-type and the F179I mutant in complex with GalNAc at site II. The results suggest that site I of HA33/C is quite unique in that it mainly recognizes Neu5Ac, and site II seems less important for the lectin specificity. The architectures and the properties of the sugar-binding sites of HA33/C and HA33/A were shown to be drastically different.

  5. Monovalent mannose-based DC-SIGN antagonists: targeting the hydrophobic groove of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Tomašić, Tihomir; Hajšek, David; Švajger, Urban; Luzar, Jernej; Obermajer, Nataša; Petit-Haertlein, Isabelle; Fieschi, Franck; Anderluh, Marko

    2014-03-21

    Dendritic cell-specific, intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) is a C-type lectin expressed specifically on dendritic cells. It is a primary site for recognition and binding of various pathogens and thus a promising therapeutic target for inhibition of pathogen entry and subsequent prevention of immune defense cell infection. We report the design and synthesis of d-mannose-based DC-SIGN antagonists bearing diaryl substituted 1,3-diaminopropanol or glycerol moieties incorporated to target the hydrophobic groove of the receptor. The designed glycomimetics were evaluated by in vitro assay of the isolated DC-SIGN extracellular domain for their ability to compete with HIV-1 gp120 for binding to the DC-SIGN carbohydrate recognition domain. Compounds 14d and 14e, that display IC50 values of 40 μM and 50 μM, are among the most potent monovalent DC-SIGN antagonists reported. The antagonistic effect of all the synthesized compounds was further evaluated by a one-point in vitro assay that measures DC adhesion. Compounds 14d, 14e, 18d and 18e were shown to act as functional antagonists of DC-SIGN-mediated DC adhesion. The binding mode of 14d was also studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, which revealed flexibility of 14d in the binding site and provides a basis for further optimization.

  6. Lectins and Tetrahymena - A review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2016-09-01

    The unicellular ciliate Tetrahymena is a complete organism, one of the most highly developed protozoans, which has specialized organelles performing each of the functions characteristic to the cells of higher ranked animals. It is also able to produce, store, and secrete hormones of higher ranked animals and also react to them. It produces lectins that can bind them and has functions, which are influenced by exogenous lectins. The review lists the observations on the relationship between lectins and Tetrahymena and try to construe them on the basis of the data, which are at our disposal. Considering the data, lectins can be used by Tetrahymena as materials for influencing conjugation, for stimulating hormone receptors, and by this, mimic the hormonal functions. Lectins can influence phagocytosis and movement of the cells as well as the cell division. As Tetrahymena can recognize both related and hostile cells by the help of lectins and surface sugars, it could be surmised a complex predator-prey system. This could determine the survival of the population as well as the nourishment conditions. When Tetrahymena is pathogenic, it can use lectins as virulence factors.

  7. The Neck Region of the C-type Lectin DC-SIGN Regulates Its Surface Spatiotemporal Organization and Virus-binding Capacity on Antigen-presenting Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Carlo; Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Joosten, Ben; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Gualda, Emilio J.; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Figdor, Carl G.; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The C-type lectin DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells (DCs) facilitates capture and internalization of a plethora of different pathogens. Although it is known that DC-SIGN organizes in nanoclusters at the surface of DCs, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this well defined nanopatterning and role in viral binding remain enigmatic. By combining biochemical and advanced biophysical techniques, including optical superresolution and single particle tracking, we demonstrate that DC-SIGN intrinsic nanoclustering strictly depends on its molecular structure. DC-SIGN nanoclusters exhibited free, Brownian diffusion on the cell membrane. Truncation of the extracellular neck region, known to abrogate tetramerization, significantly reduced nanoclustering and concomitantly increased lateral diffusion. Importantly, DC-SIGN nanocluster dissolution exclusively compromised binding to nanoscale size pathogens. Monte Carlo simulations revealed that heterogeneity on nanocluster density and spatial distribution confers broader binding capabilities to DC-SIGN. As such, our results underscore a direct relationship between spatial nanopatterning, driven by intermolecular interactions between the neck regions, and receptor diffusion to provide DC-SIGN with the exquisite ability to dock pathogens at the virus length scale. Insight into how virus receptors are organized prior to virus binding and how they assemble into functional platforms for virus docking is helpful to develop novel strategies to prevent virus entry and infection. PMID:23019323

  8. Distribution of binding sites for the plant lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I on primary sensory neurones in seven different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Michelle B; Plenderleith, Mark B

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that different functional classes of neurones express characteristic cell-surface carbohydrates. Previous studies have shown that the plant lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA) binds to a population of small to medium diameter primary sensory neurones in rabbits and humans. This suggests that a fucose-containing glycoconjugate may be expressed by nociceptive primary sensory neurones. In order to determine the extent to which this glycoconjugate is expressed by other species, in the current study, we have examined the distribution of UEA-binding sites on primary sensory neurones in seven different mammals. Binding sites for UEA were associated with the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic granules of small to medium dorsal root ganglion cells and their axon terminals in laminae I-III of the grey matter of the spinal cord, in the rabbit, cat and marmoset monkey. However, no binding was observed in either the dorsal root ganglia or spinal cord in the mouse, rat, guinea pig or flying fox. These results indicate an inter-species variation in the expression of cell-surface glycoconjugates on mammalian primary sensory neurones.

  9. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  10. Binding of the wheat germ lectin to Cryptococcus neoformans chitooligomers affects multiple mechanisms required for fungal pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Kmetzsch, Lívia; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Silva, Fernanda D.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Araujo, Glauber de S.; Frases, Susana; Staats, Charley C.; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Schrank, Augusto; Vainstein, Marilene H.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2015-01-01

    The principal capsular component of Cryptococcus neoformans, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM), interacts with surface glycans, including chitin-like oligomers. Although the role of GXM in cryptococcal infection has been well explored, there is no information on how chitooligomers affect fungal pathogenesis. In this study, surface chitooligomers of C. neoformans were blocked through the use of the wheat germ lectin (WGA) and the effects on animal pathogenesis, interaction with host cells, fungal growth and capsule formation were analyzed. Treatment of C. neoformans cells with WGA followed by infection of mice delayed mortality relative to animals infected with untreated fungal cells. This observation was associated with reduced brain colonization by lectin-treated cryptococci. Blocking chitooligomers also rendered yeast cells less efficient in their ability to associate with phagocytes. WGA did not affect fungal viability, but inhibited GXM release to the extracellular space and capsule formation. In WGA-treated yeast cells, genes that are involved in capsule formation and GXM traffic had their transcription levels decreased in comparison with untreated cells. Our results suggest that cellular pathways required for capsule formation and pathogenic mechanisms are affected by blocking chitin-derived structures at the cell surface of C. neoformans. Targeting chitooligomers with specific ligands may reveal new therapeutic alternatives to control cryptococcosis. PMID:23608320

  11. Recognition and binding of the PF2 lectin to α-amylase from Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera:Bruchidae) larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Lagarda-Diaz, I; Geiser, D; Guzman-Partida, A M; Winzerling, J; Vazquez-Moreno, L

    2014-01-01

    Amylases are an important family of enzymes involved in insect carbohydrate metabolism that are required for the survival of insect larvae. For this reason, enzymes from starch-dependent insects are targets for insecticidal control. PF2 (Olneya tesota) is a lectin that is toxic to Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) larvae. In this study, we evaluated recognition of the PF2 lectin to α-amylases from Z. subfasciatus midgut and the effect of PF2 on α-amylase activity. PF2 caused a decrease of total amylase activity in vitro. Subsequently, several α-amylase isoforms were isolated from insect midgut tissues using ion exchange chromatography. Three enzyme isoforms were verified by an in-gel assay for amylase activity; however, only one isoform was recognized by antiamylase serum and PF2. The identity of this Z. subfasciatus α-amylase was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The findings strongly suggest that a glycosylated α-amylase isoform from larval Z. subfasciatus midgut interacts with PF2, which interferes with starch digestion.

  12. Use of lectins in immunohematology

    PubMed Central

    Gorakshakar, Ajit C.; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in seeds of many plants, especially corals and beans, in fungi and bacteria, and in animals. Apart from their hemagglutinating property, a wide range of functions have been attributed to them. Their importance in the area of immunohematology is immense. They are used to detect specific red cell antigens, to activate different types of lymphocytes, in order to resolve problems related to polyagglutination and so on. The introduction of advanced biotechnological tools generates new opportunities to exploit the properties of lectins, which were not used earlier. Stem cell research is a very important area in transplant medicine. Certain lectins detect surface markers of stem cell. Hence, they are used to understand the developmental biology of stem cells. The role of various lectins in the areas of transfusion and transplant medicine is discussed in detail in this review. PMID:27011665

  13. Carbamate-linked lactose: design of clusters and evidence for selectivity to block binding of human lectins to (neo)glycoproteins with increasing degree of branching and to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    André, Sabine; Specker, Daniel; Bovin, Nicolai V; Lensch, Martin; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Wittmann, Valentin

    2009-09-01

    Various pathogenic processes are driven by protein(lectin)-glycan interactions, especially involving beta-galactosides at branch ends of cellular glycans. These emerging insights fuel the interest to design potent inhibitors to block lectins. As a step toward this aim, we prepared a series of ten mono- to tetravalent glycocompounds with lactose as a common headgroup. To obtain activated carbonate for ensuing carbamate formation, conditions for the facile synthesis of pure isomers from anomerically unprotected lactose were identified. To probe for the often encountered intrafamily diversity of human lectins, we selected representative members from the three subgroups of adhesion/growth-regulatory galectins as receptors. Diversity of the glycan display was accounted for by using four (neo)glycoproteins with different degrees of glycan branching as matrices in solid-phase assays. Cases of increased inhibitory potency of lactose clusters compared to free lactose were revealed. Extent of relative inhibition was not directly associated with valency in the glycocompound and depended on the lectin type. Of note for screening protocols, efficacy of blocking appeared to decrease with increased degree of glycan branching in matrix glycoproteins. Binding to tumor cells was impaired with selectivity for galectins-3 and -4. Representative compounds did not impair growth of carcinoma cells up to a concentration of 5 mM of lactose moieties (valence-corrected value) per assay. The reported bioactivity and the delineation of its modulation by structural parameters of lectins and glycans set instructive examples for the further design of selective inhibitors and assay procedures.

  14. CH-π "T-shape" interaction with histidine explains binding of aromatic galactosides to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin LecA.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Rameshwar U; Garg, Divita; Schwartz, Julian; Visini, Ricardo; Sattler, Michael; Stocker, Achim; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2013-09-20

    The galactose specific lectin LecA mediates biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa . The interaction between LecA and aromatic β-galactoside biofilm inhibitors involves an intermolecular CH-π T-shape interaction between C(ε1)-H of residue His50 in LecA and the aromatic ring of the galactoside aglycone. The generality of this interaction was tested in a diverse family of β-galactosides. LecA binding to aromatic β-galactosides (KD ∼ 8 μM) was consistently stronger than to aliphatic β-galactosides (KD ∼ 36 μM). The CH-π interaction was observed in the X-ray crystal structures of six different LecA complexes, with shorter than the van der Waals distances indicating productive binding. Related XH/cation/π-π interactions involving other residues were identified in complexes of aromatic glycosides with a variety of carbohydrate binding proteins such as concanavalin A. Exploiting such interactions might be generally useful in drug design against these targets.

  15. Photo- and biophysical studies of lectin-conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles: reduced sensitivity in high density assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2010-11-18

    Lectin-conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate-based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose-recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies revealed surprisingly low emission intensities upon staining with ConA-fNP compared to those with biotin-ConA/Cy3-streptavidin staining. A series of photophysical and biophysical characterizations of the fNP and ConA-fNP conjugates were performed to probe the low sensitivity from fNP in the microarray assays. Up to 1200 fluorescein (FL) and 80 tetramethylrhodamine (TR) dye molecules were incorporated into 46 nm diameter fNP, yielding emissive brightness values 400 and 35 times larger than the individual dye molecules, respectively. ConA lectin conjugated to carboxylic acid surface-modified nanoparticles covers 15-30% of the fNP surface. The CD spectra and mannose substrate selectivity of ConA conjugated to the fNP differed slightly compared to that of soluble ConA. Although, the high emissive brightness of fNP enhances detection sensitivity for samples with low analyte densities, large fNP diameters limit fNP recruitment and binding to samples with high analyte densities. The high analyte density and nearly two-dimensional target format of carbohydrate microarrays make probe size a critical parameter. In this application, fNP labels afford minimal sensitivity advantage compared to direct dye labeling.

  16. Antivirulence Isoquinolone Mannosides: Optimization of the Biaryl Aglycone for FimH Lectin Binding Affinity and Efficacy in the Treatment of Chronic UTI

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Cassie; Han, Zhenfu; Kalas, Vasilios; Klein, Roger; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Ford, Bradley; Binkley, Jana; Cusumano, Corinne K.; Cusumano, Zachary; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) employ the mannose-binding adhesin FimH to colonize the bladder epithelium during urinary tract infection (UTI). Previously reported FimH antagonists exhibit good potency and efficacy, but low bioavailability and a short half-life in vivo. In a rational design strategy, we obtained an X-ray structure of lead mannosides and then designed mannosides with improved drug-like properties. We show that cyclizing the carboxamide onto the biphenyl B-ring aglycone of biphenyl mannosides into a fused heterocyclic ring, generates new biaryl mannosides such as isoquinolone 22 (2-methyl-4-(1-oxo-1,2-dihydroisoquinolin-7-yl)phenyl α-D-mannopyranoside) with enhanced potency and in vivo efficacy resulting from increased oral bioavailability. N-Substitution of the isoquinolone aglycone with various functionalities produced a new potent subseries of FimH antagonists. All analogues of the subseries have higher FimH binding affinity than unsubstituted lead 22, as determined by thermal shift differential scanning fluorimetry assay. Mannosides with pyridyl substitution on the isoquinolone group inhibit bacteria-mediated hemagglutination and prevent biofilm formation by UPEC with single-digit nanomolar potency, which is unprecedented for any FimH antagonists or any other antivirulence compounds reported to date. PMID:26812660

  17. Purification, Biochemical Characterization, and Amino Acid Sequence of a Novel Type of Lectin from Aplysia dactylomela Eggs with Antibacterial/Antibiofilm Potential.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Torres, Renato Cézar Farias; Chaves, Renata Pinheiro; de Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; de Sousa, Bruno Lopes; Goveia, André Castelo Rodrigues; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe; Matos, Maria Nágila Carneiro; Matthews-Cascon, Helena; Freire, Valder Nogueira; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2017-02-01

    A new lectin from Aplysia dactylomela eggs (ADEL) was isolated by affinity chromatography on HCl-activated Sepharose™ media. Hemagglutination caused by ADEL was inhibited by several galactosides, mainly galacturonic acid (Ka = 6.05 × 10(6) M(-1)). The primary structure of ADEL consists of 217 residues, including 11 half-cystines involved in five intrachain and one interchain disulfide bond, resulting in a molecular mass of 57,228 ± 2 Da, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. ADEL showed high similarity with lectins isolated from Aplysia eggs, but not with other known lectins, indicating that these lectins could be grouped into a new family of animal lectins. Three glycosylation sites were found in its polypeptide backbone. Data from peptide-N-glycosidase F digestion and MS suggest that all oligosaccharides attached to ADEL are high in mannose. The secondary structure of ADEL is predominantly β-sheet, and its tertiary structure is sensitive to the presence of ligands, as observed by CD. A 3D structure model of ADEL was created and shows two domains connected by a short loop. Domain A is composed of a flat three-stranded and a curved five-stranded β-sheet, while domain B presents a flat three-stranded and a curved four-stranded β-sheet. Molecular docking revealed favorable binding energies for interactions between lectin and galacturonic acid, lactose, galactosamine, and galactose. Moreover, ADEL was able to agglutinate and inhibit biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus, suggesting that this lectin may be a potential alternative to conventional use of antimicrobial agents in the treatment of infections caused by Staphylococcal biofilms.

  18. A lectin histochemical study on carbohydrate moieties of the gonadotropin-like substance in the epithelial cells of Hatschek's pit of Branchiostoma belcheri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. Q.; Welsch, U.

    1997-03-01

    The present light microscopic lectin, histochemical study suggests for the first time that the vertebrate gonadotropin-like substance in the basal part of the epithelial cells of Hatschek's pit is a sialic acid-containing glycoprotein. The binding intensity of the epithelial cells in Hatschek's pit to 6 lectins ( Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (LPA), Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Concanavalin A (Con A), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) and Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I)) indicate that the carbohydrate composition of the gonadotrophic glycoprotein is similar to that of mammals and fish, and that N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid, glucosamine, D-mannose and L-fucose are components of the carbohydrate portion.

  19. Two novel lectins from Parkia biglandulosa and Parkia roxburghii: isolation, physicochemical characterization, mitogenicity and anti-proliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navjot; Singh, Jatinder; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Agrewala, Javed N; Kaur, Manpreet

    2005-08-01

    Two mannose/glucose specific seed lectins were isolated from Parkia biglandulosa and Parkia roxburghii and were characterized w.r.t various physicochemical properties. Unlike other Parkia lectins a comparison of native and subunit molecular mass showed that both Parkia lectins were heterotetramers. Parkia biglandulosa lectin was found to be T-cell mitogen as revealed by IL-2 bioassay. These lectins showed anti-proliferative effect on two murine macrophage cancer cell lines i.e. P 388DI (50%) and J774 (70%). In addition Parkia roxburghii also inhibited proliferation of HB98 (65.47%), a B-cell hybridoma cell line.

  20. High mannose oligosaccharide of phytohemagglutinin is attached to asparagine 12 and the modified oligosaccharide to asparagine 60. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, A.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Phytohemagglutinin, the lectin of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris, has a high mannose and a modified (fucosylated) oligosaccharide on each polypeptide. Fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography of tryptic digests of (/sup 3/H)fucose or (/sup 3/H)glucosamine labeled phytohemagglutinin, followed by amino acid sequencing of the isolated glycopeptides, shows that the high mannose oligosaccharide is attached to Asn/sup 12/ and the modified oligosaccharide to Asn /sup 60/ of the protein. In animal glycoproteins, high mannose chains are rarely found at the N-terminal side of complex chains.

  1. Solution Structure and Sugar-Binding Mechanism of Mouse Latrophilin-1 RBL: a 7TM Receptor-Attached Lectin-Like Domain

    PubMed Central

    Vakonakis, Ioannis; Langenhan, Tobias; Prömel, Simone; Russ, Andreas; Campbell, Iain D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Latrophilin-1 (Lat-1), a target receptor for α-Latrotoxin, is a putative G protein-coupled receptor implicated in synaptic function. The extracellular portion of Lat-1 contains a rhamnose binding lectin (RBL)-like domain of unknown structure. RBL domains, first isolated from the eggs of marine species, are also found in the ectodomains of other metazoan transmembrane proteins, including a recently discovered coreceptor of the neuronal axon guidance molecule SLT-1/Slit. Here, we describe a structure of this domain from the mouse Lat-1. RBL adopts a unique α/β fold with long structured loops important for monosaccharide recognition, as shown in the structure of a complex with L-rhamnose. Sequence alignments and mutagenesis show that residues important for carbohydrate binding are often absent in other receptor-attached examples of RBL, including the SLT-1/Slit coreceptor. We postulate that this domain class facilitates direct protein-protein interactions in many transmembrane receptors. PMID:18547526

  2. Specific binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin to sarcolemma of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, K; Kawai, M

    1997-08-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) binding was studied in 83 patients with various neuromuscular disorders. UEA I labelled endomysial capillaries and endothelial cells of perimysial blood vessels in all the examined muscles. There was no UEA I binding to muscle fibres except for all (9) cases of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV), 1 of 5 cases of inclusion body myositis and 1 of 36 cases of inflammatory myopathies. The UEA I binding was completely eliminated by preincubation of UEA I solution with L-fucose. Using electron microscopy, the UEA I binding was localized to sarcolemma and intrasarco-plasmic membranous organelles other than mitochondria. Myosatellite cells were not labelled. These findings revealed the existence of fucosylated proteins or lipids in a subset of skeletal muscles suffering from DMRV. Biochemical identification of the fucosylated substance and further detailed study on subcellular localization of UEA I binding may yield important clues to the unknown pathogenesis of DMRV.

  3. Lectins and their application to clinical microbiology.

    PubMed Central

    Slifkin, M; Doyle, R J

    1990-01-01

    Lectins are generally associated with plant or animal components, selectively bind carbohydrates, and interact with procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. Lectins have various specificities that are associated with their ability to interact with acetylaminocarbohydrates, aminocarbohydrates, sialic acids, hexoses, pentoses, and as other carbohydrates. Microbial surfaces generally contain many of the sugar residues that react with lectins. Lectins are presently used in the clinical laboratory to type blood cells and are used in a wide spectrum of applications, including, in part, as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents, as mitogens, for fractionation of animal cells, and for investigations of cellular surfaces. Numerous studies have shown that lectins can be used to identify rapidly certain microorganisms isolated from a clinical specimen or directly in a clinical specimen. Lectins have been demonstrated to be important diagnostic reagents in the major realms of clinical microbiology. Thus, they have been applied in bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and virology for the identification and/or differentiation of various microorganisms. Lectins have been used successfully as epidemiologic as well as taxonomic markers of specific microorganisms. Lectins provide the clinical microbiologist with cost-effective and potential diagnostic reagents. This review describes the applications of lectins in clinical microbiology. Images PMID:2200603

  4. Classical and lectin complement pathway activity in polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Stork, Abraham C J; Cats, Elisabeth A; Vlam, Lotte; Heezius, Erik; Rooijakkers, Suzan; Herpers, Bjorn; de Jong, Ben A W; Rijkers, Ger; van Strijp, Jos; Notermans, Nicolette C; van den Berg, Leonard H; van der Pol, W-Ludo

    2016-01-15

    Polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy (IgM-PNP) is a slowly progressive, sensorimotor neuropathy. It is assumed that complement activation contributes to IgM-PNP pathogenesis. We investigated whether innate differences in complement activity of the classical and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways are associated with IgM-PNP or its severity. We measured complement activity using ELISA and determined MBL serumc oncentrations and MBL gene polymorphisms in 83 patients and 83 healthy controls. We did not observe differences between IgM-PNP patients and healthy controls nor associations with different disease severities. Differences in innate complement activity are not likely to explain susceptibility to or severity of IgM-PNP.

  5. RapA2 Is a Calcium-binding Lectin Composed of Two Highly Conserved Cadherin-like Domains That Specifically Recognize Rhizobium leguminosarum Acidic Exopolysaccharides*

    PubMed Central

    Abdian, Patricia L.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Ausmees, Nora; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2013-01-01

    In silico analyses have revealed a conserved protein domain (CHDL) widely present in bacteria that has significant structural similarity to eukaryotic cadherins. A CHDL domain was shown to be present in RapA, a protein that is involved in autoaggregation of Rhizobium cells, biofilm formation, and adhesion to plant roots as shown by us and others. Structural similarity to cadherins suggested calcium-dependent oligomerization of CHDL domains as a mechanistic basis for RapA action. Here we show by circular dichroism spectroscopy, light scattering, isothermal titration calorimetry, and other methods that RapA2 from Rhizobium leguminosarum indeed exhibits a cadherin-like β-sheet conformation and that its proper folding and stability are dependent on the binding of one calcium ion per protein molecule. By further in silico analysis we also reveal that RapA2 consists of two CHDL domains and expand the range of CHDL-containing proteins in bacteria and archaea. However, light scattering assays at various concentrations of added calcium revealed that RapA2 formed neither homo-oligomers nor hetero-oligomers with RapB (a distinct CHDL protein), indicating that RapA2 does not mediate cellular interactions through a cadherin-like mechanism. Instead, we demonstrate that RapA2 interacts specifically with the acidic exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by R. leguminosarum in a calcium-dependent manner, sustaining a role of these proteins in the development of the biofilm matrix made of EPS. Because EPS binding by RapA2 can only be attributed to its two CHDL domains, we propose that RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin and that CHDL domains in various bacterial and archaeal proteins confer carbohydrate binding activity to these proteins. PMID:23235153

  6. Assembling different antennas of the gp120 high mannose-type glycans on gold nanoparticles provides superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 than the individual antennas.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Fabrizio; Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2015-03-20

    In order to re-build Man9GlcNAc2 clusters of the HIV gp120 glycoprotein, ∼2 nm gold glyconanoparticles (GNPs) were coated with the synthetic partial structures of Man9, the tetramannoside Manα1-2Manα1-2Manα1-3Manα1- and the pentamannoside Manα1-2Manα1-3[Manα1-2Manα1-6]Manα1-. Their interactions with the anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors and saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR spectroscopy. A synergistic effect of the tetra- and pentamannosides multimerized on a same GNP was observed. The assembly of these antennas of the gp120 high-mannose type glycan on GNPs provided superior binding to the anti-HIV antibody 2G12 with respect to GNPs carrying only the individual oligomannosides. The results presented in this work provide new molecular information on the interactions between clusters of oligomannosides and 2G12 that could help in the design of a carbohydrate-based vaccine against HIV.

  7. Regulation of ozone-induced lung inflammation and injury by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Francis, Mary; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Choi, Hyejeong; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-04-15

    Macrophages play a dual role in ozone toxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a lectin known to regulate macrophage activity. Herein, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in the response of lung macrophages to ozone. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 24-72h after exposure (3h) of WT and Gal-3(-/-) mice to air or 0.8ppm ozone. In WT mice, ozone inhalation resulted in increased numbers of proinflammatory (Gal-3(+), iNOS(+)) and anti-inflammatory (MR-1(+)) macrophages in the lungs. While accumulation of iNOS(+) macrophages was attenuated in Gal-3(-/-) mice, increased numbers of enlarged MR-1(+) macrophages were noted. This correlated with increased numbers of macrophages in BAL. Flow cytometric analysis showed that these cells were CD11b(+) and consisted mainly (>97%) of mature (F4/80(+)CD11c(+)) proinflammatory (Ly6GLy6C(hi)) and anti-inflammatory (Ly6GLy6C(lo)) macrophages. Increases in both macrophage subpopulations were observed following ozone inhalation. Loss of Gal-3 resulted in a decrease in Ly6C(hi) macrophages, with no effect on Ly6C(lo) macrophages. CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(+) granulocytic (G) and monocytic (M) myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were also identified in the lung after ozone. In Gal-3(-/-) mice, the response of G-MDSC to ozone was attenuated, while the response of M-MDSC was heightened. Changes in inflammatory cell populations in the lung of ozone treated Gal-3(-/-) mice were correlated with reduced tissue injury as measured by cytochrome b5 expression. These data demonstrate that Gal-3 plays a role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage accumulation and toxicity in the lung following ozone exposure.

  8. Structure and binding analysis of Polyporus squamosus lectin in complex with the Neu5Ac[alpha]2-6Gal[beta]1-4GlcNAc human-type influenza receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kadirvelraj, Renuka; Grant, Oliver C.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Winter, Harry C.; Tateno, Hiroaki; Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J.

    2013-03-07

    Glycan chains that terminate in sialic acid (Neu5Ac) are frequently the receptors targeted by pathogens for initial adhesion. Carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) with specificity for Neu5Ac are particularly useful in the detection and isolation of sialylated glycoconjugates, such as those associated with pathogen adhesion as well as those characteristic of several diseases including cancer. Structural studies of lectins are essential in order to understand the origin of their specificity, which is particularly important when employing such reagents as diagnostic tools. Here, we report a crystallographic and molecular dynamics (MD) analysis of a lectin from Polyporus squamosus (PSL) that is specific for glycans terminating with the sequence Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal{beta}. Because of its importance as a histological reagent, the PSL structure was solved (to 1.7 {angstrom}) in complex with a trisaccharide, whose sequence (Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal{beta}1-4GlcNAc) is exploited by influenza A hemagglutinin for viral adhesion to human tissue. The structural data illuminate the origin of the high specificity of PSL for the Neu5Ac{alpha}2-6Gal sequence. Theoretical binding free energies derived from the MD data confirm the key interactions identified crystallographically and provide additional insight into the relative contributions from each amino acid, as well as estimates of the importance of entropic and enthalpic contributions to binding.

  9. Biosynthesis of human ficolin, an Escherichia coli-binding protein, by monocytes: comparison with the synthesis of two macrophage-specific proteins, C1q and the mannose receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J; Le, Y; Kon, O L; Chan, J; Lee, S H

    1996-01-01

    Ficolin is characterized by the presence of both collagen-like and fibrinogen-like sequences, and potentially has a similar overall structure as the complement protein C1q and the collectins. Previous studies have reported the presence of human ficolin mRNA predominantly in peripheral blood leucocytes. In the present study, the cellular origin of human ficolin was investigated in further detail. Preliminary studies using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that ficolin mRNA was synthesized by U937 cells, a human monocyte cell line. This finding suggested that blood monocytes also normally synthesize human ficolin. Peripheral blood monocytes from adult human donors were harvested at serial time-points (0-20 hr) after adhesion to tissue culture plates, and total RNA was isolated and assayed for ficolin mRNA by RT-PCR. Ficolin mRNA was highly expressed in monocytes throughout the first 20 hr of adhesion. In contrast, C1q and mannose receptor mRNA were not detectable during the first 8 hr of adhesion, but were highly expressed by 20 hr. Cells were harvested at longer time intervals (1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 days) to determine whether ficolin expression was temporally regulated at later stages of monocyte differentiation. Ficolin mRNA levels decreased sharply from day 1 to day 6. In contrast, the levels of both C1q and mannose receptor mRNA showed no changing trend. These results are consistent with the absence of ficolin expression in many macrophage-rich tissues previously reported. The origin of ficolin from monocytes, together with its structural similarity to C1q and the collectins, raises the possibility that ficolin may be another plasma protein capable of binding to surface structures of micro-organisms. Escherichia coli was therefore incubated with human serum, and bound proteins, after elution with sugars, were analysed by Western blotting using an antiserum raised against a synthetic ficolin peptide. The antiserum identified a polypeptide

  10. Carbohydrate Recognition Specificity of Trans-sialidase Lectin Domain from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Waespy, Mario; Gbem, Thaddeus T.; Elenschneider, Leroy; Jeck, André-Philippe; Day, Christopher J.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Bovin, Nicolai; Tiralongo, Joe; Haselhorst, Thomas; Kelm, Sørge

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen different active Trypanosoma congolense trans-sialidases (TconTS), 11 variants of TconTS1 besides TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4, have been described. Notably, the specific transfer and sialidase activities of these TconTS differ by orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analysis of the catalytic domains (CD) grouped each of the highly active TconTS together with the less active enzymes. In contrast, when aligning lectin-like domains (LD), the highly active TconTS grouped together, leading to the hypothesis that the LD of TconTS modulates its enzymatic activity. So far, little is known about the function and ligand specificity of these LDs. To explore their carbohydrate-binding potential, glycan array analysis was performed on the LD of TconTS1, TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4. In addition, Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR experiments were done on TconTS2-LD for a more detailed analysis of its lectin activity. Several mannose-containing oligosaccharides, such as mannobiose, mannotriose and higher mannosylated glycans, as well as Gal, GalNAc and LacNAc containing oligosaccharides were confirmed as binding partners of TconTS1-LD and TconTS2-LD. Interestingly, terminal mannose residues are not acceptor substrates for TconTS activity. This indicates a different, yet unknown biological function for TconTS-LD, including specific interactions with oligomannose-containing glycans on glycoproteins and GPI anchors found on the surface of the parasite, including the TconTS itself. Experimental evidence for such a scenario is presented. PMID:26474304

  11. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes

    SciTech Connect

    de Miranda Santos, I.K.; Pereira, M.E.

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various /sup 125/I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  12. Lectins discriminate between pathogenic and nonpathogenic South American trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    de Miranda Santos, I K; Pereira, M E

    1984-09-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli, and Trypanosoma conorhini were analyzed by a micro-agglutination assay employing 27 highly purified lectins and by binding assays using various 125I-labeled lectins. The following seven lectins discriminated between the trypanosomes: 1) tomato lectin (an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine-binding protein), both in purified form and as crude tomato juice; 2) Bauhinea purpurea and Sophora japonica lectins (both N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding proteins), which selectively agglutinated T. cruzi; 3) Vicia villosa (an N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-binding protein) which was specific for T. rangeli; 4) peanut lectin (a D-galactose-binding protein) both in purified form and as crude saline extract; and 5) Ulex europaeus and Lotus tetragonolobus (both L-fucose-binding proteins) lectins which reacted only with T. conorhini. Binding studies with 125I-labeled lectins were performed to find whether unagglutinated cells of the three different species of trypanosomes might have receptors for these lectins, in which case absence of agglutination could be due to a peculiar arrangement of the receptors. These assays essentially confirmed the agglutination experiments.

  13. Lectins Offer New Perspectives in the Development of Macrophage-Targeted Therapies for COPD/Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Mukaro, Violet R.; Bylund, Johan; Hodge, Greg; Holmes, Mark; Jersmann, Hubertus; Reynolds, Paul N.; Hodge, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the defective ability of alveolar macrophages (AM) to phagocytose apoptotic cells (‘efferocytosis’) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease/emphysema (COPD) could be therapeutically improved using the C-type lectin, mannose binding lectin (MBL), although the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. An S-type lectin, galectin-3, is also known to regulate macrophage phenotype and function, via interaction with its receptor CD98. We hypothesized that defective expression of galectin/CD98 would be associated with defective efferocytosis in COPD and that mechanisms would include effects on cytoskeletal remodeling and macrophage phenotype and glutathione (GSH) availability. Galectin-3 was measured by ELISA in BAL from controls, smokers and current/ex-smokers with COPD. CD98 was measured on AM using flow cytometry. We assessed the effects of galectin-3 on efferocytosis, CD98, GSH, actin polymerisation, rac activation, and the involvement of PI3K (using β-actin probing and wortmannin inhibition) in vitro using human AM and/or MH-S macrophage cell line. Significant decreases in BAL galectin-3 and AM CD98 were observed in BAL from both current- and ex-smoker COPD subjects vs controls. Galectin 3 increased efferocytosis via an increase in active GTP bound Rac1. This was confirmed with β-actin probing and the role of PI3K was confirmed using wortmannin inhibition. The increased efferocytosis was associated with increases in available glutathione and expression of CD98. We provide evidence for a role of airway lectins in the failed efferocytosis in COPD, supporting their further investigation as potential macrophage-targeted therapies. PMID:23441163

  14. Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectin G Promotes Atherosclerosis and Liver Inflammation by Suppressing the Protective Functions of B-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Sabrina; Hendrikx, Tim; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Ozsvar-Kozma, Maria; Göderle, Laura; Mallat, Ziad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Nitschke, Lars; Binder, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is initiated and sustained by hypercholesterolemia, which results in the generation of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) and other metabolic byproducts that trigger inflammation. Specific immune responses have been shown to modulate the inflammatory response during atherogenesis. The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G) is a negative regulator of the functions of several immune cells, including myeloid cells and B-1 cells. Here, we show that deficiency of Siglec-G in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibits plaque formation and diet-induced hepatic inflammation. We further demonstrate that selective deficiency of Siglec-G in B cells alone is sufficient to mediate these effects. Levels of B-1 cell-derived natural IgM with specificity for OxLDL were significantly increased in the plasma and peritoneal cavity of Siglec-G-deficient mice. Consistent with the neutralizing functions of OxLDL-specific IgM, Siglec-G-deficient mice were protected from OxLDL-induced sterile inflammation. Thus, Siglec-G promotes atherosclerosis and hepatic inflammation by suppressing protective anti-inflammatory effector functions of B cells. PMID:26947073

  15. C3 dysregulation due to factor H deficiency is mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1 and MASP-3 independent in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ruseva, M M; Takahashi, M; Fujita, T; Pickering, M C

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled activation of the complement alternative pathway is associated with complement-mediated renal disease. Factor B and factor D are essential components of this pathway, while factor H (FH) is its major regulator. In complete FH deficiency, uncontrolled C3 activation through the alternative pathway results in plasma C3 depletion and complement-mediated renal disease. These are dependent on factor B. Mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 3 (MASP-1, MASP-3) have been shown recently to contribute to alternative pathway activation by cleaving pro-factor D to its active form, factor D. We studied the contribution of MASP-1 and MASP-3 to uncontrolled alternative pathway activation in experimental complete FH deficiency. Co-deficiency of FH and MASP-1/MASP-3 did not ameliorate either the plasma C3 activation or glomerular C3 accumulation in FH-deficient mice. Our data indicate that MASP-1 and MASP-3 are not essential for alternative pathway activation in complete FH deficiency. PMID:24279761

  16. Synthesis of high-affinity, hydrophobic monosaccharide derivatives and study of their interaction with concanavalin A, the pea, the lentil, and fava bean lectins.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, D; Osborne, S E; Glick, G D; Goldstein, I J

    1992-12-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) and agglutinins from the pea (PSA), lentil (LCH), and fava bean (VFA) constitute a group of D-mannose/D-glucose binding legume lectins. In addition to their sugar binding specificity, these lectins also contain sites that bind hydrophobic ligands. The present study explores a class of nonpolar binding sites reportedly present adjacent to the carbohydrate binding site in PSA, LCH, and VFA. A series of 2-O- and 3-O-substituted nitrobenzoyl and nitrobenzyl derivatives of methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside and methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside were synthesized. Evaluation of their binding to Con A, PSA, LCH, and VFA was carried out by the technique of hapten inhibition of precipitation reaction. The hapten inhibition assay results reveal that the presence of a methyl or methylene group at the O-2 or O-3 position of the sugar is essential for hydrophobic interaction with PSA, LCH, and VFA. The substitution of methyl by nitrobenzyl leads to enhanced binding (1.7-16.7 times for the 2-O-substituted compounds and 7.9-40.5 times for the 3-O-substituted compounds) with the m-nitrobenzyl group contributing to maximum binding. A hydrophobic interaction is also involved between Con A and 2-O-nitrobenzyl derivatives, resulting in enhanced binding, but the corresponding 3-O-isomers bind poorly due probably to steric reasons. These results may be rationalized on the basis of the recently published X-ray data of Con A and VFA. The nitrobenzyl derivatives, after transformation to their azido analogs, have potential applications in the photoaffinity labeling of these lectins.

  17. O serotype-independent susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to lectin-like pyocins

    PubMed Central

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; Dingemans, Jozef; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; De Vos, Daniel; Cornelis, Pierre; De Mot, René

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-like bacteriocins of the LlpA family, originally identified in plant-associated bacteria, are narrow-spectrum antibacterial proteins composed of two tandemly organized monocot mannose-binding lectin (MMBL) domains. The LlpA-like bacteriocin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa C1433, pyocin L1, lacks any similarity to known P. aeruginosa bacteriocins. The initial interaction of pyocin L1 with target cells is mediated by binding to d-rhamnose, present in the common polysaccharide antigen of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), but the actual cytotoxic mechanism is unknown. In this study, we characterized the activity range of pyocin L1 and two additional L pyocins revealed by genome mining, representing two highly diverged LlpA groups in P. aeruginosa. The recombinant proteins exhibit species-specific antagonistic activities down to nanomolar concentrations against clinical and environmental P. aeruginosa strains, including several multidrug-resistant isolates. The overlap in target strain spectrum between two close homologues of the pyocin L1 group is only minimal, contrasting with the considerable spectral redundancy of LlpA proteins reported for other Pseudomonas species. No correlation was found between L pyocin susceptibility and phylogenetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates. Sensitive strains were retrieved in 13 out of 15 O serotypes tested, excluding the possibility that the highly variable and immunogenic O serotype antigen of the LPS coating would represent a dominant susceptibility-discriminating factor. PMID:25224846

  18. Effect of plant lectins on Ustilago maydis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santiago, A P; Saavedra, E; Pérez Campos, E; Córdoba, F

    2000-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is an edible parasitic basidiomycete, which specifically infects corn (Zea mays) and teocintle (Z. diploperennis). To characterise the interaction between the basidiomycete and its host organism, we tested the effect of plant lectins with well-known sugar specificity on the growth and germination of U. maydis spores. Lectins specific for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, such as those from Dolichos biflorus and Phaseolus lunatus, and the wheatgerm agglutinin specific for N-acetyl-D-glucosamine inhibited spore germination, but were ineffective in modifying U. maydis cell growth. The galactose-specific lectin from the corn coleoptyle inhibited both germination and cell growth, while the lectin concanavalin A (mannose/glucose specific) activated spore germination and growth. Our results suggest that specific saccharide-containing receptors participate in regulating the growth and maturation of U. maydis spores.

  19. Regulation of ozone-induced lung inflammation and injury by the β-galactoside-binding lectin galectin-3

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Francis, Mary; Vayas, Kinal N.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Choi, Hyejeong; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-04-15

    Macrophages play a dual role in ozone toxicity, contributing to both pro- and anti-inflammatory processes. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a lectin known to regulate macrophage activity. Herein, we analyzed the role of Gal-3 in the response of lung macrophages to ozone. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 24–72 h after exposure (3 h) of WT and Gal-3{sup -/-} mice to air or 0.8 ppm ozone. In WT mice, ozone inhalation resulted in increased numbers of proinflammatory (Gal-3{sup +}, iNOS{sup +}) and anti-inflammatory (MR-1{sup +}) macrophages in the lungs. While accumulation of iNOS{sup +} macrophages was attenuated in Gal-3{sup -/-} mice, increased numbers of enlarged MR-1{sup +} macrophages were noted. This correlated with increased numbers of macrophages in BAL. Flow cytometric analysis showed that these cells were CD11b{sup +} and consisted mainly (> 97%) of mature (F4/80{sup +}CD11c{sup +}) proinflammatory (Ly6GLy6C{sup hi}) and anti-inflammatory (Ly6GLy6C{sup lo}) macrophages. Increases in both macrophage subpopulations were observed following ozone inhalation. Loss of Gal-3 resulted in a decrease in Ly6C{sup hi} macrophages, with no effect on Ly6C{sup lo} macrophages. CD11b{sup +}Ly6G{sup +}Ly6C{sup +} granulocytic (G) and monocytic (M) myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were also identified in the lung after ozone. In Gal-3{sup -/-} mice, the response of G-MDSC to ozone was attenuated, while the response of M-MDSC was heightened. Changes in inflammatory cell populations in the lung of ozone treated Gal-3{sup -/-} mice were correlated with reduced tissue injury as measured by cytochrome b5 expression. These data demonstrate that Gal-3 plays a role in promoting proinflammatory macrophage accumulation and toxicity in the lung following ozone exposure. - Highlights: • Multiple monocytic-macrophage subpopulations accumulate in the lung after ozone inhalation. • Galectin-3 plays a proinflammatory role in ozone-induced lung injury. • In the

  20. AB-type lectin (toxin/agglutinin) from mistletoe: differences in affinity of the two galactoside-binding Trp/Tyr-sites and regulation of their functionality by monomer/dimer equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Marta; André, Sabine; Siebert, Hans-C; Gabius, Hans-J; Solís, Dolores

    2006-10-01

    Viscumin of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) has a concentration-dependent activity profile unique to plant AB-toxins. It starts with lectin-dependent mitogenicity and then covers toxicity and cell agglutination, associated with shifts in the monomer/dimer equilibrium. Each lectin subunit harbors two sections for ligand contact. In the dimer, the B-chain sites in subdomain 2 gamma (designated as the Tyr-sites) appear fully accessible, whereas Trp-sites in subdomain 1 alpha are close to the dimer interface. It is unclear whether both types of sites operate similarly in binding glycoligands in solution. By systematically covering a broad range of lactose/lectin ratio in isothermal titration calorimetry, we obtained evidence for two sites showing dissimilar binding affinity. Intriguingly, the site with higher affinity was only partially occupied. To assign the observed properties to the Trp/Tyr-sites, we next performed chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization measurements of Trp and Tyr accessibility. A Tyr signal, but not distinct Trp peaks, was recorded when testing the dimer. Lactose-quenchable Trp peaks became visible on the destabilization of the dimer by citraconylation, intimating Trp involvement in ligand contact in the monomer. Fittingly, Tyr acetylation but not mild Trp oxidation reduced the dimer hemagglutination activity and the extent of binding to asialofetuin-Sepharose 4B. Altogether, the results attribute lectin activity in the dimer primarily to Tyr-sites. Full access to Trp-sites is gained on dimer dissociation. Thus, the monomer/dimer equilibrium of viscumin regulates the operativity of these sites. Their structural divergence affords the possibility for differences in ligand selection when comparing monomers (Tyr- and Trp-sites) with dimers (primarily Tyr-sites).

  1. Purification of a thermostable antinociceptive lectin isolated from Andira anthelmia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino do; Silva, Mayara Torquato Lima; Nobre, Camila Bezerra; Moreira, Cleane Gomes; Brizeno, Luiz André Cavalcante; da Ponte, Edson Lopes; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-06-01

    Andira anthelmia (tribe Dalbergieae), a plant from Brazilian Amazon, possesses a seed lectin that was purified by affinity chromatography in sepharose-mannose. This novel Dalbergieae lectin, named AAL, agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes treated with trypsin. The hemagglutinating activity of AAL was maintained after incubation at a wide range of temperature (40 to 70 °C) and pH, was shown to be dependent on divalent cations, and was inhibited by d-mannose and d-sucrose. AAL showed an electrophoretic profile in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis similar to other lectins of the tribe Dalbergieae, presenting a double band of molecular weight with approximately 20 kDa and other minor bands of 17, 15, and 13 kDa, being the smaller fragment glycosylated. AAL injected by intravenous route in mice showed antinociceptive activity in two behavioral tests (writhing and formalin). In the writhing test induced by acetic acid, AAL showed inhibitory effect at 0.01 mg/kg (68%), 0.1 mg/kg (46%) and 1 mg/kg (74%). In the formalin test, AAL (0.1 mg/kg) inhibited by 48% the licking time in the inflammatory phase, an effect that was recovered by the lectin association with mannose. In conclusion, AAL presents analgesic effect involving the lectin domain via peripheral mechanisms of inflammatory nociception. This activity highlights the importance of lectins as tools to be used for understanding the interaction of protein-carbohydrate in processes associated to inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  3. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  4. Cell- and region-specific expression of sugar chains in the mouse epididymal epithelium using lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Shota; Fukui, Tatsuya; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2012-02-01

    To understand the cytochemical properties of epididymal epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in the mouse epididymis were examined using the technique of lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns depending on the type of lectins were observed in the epididymal epithelium. Principal cells expressed N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and Fucose in the proximal region of the epididymis and Mannose, Glucose, and Galactose in the distal region of the epididymis. Basal cells expressed Mannose, Glucose, Galactose, and GlcNAc in the proximal region and Galactose in the distal region. On the other hand, clear cells expressed various sugar residues and differences among regions were not observed. Interestingly, principal cells, clear cells, and basal cells specifically reacted with Ulex Europaeus-Agglutinin I (UEA-I lectin), Maackia Amurensis-Lectin I (MAL-I lectin), and Griffonia simplicifolia Lectin I-B4 (GS-I B lectin), respectively. These findings indicate that the selectivity in lectin reactivity for distinct cell types and segment-dependent staining in the epididymis may be related to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, because some lectins stain particular cells or cellular compartments selectively, these lectins could be useful markers for histopathological evaluation of diseases or diagnosis of male infertility.

  5. A soluble fucose-specific lectin from Aspergillus fumigatus conidia--structure, specificity and possible role in fungal pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Houser, Josef; Komarek, Jan; Kostlanova, Nikola; Cioci, Gianluca; Varrot, Annabelle; Kerr, Sheena C; Lahmann, Martina; Balloy, Viviane; Fahy, John V; Chignard, Michel; Imberty, Anne; Wimmerova, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an important allergen and opportunistic pathogen. Similarly to many other pathogens, it is able to produce lectins that may be involved in the host-pathogen interaction. We focused on the lectin AFL, which was prepared in recombinant form and characterized. Its binding properties were studied using hemagglutination and glycan array analysis. We determined the specificity of the lectin towards l-fucose and fucosylated oligosaccharides, including α1-6 linked core-fucose, which is an important marker for cancerogenesis. Other biologically relevant saccharides such as sialic acid, d-mannose or d-galactose were not bound. Blood group epitopes of the ABH and Lewis systems were recognized, Le(Y) being the preferred ligand among others. To provide a correlation between the observed functional characteristics and structural basis, AFL was crystallized in a complex with methyl-α,L-selenofucoside and its structure was solved using the SAD method. Six binding sites, each with different compositions, were identified per monomer and significant differences from the homologous AAL lectin were found. Structure-derived peptides were utilized to prepare anti-AFL polyclonal antibodies, which suggested the presence of AFL on the Aspergillus' conidia, confirming its expression in vivo. Stimulation of human bronchial cells by AFL led to IL-8 production in a dose-dependent manner. AFL thus probably contributes to the inflammatory response observed upon the exposure of a patient to A. fumigatus. The combination of affinity to human epithelial epitopes, production by conidia and pro-inflammatory activity is remarkable and shows that AFL might be an important virulence factor involved in an early stage of A. fumigatus infection.

  6. Lectin-Magnetic Beads for Plasma Membrane Isolation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Chuang, Carol; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane proteins mainly function to transmit external signals into the cell. Many plasma membrane receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g., HER2 and EGFR) are known to mediate oncogenic progression, making them prime targets for cancer therapy. Recently, it has become important to identify plasma membrane proteins that are differentially expressed in normal versus cancer cells, in drug-sensitive versus drug-resistant cells, or among tumor cells that metastasize to different organ sites because these differentially expressed membrane proteins may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets or diagnostic markers. In addition, there is an increased interest in identifying cell-surface proteins that could serve as markers for stem cells, progenitor cells, or cells of different lineages. Traditionally, membrane isolation requires multiple centrifugation steps to isolate different organelles based on their density. With the advent of affinity matrix technology, it is possible to separate organelles based on their molecular differences. A defining characteristic of the plasma membrane is that plasma membrane proteins are more extensively glycosylated than are intracellular membrane proteins. As a result, affinity chromatography employing lectin, a carbohydrate-binding protein, is commonly used to isolate plasma membrane proteins. We have extended this concept for plasma membrane isolation by using concanavalin A (ConA), a lectin with mannose specificity. Here we describe a protocol that uses immobilized ConA bound to magnetic beads to isolate plasma membranes from homogenized cell lysates. The captured plasma membrane proteins are then solubilized from the ConA-magnetic beads by detergents in the presence of a competing sugar, methyl α-mannopyranoside.

  7. Mushroom Lectins: Specificity, Structure and Bioactivity Relevant to Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W.; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell–cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity. PMID:25856678

  8. Mushroom lectins: specificity, structure and bioactivity relevant to human disease.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohamed Ali Abol; Rouf, Razina; Tiralongo, Evelin; May, Tom W; Tiralongo, Joe

    2015-04-08

    Lectins are non-immunoglobulin proteins that bind diverse sugar structures with a high degree of selectivity. Lectins play crucial role in various biological processes such as cellular signaling, scavenging of glycoproteins from the circulatory system, cell-cell interactions in the immune system, differentiation and protein targeting to cellular compartments, as well as in host defence mechanisms, inflammation, and cancer. Among all the sources of lectins, plants have been most extensively studied. However, more recently fungal lectins have attracted considerable attention due to their antitumor, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. Given that only 10% of mushroom species are known and have been taxonomically classified, mushrooms represent an enormous unexplored source of potentially useful and novel lectins. In this review we provide an up-to-date summary on the biochemical, molecular and structural properties of mushroom lectins, as well as their versatile applications specifically focusing on mushroom lectin bioactivity.

  9. A lectin HPLC method to enrich selectively-glycosylated peptides from complex biological samples.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Eric; Schilling, Birgit; Lerch, Michael; Niles, Richard K; Liu, Haichuan; Li, Bensheng; Allen, Simon; Hall, Steven C; Witkowska, H Ewa; Regnier, Fred E; Gibson, Bradford W; Fisher, Susan J; Drake, Penelope M

    2009-10-01

    Glycans are an important class of post-translational modifications. Typically found on secreted and extracellular molecules, glycan structures signal the internal status of the cell. Glycans on tumor cells tend to have abundant sialic acid and fucose moieties. We propose that these cancer-associated glycan variants be exploited for biomarker development aimed at diagnosing early-stage disease. Accordingly, we developed a mass spectrometry-based workflow that incorporates chromatography on affinity matrices formed from lectins, proteins that bind specific glycan structures. The lectins Sambucus nigra (SNA) and Aleuria aurantia (AAL), which bind sialic acid and fucose, respectively, were covalently coupled to POROS beads (Applied Biosystems) and packed into PEEK columns for high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Briefly, plasma was depleted of the fourteen most abundant proteins using a multiple affinity removal system (MARS-14; Agilent). Depleted plasma was trypsin-digested and separated into flow-through and bound fractions by SNA or AAL HPLC. The fractions were treated with PNGaseF to remove N-linked glycans, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS on a QStar Elite. Data were analyzed using Mascot software. The experimental design included positive controls-fucosylated and sialylated human lactoferrin glycopeptides-and negative controls-high mannose glycopeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae-that were used to monitor the specificity of lectin capture. Key features of this workflow include the reproducibility derived from the HPLC format, the positive identification of the captured and PNGaseF-treated glycopeptides from their deamidated Asn-Xxx-Ser/Thr motifs, and quality assessment using glycoprotein standards. Protocol optimization also included determining the appropriate ratio of starting material to column capacity, identifying the most efficient capture and elution buffers, and monitoring the PNGaseF-treatment to ensure full deglycosylation. Future directions include

  10. Secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 promote recovery after rat spinal cord injury by altering macrophage polarity.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kohki; Matsushita, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Kano, Fumiya; Kondo, Megumi; Noda, Mariko; Hashimoto, Noboru; Imagama, Shiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Suzumura, Akio; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Koichi; Yamamoto, Akihito

    2015-02-11

    Engrafted mesenchymal stem cells from human deciduous dental pulp (SHEDs) support recovery from neural insults via paracrine mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here we show that the conditioned serum-free medium (CM) from SHEDs, administered intrathecally into rat injured spinal cord during the acute postinjury period, caused remarkable functional recovery. The ability of SHED-CM to induce recovery was associated with an immunoregulatory activity that induced anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages. Secretome analysis of the SHED-CM revealed a previously unrecognized set of inducers for anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the secreted ectodomain of sialic acid-binding Ig-like lectin-9 (ED-Siglec-9). Depleting MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 from the SHED-CM prominently reduced its ability to induce M2-like macrophages and to promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The combination of MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 synergistically promoted the M2-like differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro, and this effect was abolished by a selective antagonist for CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) or by the genetic knock-out of CCR2. Furthermore, MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 administration into the injured spinal cord induced M2-like macrophages and led to a marked recovery of hindlimb locomotor function after SCI. The inhibition of this M2 induction through the inactivation of CCR2 function abolished the therapeutic effects of both SHED-CM and MCP-1/ED-Siglec-9. Macrophages activated by MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 extended neurite and suppressed apoptosis of primary cerebellar granule neurons against the neurotoxic effects of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Our data suggest that the unique combination of MCP-1 and ED-Siglec-9 repairs the SCI through anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophage induction.

  11. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  12. Tissue- and cell-specific localization of galectins, β-galactose-binding animal lectins, and their potential functions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nio-Kobayashi, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Fifteen galectins, β-galactose-binding animal lectins, are known to be distributed throughout the body. We herein summarize current knowledge on the tissue- and cell-specific localization of galectins and their potential functions in health and disease. Galectin-3 is widely distributed in epithelia, including the simple columnar epithelium in the gut, stratified squamous epithelium in the gut and skin, and transitional epithelium and several regions in nephrons in the urinary tract. Galectin-2 and galectin-4/6 are gut-specific, while galectin-7 is found in the stratified squamous epithelium in the gut and skin. The reproductive tract mainly contains galectin-1 and galectin-3, and their expression markedly changes during the estrous/menstrual cycle. The galectin subtype expressed in the corpus luteum (CL) changes in association with luteal function. The CL of women and cows displays a "galectin switch" with coordinated changes in the major galectin subtype and its ligand glycoconjugate structure. Macrophages express galectin-3, which may be involved in phagocytotic activity. Lymphoid tissues contain galectin-3-positive macrophages, which are not always stained with the macrophage marker, F4/80. Subsets of neurons in the brain and dorsal root ganglion express galectin-1 and galectin-3, which may contribute to the regeneration of damaged axons, stem cell differentiation, and pain control. The subtype-specific contribution of galectins to implantation, fibrosis, and diabetes are also discussed. The function of galectins may differ depending on the tissues or cells in which they act. The ligand glycoconjugate structures mediated by glycosyltransferases including MGAT5, ST6GAL1, and C2GnT are important for revealing the functions of galectins in healthy and disease states.

  13. New amphiphilic glycopolymers by click functionalization of random copolymers – application to the colloidal stabilisation of polymer nanoparticles and their interaction with concanavalin A lectin

    PubMed Central

    Otman, Otman; Boullanger, Paul; Drockenmuller, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Summary Glycopolymers with mannose units were readily prepared by click chemistry of an azido mannopyranoside derivative and a poly(propargyl acrylate-co-N-vinyl pyrrolidone). These glycopolymers were used as polymer surfactants, in order to obtain glycosylated polycaprolactone nanoparticles. Optimum stabilization for long time storage was achieved by using a mixture of glycopolymers and the non-ionic triblock copolymer Pluronic® F-68. The mannose moieties are accessible at the surface of nanoparticles and available for molecular recognition by concanavalin A lectin. Interaction of mannose units with the lectin were evaluated by measuring the changes in nanoparticles size by dynamic light scattering in dilute media. PMID:20625527

  14. The pepper GNA-related lectin and PAN domain protein gene, CaGLP1, is required for plant cell death and defense signaling during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nak Hyun; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Choi, Du Seok; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-12-01

    Carbohydrate-binding proteins, commonly referred to as lectins or agglutinins, function in defense responses to microbial pathogens. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) GNA-related lectin and PAN-domain protein gene CaGLP1 was isolated and functionally characterized from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv). CaGLP1 contained an amine-terminus prokaryotic membrane lipoprotein lipid attachment site, a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans, and a carboxyl-terminus PAN/apple domain. RNA gel blot and immunoblot analyses determined that