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Sample records for mannose binding lectin

  1. Ureaplasma urealyticum binds mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Benstein, Barbara D; Ourth, Donald D; Crouse, Dennis T; Shanklin, D Radford

    2004-10-01

    Mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity in mammals. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an acute phase protein, acts as an opsonin for phagocytosis and also activates the mannan-binding lectin complement pathway. It may play a particularly significant role during infancy before adequate specific protection can be provided by the adaptive immune system. Ureaplasma urealyticum has been linked to several diseases including pneumonia and chronic lung disease (CLD) in premature infants. We therefore investigated the ability of U. urealyticum to bind MBL. A guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit-MBL antiserum was produced. An immunoblot (dot-blot) assay done on nitrocellulose membrane determined that the anti-MBL antibody had specificity against both rabbit and human MBL. Pure cultures of U. urealyticum, serotype 3, were used to make slide preparations. The slides containing the organisms were then incubated with nonimmune rabbit serum containing MBL. Ureaplasma was shown to bind rabbit MBL with an immunocytochemical assay using the guinea pig IgG anti-rabbit MBL antiserum. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled anti-guinea pig IgG was used to localize the reaction. The anti-MBL antiserum was also used in an immunocytochemical assay to localize U. urealyticum in histological sections of lungs from mice specifically infected with this organism. The same method also indicated binding of MBL by ureaplasma in human lung tissue obtained at autopsy from culture positive infants. Our results demonstrate that ureaplasma has the capacity to bind MBL. The absence of MBL may play a role in the predisposition of diseases related to this organism.

  2. Structure-function relationship of monocot mannose-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1996-01-01

    The monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins, which until now have been isolated from species of the Amaryllidaceae, Alliaceae, Araceae, Orchidaceae, and Liliaceae. To explain the obvious differences in biological activities, the structure-function relationships of the monocot mannose-binding lectins were studied by a combination of glycan-binding studies and molecular modeling using the deduced amino acid sequences of the currently known lectins. Molecular modeling indicated that the number of active mannose-binding sites per monomer varies between three and zero. Since the number of binding sites is fairly well correlated with the binding activity measured by surface plasmon resonance, and is also in good agreement with the results of previous studies of the biological activities of the mannose-binding lectins, molecular modeling is of great value for predicting which lectins are best suited for a particular application. PMID:8972598

  3. Characterization of mannose binding lectin from channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of innate immunity capable of activating the lectin pathway of the complement system. A MBL gene was isolated from channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). The deduced protein contains a canonical collagen-like domain, a carbohydrate recognition d...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: mannose-binding lectin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... MBL2 gene. Mannose-binding lectin plays an important role in the body's immune response by attaching to foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, or yeast and turning on (activating) the complement system . The complement system is a group of immune system proteins that work together to ...

  5. Pharmacological inhibition of mannose-binding lectin ameliorates neurobehavioral dysfunction following experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    De Blasio, Daiana; Fumagalli, Stefano; Longhi, Luca; Orsini, Franca; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Vegliante, Gloria; Zanier, Elisa R; Bernardi, Anna; Gobbi, Marco; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2017-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is present in the contusion area of traumatic brain-injured patients and in that of traumatic brain-injured mice, where mannose-binding lectin-C exceeds mannose-binding lectin-A. The reduced susceptibility to traumatic brain injury of mannose-binding lectin double knock-out mice (mannose-binding lectin(-/-)) when compared to wild type mice suggests that mannose-binding lectin may be a therapeutic target following traumatic brain injury. Here, we evaluated the effects of a multivalent glycomimetic mannose-binding lectin ligand, Polyman9, following traumatic brain injury in mice. In vitro surface plasmon resonance assay indicated that Polyman9 dose-dependently inhibits the binding to immobilized mannose residues of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C selectively over that of mannose-binding lectin-A. Male C57Bl/6 mice underwent sham/controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury and intravenous treatment with Polyman9/saline. Ex-vivo surface plasmon resonance studies confirmed that Polyman9 effectively reduces the binding of plasma mannose-binding lectin-C to immobilized mannose residues. In vivo studies up to four weeks post injury, showed that Polyman9 induces significant improvement in sensorimotor deficits (by neuroscore and beam walk), promotes neurogenesis (73% increase in doublecortin immunoreactivity), and astrogliosis (28% increase in glial fibrillary acid protein). Polyman9 administration in brain-injured mannose-binding lectin(-/-) mice had no effect on post-traumatic brain-injured functional deficits, suggestive of the specificity of its neuroprotective effects. The neurobehavioral efficacy of Polyman9 implicates mannose-binding lectin-C as a novel therapeutic target for traumatic brain injury.

  6. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  7. Mannose-Binding Lectin Serum Levels in Patients With Candiduria

    PubMed Central

    Moslem, Maryam; Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali; Fatahinia, Mahnaz; Kheradmand, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candida species are normal mycoflora of human body which are capable to cause urinary tract infection (UTI). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a kind of innate immune system and decreasing plasma levels of MBL may disrupt the natural immune response and increase susceptibility to infections. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to assess MBL in the serum of patients with candiduria and compare them with control. Patients and Methods: The blood and urine samples were collected from 335 patients (hospitalized in Golestan hospital, Ahvaz) using standard methods and the growing colonies on CHROMagar were identified using routine diagnostic tests. MBL activity in the serum of 45 patients with candiduria and 45 controls was measured using Eastbiopharm enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Results: In this study, 45 (13.4 %) urine samples were positive for Candida species (17 males and 28 females). The most common isolated yeast was Candida albicans (34%), followed by C. glabrata (32.1%), C. tropicalis (9.4%), other Candida species (22.6%), and Rhodotorula species (1.9%). The mean serum levels of MBL were 0.85 ± 0.01 ng/mL and 1.02 ± 0.03 ng/mL among candiduric patients and controls, respectively, and there was no significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.6). Conclusions: Our results showed that there was no significant relationship between MBL serum levels and candiduria. PMID:26870314

  8. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, M W

    1998-08-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is the most intensively studied human collectin. It is recognized to be a versatile macro-molecule with many of the functional characteristics of IgM, IgG and Clq. In the presence of calcium the protein can bind to a wide spectrum of oligosaccharides through multiple lectin domains. Such binding to the repeating sugar arrays on microbial surfaces may result in direct uptake by one or more collectin receptors on phagocyte surface or may trigger the activation of a pro-serine protease complex (MASP 1 and MASP 2) leading to cleavage of C4 and C2 of the classical complement pathway. Although serum levels of MBL are normally rather low (1500 micrograms/litre) there is increasing evidence that the protein plays an important role in immune defence, particularly during the phase of primary contact with a microorganism. This is suggested by the observed association of an increased incidence of infections in individuals with structural mutations in exon 1 of the MBL gene. A cluster of such mutations in codons 52, 54 and 57 lead to secondary structural abnormalities of the collagenous triple helix and a failure to form biologically functional higher order oligomers. The codon 54 mutation has been identified in several Eurasian populations whereas the codon 57 mutation is characteristic of sub-Saharan populations. One intriguing paradox arising from the MBL genotyping studies is the observation that in many populations there are surprisingly high frequencies of either the codon 54 or codon 57 mutation, suggesting that there may be some biological advantage associated with absence of the protein. Nevertheless, various groups have reported either low serum levels of MBL or an increased frequency of the structural gene mutations in patients with suspected immunodeficiencies, those with frequent unexplained infections and those with systemic lupus erythematosus. There is also evidence that the rate of progression of AIDS in HIV positive men is faster

  9. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  10. Interaction of linear manno-oligosaccharides with three mannose-specific bulb lectins. Comparison with mannose/glucose-binding lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J

    1992-05-22

    Three new mannose-binding lectins, isolated from daffodil (NPA), amaryllis (HHA), and snowdrop (GNA) bulbs, are capable of precipitating with a linear mannopentaose (Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-3Man alpha 1-2Man). NPA and HHA reacted strongly with the mannopentaose whereas GNA gave a precipitate only at concentrations greater than 500 microM. A phosphate group at C-6 of the nonreducing terminal mannosyl group prevented precipitation in all three cases. The reduced (NaBH4) mannopentaose, Man4Man-ol, did not precipitate with GNA or NPA, but was active with HHA. This activity was lost when Man4Man-ol was converted (NaIO4 then NaBH4; mild acid hydrolysis of the reduced product) into trisaccharide derivatives. With alpha-D-Manp-OMe the three lectins gave UV difference spectra having large positive peaks at 292-293 and 283-284 nm, and a small positive peak at 275 nm, characteristic of tryptophanyl and tyrosyl residues. The association constants for the interaction with alpha-D-Manp-OMe were very low (NPA, 86; HHA, 66; and GNA, 41 M-1), but the lectins bound methyl (1----3)-alpha-mannobioside with increased affinity (K for NPA 540, for HHA 2400, and for GNA 200 M-1). The bulb lectins lack binding sites for hydrophobic ligands, as judged by their failure to interact with the fluorescent probes 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) and 6-p-toluidino-2-naphthalenesulfonic acid (TNS).

  11. Innate immune response of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) mannose-binding lectin to channel catfish virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The channel catfish virus (CCV) is a pathogenic herpesvirus that infects channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) in pond aquaculture in the Southeast USA. The innate immune protein mannose-binding lectin (MBL) could play an important role in the innate response of channel catfish by binding to the CC...

  12. Mannose-Binding Lectin Genotypes and Susceptibility to Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Infancy▿

    PubMed Central

    Friborg, Jeppe T.; Jarrett, Ruth F.; Koch, Anders; Garred, Peter; Freeland, June M. L.; Andersen, Andreas; Melbye, Mads

    2010-01-01

    In a cohort study of children <4 years of age in Greenland, mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotypes and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody levels were determined. EBV seropositivity was significantly lower and time to seroconversion increased in MBL-insufficient compared with MBL-sufficient children, indicating that MBL may be involved in primary EBV infection in infancy. PMID:20610664

  13. The Liverwort Contains a Lectin That Is Structurally and Evolutionary Related to the Monocot Mannose-Binding Lectins1

    PubMed Central

    Peumans, Willy J.; Barre, Annick; Bras, Julien; Rougé, Pierre; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Els J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A mannose (Man)-binding lectin has been isolated and characterized from the thallus of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. N-terminal sequencing indicated that the M. polymorpha agglutinin (Marpola) shares sequence similarity with the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Searches in the databases yielded expressed sequence tags encoding Marpola. Sequence analysis, molecular modeling, and docking experiments revealed striking structural similarities between Marpola and the monocot Man-binding lectins. Activity and specificity studies further indicated that Marpola is a much stronger agglutinin than the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin and exhibits a preference for methylated Man and glucose, which is unprecedented within the family of monocot Man-binding lectins. The discovery of Marpola allows us, for the first time, to corroborate the evolutionary relationship between a lectin from a lower plant and a well-established lectin family from flowering plants. In addition, the identification of Marpola sheds a new light on the molecular evolution of the superfamily of monocot Man-binding lectins. Beside evolutionary considerations, the occurrence of a G. nivalis agglutinin homolog in a lower plant necessitates the rethinking of the physiological role of the whole family of monocot Man-binding lectins. PMID:12114560

  14. Recombinant chimeric lectins consisting of mannose-binding lectin and L-ficolin are potent inhibitors of influenza A virus compared with mannose-binding lectin

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Chuan; Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Moyoa, Patience; Michelow, Ian C.; Koziel, Henry; Kinane, Bernard T.; Schmidt, Emmett V.; Fujita, Teizo; Takahashi, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    MBL structurally contains a type II-like collagenous domain and a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). We have recently generated three novel recombinant chimeric lectins (RCL), in which varying length of collagenous domain of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is replaced with that of L-ficolin (L-FCN). CRD of MBL is used for target recognition because it has a broad spectrum in pathogen recognition compared with L-FCN. Results of our study demonstrate that these RCLs are potent inhibitors of influenza A virus (IAV). RCLs, against IAV, show dose-dependent activation of the lectin complement pathway, which is significantly higher than that of recombinant human MBL (rMBL). This activity is observed even without MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs, provided by MBL deficient mouse sera), which have been thought to mediate complement activation. These observations suggest that RCLs are more efficient in associating with MASP-2, which predominantly mediates the activity. Yet, additional serum further increases the activity while RCL-mediated coagulation-like enzyme activities are diminished compared with rMBL, suggesting reduced association with MASP-1, which has been shown to mediate coagulation-like activity. These data suggest that RCLs may interfere less with host coagulation, which is advantageous to be a therapeutic drug. Importantly, these RCLs have surpassed rMBL for anti-viral activities, such as viral aggregation, reduction of viral hemagglutination (HA) and inhibition of virus-mediated HA and neuraminidase (NA) activities. These results are encouraging that novel RCLs could be used as anti-IAV agents with less side effect and that RCLs would be suitable candidates in developing a new anti-IAV therapy. PMID:21035429

  15. Recombinant chimeric lectins consisting of mannose-binding lectin and L-ficolin are potent inhibitors of influenza A virus compared with mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Chuan; Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Moyo, Patience; Michelow, Ian C; Koziel, Henry; Kinane, Bernard T; Schmidt, Emmett V; Fujita, Teizo; Takahashi, Kazue

    2011-02-01

    MBL structurally contains a type II-like collagenous domain and a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). We have recently generated three novel recombinant chimeric lectins (RCL), in which varying length of collagenous domain of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is replaced with that of L-ficolin (L-FCN). CRD of MBL is used for target recognition because it has a broad spectrum in pathogen recognition compared with L-FCN. Results of our study demonstrate that these RCLs are potent inhibitors of influenza A virus (IAV). RCLs, against IAV, show dose-dependent activation of the lectin complement pathway, which is significantly higher than that of recombinant human MBL (rMBL). This activity is observed even without MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs, provided by MBL deficient mouse sera), which have been thought to mediate complement activation. These observations suggest that RCLs are more efficient in associating with MASP-2, which predominantly mediates the activity. Yet, additional serum further increases the activity while RCL-mediated coagulation-like enzyme activities are diminished compared with rMBL, suggesting reduced association with MASP-1, which has been shown to mediate coagulation-like activity. These data suggest that RCLs may interfere less with host coagulation, which is advantageous to be a therapeutic drug. Importantly, these RCLs have surpassed rMBL for anti-viral activities, such as viral aggregation, reduction of viral hemagglutination (HA) and inhibition of virus-mediated HA and neuraminidase (NA) activities. These results are encouraging that novel RCLs could be used as anti-IAV agents with less side effect and that RCLs would be suitable candidates in developing a new anti-IAV therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An ancient and variable mannose-binding lectin from the coral Acropora millepora binds both pathogens and symbionts.

    PubMed

    Kvennefors, E Charlotte E; Leggat, William; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Degnan, Bernard M; Barnes, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    Corals form the framework of the world's coral reefs and are under threat from increases in disease and bleaching (symbiotic dysfunction), yet the mechanisms of pathogen and symbiont recognition remain largely unknown. Here we describe the isolation and characterisation of an ancient mannose-binding lectin in the coral Acropora millepora, which is likely to be involved in both processes. The lectin ('Millectin') was isolated by affinity chromatography and was shown to bind to bacterial pathogens as well as coral symbionts, dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. cDNA analysis of Millectin indicate extensive sequence variation in the binding region, reflecting its ability to recognise various mannose-like carbohydrate structures on non-self cells, including symbionts and pathogens. This is the first mannose-binding lectin to show extensive sequence variability as observed for pattern recognition proteins in other invertebrate immune systems and, given that invertebrates rely on non-adaptive immunity, is a potential keystone component of coral defence mechanisms.

  17. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of a mannose-binding lectin from champedak

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Isaacs, Neil W.; Hashim, Onn Haji; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) is a homotetra­mer with a single-monomer molecular weight of 16 800 Da. Previous work has shown it to bind IgE and IgM, as well as being a mitogen of T cells in humans. Champedak mannose-binding lectin has successfully been used to detect altered glycosylation states of serum proteins. The protein was crystallized at 293 K in space group P212121 (unit-cell parameters a = 76.89, b = 86.22, c = 95.37 Å) and the crystals diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution. PMID:20445267

  18. New mannose-binding lectin isolated from the rhizome of Sarsaparilla Smilax glabra Roxb. (Liliaceae).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Sun, Samuel S M; Wang, Hua; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2004-10-06

    A new mannose-binding lectin, designated SGM2, was isolated from the rhizome of a Chinese medicinal herb Smilax glabra (also known as sarsaparilla in general) by saline extraction, ammonium sulfate precipitation and fractionation, and affinity chromatography on fetuin- and mannose-agarose. SGM2 is shown to have a molecular mass of 37 kDa on gel filtration and 12.5 kDa on SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a trimeric protein composed of three identical subunits. When the first 30 amino acid residues at the N-terminal were compared, SGM2 had approximately 40% homology with those of some other monocots. SGM2 had the property of hemagglutinating activity toward rabbit erythrocytes, which could be reversed by mannose and mannose polymers. SGM2 exhibited antiviral activities against both herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with the same EC(50) of 8.1 microM.

  19. Molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from Clivia miniata.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-03-01

    Screening of a cDNA library constructed from total RNA isolated from young developing ovaries of Clivia miniata Regel with the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone resulted in the isolation of four different isolectin clones which clearly differ from each other in their nucleotide sequences and hence also in their deduced amino acid sequences. Apparently the lectin is translated from an mRNA of ca. 800 nucleotides encoding a precursor polypeptide of 163 amino acids. Northern blot analysis of total RNA isolated from different tissues of Clivia miniata has shown that the lectin is expressed in most plant tissues with very high lectin mRNA concentrations in the ovary and the seed endosperm.

  20. Mannose-specific lectins modulate ligand binding to AMPA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K B; Kessler, M; Ta, J; Lam, L; Lynch, G

    1998-06-08

    Binding of [3H]AMPA was increased above control levels in rat brain membranes that had been incubated with concanavalin A (Con A) or a lectin from Lens culinaris (LC), both of which bind mannose residues. This did not occur with any of six lectins with other specificities. The magnitude of the increased binding varied from 15% in cortex to 70% in hippocampus and decreased significantly between 3 weeks and 6 months of age. Succinylated Con A was without effect and neither Con A nor LC increased binding to solubilized AMPA receptors. Increases in binding were not obtained in membranes purified from HEK293 cell lines expressing homomeric AMPA receptors. This indicates that mannose specific lectins may enhance binding by cross-linking AMPA receptors to each other or to proteins that are specific to brain. Con A has been reported to reduce glutamate receptor desensitization with higher efficacy at kainate than at AMPA receptors; the increase in binding reported here appears to be unrelated to such effects because (1) it was not affected by drugs that block desensitization and (2) [3H]kainate binding was reduced rather than increased by Con A. These observations suggest that AMPA receptor kinetic properties not involving desensitization are influenced by extracellular interactions between the receptors and other transmembrane proteins. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel mannose-binding lectin gene from Amorphophallus konjac.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jiong; Liao, Zhihua; Chai, Yourong; Pang, Yongzhen; Yao, Jianhong; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2003-09-01

    A new lectin gene was cloned from Amorphophallus konjac. The full-length cDNA of Amorphophallus konjac agglutinin (aka) was 736 bp and contained a 474 bp open reading frame encoding a 158 amino acid protein. Homology analysis revealed that the lectin from this Araceae species belonged to the superfamily of monocot mannose-binding proteins. Molecular modeling of AKA indicated that the three-dimensional structure of AKA strongly resembles that of the snowdrop lectin. Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA revealed that aka belonged to a low-copy gene family. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that aka expression was tissue-specific with the strongest expression being found in root.

  2. Curculin, a sweet-tasting and taste-modifying protein, is a non-functional mannose-binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Barre, A; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Rougé, P

    1997-03-01

    A three-dimensional model of curculin, a sweet-tasting and taste-modifying protein from the fruits of Curculigo latifolia, was built from the X-ray coordinates of GNA, a mannose-binding lectin from snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis). The three mannose-binding sites present in GNA were found in curculin but are devoid of mannose-binding activity as shown by docking experiments performed with mannose. Some regions well exposed on the surface of the three-dimensional model of curculin could act as epitopes responsible for the sweet-tasting properties of this protein.

  3. Network Analysis Reveals the Recognition Mechanism for Mannose-binding Lectins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunjie; Jian, Yiren; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    The specific carbohydrate binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) protein in plants makes it a very useful molecular tool for cancer cell detection and other applications. The biological states of most MBL proteins are dimeric. Using dynamics network analysis on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the model protein of MBL, we elucidate the short- and long-range driving forces behind the dimer formation. The results are further supported by sequence coevolution analysis. We propose a general framework for deciphering the recognition mechanism underlying protein-protein interactions that may have potential applications in signaling pathways.

  4. Characterization and molecular cloning of mannose-binding lectins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata, Epipactis helleborine and Cymbidium hybrid.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-04-15

    Mannose-binding lectins were purified from the leaves of three Orchidaceae species, namely Listera ovata (twayblade), Epipactis helleborine (broad-leaved helleborine) and Cymbidium hybrid, using affinity chromatography on Mannose - Sepharose-4B. Apparently, the Orchidaceae lectins are dimeric proteins composed of lectin subunits of 12-13 kDa. All of the isolated lectins exhibit exclusive specificity towards mannose. A cDNA library constructed from poly(A) rich RNA isolated from leaves of L. ovata was screened for cDNA clones encoding the lectin using colony hybridization. Since N-terminal sequence analysis of the twayblade lectin revealed some sequence similarity to the previously cloned mannose-binding lectin Hippeastrum hybrid (amaryllis) ovaries, the amaryllis lectin cDNA clone was used as a probe to screen the L. ovata library. Subsequently, the cDNA clone encoding the L. ovata lectin was used to screen the cDNA libraries from the taxonomically related orchid species Cymbidium hybrid and E. helleborine. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from different Orchidaceae species revealed approximately 50% sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and amino acid level. The Orchidaceae lectins are apparently translated from mRNAs consisting of approximately 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins which are converted into the mature lectins following post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  5. Mannose-Binding Lectin Promoter Polymorphisms and Gene Variants in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients from Cantabria (Northern Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Lavín-Alconero, Lucía; Sánchez-Velasco, Pablo; Guerrero-Alonso, M.-Ángeles; Ausín, Fernando; Fariñas, M.-Carmen; Leyva-Cobián, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin is a central molecule of the innate immune system. Mannose-binding lectin 2 promoter polymorphisms and structural variants have been associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis. However, contradictory results among different populations have been reported, resulting in no convincing evidence of association between mannose-binding lectin 2 and susceptibility to tuberculosis. For this reason, we conducted a study in a well genetically conserved Spanish population in order to shed light on this controversial association. We analysed the six promoter and structural mannose-binding lectin 2 gene variants in 107 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 441 healthy controls. Only D variant and HYPD haplotype were significantly more frequents in controls which would indicate that this allele could confer protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, but this difference disappeared after statistical correction. Neither the rest of alleles nor the haplotypes were significantly associated with the disease. These results would indicate that mannose-binding lectin promoter polymorphisms and gene variants would not be associated with an increased risk to pulmonary tuberculosis. Despite the slight trend of the D allele and HYPD haplotype in conferring protection against pulmonary tuberculosis, susceptibility to this disease would probably be due to other genetic factors, at least in our population. PMID:23304495

  6. Efficiency of mannose-binding plant lectins in controlling a homopteran insect, the red cotton bug.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anita; Banerjee, Santanu; Majumder, Pralay; Das, Sampa

    2002-11-06

    Yield losses of different crops due to the attack of various classes of insects are a worldwide problem. Sucking type homopteran pests causing damage to many crop species are not controlled by commonly known insecticidal proteins, namely, Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin (Bt). This study describes the purification of mannose-binding lectins from three different monocotyledonous plants (Allium sativum, Colocasia esculenta, and Diffenbachia sequina) and their effects on a homopteran insect, the red cotton bug. All of them had a detrimental effect on the growth and development of the insect, where A. sativum bulb lectin showed the highest mortality of all, in particular. The same bulb lectin not only affected the growth and fecundity of the insect but also imparted drastic changes in the color, weight, and size, even on the second generation of the insects which have been reared on artificial diet supplemented with a sublethal dose of the lectin. Thus, this finding opens up a possibility of using this lectin as an important component in crop management.

  7. Near-planar Solution Structures of Mannose-binding Lectin Oligomers Provide Insight on Activation of Lectin Pathway of Complement

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ami; Phillips, Anna; Gor, Jayesh; Wallis, Russell; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is a fundamental component of innate immunity that orchestrates complex immunological and inflammatory processes. Complement comprises over 30 proteins that eliminate invading microorganisms while maintaining host cell integrity. Protein-carbohydrate interactions play critical roles in both the activation and regulation of complement. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) activates the lectin pathway of complement via the recognition of sugar arrays on pathogenic surfaces. To determine the solution structure of MBL, synchrotron x-ray scattering and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domains in the MBL dimer, trimer, and tetramer are positioned close to each other in near-planar fan-like structures. These data were subjected to constrained modeling fits. A bent structure for the MBL monomer was identified starting from two crystal structures for its carbohydrate-recognition domain and its triple helical region. The MBL monomer structure was used to identify 10–12 near-planar solution structures for each of the MBL dimers, trimers, and tetramers starting from 900 to 6,859 randomized structures for each. These near-planar fan-like solution structures joined at an N-terminal hub clarified how the carbohydrate-recognition domain of MBL binds to pathogenic surfaces. They also provided insight on how MBL presents a structural template for the binding and auto-activation of the MBL-associated serine proteases to initiate the lectin pathway of complement activation. PMID:22167201

  8. Enhancement of anti-Aeromonas salmonicida activity in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) macrophages by a mannose-binding lectin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, C.A.; Johnson, S.C.; Ewart, K.V.; Brown, L.L.; Ross, N.W.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a calcium-dependent mannose-binding lectin isolated from the serum of Atlantic salmon on Aeromonassalmonicida viability and the anti-A. salmonicida activity of Atlantic salmon macrophages. In the absence of other factors, binding of this lectin at concentrations of 0.8, 4.0 and 20.0 ng ml−1 to virulent A. salmonicida failed to significantly reduce (P>0.05) cell viability. However, binding of the lectin to A. salmonicida did result in significant (P≤0.05) dose-dependent increases in phagocytosis, and bactericidal activity. Significant increases (P≤0.05) were also observed in phagocyte respiratory burst activity within the lectin concentration range of 4.0–20.0 ng ml−1 but the stimulation was not dose dependent at these lectin concentrations. At the lowest lectin concentration tested (0.32 ng ml−1), a significant decrease (P≤0.05) in respiratory burst was observed. The structure and activity of this lectin are similar to that of mammalian mannose-binding lectins, which are known to play a pivotal role in innate immunity. The presence of this lectin may be an important defense mechanism against Gram-negative bacteria such as A. salmonicida.

  9. Direct Complement Restriction of Flavivirus Infection Requires Glycan Recognition by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Beasley, David W.; Stover, Cordula M.; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Diamond, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY An intact complement system is crucial for limiting West Nile virus (WNV) dissemination. Herein, we define how complement directly restricts flavivirus infection in an antibody-independent fashion. Mannose binding lectin (MBL) recognized N-linked glycans on the structural proteins of WNV and Dengue virus (DENV), resulting in neutralization through a C3 and C4-dependent mechanism that utilized both the canonical and bypass lectin activation pathways. For WNV, neutralization occurred with virus produced in insect cells, whereas for DENV, neutralization of insect and mammalian cell-derived virus was observed. Mechanism of action studies suggested that the MBL-dependent neutralization occurred in part, by blocking viral fusion. Experiments in mice showed an MBL-dependent accelerated intravascular clearance of DENV or a WNV mutant with two N-linked glycans on its E protein, but not with wild type WNV. Our studies show that MBL recognizes terminal mannose containing carbohydrates on flaviviruses, resulting in neutralization and efficient clearance in vivo. PMID:20709295

  10. Interaction of human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) with Yersinia enterocolitica lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Swierzko, Anna S; Bartlomiejczyk, Marcin A; Cedzynski, Maciej; Noszczynska, Magdalena; Duda, Katarzyna A; Michalski, Mateusz; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-09-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is involved in the interaction between Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and host. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), complement-activating soluble pattern-recognition receptor targets microbial glycoconjugates, including LPS. We studied its interactions with a set of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 LPS mutants. The wild-type strain LPS consists of lipid A (LA) substituted with an inner core oligosaccharide (IC) which in turn is substituted either with the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) or the outer core hexasaccharide (OC), and sometimes also with the enterobacterial common antigen (ECA). The LPS mutants produced truncated LPS, missing OPS, OC or both, or, in addition, different IC constituents or ECA. MBL bound to LA-IC, LA-IC-OPS and LA-IC-ECA but not LA-IC-OC structures. Moreover, LA-IC substitution with both OPS and ECA prevented the lectin binding. Sequential truncation of the IC heptoses demonstrated that the MBL targets the IC heptose region. Furthermore, microbial growth temperature influenced MBL binding; binding was stronger to bacteria grown at room temperature (22°C) than to bacteria grown at 37°C. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that MBL can interact with Y. enterocolitica LPS, however, the in vivo significance of that interaction remains to be elucidated.

  11. Mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis: A short review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Epp Boschmann, Stefanie; Goeldner, Isabela; Tuon, Felipe Francisco; Schiel, Wagner; Aoyama, Fernanda; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement system. MBL binds to carbohydrates on microorganism's surfaces leading to complement activation, opsonization and phagocytosis. Polymorphisms in the MBL gene (MBL2) are associated with variations on MBL serum levels and with the susceptibility to various infectious and autoimmune diseases. The involvement of the lectin pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been demonstrated by several studies and although MBL has been considered to have a dual role in the pathogenesis of the disease, the association between MBL and RA remains inconclusive. In an attempt to clarify this relationship, we developed this short review summarizing accumulated evidences in regard to MBL and RA and a meta-analysis to evaluate the influence of MBL2 polymorphisms on the susceptibility to RA. Among a total of 217 articles that were identified following a predefined search strategy on PubMed, Scopus, Scielo, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, only 13 met all inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Data assessment was conducted by three independent investigators and presented in odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using forest plot charts. Both heterogeneity and publication bias were analyzed. The results of the meta-analysis evidenced that MBL2 low producing OO and XX genotypes do not confer higher risk to RA, even when data were analyzed according to cohort's ethnicity. Further studies are needed in order to clarify the importance of other genes of the lectin pathway in the pathogenesis of RA.

  12. Plumieribetin, a fish lectin homologous to mannose-binding B-type lectins, inhibits the collagen-binding alpha1beta1 integrin.

    PubMed

    de Santana Evangelista, Karla; Andrich, Filipe; Figueiredo de Rezende, Flávia; Niland, Stephan; Cordeiro, Marta N; Horlacher, Tim; Castelli, Riccardo; Schmidt-Hederich, Alletta; Seeberger, Peter H; Sanchez, Eladio F; Richardson, Michael; Gomes de Figueiredo, Suely; Eble, Johannes A

    2009-12-11

    Recently, a few fish proteins have been described with a high homology to B-type lectins of monocotyledonous plants. Because of their mannose binding activity, they have been ascribed a role in innate immunity. By screening various fish venoms for their integrin inhibitory activity, we isolated a homologous protein from the fin stings and skin mucus of the scorpionfish (Scorpaena plumieri). This protein inhibits alpha1beta1 integrin binding to basement membrane collagen IV. By protein chemical and spectroscopic means, we demonstrated that this fish protein, called plumieribetin, is a homotetramer and contains a high content of anti-parallel beta strands, similar to the mannose-binding monocot B-lectins. It lacks both N-linked glycoconjugates and common O-glycan motifs. Despite its B-lectin-like structure, plumieribetin binds to alpha1beta1 integrin irrespective of N-glycosylation, suggesting a direct protein-protein interaction. This interaction is independent of divalent cations. On the cellular level, plumieribetin failed to completely detach hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells and primary arterial smooth muscle cells from the collagen IV fragment CB3. However, plumieribetin weakened the cell-collagen contacts, reduced cell spreading, and altered the actin cytoskeleton, after the compensating alpha2beta1 integrin was blocked. The integrin inhibiting effect of plumieribetin adds a new function to the B-lectin family, which is known for pathogen defense.

  13. Plumieribetin, a Fish Lectin Homologous to Mannose-binding B-type Lectins, Inhibits the Collagen-binding α1β1 Integrin*

    PubMed Central

    de Santana Evangelista, Karla; Andrich, Filipe; Figueiredo de Rezende, Flávia; Niland, Stephan; Cordeiro, Marta N.; Horlacher, Tim; Castelli, Riccardo; Schmidt-Hederich, Alletta; Seeberger, Peter H.; Sanchez, Eladio F.; Richardson, Michael; Gomes de Figueiredo, Suely; Eble, Johannes A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a few fish proteins have been described with a high homology to B-type lectins of monocotyledonous plants. Because of their mannose binding activity, they have been ascribed a role in innate immunity. By screening various fish venoms for their integrin inhibitory activity, we isolated a homologous protein from the fin stings and skin mucus of the scorpionfish (Scorpaena plumieri). This protein inhibits α1β1 integrin binding to basement membrane collagen IV. By protein chemical and spectroscopic means, we demonstrated that this fish protein, called plumieribetin, is a homotetramer and contains a high content of anti-parallel β strands, similar to the mannose-binding monocot B-lectins. It lacks both N-linked glycoconjugates and common O-glycan motifs. Despite its B-lectin-like structure, plumieribetin binds to α1β1 integrin irrespective of N-glycosylation, suggesting a direct protein-protein interaction. This interaction is independent of divalent cations. On the cellular level, plumieribetin failed to completely detach hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells and primary arterial smooth muscle cells from the collagen IV fragment CB3. However, plumieribetin weakened the cell-collagen contacts, reduced cell spreading, and altered the actin cytoskeleton, after the compensating α2β1 integrin was blocked. The integrin inhibiting effect of plumieribetin adds a new function to the B-lectin family, which is known for pathogen defense. PMID:19850917

  14. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphisms and the development of coal workers' pneumoconiosis in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.T.; Ohtsuka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kaji, H.; Saito, J.; Tanino, Y.; Ishida, T.; Munakata, M.

    2008-07-15

    Infection, immunity and genetic factors play roles in the development of coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) and progressive massive fibrosis (PMF). We investigate whether the genetic polymorphisms of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), one of the key molecules of innate immunity, is associated with the susceptibility to CWP. MBL2 polymorphisms (codon54, promoter -221, and -550) were assessed for 197 patients with CWP (119 with nodular CWP and 78 with PMF) and 153 unexposed regional controls. Serum MBL concentrations were measured in 119 CWP patients. Three polymorphisms were in linkage disequilibrium for all study populations. The MBL2 genotype and haplotypes were associated with lower serum MBL levels. The frequency of such MBL2 genotype and haplotypes were significantly higher in patients with CWP compared to controls, whereas these distributions were not different between patients with nodular CWP and those with PMF. MBL2 polymorphisms and haplotypes may be one of the genetic determinants for the susceptibility of CWP.

  15. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  16. Intracellular Mannose Binding Lectin Mediates Subcellular Trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, CL; Kaul, M; Singh, KK

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus -1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons. PMID:24825317

  17. Lack of association between genetic variants in the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene and HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Parrella, Paola; Seripa, Davide; Matera, Maria G; Rinaldi, Monica; Signori, Emanuela; Gravina, Carolina; Gallo, Antonietta P; Prencipe, Maria; Grandone, Elvira; Mariani, Luciano; Cordiali, Paola; Di Carlo, Aldo; Stentella, Patrizia; Pachì, Antonio; Fazio, Vito M

    2007-01-01

    Genetic variants in the immunomodulatory gene mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), were associated with risk, severity, and frequency of viral infections. In a case-control setting, we investigated the association of MBL2 functional polymorphisms with Human Papillomas Virus (HPV) infection. No differences between cases (HPV(+)) and controls (HPV(-)) were found in the distribution of each single genotypes or allele. Haplotype analysis did not show any difference between HPV+ and HPV(-) groups.

  18. Plasma mannose-binding lectin is stimulated by PPARα in humans.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Stienstra, Rinke; de Wit, Nicole J; Bragt, Marjolijn C E; Haluzik, Martin; Mensink, Ronald P; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2012-03-01

    The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) is a major transcriptional regulator of lipid metabolism in liver and represents the molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrate drugs. Effects of PPARα on lipid metabolism are partially mediated by circulating proteins such as FGF21 and ANGPTL4. The present study was undertaken to screen for and identify circulating proteins produced by human liver that are under the control of PPARα. Toward that aim, primary human hepatocytes were treated with the synthetic PPARα agonist Wy-14643 and whole genome expression data selected for secreted proteins. Expression of FGF21, ANGPTL4, and mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a soluble mediator of innate immunity and primary component of the lectin branch of the complement system, was markedly upregulated by Wy-14643 in primary human hepatocytes. Mice express two MBL isomers, Mbl1 and Mbl2. Mbl1 mRNA was weakly induced by Wy-14643 in primary mouse hepatocytes and remained unaltered by Wy-14643 in mouse liver. Mbl2 mRNA was unchanged by Wy-14643 in primary mouse hepatocytes and was strongly reduced by Wy-14643 in mouse liver. Remarkably, plasma Mbl1 levels were increased by chronic PPARα activation in lean and obese mice. Importantly, in two independent clinical trials, treatment with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate at 200 mg/day for 6 wk and 3 mo increased plasma MBL levels by 73 (P = 0.0016) and 86% (P = 0.017), respectively. It is concluded that hepatocyte gene expression and plasma levels of MBL are stimulated by PPARα and fenofibrate in humans, linking PPARα to regulation of innate immunity and complement activation in humans and suggesting a possible role of MBL in lipid metabolism.

  19. Mannose-Binding Lectin and Toll-Like Receptor Polymorphisms and Chagas Disease in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Zulantay, Inés; Danquah, Ina; Hamann, Lutz; Schumann, Ralf R.; Apt, Werner; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms may influence susceptibility and manifestation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In northern Chile, we examined 61 asymptomatic patients with chronic Chagas disease (CD), 64 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 45 healthy individuals. Low-producer MBL2*B genotypes were more common in CD patients (48%) than healthy individuals (31%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–5.4, P = 0.047) but did not differ with manifestation. In contrast, the heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficiency genotype D299G/T399I occurred more frequently in asymptomatic (14.8%) than CCC patients (3.1%; P = 0.02). TLR1-I602S, TLR2-R753Q, TLR6-S249P, and MAL/TIRAP-S180L did not associate with CD or CCC. These findings support the complement system to be involved in defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection and indicate that curbed TLR4 activation might be beneficial in preventing CCC. PMID:22302853

  20. Mannose-binding lectin and Toll-like receptor polymorphisms and Chagas disease in Chile.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Thomas; Zulantay, Inés; Danquah, Ina; Hamann, Lutz; Schumann, Ralf R; Apt, Werner; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2012-02-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms may influence susceptibility and manifestation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In northern Chile, we examined 61 asymptomatic patients with chronic Chagas disease (CD), 64 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 45 healthy individuals. Low-producer MBL2*B genotypes were more common in CD patients (48%) than healthy individuals (31%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-5.4, P = 0.047) but did not differ with manifestation. In contrast, the heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficiency genotype D299G/T399I occurred more frequently in asymptomatic (14.8%) than CCC patients (3.1%; P = 0.02). TLR1-I602S, TLR2-R753Q, TLR6-S249P, and MAL/TIRAP-S180L did not associate with CD or CCC. These findings support the complement system to be involved in defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection and indicate that curbed TLR4 activation might be beneficial in preventing CCC.

  1. Frequent IgG subclass and mannose binding lectin deficiency in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Sabrina; Loebel, Madlen; Mooslechner, Agnes A; Knops, Michael; Hanitsch, Leif G; Grabowski, Patricia; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a severe disease characterized by various symptoms of immune dysfunction. CFS onset is typically with an infection and many patients suffer from frequently recurrent viral or bacterial infections. Immunoglobulin and mannose binding lectin (MBL) deficiency are frequent causes for increased susceptibility to infections. In this study we retrospectively analysed 300 patients with CFS for immunoglobulin and MBL levels, and B-cell subset frequencies. 25% of the CFS patients had decreased serum levels of at least one antibody class or subclass with IgG3 and IgG4 subclass deficiencies as most common phenotypes. However, we found elevated immunoglobulin levels with an excess of IgM and IgG2 in particular in another 25% of patients. No major alteration in numbers of B cells and B-cell subsets was seen. Deficiency of MBL was found in 15% of the CFS patients in contrast to 6% in a historical control group. In a 2nd cohort of 168 patients similar frequencies of IgG subclass and MBL deficiency were found. Thus, humoral immune defects are frequent in CFS patients and are associated with infections of the respiratory tract.

  2. Mannose-binding lectin genotypes: potential role in tubal damage and adverse IVF outcome.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Triin; Peters, Maire; Salumets, Andres

    2011-12-01

    The innate immune system provides the first-line defence against genital tract pathogens and is also involved in establishing and maintaining a successful pregnancy. Genetic variation of factors regulating immune response can be associated with complications after genital tract infections and may lead to unfavourable pregnancy outcomes. This study focused on four polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin gene (MBL2) and assessed their significance in tubal damage and female fertility by comparing genotype frequencies among 388 controls and women with tubal factor infertility (n=155) or previous ectopic pregnancy (n=178). The high-producing MBL2 genotype HYA/LYA was found to have a protective effect, while the hyper-producing MBL2 genotype HYA/HYA and low-producing MBL2 genotypes were associated with susceptibility to tubal factor infertility. Also, the low-producing genotypes showed association with early pregnancy loss in IVF treatment. In conclusion, these data suggest that certain MBL2 genotypes can be associated with tubal damage in patients with evidence of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and additionally may contribute to the pathogenesis of early pregnancy loss.

  3. Mannose-binding lectin serum levels in neonatal sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Wahab Mohamed, Walid Abdel; Saeed, Mohamed Abdullatif

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate mannose-binding lectin (MBL) serum levels as a marker for predicting sepsis, septic shock, and their outcomes in neonates. A prospective study was conducted on 62 neonates (27 preterm and 35 full term) with culture-proven sepsis and 35 controls. Serum levels of MBL were measured by immunoassay. Of 62 infants with positive blood cultures (Gram-negative = 44 and Gram-positive = 18), 11 infants had severe sepsis and 6 neonates developed septic shock. MBL levels were significantly lower in infants with sepsis than in control group (0.39 ± 0.07 vs. 1.34 ± 0.03 μg/ml; p < 0.001). The lowest MBL levels were detected in those infants with septic shock, particularly those who died (p < 0.05). MBL had high sensitivity (96.7), specificity (97.1), positive (98.3), and negative (94.4) predictive values to detect sepsis. Low MBL serum levels could be considered as sensitive and specific marker for predicting sepsis, septic shock, and their clinical outcomes in newborn infants.

  4. Effects of mannose-binding lectin polymorphisms on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    van der Bol, Jessica M; de Jong, Floris A; van Schaik, Ron H; Sparreboom, Alex; van Fessem, Marianne A; van de Geijn, Fleur E; van Daele, Paul L; Verweij, Jaap; Sleijfer, Stefan; Mathijssen, Ron H

    2010-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is important in the innate immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms affect MBL expression, and genotypes yielding low MBL levels have been associated with an elevated risk for infections in hematological cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, these reported associations are inconsistent, and data on patients with solid tumors are lacking. Here, we investigated the effects of MBL2 genotypes on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors. Irinotecan-treated patients were genotyped for the MBL2 gene. Two promoter (-550 H/L and -221 X/Y) and three exon polymorphisms (52 A/D, 54 A/B, and 57 A/C) were determined, together with known risk factors for irinotecan-induced toxicity. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were recorded during the first course. Of the 133 patients, 28% experienced severe neutropenia and 10% experienced febrile neutropenia. No associations were found between exon polymorphisms and febrile neutropenia. However, patients with the H/H promoter genotype, associated with high MBL levels, experienced significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients with the H/L and L/L genotypes (20% versus 13% versus 5%). Moreover, patients with the HYA haplotype encountered significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients without this high MBL-producing haplotype (16% versus 4%). In the subgroup with wild-type exon polymorphisms (A/A), patients with the high MBL promoter phenotype had the highest incidence of febrile neutropenia, regardless of known risk factors. Patients with high MBL2 promoter genotypes and haplotypes seem more at risk for developing febrile neutropenia. If confirmed, these preliminary findings may contribute to more individualized approaches of irinotecan treatment.

  5. Effects of Mannose-Binding Lectin Polymorphisms on Irinotecan-Induced Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Floris A.; van Schaik, Ron H.; Sparreboom, Alex; van Fessem, Marianne A.; van de Geijn, Fleur E.; van Daele, Paul L.; Verweij, Jaap; Sleijfer, Stefan; Mathijssen, Ron H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is important in the innate immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms affect MBL expression, and genotypes yielding low MBL levels have been associated with an elevated risk for infections in hematological cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, these reported associations are inconsistent, and data on patients with solid tumors are lacking. Here, we investigated the effects of MBL2 genotypes on irinotecan-induced febrile neutropenia in patients with solid tumors. Patients and Methods. Irinotecan-treated patients were genotyped for the MBL2 gene. Two promoter (−550 H/L and −221 X/Y) and three exon polymorphisms (52 A/D, 54 A/B, and 57 A/C) were determined, together with known risk factors for irinotecan-induced toxicity. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were recorded during the first course. Results. Of the 133 patients, 28% experienced severe neutropenia and 10% experienced febrile neutropenia. No associations were found between exon polymorphisms and febrile neutropenia. However, patients with the H/H promoter genotype, associated with high MBL levels, experienced significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients with the H/L and L/L genotypes (20% versus 13% versus 5%). Moreover, patients with the HYA haplotype encountered significantly more febrile neutropenia than patients without this high MBL-producing haplotype (16% versus 4%). In the subgroup with wild-type exon polymorphisms (A/A), patients with the high MBL promoter phenotype had the highest incidence of febrile neutropenia, regardless of known risk factors. Conclusion. Patients with high MBL2 promoter genotypes and haplotypes seem more at risk for developing febrile neutropenia. If confirmed, these preliminary findings may contribute to more individualized approaches of irinotecan treatment. PMID:20930093

  6. Mannose-binding lectin-deficient genotypes as a risk factor of pneumococcal meningitis in infants

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Rodriguez, Carles; Launes, Cristian; Jordan, Iolanda; Andres, Maria; Arias, Maria Teresa; Lozano, Francisco; Garcia-Garcia, Juan Jose

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate to evaluate the role of mannose-binding-lectin deficient genotypes in pneumococcal meningitis (PM) in children. Methods We performed a 16-year retrospective study (January 2001 to March 2016) including patients ≤ 18 years with PM. Variables including attack rate of pneumococcal serotype (high or low invasive capacity) and MBL2 genotypes associated with low serum MBL levels were recorded. Results Forty-eight patients were included in the study. Median age was 18.5 months and 17/48 episodes (35.4%) occurred in children ≤ 12 months old. Serotypes with high-invasive disease potential were identified in 15/48 episodes (31.2%). MBL2 deficient genotypes accounted for 18.8% (9/48). Children ≤ 12 months old had a 7-fold risk (95% CI: 1.6–29.9; p < 0.01) of having a MBL2 deficient genotype in comparison to those > 12 months old. A sub-analysis of patients by age group revealed significant proportions of carriers of MBL2 deficient genotypes among those ≤ 12 months old with PM caused by opportunistic serotypes (54.5%), admitted to the PICU (Pediatric Intensive Care Unit) (46.7%) and of White ethnicity (35.7%). These proportions were significantly higher than in older children (all p<0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that differences in MBL2 genotype in children ≤12 months old affects susceptibility to PM, and it may have an important role in the episodes caused by non-high invasive disease potential serotypes. PMID:28562692

  7. Mannose-binding lectin-deficient genotypes as a risk factor of pneumococcal meningitis in infants.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Rodriguez, Carles; Launes, Cristian; Jordan, Iolanda; Andres, Maria; Arias, Maria Teresa; Lozano, Francisco; Garcia-Garcia, Juan Jose; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate to evaluate the role of mannose-binding-lectin deficient genotypes in pneumococcal meningitis (PM) in children. We performed a 16-year retrospective study (January 2001 to March 2016) including patients ≤ 18 years with PM. Variables including attack rate of pneumococcal serotype (high or low invasive capacity) and MBL2 genotypes associated with low serum MBL levels were recorded. Forty-eight patients were included in the study. Median age was 18.5 months and 17/48 episodes (35.4%) occurred in children ≤ 12 months old. Serotypes with high-invasive disease potential were identified in 15/48 episodes (31.2%). MBL2 deficient genotypes accounted for 18.8% (9/48). Children ≤ 12 months old had a 7-fold risk (95% CI: 1.6-29.9; p < 0.01) of having a MBL2 deficient genotype in comparison to those > 12 months old. A sub-analysis of patients by age group revealed significant proportions of carriers of MBL2 deficient genotypes among those ≤ 12 months old with PM caused by opportunistic serotypes (54.5%), admitted to the PICU (Pediatric Intensive Care Unit) (46.7%) and of White ethnicity (35.7%). These proportions were significantly higher than in older children (all p<0.05). Our results suggest that differences in MBL2 genotype in children ≤12 months old affects susceptibility to PM, and it may have an important role in the episodes caused by non-high invasive disease potential serotypes.

  8. Elevated Serum Levels of Mannose-Binding Lectin and Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ling-Zhi; Tong, Qiang; Xu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Inflammation and complement activation initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) may be implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. We investigated serum MBL levels in type 2 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy (DN) and with persistent normoalbuminuria. Method Serum MBL levels were determined in 242 type 2 diabetes with overt nephropathy and 242 type 2 diabetes with persistent normoalbuminuria matched for age, sex, and duration of diabetes, as well as in 100 healthy control subjects. The prediction value of MBL was compared with HbA1c, Hs-CRP and with other known predictors. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Results The serum MBL levels were significantly higher in diabetes with DN as compared to with persistent normoalbuminuria (P<0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common factors showed that serum MBL levels≥2950ug/L was an independent indictor of DN (OR=7.55; 95%CI: 3.44–19.04). Based on the ROC curve, the optimal cutoff value of serum MBL levels as an indicator for diagnosis of DN was projected to be 2950ug/L, which yielded a sensitivity of 77.2 % and a specificity of 80.8%, with the area under the curve at 0.809 (95%CI, 0.769—0.848). Conclusion Our findings suggested that MBL may be involved in the pathogenesis of DN in type 2 diabetes, and that determination of MBL status might be used to identify patients at increased risk of developing nephropathy complications. PMID:25803807

  9. Polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 gene and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gong, Michelle N; Zhou, Wei; Williams, Paige L; Thompson, B Taylor; Pothier, Lucille; Christiani, David C

    2007-01-01

    The variant alleles in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL-2) gene have been associated with MBL deficiency and increased susceptibility to sepsis. We postulate that the variant MBL-2 genotypes are associated with increased susceptibility to and mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Nested case-control study. Tertiary academic medical center. Two hundred and twelve Caucasians with ARDS and 442 controls genotyped for the variant X, D, B, and C alleles of codon -221, 52, 54, and 57, respectively. None. Patients homozygous for the variant codon 54B allele (54BB) had worse severity of illness on admission (p = .007), greater likelihood of septic shock (p = .04), and increased odds of ARDS (adjusted odds ratio, 6.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-31) when compared with heterozygotes and homozygotes for the wild-type allele. This association with ARDS was especially strong among the 311 patients with septic shock (adjusted odds ratio, 12.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-74). Among the patients with ARDS, the 54BB genotype was associated with more daily organ dysfunction (p = .01) and higher mortality (adjusted hazard rate, 4.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-10). Development of ARDS and outcomes in ARDS did not vary significantly with variant alleles of codon -221, 52, and 57, but the power to detect an effect was limited secondary to the low allele frequencies. The MBL-2 codon 54BB genotype may be important in ARDS susceptibility and outcome. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings in other populations.

  10. Secondary Cell Wall Polymers of Enterococcus faecalis Are Critical for Resistance to Complement Activation via Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Geiss-Liebisch, Stefan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Beczala, Agnieszka; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Kruszynska, Karolina; Repp, Christian; Sakinc, Tuerkan; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes; Theilacker, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is part of our first line of defense against invading pathogens. The strategies used by Enterococcus faecalis to evade recognition by human complement are incompletely understood. In this study, we identified an insertional mutant of the wall teichoic acid (WTA) synthesis gene tagB in E. faecalis V583 that exhibited an increased susceptibility to complement-mediated killing by neutrophils. Further analysis revealed that increased killing of the mutant was due to a higher rate of phagocytosis by neutrophils, which correlated with higher C3b deposition on the bacterial surface. Our studies indicated that complement activation via the lectin pathway was much stronger on the tagB mutant compared with wild type. In concordance, we found an increased binding of the key lectin pathway components mannose-binding lectin and mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) on the mutant. To understand the mechanism of lectin pathway inhibition by E. faecalis, we purified and characterized cell wall carbohydrates of E. faecalis wild type and V583ΔtagB. NMR analysis revealed that the mutant strain lacked two WTAs with a repeating unit of →6)[α-l-Rhap-(1→3)]β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P and →6) β-d-Glcp-(1→3) [α-d-Glcp-(1→4)]-β-d-GalpNAc-(1→5)-Rbo-1-P→, respectively (Rbo, ribitol). In addition, compositional changes in the enterococcal rhamnopolysaccharide were noticed. Our study indicates that in E. faecalis, modification of peptidoglycan by secondary cell wall polymers is critical to evade recognition by the complement system. PMID:22908219

  11. Deficiency in Mannose-Binding Lectin-Associated Serine Protease-2 Does Not Increase Susceptibility to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Carolina H.; Lynch, Nicholas J.; Stover, Cordula M.; Ali, Youssif M.; Valck, Carolina; Noya-Leal, Francisca; Schwaeble, Wilhelm J.; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a chronic illness affecting 10 million people around the world. The complement system plays an important role in fighting microbial infections. The recognition molecules of the lectin pathway of complement activation, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins, and CL-11, bind to specific carbohydrates on pathogens, triggering complement activation through MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2). Previous in vitro work showed that human MBL and ficolins contribute to T. cruzi lysis. However, MBL-deficient mice are only moderately compromised in their defense against the parasite, as they may still activate the lectin pathway through ficolins and CL-11. Here, we assessed MASP-2-deficient mice, the only presently available mouse line with total lectin pathway deficiency, for a phenotype in T. cruzi infection. Total absence of lectin pathway functional activity did not confer higher susceptibility to T. cruzi infection, suggesting that it plays a minor role in the immune response against this parasite. PMID:25548381

  12. Conidiogenic effects of mannose-binding lectins isolated from cotyledons of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) on Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Hossein; Leung, David W M; Cole, Anthony L J

    2011-01-01

    Effect of proteinaceous extracts from red kidney bean cotyledons on mycelium of Alternaria alternata growing on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates was investigated. Unexpectedly, conidia formation was induced in response to applied crude extracts. A PDA disc method was developed to quantify conidia formed. A purified fraction retaining conidiation inducing effect (CIE) was obtained following several protein purification procedures including the last step of eluting bound proteins from an Affi-gel blue gel column. Based on MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization) mass spectrometric analysis, a previously identified mannose-binding lectin (MBL) called PvFRIL (Phaseolus vulgaris fetal liver tyrosine kinase 3-receptor interacting lectin) was present in this conidiation inducing fraction. The PvFRIL was subsequently purified using a single step mannose-agarose affinity column chromatography. When the lectin was applied exogenously to A. alternata, increased conidiation resulted. The conidia produced in response to the MBL were similar to those induced by other methods and their germ tubes were longer after 12 h growth than those induced under white light. To our knowledge this is the first report of exogenous application of a PvFRIL or another purified protein from a plant inducing conidia formation in a fungus.

  13. Influence of chicken serum mannose-binding lectin levels on the immune response towards Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Norup, L R; Dalgaard, T S; Friggens, N C; Sørensen, P; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) on infections with Escherichia coli in chickens. Initially, the basic levels of MBL in 4 different lines of layer chickens, namely ISA Brown, Lohmann Selected Leghorn, Lohmann Braun, and Hellevad, were investigated. This investigation revealed a 2-to 3-fold difference in the basic levels of MBL in serum between some of these commercial lines. Furthermore, the ontogeny of the basic level of MBL in serum of an experimental chicken line was investigated. The level of MBL was very stabile for long periods, with an elevation at 5 to 7 wk of age. Another elevation in MBL level started around 18 to 19 wk of age and stayed elevated at least until 38 wk of age. In this study, it was hypothesized that chickens with high levels of MBL (H-type) may be less prone to disease caused by E. coli infection than chickens with low levels of MBL (L-type) after attempts were made to immunosuppress the chickens by immunization with a live attenuated infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccine strain. The H-type and L-type chickens were divided into 4 groups receiving either no treatment (I-E-), E. coli alone (I-E+), IBDV alone (I+E-), or IBDV and E. coli (I+E+). Body weight gain was depressed by IBDV immunization as well as E. coli inoculation. The depression of BW gain was significantly larger in L-type chickens compared with H-type chickens. The antibody response to E. coli was significantly depressed by IBDV vaccination and antibody titers to E. coli were elevated by experimental E. coli inoculation, but only in the group not given IBDV (I-E- vs. I-E+). On d 28, T-cell responses in L-type chickens showed a lower percentage of proliferating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with the H-type, regardless of treatment. In conclusion, immune reactions toward infections with E. coli differed between chickens having different basal serum MBL levels, and as such, MBL may be of importance for future selection of more

  14. Cholesterol Crystals Activate the Lectin Complement Pathway via Ficolin-2 and Mannose-Binding Lectin: Implications for the Progression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pilely, Katrine; Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Gal, Peter; Pál, Gábor; Halvorsen, Bente; Holm, Sverre; Aukrust, Pål; Bakke, Siril Skaret; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Nervik, Ingunn; Niyonzima, Nathalie; Bartels, Emil D; Stahl, Gregory L; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Espevik, Terje; Garred, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Cholesterol crystals (CC) play an essential role in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. CC activate the classical and the alternative complement pathways, but the role of the lectin pathway is unknown. We hypothesized that the pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) from the lectin pathway bind CC and function as an upstream innate inflammatory signal in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. We investigated the binding of the PRMs mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolin-1, ficolin-2, and ficolin-3, the associated serine proteases, and complement activation products to CC in vitro using recombinant proteins, specific inhibitors, as well as deficient and normal sera. Additionally, we examined the deposition of ficolin-2 and MBL in human carotid plaques by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the lectin pathway was activated on CC by binding of ficolin-2 and MBL in vitro, resulting in activation and deposition of complement activation products. MBL bound to CC in a calcium-dependent manner whereas ficolin-2 binding was calcium-independent. No binding was observed for ficolin-1 or ficolin-3. MBL and ficolin-2 were present in human carotid plaques, and binding of MBL to CC was confirmed in vivo by immunohistochemistry, showing localization of MBL around CC clefts. Moreover, we demonstrated that IgM, but not IgG, bound to CC in vitro and that C1q binding was facilitated by IgM. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that PRMs from the lectin pathway recognize CC and provides evidence for an important role for this pathway in the inflammatory response induced by CC in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a mannose binding C-type lectin gene from salivary gland of Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jinzhi; Wang, Yu; Li, Fangzhan; Liu, Jian; Sun, Yu; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-07-22

    The studies on sialomes have shown that hematophagous mosquito saliva consists of a lot of pharmacologically active proteins, in which C-type lectins have been identified and regarded as an important component of saliva. The previous studies showed that C-type lectins play crucial roles not only in innate immunity but also in promoting disease transmission in mammals. However, the function and mechanism of C-type lectins from the mosquito sialome is still elusive. A putative C-type lectin gene (Aalb_CTL1) was cloned and expressed from Aedes albopictus by RT-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence was analyzed by bioinformatic methods. The gene expression profiles in different tissues and various blood-fed stages of Ae. albopictus were examined by Real-Time qRT-PCR and the biological functions of the recombined mature Aalb_CTL1 were tested by hemagglutination and sugar inhibitory agglutination assays. Moreover, the capabilities of rAalb_CTL1 against microorganisms were measured by microbial-agglutination assay. The full-length Open reading frame (ORF) of Aalb_CTL1 consisted of 462 bp, encoding 153 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence contained a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids. It also contained a CRD domain with a WND (Trp137-Asn138-Asp-139) motif that needed calcium for the hemagglutinating activity and an imperfect EPS (Glu128-Pro129-Ser130) motif that had a predicted ligand binding specificity for mannose. The mRNA level of Aalb_CTL1 was much higher in female mosquito salivary gland than those in fat body and midgut which was down-regulated in salivary gland after blood feeding. The rAalb_CTL1 contained not only hemagglutinating activity and a high affinity with mannose but also agglutinating activity against yeast C. albicans and Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus in Ca2+ dependent manner. Aalb_CTL1 was a mannose-binding C-type lectin and constituted one of the important components in saliva of Ae. albopictus, which could be involved in

  16. Efficacy of recombinant chimeric lectins, consisting of mannose binding lectin and L-ficolin, against influenza A viral infection in mouse model study

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazue; Moyo, Patience; Chigweshe, Lorencia; Chang, Wei-Chuan; White, Mitchel R.; Hartshorn, Kevan L.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus infection could result in fatal complications. Although immunization is the most effective prevention it is not effective to pandemic infection and is less effective or not approved for certain age groups. Some influenza virus strains have developed resistance to antiviral agents. Thus, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed. We focused on innate immune molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL). In order to optimize its antiviral activities, we have previously generated three recombinant chimeric lectins (RCL), by introducing portions of L-ficolin, another innate immune lectin. Our in vitro characterizations previously selected RCL2 and RCL3 for further investigations against viruses, including influenza viruses. Here, we examined efficacy of these lectins against infection with PR8 (H1N1) influenza A virus using mouse model studies and a human tracheal epithelial cell system. Our results provide in vivo evidence that RCL3 is effective agent against influenza virus infection. The therapeutic mechanisms are in part by providing host protective responses mediated by cytokines. We conclude that RCL3 is a potential new innate immune anti-influenza virus therapeutic agent. PMID:24140629

  17. Efficacy of recombinant chimeric lectins, consisting of mannose binding lectin and L-ficolin, against influenza A viral infection in mouse model study.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazue; Moyo, Patience; Chigweshe, Lorencia; Chang, Wei-Chuan; White, Mitchel R; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2013-12-26

    Influenza A virus infection could result in fatal complications. Although immunization is the most effective prevention it is not effective to pandemic infection and is less effective or not approved for certain age groups. Some influenza virus strains have developed resistance to antiviral agents. Thus, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed. We focused on innate immune molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL). In order to optimize its antiviral activities, we have previously generated three recombinant chimeric lectins (RCL), by introducing portions of L-ficolin, another innate immune lectin. Our in vitro characterizations previously selected RCL2 and RCL3 for further investigations against viruses, including influenza viruses. Here, we examined efficacy of these lectins against infection with PR8 (H1N1) influenza A virus using mouse model studies and a human tracheal epithelial cell system. Our results provide in vivo evidence that RCL3 is effective agent against influenza virus infection. The therapeutic mechanisms are in part by providing host protective responses mediated by cytokines. We conclude that RCL3 is a potential new innate immune anti-influenza virus therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents myocardial injury and arterial thrombogenesis in a novel animal model.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Vasile I; Tan, Ying S; McClure, Erin E; La Bonte, Laura R; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B; Stahl, Gregory L

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2(+/+)Mbl1(-/-)Mbl2(-/-) [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride-induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications.

  19. Human Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibitor Prevents Myocardial Injury and Arterial Thrombogenesis in a Novel Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Vasile I.; Tan, Ying S.; McClure, Erin E.; La Bonte, Laura R.; Zou, Chenhui; Gorsuch, William B.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction and coagulation disorders are leading causes of disability and death in the world. An important role of the lectin complement pathway in myocardial infarction and coagulation has been demonstrated in mice genetically deficient in lectin complement pathway proteins. However, these studies are limited to comparisons between wild-type and deficient mice and lack the ability to examine reversal/inhibition of injury after disease establishment. We developed a novel mouse that expresses functional human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 under the control of Mbl1 promoter. Serum MBL2 concentrations averaged approximately 3 μg/mL in MBL2+/+Mbl1−/−Mbl2−/− [MBL2 knock in (KI)] mice. Serum MBL2 level in MBL2 KI mice significantly increased after 7 (8 μg/mL) or 14 (9 μg/mL) days of hyperglycemia compared to normoglycemic mice (P < 0.001). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 inhibited C3 deposition on mannan-coated plates in MBL2 KI, but not wild-type, mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion in MBL2 KI mice revealed that 3F8 preserved cardiac function and decreased infarct size and fibrin deposition in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 3F8 prevented ferric chloride–induced occlusive arterial thrombogenesis in vivo. MBL2 KI mice represent a novel animal model that can be used to study the lectin complement pathway in acute and chronic models of human disease. Furthermore, these novel mice demonstrate the therapeutic window for MBL2 inhibition for effective treatment of disease and its complications. PMID:25482922

  20. High levels of serum mannose-binding lectin are associated with the severity of clinical signs of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Miranda, K A; Vasconcelos, L R S; Coelho, L C B B; Lima Filho, J L; Cavalcanti, M S M; Moura, P

    2009-04-01

    The clinical heterogeneity observed in leptospirosis may be associated with host factors or bacteria virulence. Human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) recognizes many pathogens, and low levels of this lectin are associated with susceptibility to infection. MBL is also implicated in the modulation of the inflammatory process. We determined the levels of serum MBL during leptospirosis infection. A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was used to detect the immunoreactive serum MBL. The ELISA plates were coated with monoclonal antibody to MBL and bound MBL or recombinant human MBL were detected by rabbit anti-human MBL serum. HRPO-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibody was used for detection of the reaction. Two groups of patients seen at referral hospitals in Recife, PE, Brazil, were divided according to the year of infection, 2001 (N = 61) or 2002 (N = 57) and compared in terms of disease severity and levels of serum MBL. A group of healthy volunteers (N = 97) matched by age, gender, and ethnic background was used as control. Patients infected in 2001 had more severe outcomes than those infected in 2002, including jaundice, hemorrhage, respiratory alteration, and renal complication (P = 0.0009; chi-square test). The frequency of patients producing serum MBL >1000 ng/mL was higher in the 2001 group than in the 2002 and control groups (P < 0.01), suggesting an association of MBL level with disease severity. The involvement of MBL and genetic variation of the MBL2 gene should be further evaluated to establish the role of this lectin in the pathogenesis of leptospirosis.

  1. Analysis of the sugar-binding specificity of mannose-binding-type Jacalin-related lectins by frontal affinity chromatography--an approach to functional classification.

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Uchiyama, Noboru; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M; Totani, Kiichiro; Ito, Yukishige; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-03-01

    The Jacalin-related lectin (JRL) family comprises galactose-binding-type (gJRLs) and mannose-binding-type (mJRLs) lectins. Although the documented occurrence of gJRLs is confined to the family Moraceae, mJRLs are widespread in the plant kingdom. A detailed comparison of sugar-binding specificity was made by frontal affinity chromatography to corroborate the structure-function relationships of the extended mJRL subfamily. Eight mJRLs covering a broad taxonomic range were used: Artocarpin from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit, Moraceae), BanLec from Musa acuminata (banana, Musaceae), Calsepa from Calystegia sepium (hedge bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CCA from Castanea crenata (Japanese chestnut, Fagaceae), Conarva from Convolvulus arvensis (bindweed, Convolvulaceae), CRLL from Cycas revoluta (King Sago palm tree, Cycadaceae), Heltuba from Helianthus tuberosus (Jerusalem artichoke, Asteraceae) and MornigaM from Morus nigra (black mulberry, Moraceae). The result using 103 pyridylaminated glycans clearly divided the mJRLs into two major groups, each of which was further divided into two subgroups based on the preference for high-mannose-type N-glycans. This criterion also applied to the binding preference for complex-type N-glycans. Notably, the result of cluster analysis of the amino acid sequences clearly corresponded to the above specificity classification. Thus, marked correlation between the sugar-binding specificity of mJRLs and their phylogeny should shed light on the functional significance of JRLs.

  2. Glycoepitopes of Staphylococcal Wall Teichoic Acid Govern Complement-mediated Opsonophagocytosis via Human Serum Antibody and Mannose-binding Lectin*

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; An, Jang-Hyun; Fuchs, Katharina; Jeon, Yu-Jin; Kim, Na-Hyang; Li, Xuehua; Tateishi, Koichiro; Park, Ji Ae; Xia, Guoqing; Matsushita, Misao; Takahashi, Kazue; Park, Hee-Ju; Peschel, Andreas; Lee, Bok Luel

    2013-01-01

    Serum antibodies and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) are important host defense factors for host adaptive and innate immunity, respectively. Antibodies and MBL also initiate the classical and lectin complement pathways, respectively, leading to opsonophagocytosis. We have shown previously that Staphylococcus aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer consisting of ribitol phosphate substituted with α- or β-O-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and d-alanine, is recognized by MBL and serum anti-WTA IgG. However, the exact antigenic determinants to which anti-WTA antibodies or MBL bind have not been determined. To answer this question, several S. aureus mutants, such as α-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase-deficient S. aureus ΔtarM, β-GlcNAc glycosyltransferase-deficient ΔtarS, and ΔtarMS double mutant cells, were prepared from a laboratory and a community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain. Here, we describe the unexpected finding that β-GlcNAc WTA-deficient ΔtarS mutant cells (which have intact α-GlcNAc) escape from anti-WTA antibody-mediated opsonophagocytosis, whereas α-GlcNAc WTA-deficient ΔtarM mutant cells (which have intact β-GlcNAc) are efficiently engulfed by human leukocytes via anti-WTA IgG. Likewise, MBL binding in S. aureus cells was lost in the ΔtarMS double mutant but not in either single mutant. When we determined the serum concentrations of the anti-α- or anti-β-GlcNAc-specific WTA IgGs, anti-β-GlcNAc WTA-IgG was dominant in pooled human IgG fractions and in the intact sera of healthy adults and infants. These data demonstrate the importance of the WTA sugar conformation for human innate and adaptive immunity against S. aureus infection. PMID:24045948

  3. Rapid Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus Pathogens from Infected Clinical Samples Using Magnetic Beads Coated with Fc-Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, B.; Gamini, N.; Rodas, M.; Penary, M.; Giordano, G.; Oswald, E.; Super, M.; Ingber, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe how Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can be rapidly isolated from clinical samples of articular fluid and synovial tissue using magnetic beads coated with the engineered chimeric human opsonin protein, Fc-mannose-binding lectin (FcMBL). The FcMBL-beads were used to capture and magnetically remove bacteria from purified cultures of 12 S. aureus strains, and from 8 articular fluid samples and 4 synovial tissue samples collected from patients with osteoarthritis or periprosthetic infections previously documented by positive S. aureus cultures. While the capture efficiency was high (85%) with purified S. aureus strains grown in vitro, direct FcMBL-bead capture from the clinical samples was initially disappointing (< 5% efficiency). Further analysis revealed that inhibition of FcMBL binding was due to coating of the bacteria by immunoglobulins and immune cells that masked FcMBL binding sites, and to the high viscosity of these complex biological samples. Importantly, capture of pathogens using the FcMBL-beads was increased to 76% efficiency by pretreating clinical specimens with hypotonic washes, hyaluronidase and a protease cocktail. Using this approach, S. aureus bacteria could be isolated from infected osteoarthritic tissues within 2 hours after sample collection. This FcMBL-enabled magnetic method for rapid capture and concentration of pathogens from clinical samples could be integrated upstream of current processes used in clinical microbiology laboratories to identify pathogens and perform antibiotic sensitivity testing when bacterial culture is not possible or before colonies can be detected. PMID:27275840

  4. High mannose-binding lectin with preference for the cluster of alpha1-2-mannose from the green alga Boodlea coacta is a potent entry inhibitor of HIV-1 and influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Hirayama, Makoto; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2011-06-03

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lectin from the green alga Boodlea coacta (BCA), which was determined by a combination of Edman degradation of its peptide fragments and cDNA cloning, revealed the following: 1) B. coacta used a noncanonical genetic code (where TAA and TAG codons encode glutamine rather than a translation termination), and 2) BCA consisted of three internal tandem-repeated domains, each of which contains the sequence motif similar to the carbohydrate-binding site of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins. Carbohydrate binding specificity of BCA was examined by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC assay using 42 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides. BCA bound to high mannose-type N-glycans but not to the complex-type, hybrid-type core structure of N-glycans or oligosaccharides from glycolipids. This lectin had exclusive specificity for α1-2-linked mannose at the nonreducing terminus. The binding activity was enhanced as the number of terminal α1-2-linked mannose substitutions increased. Mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannopentaose were incapable of binding to BCA. Thus, BCA preferentially recognized the nonreducing terminal α1-2-mannose cluster as a primary target. As predicted from carbohydrate-binding propensity, this lectin inhibited the HIV-1 entry into the host cells at a half-maximal effective concentration of 8.2 nm. A high association constant (3.71 × 10(8) M(-1)) of BCA with the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Moreover, BCA showed the potent anti-influenza activity by directly binding to viral envelope hemagglutinin against various strains, including a clinical isolate of pandemic H1N1-2009 virus, revealing its potential as an antiviral reagent.

  5. Linking microfilaments to intracellular membranes: the actin-binding and vesicle-associated protein comitin exhibits a mannose-specific lectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jung, E; Fucini, P; Stewart, M; Noegel, A A; Schleicher, M

    1996-01-01

    Comitin is a 24 kDa actin-binding protein from Dictyostelium discoideum that is located primarily on Golgi and vesicle membranes. We have probed the molecular basis of comitin's interaction with both actin and membranes using a series of truncation mutants obtained by expressing the appropriate cDNA in Escherichia coli. Comitin dimerizes in solution; its principle actin-binding activity is located between residues 90 and 135. The N-terminal 135 'core' residues of comitin contain a 3-fold sequence repeat that is homologous to several monocotyledon lectins and which retains key residues that determine these lectins' three-dimensional structure and mannose binding. These repeats of comitin appear to mediate its interaction with mannose residues in glycoproteins or glycolipids on the cytoplasmic surface of membrane vesicles from D.discoideum, and comitin can be released from membranes with mannose. Our data indicate that comitin binds to vesicle membranes via mannose residues and, by way of its interaction with actin, links these membranes to the cytoskeleton. Images PMID:8635456

  6. Extreme High Prevalence of a Defective Mannose-Binding Lectin (MBL2) Genotype in Native South American West Andean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O.; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations. PMID:25313559

  7. Extreme high prevalence of a defective mannose-binding lectin (MBL2) genotype in native South American West Andean populations.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, José Raul; Madsen, Hans O; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Descailleaux-Dulanto, Jaime; Velazquez-Reinoso, Margarita; Ñique, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Garred, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is one of the five recognition molecules in the lectin complement pathway. Common variant alleles in the promoter and structural regions of the human MBL gene (MBL2) influence the stability and serum concentration of the protein. Epidemiological studies have shown that MBL2 variant alleles are associated with susceptibility to and the course of different types of infectious and inflammatory conditions. However, it has been suggested that these alleles are maintained in different populations due to selected advantages for carriers. We investigated the MBL2 allelic variation in indigenous individuals from 12 different West Central South America localities spanning from the desert coast, high altitude Andean plates and the Amazon tropical forest within the territories of Peru (n = 249) (Departments of Loreto, Ucayali, Lambayeque, Junin, Ayacucho, Huancayo and Puno), and Ecuador (n = 182) (Region of Esmeraldas and Santo Domingo de los Colorados). The distribution of MBL2 genotypes among the populations showed that the defective variant LYPB haplotype was very common. It showed the highest frequencies in Puno (Taquile (0.80), Amantani (0.80) and Anapia (0.58) islander communities of the Lake Titicaca), but lower frequencies of 0.22 in Junin (Central Andean highland) and Ucayali (Central Amazonian forest), as well as 0.27 and 0.24 in the Congoma and Cayapa/Chachis populations in the Amazonian forest in Ecuador were also observed. Our results suggest that the high prevalence of the MBL2 LYPB variant causing low levels of functional MBL in serum may mainly reflect a random distribution due to a population bottleneck in the founder populations.

  8. Mannose-binding lectin 2 polymorphisms do not influence frequency or type of infection in adults with chemotherapy induced neutropaenia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michelle; Öhrmalm, Lars; Broliden, Kristina; Aust, Carl; Hibberd, Martin; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding Lectin protein (MBL) has been suggested to be relevant in the defence against infections in immunosuppressed individuals. In a Swedish adult cohort immunosuppressed from both the underlying disease and from iatrogenic treatments for their underlying disease we investigated the role of MBL in susceptibility to infection. In this cross sectional, prospective study, blood samples obtained from 96 neutropaenic febrile episodes, representing 82 individuals were analysed for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the MBL2 gene. Concurrent measurement of plasma MBL protein concentrations was also performed for observation of acute response during febrile episodes. No association was observed between MBL2 genotype or plasma MBL concentrations, and the type or frequency of infection. Adding to the literature, we found no evidence that viral infections or co-infections with virus and bacteria would be predisposed by MBL deficiency. We further saw no correlation between MBL2 genotype and the risk of fever. However, fever duration in febrile neutropaenic episodes was negatively associated with MBL2 SNP mutations (p<0.05). Patients with MBL2 SNP mutations presented a median febrile duration of 1.8 days compared with 3 days amongst patients with wildtype MBL2 genotype. We found no clear association between infection, or infection type to MBL2 genotypes or plasma MBL concentration, and add to the reports casting doubts on the benefit of recombinant MBL replacement therapy use during iatrogenic neutropaenia.

  9. Mannose-Binding Lectin 2 Polymorphisms Do Not Influence Frequency or Type of Infection in Adults with Chemotherapy Induced Neutropaenia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Öhrmalm, Lars; Broliden, Kristina; Aust, Carl; Hibberd, Martin; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Mannose-binding Lectin protein (MBL) has been suggested to be relevant in the defence against infections in immunosuppressed individuals. In a Swedish adult cohort immunosuppressed from both the underlying disease and from iatrogenic treatments for their underlying disease we investigated the role of MBL in susceptibility to infection. Methods In this cross sectional, prospective study, blood samples obtained from 96 neutropaenic febrile episodes, representing 82 individuals were analysed for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the MBL2 gene. Concurrent measurement of plasma MBL protein concentrations was also performed for observation of acute response during febrile episodes. Findings No association was observed between MBL2 genotype or plasma MBL concentrations, and the type or frequency of infection. Adding to the literature, we found no evidence that viral infections or co-infections with virus and bacteria would be predisposed by MBL deficiency. We further saw no correlation between MBL2 genotype and the risk of fever. However, fever duration in febrile neutropaenic episodes was negatively associated with MBL2 SNP mutations (p<0.05). Patients with MBL2 SNP mutations presented a median febrile duration of 1.8 days compared with 3 days amongst patients with wildtype MBL2 genotype. Interpretation We found no clear association between infection, or infection type to MBL2 genotypes or plasma MBL concentration, and add to the reports casting doubts on the benefit of recombinant MBL replacement therapy use during iatrogenic neutropaenia. PMID:22363494

  10. Mannose-binding lectin codon 54 gene polymorphism and vulvovaginal candidiasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nedovic, Bojan; Posteraro, Brunella; Leoncini, Emanuele; Ruggeri, Alberto; Amore, Rosarita; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in the human innate immune response. It has been shown that polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene, particularly at codon 54 (variant allele B; wild-type allele designated as A), impact upon host susceptibility to Candida infection. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to assess the association between MBL2 codon 54 genotype and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) or recurrent VVC (RVVC). Studies were searched in MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and ISI Web of Science until April 2013. Five studies including 704 women (386 cases and 318 controls) were part of the meta-analysis, and pooled ORs were calculated using the random effects model. For subjects with RVVC, ORs of AB versus AA and of BB versus AA were 4.84 (95% CI 2.10-11.15; P for heterogeneity = 0.013; I(2) = 68.6%) and 12.68 (95% CI 3.74-42.92; P for heterogeneity = 0.932, I(2) = 0.0%), respectively. For subjects with VVC, OR of AB versus AA was 2.57 (95% CI 1.29-5.12; P for heterogeneity = 0.897; I (2) = 0.0%). This analysis indicates that heterozygosity for the MBL2 allele B increases significantly the risk for both diseases, suggesting that MBL may influence the women's innate immunity in response to Candida.

  11. The association of mannose-binding lectin 2 polymorphisms with outcome in very low birth weight infants

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, Julia; Humberg, Alexander; Preuss, Michael; Schreiter, Lena; Rupp, Jan; Figge, Julia; Karsten, Christian M.; Nürnberg, Peter; Herting, Egbert

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Studies on the influence of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency on infection susceptibility in preterm infants have yielded controversial results. We investigated the association of genotype-based MBL levels with outcome in very-low-birth weight infants (VLBWI). Methods We genotyped 3 genetic variants of MBL2 (rs1800450, rs1800451, rs5030737) in 6878 VLBWI. MBL plasma levels were categorized as normal (wild type, A/A), low (heterozygotes, A/O) or undetectable (homozygotes, O/O). Primary outcome was the effect of genotype-based MBL2 levels on blood-culture proven and clinical sepsis during primary stay in hospital. We also evaluated burden of infection within 24 months after discharge. Results We found no association between MBL levels and sepsis risk in the whole cohort. Infants without measurable MBL levels born between 32 0/7 to 36 6/7 weeks of gestation, however, had a higher rate of Gram-negative sepsis than infants with normal or reduced MBL levels. In a follow-up investigation at 24 months (n = 1070 infants), infants without measurable MBL levels suffered more frequently from stomatitis and urinary tract infection. Conclusions In a large cohort of VLBWI MBL2 deficiency had no major impact on infection risk unless children were born between 32 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks of gestation. PMID:28558032

  12. Levels of mannose-binding lectin in individuals with visceral leishmaniasis in the northeast region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, E L; Campos Júnior, M; Monteiro, S G; Costa, G C; Magalhães, A L P; Santos, M D C; Caldas, A J M; Pimentel, M M G

    2015-12-29

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is one of the seven priority endemic diseases in the world. The clinical outcome of many infections is not only dependent on the pathogenic organism, but also on the genetic variability of the host susceptibility to infection. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a protein that plays an important role in the innate immune system. The aim of this study was to compare the serum levels of MBL between healthy controls and carriers of VL. The VL cases were recruited randomly from the main hospitals and referral outpatient clinics for VL in São Luís, and from home visits. Determination of MBL protein levels was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Of the 161 patients with VL and the 161 healthy controls, 60.9 and 67.1% had high levels of MBL, respectively. There was no significant difference in MBL levels between cases and controls. Low socioeconomic status and living conditions are conducive to the occurrence of VL. Owing to the small number of existing studies, it is extremely important to conduct further studies on MBL levels and susceptibility to VL, especially in regions where the disease is endemic, such as Maranhão, Brazil.

  13. Association between mannose-binding lectin variants, haplotypes and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chenghao; Lin, Yong; Cai, Lin; Mao, Qianguo; Niu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    The innate immunity gene mannose-binding lectin2 (MBL2) has played an important role in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, and the relationship between MBL2 variants and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk has not yet been identified. In total, 315 HCC cases and 315 healthy controls were enrolled and blood samples were acquired. High resolution melt analysis (HRM) was employed to genotype 6 polymorphisms in MBL2 gene. Increased HCC risk in carriers of LL genotype of −550 polymorphism with an adjusted OR (AOR) of 1.61 (95%CI = 1.00–2.57) was observed but no significant association detected in HL genotype. Both YX and XX genotype demonstrated a significantly elevated HCC risk in the analysis of −221 polymorphism. The B variants in codon 54 was also significantly associated with elevated HCC risk. HYB was identified as the protective factor of HCC while LXB was significantly associated with increase HCC risk. ELISA technique revealed that the MBL2 protein was significantly reduced in HCC cases. Moreover, both IL-1β and IL-6 were inversely associated with plasma MBL2 level.The mutations in MBL2 could lead to compromised innate immunity, and possibly lead to elevated HCC risk, and a novel haplotype HXB has been identified with a rate of 12.5%. PMID:27557564

  14. A C-type lectin (AiCTL-3) from bay scallop Argopecten irradians with mannose/galactose binding ability to bind various bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mengmeng; Song, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jianmin; Mu, Changkao; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Huan; Zhou, Zhi; Liu, Xiaolin; Song, Linsheng

    2013-11-15

    C-type lectins are a family of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins playing crucial roles in innate immunity of vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, the cDNA of a C-type lectin with one carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of 127 amino acids was cloned from bay scallop Argopecten irradians (designated AiCTL-3) by rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) techniques based on expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. The mRNA transcripts of AiCTL-3 could be detected in all the tested tissues including hepatopancreas, gonad, adductor muscle, heart, hemocytes, mantle and gill, with the highest expression level in hepatopancreas. After the challenges with Vibrio anguillarum and Micrococcus luteus, the mRNA expression level of AiCTL-3 was obviously up-regulated and reached the maximum level at 9h (11.87fold, P<0.01, and 20.02-fold, P<0.05, respectively). The recombinant AiCTL-3 (designated as rAiCTL-3) could bind LPS, PGN, and glucan in vitro, but could not bind mannan. And it also bound Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus as well as Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and V. anguillarum. With a Ca(2+) binding site 2 EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, rAiCTL-3 could bind both mannose and galactose which was quite different from those in vertebrate. Meanwhile, it could significantly enhance the phagocytosis of scallop hemocytes in vitro. The results clearly suggested that AiCTL-3 could serve not only as a PRR participated in the immune response against various PAMPs and bacteria in non-self recognition via mannose/galactose binding specificity but an opsonin playing an important part in clearance of invaders.

  15. Mannose-binding dietary lectins induce adipogenic differentiation of the marrow-derived mesenchymal cells via an active insulin-like signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Manmohan; Hinge, Ashwini; Limaye, Lalita S; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Surolia, Avadhesha; Kale, Vaijayanti P

    2011-04-01

    We have recently demonstrated that the mannose-binding lectins, namely banana lectin (BL) and garlic lectin (GL), interacted with the insulin receptors on M210B4 cells--an established mesenchymal cell line of murine marrow origin--and initiate mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in them. In this study, we show that this lectin-mediated active ERK signaling culminates into an adipogenic differentiation of these cells. Gene expression studies indicate that the effect takes place at the transcriptional level. Experiments carried out with pharmacological inhibitors show that MEK-dependent ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent AKT pathways are positive regulators of the lectin- and insulin-mediated adipogenic differentiation, while stress-activated kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway acts as a negative one. Since both lectins could efficiently substitute for insulin in the standard adipogenic induction medium, they may perhaps serve as molecular tools to study the mechanistic aspects of the adipogenic process that are independent of cell proliferation. Our study clearly demonstrates the ability of BL and GL to activate insulin-like signaling in the mesenchymal cells in vitro leading to their adipocytic differentiation. The dietary origin of these lectins underscores an urgent need to examine their in vivo effects on tissue homeostasis.

  16. Entry Inhibition of Influenza Viruses with High Mannose Binding Lectin ESA-2 from the Red Alga Eucheuma serra through the Recognition of Viral Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Nishizono, Akira; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2015-05-29

    Lectin sensitivity of the recent pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1-2009) was screened for 12 lectins with various carbohydrate specificity by a neutral red dye uptake assay with MDCK cells. Among them, a high mannose (HM)-binding anti-HIV lectin, ESA-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra, showed the highest inhibition against infection with an EC50 of 12.4 nM. Moreover, ESA-2 exhibited a wide range of antiviral spectrum against various influenza strains with EC50s of pico molar to low nanomolar levels. Besides ESA-2, HM-binding plant lectin ConA, fucose-binding lectins such as fungal AOL from Aspergillus oryzae and AAL from Aleuria aurantia were active against H1N1-2009, but the potency of inhibition was of less magnitude compared with ESA-2. Direct interaction between ESA-2 and a viral envelope glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), was demonstrated by ELISA assay. This interaction was effectively suppressed by glycoproteins bearing HM-glycans, indicating that ESA-2 binds to the HA of influenza virus through HM-glycans. Upon treatment with ESA-2, no viral antigens were detected in the host cells, indicating that ESA-2 inhibited the initial steps of virus entry into the cells. ESA-2 would thus be useful as a novel microbicide to prevent penetration of viruses such as HIV and influenza viruses to the host cells.

  17. Entry Inhibition of Influenza Viruses with High Mannose Binding Lectin ESA-2 from the Red Alga Eucheuma serra through the Recognition of Viral Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Kubo, Takanori; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Nishizono, Akira; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    Lectin sensitivity of the recent pandemic influenza A virus (H1N1-2009) was screened for 12 lectins with various carbohydrate specificity by a neutral red dye uptake assay with MDCK cells. Among them, a high mannose (HM)-binding anti-HIV lectin, ESA-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra, showed the highest inhibition against infection with an EC50 of 12.4 nM. Moreover, ESA-2 exhibited a wide range of antiviral spectrum against various influenza strains with EC50s of pico molar to low nanomolar levels. Besides ESA-2, HM-binding plant lectin ConA, fucose-binding lectins such as fungal AOL from Aspergillus oryzae and AAL from Aleuria aurantia were active against H1N1-2009, but the potency of inhibition was of less magnitude compared with ESA-2. Direct interaction between ESA-2 and a viral envelope glycoprotein, hemagglutinin (HA), was demonstrated by ELISA assay. This interaction was effectively suppressed by glycoproteins bearing HM-glycans, indicating that ESA-2 binds to the HA of influenza virus through HM-glycans. Upon treatment with ESA-2, no viral antigens were detected in the host cells, indicating that ESA-2 inhibited the initial steps of virus entry into the cells. ESA-2 would thus be useful as a novel microbicide to prevent penetration of viruses such as HIV and influenza viruses to the host cells. PMID:26035023

  18. Influence of mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphisms on the invasiveness of cytomegalovirus disease after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cervera, C; Lozano, F; Linares, L; Antón, A; Balderramo, D; Suárez, B; Pascal, M; Sanclemente, G; Cofán, F; Ricart, M J; Navasa, M; Roig, E; Marcos, M A; Pumarola, T; Moreno, A

    2009-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system that binds the surface of pathogens, activating the complement pathway and acting as opsonin. Certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 are associated with a decrease in the circulating levels of MBL. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of MBL2 polymorphisms in the invasiveness of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease after solid organ transplantation. We include those solid organ transplant recipients who developed CMV disease posttransplant from 2000 to 2006. MBL2 genotyping was performed by sequencing of exon 1 (wild-type allele A and variants B, C, and D) and promoter regions (alleles H and L, X and Y, and P and Q). In the case of liver transplantation, donor MBL2 genotypes were analyzed. Associations were calculated by the chi-square test and binary logistic regression. We included 45 transplant recipients with CMV disease (22 renal, 7 simultaneous kidney-pancreas, 11 liver, and 5 heart), of whom 10 (22%) had invasive CMV disease. No differences were found regarding HH (versus HL or LL), YY and YX (versus XX) and QQ (versus QP and PP) haplotypes with invasive CMV disease (P = 1.000 for all 3 comparisons). Patients with an exon 1 wild-type (AA) haplotype had 36% invasive CMV disease in comparison with 9% of patients with A/O or O/O haplotypes (P = .035). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that patients with exon 1 AA haplotype had an independent risk of developing invasive CMV disease (odds ratio, 6.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-32.5). Our results suggest that exon 1 wild-type genotypes are associated with a higher risk of invasive CMV disease after solid organ transplantation.

  19. Childhood Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Functional Mannose Binding Lectin Polymorphisms Are Associated with Increased Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Olivo-Marston, Susan E.; Yang, Ping; Mechanic, Leah E.; Bowman, Elise D.; Pine, Sharon R.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Caporaso, Neil; Shields, Peter G.; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Yanhong; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Cunningham, Julie; Jen, Jin; Harris, Curtis C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to secondhand smoke during adulthood has detrimental health effects, including increased lung cancer risk. Compared with adults, children may be more susceptible to secondhand smoke. This susceptibility may be exacerbated by alterations in inherited genetic variants of innate immunity genes. We hypothesized a positive association between childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk that would be modified by genetic polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2) gene resulting in well-known functional changes in innate immunity. Methods Childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk was assessed among men and women in the ongoing National Cancer Institute-Maryland Lung Cancer (NCI-MD) study, which included 624 cases and 348 controls. Secondhand smoke history was collected via in-person interviews. DNA was used for genotyping the MBL2 gene. To replicate, we used an independent case-control study from Mayo Clinic consisting of 461 never smokers, made up of 172 cases and 289 controls. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In the NCI-MD study, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers [odds ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-4.90]. This was confirmed in the Mayo study (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.15). A functional MBL2 haplotype associated with high circulating levels of MBL and increased MBL2 activity was associated with increased lung cancer risk among those exposed to childhood secondhand smoke in both the NCI-MD and Mayo studies (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.13-5.60, and OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.18-3.85, respectively). Conclusions Secondhand smoke exposure during childhood is associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers, particularly among those possessing a haplotype corresponding to a known overactive complement pathway of the innate immune system. PMID:19959685

  20. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) substitution: recovery of opsonic function in vivo lags behind MBL serum levels.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Nannette; Frakking, Florine N J; van de Wetering, Marianne D; van Houdt, Michel; Hart, Margreet; Budde, Ilona Kleine; Strengers, Paul F W; Laursen, Inga; Houen, Gunnar; Roos, Dirk; Jensenius, Jens C; Caron, Huib N; Dolman, Koert M; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2009-09-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency is often associated with an increased risk of infection or worse prognosis in immunocompromised patients. MBL substitution in these patients might diminish these risks. We therefore performed an open, uncontrolled safety and pharmacokinetic MBL-substitution study in 12 pediatric oncology patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. Twice weekly MBL infusions with plasma-derived MBL yielded MBL trough levels >1.0 microg/ml. We tested whether MBL substitution in vivo increased MBL-dependent complement activation and opsonophagocytosis of zymosan in vitro. Upon MBL substitution, opsonophagocytosis by control neutrophils increased significantly (p < 0.001) but remained suboptimal, although repeated MBL infusions resulted in improvement over time. The MBL-dependent MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-mediated complement C3 and C4 activation also showed a suboptimal increase. To explain these results, complement activation was studied in detail. We found that in the presence of normal MASP-2 blood levels, MASP-2 activity (p < 0.0001) was reduced as well as the alternative pathway of complement activation (p < 0.05). This MBL-substitution study demonstrates that plasma-derived MBL infusions increase MBL/MASP-mediated C3 and C4 activation and opsonophagocytosis, but that higher circulating levels of plasma-derived MBL are required to achieve MBL-mediated complement activation comparable to healthy controls. Other patient cohorts should be considered to demonstrate clinical efficacy in phase II/III MBL-substitution studies, because we found a suboptimal recovery of (in vitro) biological activity upon MBL substitution in our neutropenic pediatric oncology cohort.

  1. Association between mannose-binding lectin levels and gene polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozçaka, Ozgün; Biçakci, Nurgün; Nalbantsoy, Ayşe; Köse, Timur; Berdeli, Afig

    2010-03-01

    The aims of the present study were: (1) to investigate mannose-binding lectin (MBL) gene exon-1 polymorphisms in Turkish subjects with chronic periodontitis (CP), (2) to assess the association between these polymorphisms and plasma MBL levels, (3) to determine the effects of MBL genotypes on the outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy. A total of 172 subjects were included in the present study. Genomic DNA was obtained from the peripheral blood of 83 CP patients and 89 periodontally healthy subjects. The MBL levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The MBL gene exon-1 polymorphisms were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Subjects homozygous for the frequent allele A had higher MBL plasma levels compared with rare allele B carriers. This difference in MBL plasma levels was statistically significant both in CP patients and healthy subjects. The distribution of MBL gene codon 54 genotypes and allele frequencies did not differ significantly between study groups. All study subjects were the MBL gene codon 52 and 57 frequent allele A carriers. Codon 54 B allele carriers had similar clinical periodontal parameters compared with AA genotypes after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The present study failed to find any significant association between the MBL gene codon 54 polymorphisms and severe CP in a Turkish population. MBL gene rare allele carriers had lower MBL plasma levels in both study groups. It seems that MBL gene codon 54 B allele carriage may not influence the outcome of periodontal therapy. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke and functional mannose binding lectin polymorphisms are associated with increased lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Olivo-Marston, Susan E; Yang, Ping; Mechanic, Leah E; Bowman, Elise D; Pine, Sharon R; Loffredo, Christopher A; Alberg, Anthony J; Caporaso, Neil; Shields, Peter G; Chanock, Stephen; Wu, Yanhong; Jiang, Ruoxiang; Cunningham, Julie; Jen, Jin; Harris, Curtis C

    2009-12-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke during adulthood has detrimental health effects, including increased lung cancer risk. Compared with adults, children may be more susceptible to secondhand smoke. This susceptibility may be exacerbated by alterations in inherited genetic variants of innate immunity genes. We hypothesized a positive association between childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk that would be modified by genetic polymorphisms in the mannose binding lectin-2 (MBL2) gene resulting in well-known functional changes in innate immunity. Childhood secondhand smoke exposure and lung cancer risk was assessed among men and women in the ongoing National Cancer Institute-Maryland Lung Cancer (NCI-MD) study, which included 624 cases and 348 controls. Secondhand smoke history was collected via in-person interviews. DNA was used for genotyping the MBL2 gene. To replicate, we used an independent case-control study from Mayo Clinic consisting of 461 never smokers, made up of 172 cases and 289 controls. All statistical tests were two-sided. In the NCI-MD study, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers [odds ratio (OR), 2.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.04-4.90]. This was confirmed in the Mayo study (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.15). A functional MBL2 haplotype associated with high circulating levels of MBL and increased MBL2 activity was associated with increased lung cancer risk among those exposed to childhood secondhand smoke in both the NCI-MD and Mayo studies (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.13-5.60, and OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.18-3.85, respectively). Secondhand smoke exposure during childhood is associated with increased lung cancer risk among never smokers, particularly among those possessing a haplotype corresponding to a known overactive complement pathway of the innate immune system.

  3. Mannose-binding lectin and l-ficolin polymorphisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia caused by intracellular pathogens.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Gijs; Meijvis, Sabine; Endeman, Henrik; Vlaminckx, Bart; Meek, Bob; de Jong, Ben; Rijkers, Ger; Bos, Willem Jan

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading infectious disease requiring hospitalization in the western world. Genetic variability affecting the host response to infection may play a role in susceptibility and outcome in patients with CAP. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and l-ficolin (l-FCN) are two important activators of the complement system and they can enhance phagocytosis by opsonization. In a prospective cohort of 505 Dutch patients with CAP and 227 control participants we studied whether polymorphisms in the MBL (MBL2) and FCN (FCN2) genes influenced susceptibility and outcome. No difference in frequency of these genotypes was found between patients with CAP in general and controls. However, the +6424G>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in FCN2 was more common in patients with a Coxiella burnetii pneumonia (P = 0·014). Moreover, the haplotypes coding for the highest MBL serum levels (YA/YA and YA/XA) predisposed to atypical pneumonia (C. burnetii, Legionella or Chlamydia species or Mycoplasma pneumoniae) compared with controls (P = 0·016). Furthermore, patients with these haplotypes were more often bacteraemic (P = 0·019). It can therefore be concluded that MBL2 and FCN2 polymorphisms are not major risk factors for CAP in general, but that the +6424G>T SNP in the FCN2 gene predisposes to C. burnetii pneumonia. In addition, patients with genotypes corresponding with high serum MBL levels are at risk for atypical pneumonia, possibly caused by enhanced phagocytosis, thereby promoting cell entry of these intracellular bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A Secreted Protein with Plant-Specific Cysteine-Rich Motif Functions as a Mannose-Binding Lectin That Exhibits Antifungal Activity1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Suwa, You-ichi; Sawano, Yoriko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a variety of mechanisms for defending against plant pathogens and tolerating environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Ginkbilobin2 (Gnk2) is a seed storage protein in gymnosperm that possesses antifungal activity and a plant-specific cysteine-rich motif (domain of unknown function26 [DUF26]). The Gnk2-homologous sequence is also observed in an extracellular region of cysteine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that function in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the lectin-like molecular function of Gnk2 and the structural basis of its monosaccharide recognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments showed that mannan was the only yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell wall polysaccharide that interacted with Gnk2. Gnk2 also interacted with mannose, a building block of mannan, with a specificity that was similar to those of mannose-binding legume lectins, by strictly recognizing the configuration of the hydroxy group at the C4 position of the monosaccharide. The crystal structure of Gnk2 in complex with mannose revealed that three residues (asparagine-11, arginine-93, and glutamate-104) recognized mannose by hydrogen bonds, which defined the carbohydrate-binding specificity. These interactions were directly related to the ability of Gnk2 to inhibit the growth of fungi, including the plant pathogenic Fusarium spp., which were disrupted by mutation of arginine-93 or the presence of yeast mannan in the assay system. In addition, Gnk2 did not inhibit the growth of a yeast mutant strain lacking the α1,2-linked mannose moiety. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of the DUF26 protein family. PMID:25139159

  5. Conformations, dynamics and interactions of di-, tri- and pentamannoside with mannose binding lectin: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Parichita; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2012-02-15

    The binding of serum mannose-binding protein A (MBP-A) to high mannose N-linked glycoproteins, present on the surface of microorganism, activates the complement system. It is very important to explore the overall conformations of these ligands in the binding site of the MBP-A, which is very much dependent on the conformation of the manno-di-, tri- and the penta-saccharides that represent the component structures of these high-mannose type oligosaccharides. Herein, we report the possible conformations of α-(1→6)-linked dimannoside, benzyl-substituted trimannoside and core pentamannoside of the N-linked glycan in the binding site of MBP-A, with the help of molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that for all three ligands in addition to the non-reducing terminal mannose moiety the reducing moieties also interact with protein. Binding free energy calculations also indicate that the benzyl-substituted trisaccharide has higher affinity in comparison to the methyl substituted one. We have also found some conformers of the pentasaccharide, which have higher binding affinity than the monosaccharide.

  6. The pepper mannose-binding lectin gene CaMBL1 is required to regulate cell death and defense responses to microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Sun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Plant mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are crucial for plant defense signaling during pathogen attack by recognizing specific carbohydrates on pathogen surfaces. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized a novel pepper (Capsicum annuum) MBL gene, CaMBL1, from pepper leaves infected with Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria (Xcv). The CaMBL1 gene contains a predicted Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin domain responsible for the recognition of high-mannose N-glycans but lacks a middle S-locus glycoprotein domain and a carboxyl-terminal PAN-Apple domain. The CaMBL1 protein exhibits binding specificity for mannose and is mainly localized to the plasma membrane. Immunoblotting using a CaMBL1-specific antibody revealed that CaMBL1 is strongly expressed and accumulates in pepper leaves during avirulent Xcv infection. The transient expression of CaMBL1 induces the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), the activation of defense-related genes, and the cell death phenotype in pepper. The G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin domain of CaMBL1 is responsible for cell death induction. CaMBL1-silenced pepper plants are more susceptible to virulent or avirulent Xcv infection compared with unsilenced control plants, a phenotype that is accompanied by lowered reactive oxygen species accumulation, reduced expression of downstream SA target genes, and a concomitant decrease in SA accumulation. In contrast, CaMBL1 overexpression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) confers enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Alternaria brassicicola infection. Together, these data suggest that CaMBL1 plays a key role in the regulation of plant cell death and defense responses through the induction of downstream defense-related genes and SA accumulation after the recognition of microbial pathogens.

  7. Effects of mannose-binding lectin on pulmonary gene expression and innate immune inflammatory response to ozone

    PubMed Central

    Ciencewicki, Jonathan M.; Verhein, Kirsten C.; Gerrish, Kevin; McCaw, Zachary R.; Li, Jianying; Bushel, Pierre R.

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is a common, potent oxidant pollutant in industrialized nations. Ozone exposure causes airway hyperreactivity, lung hyperpermeability, inflammation, and cell damage in humans and laboratory animals, and exposure to ozone has been associated with exacerbation of asthma, altered lung function, and mortality. The mechanisms of ozone-induced lung injury and differential susceptibility are not fully understood. Ozone-induced lung inflammation is mediated, in part, by the innate immune system. We hypothesized that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an innate immunity serum protein, contributes to the proinflammatory events caused by ozone-mediated activation of the innate immune system. Wild-type (Mbl+/+) and MBL-deficient (Mbl−/−) mice were exposed to ozone (0.3 ppm) for up to 72 h, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was examined for inflammatory markers. Mean numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils and levels of the neutrophil attractants C-X-C motif chemokines 2 [Cxcl2 (major intrinsic protein 2)] and 5 [Cxcl5 (limb expression, LIX)] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly lower in Mbl−/− than Mbl+/+ mice exposed to ozone. Using genome-wide mRNA microarray analyses, we identified significant differences in transcript response profiles and networks at baseline [e.g., nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated oxidative stress response] and after exposure (e.g., humoral immune response) between Mbl+/+ and Mbl−/− mice. The microarray data were further analyzed to discover several informative differential response patterns and subsequent gene sets, including the antimicrobial response and the inflammatory response. We also used the lists of gene transcripts to search the LINCS L1000CDS2 data sets to identify agents that are predicted to perturb ozone-induced changes in gene transcripts and inflammation. These novel findings demonstrate that targeted deletion of Mbl caused differential levels of inflammation-related gene sets at

  8. Effects of mannose-binding lectin on pulmonary gene expression and innate immune inflammatory response to ozone.

    PubMed

    Ciencewicki, Jonathan M; Verhein, Kirsten C; Gerrish, Kevin; McCaw, Zachary R; Li, Jianying; Bushel, Pierre R; Kleeberger, Steven R

    2016-08-01

    Ozone is a common, potent oxidant pollutant in industrialized nations. Ozone exposure causes airway hyperreactivity, lung hyperpermeability, inflammation, and cell damage in humans and laboratory animals, and exposure to ozone has been associated with exacerbation of asthma, altered lung function, and mortality. The mechanisms of ozone-induced lung injury and differential susceptibility are not fully understood. Ozone-induced lung inflammation is mediated, in part, by the innate immune system. We hypothesized that mannose-binding lectin (MBL), an innate immunity serum protein, contributes to the proinflammatory events caused by ozone-mediated activation of the innate immune system. Wild-type (Mbl(+/+)) and MBL-deficient (Mbl(-/-)) mice were exposed to ozone (0.3 ppm) for up to 72 h, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was examined for inflammatory markers. Mean numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils and levels of the neutrophil attractants C-X-C motif chemokines 2 [Cxcl2 (major intrinsic protein 2)] and 5 [Cxcl5 (limb expression, LIX)] in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly lower in Mbl(-/-) than Mbl(+/+) mice exposed to ozone. Using genome-wide mRNA microarray analyses, we identified significant differences in transcript response profiles and networks at baseline [e.g., nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2)-mediated oxidative stress response] and after exposure (e.g., humoral immune response) between Mbl(+/+) and Mbl(-/-) mice. The microarray data were further analyzed to discover several informative differential response patterns and subsequent gene sets, including the antimicrobial response and the inflammatory response. We also used the lists of gene transcripts to search the LINCS L1000CDS(2) data sets to identify agents that are predicted to perturb ozone-induced changes in gene transcripts and inflammation. These novel findings demonstrate that targeted deletion of Mbl caused differential levels of inflammation-related gene sets at

  9. The Lipopolysaccharide Structures of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae Determine the Attachment of Human Mannose-Binding Lectin to Intact Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Devyatyarova-Johnson, Marina; Rees, Ian H.; Robertson, Brian D.; Turner, Malcolm W.; Klein, Nigel J.; Jack, Dominic L.

    2000-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of the innate immune system. It binds to the arrays of sugars commonly presented by microorganisms and activates the complement system independently of antibody. Despite detailed knowledge of the stereochemical basis of MBL binding, relatively little is known about how bacterial surface structures influence binding of the lectin. Using flow cytometry, we have measured the binding of MBL to a range of mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Neisseria gonorrhoeae which differ in the structure of expressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For both organisms, the possession of core LPS structures led to avid binding of MBL, which was abrogated by the addition of O antigen (Salmonella serovar Typhimurium) or sialic acid (N. gonorrhoeae). Truncation of the LPS within the core led to lower levels of MBL binding. It was not possible to predict the magnitude of MBL binding from the identity of the LPS terminal sugar alone, indicating that the three-dimensional disposition of LPS molecules is probably also of importance in determining MBL attachment. These results further support the hypothesis that LPS structure is a major determinant of MBL binding. PMID:10858200

  10. Genetically-Defined Deficiency of Mannose-Binding Lectin Is Associated with Protection after Experimental Stroke in Mice and Outcome in Human Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Alvaro; Planas, Anna M.; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Jensenius, Jens C.; Torres, Ferran; Lozano, Francisco; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Background The complement system is a major effector of innate immunity that has been involved in stroke brain damage. Complement activation occurs through the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The latter is initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Here we investigated whether the lectin pathway contributes to stroke outcome in mice and humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in MBL-null mice induced smaller infarctions, better functional outcome, and diminished C3 deposition and neutrophil infiltration than in wild-type mice. Accordingly, reconstitution of MBL-null mice with recombinant human MBL (rhMBL) enhanced brain damage. In order to investigate the clinical relevance of these experimental observations, a study of MBL2 and MASP-2 gene polymorphism rendering the lectin pathway dysfunctional was performed in 135 stroke patients. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender and initial stroke severity, unfavourable outcome at 3 months was associated with MBL-sufficient genotype (OR 10.85, p = 0.008) and circulating MBL levels (OR 1.29, p = 0.04). Individuals carrying MBL-low genotypes (17.8%) had lower C3, C4, and CRP levels, and the proinflammatory cytokine profile was attenuated versus MBL-sufficient genotypes. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, genetically defined MBL-deficiency is associated with a better outcome after acute stroke in mice and humans. PMID:20140243

  11. Energetics of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-α-d-mannose binding to the Parkia platycephala seed lectin and its use for MAD phasing

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Gómez, Javier; Hoos, Sylviane; Nagano, Celso S.; Cavada, Benildo S.; England, Patrick; Calvete, Juan J.

    2005-03-01

    The first crystal structure of a Mimosoideae lectin, Parkia platycephala has been solved by MAD phasing using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-α-d-mannose as an anomalous X-ray scatterer. This strategy may be useful for structure elucidation of novel lectins or when molecular replacement methods fail.

  12. Comparison of immunomodulatory properties of mannose-binding lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis and Cratylia argentea in a mice model of Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ayrles F B; Matos, Mayara P V; Ralph, Maria T; Silva, Daiane L; de Alencar, Nylane M; Ramos, Márcio V; Lima-Filho, José V

    2016-02-01

    The immunomodulatory properties of mannose-binding lectins ConBr (Canavalia brasiliensis) and CFL (Cratylia argentea) were investigated comparatively in a model of Salmonella infection. The lectins were intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered to mice daily for three days before the bacterial challenge with Salmonella enterica Ser. Typhimurium (0.2 mL i.p.; 10(7) CFU/mL). In vivo assays have shown that both lectins induced a significant leukocyte infiltration into the peritoneal cavity of uninfected mice, which was higher in the CFL group 3 days post-infection. Total and differential cell counts in the bloodstreams have shown uninfected animals pretreated with ConBr and CFL exhibited accentuated lymphopenia. Conversely, there was an increasing population of lymphocytes following 3 days post-infection in mice pretreated with both lectins. In addition, the bacterial burden was significantly reduced into the peritoneal cavity, bloodstreams, spleen and the liver in these mice. The lectins did not induce the release of pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines into the peritoneal fluid of uninfected animals. However, following infection, the release of TNF-α and IL-10 in the peritoneal fluid were down-regulated in mice pretreated with both lectins whereas IL-1 was only reduced in mice pretreated with ConBr. Uninfected animals pretreated with CFL exhibited high nitric oxide (NO) content in the peritoneal fluid, which was decreased after infection in comparison to ConBr group. The lectins did not alter the serum levels of NO in uninfected mice but treatments with ConBr significantly reduced the NO content in infected animals in comparison to CFL group 24h after the bacterial challenge. Survival experiments have shown survival rates ranging from 70% to 100% in mice that received CFL or ConBr. On the other hand, untreated mice (PBS group) died 1-6 days after infection. We conclude that ConBr and CFL are prospective phytotherapeutics capable of modulate the cascade of pro

  13. Mannose-Binding Lectin: Biologic Characteristics and Role in the Susceptibility to Infections and Ischemia-Reperfusion Related Injury in Critically Ill Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Moriondo, Maria; Bertaina, Chiara; Mondì, Vito; Inglese, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a member of the collectin family, belonging to the innate immunity system. Genetic, biologic, and clinical properties of MBL have been widely investigated throughout the last decades, although some interesting aspects of its potential clinical relevance are still poorly understood. Low circulating concentrations of MBL have been associated with increased risk of infection and poor neurologic outcome in neonates. On the other hand, an excessive and uncontrolled inflammatory response by the neonatal intestine after the exposure to luminal bacteria, leading to an increased production of MBL, may be involved in the onset of necrotizing enterocolitis. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge about genetic and biologic characteristics of MBL and its role in the susceptibility to infections and to ischemia-reperfusion related tissue injuries to better explore its clinical relevance during the perinatal period and the possible future therapeutic applications. PMID:28246614

  14. Murine Hyperglycemic Vasculopathy and Cardiomyopathy: Whole-Genome Gene Expression Analysis Predicts Cellular Targets and Regulatory Networks Influenced by Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Chenhui; La Bonte, Laura R.; Pavlov, Vasile I.; Stahl, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL)-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole-genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure, and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies. PMID:22375142

  15. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and complementary DNA (cDNA) cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per liter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48 - 1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  16. High-Mannose Specific Lectin and Its Recombinants from a Carrageenophyta Kappaphycus alvarezii Represent a Potent Anti-HIV Activity Through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Envelope Glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Makoto; Shibata, Hiromi; Imamura, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takemasa; Hori, Kanji

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that a high-mannose binding lectin KAA-2 from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii, which is an economically important species and widely cultivated as a source of carrageenans, had a potent anti-influenza virus activity. In this study, the full-length sequences of two KAA isoforms, KAA-1 and KAA-2, were elucidated by a combination of peptide mapping and cDNA cloning. They consisted of four internal tandem-repeated domains, which are conserved in high-mannose specific lectins from lower organisms, including a cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii and a red alga Eucheuma serra. Using an Escherichia coli expression system, an active recombinant form of KAA-1 (His-tagged rKAA-1) was successfully generated in the yield of 115 mg per a litter of culture. In a detailed oligosaccharide binding analysis by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method with 27 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, His-tagged rKAA-1 and rKAA-1 specifically bound to high-mannose N-glycans with an exposed α1-3 mannose in the D2 arm as the native lectin did. Predicted from oligosaccharide-binding specificity, a surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the recombinants exhibit strong interaction with gp120, a heavily glycosylated envelope glycoprotein of HIV with high association constants (1.48-1.61 × 10(9) M(-1)). Native KAAs and the recombinants inhibited the HIV-1 entry at IC50s of low nanomolar levels (7.3-12.9 nM). Thus, the recombinant proteins would be useful as antiviral reagents targeting the viral surface glycoproteins with high-mannose N-glycans, and the cultivated alga K. alvarezii could also be a good source of not only carrageenans but also this functional lectin(s).

  17. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  18. High mannose N-glycan binding lectin from Remusatia vivipara (RVL) limits cell growth, motility and invasiveness of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sindhura, B R; Hegde, Prajna; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Swamy, Bale M

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer known for its high metastatic potential is responsible for large mortality rate amongst women; hence it is imperative to search for effective anti-metastatic molecules despite anticancer drugs. The current study describes the potential of Remusatia vivipara lectin (RVL), inducing apoptosis in breast cancer cells there by limiting motility and invasiveness. RVL binds to the cell surface glycans of MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 cells, exhibiting strong glycan mediated cytotoxic effect, but show marginal effect on non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells. RVL elicits increased cellular stress, apoptotic vacuoles and nuclear disintegration in both MDA-MB-468 and MCF-7 cells accompanied by depletion of G0/G1, S and G2/M phases. Lectin interaction induced production of reactive oxygen species through altering mitochondrial membrane potential progressing to apoptosis. Further, RVL strongly elicited reproductive cell death in MDA-MB-468 cells and showed strong inhibitory effect on neovascularization demonstrated in chorioallantoic membrane assay. Treatment of MDA-MB-468 cells with RVL, suppress the motility and invasive property as shown by scratch wound heal and Boyden chamber transwell assays respectively. These results provide an insight into significance of interaction of RVL with specific cell surface high mannose N-glycans resulting in curtailing the metastatic ability of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Mannose-binding lectin and its associated proteases (MASPs) mediate coagulation and its deficiency is a risk factor in developing complications from infection, including disseminated intravascular coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazue; Chang, Wei-Chuan; Takahashi, Minoru; Pavlov, Vasile; Ishida, Yumi; La Bonte, Laura; Shi, Lei; Fujita, Teizo; Stahl, Gregory L.; Van Cott, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The first line of host defense is the innate immune system that includes coagulation factors and pattern recognition molecules, one of which is mannose-binding lectin (MBL). Previous studies have demonstrated that MBL deficiency increases susceptibility to infection. Several mechanisms are associated with increased susceptibility to infection, including reduced opsonophagocytic killing and reduced lectin complement pathway activation. In this study, we demonstrate that MBL and MBL-associated serine protease (MASP)-1/3 together mediate coagulation factor-like activities, including thrombin-like activity. MBL and/or MASP-1/3 deficient hosts demonstrate in vivo evidence that MBL and MASP-1/3 are involved with hemostasis following injury. Staphylococcus aureus infected MBL null mice developed disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), which was associated with elevated blood IL-6 levels (but not TNF-α and multi-organ inflammatory responses). Infected MBL null mice also develop liver injury. These findings suggest that MBL deficiency may manifest into DIC and organ failure during infectious diseases. PMID:20399528

  20. A rice jacalin-related mannose-binding lectin gene, OsJRL, enhances Escherichia coli viability under high salinity stress and improves salinity tolerance of rice.

    PubMed

    He, X; Li, L; Xu, H; Xi, J; Cao, X; Xu, H; Rong, S; Dong, Y; Wang, C; Chen, R; Xu, J; Gao, X; Xu, Z

    2017-03-01

    Salinity, which is one of the most common abiotic stresses, may severely affect plant productivity and quality. Although plant lectins are thought to play important roles in plant defense signaling during pathogen attack, little is known about the contribution of plant lectins to stress resistance. We cloned and functionally characterized a rice jacalin-related mannose-binding lectin gene, OsJRL, from rice 'Nipponbare'. We analyzed the expression patterns of OsJRL under various stress conditions in rice. Furthermore, we overexpressed OsJRL in Escherichia coli and rice. The cDNA of OsJRL contained a 438 bp open reading frame, which encodes a polypeptide of 145 amino acids. OsJRL was localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Real time PCR analyses revealed that OsJRL expression showed tissue specificity in rice and was upregulated under diverse stresses, namely salt, drought, cold, heat and abscisic acid treatments. Overexpression of OsJRL in E. coli enhanced cell viability and dramatically improved tolerance of high salinity. Overexpression of OsJRL in rice also enhanced salinity tolerance and increased the expression levels of a number of stress-related genes, including three LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins) genes (OsLEA19a, OsLEA23 and OsLEA24), three Na(+) transporter genes (OsHKT1;3, OsHKT1;4 and OsHKT1;5) and two DREB genes (OsDREB1A and OsDREB2B). Based on these results, we suggest that OsJRL plays an important role in cell protection and stress signal transduction.

  1. Limited effect of recombinant human mannose-binding lectin on the infection of novel influenza A (H7N9) virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinlei; Cao, Yang; Qin, Kun; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Donghong; Li, Zi; Xin, Li; Shu, Yuelong; Zhou, Jianfang

    2015-02-27

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern-recognition molecule in serum, recognizes specific hexose sugars rich in mannose and N-acetylglucosamine on bacterium, yeasts, viruses as well as apoptotic cells. It has been well-identified that MBL has antiviral effects via binding to seasonal influenza H1 and H3 subtype viruses. Influenza A (H7N9) virus, a novel reassortant virus to human population, possesses the surface hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes from duck and wild-bird influenza viruses and internal genes from poultry H9N2 viruses. As of Dec 7th, 2014, a total of 467 human infections and 183 fatal cases have been identified. Here, recombinant human (rh) MBL was tested for its binding and effects on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and NA activity inhibition (NAI) of avian H7N9, H9N2 and human H3N2 viruses. We discovered that rhMBL exhibited a strong binding to H7N9 virus as human H3N2 did at high virus titers. However, it performed a significantly weaker HI activity effect on H7N9 comparing to those of H3N2 and H9N2, even at a much higher concentration (3.67 ± 0.33 vs. 0.026 ± 0.001 and 0.083 ± 0.02 μg/mL, respectively). Similarly, minor NAI effect of rhMBL, even at up to 10 μg/mL, was found on H7N9 virus while it displayed significant effects on both H3N2 and H9N2 at a lowest concentration of 0.0807 ± 0.009 and 0.0625 μg/mL, respectively. The HI and NAI effects of rhMBL were calcium-dependent and mediated by lectin domain. Our findings suggest that MBL, the host innate molecule, has differential interference effects with human and avian influenza virus and limited antiviral effect against H7N9 virus.

  2. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, J. C.; De Oliveira, P. S.; Garratt, R.; Beltramini, L.; Resing, K.; Roque-Barreira, M. C.; Greene, L. J.

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature. PMID:10210179

  3. Genetic and Phenotypic Screening of Mannose-Binding Lectin in Relation to Risk of Recurrent Vulvovaginal Infections in Women of North India: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Namarta; Singh, Jatinder; Sharma, Sujata; Arora, Hardesh; Kaur, Manpreet

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent Vulvovaginal Infections (RVVI) is common problem associated with women of reproductive age. The function and deleterious effect of Mannose Binding Lectin 2 (MBL2) common polymorphisms are reported to be associated with various diseases. However, the role of MBL2 promoter gene polymorphisms and their combined effect with structural variant along with Serum Mannose Binding Lectin (sMBL) levels in RVVI has not been investigated. The study included 258 RVVI cases and 203 age matched healthy controls. These were investigated for the distribution of MBL2 codon 54 and promoter polymorphisms by Amplification Refractory Mutation System-Polymerase Chain Reaction (ARMS-PCR). sMBL levels were quantified by Enzyme Linked Immnosorbent Assay (ELISA). The frequency of X allele and its genotypes was significantly high in cases than controls conferring risk toward RVVI and its types (p < 0.05). The HXPA (OR; 2.0), LXQB (OR; 1.43) haplotypes were associated with susceptibility to RVVI cases while haplotype LYQB significantly protected against RVVI (OR; 0.58), Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) (OR; 0.27) and Mixed Infections (MI) cases (OR; 0.62) with high frequency observed in controls (p < 0.05). Mean sMBL levels were significantly low in RVVI, BV, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis (VVC), and MI cases compared to controls (p < 0.05). VVC patient showed significantly low sMBL levels than RVVI and MI cases (p < 0.05). The mean sMBL levels segregated based on MBL2 genotypes and haplotypes showed significant difference in different cases groups with controls. The findings of the present study suggested that MBL2 Y/X polymorphism and low sMBL levels were associated with susceptibility to RVVI either it is BV, VVC, or MI. Thus MBL deficiency in women with RVVI may contribute to decreased efficiency in clearing of pathogens. Hence, specific measures like administration of purified or recombinant MBL might decrease the incidence of vaginal infections recurrences and more-effective treatment. PMID

  4. Artocarpin is a polyspecific jacalin-related lectin with a monosaccharide preference for mannose.

    PubMed

    Barre, Annick; Peumans, Willy J; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Culerrier, Raphaël; Van Damme, Els J M; Rougé, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    A reinvestigation of the carbohydrate-binding properties revealed that artocarpin, a previously described mannose-specific lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds, behaves as a polyspecific lectin. Surface plasmon resonance hapten inhibition experiments demonstrated that artocarpin readily interacted with a wide range of monosaccharides covering galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine, mannose, glucose, sialic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Molecular docking confirmed this unexpected ability of artocarpin to interact with structurally different sugars. The biological significance of the polyspecificity of the lectin is discussed in terms of the broadening of the range of potential target glycans present on the surface of plant phytopathogens or predators.

  5. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) codon 54 (rs1800450) polymorphism predisposes towards medium vessel vasculitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Negi, Vir Singh; Devaraju, Panneer; Misra, Durga Prasanna; Jain, Vikramraj K; Usdadiya, Jignesh Babulal; Antony, Paul T; Gulati, Reena

    2017-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease with multiple etiological factors. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays a key role in innate immunity by activating antibody-independent lectin complement pathway, opsonisation, phagocytosis, and immune complex (IC) clearance. Genetic polymorphisms in the promoter and coding regions of MBL gene affect the circulatory levels and biological activity of MBL. Defects in MBL can lead to defective opsonisation and, hence, hamper clearance of apoptotic debris, the persistence of which can drive autoantibody formation in lupus. The exon1 variants at codon 52, 54, and 57 have been reported to augment the risk of SLE in different ethnic populations. Three hundred South Indian Tamil patients with SLE and 460 age-, sex-, and ethnicity-matched controls were genotyped for three polymorphisms at codon 52, 54, and 57 in exon1 of MBL gene by Taqman real-time PCR. The three polymorphisms in exon1 of MBL were observed not to confer risk of developing SLE. However, MBL codon 54 rs1800450 polymorphism was associated with the development of medium vessel vasculitis and gangrene (OR-2.29, CI 95% 1.08-4.83, p = 0.02), whereas, the ancestral allele G conferred protection (OR-0.44, CI 95% 0.21-0.93, p = 0.02). Genetic variants in the exon1 of MBL gene per se are not risk factors for SLE in South Indian Tamils. However, the association of codon 54 (rs1800450) with medium vessel vasculitis suggests that it may be a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in SLE.

  6. A two-nucleotide deletion renders the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene nonfunctional in Danish Landrace and Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Bergman, I M; Edman, K; van As, P; Huisman, A; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl

    2014-03-01

    The mannose-binding lectins (MBLs) are central components of innate immunity, facilitating phagocytosis and inducing the lectin activation pathway of the complement system. Previously, it has been found that certain single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in porcine MBL1 and MBL2 (pMBL1, pMBL2) affect mRNA expression, serum concentration, and susceptibility to disease, but the combinatory effect of pMBL1 and pMBL2 genotypes needs further elucidation. In the present study, pMBL1 and pMBL2 alleles, combined pMBL haplotypes, and MBL-A concentration in serum were analyzed in purebred Landrace (N = 30) and Duroc (N = 10) pigs. Furthermore, the combined pMBL haplotypes of 89 Piètrain × (Large White × Landrace) crossbred pigs were studied, and the genotypes of 67 crossbreds challenged with Escherichia coli were compared to their individual disease records. In the purebred animals, three non-synonymous SNPs and a two-nucleotide deletion were detected in the coding sequence of pMBL2. The two-nucleotide deletion was present at a frequency of 0.88 in the Landrace pigs and 0.90 in the Duroc pigs, respectively. In the crossbreds, the T allele of the SNP G949T in pMBL1-previously shown to have profound effect on MBL-A concentration even in the heterozygote condition-was detected in 47 % of the animals. Finally, an association was found between low-producing MBL genotypes and low body weight on the day of weaning in the same animals.

  7. Association of mannose-binding lectin levels and invasive fungal disease in hematologic malignancy patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Riwes, M M; Leather, H; Neal, D; Bennett, C; Sugrue, M; Cline, C; Stokes, J; Hiemenz, J; Hsu, J; Wingard, J R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have suggested an association of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency with infections. In this study, we investigated the association between MBL deficiency and invasive fungal disease (IFD) in hematologic malignancy patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. MBL levels were quantified at the start of treatment in 152 patients who were followed for 6 months and scored as developing IFD or not. Forty-five patients (29.6%) developed IFD, of which 21 (46.7% of IFD cases and 13.8% of patients) were proven or probable IFD. Fifty-nine (38.8%) had MBL levels <1000 ng/mL. The rates of all IFD in patients with MBL levels below and above 1000 ng/mL were 33.9% and 26.9%, respectively (P=0.356). The rates of proven or probable IFD in patients with MBL levels below and above 1000 ng/mL were 11.9% and 15.1%, respectively (P=0.579). MBL levels <1000 ng/mL were not predictors of death (P=0.233). As expected, IFD was associated with death (P<0.0001). Our findings indicate that MBL levels <1000 ng/mL were not associated with an increased risk of developing IFD or overall survival.

  8. Association study between mannose-binding lectin haplotypes and X gene mutation of hepatitis B virus from treatment naïve patients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chenghao; Lin, Yong; Mao, Qianguo; Wu, Daitze; Zhu, Lina; Najera, Isabel; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Niu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Mannose binding lectin (MBL) plays important role in the innate immunity of human. Mutations in the MBL2 gene can significantly change the serum level of MBL, and consequently alter the susceptibility and progression of infectious disease. However, the association between the MBL2 profile and the HBV mutation and quasispecies complexity has not yet been reported. Our approach includes the study of the MBL2 gene genotype as well as ultra-deep sequencing of the HBV viruses obtained from the plasma of 50 treatment naïve patients with chronic HBV infection. We found that the liver function was better among patients within the high MBL2 group with respect to those within the medium/low MBL2 group. Likewise, the number of mutations in the HBV X gene as well as the viral quasispecies complexity were significantly higher in medium/low MBL2 production group. Nucleotide substitution rates were also higher within the medium/low MBL2 production group in all positions described to have an influence in liver cancer development, except for A1499G. In this work we show that the MBL2 profile may have an impact on the HBV X gene mutations as well as on viral quasispecies complexity. PMID:27824315

  9. Association of mannose-binding lectin gene variation with disease severity and infections in a population-based cohort of systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Garred, P; Voss, A; Madsen, H O; Junker, P

    2001-12-01

    This study describes the importance of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) variant alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and accompanying infections in a population-based cohort. MBL alleles were determined in 99 SLE patients recruited from a representative Danish region. Patients were classified according to the 1982 revised ACR criteria as definite SLE (D-SLE) (n = 77) fulfilling > or =4 criteria and incomplete SLE (I-SLE) (n = 22) with 0.99, respectively). A meta-analysis of eight previously published studies suggested that the presence of MBL variant alleles confer a 1.6 times overall increased risk for D-SLE (P < 0.00001). MBL variant allele carriers had higher disease activity (SLEDAI-index) in a 2-year follow-up period (P = 0.02) and had an increased risk of acquiring complicating infections in general (P = 0.03) and respiratory infections in particular (P = 0.0006). Only in SLE patients fulfilling > or =4 ACR criteria an increased frequency of MBL variant alleles was found. MBL variant alleles were also associated with increased risk of disease activity and of complicating infections indicating that the MBL gene is an SLE disease modifier locus.

  10. Association Between Polymorphisms of the Mannose-Binding Lectin and Severity of Periportal Fibrosis in Schistosomiasis, in the Northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva Constantino, Taynan; de Lima, Elker Lene Santos; de Brito, Lidiane Régia Pereira Braga; Silva, Jamile Luciana; Coêlho, Maria Rosângela Cunha Duarte; Muniz, Maria Tereza Cartaxo; Silva, Paula Carolina Valença; Domingues, Ana Lúcia Coutinho

    2017-09-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a protein synthesized by the liver and its immune response is associated with the development of liver fibrosis. We hypothesized that the polymorphisms in the Exon 1 region (52, 54, 57) and promoter regions (-550 H/L, -221 X/Y) of the MBL2 gene were associated with the severity of periportal fibrosis (PPF), and that these polymorphisms affect the MBL serum levels. In this cross-sectional study we genotyped these polymorphisms within the MBL2 gene in 229 Brazilian subjects infected with Schistosoma mansoni, with different patterns of PPF. There was no association between the polymorphisms and haplotypes of the MBL2 gene and the advanced PPF pattern. The MBL levels were higher in individuals with advanced fibrosis. There was risk association among high-expression haplotypes of MBL, and a protection association between the A/O Exon 1 genotype and elevated MBL serum levels. Our results suggest that polymorphism of Exon 1 and MBL haplotypes could potentially be used to predict the severity of advanced PPF in the Brazilian population.

  11. Mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kasanmoentalib, E Soemirien; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Tanck, Michael W; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-01-03

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Disease outcome has been related to the severity of the pro-inflammatory response in the subarachnoid space. The complement system, which mediates key inflammatory processes, has been implicated as a modulator of pneumococcal meningitis disease severity in animal studies. We investigated mannose-binding lectin-associated serine protease (MASP-2) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from the diagnostic lumbar puncture, which was available for 307 of 792 pneumococcal meningitis episodes included in our prospective nationwide cohort study (39%), and the association between these levels and clinical outcome. Subsequently, we studied the role of MASP-2 in our experimental pneumococcal meningitis mouse model using Masp2 (-/-) mice and evaluated the potential of adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies in wild-type (WT) mice. MASP-2 levels in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis were correlated with poor functional outcome. Consistent with these human data, Masp2-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis had lower cytokine levels and increased survival compared to WT mice. Adjuvant treatment with MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies led to reduced complement activation and decreased disease severity. MASP-2 contributes to poor disease outcome in human and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. MASP-2-specific monoclonal antibodies can be used to attenuate the inflammatory response in pneumococcal meningitis.

  12. Human mannose-binding lectin 2 is directly regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors via a peroxisome proliferator responsive element.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Inada, Hirohiko; Sugimoto, Ken; Ishimoto, Kenji; Yamashita, Masanori; Maegawa, Takashi; Yamasaki, Daisuke; Osada, Shigehiro; Tanaka, Toshiya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Doi, Takefumi

    2013-09-01

    Human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is encoded by the MBL2 gene and is a key player in innate immunity. However, the mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of MBL2 is largely unknown. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that play an important role in a number of biological responses, including lipid homeostasis, immune function and adipogenesis. In this study, we showed that PPARα and PPARγ up-regulate the expression of human MBL2. Using a luciferase assay, electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that PPARs regulate the expression of human MBL2 via the peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE). On the other hand, MBL2 mRNA expression was not affected by the PPARα ligand both in vivo in rat liver and in vitro in rat H4IIE hepatoma cells. Thus, there is a species difference in regulation of MBL2 gene expression by PPARs between humans and rodents. We also show that the species differences in response to PPAR could be due in part to sequence-specific differences in the PPRE in the promoter region of MBL2. These results indicate that human, but not rat, MBL2 expression is regulated by PPARs via a PPRE.

  13. Mannose-binding lectin 2 (Mbl2) gene polymorphisms are related to protein plasma levels, but not to heart disease and infection by Chlamydia

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, M.A.F.; Gomes, S.T.M.; Almeida, N.C.C.; Souza, M.I.M.; Costa, S.R.C.F.; Hermes, R.B.; Lima, S.S.; Zaninotto, M.M.; Fossa, M.A.A.; Maneschy, M.A.; Martins-Feitosa, R.N.; Azevedo, V.N.; Machado, L.F.A.; Ishak, M.O.G.; Ishak, R.; Vallinoto, A.C.R.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in exon 1 of the mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2) gene was evaluated in a sample of 159 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery (71 patients undergoing valve replacement surgery and 300 control subjects) to investigate a possible association between polymorphisms and heart disease with Chlamydia infection. The identification of the alleles B and D was performed using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of the allele C was accomplished through PCR assays followed by digestion with the restriction enzyme. The comparative analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies between the three groups did not reveal any significant difference, even when related to previous Chlamydia infection. Variations in the MBL plasma levels were influenced by the presence of polymorphisms, being significantly higher in the group of cardiac patients, but without representing a risk for the disease. The results showed that despite MBL2 gene polymorphisms being associated with the protein plasma levels, the polymorphisms were not enough to predict the development of heart disease, regardless of infection with both species of Chlamydia. PMID:27982280

  14. A Novel High-Mannose Specific Lectin from the Green Alga Halimeda renschii Exhibits a Potent Anti-Influenza Virus Activity through High-Affinity Binding to the Viral Hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jinmin; Hirayama, Makoto; Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Hori, Kanji

    2017-08-16

    We have isolated a novel lectin, named HRL40 from the green alga Halimeda renschii. In hemagglutination-inhibition test and oligosaccharide-binding experiment with 29 pyridylaminated oligosaccharides, HRL40 exhibited a strict binding specificity for high-mannose N-glycans having an exposed (α1-3) mannose residue in the D2 arm of branched mannosides, and did not have an affinity for monosaccharides and other oligosaccharides examined, including complex N-glycans, an N-glycan core pentasaccharide, and oligosaccharides from glycolipids. The carbohydrate binding profile of HRL40 resembled those of Type I high-mannose specific antiviral algal lectins, or the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA) family, which were previously isolated from red algae and a blue-green alga (cyanobacterium). HRL40 potently inhibited the infection of influenza virus (A/H3N2/Udorn/72) into NCI-H292 cells with half-maximal effective dose (ED50) of 2.45 nM through high-affinity binding to a viral envelope hemagglutinin (KD, 3.69 × 10(-11) M). HRL40 consisted of two isolectins (HRL40-1 and HRL40-2), which could be separated by reverse-phase HPLC. Both isolectins had the same molecular weight of 46,564 Da and were a disulfide -linked tetrameric protein of a 11,641 Da polypeptide containing at least 13 half-cystines. Thus, HRL40, which is the first Type I high-mannose specific antiviral lectin from the green alga, had the same carbohydrate binding specificity as the OAA family, but a molecular structure distinct from the family.

  15. 3′ UTR and functional secretor haplotypes in mannose-binding lectin 2 are associated with increased colon cancer risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Krista A.; Haznadar, Majda; Welsh, Judith A.; Robles, Ana I.; Ryan, Bríd M.; McClary, Andrew C.; Bowman, Elise D.; Goodman, Julie E.; Bernig, Toralf; Chanock, Stephen J.; Harris, Curtis C.

    2012-01-01

    Because chronic intestinal inflammation is a risk factor for colorectal cancer, we hypothesized that genetic variants of inflammatory mediators, such as mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), are associated with colon cancer susceptibility. Here we report the association of 24 MBL2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and corresponding haplotypes with colon cancer risk in a case-control study. Four SNPs in the 3′-UTR region of the gene (rs10082466, rs2120132, rs2099902, and rs10450310) were associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in African Americans. Odds ratios (OR) for homozygous variants vs. wild-type ranged from 3.17 (95% CI, 1.57–6.40) to 4.51 (95% CI, 1.94–10.50), whereas the 3′-UTR region haplotype consisting of these four variants had an OR of 2.10 (95% CI, 1.42–3.12). The C allele of rs10082466 exhibited a binding affinity of miR-27a and this allele was associated with both lower MBL plasma levels and activity. We found that 5′ secretor haplotypes known to correlate with moderate and low MBL serum levels exhibited associations with increased risk of colon cancer in African Americans, specifically as driven by two haplotypes LYPA and LYQC relative to the referent HYPA haplotype (LYPA: OR 2.60; 95% CI 1.33–5.08 and LYQC: OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.20–4.30). Similar associations were not displayed in Caucasians. Together, our results support the hypothesis that genetic variations in MBL2 increase colon cancer susceptibility in African Americans. PMID:22282660

  16. Purification of 3 monomeric monocot mannose-binding lectins and their evaluation for antipoxviral activity: potential applications in multiple viral diseases caused by enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Singh, Jatinder; Singh, Rajinder; Abrahams, Melissa; Kotwal, Girish J; Saxena, A K

    2007-02-01

    Three monomeric monocot lectins from Zephyranthes carinata, Zephyranthes candida, and Gloriosa superba with carbohydrate specificity towards mannose derivatives and (or) oligomannose have been isolated and purified from their storage tissues. The lectins were purified by anion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacyl and by gel filtration chromatography on Biogel P-200 followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified lectins, Z. carinata, Z. candida, and G. superba had molecular masses of 12, 11.5, and 12.5 kDa, respectively, as determined by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that they are monomers. In a hapten inhibition assay, methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside inhibited agglutination of both Z. candida and Z. carinata; the latter was also inhibited by Man(alpha1-2)Man and Man(alpha1-3)Man. Gloriosa superba showed inhibition only with Man(alpha1-4)Man of all of the sugars and glycoproteins tested. All purified lectins agglutinated red blood cells from rabbit, whereas G. superba was also reactive towards erythrocytes from guinea pig. All of the lectins were nonglycosylated and did not require metal ions for their activity. They were labile above 60 degrees C and were affected by denaturing agents such as urea, thiourea, and guanidine-HCl. The lectins were virtually nonmitogenic, like other members of Amaryllidaceae and Liliaceae. Of the 3 lectins, G. superba was found to be highly toxic to the BSC-1 cell line (African green monkey kidney epithelial cells), while both of the Zephyranthes species showed significant in vitro inhibition of poxvirus replication in BSC-1 cells without any toxic effects to the cells. In addition, Z. candida also exhibited significant anticancer activity against SNB-78, a CNS human cancer cell line.

  17. Early Changes of Mannose-Binding Lectin, H-Ficolin, and Procalcitonin in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia: A Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Işlak Mutcalı, Sibel; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Balkan, İlker İnanç; Özaras, Reşat; Yemişen, Mücahit; Tabak, Fehmi; Mert, Ali; Öztürk, Recep; Öngören, Şeniz; Başlar, Zafer; Aydın, Yıldız; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-12-01

    The significance of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and H-ficolin deficiency in febrile neutropenic (FN) patients and the correlation of these markers along with consecutive C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels during the infectious process are investigated. Patients with any hematological malignancies who were defined to have "microbiologically confirmed infection", "clinically documented infection", or "fever of unknown origin" were included in this single-center prospective observational study. Serum levels of CRP, PCT, MBL, and H-ficolin were determined on 3 separate occasions: at baseline (between hospital admission and chemotherapy), at the onset of fever, and at the 72nd hour of fever. Forty-six patients (54% male, mean age 41.7 years) with 61 separate episodes of FN were evaluated. Eleven patients (23.9%) had "microbiologically confirmed infection", 17 (37%) had "clinically documented infection", and 18 (39.1%) had "fever of unknown origin". Fourteen (30.4%) patients had low (<500 ng/mL) initial MBL levels and 7 (15.21%) had low (<12,000 ng/mL) H-ficolin levels. Baseline MBL and H-ficolin levels did not significantly change on the first and third days of fever (p=0.076). Gram-negative bacteremia more frequently occurred in those with low initial MBL levels (p=0.006). PCT levels were significantly higher in those with microbiologically documented infections. Mean and median PCT levels were significantly higher in cases with bacteremia. There was no significant difference between hemoculture-positive and-negative patients in terms of CRP levels. Monitoring serum H-ficolin levels was shown to be of no benefit in terms of predicting severe infection. Low baseline MBL levels were correlated with high risk of gram-negative bacteremia; however, no significant correlation was shown in the follow-up. Close monitoring of PCT levels is warranted to provide more accurate and specific data while monitoring cases of bacteremia.

  18. Smoking status interacts with the association between mannose-binding lectin serum levels and gene polymorphism and the carriage of oropharyngeal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jounio, Ulla; Rantala, Aino; Bloigu, Aini; Juvonen, Raija; Lajunen, Taina; Silvennoinen-Kassinen, Sylvi; Peitso, Ari; Vainio, Olli; Harju, Terttu; Saukkoriipi, Annika; Leinonen, Maija

    2010-03-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) role in the carriage of oropharyngeal bacteria is not known. We investigated the association of smoking, MBL2 polymorphisms, and MBL concentrations with oropharyngeal carriage of respiratory bacteria in young men. Oropharyngeal specimens, MBL concentrations, and MBL2 gene polymorphisms were measured in 124 asthmatic and 394 nonasthmatic Finnish military recruits. The carriage rates of S. pneumoniae (p = 0.002), N. meningitidis (p = 0.005), and beta-hemolytic streptococci (p < 0.001) throughout the military service were significantly higher among smokers than in nonsmokers. An MBL level below the median proved to be a significant risk factor for the carriage of N. meningitidis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-3.6) and beta-hemolytic streptococci (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.2-3.2) in the nonsmokers and a borderline significant risk factor for the carriage of S. pneumoniae (OR = 1.5; 95% CI 0.9-2.6), whereas low MBL levels producing MBL2 haplotypes (LXA/LXA, LXA/O, HYA/O, LYA/O, O/O) seemed to be associated with the carriage of N. meningitidis (OR = 1.8; 95% CI 1.0-3.4) and S. pneumoniae (OR = 1.6; 95% CI 0.9-2.7). Thus, MBL deficiency may predispose nonsmokers to oropharyngeal carriage of these bacteria. We hypothesize that the major factor contributing to elevated bacterial carriage in smokers might be increased bacterial adherence to epithelial cells, which obscures the effect of MBL.

  19. Mannose-Binding Lectin Gene, MBL2, Polymorphisms Do Not Increase Susceptibility to Invasive Meningococcal Disease in a Population of Danish Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Neisseria meningitidis is the cause of meningococcal bacteremia and meningitis, and nasopharyngeal colonization with this pathogen is common. The incidence of invasive disease is highest in infants, whereas adolescents more often are carriers. Altered regulation or dysfunction of the innate immune system may predispose to invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). In this study, we investigated the effect of genetic variation in the mannose-binding lectin gene, MBL2, and its promoter on susceptibility to IMD and IMD-associated mortality among children. Methods. Children (<5 years) diagnosed during 1982–2007 with IMD and controls were identified through Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The associations between MBL2 diplotypes and IMD susceptibility and 30- and 90-day mortality were investigated using logistic regression analysis. Results. We included 1351 children: 406 with meningitis, 272 with bacteremia, and 673 age- and sex-matched controls. Of the children studied, 1292 (96%) were successfully genotyped and assigned MBL2 diplotypes. The median age in IMD cases was 19.1 months (interquartile range [IQR], 8.8–32.2 months). Children with defective MBL2 diplotypes were not at higher risk for meningococcal meningitis than children with intermediate and normal diplotypes (odds ratio [OR] = 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], .47–1.02). Similar results were found for children with bacteremia and defective diplotypes (OR = 0.84; 95% CI, .53–1.32) as well as for all cases (OR = 0.75; 95% CI, .56–1.01). There was no association between MBL2 diplotypes and mortality. Conclusions. Defective MBL2 diplotypes did not predict either an increased IMD susceptibility or mortality in a Danish population of children. PMID:26464842

  20. Lack of Association between Mannose-binding Lectin 2 Codons 54 and 57 Gene Polymorphisms and Cervicovaginal Infections in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez-Hernandez, Nadia; Aguilar-Duran, Marisela; Perez-Alamos, Alma Rosa; Estrada-Martinez, Sergio; Salas-Pacheco, Jose M.; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada. A.; Lazalde-Medina, Brissia; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2017-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin (MBL) 2 gene has an important function in the innate immune response and activation of the third pathway of the complement system. Some studies have assessed the association of the MBL2 gene polymorphisms with cervicovaginal infections (CVI); however, there is no information about this association in Mexican women. This study aimed to determine the association between the MBL2 codons 54 and 57 gene polymorphisms with CVI in a sample of Mexican women. Through a cross-sectional study, blood samples and cervicovaginal cultures were obtain from 354 women. MBL2 genotyping was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction with Taqman probes. Of the 354 women studied, 128 (36.2%) had CVI and 226 (63.8%) were healthy. The frequencies of the C and T variants in codon 54 in women with CVI were 83% and 17%, respectively; whereas the frequencies of these variants in healthy women were 82% and 18%, respectively. The frequencies of variants C/C, C/T, and T/T in women with CVI were 68%, 31%, and 1%, respectively; whereas the frequencies of these variants in healthy women were 68%, 29%, and 3%, respectively. With respect to codon 57, the frequencies of variants C and T were identical in women with CVI and in healthy women (97% and 3%, respectively). The frequencies of variants C/C, C/T, and T/T were identical in women with CVI and in healthy women (94%, 6%, and 0%, respectively). We conclude that MBL2 codons 54 and 57 gene polymorphisms do not associate with CVI in Mexican women. PMID:28824344

  1. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on growth performance, susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brian C; Peatman, E; Ourth, D D; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-05-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE; containing the essential oils carvacrol, thymol, anethol, and limonene) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (floating diet) and EO (floating diet supplemented with essential oils). The fish were fed their respective diets for 6 weeks. At the end of the study, all fish were exposed to virulent E. ictaluri by bath immersion (1.9 × 10(7) cfu/mL; final concentration). Plasma and tissue samples were taken to quantify protein and mRNA expression levels of mannose binding lectin (MBL). Weight gain and food conversion ratio were similar between treatments. After exposing fish to virulent E. ictaluri and monitoring mortality for 21 days, survival was 43% higher (69.5 vs 48.4%) in fish fed EO compared to fish not treated with EO (P < 0.05). One day after challenge, plasma MBL levels were down-regulated in the non-treated fish compared to non-challenged fish. In the EO fish, MBL levels were similar to non-challenged fish but significantly higher than non-treated fed fish (P < 0.001). By d 7, plasma MBL levels increased in non-treated fed fish to levels observed in the EO and non-challenged fish. On d 14, MBL mRNA levels were upregulated 15-fold in fish fed EO compared to non-treated fed fish and non-challenged fish (P < 0.001). The results demonstrate that essential oils improved survival of channel catfish challenged with E. ictaluri. Mechanisms through which essential oils improve survival may involve MBL.

  2. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2007-12-01

    Human mannose-binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p = 0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%, respectively; p = 0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV-positive patients.

  3. Variants of the mannose-binding lectin gene in the Benin population: heterozygosity for the p.G57E allele may confer a selective advantage. 2007.

    PubMed

    Dossou-Yovo, Omer Placide; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Hauchecorne, Michelle; Zaccaria, Isabelle; Ducrocq, Rolande; Krishnamoorthy, Rajagopal; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Elion, Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Human mannose- binding lectin (MBL) plays an important role in innate immunity. MBL deficiency is associated with mutations in the promoter region and in exon 1 of the MBL2 gene. Such deficiency has been correlated with elevated incidence of infections in infancy and in immunocompromised adults. We determined the distribution profile of the MBL2 gene variants in the general population of Benin (West Africa) and in a vulnerable subset of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) (SS homozygotes). Five hundred forty-two healthy individuals (274 newborns, 268 adults) and 128 patients with SCD (35 newborns, 93 children) were screened for the common variant alleles in the MBL2 secretor haplotype region (exon 1 and promoter). The p.G57E variant allele was the most frequent allele compared to p.G54D (27.5% vs. 1.6%, respectively). The p.R52C allele was not found in this population. There was no difference in allele or genotype frequencies between healthy newborns and newborns with SCD. Alleles associated with MBL deficiency were more frequent in adults than in newborns (69.8% vs. 57.3%, respectively; p=0.002). This enrichment was exclusively due to an elevated proportion of heterozygotes for the p.G57E allele (47.0% vs. 35.3%,respectively; p=0.004), supporting a potential selective advantage of this genotype. Our results, compared to those reported in other African countries, support the implication of the MBL2 gene in various major infections in Africa, such as meningitis and tuberculosis in HIV- positive patients.

  4. Early Changes of Mannose-Binding Lectin, H-Ficolin, and Procalcitonin in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Işlak Mutcal, Sibel; Saltoğlu, Neşe; Balkan, İlker İnanç; Özaras, Reşat; Yemişen, Mücahit; Mete, Bilgül; Tabak, Fehmi; Mert, Ali; Öztürk, Recep; Öngören, Şeniz; Başlar, Zafer; Aydın, Yıldız; Ferhanoğlu, Burhan; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The significance of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and H-ficolin deficiency in febrile neutropenic (FN) patients and the correlation of these markers along with consecutive C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels during the infectious process are investigated. Materials and Methods: Patients with any hematological malignancies who were defined to have “microbiologically confirmed infection”, “clinically documented infection”, or “fever of unknown origin” were included in this single-center prospective observational study. Serum levels of CRP, PCT, MBL, and H-ficolin were determined on 3 separate occasions: at baseline (between hospital admission and chemotherapy), at the onset of fever, and at the 72nd hour of fever. Results: Forty-six patients (54% male, mean age 41.7 years) with 61 separate episodes of FN were evaluated. Eleven patients (23.9%) had “microbiologically confirmed infection”, 17 (37%) had “clinically documented infection”, and 18 (39.1%) had “fever of unknown origin”. Fourteen (30.4%) patients had low (<500 ng/mL) initial MBL levels and 7 (15.21%) had low (<12,000 ng/mL) H-ficolin levels. Baseline MBL and H-ficolin levels did not significantly change on the first and third days of fever (p=0.076). Gram-negative bacteremia more frequently occurred in those with low initial MBL levels (p=0.006). PCT levels were significantly higher in those with microbiologically documented infections. Mean and median PCT levels were significantly higher in cases with bacteremia. There was no significant difference between hemoculture-positive and-negative patients in terms of CRP levels. Conclusion: Monitoring serum H-ficolin levels was shown to be of no benefit in terms of predicting severe infection. Low baseline MBL levels were correlated with high risk of gram-negative bacteremia; however, no significant correlation was shown in the follow-up. Close monitoring of PCT levels is warranted to provide more accurate and

  5. Low mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and MBL genetic polymorphisms associated with the risk of neonatal sepsis: An updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Xu, Fen; Lu, Guang-Jin; Lin, Hung-Chih; Feng, Zhi-Chun

    2014-10-01

    Relatively low serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) levels and MBL genetic polymorphisms have been implicated as high risk factors for neonatal sepsis. However, different studies have reported conflicting findings and have generally been underpowered to exclude modest effect sizes. Standard methodology of systematic reviews and meta-analyses was followed. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, and Scopus databases were searched from January 1996 to December 2013. The eligible studies were collected and analyzed using Review Manager 5.2. Meta-Disc version 1.4 was used to describe and calculate sensitivity, specificity, summary receiver operator characteristic (SROC) curves and area under the curve. SROC curve analysis was used to summarize the overall performance. Funnel plots, Egger's test and Begg's test were used to investigate publication bias. Seven studies addressing low MBL levels and MBL genetic polymorphisms (structure variant A/O, A/B of Exon1) were analyzed for susceptibility to neonatal sepsis, respectively. All of these control studies were of reasonable methodological quality. The pooled unadjusted odds ratio showed that low MBL levels were significantly associated with neonatal sepsis (P=0.0002; odds ratio=4.94, 95% confidence interval=2.16-11.29) and MBL genetic polymorphisms were also significantly associated with neonatal sepsis (P=0.03; odds ratio=1.41, 95% confidence interval=1.03-1.94). In subgroup analysis based on gestational age, increased risk was found in the preterm infants in the dominant model (RR 2.33, 95%CI 1.06-5.13, P=0.03). However, no association was observed for term infants in subgroup analysis. Additionally, the SROC curve of low MBL levels in the prediction of neonatal sepsis indicated a poor predictive ability. The area under curve was 0.80 (95% confidence interval=0.74-0.86). Currently available evidence shows that neonates with low serum MBL levels are more than four times more likely to have neonatal sepsis compared to

  6. [Can mannose-binding lectin and plasma level of soluble urokinase receptor be used in diagnosis and treatment monitorization of brucellosis patients?].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Cesur, Salih; Karaağaç, Leman; Binici, Irfan; Fidan, Yasemin; Oğüş, Elmas; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and plasma soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (SuPAR) levels in monitoring the treatment in patients with brucellosis, by comparing their levels before and after treatment with the values obtained from healthy control group. Thirty brucellosis patients (mean age: 25.8 ± 12.2 years; 15 were male) and 28 healthy controls (mean age: 29.3 ± 12.3 years; 15 were male) were included in the study. Patients were diagnosed with brucellosis according to the characteristic clinical findings and by brucella standard tube agglutination test (SAT) titer ≥ 1/160 and/or blood culture positivity. Serum MBL (Antibodyshop, Denmark) and plasma SuPAR (Virogates, Denmark) levels were investigated with commercial ELISA kits. In our study, no statistical significance was observed between the pre-treatment (13.8 ± 13.4 ng/ml) and post-treatment (12.4 ± 13.1 ng/ml) MBL levels of the patient group and MBL levels of the control group (16.5 ± 14.8 ng/ml) (p> 0.05). Moreover, the mean SuPAR levels measured in pre-treatment and post-treatment plasma samples of the brucellosis patients was 5.1 ± 1.9 ng/ml and 2.9 ± 1.3 ng/ml, respectively, while the mean SuPAR level was 1.8 ± 0.5 ng/ml in the control group. The difference between mean SuPAR levels of patients in pre- and post-treatment samples was found statistically significant (p< 0.001). In addition SuPAR levels were significantly higher in patients before and after treatment than the control group (p> 0.001). In conclusion, plasma SuPAR level would be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment follow up of the patients with brucellosis.

  7. The mannose-specific lectins from ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) are encoded by three sets of genes.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, J M; Smeets, K; Torrekens, S; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Lectin cDNA clones encoding the two mannose-binding lectins from ramsons (allium ursinum L.) bulbs, AUAI and AUAII (AUA, Allium ursinum agglutinin), were isolated and characterized. Sequence comparison of the different cDNA clones isolated revealed three types of lectin clones called LECAUAG0, LECAUAG1 and LECAUAG2, which besides the obvious differences in their sequences also differ from each other in the number of potential glycosylation sites within the C-terminal peptide of the lectin precursor. In vivo biosynthesis studies of the ramson lectins have shown that glycosylated lectin precursors occur in the organelle fraction of radioactively labeled ramson bulbs. Despite the similarities between the A. ursinum and the A. sativum (garlic) lectins at the protein level, molecular cloning of the two ramson lectins has shown that the lectin genes in A. ursinum are organized differently. Whereas in A. sativum the lectin polypeptides of the heterodimeric ASAI are encoded by one large precursor, those of the heterodimeric AUAI lectin are derived from two different precursors. These results are confirmed by Northern blot hybridization of A. ursinum RNA which, after hybridization with a labeled lectin cDNA, reveals only one band of 800 nucleotides in contrast to A. sativum RNA which yields two bands of 1400 and 800 nucleotides. Furthermore it is shown that the two mannose-binding lectins are differentially expressed.

  8. New mannose-specific lectins from garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1992-05-22

    Two new mannose-binding lectins were isolated from garlic (Allium sativum, ASA) and ramsons (Allium ursinum, AUA) bulbs, of the family Alliaceae, by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of these two lectins was studied by quantitative precipitation and hapten-inhibition assay. ASA reacted strongly with a synthetic linear (1----3)-alpha-D-mannan and S. cerevisiae mannan, weakly with a synthetic (1----6)-alpha-D-mannan, and failed to precipitate with galactomannans from T. gropengiesseri and T. lactis-condensi, a linear mannopentaose, and murine IgM. On the other hand, AUA gave a strong reaction of precipitation with murine IgM, and good reactions with S. cerevisiae mannan and both synthetic linear mannans, suggesting that the two lectins have somewhat different binding specificities for alpha-D-mannosyl units. Of the saccharides tested as inhibitors of precipitation, those with alpha-(1----3)-linked mannosyl units were the best inhibitors of ASA, the alpha-(1----2)-, alpha-(1----4)-, and alpha-(1----6)-linked mannobioses and biosides having less than one eighth the affinity of the alpha-(1----3)-linked compounds. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of ASA exhibits 79% homology with that of AUA, and moderately high homology (53%) with that of snowdrop bulb lectin, also an alpha-D-mannosyl-binding lectin.

  9. High mannose-specific lectin Msl mediates key interactions of the vaginal Lactobacillus plantarum isolate CMPG5300

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shweta; Petrova, Mariya I.; Imholz, Nicole C. E.; Verhoeven, Tine L. A.; Noppen, Sam; Van Damme, Els J. M.; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the interaction potential of the human vaginal isolate Lactobacillus plantarum CMPG5300, its genome was mined for genes encoding lectin-like proteins. cmpg5300.05_29 was identified as the gene encoding a putative mannose-binding lectin. Phenotypic analysis of a gene knock-out mutant of cmpg5300.05_29 showed that expression of this gene is important for auto-aggregation, adhesion to the vaginal epithelial cells, biofilm formation and binding to mannosylated glycans. Purification of the predicted lectin domain of Cmpg5300.05_29 and characterization of its sugar binding capacity confirmed the specificity of the lectin for high- mannose glycans. Therefore, we renamed Cmpg5300.05_29 as a mannose-specific lectin (Msl). The purified lectin domain of Msl could efficiently bind to HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 and Candida albicans, and showed an inhibitory activity against biofilm formation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium. Thus, using a combination of molecular lectin characterization and functional assays, we could show that lectin-sugar interactions play a key role in host and pathogen interactions of a prototype isolate of the vaginal Lactobacillus microbiota. PMID:27853317

  10. Synthesis of high-mannose oligosaccharide analogues through click chemistry: true functional mimics of their natural counterparts against lectins?

    PubMed

    François-Heude, Marc; Méndez-Ardoy, Alejandro; Cendret, Virginie; Lafite, Pierre; Daniellou, Richard; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; García Fernández, José M; Moreau, Vincent; Djedaïni-Pilard, Florence

    2015-01-26

    Terminal "high-mannose oligosaccharides" are involved in a broad range of biological and pathological processes, from sperm-egg fusion to influenza and human immunodeficiency virus infections. In spite of many efforts, their synthesis continues to be very challenging and actually represents a major bottleneck in the field. Whereas multivalent presentation of mannopyranosyl motifs onto a variety of scaffolds has proven to be a successful way to interfere in recognition processes involving high-mannose oligosaccharides, such constructs fail at reproducing the subtle differences in affinity towards the variety of protein receptors (lectins) and antibodies susceptible to binding to the natural ligands. Here we report a family of functional high-mannose oligosaccharide mimics that reproduce not only the terminal mannopyranosyl display, but also the core structure and the branching pattern, by replacing some inner mannopyranosyl units with triazole rings. Such molecular design can be implemented by exploiting "click" ligation strategies, resulting in a substantial reduction of synthetic cost. The binding affinities of the new "click" high-mannose oligosaccharide mimics towards two mannose specific lectins, namely the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) and the human macrophage mannose receptor (rhMMR), have been studied by enzyme-linked lectin assays and found to follow identical trends to those observed for the natural oligosaccharide counterparts. Calorimetric determinations against ConA, and X-ray structural data support the conclusion that these compounds are not just another family of multivalent mannosides, but real "structural mimics" of the high-mannose oligosaccharides.

  11. Fine specificities of two lectins from Cymbosema roseum seeds: a lectin specific for high-mannose oligosaccharides and a lectin specific for blood group H type II trisaccharide.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Cavada, Benildo S; Nagano, Celso S; Rocha, Bruno Am; Benevides, Raquel G; Nascimento, Kyria S; de Sousa, Luiz Ag; Oscarson, Stefan; Brewer, C Fred

    2011-07-01

    The legume species of Cymbosema roseum of Diocleinae subtribe produce at least two different seed lectins. The present study demonstrates that C. roseum lectin I (CRL I) binds with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside of N-linked oligosaccharides. Cymbosema roseum lectin II (CRL II), on the other hand, binds with high affinity to the blood group H trisaccharide (Fucα1,2Galα1-4GlcNAc-). Thermodynamic and hemagglutination inhibition studies reveal the fine binding specificities of the two lectins. Data obtained with a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside indicate that CRL I recognizes the 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxyl groups of the α(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the α(1,3) Man residue and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. CRL I possesses enhanced affinities for the Man5 oligomannose glycan and a biantennary complex glycan as well as glycoproteins containing high-mannose glycans. On the other hand, CRL II distinguishes the blood group H type II epitope from the Lewis(x), Lewis(y), Lewis(a) and Lewis(b) epitopes. CRL II also distinguishes between blood group H type II and type I trisaccharides. CRL I and CRL II, respectively, possess differences in fine specificities when compared with other reported mannose and fucose recognizing lectins. This is the first report of a mannose-specific lectin (CRL I) and a blood group H type II-specific lectin (CRL II) from seeds of a member of the Diocleinae subtribe.

  12. Purification and characterization of a mannose-specific lectin from Shallot (Allium ascalonicum) bulbs.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1993-11-01

    A new mannose-binding lectin was isolated from shallot (Allium ascalonicum) bulbs by affinity chromatography on an immobilized D-mannose column. The lectin (A. ascalonicum agglutinin, AAA) appeared homogeneous by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4.3 and gave a single protein band with an apparent M(r) of 11 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a single symmetrical peak of 11 kDa by gel filtration on a Sephacryl S-200 HR column, indicating that AAA exists as a monomeric protein at neutral pH under the gel filtration condition employed. However, chemical cross-linking studies revealed that some degree of self-association of the lectin molecules occurs and that the lectin exists in solution as a mixture of monomers and oligomers. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium dialysis data showed the presence of one carbohydrate binding site for Man (alpha 1-3) Man-alpha-O-Me per monomer, with Ka = 1.62 x 10(4) M-1. The carbohydrate-binding properties of the purified AAA were investigated by quantitative precipitation and hapten inhibition assays. Purified AAA precipitated asialofetuin, asialotransferrin, asialothyroglobulin, asialoorosomucoid, as well as their agalacto derivatives, but did not precipitate either sialylated glycoproteins or mucins. AAA also reacted strongly with the highly branched yeast mannan obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of the monosaccharides tested only D-mannose was a hapten inhibitor of the AAA-asialofetuin precipitation system, whereas D-glucose, D-altrose, D-talose, N-acetyl-D-mannosamine, and derivatives of D-mannose, including 2-deoxy-, 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-, 3-deoxy-, and 6-deoxy-D-mannose were noninhibitors. These results suggest that the presence of equatorial hydroxyl groups at the C-3 and C-4 positions, an axial hydroxyl group at the C-2 position, and a free hydroxyl group at the C-6 position of the pyranose ring are the most important loci for the binding of D-mannose to AAA. Of the oligosaccharides

  13. High-mannose N-glycan-specific lectin from the red alga Kappaphycus striatum (Carrageenophyte).

    PubMed

    Hung, Le Dinh; Sato, Yuichiro; Hori, Kanji

    2011-06-01

    From a fresh sample (1 kg) of cultivated red alga Kappaphycus striatum, three isolectins, KSA-1 (15.1 mg), KSA-2 (58.0 mg) and KSA-3 (6.9 mg), were isolated by a combination of extraction with aqueous ethanol, ethanol precipitation, and ion exchange chromatography. Isolated KSAs were monomeric proteins of about 28kDa having identical 20N-terminal amino acid sequences to each other. Their hemagglutination activities were not inhibited by monosaccharides, but inhibited by glycoproteins bearing high-mannose N-glycans. In a binding experiment with pyridylaminated oligosaccharides by centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC assay, the isolectin KSA-2 was exclusively bound to high-mannose type N-glycans, but not to other glycans. Including complex types and a pentasaccharide core of N-glycans, indicating that it recognized branched oligomannosides. The binding activity of KSA-2 was slightly different among high-mannose N-glycans examined, indicating that the lectin has a higher affinity for those having the exposed (α1-3) Man in the D2 arm. On the other hand, KSA-2 did not bind to a free oligomannose that is a constituent of the branched oligomannosides, implying that the portion of the core GlcNAc residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, KSA-2 appears to recognize the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimal length of a tetrasaccharide, Man(α1-3)Man(α1-6)Man(β1-4)GlcNAc. This study indicates that K. striatum, which has extensively been cultivated as a source of carrageenan, is a good source of a valuable lectin(s) that is strictly specific for high-mannose N-glycans.

  14. ERGIC-53 is a functional mannose-selective and calcium-dependent human homologue of leguminous lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Itin, C; Roche, A C; Monsigny, M; Hauri, H P

    1996-01-01

    Based on sequence homologies with leguminous lectins, the intermediate compartment marker ERGIC-53 was proposed to be a member of a putative new class of animal lectins associated with the secretory pathway. Independent, a promyelocytic protein, MR60, was purified by mannose-column chromatography, and a cDNA was isolated that matched MR60 peptide sequences. This cDNA was identical to that of ERGIC-53 and homologies with the animal lectin family of the galectins were noticed. Not all peptide sequences of MR60, however, were found in ERGIC-53, raising the possibility that another protein associated with ERGIC-53 may possess the lectin activity. Here, we provide the first direct evidence for a lectin function of ERGIC-53. Overexpressed ERGIC-53 binds to a mannose column in a calcium-dependent manner and also co-stains with mannosylated neoglycoprotein in a morphological binding assay. By using a sequential elution protocol we show that ERGIC-53 has selectivity for mannose and low affinity for glucose and GlcNAc, but no affinity for galactose. To experimentally address the putative homology of ERGIC-53 to leguminous lectins, a highly conserved protein family with an invariant asparagine essential for carbohydrate binding, we substituted the corresponding asparagine in ERGIC-53. This mutation, as well as a mutation affecting a second site in the putative carbohydrate recognition domain, abolished mannose-column binding and co-staining with mannosylated neoglycoprotein. These findings establish ERGIC-53 as a lectin and provide functional evidence for its relationship to leguminous lectins. Based on its monosaccharide specificity, domain organization, and recycling properties, we propose ERGIC-53 to function as a sorting receptor for glyco-proteins in the early secretory pathway. Images PMID:8868475

  15. Purification and primary structure of a novel mannose-specific lectin from Centrolobium microchaete Mart seeds.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves de; Alves, Ana Cecília; Carneiro, Rômulo Farias; Dias, Artur Hermano Sampaio; Martins, Francisco William Viana; Cajazeiras, João Batista; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago do; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to purify and characterize a novel mannose-binding lectin from the seeds of Centrolobium microchaete. Centrolobium microchaete lectin (CML) was purified by affinity chromatography in mannose-Sepharose-4B column. CML agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes and was inhibited by D-mannose, α-methyl-D-mannoside, D-glucose, N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine and sucrose. The lectin was stable at pH 7.0 and 8.0 and temperatures up to 60°C. The monomeric form of CML showed approximately 28kDa, and its native form is probably a homodimer, as determined by gel filtration chromatography. The primary structure of CML was determined by tandem mass spectrometry that showed CML as a protein with two distinct forms (isolectins CML-1 and CML-2) with 246 and 247 residues, respectively. CML-2 possesses one residue of Asn more than CML-1 in C-terminal. The primary structure of CML agrees with the molecular weights found by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: 27,224 and 27,338Da for CML-1 and CML-2, respectively. CML is a metal-dependent glycoprotein. Moreover, the glycan composition of CML and its structure were predicted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The x-ray crystal structure of mannose-binding lectin-associated serine proteinase-3 reveals the structural basis for enzyme inactivity associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G; Reeve, Shane B; Coetzer, Theresa H; Smith, A Ian; Whisstock, James C; Pike, Robert N; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C

    2013-08-02

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome.

  17. The X-ray Crystal Structure of Mannose-binding Lectin-associated Serine Proteinase-3 Reveals the Structural Basis for Enzyme Inactivity Associated with the Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yongqing, Tang; Wilmann, Pascal G.; Reeve, Shane B.; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Smith, A. Ian; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.

    2013-01-01

    The mannose-binding lectin associated-protease-3 (MASP-3) is a member of the lectin pathway of the complement system, a key component of human innate and active immunity. Mutations in MASP-3 have recently been found to be associated with Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech, and Michels (3MC) syndrome, a severe developmental disorder manifested by cleft palate, intellectual disability, and skeletal abnormalities. However, the molecular basis for MASP-3 function remains to be understood. Here we characterize the substrate specificity of MASP-3 by screening against a combinatorial peptide substrate library. Through this approach, we successfully identified a peptide substrate that was 20-fold more efficiently cleaved than any other identified to date. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mutant forms of the enzyme associated with 3MC syndrome were completely inactive against this substrate. To address the structural basis for this defect, we determined the 2.6-Å structure of the zymogen form of the G666E mutant of MASP-3. These data reveal that the mutation disrupts the active site and perturbs the position of the catalytic serine residue. Together, these insights into the function of MASP-3 reveal how a mutation in this enzyme causes it to be inactive and thus contribute to the 3MC syndrome. PMID:23792966

  18. Lectin from Canavalia villosa seeds: A glucose/mannose-specific protein and a new tool for inflammation studies.

    PubMed

    Lossio, Claudia F; Moreira, Cleane G; Amorim, Renata M F; Nobre, Clareane S; Silva, Mayara T L; Neto, Cornevile C; Pinto-Junior, Vanir R; Silva, Ivanice B; Campos, Julia; Assreuy, Ana Maria S; Cavada, Benildo S; Nascimento, Kyria S

    2017-07-08

    With important carbohydrate binding properties, lectins are proteins able to decipher the glycocode, and as such, they can be used in bioassays involving cell-cell communication, protein targeting, inflammation, and hypernociception, among others. In this study, a new glucose/mannose-specific lectin from Canavalia villosa seeds (Cvill) was isolated by a single affinity chromatography step in a Sephadex(®) G-50 column, with a purification yield of 19.35mg of lectin per gram of powdered seed. Analysis of intact protein by mass spectrometry showed the lectin is composed of three polypeptide chains, including a 25.6kDa α chain, 12.9KDa β, and 12.6 KDa γ fragments, similar to the profile of ConA-like glucose/mannose-specific lectins. Partial sequence of the protein was obtained by MS-MALDI TOF/TOF covering 41.7% of its primary structure. Cvill presented sugar specificity to d-glucose, α-methyl-d-mannoside, d-mannose, and glycoproteins fetuin and ovoalbumin. The lectin characterization showed that Cvill presents high stability within a broad range of pH and temperature, also showing average toxicity against Artemia nauplii. The proinflammatory effect of Cvill was observed by induction of paw edema and hypernociception in mice, with the participation of the carbohydrate binding site, showing its potential to be used as tool in inflammation studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative study of the post-translational processing of the mannose-binding lectins in the bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1994-08-01

    The biosynthesis and processing of the homodimeric and heterodimeric lectins from the bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (wild garlic; Allium ursinum) were studied using pulse and pulse-chase labelling experiments on developing bulbs. By combining the results of the in vivo biosynthesis studies and the cDNA cloning of the respective lectins, the sequence of events leading from the primary translation products into the mature lectin polypeptides could be reconstructed. From this it is demonstrated that garlic and ramsons use different schemes of post-translational modifications in order to synthesize apparently similar lectins from totally different precursors. Both the homomeric garlic lectin (ASAII) and its homologue in ramsons (AUAII) are synthesized on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as nonglycosylated 13.5 kDa precursors, which, after their transport out of the ER are converted into the mature 12.0 kDa lectin polypeptides by the cleavage of a C-terminal peptide. The heterodimeric garlic lectin ASAI is synthesized on the ER as a single glycosylated precursor of 38 kDa, which after its transport out of the ER undergoes a complex processing which gives rise to two mature lectin subunits of 11.5 and 12.5 kDa. In contrast, both subunits of the heterodimeric ramsons lectin AUAI are synthesized separately on the ER as glycosylated precursors, which after their transport out of the ER are deglycosylated and further processed into the mature lectin polypeptides by the cleavage of a C-terminal peptide.

  20. How a Plant Lectin Recognizes High Mannose Oligosaccharides1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Wyns, Lode; Imberty, Anne; Loris, Remy

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of Pterocarpus angolensis seed lectin is presented in complex with a series of high mannose (Man) oligosaccharides ranging from Man-5 to Man-9. Despite that several of the nine Man residues of Man-9 have the potential to bind in the monosaccharide-binding site, all oligomannoses are bound in the same unique way, employing the tetrasaccharide sequence Manα(1–2)Manα(1–6)[Manα(1–3)]Manα(1–. Isothermal titration calorimetry titration experiments using Man-5, Man-9, and the Man-9-containing glycoprotein soybean (Glycine max) agglutinin as ligands confirm the monovalence of Man-9 and show a 4-times higher affinity for Man-9 when it is presented to P. angolensis seed lectin in a glycoprotein context. PMID:17556509

  1. Multivalent presentation of mannose on hyperbranched polyglycerol and their interaction with concanavalin A lectin.

    PubMed

    Papp, Ilona; Dernedde, Jens; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Roy, René; Haag, Rainer

    2011-05-02

    We describe the synthesis of multivalent mannose derivatives by using hyperbranched polyglycerols (hPG) as a scaffold with different linker structures. Grafting of protected mannose (Man) units is achieved by using Cu(I) -catalyzed Huisgen click chemistry with either an anomeric azide or propargyl ether onto complementarily functionalized alkyne or azido polymer surfaces. NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), IR spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), and elemental analysis have been used to characterize the hPG-Man compounds. The surface availability and bioactivity of Man-modified polymers were evaluated by using a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based binding assay by interactions of the glycopolymers with concanavalin A (Con A), a lectin that binds mannose containing molecules. The results indicated that the novel glycoarchitectures presented in this work are efficient inhibitors of Con A-mannose recognition and resulted in inhibitor concentrations (mean IC(50)) from the micro- to the nanomolar range, whereas the corresponding monovalent mannoside (methyl-Man) requires millimolar concentrations. The results provide an interesting structure-activity relationship for libraries of materials that differ in the linkage of the sugar moiety presented on a biocompatible polyglycerol scaffold.

  2. Biodiversity of mannose-specific lectins within Narcissus species.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Susanna; Codina, Carlos; Bastida, Jaume; Viladomat, Francesc; Davidson, Elaine; Stewart, Derek

    2002-04-24

    Mannose-specific lectins (MSLs) were isolated from the bulbs of 27 species of wild Spanish Narcissi and compared to the commercially available MSL from daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus, NPA). Molecular weight analysis showed the monomers of all the MSLs were at, or around, 12.5 kD. Haemagglutination assays showed that the MSLs exhibited activities at up to four times greater than that displayed by NPA and other MSLs derived from other species such as Galanthus nivalus (snowdrop) and Allium ursinum (ramson). Elution profiles from ion exchange chromatography exhibited similarities for species within the same taxonomic section suggesting that this method could aid in species classification. Further analysis by isoelectric focusing showed many isolectins are present in vivo and that even within a single peak from ion exchange chromatography there are numerous isolectins present. The basis of the isolectin heterogeneity is suggested to reside in the tetraploidy (sometime triploidy) nature of Narcissus genes.

  3. Mannose-binding lectin gene polymorphic variants predispose to the development of bronchopulmonary complications but have no influence on other clinical and laboratory symptoms or signs of common variable immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Litzman, J; Freiberger, T; Grimbacher, B; Gathmann, B; Salzer, U; Pavlík, T; Vlček, J; Postránecká, V; Trávníčková, Z; Thon, V

    2008-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), activating protein of the lectin pathway of the complement system, is an important component of the non-specific immune response. MBL2 gene polymorphisms, both in the coding and promoter regions, lead to low or deficient serum MBL levels. Low serum MBL levels were shown to be associated with serious infectious complications, mainly in patients in whom other non-specific immune system barriers were disturbed (granulocytopenia, cystic fibrosis). We have analysed two promoter (−550 and −221) and three exon (codons 52, 54 and 57) MBL2 polymorphisms in a total of 94 patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) from two immunodeficiency centres. Low-producing genotypes were associated with the presence of bronchiectasis (P = 0·009), lung fibrosis (P = 0·037) and also with respiratory insufficiency (P = 0·029). We could not demonstrate any association of MBL deficiency with age at onset of clinical symptoms, age at diagnosis, the number of pneumonias before diagnosis or serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA and IgM levels before initiation of Ig treatment. No association with emphysema development was observed, such as with lung function test abnormalities. No effect of MBL2 genotypes on the presence of diarrhoea, granuloma formation, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, frequency of respiratory tract infection or the number of antibiotic courses of the patients was observed. Our study suggests that low MBL-producing genotypes predispose to bronchiectasis formation, and also fibrosis and respiratory insufficiency development, but have no effect on other complications in CVID patients. PMID:18637104

  4. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin. PMID:11988090

  5. Mannose Binding Lectin and Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Gene Polymorphisms in Turkish Children with Cardiomyopathy: No Association with MBL2 Codon 54 A/B Genotype, but an Association between MIF -173 CC Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Col-Araz, Nilgun; Oguzkan-Balci, Sibel; Baspinar, Osman; Sever, Tugce; Balat, Ayse; Pehlivan, Sacide

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial inflammation is one of the commonest mechanisms in cardiomyopathy (CMP). Mannose binding lectin (MBL) is a key molecule in innate immunity, while macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a constitutive element of the host defenses. We investigated the possible association between polymorphisms of MBL2 and MIF genes and CMP in Turkish children. Twenty-children with CMP and 30 healthy controls were analyzed for codon 54 A/B polymorphism in MBL, and -173 G/C polymorphism in MIF genes by using PCR-RFLP methods. No significant difference was found between genotypes and alleles of MBL2 gene codon 54 A/B polymorphism in patients and controls (p>0.05). However, serum uric acid levels was found higher in dilated CMP patients with AA genotype. Frequency of MIF -173 CC genotype was significantly higher in patients (p<0.05), and sodium levels were higher in patients with MIF -173 CC genotype. This study is the first to investigate the MBL and MIF gene polymorphisms in Turkish children with CMP. We conclude that CC genotype of MIF (-173) polymorphism may be a risk factor for CMP patients. However, further studies with larger samples are needed to address the exact role of this polymorphism in CMP. PMID:22927777

  6. Lectin-binding by sporozoites of Elmeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fuller, A L; McDougald, L R

    2002-02-01

    Sporozoites of Eimeria tenella were reacted in vitro with 19 different lectins characterized with a variety of carbohydrate-binding properties. Nine lectins caused sporozoite agglutination, which was inhibited by the specific carbohydrates mannose, sialic acid, melibiose, D-galactose, or D-galNAc. When intact live or fixed whole sporozoites were reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectins, another nine lectins bound to sporozoites, giving weak to strong fluorescence but not agglutination. Of these, all nine lectins bound to surface sites, but four also bound to the refractile body. Two of the agglutinating lectins also bound to intracellular organelles of air-dried sporozoites. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that biotinylated lectins bound a wide variety of parasite proteins. Lectins with similar carbohydrate specificities had some similarity in binding patterns of parasite proteins, as well as marked differences. In a few cases lectins with different carbohydrate specificities bound common protein bands. Only one lectin (Dolichos biflorus) showed no evidence of binding to whole sporozoites, organelles, or proteins.

  7. Purification, partial characterization, and CNBr-sepharose immobilization of a vasorelaxant glucose/mannose lectin from Canavalia virosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Osterne, Vinicius J S; Santiago, Mayara Q; Pinto-Junior, Vanir R; Cajazeiras, João B; Correia, Jorge L A; Leitão, Cintia C F; Carneiro, Rômulo F; Pereira-Junior, Francisco N; Vasconcelos, Mayron A; Rocha, Bruno A M; Assreuy, Ana Maria S; Bringel, Pedro Henrique S F; Nagano, Celso S; Nascimento, Kyria S; Cavada, Benildo S

    2014-04-01

    A novel mannose/glucose-binding lectin from Canavalia virosa (designated as ConV) has been purified from seeds of C. virosa by affinity chromatography on a mannose-Sepharose 4B column. ConV strongly agglutinates rabbit erythrocytes and was inhibited by monosaccharides (D-mannose, D-glucose, and α-methyl-D-mannoside) and glycoproteins (ovalbumin and fetuin). SDS-PAGE revealed three bands corresponding to three subunits (α, β, and γ) confirmed by ESI mass spectrometry with exact mass of 25,480 ± 2 Da, 12,864 ± 1 Da, and 12,633 ± 1 Da, respectively. The purified lectin was more stable in pH ranging from 7.0 to 9.0, supported up to 80 ºC without any loss in activity and unaffected by EDTA. ConV showed no toxicity against Artemia sp. nauplii and relaxed endothelized rat aorta, with the participation of the lectin domain. In our tests, the lectin immobilized on CNBr-Sepharose was capable of binding 0.8 mg of ovalbumin per chromatography, allowing the use of ConV as a tool for capture and purification of glycoproteins.

  8. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, plays a potent adjuvant and immunostimulatory role in immunization against Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Mariana R D; Mota, Caroline M; Ribeiro, Dâmaso P; Santiago, Fernanda M; Carvalho, Julianne V; Araujo, Ester C B; Silva, Neide M; Mineo, Tiago W P; Roque-Barreira, Maria C; Mineo, José R; Silva, Deise A O

    2011-11-15

    ArtinM and Jacalin (JAC) are lectins from the jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) that have important role in modulation of immune responses to pathogens. Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexa parasite that causes neuromuscular disease in dogs and reproductive disorders in cattle, with economic impact on the livestock industry. Hence, we evaluated the adjuvant effect of ArtinM and JAC in immunization of mice against neosporosis. Six C57BL/6 mouse groups were subcutaneously immunized three times at 2-week intervals with Neospora lysate antigen (NLA) associated with lectins (NLA+ArtinM and NLA+JAC), NLA, ArtinM and JAC alone, and PBS (infection control). Animals were challenged with lethal dose of Nc-1 isolate and evaluated for morbidity, mortality, specific antibody response, cytokine production by spleen cells, brain parasite burden and inflammation. Our results demonstrated that ArtinM was able to increase NLA immunogenicity, inducing the highest levels of specific total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, ex vivo Th1 cytokine production, increased survival, the lowest brain parasite burden, along with the highest inflammation scores. In contrast, NLA+JAC immunized group showed intermediate survival, the highest brain parasite burden and the lowest inflammation scores. In conclusion, ArtinM presents stronger immunostimulatory and adjuvant effect than Jacalin in immunization of mice against neosporosis, by inducing a protective Th1-biased pro-inflammatory immune response and higher protection after parasite challenge. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Polymorphisms of Mannose-binding Lectin and Toll-like Receptors 2, 3, 4, 7 and 8 and the Risk of Respiratory Infections and Acute Otitis Media in Children.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Laura; Vuononvirta, Juho; Mertsola, Jussi; Waris, Matti; He, Qiushui; Peltola, Ville

    2017-05-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important components of the innate immune system. We assessed the susceptibility of children with genetic variants in these factors to respiratory infections, rhinovirus infections and acute otitis media. In a prospective cohort study, blood samples from 381 Finnish children were analyzed for polymorphisms in MBL2 at codons 52, 54 and 57, TLR2 Arg753Gln, TLR3 Leu412Phe, TLR4 Asp299Gly, TLR7 Gln11Leu and TLR8 Leu651Leu. Children were followed up for respiratory infections until 24 months of age with daily diaries. Polymerase chain reaction and antigen tests were used for detection of respiratory viruses from nasal swabs. Children with MBL variant genotype had a mean of 59 days with symptoms of respiratory infection per year, compared with 49 days in those with wild-type (P = 0.01). TLR8 polymorphisms were associated with an increased risk and TLR7 polymorphisms with a decreased risk of recurrent rhinovirus infections (P = 0.02 for both). TLR2 polymorphisms were associated with recurrent acute otitis media (P = 0.02). MBL polymorphisms were associated with an increased and TLR7 polymorphisms with a decreased risk of rhinovirus-associated acute otitis media (P = 0.03 and P = 0.006, respectively). Genetic polymorphisms in MBL and TLRs promote susceptibility to or protection against respiratory infections. In addition to environmental factors, genetic variations may explain why some children are more prone to respiratory infections.

  10. Structure of the native (unligated) mannose-specific bulb lectin from Scilla campanulata (bluebell) at 1.7 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D; Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J

    1999-07-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of native Scilla campanulata agglutinin, a mannose-specific lectin from bluebell bulbs and a member of the Liliaceae family, has been determined by molecular replacement and refined to an R value of 0.186 at 1.7 A resolution. The lectin crystallizes in space group P21212 with unit-cell parameters a = 70. 42, b = 92.95, c = 46.64 A. The unit cell contains eight protein molecules of Mr = 13143 Da (119 amino-acid residues). The asymmetric unit comprises two chemically identical molecules, A and B, related by a non-crystallographic twofold axis perpendicular to c. This dimer further associates by crystallographic twofold symmetry to form a tetramer. The fold of the polypeptide backbone closely resembles that found in the lectins from Galanthus nivalis (snowdrop) and Hippeastrum (amaryllis) and contains a threefold symmetric beta-prism made up of three antiparallel four-stranded beta-sheets. Each of the four-stranded beta-sheets (I, II and III) possesses a potential saccharide-binding site containing conserved residues; however, site II has two mutations relative to sites I and III which may prevent ligation at this site. Our study provides the first accurate and detailed description of a native (unligated) structure from this superfamily of mannose-specific bulb lectins and will allow comparisons with a number of lectin-saccharide complexes which have already been determined or are currently under investigation.

  11. Lectin binding to cystic stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, R M; Williams, J F

    1984-10-01

    Studies of membrane glycoconjugates of Taenia taeniaeformis were initiated by assays of the lectin binding characteristics of 35-day-old cysticerci. Parasites fixed in glutaraldehyde were incubated with one of the following FITC-labelled lectins: Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), peanut agglutinin (PNA), fucose binding protein (FBP) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and either their specific or a nonspecific sugar. Ultraviolet microscopy revealed that only Con A and LCA bound in large amounts to the surface of cysticerci. This binding was partly inhibited by the specific sugar, but the nonspecific sugar had little effect. The lectin not removed by either of the sugars may have been bound nonspecifically to the charged glycocalyx. Lectins were primarily bound on the anterior third of the parasite around the scolex invagination. Kinetic studies of lectin interactions were carried out with LCA and RCA by spectrophotofluorometric analysis of the amount bound specifically or nonspecifically over a range of lectin concentrations. Lens culinaris lectin binding was found to be specific and involve 2 receptors which showed large differences in their affinity for lectin and prevalence on the surface. Ricinus communis lectin did not bind specifically but nonspecific interactions were observed. Adherence of small numbers of host cells was shown to have no measurable effect on the lectin binding characteristics. The results suggest that the major surface carbohydrates exposed are D-mannose and/or D-glucose residues with the other sugar groups poorly represented. This relatively homogeneous surface may have implications for the antigenicity of the parasite in its host.

  12. Identification, Characterization, and X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of a Novel Type of Mannose-Specific Lectin CGL1 from the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Unno, Hideaki; Matsuyama, Kazuki; Tsuji, Yoshiteru; Goda, Shuichiro; Hiemori, Keiko; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2016-01-01

    A novel mannose-specific lectin, named CGL1 (15.5 kDa), was isolated from the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Characterization of CGL1 involved isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), glycoconjugate microarray, and frontal affinity chromatography (FAC). This analysis revealed that CGL1 has strict specificity for the mannose monomer and for high mannose-type N-glycans (HMTGs). Primary structure of CGL1 did not show any homology with known lectins but did show homology with proteins of the natterin family. Crystal structure of the CGL1 revealed a unique homodimer in which each protomer was composed of 2 domains related by a pseudo two-fold axis. Complex structures of CGL1 with mannose molecules showed that residues have 8 hydrogen bond interactions with O1, O2, O3, O4, and O5 hydroxyl groups of mannose. The complex interactions that are not observed with other mannose-binding lectins revealed the structural basis for the strict specificity for mannose. These characteristics of CGL1 may be helpful as a research tool and for clinical applications. PMID:27377186

  13. Effects of lectins with various carbohydrate binding specificities on lipid metabolism in isolated rat and hamster adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1989-01-01

    1. Mannose-binding and N-acetylglucosamine binding lectins exhibited potent antilipolytic and lipogenic activities. 2. Fucose-binding lectins had minimal lipogenic activity but possessed antilipolytic activity. 3. Most galactose-binding and N-acetylgalactosamine-binding lectins were devoid of significant antilipolytic and lipogenic activities. Notable exceptions were lectins from Momordica charantia, Wisteria floribunda, Vicia villosa, Codium fragile and the Siberian pine tree. lipogenic activity but lacked antilipolytic activity. 5. The galactose-binding horse gram and osage orange lectins exerted antilipolytic activity in hamster but not in rat adipocytes.

  14. Mannose incorporation and lectin recognition of pronase-sensitive components in Micrococcus lysodeikticus (M. luteus) membranes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Muñoz, E; Larraga, V

    1986-02-01

    Isolated cytoplasmic membranes from Micrococcus lysodeikticus were able to incorporate [14C]mannose from GDP-[14C]mannose. Labelled mannose remained in the membrane fraction after its repeated washing and lipid extraction. Sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in 12% acrylamide showed a set of bands with molecular weights ranging from 230 000 to 19 000 which stained for protein and carbohydrate, and incorporated [14C]mannose. Some of these bands reacted with different lectins (concanavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin and ricin). Furthermore, the mannose was incorporated via a glycosylation pathway similar to that followed in eukaryotic system as shown by the preliminary identification of a lipid intermediate transferring the sugar to proteins and by the differential sensitivity to bacitracin and tunicamycin. These complex membrane components were sensitive to digestion with pronase. All the results presented suggest their glycoprotein nature.

  15. The monomeric and dimeric mannose-binding proteins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata and Epipactis helleborine: sequence homologies and differences in biological activities.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Balzarini, J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-08-01

    The Orchidaceae species Listera ovata and Epipactis helleborine contain two types of mannose-binding proteins. Using a combination of affinity chromatography on mannose-Sepharose-4B and ion exchange chromatography on a Mono-S column eight different mannose-binding proteins were isolated from the leaves of Listera ovata. Whereas seven of these mannose-binding proteins have agglutination activity and occur as dimers composed of lectin subunits of 11-13 kDa, the eighth mannose-binding protein is a monomer of 14 kDa devoid of agglutination activity. Moreover, the monomeric mannose-binding protein does not react with an antiserum raised against the dimeric lectin and, in contrast to the lectins, is completely inactive when tested for antiretroviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2. Mannose-binding proteins with similar properties were also found in the leaves of Epipactis helleborine. However, in contrast to Listera only one lectin was found in Epipactis. Despite the obvious differences in molecular structure and biological activities molecular cloning of different mannose-binding proteins from Listera and Epipactis has shown that these proteins are related and some parts of the sequences show a high degree of sequence homology indicating that they have been conserved through evolution.

  16. Interactions of five D-mannose-specific lectins with a series of synthetic branched trisaccharides.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Oscarson, S

    1991-06-25

    The interaction of a series of synthetic, branched trisaccharides with five D-mannose-specific lectins was studied by precipitation-inhibition assay. The branched methyl alpha-D-mannotrioside, alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe, the best inhibitor of the Con A-Dextran interaction, was 42 times more potent than alpha-D-ManpOMe, and 3-6 times more potent than the two trisaccharides substituted with D-glucosyl groups, and 8-15 times those with D-galactosyl groups. Surprisingly, methyl O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside was bound to Con A 8-fold more avidly than methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. However, the related pea lectin (PSA) was singularly different from Con A in its carbohydrate-binding activity, showing no significantly enhanced binding to any of the sugars examined. The trisacchrides containing terminal, nonreducing, (1----3)-linked alpha-D-mannopyranosyl groups, i.e., alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Glep-(1----6)]alpha-D-Manp OMe, alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)]-alpha-D-Galp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-ManpOMe++ +, and alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe, were the best inhibitors of the snowdrop lectin (GNA)-D-mannan precipitation system. On the other hand, all branched trisaccharides exhibited very similar inhibitory potencies toward the daffodil lectin (NPA)-D-mannan interaction, whereas alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Galp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-ManpOMe++ + and alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe were somewhat better inhibitors than the other branched trisaccharides of the amaryllis lectin (HHA)-D-mannan precipitation reaction. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Gliadins bind to reticulin in a lectin-like manner.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, D J; Leonard, J N; Hobday, C M; Griffiths, C E; Powles, A V; Haffenden, G P; Fry, L

    1987-01-01

    It has previously been reported that gliadins bind to reticulin in tissue sections. Three lines of evidence are reported in this study which indicate that the gliadins bind to reticulins because they are lectins which bind to sugars expressed on glycoproteins in reticulin and other sites. First, immunofluorescence studies on tissue sections showed that although gliadin binding is largely confined to areas rich in reticulin, it is, nonetheless, also seen in one or two other sites devoid of reticulin. Second, by using fluorescein-labelled lectins of known specificity, it has been shown that the areas to which gliadins bind in tissue sections (including those sites devoid of reticulin) are rich in particular sugars. Third, it has been shown that one of these sugars, alpha-D-mannose, partially inhibited gliadin binding to tissue sections.

  18. Strict specificity for high-mannose type N-glycans and primary structure of a red alga Eucheuma serra lectin.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kanji; Sato, Yuichiro; Ito, Kaori; Fujiwara, Yoshifumi; Iwamoto, Yasumasa; Makino, Hiroyuki; Kawakubo, Akihiro

    2007-05-01

    We have elucidated the carbohydrate-binding profile of a non-monosaccharide-binding lectin named Eucheuma serra lectin (ESA)-2 from the red alga Eucheuma serra using a lectin-immobilized column and a centrifugal ultrafiltration-high performance liquid chromatography method with a variety of fluorescence-labeled oligosaccharides. In both methods, ESA-2 exclusively bound with high-mannose type (HM) N-glycans, but not with any of other N-glycans including complex type, hybrid type and core pentasaccharides, and oligosaccharides from glycolipids. These findings indicate that ESA-2 recognizes the branched oligomannosides of the N-glycans. However, ESA-2 did not bind with any of the free oligomannoses examined that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides implying that the portion of the core N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residue(s) of the N-glycans is also essential for binding. Thus, the algal lectin was strictly specific for HM N-glycans and recognized the extended carbohydrate structure with a minimum size of the pentasaccharide, Man(alpha1-3)Man(alpha1-6)Man(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-4) GlcNAc. Kinetic analysis of binding with a HM heptasaccharide (M5) showed that ESA-2 has four carbohydrate-binding sites per polypeptide with a high association constant of 1.6x10(8) M-1. Sequence analysis, by a combination of Edman degradation and mass analyses of the intact protein and of peptides produced by its enzymic digestions, showed that ESA-2 is composed of 268 amino acids (molecular weight 27950) with four tandemly repeated domains of 67 amino acids. The number of repeats coincided with the number of carbohydrate-binding sites in the monomeric molecule. Surprisingly, the marine algal lectin was homologous to hemagglutinin from the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus.

  19. Mannose-binding geometry of pradimicin A.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yu; Doi, Takashi; Taketani, Takara; Takegoshi, K; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-08-05

    Pradimicins (PRMs) and benanomicins are the only family of non-peptidic natural products with lectin-like properties, that is, they recognize D-mannopyranoside (Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Coupled with their unique Man binding ability, they exhibit antifungal and anti-HIV activities through binding to Man-containing glycans of pathogens. Notwithstanding the great potential of PRMs as the lectin mimics and therapeutic leads, their molecular basis of Man recognition has yet to be established. Their aggregate-forming propensity has impeded conventional interaction analysis in solution, and the analytical difficulty is exacerbated by the existence of two Man binding sites in PRMs. In this work, we investigated the geometry of the primary Man binding of PRM-A, an original member of PRMs, by the recently developed analytical strategy using the solid aggregate composed of the 1:1 complex of PRM-A and Man. Evaluation of intermolecular distances by solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the C2-C4 region of Man is in close contact with the primary binding site of PRM-A, while the C1 and C6 positions of Man are relatively distant. The binding geometry was further validated by co-precipitation experiments using deoxy-Man derivatives, leading to the proposal that PRM-A binds not only to terminal Man residues at the non-reducing end of glycans, but also to internal 6-substituted Man residues. The present study provides new insights into the molecular basis of Man recognition and glycan specificity of PRM-A. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Lectin binding patterns and carbohydrate mediation of sperm binding to llama oviductal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Apichela, Silvana A; Valz-Gianinet, Jorge N; Schuster, Stefanie; Jiménez-Díaz, María A; Roldán-Olarte, Eugenia M; Miceli, Dora C

    2010-04-01

    Sperm binding to oviductal epithelium would be involved in sperm reservoir formation in the utero tubal junction (UTJ). Although in other mammals sperm-oviduct interaction has been proved to be mediated by carbohydrate-recognition mechanisms, the factors implicated in the sperm adhesion to oviductal epithelium of llama are still unknown. In order to assess the role of carbohydrates present in the mucosa surface, we examined the distribution of glycoconjugates in the llama oviduct by confocal lectin-histochemistry. Mannosyl, glucosyl, N-acetylglucosaminyl, galactosyl, N-acetylgalactosaminyl and sialic acid residues were detected in the oviductal mucose glycocalyx. By incubation of UTJ oviductal explants with LCA, DBA, UEA-1 or PNA lectin previous to co-culture with sperm, we observed a significant decrease in sperm binding only with LCA lectin. In the mucosa surface there were numerous d-glucosyl and D-manosyl residues, which were spotted by this lectin. Probably, this fact promotes the whole covering of the oviduct luminal surface by the sugar-lectin complex, preventing sperm access and adhesion of further residues. However, sperm incubation with mannose or glucose does not significantly prevent binding, which means that glucose and mannose would not be involved in a specific sperm-oviduct interaction. On the other hand, we observed a high reduction in sperm binding to UTJ explants with N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose (p<0.001). Coincidentally, binding sites for N-acetylgalactosamine-PAA-FITC conjugate were observed on the whole surface of the sperm, supporting the concept that llama sperm have lectin-like molecules in their surface, as is the case in other mammals. Probably, these lectin-like molecules, by means of N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose recognition, could link the sperm to the oviductal mucosa with the purpose of forming storing sites in the UTJ. Our results support the idea that more than one carbohydrate could participate in sperm reservoir

  1. Stability, subunit interactions and carbohydrate-binding of the seed lectin from Pterocarpus angolensis.

    PubMed

    Echemendia-Blanco, Dannele; Van Driessche, Edilbert; Ncube, Ignatious; Read, John S; Beeckmans, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    From 1 kg of defatted Pterocarpus angolensis (mukwa tree) seed meal, 21.6 grams of an alpha,D-mannose/glucose-specific lectin can be purified on mannose-Sepharose. Relative affinities for several (oligo)saccharides and glycoproteins were studied by haemagglutination-inhibition. Gel filtration shows that the lectin exists as a dimer above pH 5 and as a monomer below pH 3.5. This is confirmed by studies on the release of lectin subunits that were adsorbed from solution to lectin monomers immobilized onto Eupergit-c. From the gel filtration patterns it is calculated that a residue with pK(a) of about 4.4 is involved in dimer dissociation. Titration of glutamic acids (E60, E209) is postulated to be involved. CD spectroscopy shows that the secondary structure of the lectin is unchanged between pH 1 and 12.5, and that the tertiary structure remains unchanged between pH 5 and 12. In the acid pH region, reversible spectral changes occur that may be due to the titration of one or more amino acids with a pK(a) value of 3.9-4.2, probably aspartic acid. These residues are implicated in sugar-binding but not in dimerization of the lectin. Only at pH 12.5, irreversible denaturation occurs. Mukwa lectin displays full carbohydrate-binding capacity between pH 4 and 12, as is concluded from ELLA (Enzyme Linked Lectin Assay) using ovalbumin and fetuin, and from binding of the same glycoproteins to immobilized lectin monomers. The lectin is rapidly and fully reversibly demetallized at pH 2.5 with 5 mM EDTA. The demetallized lectin is completely devoid of sugar-binding activity. Mukwa lectin is a very thermostable molecule (at least till 85 degrees C). However, addition of non-ionic detergents substantially lowers its thermostability.

  2. Profile of Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus to Mannose-Specific Plant Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, Jan; Van Laethem, Kristel; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; De Clercq, Erik; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Böhlmstedt, Anders; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    The mannose-specific plant lectins from the Amaryllidaceae family (e.g., Hippeastrum sp. hybrid and Galanthus nivalis) inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of human lymphocytic cells in the higher nanogram per milliliter range and suppress syncytium formation between persistently HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells and uninfected CD4+ T cells. These lectins inhibit virus entry. When exposed to escalating concentrations of G. nivalis and Hippeastrum sp. hybrid agglutinin, a variety of HIV-1(IIIB) strains were isolated after 20 to 40 subcultivations which showed a decreased sensitivity to the plant lectins. Several amino acid changes in the envelope glycoprotein gp120, but not in gp41, of the mutant virus isolates were observed. The vast majority of the amino acid changes occurred at the N glycosylation sites and at the S or T residues that are part of the N glycosylation motif. The degree of resistance to the plant lectins was invariably correlated with an increasing number of mutated glycosylation sites in gp120. The nature of these mutations was entirely different from that of mutations that are known to appear in HIV-1 gp120 under the pressure of other viral entry inhibitors such as dextran sulfate, bicyclams (i.e., AMD3100), and chicoric acid, which also explains the lack of cross-resistance of plant lectin-resistant viruses to any other HIV inhibitor including T-20 and the blue-green algae (cyanobacteria)-derived mannose-specific cyanovirin. The plant lectins represent a well-defined class of anti-HIV (microbicidal) drugs with a novel HIV drug resistance profile different from those of other existing anti-HIV drugs. PMID:15367629

  3. Lectin-binding sites in epithelial cells of the mouse prostate gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Kentaro; Yoshida, Ayaka; Muragishi, Ryoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    The prostate is an exocrine gland in the male reproductive tract that secretes seminal fluids. To gain insight into the cytochemical properties of prostatic epithelial cells, the characteristics of glycoconjugates in mouse prostate sections were examined by lectin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Characteristic staining patterns were observed, depending on the type of lectins present in the epithelia. Luminal cells reacted specifically with mannose-binding lectins (Galanthus nivalis lectin, Hippeastrum hybrid lectin, Narcissus pseudonarcissus lectin) and Maclura pomifera lectin in all lobes of the prostate. Luminal cells also expressed galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), and fucose residues in the lateral and ventral lobes. Basal cells expressed GlcNAc and fucose, and reacted with Datura stramonium lectin and Aleuria aurantia lectin in all lobes. These results indicate that in the mouse prostate, the selectivity of lectin-binding sites for distinct cell types and lobe-dependent staining may relate to cellular and regional differences in function. Furthermore, some lectins selectively bound to prostatic epithelial cells, indicating their potential use as markers for the histopathological evaluation of prostatic diseases, cancer diagnosis, or male infertility.

  4. Influence of glycosidic linkage on the nature of carbohydrate binding in beta-prism I fold lectins: an X-ray and molecular dynamics investigation on banana lectin-carbohydrate complexes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, Mamannamana

    2011-01-01

    The three crystal structures reported here provide details of the interactions of mannose and the mannosyl-α-1,3-mannose component of a pentamannose with banana lectin and evidence for the binding of glucosyl-α-1,2-glucose to the lectin. The known structures involving the lectin include a complex with glucosyl-β-1,3-glucose. Modeling studies on the three disaccharide complexes with the reducing end and the nonreducing end at the primary binding site are also provided here. The results of the X-ray and modeling studies show that the disaccharides with an α-1,3 linkage prefer to have the nonreducing end at the primary binding site, whereas the reducing end is preferred at the site when the linkage is β-1,3 in mannose/glucose-specific β-prism I fold lectins. In the corresponding galactose-specific lectins, however, α-1,3-linked disaccharides cannot bind the lectin with the nonreducing end at the primary binding site on account of steric clashes with an aromatic residue that occurs only when the lectin is galactose-specific. Molecular dynamics simulations based on the known structures involving banana lectin enrich the information on lectin-carbohydrate interactions obtained from crystal structures. They demonstrate that conformational selection as well as induced fit operate when carbohydrates bind to banana lectin.

  5. Mannose glycoconjugates functionalized at positions 1 and 6. Binding analysis to DC-SIGN using biosensors.

    PubMed

    Reina, José J; Maldonado, Olivia S; Tabarani, Georges; Fieschi, Franck; Rojo, Javier

    2007-01-01

    The design of glycoconjugates to allow the generation of multivalent ligands capable of interacting with the receptor DC-SIGN is a topic of high interest due to the role played by this lectin in pathogen infections. Mannose, a ligand of this lectin, could be conjugated at two different positions, 1 and 6, not implicated in the binding process. We have prepared mannose conjugates at these two positions with a long spacer to allow their attachment to a biosensor chip surface. Analysis of the interaction between these surfaces and the tetravalent extracellular domain (ECD) of DC-SIGN by SPR biosensor has demonstrated that both positions are available for this conjugation without affecting the protein binding process. These results emphasize the possibility to conjugate mannose at position 6, allowing the incorporation of hydrophobic groups at the anomeric position to interact with hydrophobic residues in the carbohydrate recognition domain of DC-SIGN, increasing binding affinities. This fact is relevant for the future design of new ligands and the corresponding multivalent systems for DC-SIGN.

  6. Differences in the mannose oligomer specificities of the closely related lectins from Galanthus nivalis and Zea mays strongly determine their eventual anti-HIV activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a recent report, the carbohydrate-binding specificities of the plant lectins Galanthus nivalis (GNA) and the closely related lectin from Zea mays (GNAmaize) were determined by glycan array analysis and indicated that GNAmaize recognizes complex-type N-glycans whereas GNA has specificity towards high-mannose-type glycans. Both lectins are tetrameric proteins sharing 64% sequence similarity. Results GNAmaize appeared to be ~20- to 100-fold less inhibitory than GNA against HIV infection, syncytia formation between persistently HIV-1-infected HuT-78 cells and uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte SupT1 cells, HIV-1 capture by DC-SIGN and subsequent transmission of DC-SIGN-captured virions to uninfected CD4+ T-lymphocyte cells. In contrast to GNA, which preferentially selects for virus strains with deleted high-mannose-type glycans on gp120, prolonged exposure of HIV-1 to dose-escalating concentrations of GNAmaize selected for mutant virus strains in which one complex-type glycan of gp120 was deleted. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis revealed that GNA and GNAmaize interact with HIV IIIB gp120 with affinity constants (KD) of 0.33 nM and 34 nM, respectively. Whereas immobilized GNA specifically binds mannose oligomers, GNAmaize selectively binds complex-type GlcNAcβ1,2Man oligomers. Also, epitope mapping experiments revealed that GNA and the mannose-specific mAb 2G12 can independently bind from GNAmaize to gp120, whereas GNAmaize cannot efficiently bind to gp120 that contained prebound PHA-E (GlcNAcβ1,2man specific) or SNA (NeuAcα2,6X specific). Conclusion The markedly reduced anti-HIV activity of GNAmaize compared to GNA can be explained by the profound shift in glycan recognition and the disappearance of carbohydrate-binding sites in GNAmaize that have high affinity for mannose oligomers. These findings underscore the need for mannose oligomer recognition of therapeutics to be endowed with anti-HIV activity and that mannose, but not complex-type glycan

  7. Solubility-insolubility interconversion of sophoragrin, a mannose/glucose-specific lectin in Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) bark, regulated by the sugar-specific interaction.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Haruko; Fukushima, Hisako; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Ogawa, Haruko

    2004-09-15

    Sophoragrin, a mannose/glucose-specific lectin in Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) bark, was the first lectin found to show self-aggregation that is dependent on the sugar concentration accompanying the interconversion between solubility and insolubility [Ueno, Ogawa, Matsumoto and Seno (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 3146-3153]. The interconversion is regulated by the concentrations of Ca(2+) and specific sugars: mannose, glucose or sucrose. The specific glycotopes for sophoragrin were found in the sophoragrin subunit and an endogenous galactose-specific lectin, B-SJA-I (bark S. japonica agglutinin I), and the lectin subunit that binds to the glycotope was identified by photoaffinity glycan probes. Remarkably, the insoluble polymer of sophoragrin is dissociated by interaction with B-SJA-I into various soluble complexes. Based on these results, self-aggregation of sophoragrin was shown to be a unique homopolymerization due to the sugar-specific interaction. An immunostaining study indicated that sophoragrin localizes mainly in vacuoles of parenchymal cells coincidently with B-SJA-I. These results indicate that sophoragrin can sequester endogenous glycoprotein ligands via sugar-specific interactions, thus providing new insights into the occurrence and significance of the intravacuolar interaction shown by a legume lectin.

  8. Alpha-(1-3)- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific plant lectins are markedly inhibitory to human immunodeficiency virus and cytomegalovirus infections in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Schols, D; Neyts, J; Van Damme, E; Peumans, W; De Clercq, E

    1991-01-01

    The alpha-(1-3)-D-mannose- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific agglutinins (lectins) from Galanthus nivalis, Hippeastrum hybrid, Narcissus pseudonarcissus, and Listera ovata inhibited infection of MT-4 cells by human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) and simian immunodeficiency virus at concentrations comparable to the concentrations at which dextran sulfate (molecular weight, 5,000 [DS-5000]) inhibits these viruses (50% effective concentration, 0.2 to 0.6 microgram/ml). Unlike DS-5000, however, the plant lectins did not inhibit the replication of other enveloped viruses, except for human cytomegalovirus (50% effective concentration, 0.9 to 1.6 microgram/ml). The plant lectins suppressed syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1- or HIV-2-infected HUT-78 cells and uninfected MOLT-4 (clone 8) cells at concentrations that were 5- to 10-fold lower than that required for DS-5000. Unlike DS-5000, however, the plant lectins did not inhibit HIV-1 binding to CD4+ cells. Combination of the plant lectins with DS-5000 led to a potent synergistic inhibition of HIV-1-induced cytopathogenicity in MT-4 cells and syncytium formation between HIV-infected HUT-78 cells and MOLT-4 cells. Our data suggest that alpha-(1-3)-D- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose-specific plant lectins interfere with an event in the HIV replicative cycle that is subsequent to the attachment of the virions to the cells (i.e., the fusion process). PMID:1645507

  9. N-glycan analysis of mannose/glucose specific lectin from Dolichos lablab seeds.

    PubMed

    B S, Gnanesh Kumar; Pohlentz, Gottfried; Schulte, Mona; Mormann, Michael; Nadimpalli, Siva Kumar

    2014-08-01

    An affinity purified mannose/glucose specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab (Indian bean/lablab bean) resolves into five subunits upon SDS-PAGE in the range of Mr 12-20kDa. Partial de novo sequencing of subunits resulted in 88% and 73% sequence coverage for α and β subunits of the cDNA derived FRIL (Flt3 receptor interacting lectin) sequence, respectively and suggested that four bands correspond to the α-subunits while the band of lowest molecular mass is designated as β. It was proposed in an earlier study on FRIL that the difference in molecular mass of α-subunits is due to differences in C-terminal processing and differential N-glycosylation i.e. numbers of N-glycans present (Colucci et al., 1999). Thus, differential N-glycosylation of the purified mannose/glucose specific lectin was unravelled by in-gel trypsin/chymotrypsin digestion of the α-subunits followed by desalting and ZIC-HILIC enrichment of N-glycopeptides. Subsequently, analyses by nano electrospray ionisation quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry and low-energy collision-induced dissociation experiments revealed the presence of a typical paucimannose type N-glycan (Man2(Xyl)GlcNAc2(Fuc)) in α subunits 2-4.

  10. Lectin binding pattern and proteoglycan distribution in human eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Sames, K; Moll, I; van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Schumacher, U

    1999-11-01

    The distribution pattern of glycoconjugates in human eccrine sweat glands has been studied by the binding of newly discovered lectins and by antibodies against a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and chondroitin sulphate glycosaminoglycans. Mannose-specific lectins labelled large intracellular granules, part of which could be extended cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus. In contrast, lectins specific for terminal mannose/glucose residues predominantly labelled basement membranes and the glycocalyx. Lectins recognizing terminal N-acetylgalactosamine groups left most parts of the glands unstained, but stained some dark cells intensely. These last cells were also intensively labelled by N-acetylglucosamine-specific and by fucose-specific lectins. Sialic acid residues were preferentially located in luminal borders of secretory coils. No terminal galactose residues were detected. All antibodies against chondroitin glycoconjugates stained large granules similar to those revealed by the mannose-specific lectins in the secretory cells. The basement membrane is only stained by the proteoglycan antibody and the chondroitin-6-sulphate antibody. Thus, a complex composition of glycoconjugates exists not only in matrix elements but also in the cells of eccrine glands of the human skin. A possible secretion of glycoconjugates is discussed.

  11. Cyborg lectins: novel leguminous lectins with unique specificities.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Maruyama, I N; Osawa, T

    2000-01-01

    Bauhinia purpurea lectin (BPA) is one of the beta-galactose-binding leguminous lectins. Leguminous lectins contain a long metal-binding loop, part of which determines their carbohydrate-binding specificities. Random mutations were introduced into a portion of the cDNA coding BPA that corresponds to the carbohydrate-binding loop of the lectin. An library of the mutant lectin expressed on the surface of lambda foo phages was screened by the panning method. Several phage clones with an affinity for mannose or N-acetylglucosamine were isolated. These results indicate the possibility of making artificial lectins (so-called "cyborg lectins") with distinct and desired carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  12. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  13. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  14. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  15. Influence of ligand presentation density on the molecular recognition of mannose-functionalised glyconanoparticles by bacterial lectin BC2L-A.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Michael; Marradi, Marco; Imberty, Anne; Penadés, Soledad; Pérez, Serge

    2013-11-01

    Polyvalent carbohydrate-protein interactions play a key role in bio- and pathological processes, including cell-cell communication and pathogen invasion. In order to study, control and manipulate these interactions gold nanoparticles have been employed as a 3D scaffold, presenting carbohydrate ligands in a multivalent fashion for use as high affinity binding partners and a model system for oligosaccharide presentation at biomacromolecular surfaces. In this study, the binding of a series of mannose-functionalised gold nanoparticles to the dimeric BC2L-A lectin from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been evaluated. BC2L-A is known to exhibit a high specificity for (oligo)mannosides. Due to the unique structure and binding nature of this lectin, it provides a useful tool to study (oligo)saccharides presented on multivalent scaffolds. Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetric assays were used to investigate the effect of ligand presentation density towards binding to the bacterial lectin. We show how a combination of structural complementarities between ligand presentation and lectin architecture and statistical re-binding effects are important for increasing the avidity of multivalent ligands for recognition by their protein receptors; further demonstrating the application of glyconanotechnology towards fundamental glycobiology research as well as a potential towards biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic treatments.

  16. Biosensor for selective detection of E. coli in spinach using the strong affinity of derivatized mannose with fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed

    Yazgan, Idris; Noah, Naumih M; Toure, Ousmane; Zhang, Siyi; Sadik, Omowunmi A

    2014-11-15

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination in foods and water resources represents a major threat for human health and the environment. This work exploits the strong affinity of mannose-containing oligosaccharides with the fimbrial lectin of E. coli to design novel biosensors. Modified carbohydrate ligands were synthesized by introducing phenyl residues and aliphatic chains to mannose via reductive amination in order to increase both the affinity and selectivity to E. coli compared to other pathogenic bacteria. The synthesized ligands include p-thiolphenyl aminomannose (PTAM), p-carboxyphenyl aminomannose (PCAM), 1-deoxy-1-aminomannopyranoside (DAMP), glucosamine and low molecular weight chitosan bonded to mercapto undecanoic acid. The structures of the ligands were confirmed using (1)H NMR and 1H, (13)C, COZY NMR, and ESI/MS. The ligands were immobilized onto gold electrodes and SPR surfaces using-mercaptoundecanoic acid with glycine as deactivating agent. Two detection mechanisms were tested: (i) metal-enhanced electrochemical detection (MED) and (ii) label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection. The introduction of phenyl residues and aliphatic side groups to the mannose-containing oligosaccharides produced extremely high affinity for E. coli with detection limit of 1 cfu/mL. The relative selectivity of these ligands for E. coli, Citrobacter freundii, Staphylococcus epidermidis were 100%, 2.6% and 8.6% respectively. The biosensors were validated using spinach leaves at 3.0 cfu/mL. The work provides a generic biosensor for other pathogenic bacteria by enabling multivalent binding, immediate recognition for pathogens as well as inhibition of bacterial growth.

  17. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  18. Endocytosis of lysosomal acid phosphatase; involvement of mannose receptor and effect of lectins.

    PubMed

    Imai, K; Yoshimura, T

    1994-08-01

    Acid phosphatase and beta-glucosidase are unique among lysosomal enzymes in that they have both high mannose and complex type sugasr chains, whereas oligosaccharide chains of lysosomal enzymes in matrix are of high mannose type. We have previously shown that beta-glucosidase was endocytosed into macrophages via an unidentified receptor different from a mannose/fucose receptor (K. Imai, Cell Struct. Funct. 13, 325-332, 1988). Here, we show that uptake of acid phosphatase purified from rat liver lysosomes into rat macrophages was inhibited by ligands for a mannose/fucose receptor and was mediated via an apparently single binding site with Kuptake of 24.7 nM. These results indicate that acid phosphatase and beta-glucosidase recognize different types of receptors even if they have similar sugar chains. Polyvalent concanavalin A which binds both to the enzyme and to macrophages specifically stimulated the uptake in a dose dependent manner, whereas wheat germ agglutinin and phytohaemagglutinin did not.

  19. Investigating the effects of point mutations on the affinity between the cyanobacterial lectin microvirin and high mannose-type glycans present on the HIV envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Conceição de Souza, Rafael; de Medeiros Muniz, Gabriela; Siqueira, Andrei Santos; de Melo Lima, Adonis; da Silva, Alessandra Pereira; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa; da Silva Gonçalves Vianez Júnior, João Lídio

    2016-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections continue to exert an enormous impact on global human health. This led experts to emphasize the importance of new measures for preventing HIV infections, including the development of vaccines and novel drugs. In this context, a promising approach involves the use of lectins that can bind the surface envelope glycoprotein gp120 of HIV with high affinity, preventing viral entry. The cyanobacterial lectin microvirin (MVN) has been proposed as a candidate for development as a topical microbicide because of its ability to bind to high mannose-type glycans, potently inhibiting HIV-1 entry. Thus, the aim of this computational study was to investigate the effects of four point mutations (D53Q, D53E, D53K, and D53W) on the structure and affinity of MVN with di-mannose (MAN). Molecular dynamics simulations followed by binding free energy calculations using MM-GBSA were employed. The calculated binding free energy of ligand-receptor complexation of MVN with MAN was -26.02 kcal mol(-1). We identified in the wild-type protein that residues I45, T59, and Q81 have a major contribution to the binding free energy of di-mannose. Among the investigated mutants, the most promising one was the D53W mutation, with a theoretical binding free energy value of -29.16 kcal mol(-1). We suggest that this increased stability is due to the introduction of extra rigidity on the hinge region connecting two key structural elements of the MVN binding site.

  20. Glycan profiling of proteins using lectin binding by Surface Plasmon Resonance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Soriano, Brian; Chen, Qing

    2017-09-22

    Glycan profiling of proteins was studied through their lectin binding activity by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). To validate the method, we monitored specific lectin binding with sequential removal of sugar moieties from human transferrin using specific glycosidases. The results clearly indicated that glycans on the protein can be identified by their selective binding activity to various lectins. Using this method, we characterized Fc glycosylation profiles of therapeutic peptibodies and antibodies expressed in mammalian cells (CHO and HEK 293 6E cells), with E. coli expressed proteins as the negative controls. We observed that antibodies expressed in CHO cells did not contain any sialic acid, while antibodies expressed in 293 6E cells contained sialic acid. CHO cell expressed antibodies were also more heavily fucosylated than the ones expressed by 293 6E cells. We further applied this method to measure the fucose composition of glycan engineered mouse antibodies, as well as to determine mannose composition of human antibody variants with depletion or enrichment of high mannose. The glycan profiles generated using this method were comparable to results from 2-AB labeled glycan analysis of normal-phase separated glycans, and Fc gamma receptor binding activity of the glycan engineered antibodies were consistent with their glycan profiles. Hence, we demonstrated that SPR lectin binding analysis can be a quick alternative method to profile protein glycosylation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Mannose-rich glycosylation patterns on HIV-1 subtype C gp120 and sensitivity to the lectins, Griffithsin, Cyanovirin-N and Scytovirin

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Kabamba B.; Gray, Elin S.; Lambson, Bronwen E.; Moore, Penny L.; Choge, Isaac A.; Mlisana, Koleka; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; McMahon, James; O’Keefe, Barry; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), Cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Scytovirin (SVN) are lectins that inhibit HIV-1 infection by binding to multiple mannose-rich glycans on the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env). Here we show that these lectins neutralize subtype C primary virus isolates in addition to Env-pseudotyped viruses obtained from plasma and cervical vaginal lavages. Among 15 subtype C pseudoviruses, the median IC50 values were 0.4, 1.8 and 20.1 nM for GRFT, CV-N and SVN, respectively, similar to what was found for subtype B and A. Analysis of Env sequences suggested that concomitant lack of glycans at positions 234 and 295 resulted in natural resistance to these compounds, which was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, the binding sites for these lectins overlapped that of the 2G12 monoclonal antibody epitope, which is generally absent on subtype C Env. This data support further research on these lectins as potential microbicides in the context of HIV-1 subtype C infection. PMID:20392471

  2. Lectin binding to formalin-fixed paraffin sections.

    PubMed Central

    Leathem, A; Atkins, N

    1983-01-01

    Lectins are potentially useful tools in histopathology for the identification of carbohydrates and distinguishing cells according to their type, differentiation or function. Conjugated to fluorescent or enzyme labels, lectins are simple to use on fresh tissue but fixation and processing sequesters glycoconjugates and dissolves out fat-linked sugars. We describe here the use of labelled antibodies to lectins to localise sites of lectin binding and increase sensitivity, combined with trypsin and neuraminidase to reveal sequestered carbohydrates. Absorbing lectins with appropriate sugars establishes the specificity of binding and allows lectins to be used as sensitive and specific reagents. PMID:6190843

  3. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  4. Bridging lectin binding sites by multivalent carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Valentin; Pieters, Roland J

    2013-05-21

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions are involved in a multitude of biological recognition processes. Since individual protein-carbohydrate interactions are usually weak, multivalency is often required to achieve biologically relevant binding affinities and selectivities. Among the possible mechanisms responsible for binding enhancement by multivalency, the simultaneous attachment of a multivalent ligand to several binding sites of a multivalent receptor (i.e. chelation) has been proven to have a strong impact. This article summarizes recent examples of chelating lectin ligands of different size. Covered lectins include the Shiga-like toxin, where the shortest distance between binding sites is ca. 9 Å, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (shortest distance between binding sites 13-14 Å), LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (shortest distance 26 Å), cholera toxin and heat-labile enterotoxin (shortest distance 31 Å), anti-HIV antibody 2G12 (shortest distance 31 Å), concanavalin A (ConA) (shortest distance 72 Å), RCA120 (shortest distance 100 Å), and Erythrina cristagalli (ECL) (shortest distance 100 Å). While chelating binding of the discussed ligands is likely, experimental proof, for example by X-ray crystallography, is limited to only a few cases.

  5. Purification and molecular characterization of a novel mannose-specific lectin from Dioclea reflexa hook seeds with inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Junior, Vanir R; Correia, Jorge L A; Pereira, Ronniery I; Pereira-Junior, Francisco N; Santiago, Mayara Q; Osterne, Vinicius J S; Madeira, Juliana C; Cajazeiras, João B; Nagano, Celso S; Delatorre, Plinio; Assreuy, Ana M S; Nascimento, Kyria S; Cavada, Benildo S

    2016-04-01

    A novel lectin present in Dioclea reflexa seeds (DrfL) was discovered and described in this study. DrfL was purified in a single step by affinity chromatography in a Sephadex G-50 column. The lectin strongly agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes and was inhibited by α-methyl-D-mannoside, D-mannose, and D-glucose. The hemagglutinating activity of DrfL is optimum at pH 5.0-7.0, stable up to 50 °C, and dependent on divalent cations. Similar to other lectins of the subtribe Diocleinae, the analysis by mass spectrometry indicated that DrfL has three chains (α, β, and γ) with masses of 25,562, 12,874, and 12,706 Da, respectively, with no disulfide bonds or glycosylation. DrfL showed inflammatory activity in the paw edema model and exhibited low cytotoxicity against Artemia sp. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. High mannose-specific lectin (KAA-2) from the red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii potently inhibits influenza virus infection in a strain-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Morimoto, Kinjiro; Hirayama, Makoto; Hori, Kanji

    2011-02-11

    The carbohydrate binding profile of the red algal lectin KAA-2 from Kappaphycus alvarezii was evaluated by a centrifugal ultrafiltration-HPLC method using pyridylaminated oligosaccharides. KAA-2 bound exclusively to high mannose type N-glycans, but not to other glycans such as complex type, hybrid type, or the pentasaccharide core of N-glycans. This lectin exhibited a preference for an exposed α1-3 Man on a D2 arm in a similar manner to Eucheuma serra agglutinin (ESA-2), which shows various biological activities, such as anti-HIV and anti-carcinogenic activity. We tested the anti-influenza virus activity of KAA-2 against various strains including the recent pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza virus. KAA-2 inhibited infection of various influenza strains with EC50s of low nanomolar levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy using an anti-influenza antibody demonstrated that the antiviral activity of KAA-2 was exerted by interference with virus entry into host cells. This mechanism was further confirmed by the evidence of direct binding of KAA-2 to a viral envelope protein, hemagglutinin (HA), using an ELISA assay. These results indicate that this lectin would be useful as a novel antiviral reagent for the prevention of infection.

  7. γ-Tilmanocept, a New Radiopharmaceutical Tracer for Cancer Sentinel Lymph Nodes, Binds to the Mannose Receptor (CD206)

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Metz, Wendy L.; Cope, Frederick O.; Blue, Michael S.; Vera, David R.

    2015-01-01

    γ-Tilmanocept (99mTc-labeled-tilmanocept or [99mTc]-tilmanocept) is the first mannose-containing, receptor-directed, radiolabeled tracer for the highly sensitive imaging of sentinel lymph nodes in solid tumor staging. To elucidate the mannose-binding receptor that retains tilmanocept in this microenvironment, human macrophages were used that have high expression of the C-type lectin mannose receptor (MR; CD206). Cy3-labeled tilmanocept exhibited high specificity binding to macrophages that was nearly abolished in competitive inhibition experiments. Furthermore, Cy3-tilmanocept binding was markedly reduced on macrophages deficient in the MR by small interfering RNA treatment and was increased on MR-transfected HEK 293 cells. Finally, confocal microscopy revealed colocalization of Cy3-tilmanocept with the macrophage membrane MR and binding of labeled tilmanocept to MR+ cells (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) in human sentinel lymph node tissues. Together these data provide strong evidence that CD206 is a major binding receptor for γ-tilmanocept. Identification of CD206 as the γ-tilmanocept–binding receptor enables opportunities for designing receptor-targeted advanced imaging agents and therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. PMID:26202986

  8. Concanavalin A binds to a mannose-containing ligand in the cell wall of some lichen phycobionts.

    PubMed

    Fontaniella, Blanca; Millanes, Ana-María; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, María-Estrella

    2004-12-01

    Concanavalin A, the lectin from Canavalia ensiformis, develops arginase activity depending on Mn(2+). The cation cannot be substituted by Ca(2+) which, in addition, inhibits Mn(2+)-supported activity. Fluorescein-labeled Concanavalin A is able to bind to the cell wall of algal cells recently isolated from Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina thalli. This binding involves a ligand, probably a glycoprotein containing mannose, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography. Analysis by SDS-PAGE reveals that the ligand is a dimeric protein composed by two monomers of 54 and 48 kDa. This ligand shows to be different from the receptor for natural lichen lectins, previously identified as a polygalactosylated urease.

  9. Cloning and characterization of a novel mannose-binding protein of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Garate, Marco; Cao, Zhiyi; Bateman, Erik; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2004-07-09

    Acanthamoebae produce a painful, blinding infection of the cornea. The mannose-binding protein (MBP) of Acanthamoeba is thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of the infection by mediating the adhesion of parasites to the host cells. We describe here the isolation and molecular cloning of Acanthamoeba MBP. The MBP was isolated by chromatography on the mannose affinity gel. Gel filtration experiments revealed that the Acanthamoeba lectin is a approximately 400-kDa protein that is constituted of multiple 130-kDa subunits. Cloning and sequencing experiments indicated that the Acanthamoeba MBP gene is composed of 6 exons and 5 introns that span 3.6 kb of the amoeba genome and that MBP cDNA codes for a precursor protein of 833 amino acids. That the cloned cDNA encodes authentic MBP was demonstrated by showing that: (i). recombinant MBP possesses mannose binding activity, and (ii). polyclonal antibodies prepared against Acanthamoeba MBP bound to the recombinant protein. Sequence analysis revealed that the MBP contains a large N-terminal extracellular domain, a transmembrane domain, and a short C-terminal cytoplasmic domain. Despite extensive BLAST searches using the MBP sequence, no significant matches were retrieved. The most striking feature of the Acanthamoeba MBP sequence is the presence of a cysteine-rich region containing 14 CXCXC motifs within the extracellular domain. In summary, we have isolated, cloned, and characterized a novel MBP from Acanthamoeba. Because the presence of antibodies to MBP in tears provides protection against infection, the availability of the MBP cDNA sequence and rMBP should help develop: (i). a tear-based test to identify individuals who are at risk of developing the keratitis and (ii). strategies to immunize high-risk individuals.

  10. Polyvalent display of monosaccharides on ferritin protein cage nanoparticles for the recognition and binding of cell-surface lectins.

    PubMed

    Kang, Young Ji; Yang, Hyun Ji; Jeon, Sangbin; Kang, Young-Sun; Do, Yoonkyung; Hong, Sung You; Kang, Sebyung

    2014-05-01

    Carbohydrate-lectin interactions are important in many biological events. Endogenous cell-surface lectins are attractive markers for the recognition and targeting. Human ferritin protein cage nanoparticles (HFPCNs) are prepared as delivery nanoplatforms and two different types of monosaccharide derivatives; maleimido group terminated-mannopyranoside and galactopyranoside. Uniform and polyvalent displays of mannoses or galactoses on the surface of HFPCNs are achieved by using site-specific thiol-maleimide Michael-type addition. Mannose- or galactose-displaying HFPCNs recognize and tightly bind to DC-SIGN or ASGP-R lectins on the surface of the mammalian cells, DCEK or HepG2 cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  12. Cell-to-cell binding induced by different lectins.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, U; Sachs, L

    1975-05-01

    The cell-to-cell binding induced by concanavalin A (Con A) and the lectins from wheatgerm, soybean, and waxbean has been analyzed by measuring the ability of single cells to bind to lectin-coated cells immobilized on nylon fibers. The cells used were lymphoma, myeloid leukemia, and normal fibroblast cells. With all lectins, cell-to-cell binding was inhibited if both cells were prefixed with glutaraldehyde. However, in most cases cell-to-cell binding was enhanced when only the lectin-coated cell was prefixed. With normal fibroblasts, treatment of either one or both cells with trypsin enhanced the cell-to-cell binding induced by Con A and the wheatgerm lectin. Neuraminidase, which increases the number of receptors for soybean agglutinin, increased cell-to-cell binding only if both cells were treated. Although cell-to-cell binding induced by the lectins from soybean and wheatgerm could be partially reversed by the appropriate competitive saccharide inhibitor, binding induced by Con A could not be reversed. The experiments indicate that cell-to-cell binding induced by a lectin can be prevented by an insufficient density of receptors for the lectin, insufficient receptor mobility, or induced clustering of receptors. These effects can explain the differences in cell-to-cell binding and agglutination observed with different cell types and lectins. They also suggest that cell-to-cell binding induced by different lectins with a variety of cell types is initiated by a mechanism involving the alignment of complementary receptors on the colliding cells for the formation of multiple cell-to-lectin-to-cell bridges.

  13. Carbohydrate binding properties of banana (Musa acuminata) lectin I. Novel recognition of internal alpha1,3-linked glucosyl residues.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Winter, H C; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Misaki, A; Goldstein, I J

    2001-05-01

    Examination of lectins of banana (Musa acuminata) and the closely related plantain (Musa spp.) by the techniques of quantitative precipitation, hapten inhibition of precipitation, and isothermal titration calorimetry showed that they are mannose/glucose binding proteins with a preference for the alpha-anomeric form of these sugars. Both generate precipitin curves with branched chain alpha-mannans (yeast mannans) and alpha-glucans (glycogens, dextrans, and starches), but not with linear alpha-glucans containing only alpha1,4- and alpha1,6-glucosidic bonds (isolichenan and pullulan). The novel observation was made that banana and plantain lectins recognize internal alpha1,3-linked glucosyl residues, which occur in the linear polysaccharides elsinan and nigeran. Concanavalin A and lectins from pea and lentil, also mannose/glucose binding lectins, did not precipitate with any of these linear alpha-glucans. This is, the authors believe, the first report of the recognition of internal alpha1,3-glucosidic bonds by a plant lectin. It is possible that these lectins are present in the pulp of their respective fruit, complexed with starch.

  14. Affinity Separation of Lectins Using Porous Membranes Immobilized with Glycopolymer Brushes Containing Mannose or N-Acetyl-d-Glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Yutaro; Seto, Hirokazu; Murakami, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Yu; Miura, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Porous membranes with glycopolymer brushes were prepared as biomaterials for affinity separation. Glycopolymer brushes contained acrylic acid and D-mannose or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and were formed on substrates by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The presence of glycopolymer brush was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry measurements. The interaction between lectin and the glycopolymer immobilized on glass slides was confirmed using fluorescent-labeled proteins. Glycopolymer-immobilized surfaces exhibited specific adsorption of the corresponding lectin, compared with bovine serum albumin. Lectins were continuously rejected by the glycopolymer-immobilized membranes. When the protein solution was permeated through the glycopolymer-immobilized membrane, bovine serum albumin was not adsorbed on the membrane surface. In contrast, concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin were rejected by membranes incorporating D-mannose or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, respectively. The amounts of adsorbed concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was increased five- and two-fold that of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, respectively. PMID:24956944

  15. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of chitin-binding lectin from Canna limbata seeds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Theolyta S; Teixeira, Claudener S; Falcão, Maria A P; Junior, Vanir R Pinto; Santiago, Mayara Quiroz; Benevides, Raquel G; Delatorre, Plínio; Martins, Jorge L; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna S; Cavada, Benildo S; Campesatto, Eliane A; Rocha, Bruno A M

    2013-12-01

    Lectins are a structurally heterogeneous group of proteins or glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to a specific mono- or oligosaccharide. Monocot mannose-binding lectins are an extended superfamily of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. In this study, we evaluated anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of monocot lectin from the Canna limbata seeds (CLL). To accomplish this, CLL was purified and subjected to pharmacological assays: abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and Zymosan A-induced peritonitis tests. The CLL was purified by chromatographic chitin column, and the relative mass of 21 kDa observed in electrophoresis was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry, which also revealed that purified CLL consists of a dimer having a weight of 49,676 Da. The CLL showed nociceptive activity in the acetic acid test as well as peripheral antinociceptive response. The CLL also showed anti-inflammatory effect with the reduction of inflammation in the formalin test and neutrophil migration into the peritoneal cavity. This is the first report of anti-inflammatory activity for a monocot lectin, and it suggests a new pharmacological tool to understand inflammatory and antinociceptive processes mediated through lectins.

  16. Candida glabrata binds to glycosylated and lectinic receptors on the coronary endothelial luminal membrane and inhibits flow sense and cardiac responses to agonists.

    PubMed

    Torres-Tirado, David; Knabb, Maureen; Castaño, Irene; Patrón-Soberano, Araceli; De Las Peñas, Alejandro; Rubio, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata (CG) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that initiates infection by binding to host cells via specific lectin-like adhesin proteins. We have previously shown the importance of lectin-oligosaccharide binding in cardiac responses to flow and agonists. Because of the lectinic-oligosaccharide nature of CG binding, we tested the ability of CG to alter the agonist- and flow-induced changes in cardiac function in isolated perfused guinea pig hearts. Both transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed strong attachment of CG to the coronary endothelium, even after extensive washing. CG shifted the coronary flow vs. auricular-ventricular (AV) delay relationship upward, indicating that greater flow was required to achieve the same AV delay. This effect was completely reversed with mannose, partially reversed with galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine, but hyaluronan had no effect. Western blot analysis was used to determine binding of CG to isolated coronary endothelial luminal membrane (CELM) receptors, and the results indicate that flow-sensitive CELM receptors, ANG II type I, α-adrenergic 1A receptor, endothelin-2, and VCAM-1 bind to CG. In addition, CG inhibited agonist-induced effects of bradykinin, angiotensin, and phenylephrine on AV delay, coronary perfusion pressure, and left ventricular pressure. Mannose reversed the inhibitory effects of CG on the agonist responses. These results suggest that CG directly binds to flow-sensitive CELM receptors via lectinic-oligosaccharide interactions with mannose and disrupts the lectin-oligosaccharide binding necessary for flow-induced cardiac responses.

  17. Lectin-binding properties of Aeromonas caviae strains

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-de-Souza, Cláudio M.; Hirata-Jr, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Freitas-Almeida, Angela C.; Andrade, Arnaldo F. B.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface carbohydrates of four strains of Aeromonas caviae were analyzed by agglutination and lectin-binding assays employing twenty highly purified lectins encompassing all sugar specificities. With the exception of L-fucose and sialic acid, the sugar residues were detected in A. caviae strains. A marked difference, however, in the pattern of cell surface carbohydrates in different A. caviae isolates was observed. Specific receptors for Tritricum vulgaris (WGA), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and Solanum tuberosum (STA) (D-GlcNAc-binding lectins) were found only in ATCC 15468 strain, whereas Euonymus europaeus (EEL, D-Gal-binding lectin) sites were present exclusively in AeQ32 strain, those for Helix pomatia (HPA, D-GalNAc-binding lectin) in AeC398 and AeV11 strains, and for Canavalia ensiformes (Con A, D-Man-binding lectin) in ATCC 15468, AeC398, AeQ32 and AeV11 strains, after bacterial growing at 37°C. On the other hand, specific receptors for WGA and EEL were completely abrogated growing the bacteria at 22°C. Binding studies with 125I- labeled lectins from WGA, EEL and Con A were performed. These assays essentially confirmed the selectivity, demonstrated in the agglutination assays of these lectins for the A. caviae strains. PMID:24031204

  18. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  19. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins.

  20. C-Type Lectin Receptor Dectin-2 Binds to an Endogenous Protein β-Glucuronidase on Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Daiki; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Sho

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize pathogen-derived ligands and abnormal self that trigger protective immune responses. However, the precise nature of self ligands recognized by CLRs remains to be determined. Here, we found that Dectin-2 recognizes bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) using Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. This activity was inhibited by an excessive amount of mannose, and by the mutation of mannose-binding motif in Dectin-2. β-glucuronidase (Gusb) was identified as a protein bound to Dectin-2 and mutations of N-glycosylation sites in Gusb impaired the binding of Gusb to Dectin-2. Overexpression of Gusb in a macrophage cell line conferred an ability to stimulate Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. Our study suggests that a glycosylated protein with mannose-related structure is recognized by Dectin-2. PMID:28046067

  1. C-Type Lectin Receptor Dectin-2 Binds to an Endogenous Protein β-Glucuronidase on Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daiki; Shibata, Kensuke; Yamasaki, Sho

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) recognize pathogen-derived ligands and abnormal self that trigger protective immune responses. However, the precise nature of self ligands recognized by CLRs remains to be determined. Here, we found that Dectin-2 recognizes bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) using Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. This activity was inhibited by an excessive amount of mannose, and by the mutation of mannose-binding motif in Dectin-2. β-glucuronidase (Gusb) was identified as a protein bound to Dectin-2 and mutations of N-glycosylation sites in Gusb impaired the binding of Gusb to Dectin-2. Overexpression of Gusb in a macrophage cell line conferred an ability to stimulate Dectin-2-expressing reporter cells. Our study suggests that a glycosylated protein with mannose-related structure is recognized by Dectin-2.

  2. Distribution of lectin-bindings in the testis of the lesser mouse deer, Tragulus javanicus.

    PubMed

    Agungpriyono, S; Kurohmaru, M; Kimura, J; Wahid, A H; Sasaki, M; Kitamura, N; Yamada, J; Fukuta, K; Zuki, A B

    2009-06-01

    The distribution of lectin bindings in the testis of the smallest ruminant, lesser mouse deer (Tragulus javanicus), was studied using 12 biotinylated lectins specific for d-galactose (peanut agglutinin PNA, Ricinus communis agglutinin RCA I), N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (Dolichos biflorus agglutinin DBA, Vicia villosa agglutinin VVA, Soybean agglutinin SBA), N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic acid (wheat germ agglutinin WGA, s-WGA), D-mannose and d-glucose (Lens culinaris agglutinin LCA, Pisum sativum agglutinin PSA, Concanavalin A Con A), L-fucose (Ulex europaeus agglutinin UEA I), and oligosaccharide (Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin PHA-E) sugar residues. In Golgi-, cap-, and acrosome-phase spermatids, lectin-bindings were found in the acrosome (PNA, RCA I, VVA, SBA, WGA and s-WGA), and in the cytoplasm (PNA, RCA I, VVA, SBA, WGA, LCA, PSA, Con A and PHA-E). s-WGA binding was confined to the spermatid acrosome, but other lectins were also observed in spermatocytes. In spermatogonia, VVA, WGA, Con A, and PHA-E bindings were observed. Sertoli cells were intensely stained with DBA and Con A, and weakly with PHA-E. In interstitial Leydig cells, RCA I, DBA, VVA, Con A, PSA, LCA, WGA and PHA-E were positive. UEA I was negative in all cell types including spermatogenic cells. Unusual distribution of lectin-bindings noted in the testis of lesser mouse deer included the limited distribution of s-WGA only in the spermatid acrosome, the distribution of DBA in Sertoli cells, Leydig cells and lamina propria, and the absence of UEA I in all type cells. The present results were discussed in comparison with those of other animals and their possible functional implications.

  3. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus by the cyanobacterial protein Microcystis viridis lectin: mechanistic differences between the high-mannose specific lectins MVL, CV-N, and GNA.

    PubMed

    Kachko, Alla; Loesgen, Sandra; Shahzad-Ul-Hussan, Syed; Tan, Wendy; Zubkova, Iryna; Takeda, Kazuyo; Wells, Frances; Rubin, Steven; Bewley, Carole A; Major, Marian E

    2013-12-02

    Plant or microbial lectins are known to exhibit potent antiviral activities against viruses with glycosylated surface proteins, yet the mechanism(s) by which these carbohydrate-binding proteins exert their antiviral activities is not fully understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to possess glycosylated envelope proteins (gpE1E2) and to be potently inhibited by lectins. Here, we tested in detail the antiviral properties of the newly discovered Microcystis viridis lectin (MVL) along with cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) against cell culture HCV, as well as their binding properties toward viral particles, target cells, and recombinant HCV glycoproteins. Using infectivity assays, CV-N, MVL, and GNA inhibited HCV with IC50 values of 0.6 nM, 30.4 nM, and 11.1 nM, respectively. Biolayer interferometry analysis demonstrated a higher affinity of GNA to immobilized recombinant HCV glycoproteins compared to CV-N and MVL. Complementary studies, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, confocal microscopy, and pre- and post-virus binding assays, showed a complex mechanism of inhibition for CV-N and MVL that includes both viral and cell association, while GNA functions by binding directly to the viral particle. Combinations of GNA with CV-N or MVL in HCV infection studies revealed synergistic inhibitory effects, which can be explained by different glycan recognition profiles of the mainly high-mannoside specific lectins, and supports the hypothesis that these lectins inhibit through different and complex modes of action. Our findings provide important insights into the mechanisms by which lectins inhibit HCV infection. Overall, the data suggest MVL and CV-N have the potential for toxicity due to interactions with cellular proteins while GNA may be a better therapeutic agent due to specificity for the HCV gpE1E2.

  4. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  5. Multiple Modes of Binding Enhance the Affinity of DC-SIGN for High-Mannose N-Linked Glycans Found on Viral Glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Castelli, R.; Drickamer, K.; Seeberger, P.H.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Zurich, ETH /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-09

    The dendritic cell surface receptor DC-SIGN and the closely related endothelial cell receptor DC-SIGNR specifically recognize high mannose N-linked carbohydrates on viral pathogens. Previous studies have shown that these receptors bind the outer trimannose branch Man{alpha}1-3[Man{alpha}1-6]Man{alpha} present in high mannose structures. Although the trimannoside binds to DC-SIGN or DC-SIGNR more strongly than mannose, additional affinity enhancements are observed in the presence of one or more Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha} moieties on the nonreducing termini of oligomannose structures. The molecular basis of this enhancement has been investigated by determining crystal structures of DC-SIGN bound to a synthetic six-mannose fragment of a high mannose N-linked oligosaccharide, Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha}1-3[Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha}1-6]Man{alpha}1-6Man and to the disaccharide Man{alpha}1-2Man. The structures reveal mixtures of two binding modes in each case. Each mode features typical C-type lectin binding at the principal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site by one mannose residue. In addition, other sugar residues form contacts unique to each binding mode. These results suggest that the affinity enhancement displayed toward oligosaccharides decorated with the Man{alpha}1-2Man{alpha} structure is due in part to multiple binding modes at the primary Ca{sup 2+} site, which provide both additional contacts and a statistical (entropic) enhancement of binding.

  6. Carbohydrate-binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.) bulb lectins.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Goldstein, I J

    1990-06-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificity of the daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus; NPA) and amaryllis (Hippeastrum hybr.; HHA) lectins, isolated from extracts of their bulbs by affinity chromatography on immobilized mannose, was studied by quantitative precipitation, sugar hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on the immobilized lectins. These lectins gave strong precipitation reactions with several yeast mannans, but did not precipitate with alpha-D-glucans (e.g., dextrans and glycogen). Interestingly, both lectins reacted strongly with yeast galactomannans having multiple nonreducing terminal alpha-D-galactosyl groups, a synthetic linear alpha-1,6-mannan, and an alpha-1,3-mannan (DP = 30). Treatment of the linear alpha-1,3-mannan with periodate, resulting in oxidation of the terminal, nonreducing mannosyl group, did not reduce its reactivity with NPA or HHA. Taken together, these observations suggest that NPA and HHA react not only with terminal but also with internal alpha-D-mannosyl residues. Sugar hapten inhibition studies showed these lectins to possess the greatest specific activity for alpha-D-mannosyl units whereas D-Glc and D-GlcNAc did not inhibit either lectin precipitation system. Of the oligosaccharides tested, the best inhibitor of NPA interaction was alpha-1,6-linked mannotriose, which was twice as good an inhibitor as Man alpha 1,6Man alpha-O-Me and 10 times better than methyl alpha-D-mannoside. On the other hand, oligosaccharides containing either 1,3- or 1,6-linked mannosyl units were good inhibitors of the HHA-mannan precipitation system (6- to 20-fold more active than D-Man). These results indicate that both lectins appear to possess an extended binding site(s) complementary to at least three 1,6-linked alpha-mannosyl units. Various glycosylasparagine glycopeptides which contain alpha-1,6-Man units were retarded on the immobilized NPA column. On the other hand, those containing either alpha-1,3- or alpha-1,6-mannosyl residues were

  7. Isolation and analysis of mannose/trehalose/maltose specific lectin from jack bean with antibruchid activity.

    PubMed

    Shanmugavel, Sakthivelkumar; Velayutham, Veeramani; Kamalanathan, Tamilarasan; Periasamy, Mullainadhan; Munusamy, Arumugam; Sundaram, Janarthanan

    2016-10-01

    A lectin with insecticidal property against the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus was successfully isolated from the seeds of Canavalia virosa using standard affinity chromatography. The isolated molecule typically behaved like a lectin in its characteristics. It agglutinated indicator red blood cells (RBC) in its native as well as enzyme treated conditions. The enzyme treated RBC types exhibited a very high hemagglutination (HA) titre values and this property of isolated molecule behaved like arcelin, the lectin-like molecules reported from several species of Phaseolus. As a characteristic feature of a lectin, the isolated molecule effectively inhibited the agglutination of indicator RBC types with simple and complex carbohydrates including glycoproteins. This nature of the isolated molecule also relate with characteristic feature of arcelin isoforms in inhibiting HA activity with complex glycoproteins as reported in many studies. Most interestingly, the present study disclosed trehalose as a potent inhibitor of C. virosa lectin. Therefore, feeding insect pests on the lectin like arcelin could serve as antibiosis factor/anti-insect activity. The molecular characteristics of this isolated molecule and its mass studies too revealed its homology with arcelin, arcelin-1, 2 and 6 isoforms of P. vulgaris and lectin from Canavalia cathartica, C. lineata and C. brasiliensis.

  8. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  9. A conserved flagellar pocket exposed high mannose moiety is used by African trypanosomes as a host cytokine binding molecule.

    PubMed

    Magez, S; Radwanska, M; Stijlemans, B; Xong, H V; Pays, E; De Baetselier, P

    2001-09-07

    Trypanosomes use antigenic variation of their variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat as defense against the host immune system. However, in order to sustain their growth, they need to expose conserved epitopes, allowing host macromolecule binding and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that Trypanosoma brucei uses the conserved chitobiose-oligomannose (GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9)) moieties of its VSG as a binding ligand for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a host cytokine with lectin-like properties. As endocytosis in trypanosomes is restricted to the flagellar pocket, we show that soluble flagellar pocket extracts, and in particular soluble VSG, inhibit the binding of (125)I-TNF to trypanosomes. The interaction between TNF and VSG is confirmed by affinity chromatography, biosensor, and dot-blot affinity measurements, and soluble VSG inhibition of TNF-mediated trypanolysis. In all approaches, removal of N-linked carbohydrates abrogates the TNF-VSG interaction. In addition, synthetic high mannose oligosaccharides can block TNF-VSG interactions, and a VSG glycopeptide carrying the GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9) moiety is shown to inhibit TNF-mediated trypanosome killing in mixed parasite/macrophage cell cultures. Together, these results support the observation that TNF plays a role in growth control of trypanosomes and, moreover, suggest that, by the use of conserved VSG carbohydrates as lectin-binding epitopes, trypanosomes can limit the necessity to express large numbers of invariant surface exposed receptors.

  10. Structural analysis and binding properties of isoforms of tarin, the GNA-related lectin from Colocasia esculenta.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia R; Winter, Harry C; Verícimo, Mauricio A; Meagher, Jennifer L; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Goldstein, Irwin J; Paschoalin, Vânia M F; Silva, Joab T

    2015-01-01

    The lectins, a class of proteins that occur widely in animals, plants, fungi, lichens and microorganisms, are known for their ability to specifically bind to carbohydrates. Plant lectins can be classified into 12 families including the Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin superfamily, which is widespread among monocotyledonous plants and binds specifically to mannose, a behavior that confers remarkable anti-tumor, anti-viral and insecticidal properties on these proteins. The present study characterized a mitogenic lectin from this family, called tarin, which was purified from the crude extract from taro (Colocasia esculenta). The results showed that tarin is a glycoprotein with 2-3% carbohydrate content, composed of least 10 isoforms with pIs ranging from 5.5 to 9.5. The intact protein is a heterotetramer of 47kDa composed of two non-identical and non-covalently associated polypeptides, with small subunits of 11.9kDa and large subunits of 12.6kDa. The tarin structure is stable and recovers or maintains its functional structure following treatments at different temperatures and pH. Tarin showed a complex carbohydrate specificity, binding with high affinity to high-mannose and complex N-glycans. Many of these ligands can be found in viruses, tumor cells and insects, as well as in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Chemical modifications confirmed that both conserved and non-conserved amino acids participate in this interaction. This study determined the structural and ligand binding characteristics of a GNA-related lectin that can be exploited for several different purposes, particularly as a proliferative therapeutic molecule that is able to enhance the immunological response.

  11. Fragmentation of Escherichia coli type 1 fimbriae exposes cryptic D-mannose-binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Ponniah, S; Endres, R O; Hasty, D L; Abraham, S N

    1991-01-01

    Cells of the gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli are able to attach to various host cells by means of a mannose-specific adhesin associated with type 1 fimbriae. Here we show that fragmentation of type 1 fimbriae by freezing and thawing results in increased mannose-binding activity as demonstrated by increased hemagglutination, increased stimulation of human lymphocyte proliferation, and increased binding of the mannose-containing enzyme horseradish peroxidase. Increased activity in all three assays was mannose sensitive and was not exhibited by FimH- mutant type 1 fimbriae lacking the adhesin. Scatchard analysis of the data from peroxidase binding assays showed that unfrozen and frozen fimbriae contain binding sites displaying two classes of affinity. Frozen and thawed fimbriae expressed an increase in the number of high-affinity binding sites. These results show that fragmentation of the fimbrial structure exposes cryptic mannose-binding activity associated with type 1 fimbriae, presumably that of internally located adhesin molecules. Our data support earlier observations that adhesin moieties of type 1 fimbriae are located both at the tips and at intervals along the length of the fimbriae. In addition, our data suggest that only the adhesin moieties that are located at the fimbrial tips are functional in binding mannose. Adhesins located along the length of the fimbriae have their mannose-binding activity buried within the fimbrial structure and hence are not functional. We propose an updated model for the structure of type 1 fimbriae that is in agreement with the above observations. Images PMID:1676398

  12. BAD-lectins: boronic acid-decorated lectins with enhanced binding affinity for the selective enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Wei; Chien, Chih-Wei; Lin, Po-Chiao; Huang, Li-De; Chen, Chang-Yang; Wu, Sz-Wei; Han, Chia-Li; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-09-03

    The weak and variable binding affinities exhibited by lectin-carbohydrate interactions have often compromised the practical utility of lectin in capturing glycoproteins for glycoproteomic applications. We report here the development and applications of a new type of hybrid biomaterial, namely a boronic acid-decorated lectin (BAD-lectin), for efficient bifunctional glycoprotein labeling and enrichment. Our binding studies showed an enhanced affinity by BAD-lectin, likely to be mediated via the formation of boronate ester linkages between the lectin and glycan subsequent to the initial recognition process and thus preserving its glycan-specificity. Moreover, when attached to magnetic nanoparticles (BAD-lectin@MNPs), 2 to 60-fold improvement on detection sensitivity and enrichment efficiency for specific glycoproteins was observed over the independent use of either lectin or BA. Tested at the level of whole cell lysates for glycoproteomic applications, three different types of BAD-lectin@MNPs exhibited excellent specificities with only 6% overlapping among the 295 N-linked glycopeptides identified. As many as 236 N-linked glycopeptides (80%) were uniquely identified by one of the BAD-lectin@MNPs. These results indicated that the enhanced glycan-selective recognition and binding affinity of BAD-lectin@MNPs will facilitate a complementary identification of the under-explored glycoproteome.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies on the mannose-specific lectin from Amaryllis bulbs.

    PubMed

    Wood, S D; Reynolds, C D; Lambert, S; McMichael, P A; Allen, A K; Rizkallah, P J

    1994-01-01

    Affinity-purified amaryllis lectin was used to grow single crystals using the hanging-drop method. The space group was found to be C2 with unit-cell dimensions a = 73.4 (1), b = 100.3 (1), c = 62.2 (1) A and beta = 137.3 (2) degrees. Data to 2.25 A resolution have been recorded and solution of the structure is currently underway by means of molecular-replacement techniques.

  14. Switchable binding affinity of mannose tethered to collagen peptide by temperature-dependent triple-helix formation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomoko; Isobe, Chika; Wada, Takeaki; Ezaki, Sumiyo; Minoura, Norihiko

    2013-06-19

    Novel glycopeptides were created with a view to regulate the bindings of carbohydrates to lectins as a means of controlling biological function. We synthesized glycopeptides containing mannose (Man) tethered to a collagen peptide moiety (MPOG10: -(Pro-Hyp-Gly)10- or MGPP10: -(Gly-Pro-Pro)10-). Circular dichroism spectra showed formation of a triple helical structure for MPOG10, and the melting temperature indicates that MPOG10 forms a more stable triple helical structure than MGPP10 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). At 25 °C, fluorescence polarization (FP) values of MPOG10 and MGPP10 increased following the addition of concanavalin A (ConA), and the addition of α-methyl-mannose (MeMan) to a mixed solution of each glycopeptide with ConA resulted in a decrease in FP values. These results confirm that the previous increase in FP values observed was caused by ConA binding to Man on MPOG10 or MGPP10. The binding affinity of MPOG10 was higher than that of MGPP10, and the dissociation constant of MPOG10 to ConA was 1.9 × 10(-5) (mol/L). The observed binding of MPOG10 to ConA at 25 °C was reduced at higher temperature (50 °C). Therefore, the enhanced binding affinity of MPOG10 to ConA could be accounted for by formation of a clustered Man moiety triggered by the formation of a more stable triple helical structure of MPOG10 compared with MGPP10.

  15. Mannose-specific plant lectins from the Amaryllidaceae family qualify as efficient microbicides for prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Princen, Katrien; Aquaro, Stefano; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Egberink, Herman; Vanden Mooter, Guy; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Schols, Dominique

    2004-10-01

    The plant lectins derived from Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) selectively inhibited a wide variety of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 strains and clinical (CXCR4- and CCR5-using) isolates in different cell types. They also efficiently inhibited infection of T lymphocytes by a variety of mutant virus strains. GNA and HHA markedly prevented syncytium formation between persistently infected HUT-78/HIV cells and uninfected T lymphocytes. The plant lectins did not measurably affect the antiviral activity of other clinically approved anti-HIV drugs used in the clinic when combined with these drugs. Short exposure of the lectins to cell-free virus particles or persistently HIV-infected HUT-78 cells markedly decreased HIV infectivity and increased the protective (microbicidal) activity of the plant lectins. Flow cytometric analysis and monoclonal antibody binding studies and a PCR-based assay revealed that GNA and HHA do not interfere with CD4, CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN and do not specifically bind with the membrane of uninfected cells. Instead, GNA and HHA likely interrupt the virus entry process by interfering with the virus envelope glycoprotein. HHA and GNA are odorless, colorless, and tasteless, and they are not cytotoxic, antimetabolically active, or mitogenic to human primary T lymphocytes at concentrations that exceed their antivirally active concentrations by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. GNA and HHA proved stable at high temperature (50 degrees C) and low pH (5.0) for prolonged time periods and can be easily formulated in gel preparations for microbicidal use; they did not agglutinate human erythrocytes and were not toxic to mice when administered intravenously.

  16. Mannose-Specific Plant Lectins from the Amaryllidaceae Family Qualify as Efficient Microbicides for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, Jan; Hatse, Sigrid; Vermeire, Kurt; Princen, Katrien; Aquaro, Stefano; Perno, Carlo-Federico; De Clercq, Erik; Egberink, Herman; Vanden Mooter, Guy; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Schols, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    The plant lectins derived from Galanthus nivalis (Snowdrop) (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) selectively inhibited a wide variety of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 strains and clinical (CXCR4- and CCR5-using) isolates in different cell types. They also efficiently inhibited infection of T lymphocytes by a variety of mutant virus strains. GNA and HHA markedly prevented syncytium formation between persistently infected HUT-78/HIV cells and uninfected T lymphocytes. The plant lectins did not measurably affect the antiviral activity of other clinically approved anti-HIV drugs used in the clinic when combined with these drugs. Short exposure of the lectins to cell-free virus particles or persistently HIV-infected HUT-78 cells markedly decreased HIV infectivity and increased the protective (microbicidal) activity of the plant lectins. Flow cytometric analysis and monoclonal antibody binding studies and a PCR-based assay revealed that GNA and HHA do not interfere with CD4, CXCR4, CCR5, and DC-SIGN and do not specifically bind with the membrane of uninfected cells. Instead, GNA and HHA likely interrupt the virus entry process by interfering with the virus envelope glycoprotein. HHA and GNA are odorless, colorless, and tasteless, and they are not cytotoxic, antimetabolically active, or mitogenic to human primary T lymphocytes at concentrations that exceed their antivirally active concentrations by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. GNA and HHA proved stable at high temperature (50°C) and low pH (5.0) for prolonged time periods and can be easily formulated in gel preparations for microbicidal use; they did not agglutinate human erythrocytes and were not toxic to mice when administered intravenously. PMID:15388446

  17. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  18. Shigella flexneri transformants expressing type 1 (mannose-specific) fimbriae bind to, activate, and are killed by phagocytic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gbarah, A; Mirelman, D; Sansonetti, P J; Verdon, R; Bernhard, W; Sharon, N

    1993-01-01

    Shigella flexneri M90T (invasive) and BS176 (noninvasive) are typical nonfimbriated organisms that do not bind to or activate phagocytic cells. We demonstrate that S. flexneri M90Tp and BS176p, obtained by transformation of the strains named above with the cluster of genes encoding type 1 (mannose-specific) fimbriae of Escherichia coli, express the functional fimbriae, as shown by electron microscopy, by binding of antifimbria antibodies and by yeast cell aggregation. The transformants, but not the parental strains, bound to human granulocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages. This binding was inhibited by methyl alpha-D-mannoside but not by methyl alpha-D-galactoside. The bound bacteria induced oxidative burst activation and degranulation of the granulocytes in vitro. With mouse peritoneal macrophages, the binding of the fimbriated bacteria induced degranulation in vitro. Injection of the bacteria into mouse peritoneum also induced degranulation of the macrophages in vivo; no such effect was observed with the nonfimbriated strains. The bound fimbriated transformants were effectively killed by the human granulocytes in vitro in the absence of opsonins or after opsonization with human anti-S. flexneri antiserum. The nonfimbriated strains were killed only after opsonization. These results provide further evidence for the role of type 1 fimbriae in lectin-mediated nonopsonic phagocytosis. Images PMID:8097492

  19. [Lectin-binding analysis of the biofilm exopolymeric matrix carbohydrate composition of corrosion-aggressive bacteria].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Asaulenko, L G; Abdulina, D R; Voĭtchuk, S I; Iutinskaia, G A

    2013-01-01

    The carbohydrate components of biofilms of corrosion-aggressive bacteria were studied by transmisstion electron microscopy using lectins labeled with colloidal gold. N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, and neutral carbohydrates D-glucose and D-mannose were found within the exopolymeric matrix. Lectins with equal carbohydrate specificity demonstrated different degrees of interaction with the carbohydrate components of bacterial biofilms. To identify N-acetyl-D-galactosamine in biofilms of Desulfovibrio sp. 10 and Bacillus subtilis 36, the LBA lectin appeared to be most specific; in the case of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in biofilms of B. subtilis 36 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 27, the WGA lectin. During visualization of neutral carbohydrates in the studied cultures, the PSA lectin was most specific. We have shown that lectins labeled with colloidal gold could be used as an express method for the identification and localization of carbohydrates in glycopolymers of the biofilm exopolymeric matrix.

  20. Mutation of Tyr137 of the universal Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin FimH relaxes the tyrosine gate prior to mannose binding

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Said; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Roos, Goedele; Zalewski, Adam; Preston, Roland; Eid, Sameh; Zihlmann, Pascal; Prévost, Martine; Lensink, Marc F.; Thompson, Andrew; Ernst, Beat; Bouckaert, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The most prevalent diseases manifested by Escherichia coli are acute and recurrent bladder infections and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s disease. E. coli clinical isolates express the FimH adhesin, which consists of a mannose-specific lectin domain connected via a pilin domain to the tip of type 1 pili. Although the isolated FimH lectin domain has affinities in the nanomolar range for all high-mannosidic glycans, differentiation between these glycans is based on their capacity to form predominantly hydrophobic interactions within the tyrosine gate at the entrance to the binding pocket. In this study, novel crystal structures of tyrosine-gate mutants of FimH, ligand-free or in complex with heptyl α-d-O-mannopyranoside or 4-biphenyl α-d-O-mannopyranoside, are combined with quantum-mechanical calculations and molecular-dynamics simulations. In the Y48A FimH crystal structure, a large increase in the dynamics of the alkyl chain of heptyl α-d-O-mannopyranoside attempts to compensate for the absence of the aromatic ring; however, the highly energetic and stringent mannose-binding pocket of wild-type FimH is largely maintained. The Y137A mutation, on the other hand, is the most detrimental to FimH affinity and specificity: (i) in the absence of ligand the FimH C-terminal residue Thr158 intrudes into the mannose-binding pocket and (ii) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid interacts strongly with Glu50, Thr53 and Asn136, in spite of multiple dialysis and purification steps. Upon mutation, pre-ligand-binding relaxation of the backbone dihedral angles at position 137 in the tyrosine gate and their coupling to Tyr48 via the interiorly located Ile52 form the basis of the loss of affinity of the FimH adhesin in the Y137A mutant. PMID:28250938

  1. Anomer-Specific Recognition and Dynamics in a Fucose-Binding Lectin.

    PubMed

    Antonik, Paweł M; Volkov, Alexander N; Broder, Ursula N; Re, Daniele Lo; van Nuland, Nico A J; Crowley, Peter B

    2016-03-01

    Sugar binding by a cell surface ∼29 kDa lectin (RSL) from the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum was characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The complexes formed with four monosaccharides and four fucosides were studied. Complete resonance assignments and backbone dynamics were determined for RSL in the sugar-free form and when bound to l-fucose or d-mannose. RSL was found to interact with both the α- and the β-anomer of l-fucose and the "fucose like" sugars d-arabinose and l-galactose. Peak splitting was observed for some resonances of the binding site residues. The assignment of the split signals to the α- or β-anomer was confirmed by comparison with the spectra of RSL bound to methyl-α-l-fucoside or methyl-β-l-fucoside. The backbone dynamics of RSL were sensitive to the presence of ligand, with the protein adopting a more compact structure upon binding to l-fucose. Taking advantage of tryptophan residues in the binding sites, we show that the indole resonance is an excellent reporter on ligand binding. Each sugar resulted in a distinct signature of chemical shift perturbations, suggesting that tryptophan signals are a sufficient probe of sugar binding.

  2. Differential in vitro inhibitory activity against HIV-1 of alpha-(1-3)- and alpha-(1-6)-D-mannose specific plant lectins : Implication for microbicide development

    PubMed Central

    Saïdi, Hela; Nasreddine, Nadine; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Lecerf, Maxime; Schols, Dominique; Krief, Corinne; Balzarini, Jan; Bélec, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Background Plant lectins such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) and Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA) are natural proteins able to link mannose residues, and therefore inhibit HIV-target cell interactions. Plant lectins are candidate for microbicide development. Objective To evaluate the activity against HIV of the mannose-specific plant lectins HHA and GNA at the cellular membrane level of epithelial cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC), two potential target cells of HIV at the genital mucosal level. Methods The inhibitory effects of HHA and GNA were evaluated on HIV adsorption to genital epithelial HEC-1A cell line, on HIV transcytosis throughout a monolayer of polarized epithelial HEC-1A cells, on HIV adsorption to MDDC and on transfer of HIV from MDDC to autologous T lymphocytes. Results HHA faintly inhibited attachment to HEC-1A cells of the R5-tropic HIV-1Ba-L strain, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas GNA moderately inhibited HIV adsorption in the same context, but only at high drug doses. Only HHA, but not GNA, inhibited HIV-1JR-CSF transcytosis in a dose-dependent manner. By confocal microscopy, HHA, but not GNA, was adsorbed at the epithelial cell surface, suggesting that HHA interacts specifically with receptors mediating HIV-1 transcytosis. Both plant lectins partially inhibited HIV attachment to MDDC. HHA inhibited more efficiently the transfer of HIV from MDDC to T cell, than GNA. Both HHA and GNA lacked toxicity below 200 μg/ml irrespective the cellular system used and do not disturb the monolayer integrity of epithelial cells. Conclusion These observations demonstrate higher inhibitory activities of the lectin plant HHA by comparison to GNA, on HIV adsorption to HEC-1A cell line, HIV transcytosis through HEC-1A cell line monolayer, HIV adsorption to MDDC and HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells, highlighting the potential interest of HHA as effective microbicide against HIV. PMID:17565674

  3. Binding specificity of mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding protein from the cell surface of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Bonay, P; Molina, R; Fresno, M

    2001-09-01

    The sugar binding specificity of the recently described mannose-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBP) isolated to homogeneity from both the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi has been studied by quantitative hapten inhibition of the biotinylated CBPs to immobilized thyroglobulin using model oligosaccharides. The results clearly show a differential specificity toward high-mannose glycans between the CBPs from the two developmental stages. Thus, the isolated CBP from epimastigotes exhibited stronger affinity for higher mannose oligomers containing the Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-6Manalpha1-6 structure. Its affinity decreased, as did the number of mannose residues on the oligomer or removal of the terminal Manalpha1-2-linked mannose. By contrast the CBP isolated from the trypomastigote stage showed about 400-fold lower avidity than the epimastigote form, and contrary to it, it was slightly more specific toward Man5GlcNAc than Man9GlcNAc. Analysis of the interaction of epimastigote-Man-CBP with its ligands by UV difference spectroscopy indicates the existence of an extended binding site in that protein with a large enthalpic contribution to the binding. The thermodynamic parameters of binding were obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry and been found that the DeltaH values to be in good agreement with the van't Hoff values. The binding reactions are mainly enthalpically driven and exhibit enthalpy-enthropy compensation. In addition, analysis of the high-mannose glycans from different parts of the digestive tract of the reduviid insect vector of T. cruzi suggest a role of the CBP in the retention of the epimastigote stage in the anterior portion of the gut.

  4. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mannan-Binding Lectin Enhances Susceptibility to Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    de Miranda Santos, Isabel K. F.; Costa, Carlos H. N.; Krieger, Henrique; Feitosa, Mary F.; Zurakowski, David; Fardin, Babak; Gomes, Regis B. B.; Weiner, Debra L.; Harn, Donald A.; Ezekowitz, R. Alan B.; Epstein, Judith E.

    2001-01-01

    Levels of the serum opsonin mannan-binding lectin (MBL) were directly correlated with the probability of developing visceral leishmaniasis. Monocytes infected with MBL-opsonized Leishmania chagasi promastigotes secreted higher levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-6 than cells infected with nonopsonized parasites. Our findings indicate that MBL can modulate the clinical outcome of infection with L. chagasi and the function of infected macrophages. PMID:11447210

  6. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  7. Lectin Binding to Radopholus citrophilus and R. similis Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Gottwald, T R

    1992-06-01

    Lectin-binding glycoproteins in seven populations of two burrowing nematode sibling species were probed with five different biotinylated lectins on Western blots, and differences were correlated with nematode ability to parasitize citrus and to overcome citrus rootstock resistance. Banding patterns of molecular weight standards were fit best by an exponential decay function, and a predictive equation was used to estimate molecular weights (r(2) = 0.999). A band (131 kDa) that labeled with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) occurred in extracts from cuticles and egg shells of populations of Radopholus citrophilus that parasitize citrus. Wheat germ agglutin labeled a band (58 kDa) in aqueous homogenates of populations that reproduce in roots of citrus rootstock normally resistant to burrowing nematodes. The two sibling species R. citrophilus and R. similis were distinguished by a high molecular weight Con A-labeled band (608 kDa) from cuticle and egg shells. Probing blots with the lectin Limulus polyphemus agglutinin indicated that each population contained a band (12-16 kDa) specifically inhibited by the addition of 25 mM neuraminic acid, suggesting that glycoproteins with sialic acid moieties are present in burrowing nematodes.

  8. New structural insights into the molecular deciphering of mycobacterial lipoglycan binding to C-type lectins: lipoarabinomannan glycoform characterization and quantification by capillary electrophoresis at the subnanomole level.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    2000-06-23

    Lipoarabinomannans are key molecules of the mycobacterial envelopes involved in many steps of tuberculosis immunopathogenesis. Several of the biological activities of lipoarabinomannans are mediated by their ability to bind human C-type lectins, such as the macrophage mannose receptor, the mannose-binding protein and the surfactant proteins A and D. The lipoarabinomannan mannooligosaccharide caps have been demonstrated to be involved in the binding to the lectin carbohydrate recognition domains. We report an original analytical approach, based on capillary electrophoresis monitored by laser-induced fluorescence, allowing the absolute quantification, in nanomole quantities of lipoarabinomannan, of the number of mannooligosaccharide units per lipoarabinomannan molecule. Moreover, this analytical approach was successful for the glycosidic linkage determination of the mannooligosaccharide motifs and has been applied to the comparative analysis of parietal and cellular lipoarabinomannans of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, H37Ra and Erdman strains. Significant differences were observed in the amounts of the various mannooligosaccharide units between lipoarabinomannans of different strains and between parietal and cellular lipoarabinomannans of the same strain. Nevertheless, no relationship was found between the number of mannooligosaccharide caps and the virulence of the corresponding strain. The results of the present study should help us to gain more understanding of the molecular basis of lipoarabinomannan discrimination in the process of binding to C-type lectins. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Selective binding of lectins to normal and neoplastic urothelium in rat and mouse bladder carcinogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Romih, Rok

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer adjuvant intravesical therapy could be optimized by more selective targeting of neoplastic tissue via specific binding of lectins to plasma membrane carbohydrates. Our aim was to establish rat and mouse models of bladder carcinogenesis to investigate in vivo and ex vivo binding of selected lectins to the luminal surface of normal and neoplastic urothelium. Male rats and mice were treated with 0.05 % N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) in drinking water and used for ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments. Urinary bladder samples were also used for paraffin embedding, scanning electron microscopy and immunofluorescence labelling of uroplakins. During carcinogenesis, the structure of the urinary bladder luminal surface changed from microridges to microvilli and ropy ridges and the expression of urothelial-specific glycoproteins uroplakins was decreased. Ex vivo and in vivo lectin binding experiments gave comparable results. Jacalin (lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia) exhibited the highest selectivity for neoplastic compared to normal urothelium of rats and mice. The binding of lectin from Amaranthus caudatus decreased in rat model and increased in mouse carcinogenesis model, indicating interspecies variations of plasma membrane glycosylation. Lectin from Datura stramonium showed higher affinity for neoplastic urothelium compared to the normal in rat and mouse model. The BBN-induced animal models of bladder carcinogenesis offer a promising approach for lectin binding experiments and further lectin-mediated targeted drug delivery research. Moreover, in vivo lectin binding experiments are comparable to ex vivo experiments, which should be considered when planning and optimizing future research.

  10. Purification and characterization of a new type lactose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T

    1991-02-01

    A new type lactose-binding lectin was purified from extracts of Ulex europaeus seeds by affinity chromatography on a column of galactose-Sepharose 4B, followed by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. This lectin, designated as Ulex europaeus lectin III (UEA-III), was found to be inhibited by lactose. The dimeric lectin is a glycoprotein with a molecular mass of 70,000 Da; it consists of two apparently identical subunits of a molecular mass of 34,000 Da. Compositional analysis showed that this lectin contains 30% carbohydrate and a large amount of aspartic acid, serine and valine, but no sulfur-containing amino acids. The N-terminal amino-acid sequences of L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I) and di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II), both of which we have already purified and characterized, and that of UEA-III were determined and compared.

  11. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS.

  12. NICTABA and UDA, two GlcNAc-binding lectins with unique antiviral activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Gordts, Stephanie C; Renders, Marleen; Férir, Geoffrey; Huskens, Dana; Van Damme, Els J M; Peumans, Willy; Balzarini, Jan; Schols, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the antiviral properties of a unique lectin (NICTABA) produced by the tobacco plant, Nicotiana tabacum. Cellular assays were used to investigate the antiviral activity of NICTABA and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies were performed to study the sugar specificity and the interactions of both lectins with the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1. The N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectins exhibited broad-spectrum activity against several families of enveloped viruses including influenza A/B, Dengue virus type 2, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and HIV-1/2. The IC50 of NICTABA for various HIV-1 strains, clinical isolates and HIV-2 assessed in PBMCs ranged from 5 to 30 nM. Furthermore, NICTABA inhibited syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1-infected T cells and uninfected CD4+ T lymphocytes and prevented DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ target T lymphocytes. However, unlike many other antiviral carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) described so far, NICTABA did not block HIV-1 capture to DC-SIGN+ cells and it did not interfere with the binding of the human monoclonal antibody 2G12 to gp120. SPR studies with HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins showed that the affinity of NICTABA for gp120 and gp41 was in the low nanomolar range. The specific binding of NICTABA to gp120 could be prevented in the presence of a GlcNAc trimer, but not in the presence of mannose trimers. NICTABA displayed no antiviral activity against non-enveloped viruses. Since CBAs possess a high genetic barrier for the development of viral resistance and NICTABA shows a broad antiviral activity profile, this CBA may qualify as a potential antiviral candidate with a pleiotropic mode of action aimed at targeting the entry of enveloped viruses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells. PMID:27711121

  14. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins.

    PubMed

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells.

  15. Pradimicin A, a D-mannose-binding antibiotic, binds pyranosides of L-fucose and L-galactose in a calcium-sensitive manner.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yu; Watanabe, Yasunori; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige; Ojika, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    Pradimicin A (PRM-A) is a unique antibiotic with a lectin-like ability to bind D-mannose (D-Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ion. Although accumulated evidences suggest that PRM-A recognizes the 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxyl groups of D-Man, BMY-28864, an artificial PRM-A derivative, was shown not to bind L-fucose (L-Fuc) and L-galactose (lLGal), both of which share the characteristic array of the three hydroxyl groups with D-Man. To obtain a plausible explanation for this inconsistency, we performed co-precipitation experiments of PRM-A with L-Fuc, L-Gal, and their methyl pyranosides (L-Fuc-OMe, L-Gal-OMe) by taking advantage of aggregate-forming propensity of the binary [PRM-A/Ca(2+)] complex. While L-Fuc and L-Gal were hardly incorporated into the aggregate, L-Fuc-OMe and L-Gal-OMe were found to exhibit significant binding to PRM-A. However, increased Ca(2+) concentration abolished this binding, raising the possibility that poor binding of L-Fuc and L-Gal to PRM-A is attributed to their chelation with Ca(2+) ion. This possibility was partly supported by (1)H NMR analysis that detected interaction of L-Fuc and L-Gal with Ca(2+) ion in aqueous solution. These results collectively indicate that PRM-A binds pyranosides of L-Fuc and L-Gal when Ca(2+) concentration is not excessive to trap these sugars by chelation but sufficient to form the [PRM-A/Ca(2+)] complex.

  16. Purification and characterization of a mannan-binding lectin specifically expressed in corms of saffron plant (Crocus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Escribano, J; Rubio, A; Alvarez-Ortí, M; Molina, A; Fernández, J A

    2000-02-01

    Despite the economical interest of Crocus sativus, its biochemistry has been poorly studied. Herein, we have isolated a lectin present in saffron corm by gel-filtration, anion-exchange, and reversed-phase chromatography. One- and two-dimensional PAGE, MALDI-MS, and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated that the native protein forms noncovalently linked aggregates of about 80 kDa apparent molecular mass, mainly composed of two charged heterogeneous (pI's, 6.69-6.93) basic subunits of approximately 12 kDa. Their N-terminal sequences shared 25% similarity and were homologous to the N- and C-terminal domains of monocotyledonous mannose-binding lectins, respectively. An additional polypeptide of around 28 kDa apparent molecular mass was also detected, probably corresponding to a precursor processed into two mature subunits. In addition, the N-terminal domain subunit exhibited 56% similarity with curculin, a sweet protein with taste-modifying activity. The native lectin specifically interacts with a yeast mannan and is a major corm protein specifically expressed in this organ.

  17. Histochemical characterization of the lectin-binding sites in the equine vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-young; Kang, Tae-young; Lee, Yong-duk; Shin, Tae-kyun

    2003-04-01

    The binding specificities of various lectins, such as the Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), soybean agglutinin (SBA), and the Bandeiraea simplicifolia BS-1 (Isolectin B4), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), and Ulex europaeus (UEA-I) lectins, were studied in the vomeronasal organ of the horse. The microvilli of the vomeronasal sensory epithelium were positive for DBA, SBA, Isolectin B4, WGA, PNA, and UEA-I. The receptor cells showed intense reactivity for DBA and WGA. Lectins were not detected in the supporting cells or basal cells. The Jacobson's glands were positive for WGA and UEA-I, but lectins were absent from the nerve bundles. From these results, we postulate that several lectin-binding carbohydrates on the microvilli and neurosensory cells are associated with chemoreception in the horse. In addition, the differential lectin-binding patterns in the horse suggest that the carbohydrates present in this particular sense organ are species-specific.

  18. Altered binding of Ulex europaeus I lectin to psoriatic epidermis.

    PubMed

    Kariniemi, A L; Holthöfer, H; Miettinen, A; Virtanen, I

    1983-11-01

    We have used Ulex europaeus I (UEA I) lectin, specific for alpha-L-fucose-containing glycoconjugates, in fluorescence microscopy to stain cryostat sections of human skin from normal persons and patients with psoriasis and lichen simplex. In normal skin the upper layers of the stratum spinosum and the stratum granulosum were strongly reactive with UEA I, whereas the lower layers of the epidermis did not react. The staining intensity of the upper epidermis was similar to that of the endothelium of dermal blood vessels. Biopsies of the lesional skin of lichen simplex showed an intense UEA I-specific staining throughout the whole epidermis, similar in intensity to that seen in the upper epidermis of normal skin. In psoriatic lesions positive UEA I-specific fluorescence was seen throughout the whole epidermis, but the fluorescence was more faint and often granular. In uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients the whole epidermis showed a diffuse UEA I-specific fluorescence, differing in this respect from normal skin. In normal skin UEA I binds to epidermal cells which are at a certain state of differentiation. The results with psoriatic epidermis confirm that both uninvolved and lesional epidermis have a defect in epidermal maturation, as shown by the altered binding of UEA I lectin.

  19. Characterization of Caenorhabditis Elegans Lectin-Binding Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Link, C. D.; Silverman, M. A.; Breen, M.; Watt, K. E.; Dames, S. A.

    1992-01-01

    We have identified 45 mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans that show ectopic surface binding of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA). These mutations are all recessive and define six genes: srf-2, srf-3, srf-4, srf-5, srf-8 and srf-9. Mutations in these genes fall into two phenotypic classes: srf-2, -3, -5 mutants are grossly wild-type, except for their lectin-binding phenotype; srf-4, -8, -9 mutants have a suite of defects, including uncoordinated movement, abnormal egg laying, and defective copulatory bursae morphogenesis. Characterization of these pleiotropic mutants at the cellular level reveals defects in the migration of the gonadal distal tip cell and in axon morphology. Unexpectedly, the pleiotropic mutations also interact with mutations in the lin-12 gene, which encodes a putative cell surface receptor involved in the control of cell fate. We propose that the underlying defect in the pleiotropic mutations may be in the general processing or secretion of extracellular proteins. PMID:1516818

  20. Interplay between metal binding and cis/trans isomerization in legume lectins: structural and thermodynamic study of P. angolensis lectin.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Buts, Lieven; Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy

    2006-08-04

    The interplay between metal binding, carbohydrate binding activity, stability and structure of the lectin from Pterocarpus angolensis was investigated. Removal of the metals leads to a more flexible form of the protein with significantly less conformational stability. Crystal structures of this metal-free form show significant structural rearrangements, although some structural features that allow the binding of sugars are retained. We propose that substitution of an asparagine residue at the start of the C-terminal beta-strand of the legume lectin monomer hinders the trans-isomerization of the cis-peptide bond upon demetallization and constitutes an intramolecular switch governing the isomer state of the non-proline bond and ultimately the lectin phenotype.

  1. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus by the Cyanobacterial Protein MVL: mechanistic differences between the high-mannose specific lectins MVL, CV-N, and GNA

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Tan, Wendy; Zubkova, Iryna; Takeda, Kazuyo; Wells, Frances; Rubin, Steven; Bewley, Carole A.; Major, Marian E.

    2014-01-01

    Plant or microbial lectins are known to exhibit potent antiviral activities against viruses with glycosylated surface proteins, yet the mechanism(s) by which these carbohydrate-binding proteins exert their antiviral activities is not fully understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to possess glycosylated envelope proteins (gpE1E2), and to be potently inhibited by lectins. Here, we tested in detail the antiviral properties of the newly discovered Microcystis viridis lectin (MVL) along with cyanovirin N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) against cell culture HCV, as well as their binding properties towards viral particles, target cells, and recombinant HCV glycoproteins. Using infectivity assays, CV-N, MVL and GNA inhibited HCV with IC50 values of 0.6 nM, 30.4 nM, and 11.1 nM, respectively. Biolayer interferometry analysis demonstrated a higher affinity of GNA to immobilized recombinant HCV glycoproteins compared to CV–N and MVL. Complementary studies, including FACS analysis, confocal microscopy and pre and post virus binding assays, showed a complex mechanism of inhibition for CV-N and MVL that includes both viral and cell association; while GNA functions by binding directly to the viral particle. Combinations of GNA with CV-N or MVL in HCV infection studies revealed synergistic inhibitory effects, which can be explained by different glycan recognition profiles of the mainly high-mannoside specific lectins, and supports the hypothesis that these lectins inhibit through different and complex modes of action. Our findings provide important insights into the mechanisms by which lectins inhibit HCV infection. Overall, the data suggest MVL and CV-N have the potential for toxicity due to interactions with cellular proteins while GNA may be a better therapeutic agent due to specificity for the HCV gpE1E2. PMID:24152340

  2. Lectin binding patterns in the vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb of the rat.

    PubMed

    Salazar, I; Sánchez Quinteiro, P

    1998-10-01

    A number of previous studies have indicated that lectin histochemistry is an obvious choice for characterizing the vomeronasal system. However, apparently inconsistent results have been obtained: notably, the affinity with which various lectins bind to the accessory olfactory bulb varies among taxa, even considering closely related species. In the present study, the binding patterns of seven lectins in the rat accessory olfactory bulb, vomeronasal nerves and vomeronasal duct were investigated. The Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin bound exclusively to the vomeronasal nerve and glomerular layers of the accessory olfactory bulb, while the Ulex europeus and Lycopersicon esculentum lectins bound to these regions and additionally to the nerve and glomerular layers of the main olfactory bulb. Soybean agglutinin showed a similar pattern to that obtained with the Ulex europeus and Lycopersicon esculentum lectins, though it also faintly labelled other parts of the structures examined. The Vicia villosa and Erythrina cristagalli lectins were not specific for the vomeronasal system, since they labelled grey and white matters in structures including the lateral olfactory tract and the anterior olfactory nuclei. The Dolichos biflorus lectin did not bind to vomeronasal tissues. The observed patterns of binding in the accessory olfactory bulb were consistent with those observed in the vomeronasal nerves, but unlike those observed in the epithelium of the vomeronasal duct. This latter result probably reflects binding of lectins to sugar residues contained in secreted mucus rather than those in epithelial nerve endings.

  3. Visualizing the dental biofilm matrix by means of fluorescence lectin-binding analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tawakoli, Pune N.; Neu, Thomas R.; Busck, Mette M.; Kuhlicke, Ute; Schramm, Andreas; Attin, Thomas; Wiedemeier, Daniel B.; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extracellular matrix is a poorly studied, yet important component of dental biofilms. Fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA) is a powerful tool to characterize glycoconjugates in the biofilm matrix. This study aimed to systematically investigate the ability of 75 fluorescently labeled lectins to visualize and quantify extracellular glycoconjugates in dental biofilms. Lectin binding was screened on pooled supragingival biofilm samples collected from 76 subjects using confocal microscopy. FLBA was then performed with 10 selected lectins on biofilms grown in situ for 48 h in the absence of sucrose. For five lectins that proved particularly suitable, stained biovolumes were quantified and correlated to the bacterial composition of the biofilms. Additionally, combinations of up to three differently labeled lectins were tested. Of the 10 lectins, five bound particularly well in 48-h-biofilms: Aleuria aurantia (AAL), Calystega sepiem (Calsepa), Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA), Morniga-G (MNA-G) and Helix pomatia (HPA). No significant correlation between the binding of specific lectins and bacterial composition was found. Fluorescently labeled lectins enable the visualization of glycoconjugates in the dental biofilm matrix. The characterization and quantification of glycoconjugates in dental biofilms require a combination of several lectins. For 48-h-biofilms grown in absence of sucrose, AAL, Calsepa, HPA, LEA, and MNA-G are recommendable. PMID:28748044

  4. Unique posttranslational modifications of chitin-binding lectins of Entamoeba invadens cyst walls.

    PubMed

    Van Dellen, Katrina L; Chatterjee, Anirban; Ratner, Daniel M; Magnelli, Paula E; Cipollo, John F; Steffen, Martin; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2006-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic dysentery and liver abscesses, is spread via chitin-walled cysts. The most abundant protein in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens, a model for amebic encystation, is a lectin called EiJacob1. EiJacob1 has five tandemly arrayed, six-Cys chitin-binding domains separated by low-complexity Ser- and Thr-rich spacers. E. histolytica also has numerous predicted Jessie lectins and chitinases, which contain a single, N-terminal eight-Cys chitin-binding domain. We hypothesized that E. invadens cyst walls are composed entirely of proteins with six-Cys or eight-Cys chitin-binding domains and that some of these proteins contain sugars. E. invadens genomic sequences predicted seven Jacob lectins, five Jessie lectins, and three chitinases. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that mRNAs encoding Jacobs, Jessies, and chitinases are increased during E. invadens encystation, while mass spectrometry showed that the cyst wall is composed of an approximately 30:70 mix of Jacob lectins (cross-linking proteins) and Jessie and chitinase lectins (possible enzymes). Three Jacob lectins were cleaved prior to Lys at conserved sites (e.g., TPSVDK) in the Ser- and Thr-rich spacers between chitin-binding domains. A model peptide was cleaved at the same site by papain and E. invadens Cys proteases, suggesting that the latter cleave Jacob lectins in vivo. Some Jacob lectins had O-phosphodiester-linked carbohydrates, which were one to seven hexoses long and had deoxysugars at reducing ends. We concluded that the major protein components of the E. invadens cyst wall all contain chitin-binding domains (chitinases, Jessie lectins, and Jacob lectins) and that the Jacob lectins are differentially modified by site-specific Cys proteases and O-phosphodiester-linked glycans.

  5. Unique Posttranslational Modifications of Chitin-Binding Lectins of Entamoeba invadens Cyst Walls

    PubMed Central

    Van Dellen, Katrina L.; Chatterjee, Anirban; Ratner, Daniel M.; Magnelli, Paula E.; Cipollo, John F.; Steffen, Martin; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2006-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic dysentery and liver abscesses, is spread via chitin-walled cysts. The most abundant protein in the cyst wall of Entamoeba invadens, a model for amebic encystation, is a lectin called EiJacob1. EiJacob1 has five tandemly arrayed, six-Cys chitin-binding domains separated by low-complexity Ser- and Thr-rich spacers. E. histolytica also has numerous predicted Jessie lectins and chitinases, which contain a single, N-terminal eight-Cys chitin-binding domain. We hypothesized that E. invadens cyst walls are composed entirely of proteins with six-Cys or eight-Cys chitin-binding domains and that some of these proteins contain sugars. E. invadens genomic sequences predicted seven Jacob lectins, five Jessie lectins, and three chitinases. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed that mRNAs encoding Jacobs, Jessies, and chitinases are increased during E. invadens encystation, while mass spectrometry showed that the cyst wall is composed of an ∼30:70 mix of Jacob lectins (cross-linking proteins) and Jessie and chitinase lectins (possible enzymes). Three Jacob lectins were cleaved prior to Lys at conserved sites (e.g., TPSVDK) in the Ser- and Thr-rich spacers between chitin-binding domains. A model peptide was cleaved at the same site by papain and E. invadens Cys proteases, suggesting that the latter cleave Jacob lectins in vivo. Some Jacob lectins had O-phosphodiester-linked carbohydrates, which were one to seven hexoses long and had deoxysugars at reducing ends. We concluded that the major protein components of the E. invadens cyst wall all contain chitin-binding domains (chitinases, Jessie lectins, and Jacob lectins) and that the Jacob lectins are differentially modified by site-specific Cys proteases and O-phosphodiester-linked glycans. PMID:16682461

  6. Roles for mannose binding lectin and rhamnose binding lectin in channel catfish fed essential oils and challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major problem in the catfish farming industry has been high disease loss to enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), caused by the bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri. Methods to control this disease include vaccination, antibiotic therapy, and restricted feeding. Another method that has been examined i...

  7. A C-type lectin isolated from the skin of Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus) binds a remarkably broad range of sugars and induces blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Dotsuta, Yuma; Ono, Ayaka; Suzuki, Masanari; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakamura, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physiological role of skin lectins of the Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus). A skin extract was subjected to affinity chromatography using seven different sugars as ligands. Molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated elution of the same protein by each of the seven respective cognate ligands from sugar affinity columns. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA of this protein [designated as H. japonicus C-type-lectin (HjCL)] identified it as a novel fish subgroup VII C-type lectin evolutionarily related to snake venom lectins. HjCL was predicted to bind to mannose because of the presence of a Glu-Pro-Asn (EPN) motif; however, haemagglutination inhibition assays and glycoconjugate microarray analysis demonstrated its binding to numerous structurally diverse sugars. Competitive sugar-binding assays using affinity chromatography indicated that HjCL bound multiple sugars via a common carbohydrate-recognition domain. The mRNA encoding HjCL was specifically detected in the skin, and immunohistochemical analysis detected its expression in uncharacterized large cells in the epidermis. HjCL agglutinated the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella tarda and promoted immediate clotting of shark blood, indicating that HjCL is involved in host defence on the skin surface especially when the shark is injured and bleeds. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactions between Rhizobia and Lectins of Lentil, Pea, Broad Bean, and Jackbean 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.

    1980-01-01

    A quantitative method was developed to measure the binding of fluorescent-labeled lentil (Lens esculenta Moench), pea (Pisum sativum L.), broad bean (Vicia faba L.), and jackbean (Canavalia ensiformis L., DC.) lectins to various Rhizobium strains. Lentil lectin bound to three of the five Rhizobium leguminosarum strains tested. The number of lentil lectin molecules bound per R. leguminosarum 128C53 cell was 2.1 × 104. Lentil lectin also bound to R. japonicum 61A133. Pea and broad bean lectins bound to only two of the five strains of R. leguminosarum, whereas concanavalin A (jackbean lectin) bound to all strains of R. leguminosarum, R. phaseoli, R. japonicum, and R. sp. tested. Since these four lectins have similar sugarbinding properties but different physical properties, the variation in bindings of these lectins to various Rhizobium strains indicates that binding of lectin to Rhizobium is determined not only by the sugar specificity of the lectin but also by its physical characteristics. The binding of lentil lectin and concanavalin A to R. leguminosarum 128C53 could be inhibited by glucose, fructose, and mannose. However, even at 150 millimolar glucose, about 15% of the binding remained. The binding of lentil lectin to R. japonicum 61A133 could be inhibited by glucose but not by galactose. It is concluded that the binding site of lentil lectin to R. japonicum is different from the binding site of soybean lectin to R. japonicum. PMID:16661328

  9. Structural Insights into the Mechanism of pH-dependent Ligand Binding and Release by the Cation-dependent Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Linda J.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Dahms, Nancy M.; Kim, Jung-Ja P.

    2008-04-29

    The cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR) is a key component of the lysosomal enzyme targeting system that binds newly synthesized mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-containing acid hydrolases and transports them to endosomal compartments. The interaction between the MPRs and its ligands is pH-dependent; the homodimeric CD-MPR binds lysosomal enzymes optimally in the pH environment of the trans Golgi network (pH {approx} 6.5) and releases its cargo in acidic endosomal compartments (binding affinities are modulated by divalent cations. Our previous crystallographic studies have shown that at pH 6.5, the CD-MPR bound to Man-6-P adopts a significantly different quaternary conformation than the CD-MPR in a ligand-unbound state, a feature unique among known lectin structures. To determine whether different pH conditions elicit conformational changes in the receptor that alters ligand binding affinities, we have obtained additional crystal structures representative of the various environments encountered by the receptor including: (1) the CD-MPR bound at pH 6.5 (i.e. trans Golgi network) to a high affinity ligand (the terminally phosphorylated trisaccharide P-Man({alpha}1,2)Man({alpha}1,2)Man-O-(CH{sub 2}){sub 8}COOMe), (2) the CD-MPR at pH 4.8 in an unbound state (i.e. endosome), and (3) the CD-MPR at pH 7.4 (i.e. cell surface). A detailed comparison of the available CD-MPR structures reveals the positional invariability of specific binding pocket residues and implicates intermonomer contact(s), as well as the protonation state of Man-6-P, as regulators of pH-dependent carbohydrate binding.

  10. The lectins Griffithsin, Cyanovirin-N and Scytovirin inhibit HIV-1 binding to the DC-SIGN receptor and transfer to CD4+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandre, Kabamba B.; Gray, Elin S.; Mufhandu, Hazel; McMahon, James B.; Chakauya, Ereck; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that during the sexual transmission of HIV-1, the glycan-specific DC-SIGN receptor binds the virus and mediates its transfer to CD4+ cells. The lectins griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN) inhibit HIV-1 infection by binding to mannose-rich glycans on gp120. We measured the ability of these lectins to inhibit both the HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN and the DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 infection of CD4+ cells. While GRFT, CV-N and SVN were moderately inhibitory to DC-SIGN binding, they potently inhibited DC-SIGN-transfer of HIV-1. The introduction of the 234 glycosylation site abolished HIV-1 sensitivity to lectin inhibition of binding to DC-SIGN and virus transfer to susceptible cells. However, the addition of the 295 glycosylation site increased the inhibition of transfer. Our data suggest that GRFT, CV-N and SVN can block two important stages of the sexual transmission of HIV-1, DC-SIGN binding and transfer, supporting their further development as microbicides. PMID:22209231

  11. The lectins griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and scytovirin inhibit HIV-1 binding to the DC-SIGN receptor and transfer to CD4(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Kabamba B; Gray, Elin S; Mufhandu, Hazel; McMahon, James B; Chakauya, Ereck; O'Keefe, Barry R; Chikwamba, Rachel; Morris, Lynn

    2012-02-20

    It is generally believed that during the sexual transmission of HIV-1, the glycan-specific DC-SIGN receptor binds the virus and mediates its transfer to CD4(+) cells. The lectins griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and scytovirin (SVN) inhibit HIV-1 infection by binding to mannose-rich glycans on gp120. We measured the ability of these lectins to inhibit both the HIV-1 binding to DC-SIGN and the DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 infection of CD4(+) cells. While GRFT, CV-N and SVN were moderately inhibitory to DC-SIGN binding, they potently inhibited DC-SIGN-transfer of HIV-1. The introduction of the 234 glycosylation site abolished HIV-1 sensitivity to lectin inhibition of binding to DC-SIGN and virus transfer to susceptible cells. However, the addition of the 295 glycosylation site increased the inhibition of transfer. Our data suggest that GRFT, CV-N and SVN can block two important stages of the sexual transmission of HIV-1, DC-SIGN binding and transfer, supporting their further development as microbicides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  13. High-resolution structure of a new Tn antigen-binding lectin from Vatairea macrocarpa and a comparative analysis of Tn-binding legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Bruno Lopes; Silva Filho, José Caetano; Kumar, Prashant; Pereira, Ronniery Ilário; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Delatorre, Plínio; Bezerra, Gustavo Arruda; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Gruber, Karl; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2015-02-01

    Plant lectins have been studied as histological markers and promising antineoplastic molecules for a long time, and structural characterization of different lectins bound to specific cancer epitopes has been carried out successfully. The crystal structures of Vatairea macrocarpa (VML) seed lectin in complex with GalNAc-α-O-Ser (Tn antigen) and GalNAc have been determined at the resolution of 1.4Å and 1.7Å, respectively. Molecular docking analysis of this new structure and other Tn-binding legume lectins to O-mucin fragments differently decorated with this antigen provides a comparative binding profile among these proteins, stressing that subtle alterations that may not influence monosaccharide binding can, nonetheless, directly impact the ability of these lectins to recognize naturally occurring antigens. In addition to the specific biological effects of VML, the structural and binding similarities between it and other lectins commonly used as histological markers (e.g., VVLB4 and SBA) strongly suggest VML as a candidate tool for cancer research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif

    PubMed Central

    Alenton, Rod Russel R.; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation. PMID:28374848

  15. The mannose-specific plant lectins from Cymbidium hybrid and Epipactis helleborine and the (N-acetylglucosamine)n-specific plant lectin from Urtica dioica are potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus and cytomegalovirus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, J; Neyts, J; Schols, D; Hosoya, M; Van Damme, E; Peumans, W; De Clercq, E

    1992-06-01

    A series of four mannose(Man)-, three N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)n-, ten N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose(GalNAc/Gal)-, one 5-acetylneuraminic acid (alpha-2,3-Gal/GalNAc)- and one 5-acetylneuroaminic acid(alpha-2,6-Gal/Gal-NAc)-specific plant agglutinins were evaluated for their antiviral activity in vitro. the mannose-specific lectins from the orchid species Cymbidium hybrid (CA), Epipactis helleborine (EHA) and Listera ovata (LOA) were highly inhibitory to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) in MT-4, and showed a marked anti-human cytomegalovirus (CMV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza A virus activity in HEL, HeLa and MDCK cells, respectively. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of CA and EHA for HIV ranged from 0.04 to 0.08 micrograms/ml, that is about 3 orders of magnitude below their toxicity threshold (50% inhibitory concentration for MT-4 cell growth: 54 to 60 micrograms/ml). Also, the (GlcNAc)n-specific lectin from Urtica dioica (UDA) was inhibitory to HIV-1-, HIV-2-, CMV-, RSV- and influenza A virus-induced cytopathicity at an EC50 ranging from 0.3 to 9 micrograms/ml. The GalNAc/Gal-, alpha-2,3-Gal/GalNAc- or alpha-2,6-Gal/GalNAc-specific lectins were not inhibitory to HIV or CMV at non-toxic concentrations. CA, EHA and UDA proved to be potent inhibitors of syncytium formation between persistently HIV-1- and HIV-2-infected HUT-78 cells and CD4+ Molt/4 (clone 8) cells (EC50: 0.2-2 micrograms/ml). Unlike dextran sulfate, the plant lectins CA, EHA and UDA did not interfere with HIV-1 adsorption to MT-4 cells and RSV- and influenza A virus adsorption to HeLa and MDCK cells, respectively. They presumably interact at the level of virion fusion with the target cell.

  16. Isolation of two novel mannan- and L-fucose-binding lectins from the green alga Enteromorpha prolifera: biochemical characterization of EPL-2.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Sanz, Libia; Sánchez, Eduardo I; Wolfenstein-Todel, Carlota; Calvete, Juan J

    2003-07-15

    EPL-1 and EPL-2 represent lectins isolated from the green alga Enteromorpha prolifera. Both lectins are 20- to 22-kDa single-chain, nonglycosylated proteins. N-terminal sequence analysis of peptides representing over 70% of their primary structures shows that EPL-1 and EPL-2 represent novel proteins. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium experiments showed that EPL-1 and EPL-2 had average apparent molecular masses of 60000+/-6000 Da (EPL-1) and 59500+/-3000 Da (EPL-2), indicating that EPL-1 and EPL-2 have a tendency to self-associate into higher order aggregates, possibly homodimers and homotetramers, in equilibrium. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of EPL-2 was studied by enzyme-linked lectin assay and intrinsic fluorescence measurements. The results show that the combining site of EPL-2 is capable of accommodating both D-mannose and L-fucose, which share the conformation of the hydroxyl groups at positions 2 (axial) and 4 (equatorial), and includes subsites for the substituents at O1 and for branched mannose residues.

  17. The bovine mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor. The role of arginine residues in mannose 6-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Dahms, N M; Rose, P A; Molkentin, J D; Zhang, Y; Brzycki, M A

    1993-03-15

    The extracytoplasmic region of the bovine cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF-II receptor) consists of 15 homologous repeating domains, each of which is approximately 147 residues in length. The receptor contains two high affinity mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P) binding sites and our recent studies (Westlund, B., Dahms, N. M., and Kornfeld, S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 23233-23239) have localized these two binding sites to domains 1-3 and 7-11. To further define the location of the Man-6-P binding sites and to determine the role of specific arginine residues in Man-6-P binding, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create truncated soluble forms of the M6P/IGF-II receptor in conjunction with either conservative (Lys) or nonconservative (Ala) replacement of arginine residues. These mutants were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells and assayed for their ability to bind phosphomannosyl residues by affinity chromatography. Analysis of the ligand binding activity of carboxyl-terminal truncated forms of the receptor's extracytoplasmic region demonstrated that the second Man-6-P binding site is contained within domains 7-9. Substitution of Arg435 in domain 3 of the amino-terminal binding site and Arg1334 in domain 9 of the second binding site results in a dramatic loss of ligand binding activity. However, substitutions at positions 435 and/or 1334 did not affect the secretion, glycosylation, or immunoreactivity of these truncated proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that Arg435 and Arg1334 are essential components of the M6P/IGF-II receptor's high affinity Man-6-P binding sites.

  18. Developmental changes in the distribution of cecal lectin-binding sites of Balb-c mice.

    PubMed

    Doehrn, S; Breipohl, W; Lierse, W; Romaniuk, K; Young, W

    1992-01-01

    The existence of lectin-binding sites was investigated in the cecum of Balb-c mice at seven developmental stages ranging from 18 days post conception (p.c.) to 8 weeks after birth. Nine horseradish-peroxidase-conjugated lectins (concanavalin A, Triticum vulgaris, Dolichus biflorus, Helix pomatia, Arachis hypogaea, Glycine maximus, Lotus tetragonolobus, Ulex europaeus, Limulus polyphemus) were applied to 5- to 7-microns thin paraffin sections of Bouin-fixed tissue. After DAB staining the sections were evaluated by light microscopy. It was shown that each lectin exhibits a unique developmental pattern. The adult binding patterns were established at the age of 3-4 weeks with only minor changes occurring thereafter. Considerable differences in binding patterns occurred not only between lectins of different groups but also between lectins with the same nominal monosaccharide specificity.

  19. Novel mannose binding natterin-like protein in the skin mucus of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Binoy; Patel, Deepti M; Kitani, Yoichiro; Viswanath, Kiron; Brinchmann, Monica F

    2017-09-01

    This study presents the first report of purification of natterin-like protein (Nlp) in a non-venomous fish. The peptide identities of purified cod Nlp were confirmed through LC-MSMS and matched to a cod expressed sequence tag (EST). A partial cod nlp nucleotide sequence was amplified and sequenced based on this EST. Multiple sequence alignment of cod Nlp showed considerable homology with other teleost Nlps and the presence of an N-terminal jacalin-like lectin domain coupled with a C-terminal toxin domain. nlp expression was higher in skin, head kidney, liver and spleen than in other tissues studied. Hemaggluttination of horse red blood cells by Nlp was calcium dependent and inhibited by mannose. A Vibrio anguillarum bath challenge however, did not alter the expression of cod nlp transcripts in the skin and gills. Further functional characterization is required to establish the significance of this unique protein in Atlantic cod and other teleosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of the galactose-binding lectin that mediates the in vitro adherence of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Smith, R D; Schlesinger, P H; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica adheres to human colonic mucus, colonic epithelial cells, and other target cells via a galactose (Gal) or N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) inhibitable surface lectin. Blockade of this adherence lectin with Gal or GalNAc in vitro prevents amebic killing of target cells. We have identified and purified the adherence lectin by two methods: affinity columns derivatized with galactose monomers or galactose terminal glycoproteins, and affinity columns and immunoblots prepared with monoclonal antibodies that inhibit amebic adherence. By both methods the adherence lectin was identified as a 170-kD secreted and membrane-bound amebic protein. The surface location of the lectin was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Purified lectin competitively inhibited amebic adherence to target cells by binding to receptors on the target Chinese hamster ovary cells in a Gal-inhibitable manner. Images PMID:2890654

  1. Toxicity and binding profile of lectins from the Genus canavalia on brine shrimp.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins.

  2. Toxicity and Binding Profile of Lectins from the Genus Canavalia on Brine Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Melo, Arthur Alves; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Carneiro, Romulo Farias; Barroso-Neto, Ito Liberato; Silva, Suzete Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Nagano, Celso Shiniti; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Saker-Sampaio, Silvana; Sousa Cavada, Benildo; Sampaio, Alexandre Holanda

    2013-01-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins widely distributed in nature with many biological functions. Although many lectins have a remarkable biotechnological potential, some of them can be cytotoxic. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the toxicity of five lectins, purified from seeds of different species of Canavalia genus. In order to determine the toxicity, assays with Artemia nauplii were performed. In addition, a fluorescence assay was carried out to evaluate the binding of lectins to Artemia nauplii. In order to verify the relationship between the structure of lectins and their cytotoxic effect, structural analysis was carried out to evaluate the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of each lectin. The results showed that all lectins exhibited different toxicities and bound to a similar area in the digestive tract of Artemia nauplii. Concerning the structural analysis, differences in spatial arrangement and volume of CRD may explain the variation of the toxicity exhibited by each lectin. To this date, this is the first study that establishes a link between toxicity and structure of CRD from Diocleinae lectins. PMID:24380079

  3. Gastrodianin-like mannose-binding proteins: a novel class of plant proteins with antifungal properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Bauw, G; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Chen, Z L; Van Montagu, M; Angenon, G; Dillen, W

    2001-03-01

    The orchid Gastrodia elata depends on the fungus Armillaria mellea to complete its life cycle. In the interaction, fungal hyphae penetrate older, nutritive corms but not newly formed corms. From these corms, a protein fraction with in vitro activity against plant-pathogenic fungi has previously been purified. Here, the sequence of gastrodianin, the main constituent of the antifungal fraction, is reported. Four isoforms that encoded two different mature proteins were identified at the cDNA level. Another isoform was detected in sequenced peptides. Because the antifungal activity of gastrodianins produced in and purified from Escherichia coli and Nicotiana tabacum was comparable to that of gastrodianin purified from the orchid, gastrodianins are the active component of the antifungal fractions. Gastrodianin accumulation is probably an important part of the mechanism by which the orchid controls Armillaria penetration. Gastrodianin was found to be homologous to monomeric mannose-binding proteins of other orchids, of which at least one (Epipactis helleborine mannose-binding protein) also displayed in vitro antifungal activity. This establishes the gastrodianin-like proteins (GLIPs) as a novel class of antifungal proteins.

  4. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  5. Histochemical evaluation of postnatal lectin-binding sites in the mouse prostate.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Kentaro; Muragishi, Ryoki; Yoshinaga, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory genital gland that plays an essential role in reproductive function. To understand the cytological characteristics of differentiating prostatic cells, we used lectin histochemistry combined with immunohistochemistry to examine the distribution of lectin-binding sites on prostatic cells during postnatal development in the mouse. During postnatal development, Hippeastrum Hybrid Lectin (HHL) lectin reacted consistently with the luminal cells of all prostatic lobes (regions), whereas the Ricinus Communis Agglutinin I (RCA-I) and Soybean Agglutinin (SBA) lectins showed remarkable differences with age, region, and cell type. We found that the lectin-binding pattern in differentiating prostatic cells acquired adult characteristics around 3 weeks after birth. The results indicate that prostatic cell differentiation during postnatal development in mice is characterized by the presence of cell- and region-specific lectin-binding sites in the prostate, suggesting that there may also be cellular and regional differences in their function. Furthermore, some lectins (HHL, RCA-I, and SBA) could provide useful markers for research into cell differentiation and for the pathological evaluation of prostatic diseases or in the diagnosis of male infertility.

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of carbohydrate binding to the basic lectin from winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus).

    PubMed

    Khan, M I; Sastry, M V; Surolia, A

    1986-03-05

    A basic lectin (pI approximately 10.0) was purified to homogeneity from the seeds of winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) by affinity chromatography on Sepharose 6-aminocaproyl-D-galactosamine. The lectin agglutinated trypsinized rabbit erythrocytes and had a relative molecular mass of 58,000 consisting of two subunits of Mr 29,000. The lectin binds to N-dansylgalactosamine, leading to a 15-fold increase in dansyl fluorescence with a concomitant 25-nm blue shift in the emission maximum. The lectin has two binding sites/dimer for this sugar and an association constant of 4.17 X 10(5) M-1 at 25 degrees C. The strong binding to N-dansylgalactosamine is due to a relatively positive entropic contribution as revealed by the thermodynamic parameters: delta H = -33.62 kJ mol-1 and delta S0 = -5.24 J mol-1 K-1. Binding of this sugar to the lectin shows that it can accommodate a large hydrophobic substituent on the C-2 carbon of D-galactose. Studies with other sugars indicate that a hydrophobic substituent in alpha-conformation at the anomeric position increases the affinity of binding. The C-4 and C-6 hydroxyl groups are critical for sugar binding to this lectin. Lectin difference absorption spectra in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine indicate perturbation of tryptophan residues on sugar binding. The results of stopped flow kinetics with N-dansylgalactosamine and the lectin are consistent with a simple one-step mechanism for which k+1 = 1.33 X 10(4) M-1 s-1 and k-1 = 3.2 X 10(-2) s-1 at 25 degrees C. This k-1 is slower than any reported for a lectin-monosaccharide complex so far. The activation parameters indicate an enthalpically controlled association process.

  7. Assessment of weak sugar-binding ability using lectin tetramer and membrane-based glycans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To consider biological significance of glycosylation of proteins, it is necessary to evaluate the importance of sugar-recognition processes mediated by lectins. Though the interaction between sugars and proteins, especially animal lectins, is quite weak with K d approximately 10(-4) M, cellular and molecular recognitions mediated via sugar-protein interaction increase their avidity by 1-3 orders of magnitude by the self-association of both receptors and their ligands on cell surfaces. To assess the weak interaction between lectins and their sugar ligands, we established lectin tetramer binding to cell surface glycans using flow cytometry. This strategy is highly sensitive, and useful to determine whether or not a putative lectin domain may have sugar-binding ability.

  8. Binding of live conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus activates in vitro-generated human Langerhans cells via a lectin of galactomannan specificity

    PubMed Central

    PERSAT, F; NOIREY, N; DIANA, J; GARIAZZO, M-J; SCHMITT, D; PICOT, S; VINCENT, C

    2003-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common aetiological fungus responsible for human pulmonary aspergilloses. This study investigated the primary contact between Langerhans cells (LC), corresponding to dendritic cells present in pulmonary mucosa and live conidia of A. fumigatus. LC play a key role in antigen presentation for initiation of the primary T cell response. In vitro-generated LC (iLC) were differentiated from cultured human cord blood CD34+ cells and incubated at 4°C or 37°C with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-stained conidia or control latex beads. In vitro, conidia were shown by microscopy and cytometry to adhere to iLC in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This adhesion was not limited to iLC because interstitial dendritic and other cells also fluoresced in the presence of conidia-FITC. A lectin other than mannose receptor-type lectin was demonstrated to be responsible of conidial binding. Inhibition of binding was observed with heterologous galactomannan and EDTA, indicating a C-lectin-like receptor with galactomannan structure specificity. After binding only a few conidia were internalized in acidic vesicles, as indicated by the cessation of conidial fluorescence. Conidial binding was followed by activation and maturation of iLC, suggesting that LC present in the lung may play a role in cellular host defence against aspergilloses. PMID:12930363

  9. Receptor mobility and the binding of cells to lectin-coated fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ability of cells to bind to nylon fibers coated with lectin molecules interspaced with varying numbers of albumin molecules has been analyzed. The cells used were lymphoma cells, normal lymphocytes, myeloid leukemia cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, and the fibers were coated with different densities of concanavalin A or the lectins from soybean or wheat germ. Cells fixed with glutaraldehyde did not bind to lectin-coated fibers. The number of cells bound to fibers could be increased by increasing the density of lectin molecules on the fiber, the density of specific receptors on the cell, or the mobility of the receptors. It is suggested that binding of cells to fibers involves alignment and binding of specific cell surface receptors with lectin molecules immobilized on the fibers, and that this alignment requires short-range rapid lateral mobility (RLM) of the receptors. The titration of cell binding to fibers coated with different densities of lectin and albumin has been used to measure the relative RLM of unoccupied cell surface receptors for the lectin. The results indicate a relationship of RLM to lectin-induced cell-to-cell binding. The RLM or receptors for concanavalin A (Con A) was generally found to be higher than that of receptors for the lectins from wheat germ or soybean. Receptor RLM could be decreased by use of metabolic inhibitors or by lowering the temperature. Receptors for Con A had a lower RLM on normal fibroblasts than on SV40-transformed fibroblasts, and trypsinization of normal fibroblasts increased Con A receptor RLM. Normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and lines of myeloid leukemia cells that can be induced to differentiate had a high receptor RLM, whereas lines of myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate had a low receptor RLM. These results suggest that the RLM of Con A receptors is related to the transformation of fibroblasts and the ability of myeloid leukemia cells to undergo differentiation PMID

  10. Interactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA-IIL lectin with quail egg white glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lerrer, B; Gilboa-Garber, N

    2001-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces several lectins, including the galactophilic PA-IL and the fucose- and mannose-binding PA-IIL. The great advantage of these two lectins is their stability in purified preparations. Following observations that pigeon egg white blocks Escherichia coli P-fimbriae and PA-IL, we examined the interactions of diverse avian egg white components with PA-IIL. This lectin may represent both mannose- and fucose-specific microbial adhesins. For comparison, Con A (which also binds mannose) and Ulex europaeus lectin (UEA-I, which binds fucose) were analyzed in parallel. The lectin interactions with chicken, quail, and pigeon egg whites and several purified chicken egg white glycoproteins were examined by a hemagglutination inhibition test and Western blotting. Both analyses showed that like Con A and unlike UEA-I, which was not sensitive to any of these three egg whites, PA-IIL most strongly reacted with the quail egg white. However, in contrast with Con A, its interactions with the chicken egg white components, excluding avidin, were very poor. The results of this study might indicate the possibility that some of the egg white components that interacted with the above two mannose-binding lectins (exhibiting individual heterogeneity) might be associated with the innate immunity against mannose-specific microbial or viral adhesion during the fowl embryonic period.

  11. Structural analysis of Centrolobium tomentosum seed lectin with inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Alysson Chaves; Osterne, Vinicius Jose da Silva; Santiago, Mayara Queiroz; Pinto-Junior, Vanir Reis; Silva-Filho, Jose Caetano; Lossio, Claudia Figueiredo; Nascimento, Francisco Lucas Faustino; Almeida, Ricardo Patricio Honorato; Teixeira, Claudener Souza; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Delatorre, Plinio; Rocha, Bruno Anderson Matias; Assreuy, Ana Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa

    2016-04-15

    A glycosylated lectin (CTL) with specificity for mannose and glucose has been detected and purified from seeds of Centrolobium tomentosum, a legume plant from Dalbergieae tribe. It was isolated by mannose-sepharose affinity chromatography. The primary structure was determined by tandem mass spectrometry and consists of 245 amino acids, similar to other Dalbergieae lectins. CTL structures were solved from two crystal forms, a monoclinic and a tetragonal, diffracted at 2.25 and 1.9 Å, respectively. The carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), metal-binding site and glycosylation site were characterized, and the structural basis for mannose/glucose-binding was elucidated. The lectin adopts the canonical dimeric organization of legume lectins. CTL showed acute inflammatory effect in paw edema model. The protein was subjected to ligand screening (dimannosides and trimannoside) by molecular docking, and interactions were compared with similar lectins possessing the same ligand specificity. This is the first crystal structure of mannose/glucose native seed lectin with proinflammatory activity isolated from the Centrolobium genus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Seasonal lectin binding variations of thumb pad in the frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2014-01-01

    The thumb pad is one of the most common secondary sexual characteristics in frogs. Although it is known that amphibian skin has affinity for several lectins, there is no report regarding lectin-binding affinity of the thumb pad or its structural components. This study investigated localization and seasonal variation of specific carbohydrate moieties of glycoconjugates in both the epidermal and dermal components of the frog thumb pad at the light microscopic level using lectin histochemistry. The study consisted of four seasonal groups of the frog species, Pelophylax ridibundus (Synonym of Rana ridibunda): active, prehibernating, hibernating and posthibernating. Four horseradish peroxidase conjugated lectins were employed. It was found that dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and ulex europaeus (UEAI) gave positive reactions in both epidermal layers and breeding glands. These three lectins bound specific secretory cells in the breeding glands, and the distribution of the cells and epithelial lectin reactions exhibited seasonal changes. In addition, UEA-I and peanut agglutinin (PNA) showed an affinity in granular glands and the granular zone of mixed glands. Generally, epidermal lectin binding showed dense affinity during the posthibernation period. DBA, UEA-I, and WGA-specific cells in the mucous gland decreased gradually until the posthibernation period. These findings suggest that differences of lectin binding in the thumb pad may be related to functional activities and, thus, seasonal adaptations. Moreover, the presence of specific lectin-binding cells in the breeding glands indicated that they consisted of heterogeneous secretory cell composition or that the cells were at different secretory stages.

  13. Is mannan-binding lectin (MBL) detectable on monocytes and monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells?

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Shirley L; Downing, Ian; Turner, Marc; Kilpatrick, David C

    2008-12-01

    MBL (mannan-binding lectin; also called mannose-binding lectin) is a circulating C-type lectin with a collagen-like region synthesized mainly by the liver. MBL may influence susceptibility to infection in recipients of stem cell transplants, and it has even been suggested that the MBL status of a donor can influence the recipient's susceptibility to post-transplant infections. We have previously reported that MBL can be detected on human monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells, based on detection using biotinylated anti-MBL, suggesting that those cells could synthesize MBL. If true, permanent MBL replacement therapy could be achieved by stem cell infusions. However, two other groups independently failed to find mbl-2-derived mRNA in monocytes. Therefore, to confirm or refute our previous observations, we used an alternative experimental strategy. Instead of using biotinylated antibody and labelled streptavidin, detection of surface MBL was attempted using MBL-specific primary antibodies (131-1, 131-10 and 131-11) followed by fluorescein-labelled anti-IgG, and controlled by the use of non-specific IgG as primary antibody. Monocytes were counterstained with anti-CD14-PE before FACS analysis. Adherent monocytes were also cultured for 48 h in serum-free medium or converted into immature dendritic cells by culture with IL-4 (interleukin-4) and GM-CSF (granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor). During FACS analysis, the dendritic cells were gated after counter-staining with anti-CD1a-PE. MBL was readily detected on the surface of fresh monocytes using all three specific anti-MBL monoclonal antibodies, but specific anti-MBL binding was greatly diminished after monocytes had been cultured for 2 days in serum-free medium. Moreover, we could not detect any MBL present on the surface of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. We therefore conclude that MBL is indeed present on the surface of fresh human monocytes. However, in view of the mRNA findings of others and our

  14. Gb3-binding lectins as potential carriers for transcellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan K; Wilhelm, Isabel; Schubert, Thomas; Zittlau, Katharina; Imberty, Anne; Madl, Josef; Eierhoff, Thorsten; Thuenauer, Roland; Römer, Winfried

    2017-02-01

    Epithelial cell layers as well as endothelia forming the blood-brain barrier can drastically reduce the efficiency of drug targeting. Our goal was to investigate lectins recognizing the glycosphingolipid globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) for their potential as carriers for transcytotic drug delivery. We utilized an in vitro model based on Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with Gb3 synthase to characterize transcytosis of the Gb3-binding lectins LecA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the B-subunit of Shiga toxin (StxB). Both lectins were rapidly transcytosed from the apical to the basolateral plasma membrane and vice versa. Whereas StxB proceeded on retrograde and transcytotic routes, LecA avoided retrograde transport. This differential trafficking could be explained by our observation that LecA and StxB segregated into different domains during endocytosis. Furthermore, inhibiting the small GTPase Rab11a, which organizes trafficking through apical recycling endosomes, blocked basolateral to apical transcytosis of both lectins. Gb3-binding lectins are promising candidates for transcytotic drug delivery. Our findings highlight that LecA and StxB, which both bind Gb3 but exhibit dissimilar valence and molecular structures of their carbohydrate binding sites and can take divergent intracellular trafficking routes. This opens up the possibility of developing tailor-made glycosphingolipid-binding carrier lectins, which take optimized trafficking pathways.

  15. Vimentin and desmin possess GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ise, Hirohiko; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Goto, Mitsuaki; Sato, Takao; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takahashi, Masafumi; Ikeda, Uichi; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2010-07-01

    Vimentin and desmin are intermediate filament proteins found in various mesenchymal and skeletal muscle cells, respectively. These proteins play an important role in the stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture. Here, we found, using artificial biomimicking glycopolymers, that vimentin and desmin possess N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-binding lectin-like properties on the cell surfaces of various vimentin- and desmin-expressing cells such as cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The rod II domain of these proteins was demonstrated to be localized to the cell surface and to directly bind to the artificial biomimicking GlcNAc-bearing polymer, by confocal laser microscopy and surface plasmon resonance analysis. These glycopolymers strongly interact with lectins and are useful tools for the analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions, since glycopolymers binding to lectins can induce the clustering of lectins due to multivalent glycoside ligand binding. Moreover, immunocytochemistry and pull-down assay with His-tagged vimentin-rod II domain protein showed that the vimentin-rod II domain interacts with O-GlcNAc proteins. These results suggest that O-GlcNAc proteins might be one candidate for physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands with which vimentin and desmin interact. These findings demonstrate a novel function of vimentin and desmin that does not involve stabilization of the cytoplasmic architecture by which these proteins interact with physiological GlcNAc-bearing ligands such as O-GlcNAc proteins on the cell surface through their GlcNAc-binding lectin-like properties.

  16. Microscopic and biochemical characterization of lectin binding sites in the cephalopod retina.

    PubMed

    Taba, A; Quezada, B H; Robles, L J

    1989-05-22

    Using light and electron microscope cytochemistry and lectin blotting techniques, we have shown that the lectins concanavalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA), and peanut agglutinin (PNA) bind to specific glycoconjugants in the adult cephalopod retina. For light microscope lectin cytochemistry, aldehyde-fixed, frozen, or Araldite-embedded, etched sections of cephalopod retinas were incubated with FITC- or TRITC-conjugated lectins and examined by using epifluorescence microscopy. Con A labeled structures in the entire retina including the inner limiting membrane (ILM), rhabdomeric membranes, interphotoreceptor matrix (IPM), and structures in the photoreceptor inner segments. RCA labeling was similar to that of Con A except that there was a decrease in the staining of the rhabdom tips near the ILM. PNA labeled only the interphotoreceptor matrix between apposing rhabdomeres. The intensity of staining of the IPM by PNA also decreased or was absent toward the rhabdom tips. None of the lectins labeled the myeloid bodies located in the photoreceptor inner segments. Electron microscope (EM) lectin cytochemistry was performed on aldehyde-fixed, LR White-embedded tissue or on Araldite-embedded, periodate-etched sections by using gold-conjugated lectins. EM results confirmed the observations made by light microscopy. Lectin blots with a retinal extract or light-sensitive membrane fraction revealed a variety of protein bands labeled by all three lectins. Con A and RCA labeled opsin and its aggregates whereas PNA did not. None of the lectins labeled retinochrome. The labeling of the cephalopod IPM by PNA suggests a structural similarity between the IPM of vertebrates and invertebrates. In other studies, we have demonstrated the presence of a retinoid binding protein in the IPM of cephalopods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Preparation and biological properties of a melibiose binding lectin from Bauhinia variegata seeds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2008-11-26

    A dimeric 64-kDa melibiose-binding lectin was isolated from the seeds of Bauhinia variegata. The isolation procedure comprised affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and gel filtration on Superdex 75. The lectin was adsorbed on the first two chromatographic media. Its hemagglutinating activity was stable after 30-min exposure to temperatures up to 70 degrees C. Since lectins may demonstrate biological activities such as antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, antifungal, antiviral, and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities, the isolated lectin was tested for these activities. It was found that the lectin inhibited proliferation in hepatoma HepG2 cells and breast cancer MCF7 cells with an IC(50) of 1.4 microM and 0.18 microM, respectively. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity was inhibited with an IC(50) of 1.02 microM. The lectin and concanavalin A (Con A) evoked maximal mitogenic response from mouse splenocytes at similar concentrations, but the maximal response to B. variegata lectin was only 1/5 of that induced by Con A in magnitude. B. variegata lectin was devoid of antifungal activity.

  18. Metal ions in sugar binding, sugar specificity and structural stability of Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Joseph; Dileep, Kalarickal Vijayan; Palanimuthu, Muthusamy; Geethanandan, Krishnan; Sadasivan, Chittalakkotu; Haridas, Madhathilkovilakath

    2013-08-01

    Spatholobus parviflorus seed lectin (SPL) is a heterotetrameric lectin, with two α and two β monomers. In the crystal structure of SPL α monomer, two residues at positions 240 and 241 are missing. This region was modeled based on the positional and sequence similarities. The role of metal ions in SPL structure was analyzed by 10 ns molecular dynamics simulation. MD simulations were performed in the presence and absence of metal ions to explain the loss of haemagglutinating property of the lectin due to demetallization. Demetallized structure was found to deviate drastically at the metal binding loop region. Affinity of different sugars like N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc), D-galactose and lactose towards the native and demetallized protein was calculated by molecular docking studies. It was found that the sugar binding site got severely distorted in demetallized lectin. Consequently, sugar binding ability of lectin might be decreasing in the demetallized condition. Isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis of the sugars in the presence of native and demetallized protein confirmed the in silico results. It was observed after molecular dynamics simulations, that significant structural deviations were not caused in the quaternary structure of demetallized lectin. It was confirmed that the structural changes modified the sugar binding ability, as well as sugar specificity of the present lectin. The role of metal ions in sugar binding is described based on the in silico studies and ITC analysis. A comprehensive analysis of the ITC data suggests that the sugar specificity of the metal bound lectin and the loss of sugar specificity due to metal chelation are not linear.

  19. Lectin binding to the egg envelopes in Eyprepocnemis plorans (Charp.) (Orthoptera, Acrididae).

    PubMed

    Longo, G; Viscuso, R; Sottile, L; Giuffrida, A

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of glycoconjugates in the egg envelopes of Eyprepocnemis plorans was investigated using various FITC-conjugated lectins. In the epichorion, the lectins ConA, SBA and WGA each have particular binding patterns, while TPA binding is confined to its deepest regions only. The glycoconjugates of the micropylar wall present different characteristics from those of the surrounding chorion. The vitelline coat shows a marked binding for WGA and TPA only; below the inner micropylar openings, this binding pattern is uniform over the whole extent of the coat and therefore it is not possible to identify specific binding sites for these two lectins. Contrary to what has been observed in some other insect species, the vitelline coat does not seem to be involved in the structural organization of the mycropyles.

  20. Purification and some characteristics of a beta-galactoside binding soluble lectin from amphibian ovary.

    PubMed

    Fink de Cabutti, N E; Caron, M; Joubert, R; Elola, M T; Bladier, D; Herkovitz, J

    1987-11-02

    Soluble extracts of Bufo ovaries agglutinate sialidase-treated rabbit erythrocytes. Unlike other amphibian lectins this agglutination activity does not require the presence of calcium ions. It is specifically inhibited by D-galactose and its derivatives. Thiodi-D-galactoside is the most potent saccharide inhibitor followed by lactose and methyl-beta-D-galactoside, respectively. D-Fucose, D-glucose and D-mannose do not inhibit the activity at concentrations at or above 100 mM. The lectin has been purified 500-fold to apparent homogeneity from the ovaries by salt extraction and affinity chromatography on lactose-aminophenyl-agarose, with a yield of about 0.2%. The molecular mass determined by gel filtration under native conditions was 30 kDa; polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in SDS gave a molecular mass of 15 kDa, suggesting that the lectin is a dimer. The lectin has an isoelectric point of 40 and contains a high proportion of acidic amino acids.

  1. Gram staining and lectin binding properties of Myxosporea and Sporozoea.

    PubMed

    Schachner; Holzer, A

    2001-01-01

    The staining method developed by Christian Gram was introduced as a simple and highly selective tool for demonstrating myxosporean and coccidian sporogonic stages. When using standard blood staining procedures for those enigmatic parasites it is sometimes difficult to distinguish them from fish host tissue. They clearly exhibit a partial gram-positive reaction in histological sections, but staining is variable in air dried fish organ imprints. To visualize the gram-negative background of different host tissue components in histological sections, the conventional safranin counterstain of the gram protocol may be modified as follows: after application of 2% crystal violet (basic violet 3) and Lugol's solution, sections are stained with 0.1% nuclear fast red-5% aluminum sulfate and 0.35% aniline blue (acid blue 22) dissolved in saturated aqueous picric acid. Replacement of the gram-specific dye crystal violet with 2% malachite green gave similar results in organ imprints containing myxospores or coccidia, but only in sections containing myxosporea. Staining for 1 min with an aqueous solution of 0.5% malachite green and followed 1 min washing was sufficient for rapidly demonstrating the parasite spores in organ imprints of both myxosores and oocysts. With regard to the role of acid mucopolysaccharides and other carbohydrates in the gram reaction of spores, alcian blue 8GX staining was compared to the binding of FITC-labeled WGA, GS I and GS II. Each lectin was applied at 20 microl/ml PBS, HEPES for 1 hr. Whereas WGA yielded a nonspecific pattern like the alcian blue staining, GS II resulted in a pattern similar to the gram staining results. This binding was weak in untreated specimens, but was significantly enhanced when digested first within trypsin overnight in a humid chamber at 37 degrees C. The binding of GS II to both myxosporidian and coccidian spores suggests that they are both composed of polymers containing N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues. Furthermore, the

  2. Purification, partial characterization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a mannose-specific lectin from Cymbosema roseum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Cavada, Benildo S.; Marinho, Emmanuel S.; Souza, Emmanuel P.; Benevides, Raquel G.; Delatorre, Plínio; Souza, Luis A. G.; Nascimento, Kyria S.; Sampaio, Alexandre H.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Rustiguel, Joane K. R.; Canduri, Fernanda; de Azevedo, Walter F.; Debray, Henri

    2006-01-01

    A lectin from Cymbosema roseum seeds (CRL) was purified, characterized and crystallized. The best crystals grew in a month and were obtained by the vapour-diffusion method using a precipitant solution consisting of 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 7.8, 8%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M proline at a constant temperature of 293 K. A data set was collected to 1.77 Å resolution at a synchrotron-radiation source. CRL crystals are orthorhombic, belonging to space group P212121. Crystallographic refinement and full amino-acid sequence determination are in progress. PMID:16511310

  3. Subsets of epidermal Langerhans cells as defined by lectin binding profiles.

    PubMed

    Schuler, G; Romani, N; Linert, J; Shevach, E M; Stingl, G

    1983-11-01

    In this study we characterize the cell surface glycoconjugate moieties of strain 2 guinea pig epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) in single cell suspension by using a battery of 17 fluorescent lectins. All LC displayed binding sites for concanavalin A, succinylated concanavalin A, Lens culinaris agglutinin, Pisum sativum agglutinin, wheat germ agglutinin, succinylated wheat germ agglutinin, Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Phaseolus vulgaris E agglutinin, and Phaseolus vulgaris L agglutinin, but failed to bind Sophora japonica agglutinin (SJA), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I). Neuraminidase pretreatment rendered LC reactive for SJA, but not for DBA and UEA I. The binding profiles of certain lectins point to the existence of LC subpopulations in that Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 isolectin, peanut agglutinin (PNA), Helix pomatia agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin bound to only 80% (range 70-90%) of Ia-positive epidermal cells; binding sites for these lectins on primarily unreactive Ia-positive cells were unmasked when epidermal cells were treated with neuraminidase prior to lectin labeling. Ultrastructural PNA labeling studies revealed that the vast majority of Birbeck granule-containing LC displayed PNA binding sites, whereas indeterminate cells were consistently PNA-negative. Identification of carbohydrate configurations expressed on LC surfaces by lectin binding may provide a clue for the elucidation of the mechanisms of established LC functions and possibly the discovery of as yet unknown properties of this cell type.

  4. Different bindings to lectin in human submandibular gland after enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Takai, Y; Noda, Y; Sumitomo, S; Sagara, S; Mori, M

    1986-01-01

    Lectin binding affinities were described in human submandibular gland (SMG) in the paraffin sections following alpha-amylase, sialidase, and trypsin digestions. Lectins in the present study were used Con A (Glc, Man binding lectins), PNA, and SBA(Gal, GalNAc), RCA-1(Gal), DBA(GalNAc), WGA(GlcNAc), and UEA-1(Fuc). Lectin stainings in serous and mucous acinar cells and ductal epithelia were reported to compare enzyme treated and nontreated sections. Amylase treatment showed increasing Con A staining in connective tissue fibers and no marked changes in SMG to lectin bindings. Sialidase digestion was characteristically intense in PNA and SBA bindings in SMG cells, and also enhanced staining to UEA-1 in serous and duct cells and to WGA in mucous and duct cells were noted. Trypsin digestion indicated a slight increase to Con A binding, and was relatively strong to UEA-1 in serous and duct cells and a little strong to WGA. The results suggested that SMG serous cells contain higher amounts of Gal, GalNAc, and Fuc residues; and mucous cells were also abundant in Gal, GalNAc, and GlcNAc residues.

  5. Lectin Binding to the Root and Root Hair Tips of the Tropical Legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, R. W.; Rolfe, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    Ten fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins were tested on the roots of the tropical legume Macroptilium atropurpureum Urb. Four of these (concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Ricinis communis agglutinin I [RCA-I], wheat germ agglutinin) were found to bind to the exterior of root cap cells, the root cap slime, and the channels between epidermal cells in the root elongation zone. One of these lectins, RCA-I, bound to the root hair tips in the mature and emerging hair zones and also to sites at which root hairs were only just emerging. There was no RCA-I binding to immature trichoblasts. Preincubation of these lectins with their hapten sugars eliminated all types of root cell binding. By using a microinoculation technique, preincubation of the root surface with RCA-I lectin was found to inhibit infection and nodulation by Rhizobium spp. Preincubation of the root surface with the RCA-I hapten β-d-galactose or a mixture of RCA-I lectin and its hapten failed to inhibit nodulation. Application of RCA-I lectin to the root surface caused no apparent detrimental effects to the root hair cells and did not prevent the growth of root hairs. The lectin did not prevent Rhizobium sp. motility or viability even after 24 h of incubation. It was concluded that the RCA-I lectin-specific sugar β-d-galactose may be involved in the recognition or early infection stages, or both, in the Rhizobium sp. infection of M. atropurpureum. Images PMID:16346989

  6. Dual recognition activity of a rhamnose-binding lectin to pathogenic bacteria and zooxanthellae in stony coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Yu, Xiaopeng; Tang, Jia; Zhu, Yunjie; Chen, Guangmei; Guo, Liping; Huang, Bo

    2017-05-01

    Rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) is a type of Ca(2+)-independent lectin with tandem repeat carbohydrate-recognition domain, and is crucial for the innate immunity in many invertebrates. In this study, the cDNA sequence encoding RBL in coral Pocillopora damicornis (PdRBL-1) was cloned. The PdRBL-1 protein shared highest amino acid sequence similarity (55%) with the polyp of Hydra vulgaris, and contained a signal peptide and two tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains in which all cysteine residues were conserved. Surface plasmon resonance method revealed that the recombinant PdRBL-1 protein bound to LPS and Lipid A, but not to LTA, β-glucan, mannose and Poly (I:C). Results also showed that it bonded with zooxanthellae using western blotting method, and that the bound protein was detectable only at concentrations higher than 10(2) zooxanthellae cell mL(-1). When recombinant PdRBL-1 protein was preincubated with LPS, lower amounts of protein bound to zooxanthellae compared to cells not preincubated with LPS. Furthermore, PdRBL-1 mRNA expression increased significantly at 12 h, and declined to the baseline at 24 h after heat stress at 31 °C. These results collectively suggest that PdRBL-1 could recognize not only pathogenic bacteria but also symbiotic zooxanthellae, and that the recognition of zooxanthellae by PdRBL-1 could be repressed by pathogenic bacteria through competitive binding. This information allows us to gain new insights in the mechanisms influencing the establishment and maintenance of coral-zooxanthella symbiosis in coral P. damicornis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A novel L-fucose-binding lectin from Fenneropenaeus indicus induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Biji; Ghosh, Krishna; Yadav, Nitin; Kanade, Santosh R

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are omnipresent in almost all life forms, being the proteins which specifically bind to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface; they have been explored for their anti-tumour activities. In this study, we purified a fucose specific-lectin (IFL) from Fenneropenaeus indicus haemolymph using fucose-affinity column and characterized for its haemagglutination activity, carbohydrate specificity, dependency on cations and cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The lectin showed non-specificity against human erythrocytes. It was a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin which remained stable over wide pH and temperature ranges. The lectin showed effective dose dependent cytotoxicity against different human cancer cell lines and induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as evidenced by DNA ladder assay and PARP cleavage in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, an increased p21 level corresponding to cyclin D downregulation in response to IFL treatment was observed which might work as probable factors to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we report a novel lectin from the prawn haemolymph with high specificity for L-fucose and antiproliferative towards human cancer cells. However, further establishment of the modus operandi of this lectin is required to enable its biotechnological applications.

  8. Isolation, characterization, molecular cloning and molecular modelling of two lectins of different specificities from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, L M; Van Damme, E J; Barre, A; Allen, A K; Van Leuven, F; Reynolds, C D; Rouge, P; Peumans, W J

    1999-01-01

    Two lectins have been isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs. From their isolation by affinity chromatography, they are characterized as a mannose-binding lectin (SCAman) and a fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet). SCAman preferentially binds oligosaccharides with alpha(1,3)- and alpha(1,6)-linked mannopyranosides. It is a tetramer of four identical protomers of approx. 13 kDa containing 119 amino acid residues; it is not glycosylated. The fetuin-binding lectin (SCAfet), which is not inhibited by any simple sugars, is also unglycosylated. It is a tetramer of four identical subunits of approx. 28 kDa containing 244 residues. Each 28 kDa subunit is composed of two 14 kDa domains. Both lectins have been cloned from a cDNA library and sequenced. X-ray crystallographic analysis and molecular modelling studies have demonstrated close relationships in sequence and structure between these lectins and other monocot mannose-binding lectins. A refined model of the molecular evolution of the monocot mannose-binding lectins is proposed. PMID:10229686

  9. Lectin binding to olfactory system in a shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, V; Ciani, F

    1993-01-01

    Lectin histochemical studies were performed on the olfactory system of Scyliorhinus canicula to identify specific glycoconjugates on the cell surface of primary olfactory neurons. The olfactory receptor cells, the olfactory nerve fibers and their terminals in the bulbs were labelled with SBA, BSA-I and BSA-I-B4. The lectin staining patterns indicate that the membranes of small-spotted catshark olfactory neurons had glycoproteins with alpha-galactose residues. This carbohydrate moiety could be related to modulation of the cell-cell interactions in the olfactory system.

  10. High-Dose Mannose-Binding Lectin Therapy for Ebola Virus Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    trapezoidal method. Murine Ebola model We used a validated lethal Ebola Zaire mouse model developed at the US ArmyMedical Research Institute of Infectious...exposure, mice were treated and exposed to 100 pfu of mouse-adapted Ebola Zaire either 12 hours before or 1 hour after the first dose of rhMBL as...retested 28 days later. RESULTS We previously found that rhMBL bound Ebola ( Zaire ) and Marburg (Musoke) envelope GPs [2]. RhMBL effectively blocked Ebola GP

  11. Electron spin echo envelope modulation studies of lectins: evidence for a conserved Mn(2+)-binding site.

    PubMed

    McCracken, J; Peisach, J; Bhattacharyya, L; Brewer, F

    1991-05-07

    Electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments have been used to investigate the Mn(2+)-binding site in a series of lectins including concanavalin A, pea lectin (Pisum sativum), isolectin A from lentil (Lens culinaris), soybean agglutinin (Glycine max), Erythrina indica lectin, and Lotus tetragonolobus isoelectin A. Together with model studies, the results provide direct evidence for a single nitrogen atom of a conserved residue bonded directly to Mn2+ in all of them. ESEEM measurements of the lectins exchanged with deuterium oxide, together with model studies, provide evidence for the presence of two water molecules coordinated to the Mn2+ in all of the proteins. In contrast to concanavalin A, the absence of solvent exchange at the Mn2+ site in the pea and lentil lectins demonstrated by nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion measurements [Bhattacharyya, L., Brewer, C.F., Brown, R. D., III, & Koenig, S. H. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4985-4990] must therefore be due to slow exchange of the water ligands of the bound Mn2+. Binding of saccharides was observed to have little effect on the structural features of the Mn2+ site in the lectins as determined by ESEEM.

  12. Use of fluorescent lectin binding to distinguish eggs of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep.

    PubMed

    Umair, S; McMurtry, L W; Knight, J S; Simpson, H V

    2016-02-15

    The binding of a panel of 19 lectins to carbohydrates on the eggs of economically important nematode parasites of sheep has been assessed as the basis of a rapid test to distinguish parasite eggs, at least at the genus level. A total of six lectins can be used to identify eggs of six nematode parasites: peanut agglutinin (PNA) for Haemonchus contortus; Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) for Teladorsagia sp; Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAL) for Trichostrongylus sp; Psophocarpus tetragonolobus‑II (PTLII) for Nematodirus sp; Lotus tetragonolobus lectin (LTL) for Cooperia sp and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) for Chabertia ovina. For WGA, LCA and LTL, weak binding was also observed to H. contortus and Teladorsagia sp, Trichostrongylus sp and C. ovina eggs, respectively. Nematode eggs in two faecal samples were identically identified by both lectin binding and PCR, except for PCR identification of the eggs of Nematodirus sp, as these did not lyse. Lectins bound best to H. contortus eggs extracted from fresh faecal samples or after storage at room temperature or 4 °C for up to 24 h, but eggs stored at -20 °C or -80 °C did not bind PNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth hormone abuse and biological passport: is mannan-binding lectin a complementary candidate?

    PubMed

    Such-Sanmartín, Gerard; Bosch, Jaume; Segura, Jordi; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo

    2011-09-01

    In the detection of human growth hormone (GH) abuse, the approach based on altered GH-related biomarkers is also being considered with respect to its application within the context of a biological passport. As a potential biomarker, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), which is reported to respond to recombinant GH (rGH) administration, is evaluated here. Randomized and single blind and approved by the Ethical Committee (Comité Ético de Investigación Clínica-Instituto Municipal de Asistencia Sanitaria). One group of 12 male subjects (24.2 ± 2.2 years; 76.1 ± 6.1 kg) was studied. Mannan-binding lectin concentration was measured in 12 healthy individuals after subcutaneous daily doses of 6 IU of rGH administration. Mannan-binding lectin serum concentration increased after rGH administration. Mannan-binding lectin concentration increases were observed 48 hours after the first administration and remained elevated for several days after the final dose. Mannan-binding lectin concentration increase and elapsed time to recover initial MBL values after the last rGH administration. Absolute values displayed high interindividual variability, and 1 individual did not show any MBL increase (potential MBL deficiency). Mannan-binding lectin protein showed a clear concentration increase after continued rGH administration, despite the high heterogeneity found between individuals. The use of MBL as a complementary GH-related biomarker could be of interest, taking advantage of the high increases (up to 700%) and the relatively slow recovery time.

  14. Effects of endogenous soluble beta-galactoside binding lectins and protein inhibitor of fucosyltransferase on the enzymes involved in the intestinal fucosylation process.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero-Lopez, D; Louisot, P; Martin, A

    1992-06-15

    Soluble beta-galactoside binding lectins were prepared from the rat small intestinal mucosa by chromatography on asialofetuin-Sepharose. The lectin fraction exhibits 3 bands with Mr of 21,5 kDa, 19 kDa and 17 kDa on SDS-PAGE. This fraction inhibits a partially purified soluble alpha(1-2)-fucosyltransferase by interaction with the glycoprotein substrate asialofetuin, whereas the inhibition is non competitive for the donor GDP-fucose. It has no effect on other enzymes of the fucosylation system, namely glycosyl-nucleotide pyrophosphatase and the system synthesizing GDP-fucose from GDP-mannose. A different and specific soluble protein inhibitor of fucosyltransferase activity inhibits this activity by a competitive mechanism for GDP-fucose and a non competitive one for asialofetuin. Unlike the lectins, this inhibitor also inhibits the action of pyrophosphatase and the formation of GDP-fucose by different mechanisms. The possible extension of these in vitro results to the in vivo regulation of glycosylation is discussed.

  15. A putative carbohydrate-binding domain of the lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin has a similar amino acid sequence to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus anti-H(O) lectin.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1995-04-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a lactose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin II (CSA-II) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSA-II with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSA-II with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid sequence of a putative carbohydrate-binding domain of CSA-II was found to be similar to those of several anti-H(O) leguminous lectins, especially to that of the L-fucose-binding Ulex europaeus lectin I (UEA-I).

  16. Purification and characterization of a new dimeric mannose/glucose-binding isolectin from Vicia tetrasperma (L.) Schreber.

    PubMed

    Devi, Sanjenbam Kunjeshwori; Devi, Langoljam Inaotombi; Singh, Laishram Rupachandra

    2009-01-01

    A new mannose/glucose specific isolectin VTL-II has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from the seeds of Vicia tetrasperma (L.) Schreber through successive steps of (i) lectin extraction, (ii) ammonium sulfate fractionation (30-50%), and (iii) affinity chromatography on a column of Sephadex G-50 covalently coupled with D-mannose. The isolectin was found to be a dimeric protein of molecular weight 62 kDa made up of apparently chemically identical subunits unlike the tetrameric isolectins reported earlier from the same plant source. It was found to exhibit (i) 8-16 times higher specificity for rabbit RBC than human RBC, though it showed unspecificity with respect to the different human blood groups, (ii) non-dependence on divalent metal ion for its hemagglutinating activity, (iii) relatively broad pH optimum ranging from pH 7.0 to 8.0, and (iv) thermal inactivation behavior characterized by t(1/2) of 50 degrees C.

  17. HIV-1 Nef binds with human GCC185 protein and regulates mannose 6 phosphate receptor recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manjeet; Kaur, Supinder; Nazir, Aamir; Tripathi, Raj Kamal

    2016-05-20

    HIV-1 Nef modulates cellular function that enhances viral replication in vivo which culminate into AIDS pathogenesis. With no enzymatic activity, Nef regulates cellular function through host protein interaction. Interestingly, trans-cellular introduction of recombinant Nef protein in Caenorhabditis elegans results in AIDS like pathogenesis which might share common pathophysiology because the gene sequence of C. elegans and humans share considerable homology. Therefore employing C. elegans based initial screen complemented with sequence based homology search we identified GCC185 as novel host protein interacting with HIV-1 Nef. The detailed molecular characterization revealed N-terminal EEEE{sub 65} acidic domain of Nef as key region for interaction. GCC185 is a tethering protein that binds with Rab9 transport vesicles. Our results show that Nef-GCC185 interaction disrupts Rab9 interaction resulting in delocalization of CI-MPR (cation independent Mannose 6 phosphate receptor) resulting in elevated secretion of hexosaminidase. In agreement with this, our studies identified novel host GCC185 protein that interacts with Nef EEEE65 acidic domain interfering GCC185-Rab9 vesicle membrane fusion responsible for retrograde vesicular transport of CI-MPR from late endosomes to TGN. In light of existing report suggesting critical role of Nef-GCC185 interaction reveals valuable mechanistic insights affecting specific protein transport pathway in docking of late endosome derived Rab9 bearing transport vesicle at TGN elucidating role of Nef during viral pathogenesis. -- Highlights: •Nef, an accessory protein of HIV-1 interacts with host factor and culminates into AIDS pathogenesis. •Using Caenorhabditis elegans based screen system, novel Nef interacting cellular protein GCC185 was identified. •Molecular characterization of Nef and human protein GCC185 revealed Nef EEEE{sub 65} key region interacted with full length GCC185. •Nef impeded the GCC185-Rab 9 interaction and

  18. Structural characterization of novel chitin-binding lectins from the genus Artocarpus and their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Melissa B; Lopes, José L S; Soares-Costa, Andréa; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina; Moreira, Renato A; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Beltramini, Leila M

    2006-01-01

    Two novel chitin-binding lectins from seeds of Artocarpus genus were described in this paper, one from A. integrifolia (jackfruit) and one from A. incisa (breadfruit). They were purified from saline crude extract of seeds using affinity chromatography on chitin column, size-exclusion chromatography and reverse-phase chromatography on the C-18 column. Both are 14 kDa proteins, made up of 3 chains linked by disulfide bonds. The partial amino acid sequences of the two lectins showed they are homologous to each other but not to other plant chitin-binding proteins. Thus, they cannot be classified in any known plant chitin-binding protein family, particularly because of their inter-chain covalent bonds. Their circular dichroism spectra and deconvolution showed a secondary structure content of beta-sheet and unordered elements. The lectins were thermally stable until 80 degrees C and structural changes were observed below pH 6. Both lectins inhibited the growth of Fusarium moniliforme and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and presented hemagglutination activity against human and rabbit erythrocytes. These lectins were denoted jackin (from jackfruit) and frutackin (from breadfruit).

  19. Differential Lectin Binding Patterns Identify Distinct Heart Regions in Giant Danio ( Devario aequipinnatus) and Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) Hearts.

    PubMed

    Manalo, Trina; May, Adam; Quinn, Joshua; Lafontant, Dominique S; Shifatu, Olubusola; He, Wei; Gonzalez-Rosa, Juan M; Burns, Geoffrey C; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, Alan R; Lafontant, Pascal J

    2016-11-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins commonly used as biochemical and histochemical tools to study glycoconjugate (glycoproteins, glycolipids) expression patterns in cells, tissues, including mammalian hearts. However, lectins have received little attention in zebrafish ( Danio rerio) and giant danio ( Devario aequipinnatus) heart studies. Here, we sought to determine the binding patterns of six commonly used lectins-wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia lectin (BS lectin), concanavalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I), and Lycopersicon esculentum agglutinin (tomato lectin)-in these hearts. Con A showed broad staining in the myocardium. WGA stained cardiac myocyte borders, with binding markedly stronger in the compact heart and bulbus. BS lectin, which stained giant danio coronaries, was used to measure vascular reconstruction during regeneration. However, BS lectin reacted poorly in zebrafish. RCA I stained the compact heart of both fish. Tomato lectin stained the giant danio, and while low reactivity was seen in the zebrafish ventricle, staining was observed in their transitional cardiac myocytes. In addition, we observed unique staining patterns in the developing zebrafish heart. Lectins' ability to reveal differential glycoconjugate expression in giant danio and zebrafish hearts suggests they can serve as simple but important tools in studies of developing, adult, and regenerating fish hearts.

  20. Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) PNA lectin allergen cross-reacting with other structurally related legume lectins.

    PubMed

    Rougé, Pierre; Culerrier, Raphaël; Granier, Claude; Rancé, Fabienne; Barre, Annick

    2010-08-01

    Sera from peanut allergic patients contain IgE that specifically interact with the peanut lectin PNA and other closely related legume lectins like LcA from lentil, PsA from pea and PHA from kidney bean. The IgE-binding activity of PNA and legume lectins was assessed by immunoblotting, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and ELISA measurements, using sera from peanut allergic patients as a IgE source. This IgE-binding cross-reactivity most probably depends on the occurrence of structurally related epitopes that have been identified on the molecular surface of PNA and other legume lectins. These epitopes definitely differ from those responsible for the allergenicity of the major allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3, also recognized by the IgE-containing sera of peanut allergic patients. Peanut lectin PNA and other legume lectins have been characterized as potential allergens for patients allergic to edible legume seeds. However, the clinical significance of the lectin-IgE interaction has to be addressed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Energetics of carbohydrate binding to Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) lectin: an isothermal titration calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil Ali Mohammed; Swamy, Musti J

    2005-05-01

    Physico-chemical and carbohydrate binding studies have been carried out on the Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) seed lectin (MCL). The lectin activity is maximal in the pH range 7.4-11.0, but decreases steeply below pH 7.0. The lectin activity is mostly unaffected in the temperature range 4-50 degrees C, but a sharp decrease is seen between 50 and 60 degrees C, which could be correlated to changes in the structure of the protein as seen by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies show that the tetrameric MCL binds two sugar molecules and the binding constants (Kb), determined at 288.15 K, for various saccharides were found to vary between 7.3 x 10(3) and 1.52 x 10(4)M(-1). The binding reactions for all the saccharides investigated were essentially enthalpy driven, with the binding enthalpies (DeltaHb) at 288.15 K being in the range of -50.99 and -43.39 kJ mol(-1), whereas the contribution to the binding reaction from the entropy of binding was negative, with values of binding entropy (DeltaSb) ranging between -99.2 and -72.0 J mol(-1)K(-1) at 288.15 K. Changes in heat capacity (DeltaCp) for the binding of disaccharides, lactose and lactulose, were significantly larger in magnitude than those obtained for the monosaccharides, methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, and methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside, and could be correlated reasonably well with the surface areas of these ligands. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for all the sugars studied, suggesting that water structure plays an important role in the overall binding reaction. CD spectroscopy indicates that carbohydrate binding does not lead to significant changes in the secondary and tertiary structures of MCL, suggesting that the carbohydrate binding sites on this lectin are mostly preformed.

  2. Pillar[5]arene-Based Glycoclusters: Synthesis and Multivalent Binding to Pathogenic Bacterial Lectins.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Kevin; Nierengarten, Iwona; Galanos, Nicolas; Gillon, Emilie; Holler, Michel; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien; Vincent, Stéphane P; Nierengarten, Jean-François

    2016-02-24

    The synthesis of pillar[5]arene-based glycoclusters has been readily achieved by CuAAC conjugations of azido- and alkyne-functionalized precursors. The lectin binding properties of the resulting glycosylated multivalent ligands have been studied by at least two complementary techniques to provide a good understanding. Three lectins were selected from bacterial pathogens based on their potential therapeutic applications as anti-adhesives, namely LecA and LecB from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and BambL from Burkholderia ambifaria. As a general trend, multivalency improved the binding to lectins and a higher affinity can be obtained by increasing to a certain limit the length of the spacer arm between the carbohydrate subunits and the central macrocyclic core. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Hydrophobic spacers enhance the helicity and lectin binding of synthetic, pH-responsive glycopolypeptides.

    PubMed

    Mildner, Robert; Menzel, Henning

    2014-12-08

    The influence of different hydrophobic spacers on the structural and lectin binding properties of well-defined glycopolypeptides decorated with galactose moieties was investigated. All glycopolypeptides were prepared from a poly(α,l-glutamic acid) (PGA) precursor via a polymer-analogous aqueous amide coupling reaction. Thereby, two alkyl spacers of different length (C6 and C11) as well as an aromatic spacer were introduced between the backbone and the galactose moieties, as confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The secondary structure was investigated as a function of the sugar density and the pH by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was found that the helicity in acidic medium and thus the typical coil-to-helix transition is strongly enhanced by the hydrophobic spacers. Preliminary lectin binding tests via turbidimetric assay revealed that the spacers also significantly enhance the interaction of the glycopolypeptides with the lectin RCA120.

  4. Rapid assays for lectin toxicity and binding changes that reflect altered glycosylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-06-03

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids, or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, as well as those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also generate spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed

  5. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes

  6. Optimizing the Multivalent Binding of the Bacterial Lectin LecA by Glycopeptide Dendrimers for Therapeutic Purposes.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Benjamin

    2016-06-27

    Bacterial lectins are nonenzymatic sugar-binding proteins involved in the formation of biofilms and the onset of virulence. The weakness of individual sugar-lectin interactions is compensated by the potentially large number of simultaneous copies of such contacts, resulting in high overall sugar-lectin affinities and marked specificities. Therapeutic compounds functionalized with sugar residues can compete with the host glycans for binding to lectins only if they are able to take advantage of this multivalent binding mechanism. Glycopeptide dendrimers, featuring treelike topologies with sugar moieties at their leaves, have already shown great promise in this regard. However, optimizing the dendrimers' amino acid sequence is necessary to match the dynamics of the lectin active sites with that of the multivalent ligands. This work combines long-time-scale coarse-grained simulations of dendrimers and lectins with a reasoned exploration of the dendrimer sequence space in an attempt to suggest sequences that could maximize multivalent binding to the galactose-specific bacterial lectin LecA. These candidates are validated by simulations of mixed dendrimer/lectin solutions, and the effects of the dendrimers on lectin dynamics are discussed. This approach is an attractive first step in the conception of therapeutic compounds based on the dendrimer scaffold and contributes to the understanding of the various classes of multivalency that underpin the ubiquitous "sugar code".

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptors on PC12 cells: alteration of binding properties by lectins

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The PC12 cell line displays cell surface receptors for both nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). It has been previously shown that the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) alters the properties of NGF receptors on these cells. We now report that preincubations with either WGA or concanavalin A (Con A) decrease the binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to PC12 cells by greater than 50%. The inhibition of binding occurred at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C and could be blocked or reversed by the addition of sugars which bind specifically to WGA or Con A. Scatchard analysis revealed that these lectins decreased binding primarily by lowering the affinity of the receptor and to a lesser extent by decreasing receptor number. Succinylation of Con A (sCon A) produced a derivative that was less effective than the native lectin in decreasing EGF binding; however, addition of an antibody against Con A restored the ability of sCon A to decrease binding. Similar to results obtained with /sup 125/I-NGF binding, WGA but not Con A was found to increase, by severalfold, the proportion of /sup 125/I-EGF binding that is resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 detergent. A potential association of the EGF receptor with cytoskeletal elements is discussed which could account for such results.

  8. A quantitative analysis of lectin binding to adult rat hepatocyte cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, H O; McMillan, P N; Hevey, K; Naik, S

    1988-05-01

    A quantitative evaluation of lectin binding to adult rat hepatocyte cell surfaces was done using cells isolated by two different collagenase perfusion methodologies and cultured as monolayers with two different tissue culture media formulations (protocol I vs. protocol II). The presence of alpha-D-mannosyl and alpha-D-glucosyl groups was detected by the binding of Concanavalin A (Con A), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA) to freshly isolated cells. Furthermore, beta-D-galactose [Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA)] and sialic acid residues [wheat germ (WGA)] were also found. Protocols I and II served as models for evaluation of: a) the stripping effect of collagenase separation procedures, b) the restoration in culture of collagenase-stripped sugar residues, c) the effect of the culture environment on cell viability [as measured by lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage] and the protein content of hepatocytes, and d) the presence of cell surface sugar residues as a function of culture duration. The ultrastructural morphology of freshly isolated and cultured hepatocytes was also evaluated. These studies indicated that a decline in lectin binding invariably occurred earlier than a massive leakage of LDH and a decrease in the protein content of the cells in culture. Ultrastructurally, autophagocytosis was an early phenomenon in cells isolated and cultured by protocol I, which was also inferior to protocol II regarding the preservation of hepatocyte glycocalyces. Sugar residues lost due to the collagenase-stripping effect were restored, as shown by lectin binding, within the first 24 h of culture. This stripping effect was confirmed by quantitative evaluations of lectin binding to hepatocytes in culture after an incubation with collagenase. This study shows that the binding of peroxidase-labeled lectins is a useful tool for quantitative evaluation of the sugar composition of hepatocyte cultures.

  9. Lectin binding patterns in hyperplastic and metaplastic bullock prostate tissues after diethylstilbestrol administration.

    PubMed

    Fernández, P E; Barbeito, C G; Portiansky, E L; Gimeno, E J

    2004-03-06

    Hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia of the prostatic epithelium are conditions induced by oestrogens. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) has been banned from cattle used for beef production because of the health risks. The potential use of molecular markers for the detection of illegal oestrogen administration was evaluated by taking samples of prostatic tissue from control bullocks, bullocks which had been treated with oestrogens, and bullocks sacrificed 21 and 90 days after a single dose of DES. The expression of the glycoconjugates was examined by lectinhistochemistry and the lectin binding pattern was characterised in epithelium and connective tissue. In the animals sacrificed after 21 days there was an increase in the binding of one lectin (JAC) and there was an increase in the binding of one of the other lectins (DBA) in the animals sacrificed after 90 days. An increase in SWGA lectin staining was observed in the bullocks that had probably been treated with oestrogen and in the animals sacrificed 90 days after the inoculation with DES. There were also differences between the binding of SWGA in the control bullocks and the other groups.

  10. Cellular heterogeneity in the membrana granulosa of developing rat follicles: assessment by flow cytometry and lectin binding.

    PubMed

    Kerketze, K; Blaschuk, O W; Farookhi, R

    1996-07-01

    The hormone-mediated maturation of ovarian follicles is apparently accompanied by position-specific differentiation of cells of the membrana granulosa. We have assessed the extent of this cellular heterogeneity by flow cytometry using a variety of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectins as probes. Follicular development was stimulated in immature rats by treatment with either diethylstilbestrol (DES) or equine CG (eCG). Lectin binding to monodispersed rat granulosa cells was then analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that there are two distinct populations of small (4-7 microM) and large (9-12 microM) granulosa cells in follicles from DES- and eCG-treated animals. Both populations appear to be mitotically active and show specific lectin-binding characteristics. Six lectins (canavalia ensiforms, triticum vulgaris, maclura pomifera, erythrina cristagalli, jacalin, and vicia villosa) bind equally to both small and large granulosa cells from the DES- and eCG-treated rats. In contrast, no binding to either cell population was detected with six other lectins (dolichos biflorus, griffonia simplicifolia-II, lycopersicon esculentum, datura stramonium, solanum tuberosum, and ulex europaeus). Furthermore, four galactose-binding lectins (bauhinia purpurea, glysine maximus, griffonia simplicifolia-I, and arachis hypogaea) were found to identify specific subsets of granulosa cells. Three of these lectins (bauhinia purpurea, glysine maximus, and griffonia simplicifolia-I) bind to only small granulosa cells from either DES- or eCG- treated immature rats. The fourth lectin (arachis hypogaea) identifies subpopulations of both small and large granulosa cells. Application of the four galactose-specific lectins to fixed sections of frozen ovaries demonstrated binding to the perioocyte and cumulus granulosa cells. We conclude that cellular heterogeneity exists within the follicular epithelium at various stages-specific lectin-binding sites.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of porphyrin binding to Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) lectin.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Nabil A M; Maiya, Bhaskar G; Swamy, Musti J

    2004-08-01

    Owing to the use of porphyrins in photodynamic therapy for the treatment of malignant tumors, and the preferential interaction of lectins with tumor cells, studies on lectin-porphyrin interaction are of significant interest. In this study, the interaction of several free-base and metalloporphyrins with Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) lectin (MCL) was investigated by absorption spectroscopy. Difference absorption spectra revealed that significant changes occur in the Soret band region of the porphyrins on binding to MCL. These changes were monitored to obtain association constants (Ka) and stoichiometry of binding. The tetrameric MCL binds four porphyrin molecules, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, lactose. In addition, the agglutination activity of MCL was unaffected by the presence of the porphyrins used in this study, clearly indicating that porphyrin and carbohydrate ligands bind at different sites. Both cationic and anionic porphyrins bind to the lectin with comparable affinity (Ka =10(3)-10(5) m(-1)). The thermodynamic parameters associated with the interaction of several porphyrins, obtained from the temperature dependence of the Ka values, were found to be in the range: DeltaH degrees = -98.1 to -54.4 kJ.mol(-1) and DeltaS degrees =-243.9 to -90.8 J.mol(-1).K(-1). These results indicate that porphyrin binding to MCL is governed by enthalpic forces and that the contribution from binding entropy is negative. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed in the interaction of different porphyrins with MCL, underscoring the role of water structure in the overall binding process. Analysis of CD spectra of MCL indicates that this protein contains about 13%alpha-helix, 36%beta-sheet, 21%beta-turn, and the rest unordered structures. Binding of porphyrins does not significantly alter the secondary and tertiary structures of MCL.

  12. Increased lectin binding capacity of trophoblastic cells of late day 5 rat blastocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, B A; Shaw, T J; Turner, V F; Murphy, C R

    1994-01-01

    The binding of lectins to the trophoblast of rat blastocysts has been studied using quantitative ultrastructural cytochemistry. Rat blastocysts from early, mid and late d 5 of gestation were stained using biotinylated lectins (Phytolacca americana [Phy am], fucose binding protein [FBP] and soybean agglutinin [SBA]) and a sensitive avidin-ferritin cytochemical method. Electron micrographs of ferritin particles along the membrane were processed to produce images for which grey scale levels could be established and the ferritin particles automatically counted. The ferritin:membrane ratio was then calculated. Increased binding with Phy am (which detects short chain oligosaccharides) was found after midday of d 5, i.e. after hatching. Binding of FBP and SBA did not alter during the period studied. The increased concentration of oligosaccharides on the blastocyst surface membrane after hatching may have important implications for blastocyst attachment to the endometrium. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7649802

  13. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    PubMed Central

    Khin, Mar Mar; Hua, Jie Song; Ng, Han Cong; Wadström, Torkel; Ho, Bow

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms. METHODS: Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS: Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A), fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas (Lotus A) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori lectin agglutination. Interes tingly, heating of H. pylori cells at 60 °C for 1 h was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION: The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during the events of morphological transformation, resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection. This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease. PMID:11819557

  14. Characterization and sugar-binding properties of arcelin-1, an insecticidal lectin-like protein isolated from kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. RAZ-2) seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, C; Causse, H; Mourey, L; Koninkx, J; Rivière, M; Hendriks, H; Puzo, G; Samama, J P; Rougé, P

    1998-01-01

    Arcelin-1 is a lectin-like protein found in the seeds of wild varieties of the kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). This protein displays insecticidal properties, but the mechanism of action is as yet unknown. In the present study we investigated the biochemical and biophysical properties of arcelin-1 from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. RAZ-2. Native arcelin-1 is a dimeric glycoprotein of 60 kDa, built from the non-covalent association of two identical monomers. This dimer resists dissociation by chaotropic agents and is highly resistant to proteolytic enzymes. Each subunit contains 10% (w/w) neutral sugars which belong to the high-mannose and complex-type glycans attached to three glycosylation sites. No interaction of the protein with simple sugars could be detected, but arcelin-1 displays an intrinsic specificity in binding complex glycans. Arcelin-1 therefore differs from the closely related phytohaemagglutinin lectins and alpha-amylase inhibitor in several respects: oligomerization states, sugar-binding affinities and the type and number of glycan chains. These features may be related to the toxicity of arcelin-1. PMID:9445382

  15. Crystallization and preliminary structural studies of champedak galactose-binding lectin

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Mohamed, Emida; Ibrahim, Wan Izlina Wan; Hashim, Onn Haji; Isaacs, Neil W.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Galactose-binding lectin from champedak (Artocarpus integer) consists of two chains: α and β (133 and 21 amino acids, respectively). It has been shown to recognize and bind to carbohydrates involved in IgA and C1 inhibitor molecules. The protein was purified and crystallized at 293 K. Crystals were observed in two space groups, P21 and P21212, and diffracted to 1.65 and 2.6 Å, respectively. PMID:19724126

  16. Organogel-assisted topochemical synthesis of multivalent glyco-polymer for high-affinity lectin binding.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Baiju P; Raghu, Sreedevi; Mukherjee, Somnath; Sureshan, Kana M

    2016-12-01

    An organogelator, 2,4-undeca-diynyl-4',6'-O-benzylidene-β-d-galactopyranoside, which aligns its diacetylene upon gelation, has been synthesized. UV irradiation of its gel resulted in topochemical polymerization of the gelator forming polydiacetylene (PDA). We have used this gel-state reaction for the synthesis of surface-immobilized multi-valent glycoclusters, which showed 1000-fold enhanced binding, compared to monomers, with various galactose-binding lectins.

  17. Roles for the galactose-/N-acetylgalactosamine-binding lectin of Entamoeba in parasite virulence and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jesse R; Petri, William A

    2005-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an intestinal protozoan parasite, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The pathology of the disease is caused by the colonization of the large intestine by the amoebic trophozoites and the invasion of the intestinal epithelium. Some of the trophozoites will eventually differentiate into the infectious cyst form, allowing them to be transmitted out of the bowel and into water supplies to be passed from person to person. Both the virulence of the organism and the differentiation process relies on a galactose-/N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-binding lectin that is expressed on the surface of trophozoites. The functional activity of this lectin has been shown to be involved in host cell binding, cytotoxicity, complement resistance, induction of encystation, and generation of the cyst wall. The role of the lectin in both differentiation and virulence suggests that it may be a pivotal molecule that determines the severity of the infection from a commensal state resulting from increased encystation to an invasive state. The lectin-glycan interactions that initiate these diverse processes are discussed with emphasis on comparing the binding of host ligands and the interactions involved in encystation.

  18. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  19. Hemagglutinating activity and conformation of a lactose-binding lectin from mushroom Agrocybe cylindracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Zhao, Xi; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Li, Ling-Rui; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhong, Shao-Dong; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2008-03-01

    A lactose-binding lectin (Agrocybe cylindracea Lectin, ACL) purified from fruiting bodies of the mushroom A. cylindracea was investigated to determine the hemagglutinating activity and conformation changes after chemical modification, removal of metal ion and treatment at different temperatures and pH. ACL agglutinated both rabbit and human erythrocytes and its hemagglutinating activity could be inhibited by lactose. This lectin was stable in the pH range of 6-9 and temperature up to 60 degrees C. Fluorescence quenching and modification of tryptophan residues indicated that there were about two tryptophan residues in ACL molecule and one of them might be located on the surface, while the other was buried in the hydrophobic shallow groove near the surface. Chemical modification of serine/threonine and histidine showed that the partial necessity of these residues for the hemagglutinating activity of ACL. However, modifications of arginine, tyrosine and cysteine residues had no effect on its agglutinating activity.

  20. Contribution of the carbohydrate-binding ability of Vatairea guianensis lectin to induce edematogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Marques, Gabriela F O; Osterne, Vinicius J S; Almeida, Livia M; Oliveira, Messias V; Brizeno, Luiz A C; Pinto-Junior, Vanir R; Santiago, Mayara Q; Neco, Antonio H B; Mota, Mario R L; Souza, Luiz A G; Nascimento, Kyria S; Pires, Alana F; Cavada, Benildo S; Assreuy, Ana M S

    2017-09-01

    Vatairea guianensis lectin (VGL), Dalbergiae tribe, is a N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc)/Galactose (Gal) lectin previously purified and characterized. In this work, we report its structural features, obtained from bioinformatics tools, and its inflammatory effect, obtained from a rat paw edema model. The VGL model was obtained by homology with the lectin of Vatairea macrocarpa (VML) as template, and we used it to demonstrate the common characteristics of legume lectins, such as the jellyroll motif and presence of a metal-binding site in the vicinity of the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD). Protein-ligand docking revealed favorable interactions with N-acetyl-d-galactosamine, d-galactose and related sugars as well as several biologically relevant N- and O-glycans. In vivo testing of paw edema revealed that VGL induces edematogenic effect involving prostaglandins, interleukins and VGL CRD. Taken together, these data corroborate with previous reports showing that VGL interacts with N- and/or O-glycans of molecular targets, particularly in those presenting galactosides in their structure, contributing to the lectin inflammatory effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  1. Pentavalent pillar[5]arene-based glycoclusters and their multivalent binding to pathogenic bacterial lectins.

    PubMed

    Galanos, Nicolas; Gillon, Emilie; Imberty, Anne; Matthews, Susan E; Vidal, Sébastien

    2016-04-07

    Anti-adhesive glycoclusters offer potential as therapeutic alternatives to classical antibiotics in treating infections. Pillar[5]arenes functionalised with either five galactose or five fucose residues were readily prepared using CuAAC reactions and evaluated for their binding to three therapeutically relevant bacterial lectins: LecA and Lec B from Pseudomonas aeuruginosa and BambL from Burkholderia ambifaria. Steric interactions were demonstrated to be a key factor in achieving good binding to LecA with more flexible galactose glycoclusters showing enhanced activity. In contrast binding to the fucose-selective lectins confirmed the importance of topology of the glycoclusters for activity with the pillar[5]arene ligand proving a selective ligand for BambL.

  2. Impact of Mannose-Binding Protein Gene Polymorphisms in Omani Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Mathew; Al Zadjali, Shoaib; Bashir, Wafa; Al Ambusaidi, Rahma; Misquith, Rhea; Wali, Yasser; Pathare, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to study mannose-binding protein (MBP) polymorphisms in exonic and promoter region and correlate it with associated infections and vasoocculsive (VOC) episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients since MBP plays an important role in innate immunity by activating the complement system. Methods We studied the genetic polymorphisms in the Exon 1 (alleles A/O) and promoter region (alleles Y/X; H/L, P/Q) of the MBL2 gene, in SCD patients as an increased incidence of infections is seen in these patients. A PCR-based, targeted genomic DNA sequencing of MBL2 was used to study 68 SCD Omani patients and 44 controls (healthy voluntary blood donors). Results In SCD patients, the frequency of the genotype related to the high production of MBL was 0.35 (YA/YA) and for intermediate/low production was 0.65 (YA/XA, XA/XA, YA/YO, XA/YO, YO/YO). The observed frequencies of MBL2 gene promoter polymorphism (-221, Y/X) were 44.4% and 20.5% for the heterozygous genotype Y/X and 3.2% and 2.2% for the homozygous (X/X) respectively between SCD patients and controls. MBL2 Exon1 gene mutations were 29.4% and 50% for the heterozygous genotype A/O and 5.9% and 6.8% respectively for the homozygous (O/O) genotype between SCD patients and controls. The distribution of variant MBL2 gene polymorphisms did not show any correlation in SCD patients with or without VOC attacks (p=0.16; OR −0.486; CI=0.177 −1.33), however, it was correlated with infections (p=0.0162; OR −3.55; CI 1.25–10.04). Conclusions Although the frequency of the genotypes and haplotypes of MBL2 in SCD patients did not differ from controls, overall in the SCD patient cohort the increased representation of variant alleles was significantly correlated with infections (p<0.05). However, these variant MBL2 polymorphisms did not seem to play a significant role in the VOC episodes in this SCD cohort. PMID:26977272

  3. Structural and histological characterization of oviductal magnum and lectin-binding patterns in Gallus domesticus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although chicken oviduct is a useful model and target tissue for reproductive biology and transgenesis, little is known because of the highly specific hormonal regulation and the lack of fundamental researches, including lectin-binding activities and glycobiology. Because lectin is attached to secreted glycoproteins, we hypothesized that lectin could be bound to secretory egg-white proteins, and played a crucial role in the generation of egg-white protein in the oviduct. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the structural, histological and lectin-binding characteristics of the chicken oviductal magnum from juvenile and adult hens. Methods The oviductal magnums from juvenile and adult hens were prepared for ultrastructural analysis, qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Immunohistochemistry of anti-ovalbumin, anti-ESR1 and anti-PGR, and mRNA expression of egg-white genes and steroid hormone receptor genes were evaluated. Lectin histochemical staining was also conducted in juvenile and adult oviductal magnum tissues. Results The ultrastructural analysis showed that ciliated cells were rarely developed on luminal surface in juvenile magnum, but not tubular gland cells. In adult magnum, two types of epithelium and three types of tubular gland cells were observed. qRT-PCR analysis showed that egg-white genes were highly expressed in adult oviduct compared with the juvenile. However, mRNA expressions of ESR1 and PGR were considerably higher in juvenile oviduct than adult (P < 0.05). The immunohistochemical analysis showed that anti-ovalbumin antibody was detected in adult oviduct not in juvenile, unlikely anti-ESR1 and anti-PGR antibodies that were stained in both oviducts. In histological analysis, Toluidine blue was stained in juvenile and adult oviductal epithelia, and adult tubular glands located in the outer layer of oviductal magnum. In contrast, PAS was positive only in adult oviductal tubular gland. Lectins were selectively bound to oviductal

  4. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in beta-prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Chandran, Divya; Singh, Desh D; Vijayan, M

    2007-09-01

    The beta-prism II fold lectins of known structure, all from monocots, invariably have three carbohydrate-binding sites in each subunit/domain. Until recently, beta-prism I fold lectins of known structure were all from dicots and they exhibited one carbohydrate-binding site per subunit/domain. However, the recently determined structure of the beta-prism fold I lectin from banana, a monocot, has two very similar carbohydrate-binding sites. This prompted a detailed analysis of all the sequences appropriate for two-lectin folds and which carry one or more relevant carbohydrate-binding motifs. The very recent observation of a beta-prism I fold lectin, griffthsin, with three binding sites in each domain further confirmed the need for such an analysis. The analysis demonstrates substantial diversity in the number of binding sites unrelated to the taxonomical position of the plant source. However, the number of binding sites and the symmetry within the sequence exhibit reasonable correlation. The distribution of the two families of beta-prism fold lectins among plants and the number of binding sites in them, appear to suggest that both of them arose through successive gene duplication, fusion and divergent evolution of the same primitive carbohydrate-binding motif involving a Greek key. Analysis with sequences in individual Greek keys as independent units lends further support to this conclusion.It would seem that the preponderance of three carbohydrate-binding sites per domain in monocot lectins, particularly those with the beta-prism II fold, is related to the role of plant lectins in defence.

  5. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-01-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery. PMID:26832966

  6. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility.

    PubMed

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-02-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery.

  7. Binding and cytotoxicity of Ricinus communis lectins to HeLa cells, Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells and erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Aizono, Y; Funatsu, G

    1984-08-01

    The binding of Ricinus communis lectins to HeLa cells, Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells and human erythrocytes was studied in detail. Scatchard plots of binding of 125I-lectins to these cells gave biphasic lines except for HeLa cells at 0 degree C. The association constants of lectins for the three cell types at 37 degrees C were lower than those at 0 degree C. The numbers of total binding sites were estimated to be 7 to 16 X 10(7) per HeLa cell, 3 to 4 X 10(7) per Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cell and 0.4 to 1 X 10(6) per erythrocyte. A fraction, 16 to 27% of the total amount of cell-bound lectin at 37 degrees C, appeared to be bound irreversibly as judged by non-removal on washing with 0.1 M lactose, whereas no lectin was irreversibly bound at 0 degree C. In the case of erythrocytes, no lectin became irreversibly bound even at 37 degrees C. The toxicity of lectins on HeLa cells and Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells was investigated. The toxicity of ricin D was 50 times for Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells and 140 times for HeLa cells as much as that for castor bean hemagglutinin. As to the sensitivities of both cell types to these lectins, it became apparent that Sarcoma 180 ascites tumor cells were more susceptible than HeLa cells.

  8. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  9. Lectins with potential for anti-cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yau, Tammy; Dan, Xiuli; Ng, Charlene Cheuk Wing; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-02-26

    This article reviews lectins of animal and plant origin that induce apoptosis and autophagy of cancer cells and hence possess the potential of being developed into anticancer drugs. Apoptosis-inducing lectins encompass galectins, C-type lectins, annexins, Haliotis discus discus lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, mistletoe lectin, and concanavalin A, fucose-binding Dicentrarchus labrax lectin, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, and mistletoe lectin, Polygonatum odoratum lectin, autophagy inducing lectins include annexins and Polygonatum odoratum lectin.

  10. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors

    PubMed Central

    Olejnik, Beata; Jarząb, Anna; Kratz, Ewa M.; Zimmer, Mariusz; Gamian, Andrzej; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate–protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers. PMID:26147424

  11. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mikeska, Ruth; Arni, Raghuvir; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R{sub free} = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R{sub free} = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound.

  12. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  13. A lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with midgut surface of Lutzomyia migonei, unlike its homologues, Cratylia floribunda lectin and Canavalia gladiata lectin.

    PubMed

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania.

  14. Identification of structural and secretory lectin-binding glycoproteins of normal and cancerous human prostate.

    PubMed

    Lad, P M; Cooper, J F; Learn, D B; Olson, C V

    1984-12-07

    We have utilized the technique of lectin-loading of SDS gels with iodinated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin to identify glycoproteins in prostatic and seminal fluids as well as in prostate tissue fractions. The following subunits which bound both lectins were detected: (a) 50, 43 and 38 kDa subunits common to prostatic and seminal fluids, and an additional 55 kDa subunit which predominates only in prostatic fluid; (b) 78, 55, 50 and 43 kDa subunits in prostatic tissue cytosol and (c) 195, 170, 135, 116 and 95 kDa subunits present in the particulate fractions of prostatic tissue. Immunoblotting using specific rabbit antibodies revealed the 50 kDa band to be prostatic acid phosphatase and the 38 kDa band to be prostate-specific antigen. Interestingly, antibodies directed toward prostatic acid phosphatase were found to cross-react with the 43 kDa band. Fractionation on sucrose gradients showed that several of these particulate glycoproteins were associated with a vesicle fraction enriched in adenylate cyclase activity, implying that they are plasma membrane glycoproteins. Comparison of soluble and particulate fractions of normal and cancerous tissue homogenates was made by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms of lectin-loaded gels. Similar relative intensities of lectin-binding were obtained for corresponding proteins in normal and cancerous tissue fractions. Also, immunoblotting showed no differences in prostatic acid phosphatase or prostate-specific antigen between normal and cancerous soluble homogenate fractions. Our results suggest that major lectin-binding proteins are conserved in the transition from normal to cancerous tissue. These results may be useful in developing a multiple-marker profile of metastatic prostate cancer and for the design of imaging agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, to prominent soluble and particulate prostate glycoproteins.

  15. Mannan-binding lectin deficiency - Good news, bad news, doesn't matter?

    PubMed

    Heitzeneder, Sabine; Seidel, Markus; Förster-Waldl, Elisabeth; Heitger, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) deficiency has been classified as a commonly occurring immune disorder, affecting approximately 30% of the human population. MBL, being part of the innate immune system, supports the recognition of infectious pathogens by binding to carbohydrate moieties expressed on microorganisms and activates the lectin pathway of the complement system. MBL2 gene polymorphisms are associated with quantitative and qualitative MBL abnormalities in the serum. The clinical impact of MBL deficiency and its association to a wide variety of diseases has been extensively studied. The picture is puzzling as the studies suggest a detrimental or beneficial or no impact of low or high MBL serum levels on disease susceptibility. In this review we attempt to extract what is relevant from the literature and address controversial issues. We finally suggest that a comprehensive understanding of the role of MBL in human diseases requires considering its context-dependency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular cloning of a lectin cDNA from Alocasia macrorrhiza and prediction of its characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ya-Ran; Wang, Jie; Huang, Bing-Qiu; Hou, Xue-Wen

    2006-12-01

    The cDNA of Alocasia macrorrhiza lectin (aml, GenBank accession number: DQ340864) was cloned by RACE-PCR and its characteristics were predicted by various bioinformatics tools. GSPs (Gene Specific Primers) were designed according to the conserved regions of the genes encoded for lectins and similar proteins from the same family Araceae. Total RNAs were extracted from the tubers of A macrorrhiza by Qiagen RNeasy mini kit. The 3'- and 5'-RACE-PCRs were performed with the isolated total RNAs by SMART(TM)RACE cDNA amplification kit from BD Biosciences Clontech Company, respectively. The purified PCR products were ligated with pMD 18-T vector, and the confirmed clones were sequenced. The full-length cDNA of aml was obtained by combination of 3'- and 5'-end sequences, and was then confirmed by full-length 3'-RACE-PCR. The aml cDNA is 1 124 bp long. The deduced amino acid length of AML lectin is 270 aa. Its relative molecular weight is 29.7 kD. The results of homologous analysis showed a high similarity between AML and other mannose-binding lectins and similar proteins from Araceae family. Two typical B-lectin domains and three mannose- binding motifs were found in the sequence of AML. With all these taken together, it can be concluded that this newly cloned aml cDNA encodes for a mannose-binding lectin.

  17. Importance of topology for glycocluster binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia ambifaria bacterial lectins.

    PubMed

    Ligeour, Caroline; Dupin, Lucie; Angeli, Anthony; Vergoten, Gérard; Vidal, Sébastien; Meyer, Albert; Souteyrand, Eliane; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Chevolot, Yann; Morvan, François

    2015-12-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and Burkholderia ambifaria (BA) are two opportunistic Gram negative bacteria and major infectious agents involved in lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients. Both bacteria can develop resistance to conventional antibiotherapies. An alternative strategy consists of targeting virulence factors in particular lectins with high affinity ligands such as multivalent glycoclusters. LecA (PA-IL) and LecB (PA-IIL) are two tetravalent lectins from PA that recognise galactose and fucose respectively. BambL lectin from BA is trimeric with 2 binding sites per monomer and is also specific for fucose. These three lectins are potential therapeutic targets in an anti-adhesive anti-bacterial approach. Herein, we report the synthesis of 18 oligonucleotide pentofuranose-centered or mannitol-centered glycoclusters leading to tri-, penta- or decavalent clusters with different topologies. The linker arm length between the core and the carbohydrate epitope was also varied leading to 9 galactoclusters targeting LecA and 9 fucoclusters targeting both LecB and BambL. Their dissociation constants (Kd) were determined using a DNA-based carbohydrate microarray technology. The trivalent xylo-centered galactocluster and the ribo-centered fucocluster exhibited the best affinity for LecA and LecB respectively while the mannitol-centered decafucocluster displayed the best affinity to BambL. These data demonstrated that the topology and nature of linkers were the predominant factors for achieving high affinity rather than valency.

  18. Galactose-binding lectins as markers of pregnancy-related glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Horvat, B

    1993-01-01

    Protein extracts from pregnant mouse endometria were compared with those obtained from non-pregnant and pseudopregnant mice to detect early pregnancy-specific galactose-rich glycoproteins. Gradient gel electrophoresis combined with lectin overlay and lectin histochemistry were used to identify Ricinus communis I (RCA-I), R. communis II (RCA-II) and Cytisus scoparius (CSA) lectin binding glycoproteins. Using this approach, galactose-rich glycoproteins were identified that were maximally expressed in the estrus phase of non-pregnant endometria and also those that had peak expression in pregnancy. Lectin histochemistry revealed pregnancy related changes in three portions of mouse endometrium: endometrial glands, luminal epithelium and its basement membrane. Two major glycoproteins (RCA-I reactive 64 kDa and RCA-II reactive 35 kDa) were specifically expressed in peri-implantation endometrium on days 3 and 4 of pregnancy. The appearance of these glycoproteins during the period of the implantation window in mouse suggests that they could serve as markers of uterine receptivity to the implanting blastocyst.

  19. Developmental changes affecting lectin binding in the vomeronasal organ of domestic pigs, Sus scrofa.

    PubMed

    Park, Junwoo; Lee, Wonho; Jeong, Chanwoo; Kim, Hwangryong; Taniguchi, Kazumi; Shin, Taekyun

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the developmental changes of glycoconjugate patterns in the porcine vomeronasal organs (VNOs) and associated glands (Jacobson's glands) from prenatal (9 weeks of gestation) and postnatal (2 days after birth) to the sexually mature stage (6 months old). The VNO of pigs (Sus scrofa) was examined using the following: Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), Bandeiraea simplicifolia agglutinin isolectin B4 (BSI-B4), Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and soybean agglutinin (SBA). At the fetal stage, all lectins examined were detected mainly in the free border of the vomeronasal epithelium, but few (WGA and UEA-I) and or absent in the VNO cell bodies. At the postnatal and sexually mature stages, the reactivity of some lectins, including WGA, UEA-I, DBA and SBA, were shown to increase in the VNO sensory epithelium as well as the free border. The increased reactivity of lectins as development progressed was also observed in Jacobson's gland acini. These findings suggest that binding sites of lectins, including those of WGA, UEA-I, DBA, and SBA, increase during development from fetal to postnatal growth, possibly contributing to the increased ability of chemoreception in the pig.

  20. Structure, interactions and evolutionary implications of a domain-swapped lectin dimer from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Dhabaleswar; Mishra, Padmanabh; Surolia, Avadhesha; Vijayan, Mamannamana

    2014-10-01

    Crystal structure determination of the lectin domain of MSMEG_3662 from Mycobacterium smegmatis and its complexes with mannose and methyl-α-mannose, the first effort of its kind on a mycobacterial lectin, reveals a structure very similar to β-prism II fold lectins from plant sources, but with extensive unprecedented domain swapping in dimer formation. The two subunits in a dimer often show small differences in structure, but the two domains, not always related by 2-fold symmetry, have the same structure. Each domain carries three sugar-binding sites, similar to those in plant lectins, one on each Greek key motif. The occurrence of β-prism II fold lectins in bacteria, with characteristics similar to those from plants, indicates that this family of lectins is of ancient origin and had evolved into a mature system before bacteria and plants diverged. In plants, the number of binding sites per domain varies between one and three, whereas the number is two in the recently reported lectin domains from Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. An analysis of the sequences of the lectins and the lectin domains shows that the level of sequence similarity among the three Greek keys in each domain has a correlation with the number of binding sites in it. Furthermore, sequence conservation among the lectins from different species is the highest for that Greek key which carries a binding site in all of them. Thus, it would appear that carbohydrate binding influences the course of the evolution of the lectin. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Reduced binding and phagocytosis of Pneumocystis carinii by alveolar macrophages from persons infected with HIV-1 correlates with mannose receptor downregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Koziel, H; Eichbaum, Q; Kruskal, B A; Pinkston, P; Rogers, R A; Armstrong, M Y; Richards, F F; Rose, R M; Ezekowitz, R A

    1998-01-01

    The macrophage mannose receptor, a pattern recognition molecule and component of innate immunity, mediates binding and phagocytosis of Pneumocystis carinii and likely represents an important clearance mechanism in the lungs of immunocompetent hosts. The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected individuals to bind and phagocytose P. carinii, and to investigate the role of the macrophage mannose receptor in mediating this interaction. Compared with healthy individuals, alveolar macrophage phagocytosis of P. carinii from HIV+ persons was reduced up to 74% (P = 0.02), primarily reflecting a reduction in the number of organisms associated with each macrophage (P = 0.019). Furthermore, macrophages from HIV+ individuals demonstrated up to an 80% (P < 0.05) reduction in mannose receptor surface expression and endocytosis. Mannose receptor affinity was unaltered, and mRNA levels were modestly reduced (P < 0.05). Cells from HIV+ individuals with CD4(+) counts < 200 cells/mm3 (representing individuals at high clinical risk for P. carinii pneumonia) demonstrated the lowest levels of P. carinii phagocytosis and mannose receptor endocytosis. In vitro HIV infection of alveolar macrophages from healthy individuals reduced mannose receptor endocytosis to 53.2% (P < 0.05) and P. carinii binding and phagocytosis to 67.4% (P < 0.05) of control. Our studies suggest that HIV infection may alter innate immunity in the lungs, and that impaired alveolar macrophage mannose receptor-mediated binding and phagocytosis of P. carinii may contribute to the susceptibility of HIV-infected individuals to this opportunistic pulmonary pathogen. PMID:9769325

  2. Fucose-binding lectin from opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia ambifaria binds to both plant and human oligosaccharidic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Audfray, Aymeric; Claudinon, Julie; Abounit, Saïda; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Larson, Göran; Smith, David F; Wimmerová, Michaela; Le Pendu, Jacques; Römer, Winfried; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2012-02-03

    Burkholderia ambifaria is generally associated with the rhizosphere of plants where it has biocontrol effects on other microorganisms. It is also a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related bacteria that cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients as well as in patients with granulomatous disease or cystic fibrosis. Our previous work indicated that fucose on human epithelia is a frequent target for lectins and adhesins of lung pathogens (Sulák, O., Cioci, G., Lameignère, E., Balloy, V., Round, A., Gutsche, I., Malinovská, L., Chignard, M., Kosma, P., Aubert, D. F., Marolda, C. L., Valvano, M. A., Wimmerová, M., and Imberty, A. (2011) PLoS Pathog. 7, e1002238). Analysis of the B. ambifaria genome identified BambL as a putative fucose-binding lectin. The 87-amino acid protein was produced recombinantly and demonstrated to bind to fucosylated oligosaccharides with a preference for αFuc1-2Gal epitopes. Crystal structures revealed that it associates as a trimer with two fucose-binding sites per monomer. The overall fold is a six-bladed β-propeller formed by oligomerization as in the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin and not by sequential domains like the fungal fucose lectin from Aleuria aurantia. The affinity of BambL for small fucosylated glycans is very high as demonstrated by microcalorimetry (K(D) < 1 μM). Plant cell wall oligosaccharides and human histo-blood group oligosaccharides H-type 2 and Lewis Y are bound with equivalent efficiency. Binding to artificial glycosphingolipid-containing vesicles, human saliva, and lung tissues confirmed that BambL could recognize a wide spectrum of fucosylated epitopes, albeit with a lower affinity for biological material from nonsecretor individuals.

  3. Fucose-binding Lectin from Opportunistic Pathogen Burkholderia ambifaria Binds to Both Plant and Human Oligosaccharidic Epitopes*

    PubMed Central

    Audfray, Aymeric; Claudinon, Julie; Abounit, Saïda; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Larson, Göran; Smith, David F.; Wimmerová, Michaela; Le Pendu, Jacques; Römer, Winfried; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia ambifaria is generally associated with the rhizosphere of plants where it has biocontrol effects on other microorganisms. It is also a member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of closely related bacteria that cause lung infections in immunocompromised patients as well as in patients with granulomatous disease or cystic fibrosis. Our previous work indicated that fucose on human epithelia is a frequent target for lectins and adhesins of lung pathogens (Sulák, O., Cioci, G., Lameignère, E., Balloy, V., Round, A., Gutsche, I., Malinovská, L., Chignard, M., Kosma, P., Aubert, D. F., Marolda, C. L., Valvano, M. A., Wimmerová, M., and Imberty, A. (2011) PLoS Pathog. 7, e1002238). Analysis of the B. ambifaria genome identified BambL as a putative fucose-binding lectin. The 87-amino acid protein was produced recombinantly and demonstrated to bind to fucosylated oligosaccharides with a preference for αFuc1–2Gal epitopes. Crystal structures revealed that it associates as a trimer with two fucose-binding sites per monomer. The overall fold is a six-bladed β-propeller formed by oligomerization as in the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin and not by sequential domains like the fungal fucose lectin from Aleuria aurantia. The affinity of BambL for small fucosylated glycans is very high as demonstrated by microcalorimetry (KD < 1 μm). Plant cell wall oligosaccharides and human histo-blood group oligosaccharides H-type 2 and Lewis Y are bound with equivalent efficiency. Binding to artificial glycosphingolipid-containing vesicles, human saliva, and lung tissues confirmed that BambL could recognize a wide spectrum of fucosylated epitopes, albeit with a lower affinity for biological material from nonsecretor individuals. PMID:22170069

  4. Binding of isolated plant lectin by rhizobia during episodes of reduced gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. L.; Green, P. D.; Wong, P. P.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Development of a legume root nodule is a complex process culminating in a plant/bacterial symbiosis possessing the capacity for biological dinitrogen fixation. Formation of root nodules is initiated by the binding and stabilization of rhizobia to plant root hairs, mediated in part by a receptor/ligand recognition system composed of lectins on the plant root surface and lectin-binding sites on the rhizobial cell surface. The dinitrogen fixation activity of these root nodules may be an important feature of enclosed, space-based life support systems, and may provide an ecological method to recycle nitrogen for amino acid production. However, the effects on nodule development of varied gravitational fields, or of root nutrient delivery hardware, remain unknown. We have investigated the effects of microgravity on root nodule formation, with preliminary experiments focused upon the receptor/ligand component. Microgravity, obtained during parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, has no apparent effect on the binding of purified lectin to rhizobia, a result that will facilitate forthcoming experiments using intact root tissues.

  5. Binding of isolated plant lectin by rhizobia during episodes of reduced gravity obtained by parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. L.; Green, P. D.; Wong, P. P.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    Development of a legume root nodule is a complex process culminating in a plant/bacterial symbiosis possessing the capacity for biological dinitrogen fixation. Formation of root nodules is initiated by the binding and stabilization of rhizobia to plant root hairs, mediated in part by a receptor/ligand recognition system composed of lectins on the plant root surface and lectin-binding sites on the rhizobial cell surface. The dinitrogen fixation activity of these root nodules may be an important feature of enclosed, space-based life support systems, and may provide an ecological method to recycle nitrogen for amino acid production. However, the effects on nodule development of varied gravitational fields, or of root nutrient delivery hardware, remain unknown. We have investigated the effects of microgravity on root nodule formation, with preliminary experiments focused upon the receptor/ligand component. Microgravity, obtained during parabolic flight aboard NASA 930, has no apparent effect on the binding of purified lectin to rhizobia, a result that will facilitate forthcoming experiments using intact root tissues.

  6. Lectin binding to cutaneous malignant melanoma: HPA is associated with metastasis formation

    PubMed Central

    Thies, A; Moll, I; Berger, J; Schumacher, U

    2001-01-01

    Changes in protein glycosylation of tumour cells, as detected by lectin histochemistry, have been associated with metastasis formation in several human malignancies. This study analysed the association between lectin binding and metastasis in cutaneous malignant melanoma. In a 10-year retrospective study, sections of 100 primary cutaneous malignant melanomas were histochemically stained for the following 5 lectins: HPA, SNA-I, MAA, WGA and PHA-L, differing in their carbohydrate specificity. Since differences in the results of HPA binding depending on methodology have been reported, an indirect and a biotinylated method were employed for HPA. Kaplan–Meier analysis of time to first metastasis revealed a positive correlation between HPA binding and metastasis for both methods, with the biotinylated HPA method (P< 0.0001) being superior to the ‘indirect’ method (P = 0.0006). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that even after adjustment for stage, HPA positivity is an independent predictor for metastasis. The results of the present study indicate that N -acetyl-galactosamine/-glucosamine residues, recognized by HPA, are linked to metastasis in malignant melanoma. In contrast, β1-6 branched oligosaccharides or sialic acid residues, both of which were correlated with metastasis in other malignancies, are of no functional importance for metastasis formation in malignant melanoma. Thus, HPA proved to be a useful and independent prognostic marker for the metastatic phenotype of melanoma. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11259098

  7. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin

    SciTech Connect

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. - Highlights: • The six-bladed β-propeller structure of AOL was solved by seleno-sugar phasing. • The mode of fucose binding is essentially conserved at all six binding sites. • The seleno-fucosides exhibit slightly different interactions and electron densities. • These findings suggest that the affinity for fucose is not identical at each site.

  8. Quantitative analysis of multivalent ligand presentation on gold glyconanoparticles and the impact on lectin binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-11-01

    Glyconanomaterials, nanomaterials carrying multiple carbohydrate ligands, provide an excellent platform for sensitive protein recognition. Using nanomaterials as the scaffold, multivalent interactions between glycan ligands and proteins have been demonstrated. However, the quantitative analysis of the binding affinity of these glyconanomaterials has been lacking. In this Article, we report a new method to measure the binding affinity of glyconanoparticle (GNP)-protein interactions based on a fluorescent competition binding assay, which yielded the apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) of GNPs with the interacting protein. Au nanoparticles conjugated with underivatized mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides were synthesized using our recently developed photocoupling chemistry. The affinities of these GNPs with lectins were measured and were several orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding free ligands with lectins. The effect of ligand display on the binding affinity of GNPs was, furthermore, studied where GNPs of varying linker type, spacer length, ligand density, and nanoparticle size were prepared and K(d) values determined. The long spacer linker containing hydrocarbon and ethylene oxide units gave the highest binding affinity as well as assay sensitivity. The binding affinity increased with ligand density in general, showing a drastic increase in affinity at low ligand density. In addition, the affinity enhancement was more pronounced on smaller NPs than the larger ones. These results not only demonstrate that the binding affinity of GNPs is highly influenced by how the ligands are presented on the nanoparticles but also pave the way for tailor-made glyconanomaterials with tunable affinity by way of ligand display.

  9. Helix pomatia lectin binding pattern of brain metastases originating from breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, U; Kretzschmar, H; Brooks, S; Leathem, A

    1992-04-01

    The glycosylation pattern of brain metastases originating from primary breast carcinomas was investigated using Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), a lectin which recognises N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNac) residues of glycoconjugates. In a previous retrospective study this lectin was shown to label only those primary breast cancers that metastasised. To explore this as a clinical marker of metastatic breast cancer behaviour it is necessary to analyse the HPA binding pattern of metastases to see if this differs from primary cancers. To test the question if brain metastases commitently retain this trait of metastatic primary tumors, we studied Helix pomatia binding pattern of brain metastases removed by surgical excision and immediately fixed and processed. Brain metastases from 16 patients with breast cancer were obtained, 13/16 metastases showed binding to the cytoplasm in the majority of cancer cells, 3/16 did not show binding to cancer cells. Normal adjacent brain showed binding to red blood cells, to capillary endothelium of several biopsies and to rare neurones; this binding did not relate to cancer cell binding. Therefore we conclude that HPA is a relatively stable marker for metastasizing breast cancer cells.

  10. [The significance of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin binding fibers in various muscular diseases].

    PubMed

    Yatabe, K; Hiraguri, M; Sueishi, M; Takeuchi, M; Nonaka, I; Kawai, M

    1998-05-01

    In the present study, we have reported that Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectin labeled muscle fibers in distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV). UEA I binding to muscle fibers was also observed in a small number of biopsies with inflammatory myopathy, but not in other diseases, including neurogenic muscular atrophies and muscular dystrophies. In order to elucidate the relationship between this UEA I binding, rimmed vacuole formation and active autophagocytosis, we examined the UEA I binding fibers in other myopathies which frequently showed rimmed vacuoles, including adult onset acid maltase deficiency, oculo-pharyngo-distal type myopathy and oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. No UEA I lectin labeling fiber was observed in the diseases examined. We then studied UEA I binding behavior on 70 biopsies of inflammatory myopathy to characterize the clinical features of UEA I binding positive patients. UEA I binding fibers were observed in 3 of 28 patients (11%) with other collagen diseases, 11 of 36 (31%) without these disorders, and 2 of 6 (33%) with inclusion body myositis. There were no common clinical histories, complications or laboratory findings among the UEA I binding positive patients. In conclusion, a common process may exist between the muscle fiber degeneration in DMRV and subgroups of inflammatory myopathy patients, but the basic mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  11. Isolation and characterization of lectins and lectin-alliinase complexes from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) and ramsons (Allium ursinum).

    PubMed

    Smeets, K; Van Damme, E J; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1997-04-01

    A procedure developed to separate the homodimeric and heterodimeric mannose-binding lectins from bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum L.) and ramsons (Allium ursinum L.) also enabled the isolation of stable lectin-alliinase complexes. Characterization of the individual lectins indicated that, in spite of their different molecular structure, the homomeric and heteromeric lectins resemble each other reasonably well with respect to their agglutination properties and carbohydrate-binding specificity. However, a detailed analysis of the lectin-alliinase complexes from garlic and ramsons bulbs demonstrated that only the heterodimeric lectins are capable of binding to the glycan chains of the alliinase molecules (EC 4.4.1.4). Moreover, it appears that only a subpopulation of the alliinase molecules is involved in the formation of lectin-alliinase complexes and that the complexed alliinase contains more glycan chains than the free enzyme. Finally, some arguments are given that the lectin-alliinase complexes do not occur in vivo but are formed in vitro after homogenization of the tissue.

  12. Structural Insight into Multivalent Galactoside Binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lectin LecA.

    PubMed

    Visini, Ricardo; Jin, Xian; Bergmann, Myriam; Michaud, Gaelle; Pertici, Francesca; Fu, Ou; Pukin, Aliaksei; Branson, Thomas R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Kemmink, Johan; Gillon, Emilie; Imberty, Anne; Stocker, Achim; Darbre, Tamis; Pieters, Roland J; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2015-11-20

    Multivalent galactosides inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms may help control this problematic pathogen. To understand the binding mode of tetravalent glycopeptide dendrimer GalAG2 [(Gal-β-OC6H4CO-Lys-Pro-Leu)4(Lys-Phe-Lys-Ile)2Lys-His-Ile-NH2] to its target lectin LecA, crystal structures of LecA complexes with divalent analog GalAG1 [(Gal-β-OC6H4CO-Lys-Pro-Leu)2Lys-Phe-Lys-Ile-NH2] and related glucose-triazole linked bis-galactosides 3u3 [Gal-β-O(CH2)n-(C2HN3)-4-Glc-β-(C2HN3)-[β-Glc-4-(N3HC2)]2-(CH2)n-O-β-Gal (n = 1)] and 5u3 (n = 3) were obtained, revealing a chelate bound 3u3, cross-linked 5u3, and monovalently bound GalAG1. Nevertheless, a chelate bound model better explaining their strong LecA binding and the absence of lectin aggregation was obtained by modeling for all three ligands. A model of the chelate bound GalAG2·LecA complex was also obtained rationalizing its unusually tight LecA binding (KD = 2.5 nM) and aggregation by lectin cross-linking. The very weak biofilm inhibition with divalent LecA inhibitors suggests that lectin aggregation is necessary for biofilm inhibition by GalAG2, pointing to multivalent glycoclusters as a unique opportunity to control P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  13. The primary structure of the Cytisus scoparius seed lectin and a carbohydrate-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-09-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose-binding Cytisus scoparius seed lectin II (CSII) was determined using a protein sequencer. After digestion of CSII with endoproteinase Lys-C or Asp-N, the resulting peptides were purified by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and then subjected to sequence analysis. Comparison of the complete amino acid sequence of CSII with the sequences of other leguminous seed lectins revealed regions of extensive homology. The amino acid residues of concanavalin A (Con A) involved in the metal binding site are highly conserved among those of CSII. A carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSII was obtained from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSII by affinity chromatography on a column of GalNAc-Gel. This peptide was retained on the GalNAc-Gel column and was presumed to have affinity for the column. The amino acid sequence of the retarded peptide was determined using a protein sequencer. The retarded peptide was found to correspond to the putative metal-binding region of Con A. These results strongly suggest that this peptide represents the carbohydrate-binding and metal ion-binding sites of CSII.

  14. Carbohydrate binding activities of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. II. Isolation and characterization of a galactose-specific lectin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Extracts of Bradyrhizobium japonicum were fractionated on Sepharose columns covalently derivatized with lactose. Elution of the material that was specifically bound to the affinity column with lactose yielded a protein of Mr approximately 38,000. Isoelectric focusing of this sample yielded two spots with pI values of 6.4 and 6.8. This protein specifically bound to galactose-containing glycoconjugates, but did not bind either to glucose or mannose. Derivatives of galactose at the C-2 position showed much weaker binding; there was an 18-fold difference in the relative binding affinities of galactose versus N-acetyl-D- galactosamine. These results indicate that we have purified a newly identified carbohydrate-binding protein from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, that can exquisitely distinguish galactose from its derivatives at the C-2 position. PMID:2211830

  15. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Mikeska, Ruth; Wacker, Roland; Arni, Raghuvir; Singh, Tej P.; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R free = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R free = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound. PMID:16508080

  16. Chelating agents inhibit activity and prevent expression of streptococcal glucan-binding lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Lü-Lü; Singh, J S; Galperin, M Y; Drake, D; Taylor, K G; Doyle, R J

    1992-01-01

    Several of the cariogenic mutans streptococci produce cell wall-associated glucan-binding lectins (GBLs). The lectins bind alpha-1,6-linked glucans and have no affinity for other polysaccharides or anomeric linkages. When citrate or lactate was included in the growth medium, expression of the activities of the GBLs of Streptococcus cricetus and S. sobrinus was prevented. Furthermore, chelating agents, including citrate, lactate, EDTA, and acetylacetone, were able to reversibly inhibit glucan-induced aggregation of GBL+ streptococci. In addition, the chelating agents prevented sucrose-dependent streptococcal adhesion to glass surfaces and dispersed preformed adherent masses of the streptococci. Neither citrate nor other chelating agents modified the activities of glucosyltransferases. Expression of the lectin could only be achieved by the addition of manganous ion to the growth medium. Chloramphenicol and other metabolic inhibitors prevented synthesis of GBL in cells obtained from manganese-deficient medium and shifted to manganous ion-sufficient medium. The GBL may be a manganoprotein, the manganese of which may be perturbed, but not removed, by chelating agents. During synthesis of the GBL, manganous ion may be required in order for the protein to achieve an active conformation. Citrate or other chelating agents may have promise as anticaries agents. Images PMID:1500189

  17. Purification, physico-chemical characterization and thermodynamics of chitooligosaccharide binding to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) phloem lectin.

    PubMed

    Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Swamy, Musti J

    2017-02-01

    A chitooligosaccharide-specific lectin has been purified from the phloem exudate of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) by affinity chromatography on chitin. The molecular weight of the cucumber phloem lectin (CPL) was determined as 51912.8Da by mass spectrometry whereas SDS-PAGE yielded a single band with a subunit mass of 26kDa, indicating that the protein is a homodimer. Peptide mass fingerprinting studies strongly suggest that CPL is identical to the 26kDa phloem protein 2 (PP2) from cucumber. CD spectroscopy indicated that CPL is a predominantly β-sheets protein. Hemagglutination activity of CPL was mostly unaffected between 4 and 90°C and between pH 4.0 and 10.0, indicating functional stability of the protein. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies indicate that the CPL dimer binds to two chitooligosaccharide ((GlcNAc)2-6) molecules with association constants ranging from 1.0×10(3) to 17.5×10(5)M(-1). The binding reaction was strongly enthalpy driven (ΔHb=-ve) with negative contribution from binding entropy (ΔSb=-ve). The enthalpy-driven nature of binding reactions suggests that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions stabilize the CPL-chitooligosaccharide association. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the CPL-chitooligosaccharide interaction, indicating that water molecules play an important role in the binding process.

  18. A galactose-binding lectin isolated from Aplysia kurodai (sea hare) eggs inhibits streptolysin-induced hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Imtiaj; Watanabe, Miharu; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kawakami, Yasushi; Suzuki, Jun; Dogasaki, Chikaku; Rajia, Sultana; Kawsar, Sarkar M A; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Fujii, Yuki; Iriko, Hideyuki; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-05

    A specific galactose-binding lectin was shown to inhibit the hemolytic effect of streptolysin O (SLO), an exotoxin produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Commercially available lectins that recognize N-acetyllactosamine (ECA), T-antigen (PNA), and Tn-antigen (ABA) agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes, but had no effect on SLO-induced hemolysis. In contrast, SLO-induced hemolysis was inhibited by AKL, a lectin purified from sea hare (Aplysia kurodai) eggs that recognizes α-galactoside oligosaccharides. This inhibitory effect was blocked by the co-presence of d-galactose, which binds to AKL. A possible explanation for these findings is that cholesterol-enriched microdomains containing glycosphingolipids in the erythrocyte membrane become occupied by tightly stacked lectin molecules, blocking the interaction between cholesterol and SLO that would otherwise result in penetration of the membrane. Growth of S. pyogenes was inhibited by lectins from a marine invertebrate (AKL) and a mushroom (ABA), but was promoted by a plant lectin (ECA). Both these inhibitory and promoting effects were blocked by co-presence of galactose in the culture medium. Our findings demonstrate the importance of glycans and lectins in regulating mechanisms of toxicity, creation of pores in the target cell membrane, and bacterial growth.

  19. Glycosylation of surface Ig creates a functional bridge between human follicular lymphoma and microenvironmental lectins.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Vania; Krysov, Sergey; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Emara, Mohamed; Potter, Kathleen N; Johnson, Peter; Packham, Graham; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Stevenson, Freda K

    2010-10-26

    Surface Ig (sIg) of follicular lymphoma (FL) is vital for tumor cell survival. We found previously that the Ig in FL is unusual, because the variable region genes carry sequence motifs for N-glycan addition. These are introduced by somatic mutation and are tumor specific. Unexpectedly, added glycans terminate at high mannose, suggesting a potentially important interaction of FL cells with mannose-binding lectins of the innate immune system. We have now identified mannosylated IgM at the surface of primary lymphoma cells. Recombinant lectin domains of the mannose receptor (MR) or DC-SIGN bind mannosylated Igs in vitro and bind to FL cells, signaling sIgM-associated increases in intracellular Ca(2+). Lectins also bind to normal B cells but fail to signal. In contrast, anti-Ig signaled similarly in both FL and normal B cells. Mannosylation patterns were mimicked by FL Ig-derived single-chain Fvs (scFv), providing probes for potential receptors. Mannosylated scFv bound specifically to the lectin domains of the MR and DC-SIGN and blocked signaling. Mannosylated scFv also bound to DC-SIGN on the surface of dendritic cells. This unique lymphoma-specific interaction of sIg with lectins of innate immunity reveals a potential route for microenvironmental support of tumor cells, mediated via the key B-cell receptor.

  20. Glycosylation of surface Ig creates a functional bridge between human follicular lymphoma and microenvironmental lectins

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Vania; Krysov, Sergey; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.; Emara, Mohamed; Potter, Kathleen N.; Johnson, Peter; Packham, Graham; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Stevenson, Freda K.

    2010-01-01

    Surface Ig (sIg) of follicular lymphoma (FL) is vital for tumor cell survival. We found previously that the Ig in FL is unusual, because the variable region genes carry sequence motifs for N-glycan addition. These are introduced by somatic mutation and are tumor specific. Unexpectedly, added glycans terminate at high mannose, suggesting a potentially important interaction of FL cells with mannose-binding lectins of the innate immune system. We have now identified mannosylated IgM at the surface of primary lymphoma cells. Recombinant lectin domains of the mannose receptor (MR) or DC-SIGN bind mannosylated Igs in vitro and bind to FL cells, signaling sIgM-associated increases in intracellular Ca2+. Lectins also bind to normal B cells but fail to signal. In contrast, anti-Ig signaled similarly in both FL and normal B cells. Mannosylation patterns were mimicked by FL Ig-derived single-chain Fvs (scFv), providing probes for potential receptors. Mannosylated scFv bound specifically to the lectin domains of the MR and DC-SIGN and blocked signaling. Mannosylated scFv also bound to DC-SIGN on the surface of dendritic cells. This unique lymphoma-specific interaction of sIg with lectins of innate immunity reveals a potential route for microenvironmental support of tumor cells, mediated via the key B-cell receptor. PMID:20937880

  1. Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding lectin under different urea concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kameel, Nurul Iman Ahamed; Wong, Yin How; Shuib, Adawiyah Suriza; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-01-01

    Conformational analysis of champedak galactose-binding (CGB) lectin under different urea concentrations was studied in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.2) using far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (far-UV CD), tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence and ANS fluorescence. In all cases, CGB lectin displayed a two-step, three-state transition. The first transition (from the native state to the intermediate state) started at ∼2.0 M urea and ended at ∼4.5 M urea, while the second transition (from the intermediate state to the completely denatured state) was characterized by the start- and end-points at ∼5.75 M and ∼7.5 M urea, respectively, when analyzed by the emission maximum of Trp fluorescence. A marked increase in the Trp fluorescence, ANS fluorescence and -CD values at 218 nm (-CD218 nm) represented the first transition, whereas a decrease in these parameters defined the second transition. On the other hand, emission maximum of the Trp fluorescence showed a continuous increase throughout the urea concentration range. Transformation of tetramer into monomer represented the first transition, whereas the second transition reflected the unfolding of monomer. Far-UV CD, Trp fluorescence and ANS fluorescence spectra were used to characterize the native, the intermediate and the completely denatured states of CGB lectin, obtained at 0.0 M, 5.0 M and 9.0 M urea, respectively. The intermediate state was characterized by the presence of higher secondary structures, increased ANS binding as well as increased Trp fluorescence intensity. A gradual decrease in the hemagglutination activity of CGB lectin was observed with increasing urea concentrations, showing complete loss at 4.0 M urea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence that a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin is encoded by a family of genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gitt, M A; Barondes, S H

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones were isolated by immunoscreening a human hepatoma cDNA library with an antiserum that bound specifically to a human soluble beta-galactoside-binding lectin with Mr of approximately 14,000. The deduced amino acid sequences of the inserts of these two clones show considerable homology with each other, the sequence of chicken skin beta-galactoside-binding lectin, and eight peptides derived from purified human lung lectin of Mr approximately 14,000. However, the sequence differences between the two hepatoma clones as well as among each clone and the lung peptides suggest that at least three variants of the gene encoding this lectin are expressed in human tissue. Images PMID:3020551

  3. Variation in the saccharide lectin binding pattern from different isolates of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Doumecq, María Laura; Soto, Pedro; Casalini, María Belén; Gimeno, Eduardo Juan; Barbeito, Claudio Gustavo; Monteavaro, Cristina Esther

    2014-12-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) is the causal agent of bovine tritrichomonosis (BT), a venereal disease that causes significant economic losses in the bovine livestock industry. The structural organization of T. foetus presents a cell membrane, an undulating membrane which extends along the parasite, three anterior flagella and a recurrent posterior flagellum. The interaction between the superficial glycoconjugates of the parasite and the host cell is one of the most relevant pathogenic mechanisms. In the present study, we analyzed the saccharide pattern through lectincytochemistry of the cell membrane, undulating membrane, cytoplasm and flagella of 28 isolates of T. foetus. Lectins that labeled most of the isolates were WGA, Con-A, RCA-I, LCA, GS-II and PHA-E showing the presence of D-mannose, D-glucose, N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid. On the other hand, no labeling was observed in any of the structures with VVA, STA, LEA, Jacalin, GS-I, SJA, PHA-L, DSA, and weak labeling was observed with DBA, PNA, SBA and UEA I, showing therefore a low expression of N-acetylgalactosamine, L-fucose and galactose. In addition, GS II labeled in a granular pattern when lectincytochemistry was positive, whereas LCA strongly labeled the membranes and weakly the cytoplasms. The labeling variations observed among the isolates analyzed in the present work, could be related to differences in the pathogenic behavior of the isolates.

  4. Correlation between carbohydrate-binding specificity and amino acid sequence of carbohydrate-binding regions of Cytisus-type anti-H(O) lectins.

    PubMed

    Konami, Y; Yamamoto, K; Osawa, T; Irimura, T

    1992-06-15

    A carbohydrate-binding peptide of the di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding Cytisus sessilifolius anti-H(O) lectin I (CSA-I) was isolated from the endoproteinase Asp-N digest of CSA-I by affinity chromatography on a column of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine oligomer-Sepharose (GlcNAc oligomer-Sepharose). The amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding peptide of CSA-I was determined to be DTYFGKTYNPW using a gas-phase protein sequencer. This sequence corresponds to the sequence from Asp-129 to Trp-139 based on the primary structure of CSA-I, and shows a high degree of homology to those of the putative carbohydrate-binding peptide of the Laburnum alpinum lectin I (LAA-I) (DTYFGKAYNPW) and of the Ulex europaeus lectin II (UEA-II) (DSYFGKTYNPW). The binding of these three anti-H(O) lectins is known to be inhibited by di-N-acetylchitobiose but not by L-fucose. These results strongly suggest that there is a good correlation between the carbohydrate-binding specificity and the amino acid sequence of the carbohydrate-binding regions of di-N-acetylchitobiose-binding lectins.

  5. Analysis of unconventional approaches for the rapid detection of surface lectin binding ligands on human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Welty, Lily Anne Y; Heinrich, Eileen L; Garcia, Karina; Banner, Lisa R; Summers, Michael L; Baresi, Larry; Metzenberg, Stan; Coyle-Thompson, Cathy; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2006-01-01

    For over a decade our laboratory has developed and used a novel histochemical assay using derivatized agarose beads to examine the surface properties of various cell types. Most recently, we have used this assay to examine lectin binding ligands on two human cell types, CCL-220, a colon cancer cell line, and CRL-1459, a non-cancer colon cell line. We found that CCL-220 cells bound specific lectins better than CRL-1459, and this information was used to test for possible differential toxicity of these lectins in culture, as a possible approach in the design of more specific anti-cancer drugs. Although we have examined the validity of the bead-binding assay in sea urchin cell systems, we have not previously validated this technique for mammalian cells. Here the binding results of the bead assay are compared with conventional fluorescence assays, using lectins from three species (Triticum vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Lens culinaris) on the two colon cell lines. These lectins were chosen because they seemed to interact with the two cell lines differently. Binding results obtained using both assays were compared for frozen, thawed and fixed; cultured and fixed; and live cells. Both qualitative and quantitative fluorescence results generally correlated with those using the bead assay. Similar results were also obtained with all of the three different cell preparation protocols. The fluorescence assay was able to detect lower lectin binding ligand levels than the bead assay, while the bead assay, because it can so rapidly detect cells with large numbers of lectin binding ligands, is ideal for initial screening studies that seek to identify cells that are rich in surface binders for specific molecules. The direct use of frozen, thawed and fixed cells allows rapid mass screening for surface molecules, without the requirement for costly and time consuming cell culture.

  6. Re-examining the proposed lectin properties of IL-2.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Giuseppe A; Rini, James M

    2008-03-01

    Early work examining the interactions of IL-2 and the urinary glycoprotein uromodulin led to the suggestion that IL-2 was a lectin with specificity for high-mannose and mannan ligands. Subsequent studies have attributed various roles to these properties, some critical to the cell proliferative activity of IL-2. In an attempt to verify the reported interaction between IL-2 and mannose containing carbohydrate ligands we studied two biologically active forms of IL-2 using various techniques including affinity chromatography, equilibrium dialysis, and NMR methods. Despite previous reports we have not been able to demonstrate that IL-2 possesses the ability to bind carbohydrate.

  7. A rainbow trout lectin with multimeric structure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, L E; Thiel, S; Petersen, T E; Jensenius, J C

    1997-04-01

    A novel lectin has been identified in rainbow trout serum and plasma. The lectin binds to Sepharose (an agarose polymer) in a calcium-dependent manner. Glucose, N-acetyl-glucosamine, mannose, N-acetyl-mannosamine, L-fucose, maltose and alpha-methyl-mannoside are good inhibitors of this binding, whereas glucosamine and D-fucose inhibits to a lesser degree and mannosamine and galactose do not inhibit the binding to Sepharose. When analysed by SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions, the lectin appears as a characteristic ladder of bands with approximately 16 kDa between consecutive bands. Upon reduction, the lectin appears as a 16-kDa band. On size-exclusion chromatography of trout serum and plasma, the protein emerges over a broad range corresponding to sizes from about 2000 kDa to less than 200 kDa. The NH2-terminal sequence (AAENRNQXPPG) shows no significant homology with known proteins. Because of the characteristic appearance in non-reducing SDS-PAGE and the lectin activity, we propose to name the protein "ladderlectin."

  8. Multivalent 3D Display of Glycopolymer Chains for Enhanced Lectin Interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M

    2015-08-19

    Synthetic glycoprotein conjugates were synthesized through the polymerization of glycomonomers (mannose and/or galactose acrylate) directly from a protein macroinitiator. This design combines the multivalency of polymer structures with 3D display of saccharides randomly arranged around a central protein structure. The conjugates were tested for their interaction with mannose binding lectin (MBL), a key protein of immune complement. Increasing mannose number (controlled through polymer chain length) and density (controlled through comonomer feed ratio of mannose versus galactose) result in greater interaction with MBL. Most significantly, mannose glycopolymers displayed in a multivalent and 3D configuration from the protein exhibit dramatically enhanced interaction with MBL compared to linear glycopolymer chains with similar total valency but lacking 3D display. These findings demonstrate the importance of the 3D presentation of ligand structures for designing biomimetic materials.

  9. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  10. Binding studies of a sialic acid-specific lectin from the horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotunda cauda with various sialoglycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, S; Thambi Dorai, D; Srimal, S; Bachhawat, B K

    1982-01-01

    Interaction of the sialic acid-specific lectin carcinoscorpin with various sialoglycoproteins was studied by using radioiodinated lectin. The binding of carcinoscorpin was dependent not only on sialic acid content but also on the type of glycosidic linkage and form (branched or linear) of the carbohydrate chains. Carcinoscorpin has different classes of binding sites, and binding follows a phenomenon of positive co-operativity. The effect of Ca2+ concentration on the binding was studied, and the optimal concentration was found to be 0.02 M. Effect of pH, temperature and other bivalent metal ions are also reported. From haemagglutination- and precipitation-inhibition studies, it was concluded that carcinoscorpin has multispecificity towards acidic sugars, and its relation to the biological role of the lectin in the horseshoe crab is discussed. PMID:7103938

  11. Mechanism of entomotoxicity of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2012-09-01

    Plant lectins have received a lot of attention because of their insecticidal properties. When orally administered in artificial diet or in transgenic plants, lectins provoke a wide range of detrimental effects, including alteration of the digestive enzyme machinery, fecundity drop, reduced feeding, changes in oviposition behavior, growth and development inhibition and mortality. Although many studies reported the entomotoxicity of lectins, only a few of them investigated the mode of action by which lectins exert toxicity. In the present paper we have studied for the first time the insecticidal potential of the plant lectin from Hippeastrum hybrid (Amaryllis) (HHA) bulbs against the larvae of the cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis). Bioassays on neonate larvae showed that this mannose-specific lectin affected larval growth, causing a development retardation and larval weight decrease. Using primary cell cultures from S. littoralis midguts and confocal microscopy we have elucidated FITC-HHA binding and internalization mechanisms. We found that HHA did not exert a toxic effect on S. littoralis midgut cells, but HHA interaction with the brush border of midgut cells interfered with normal nutrient absorption in the S. littoralis midgut, thereby affecting normal larval growth in vivo. This study thus confirms the potential of mannose-specific lectins as pest control agents and sheds light on the mechanism underlying lectin entomotoxicity.

  12. Application of Lectin Array Technology for Biobetter Characterization: Its Correlation with FcγRIII Binding and ADCC

    PubMed Central

    Roucka, Markus; Zimmermann, Klaus; Fido, Markus; Nechansky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Lectin microarray technology was applied to compare the glycosylation pattern of the monoclonal antibody MB311 expressed in SP2.0 cells to an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic effector function (ADCC)-optimized variant (MB314). MB314 was generated by a plant expression system that uses genetically modified moss protoplasts (Physcomitrella patens) to generate a de-fucosylated version of MB311. In contrast to MB311, no or very low interactions of MB314 with lectins Aspergillus oryzae l-fucose (AOL), Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) were observed. These lectins are specific for mono-/biantennary N-glycans containing a core fucose residue. Importantly, this fucose indicative lectin-binding pattern correlated with increased MB314 binding to CD16 (FcγRIII; receptor for the constant region of an antibody)—whose affinity is mediated through core fucosylation—and stronger ADCC. In summary, these results demonstrate that lectin microarrays are useful orthogonal methods during antibody development and for characterization. PMID:28029136

  13. Generation of ligand specificity and modes of oligomerization in β-prism I fold lectins.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Thyageshwar; Sharma, Alok; Vijayan, Mamannamana

    2013-01-01

    β-Prism I fold lectins constitute one of the five widely occurring structural classes of plant lectins. Each single domain subunit is made up of three Greek key motifs arranged in a threefold symmetric fashion. The threefold symmetry is not reflected in the sequence except in the case of the lectin from banana, a monocot, which carries two sugar-binding sites instead of the one in other lectins of known three-dimensional structure, all from dicots. This is believed to be a consequence of the different evolutionary paths followed by the lectin in monocots and dicots. The galactose-specific lectins among them have two chains produced by posttranslational proteolysis and contain three aromatic residues at the binding site. The extended binding sites of galactose- and mannose-specific lectins have been thoroughly characterized. Ligand binding at the sites involves both conformational selection and induced fit. Molecular plasticity of some of the lectins in the family has been characterized. The plasticity appears to be such as to promote variability in quaternary association which could be dimeric, tetrameric, or octameric. Structural and evolutionary reasons for the variability have been explored, and the relation of oligomerization to ligand binding and conformational selection investigated. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Responsive Photonic Crystal Carbohydrate Hydrogel Sensor Materials for Selective and Sensitive Lectin Protein Detection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhongyu; Sasmal, Aniruddha; Liu, Xinyu; Asher, Sanford A

    2017-10-04

    Lectin proteins, such as the highly toxic lectin protein, ricin, and the immunochemically important lectin, jacalin, play significant roles in many biological functions. It is highly desirable to develop a simple but efficient method to selectively detect lectin proteins. Here we report the development of carbohydrate containing responsive hydrogel sensing materials for the selective detection of lectin proteins. The copolymerization of a vinyl linked carbohydrate monomer with acrylamide and acrylic acid forms a carbohydrate hydrogel that shows specific "multivalent" binding to lectin proteins. The resulting carbohydrate hydrogels are attached to 2-D photonic crystals (PCs) that brightly diffract visible light. This diffraction provides an optical readout that sensitively monitors the hydrogel volume. We utilize lactose, galactose, and mannose containing hydrogels to fabricate a series of 2-D PC sensors that show strong selective binding to the lectin proteins ricin, jacalin, and concanavalin A (Con A). This binding causes a carbohydrate hydrogel shrinkage which significantly shifts the diffraction wavelength. The resulting 2-D PC sensors can selectively detect the lectin proteins ricin, jacalin, and Con A. These unoptimized 2-D PC hydrogel sensors show a limit of detection (LoD) of 7.5 × 10(-8) M for ricin, a LoD of 2.3 × 10(-7) M for jacalin, and a LoD of 3.8 × 10(-8) M for Con A, respectively. This sensor fabrication approach may enable numerous sensors for the selective detection of numerous lectin proteins.

  15. Effect of leguminous lectins on the growth of Rhizobium tropici CIAT899.

    PubMed

    de Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Cunha, Cláudio Oliveira; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Carneiro, Victor Alves; Bastos, Rafaela Mesquita; Mercante, Fábio Martins; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Teixeira, Edson Holanda

    2013-05-17

    Rhizobium tropici is a Gram-negative bacterium that induces nodules and fixed atmospheric nitrogen in symbiotic association with Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) and some other leguminous species. Lectins are proteins that specifically bind to carbohydrates and, consequently, modulate different biological functions. In this study, the d-glucose/ d-mannose-binding lectins (from seeds of Dioclea megacarpa, D. rostrata and D. violacea) and D-galactose-binding lectins (from seeds of Bauhinia variegata, Erythina velutina and Vatairea macrocarpa) were purified using chromatographic techniques and evaluated for their effect on the growth of R. tropici CIAT899. All lectins were assayed with a satisfactory degree of purity according to SDS-PAGE analysis, and stimulated bacterial growth; in particular, the Dioclea rostrata lectin was the most active among all tested proteins. As confirmed in the present study, both d-galactose- and d-glucose/d-mannose-binding lectins purified from the seeds of leguminous plants may be powerful biotechnological tools to stimulate the growth of R. tropici CIAT99, thus improving symbiotic interaction between rhizobia and common bean and, hence, the production of this field crop.

  16. A rhamnose-binding lectin from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) plasma agglutinates and opsonizes pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarata, Matteo; Parisi, Maria Giovanna; Benenati, Gigliola; Vasta, Gerardo R; Parrinello, Nicolò

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in teleost fish eggs led to the identification of a novel lectin family characterized by a unique sequence motif and a structural fold, and initially proposed to modulate fertilization. Further studies of the RBL tissue localization and gene organization were also suggestive of role(s) in innate immunity. Here we describe the purification, and biochemical and functional characterization of a novel RBL (DlRBL) from sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) serum. The purified DlRBL had electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to 24 kDa and 100 kDa under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively, suggesting that in plasma the DlRBL is present as a physiological homotetramer. DlRBL subunit transcripts revealed an open reading frame encoding 212 amino acid residues that included two tandemly-arrayed carbohydrate-recognition domains, and an 18-residue signal sequence at the N-terminus. The deduced size of 24.1 kDa for the mature protein was in good agreement with the subunit size of the isolated lectin. Binding activity of DlRBL for rabbit erythrocytes could be inhibited in the presence of rhamnose or galactose, did not require calcium, and was optimal at around 20°C and within the pH 6.5-8.0 range. DlRBL agglutinated Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and exposure of formalin-killed Escherichia coli to DlRBL enhanced their phagocytosis by D. labrax peritoneal macrophages relative to the unexposed controls. Taken together, the results suggest that plasma DlRBL may play a role in immune recognition of microbial pathogens and facilitate their clearance by phagocytosis.

  17. Lectin interactions with the Jurkat leukemic T-cell line: quantitative binding studies and interleukin-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, G.; Bastin, B.

    1988-03-01

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), pea lectin, and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) have been used to investigate their binding properties to Jurkat 77 6.8 leukemic human T cells and their ability to induce these cells to produce interleukin-2 (IL-2). Binding studies showed that the Jurkat cells fixed 0.82 +/- 0.11 microgram pea lectin, 2.02 +/- 0.17 micrograms Con A, 1.85 +/- 0.07 micrograms PHA and 8.88 +/- 0.61 micrograms WGA. Scatchard plots were linear, indicating that the binding process was homogeneous with respect to the binding constant. PHA and Con A bound with the highest affinity (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 9 x 10(9) M-1), followed by pea lectin and WGA (Kass (apparent) approximately equal to 3 x 10(9) M-1). The number of lectin binding sites was in agreement with the results of saturation experiments. We also evaluated the effect of the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on the binding process. Results show that there were no gross alterations in the value of (apparent) Kass in the case of PHA and WGA. In contrast, the presence of TPA decreased the affinity of Con A and modified the Scatchard profile for pea lectin, which was curvilinear with a concavity turned upward. In this case, data were (apparent) K1 = 17.7 x 10(9) M-1 (high-affinity sites) and (apparent) K2 = 2.6 x 10(9) M-1 (low-affinity sites). The four lectins shared the ability to stimulate Jurkat 77 6.8 cells to secrete IL-2. Optimal lectin concentrations were 20 micrograms/ml (PHA) and 50 micrograms/ml (WGA and Con A). Pea lectin failed to display a dose-response relationship, and IL-2 production increased proportionally with lectin concentration. Con A was the most efficient stimulator (250 U/ml), followed by WGA (160 U/ml) and PHA (108 U/ml).

  18. Structural and functional overview of the lectin complement pathway: its molecular basis and physiological implication.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Misao; Endo, Yuichi; Fujita, Teizo

    2013-08-01

    The complement system is an effector mechanism in immunity. It is activated in three ways, the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The lectin pathway is initiated by the binding of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) or ficolins to carbohydrates on the surfaces of pathogens. In humans, MBL and three types of ficolins (L-ficolin, H-ficolin, and M-ficolin) are present in plasma. Of these lectins, at least, MBL, L-ficolin, and H-ficolin are complexed with three types of MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), MASP-1, MASP-2, and MASP-3 and their truncated proteins (MAp44 and sMAP). In the lectin pathway, the lectin-MASP complex (i.e., a complex of lectin, MASPs and their truncated proteins) binds to pathogens, resulting in the activation of C4 and C2 to generate a C3 convertase capable of activating C3. MASP-2 is involved in the activation of C4 and C2. MASP-1 activates C2 and MASP-2. The functions of MASP-3, sMAP, and MAp44 in the lectin pathway remain unknown. MASP-1 and MASP-3 also have a role in the alternative pathway. MBL and ficolins are able to bind to a variety of pathogens depending on their carbohydrate binding specificity, resulting in the activation of the lectin pathway. Deficiencies of the components of the lectin pathway are associated to susceptibility to infection, indicating an important role of the lectin pathway in innate immunity. The lectin-MASP complex is also involved in innate immunity by activating the coagulation system. Recent findings suggest a crucial role of MASP-3 in development.

  19. Physiochemical studies on achatininH, a novel sialic acid-binding lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, C; Basu, S; Mandal, C

    1989-01-01

    We have purified a sialic acid-binding lectin, achatininH, in a single step by affinity chromatography, having high affinity for 9-O-acetylneuraminic acid. The physicochemical characterization of the interaction of achatininH with bivalent metal ions and sialic acid derivatives by the use of spectrofluorimetry, spectropolarimetry and precipitin reaction is reported. From fluorescence quenching studies the binding of Ca2+ (Ka = 251 +/- 9 M-1) and of Mn2+ (Ka = 86 +/- 5 M-1) was found to be weak, but their presence is absolutely necessary for sugar binding as well as biological activity. The nature and position of the substituent group play a very important role in the binding affinity. AchatininH shows a high affinity for 9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Ka = 1.20 x 10(3) +/- 0.07 x 10(3) M-1) compared with that for the 4-O-acetyl derivative. In oligomers the binding strength increases in the order monosaccharide less than disaccharide less than trisaccharide. The binding affinity of achatininH for the disaccharide was found to reach a peak around pH 8. From c.d. spectral studies achatininH was found to have a high beta-sheet content (46%) and a low alpha-helix content (24%). From precipitin analysis at least one sugar-binding site on each of the 16 monomer subunits of the protein is indicated. PMID:2920028

  20. Lessons learned from mice deficient in lectin complement pathway molecules.

    PubMed

    Genster, Ninette; Takahashi, Minoru; Sekine, Hideharu; Endo, Yuichi; Garred, Peter; Fujita, Teizo

    2014-10-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when the pattern-recognition molecules, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins or collectin-11, bind to invading pathogens or damaged host cells. This leads to activation of MBL/ficolin/collectin-11 associated serine proteases (MASPs), which in turn activate downstream complement components, ultimately leading to elimination of the pathogen. Mice deficient in the key molecules of lectin pathway of complement have been generated in order to build knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of the lectin pathway in health and disease. Despite differences in the genetic arrangements of murine and human orthologues of lectin pathway molecules, the knockout mice have proven to be valuable models to explore the effect of deficiency states in humans. In addition, new insight and unexpected findings on the diverse roles of lectin pathway molecules in complement activation, pathogen infection, coagulation, host tissue injury and developmental biology have been revealed by in vivo investigations. This review provides an overview of the mice deficient in lectin pathway molecules and highlights some of the most important findings that have resulted from studies of these. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetes Is Associated with Increased Autoreactivity of Mannan-Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) has been reported to be involved in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. MBL is a pattern-recognition molecule of the innate immune system that initiates the lectin pathway of the complement system upon recognition of evolutionary conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns or to altered self-tissue. Our group have previously shown direct effects of MBL on diabetes-induced kidney damage, and we hypothesized that MBL may cause autoactivation of the complement system via binding to neoepitopes induced by hyperglycemia. In the present study, we induced diabetes in MBL knockout mice and in wild type C57BL/6J mice by low-dose streptozotocin injection and measured blood glucose and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio to monitor development of diabetes. After 24 weeks, fluorescently labelled recombinant MBL was injected intravenously in diabetic MBL knockout mice after which the distribution was investigated using in vivo fluorescence imaging. Mice were subjected to in vivo and ex vivo imaging 24 hours after injection. MBL was found to accumulate in the kidneys of diabetic mice as compared to healthy control mice (p < 0.0001). These findings support the hypothesis of a significant role of MBL and the complement system in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:28349070

  2. Association of alginate from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with two forms of heparin-binding lectin isolated from rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Ceri, H; McArthur, H A; Whitfield, C

    1986-01-01

    An endogenous heparin-binding lectin activity isolated from rat lung was separated into two distinct isolectin forms which showed subtle changes in carbohydrate specificity. The two lectin forms displayed different specificities toward alginic acid-purified cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa when assayed by inhibition of both hemagglutination and [3H]heparin binding. This ability of isolectin forms to show higher affinity toward alginic acid from certain P. aeruginosa strains may suggest that there is a selective mechanism in the colonization of patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:3079726

  3. Lectin Microarray Reveals Binding Profiles of Lactobacillus casei Strains in a Comprehensive Analysis of Bacterial Cell Wall Polysaccharides▿†

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Emi; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabarashi, Jun; Iino, Tohru; Sako, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed a pivotal role of the polysaccharide (PS) moiety in the cell wall of the Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (YIT 9029) as a possible immune modulator (E. Yasuda M. Serata, and T. Sako, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 74:4746-4755, 2008). To distinguish PS structures on the bacterial cell surface of individual strains in relation to their activities, it would be useful to have a rapid and high-throughput methodology. Recently, a new technique called lectin microarray was developed for rapid profiling of glycosylation in eukaryotic polymers and cell surfaces. Here, we report on the development of a simple and sensitive method based on this technology for direct analysis of intact bacterial cell surface glycomes. The method involves labeling bacterial cells with SYTOX Orange before incubation with the lectin microarray. After washing, bound cells are directly detected using an evanescent-field fluorescence scanner in a liquid phase. Using this method, we compared the cell surface glycomes from 16 different strains of L. casei. The patterns of lectin-binding affinity of most strains were found to be unique. There appears to be two types of lectin-binding profiles: the first is characterized by a few lectins, and the other is characterized by multiple lectins with different specificities. We also showed a dramatic change in the lectin-binding profile of a YIT 9029 derivative with a mutation in the cps1C gene, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase. In conclusion, the developed technique provided a novel strategy for rapid profiling and, more importantly, differentiating numerous bacterial strains with relevance to the biological functions of PS. PMID:21602390

  4. Thermodynamics of multivalent carbohydrate-lectin cross-linking interactions: importance of entropy in the bind and jump mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Gerken, Thomas A; Brewer, C Fred

    2009-05-12

    The high affinity (K(d) = 0.2 nM) of the soybean agglutinin (SBA), a tetrameric GalNAc specific lectin, for a modified form of porcine submaxillary mucin, a linear glycoprotein, with a molecular mass of approximately 10(6) Da and approximately 2300 GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr residues (Tn-PSM) has been ascribed to an internal diffusion mechanism that involves binding and jumping of the lectin from GalNAc to GalNAc residue of the mucin [Dam, T. K., et al. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 28256-28263]. Hill plot analysis of the raw ITC data shows increasing negative cooperativity, which correlates with an increasing number of lectin-mucin cross-linking interactions and decreasing favorable binding entropies. However, the affinity of bound SBA for other Tn-PSM molecules during cross-linking is much higher than that of free SBA for GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser, a monovalent analogue. The high affinity of bound SBA for GalNAc residues on other Tn-PSM molecules appears to be due to the favorable entropy of binding associated with the internal diffusion mechanism. Furthermore, the increasing negative cooperativity of SBA binding to Tn-PSM correlates with a decreasing level of internal diffusion of the lectin on the mucin as cross-linking occurs. These findings indicate the importance of the internal diffusion mechanism in generating large, favorable entropies of binding that drive lectin-mucin cross-linking interactions. The results are important for understanding the energetics of lectin-mucin cross-linking interactions that are associated with biological signaling on the surface of cells and the role of the internal diffusion mechanism in ligand-biopolymer interactions in general.

  5. Sperm surface hyaluronan binding protein (HABP1) interacts with zona pellucida of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) through its clustered mannose residues.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ilora; Datta, Kasturi

    2003-02-01

    Sperm-oocyte interaction during fertilization is multiphasic, with multicomponent events, taking place between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and sperm surface receptor. d-mannosylated glycoproteins, the major constituents of ZP are considered to serve as ligands for sperm binding. The presence of hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1) on sperm surface of different mammals including cattle and its possible involvement in sperm function is already reported. Recently, we have demonstrated the specificity of clustered mannose as another ligand for HABP1 (Kumar et al., 2001: J Biosci 26:325-332). Here, we report that only N-linked mannosylated zona-glycoproteins bind to sperm surface HABP1. Labeled HABP1 interacts with ZP of intact oocyte of Bubalus bubalis, which can be competed with unlabeled HABP1 or excess d-mannosylated albumin (DMA). This data suggests the specific interaction of HABP1 with ZP, through clustered mannose residues. In order to examine the physiological significance of such an interaction, the capacity of sperm binding to oocytes under in vitro fertilization plates was examined either in presence of DMA alone or in combination with HABP1. The number of sperms, bound to oocytes was observed to reduce significantly in presence of DMA, which could be reversed by the addition of purified recombinant HABP1 (rHABP1) in the same plate. This suggests that sperm surface HABP1 may act as mannose binding sites for zona recognition. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Structural basis of oligomannose recognition by the Pterocarpus angolensis seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Loris, Remy; Van Walle, Ivo; De Greve, Henri; Beeckmans, Sonia; Deboeck, Francine; Wyns, Lode; Bouckaert, Julie

    2004-01-30

    The crystal structure of a Man/Glc-specific lectin from the seeds of the bloodwood tree (Pterocarpus angolensis), a leguminous plant from central Africa, has been determined in complex with mannose and five manno-oligosaccharides. The lectin contains a classical mannose-specificity loop, but its metal-binding loop resembles that of lectins of unrelated specificity from Ulex europaeus and Maackia amurensis. As a consequence, the interactions with mannose in the primary binding site are conserved, but details of carbohydrate-binding outside the primary binding site differ from those seen in the equivalent carbohydrate complexes of concanavalin A. These observations explain the differences in their respective fine specificity profiles for oligomannoses. While Man(alpha1-3)Man and Man(alpha1-3)[Man(alpha1-6)]Man bind to PAL in low-energy conformations identical with that of ConA, Man(alpha1-6)Man is required to adopt a different conformation. Man(alpha1-2)Man can bind only in a single binding mode, in sharp contrast to ConA, which creates a higher affinity for this disaccharide by allowing two binding modes.

  7. Correlation of Interleukin-6 levels and lectins during Schistosoma haematobium infection.

    PubMed

    Antony, Justin S; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Meyer, Christian G; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Mishra, Anshuman; Kremsner, Peter G; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P

    2015-12-01

    Urogenital schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium induces a Th2 immune response, including expression of Interleukin-6. IL-6 confers protection from experimental Schistosoma-induced pulmonary hypertension and modulates production of mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and other lectins. We studied IL-6 levels in schistosomiasis and its effect on lectins production. Elevated IL-6 levels occurred in cases, compared to controls. IL-6 correlated with the lectins MBL, ficolin-2 and Collectin Kidney-1 (CL-K1) in cases, but correlated inversely in controls. The study shows that IL-6 levels are elevated in individuals infected with urogenital schistosomiasis. IL-6 was also found to be correlated with the production of lectins in S. haematobium infection. A similar correlation between IL-6 and MBL was observed during visceral leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new LDLa domain-containing C-type lectin with bacterial agglutinating and binding activity in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Qu, Baozhen; Yang, Shuangshuang; Ma, Zengyu; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-12-15

    Over 1200 C-type lectin gene models have been identified in amphioxus, but only a few of them have been functionally characterized. In this study, we identified a C-type lectin, BjCTL, with domain structure of LDLa-CTLD-EGF_Lam, the first such data in chordates. It was expressed mainly in the notochord and ovary in a tissue-dependent fashion. Recombinant BjCTL was characterized as a typical Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding protein capable of agglutinating and binding to both Gram-negative and positive bacteria we tested. In addition, it specifically bound to insoluble lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan, which can be inhibited by galactose. We also showed that the interaction of BjCTL with the bacteria is primarily attributable to CTLD domain. Thus, BjCTL is a novel pattern recognition protein involved in lectin-mediated innate immunity.

  9. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The three-dimensional structure of codakine and related marine C-type lectins.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Markiv, Anatoly; Smith-Ravin, Juliette

    2007-10-01

    Codakine is a new Ca(2+)-dependent mannose-binding C-type lectin (MBL) isolated from the gill tissue of the tropical clam, Codakia orbicularis. Bioinformatic analyses with the BLAST program have revealed similarities with marine lectins involved in immunity whose three-dimensional (3D) structures were unknown up until recently. In this article, we present bioinformatic analyses of marine lectins that are homologous to codakine, in particular lectins from the sea worm Laxus oneistus, named mermaid. These lectins are involved in the symbiotic association with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria which are closely related to the C. orbicularis gill symbiont. Using homology modelling, folding that is characteristic of C-type lectins was observed in all the marine Ca(2+)-dependent lectins studied, with conservation of random coiled structures of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) and Ca(2+)-binding sites. Like codakine, the marine lectins analysed contain a signal peptide commonly found in secreted and transmembrane proteins. The majority of the predictive 3D models established from the lectins exhibit a common feature, namely the involvement in invertebrate and vertebrate immunity (dendritic cell receptor, macrophage receptor, etc.). These bioinformatic analyses and the literature data support the hypothesis that codakine, like the L. oneistus mermaids, is probably involved in the cellular mediation of symbiosis and defence against pathogenic microorganisms.

  11. Differing Lectin Binding Profiles among Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Derivatives Aid in the Isolation of Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Mahesh C.; Young, Amber; Venable, Alison; Hasneen, Kowser; Rao, Raj R.; Machacek, David W.; Stice, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their differentiated progeny allow for investigation of important changes/events during normal embryonic development. Currently most of the research is focused on proteinacous changes occurring as a result of differentiation of stem cells and little is known about changes in cell surface glycosylation patterns. Identification of cell lineage specific glycans can help in understanding their role in maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, these glycans can serve as markers for isolation of homogenous populations of cells. Using a panel of eight biotinylated lectins, the glycan expression of hESCs, hESCs-derived human neural progenitors (hNP) cells, and hESCs-derived mesenchymal progenitor (hMP) cells was investigated. Our goal was to identify glycans that are unique for hNP cells and use the corresponding lectins for cell isolation. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were used to determine expression and localization of glycans, respectively, in each cell type. These results show that the glycan expression changes upon differentiation of hESCs and is different for neural and mesenchymal lineage. For example, binding of PHA-L lectin is low in hESCs (14±4.4%) but significantly higher in differentiated hNP cells (99±0.4%) and hMP cells (90±3%). Three lectins: VVA, DBA and LTL have low binding in hESCs and hMP cells, but significantly higher binding in hNP cells. Finally, VVA lectin binding was used to isolate hNP cells from a mixed population of hESCs, hNP cells and hMP cells. This is the first report that compares glycan expression across these human stem cell lineages and identifies significant differences. Also, this is the first study that uses VVA lectin for isolation for human neural progenitor cells. PMID:21850265

  12. Stability of Curcuma longa rhizome lectin: Role of N-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Himadri; Chattopadhyaya, Rajagopal

    2016-04-01

    Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, a mannose-binding protein of non-seed portions of turmeric, is known to have antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities. We studied the role of complex-type glycans attached to asparagine (Asn) 66 and Asn 110 to elucidate the role of carbohydrates in lectin activity and stability. Apart from the native lectin, the characteristics of a deglycosylated Escherichia coli expressed lectin, high-mannose oligosaccharides at both asparagines and its glycosylation mutants N66Q and N110Q expressed in Pichia pastoris, were compared to understand the relationship between glycosylation and activity. Far UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence emission maximum, hemagglutination assay show no change in secondary or tertiary structures or sugar-binding properties between wild-type and aforementioned recombinant lectins under physiological pH. But reduced agglutination activity and loss of tertiary structure are observed in the acidic pH range for the deglycosylated and the N110Q protein. In thermal and guanidine hydrochloride (GdnCl)-induced unfolding, the wild-type and high-mannose lectins possess higher stability compared with the deglycosylated recombinant lectin and both mutants, as measured by a higher Tm of denaturation or a greater free energy change, respectively. Reversibility experiments after thermal denaturation reveal that deglycosylated proteins tend to aggregate during thermal inactivation but the wild type shows a much greater recovery to the native state upon refolding. These results suggest that N-glycosylation in turmeric lectin is important for the maintenance of its proper folding upon changes in pH, and that the oligosaccharides help in maintaining the active conformation and prevent aggregation in unfolded or partially folded molecules.

  13. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  14. High-Affinity Ligand Binding by Wild-Type:Mutant Heteromeric Complexes of the Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Michelle A.; Kreiling, Jodi L.; Byrd, James C.; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) has diverse ligand-binding properties contributing to its roles in lysosome biogenesis and growth suppression. Optimal receptor binding and internalization of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-bearing ligands requires a dimeric structure leading to bivalent high-affinity binding, presumably mediated by cooperation between sites on both subunits. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binds to a single site on each monomer. It is hypothesized that IGF-II binding to cognate sites on each monomer occurs independently, but bivalent Man-6-P ligand binding requires cooperative contributions from sites on both monomers. To test this hypothesis, we co-immunoprecipitated differentially epitope-tagged soluble mini-receptors and assessed ligand binding. Pairing of wild-type and point-mutated IGF-II binding sites between two dimerized mini-receptors had no effect on the function of the contralateral binding site, indicating IGF-II binding to each side of the dimer is independent and manifests no intersubunit effects. As expected, heterodimeric receptors composed of a wild-type monomer and a mutant bearing two Man-6-P-binding knockout mutations form functional IGF-II binding sites. In contrast to prediction, such heterodimeric receptors also bind Man-6-P–based ligands with high affinity, and the amount of binding can be attributed entirely to the immunoprecipitated wild-type receptors. Anchoring of both C-terminal ends of the heterodimer produces optimal binding of both IGF-II and Man-6-P ligands. Thus, IGF-II binds independently to both subunits of the dimeric M6P/IGF2R. Although wild-type/mutant heterooligomers from readily when mixed, it appears that multivalent Man-6-P ligands bind preferentially to wild-type sites, possibly by cross-bridging receptors within clusters of immobilized receptors. PMID:19236480

  15. Recognition of the galactose- or N-acetylgalactosamine-binding lectin of Entamoeba histolytica by human immune sera.

    PubMed Central

    Petri, W A; Joyce, M P; Broman, J; Smith, R D; Murphy, C F; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Cure of amebic liver abscess is associated with resistance to recurrent invasive amebiasis and the development of a humoral and cell-mediated immune response. We determined whether human immune sera contain blocking antibody for the 170-kilodalton (kDa) galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc)-binding lectin of Entamoeba histolytica. By Western blot (immunoblot) of whole amebae subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, all eight immune sera studied here prominently recognized a 170-kDa amebic protein. Western blot of the purified Gal/GalNAc lectin with pooled human immune sera (PHIS) confirmed that the 170-kDa band was the adherence lectin. Immunoprecipitation of [35S]methionine-metabolically-labeled amebae with the antilectin monoclonal antibody H8-5 and with PHIS demonstrated that the 170-kDa lectin was the major antigen recognized by PHIS. The in vitro adherence of E. histolytica trophozoites to CHO cells at 4 degrees C was inhibited by prior exposure of amebae to greater than or equal to 1.0% PHIS. The humoral response to the Gal/GalNAc-binding lectin of the parasite may contribute to the development of protective immunity against invasive amebiasis. Images PMID:2888730

  16. Modification of lectin binding in rat gut mucosa during experimental cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, R; Casu, C; Renda, T

    1992-01-01

    Glycoconjugate distribution on rat gut mucosa has been studied by using peroxidase-labelled lectins (Lotus tetragonolobus, Dolichos biflorus, Arachis hypogaea and Glycine max) after surgical interruption of the common bile duct. Specimens from cholestatic rats were compared with sham-operated (simple laparotomy) and normal controls to determine which of the observed modifications could be due either to the operation itself or to the cholestasis. Most of the modifications occurred in the duodenum. The operation itself modified some binding properties. Lotus tetragonolobus binding extended both in cholestatic and in sham-operated rats, but returned to normal levels earlier in sham-operated than in cholestatic rats. Conversely, cholestasis induced (1) almost total loss of Arachis hypogaea binding in the Golgi zone of superficial duodenal goblet cells; (2) an increase at the 14th postoperative day of Dolichos biflorus binding in the cytoplasmic calyx of goblet cells which then diminished up until the 28th day; and (3) an increase of Glycine max binding in the Golgi zone of goblet cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:1295862

  17. Lectin Activity in Gut Extract of Culex pipiens

    PubMed Central

    Koosha, Mona; Abai, Mohammad Reza; Abolhasani, Mandan; Charedar, Soroor; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of lectins is important in interaction between pathogens and mosquito vectors. This study was performed to identify agglutinin activities of protein molecules on the midgut of Culex pipiens. Methods: Culex pipiens was reared in insectray condition and the midguts of males and females (blood fed and unfed) were dissected separately in Tris-HCl buffer. The extracts of midguts were applied for hemagglutinin assay against red blood cells of rabbit, mouse, rat, dog, horse, sheep, guinea pig, cow, human (A, B, AB, O groups). Then, the RBCs with relatively high agglutinin activity were chosen for carbohydrate inhibition assay. D (+) glucose, D (+) galactose, D (+) mannose, D (−) fructose, D (−) arabinose, L (−) fucose, lactose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, sialic acid were used to specify carbohydrate binding lectin. Results: The highest agglutinin activities were found against sheep and rabbits RBCs. Sexual diversity of agglutinin activities was observed among midgut extraction of males and females. In addition, variation in agglutinin activity of blood fed and unfed female mosquitoes were detected. The lectin activity was inhibited highly with glucose, galactose, fucose and fructose but less inhibitor activities was observed by arabinose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, n-acetyl-d-glucosamine, lactose and mannose. Conclusion: The secretion of hemagglutinins (lectins or lectin-like molecules) in the digestive system depends on the type of food in the gut. This suggests that emptying of the gut in preparation for protein rich food probably starts the secretion of hemagglutinins. PMID:23785692

  18. Preferential lectin binding of cancer cells upon sialic acid treatment under nutrient deprivation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; Elsayed, Abdelaleim I; Ahmed, Hafiz; Dwek, Miriam V; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B

    2013-10-01

    The terminal monosaccharide of glycoconjugates on a eukaryotic cell surface is typically a sialic acid (Neu5Ac). Increased sialylation usually indicates progression and poor prognosis of most carcinomas. Here, we utilize two human mammary epithelial cell lines, HB4A (breast normal cells) and T47D (breast cancer cells), as a model system to demonstrate differential surface glycans when treated with sialic acid under nutrient deprivation. Under a starved condition, sialic acid treatment of both cells resulted in increased activities of α2→3/6 sialyltransferases as demonstrated by solid phase assay using lectin binding. However, a very strong Maackia amurensis agglutinin I (MAL-I) staining on the membrane of sialic acid-treated T47D cells was observed, indicating an increase of Neu5Acα2→3Gal on the cell surface. To our knowledge, this is a first report showing the utility of lectins, particularly MAL-I, as a means to discriminate between normal and cancer cells after sialic acid treatment under nutrient deprivation. This method is sensitive and allows selective detection of glycan sialylation on a cancer cell surface.

  19. Interaction of lectins with proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi system of rat liver.

    PubMed

    Winqvist, L; Eriksson, L C; Dallner, G

    1979-10-01

    The interaction of glycoproteins of rough and smooth microsomal and Golgi membranes with Sepharose-bound lectins has been studied. One of these lectins was a crude preparation from wheat germ lipase which was found to bind primarily to N-acetyl neuraminic acid. Rough microsomes, smooth microsomes and Golgi membranes contain glycoproteins which bind to Concanavalin A (Con A specific for mannose residues) in decreasing amounts in the order indicated (rough, smooth and Golgi) and to wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, glucosamine-specific) and to the crude lipase preparation in increasing amounts in the order indicated. The small amount of binding of rough microsomes and Golgi membranes to Crotalaria (galactose-specific) increases substantially after neuraminidase treatment. Three submicrosomal particle preparations enriched either in AMPase or in NADH- or NADPH-oxidizing electron-transport enzymes contain glycoproteins which bind Con A and wheat germ agglutinin. The latter binding is sensitive to neuraminidase treatment. Two other submicrosomal particle preparations, both enriched in glucose-6-phosphatase activity, bind preferentially to WGA. This binding is, however, not sensitive to neuraminidase. Prolonged incubation with Ervilia lectin (mannose-specific) inhibits NADH-ferricyanide reductase activity, while the electron-transport chain involving cytochrome b5 is also inhibited by Crotalaria, indicating that both the flavoprotein and the cytochrome b5 are glycoproteins whose oligosaccharide chains have terminal mannose or galactose residues.

  20. Purification and Characterization of Two Major Lectins from Araucaria brasiliensis syn. Araucaria angustifolia Seeds (Pinhão) 1

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Pradip K.; Figueroa, Maria O. D. C. R.; Lajolo, Franco M.

    1991-01-01

    Two major lectins (lectin I and lectin II) were purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Araucaria brasiliensis (Gymnospermae). The purity of the lectins was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and high performance liquid chromatography. They are glycoproteins in nature containing 6.3 and 2.9%, respectively, of neutral sugar and have absorption coefficients of 3.8 and 4.7, respectively, at 280 nanometers. The molecular weights of both lectins obtained by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-400 were equal: 200,000. After dissociation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, molecular weights were 20,000 and 34,000, respectively, for lectin I and lectin II, suggesting they are decameric and hexameric in nature. The amino acid composition of both lectins showed little difference, but both had high amounts of acidic amino acids and lacked methionine in their molecule. The carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins was directed towards mannose, glucose, and their oligomers. High inhibitory activity was also found with thyroglobulin. The erythroagglutinating activity of the lectins was enhanced in the presence of high-molecular-weight substances both at 37 and 4°C. Divalent cations do not appear to be essential for activity. They maintained their agglutinating activity over a broad but different range of pH: 5.5 to 7.5 and 6.5 to 7.5, respectively. Both lectins agglutinated erythrocytes of human ABO blood types equally well. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668523

  1. Bivalent Carbohydrate Binding Is Required for Biological Activity of Clitocybe nebularis Lectin (CNL), the N,N′-Diacetyllactosediamine (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc, LacdiNAc)-specific Lectin from Basidiomycete C. nebularis*

    PubMed Central

    Pohleven, Jure; Renko, Miha; Magister, Špela; Smith, David F.; Künzler, Markus; Štrukelj, Borut; Turk, Dušan; Kos, Janko; Sabotič, Jerica

    2012-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that exert their biological activity by binding to specific cell glycoreceptors. We have expressed CNL, a ricin B-like lectin from the basidiomycete Clitocybe nebularis in Escherichia coli. The recombinant lectin, rCNL, agglutinates human blood group A erythrocytes and is specific for the unique glycan N,N′-diacetyllactosediamine (GalNAcβ1–4GlcNAc, LacdiNAc) as demonstrated by glycan microarray analysis. We here describe the crystal structures of rCNL in complex with lactose and LacdiNAc, defining its interactions with the sugars. CNL is a homodimeric lectin, each of whose monomers consist of a single ricin B lectin domain with its β-trefoil fold and one carbohydrate-binding site. To study the mode of CNL action, a nonsugar-binding mutant and nondimerizing monovalent CNL mutants that retain carbohydrate-binding activity were prepared. rCNL and the mutants were examined for their biological activities against Jurkat human leukemic T cells and the hypersensitive nematode Caenorhabditis elegans mutant strain pmk-1. rCNL was toxic against both, although the mutants were inactive. Thus, the bivalent carbohydrate-binding property of homodimeric CNL is essential for its activity, providing one of the rare pieces of evidence that certain activities of lectins are associated with their multivalency. PMID:22298779

  2. A Novel Fucose-binding Lectin from Photorhabdus luminescens (PLL) with an Unusual Heptabladed β-Propeller Tetrameric Structure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Sýkorová, Petra; Demo, Gabriel; Dobeš, Pavel; Hyršl, Pavel; Wimmerová, Michaela

    2016-11-25

    Photorhabdus luminescens is known for its symbiosis with the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and its pathogenicity toward insect larvae. A hypothetical protein from P. luminescens was identified, purified from the native source, and characterized as an l-fucose-binding lectin, named P. luminescens lectin (PLL). Glycan array and biochemical characterization data revealed PLL to be specific toward l-fucose and the disaccharide glycan 3,6-O-Me2-Glcβ1-4(2,3-O-Me2)Rhaα-O-(p-C6H4)-OCH2CH2NH2 PLL was discovered to be a homotetramer with an intersubunit disulfide bridge. The crystal structures of native and recombinant PLL revealed a seven-bladed β-propeller fold creating seven putative fucose-binding sites per monomer. The crystal structure of the recombinant PLL·l-fucose complex confirmed that at least three sites were fucose-binding. Moreover, the crystal structures indicated that some of the other sites are masked either by the tetrameric nature of the lectin or by incorporation of the C terminus of the lectin into one of these sites. PLL exhibited an ability to bind to insect hemocytes and the cuticular surface of a nematode, H. bacteriophora. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. L-rhamnose-binding lectins (RBLs) in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus: Characterization and expression profiling in mucosal tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rhamnose binding-lectins (RBLs) have recently emerged as important molecules in the context of innate immunity in teleost fishes. Previously, using RNA-seq technology, we observed marked up-regulation of a RBL in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) gill following a challenge with the bacterial pat...

  4. Glycodendritic structures based on Boltorn hyperbranched polymers and their interactions with Lens culinaris lectin.

    PubMed

    Arce, Eva; Nieto, Pedro M; Díaz, Vicente; Castro, Rossana García; Bernad, Antonio; Rojo, Javier

    2003-01-01

    Multivalent scaffolds bearing carbohydrates have been prepared to mediate biological processes where carbohydrates are involved. These systems consist of dendritic structures based on Boltorn H20 and H30 hyperbranched polymers to which carbohydrates are linked through a convenient spacer. Mannose has been chosen as a sugar unit to test the viability of this strategy. These glycodendritic compounds have been prepared in a few steps with good yields, showing a high solubility in physiological media and low toxicity. The binding of these dendritic polymers to the mannose-binding lectin Lens culinaris (LCA) was studied using STD-NMR experiments and quantitative precipitation assays. The results demonstrate the existence of a clear interaction between the mannose derivative systems and the Lens lectin where the dendritic scaffold does not have an important role in mannose binding but supplies the necessary multivalence for lectin cluster formation. These glycodendritic structures are able to interact with a receptor, and therefore they can be considered as promising tools for biological studies.

  5. Human CLEC18 Gene Cluster Contains C-type Lectins with Differential Glycan-binding Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Lang; Pai, Feng-Shuo; Tsou, Yun-Ting; Mon, Hsien-Chen; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chou, Teh-Ying; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Wong, Chi-Huey; Hsieh, Shie-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The human C-type lectin 18 (clec18) gene cluster, which contains three clec18a, clec18b, and clec18c loci, is located in human chromosome 16q22. Although the amino acid sequences of CLEC18A, CLEC18B, and CLEC18C are almost identical, several amino acid residues located in the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) and the sperm-coating protein/Tpx-1/Ag5/PR-1/Sc7 (SCP/TAPS) domain, also known as the cysteine-rich secretory proteins/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 proteins (CAP) domain, are distinct from each other. Genotyping by real-time PCR and sequencing further shows the presence of multiple alleles in clec18a/b/c loci. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrates that CLEC18 (CLEC18A, -B, and -C) are expressed abundantly in human peripheral blood cells. Moreover, CLEC18 expression is further up-regulated when monocytes differentiate into macrophages and dendritic cells. Immunofluorescence staining reveals that CLEC18 are localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and endosome. Interestingly, CLEC18 are also detectable in human sera and culture supernatants from primary cells and 293T cells overexpressing CLEC18. Moreover, CLEC18 bind polysaccharide in Ca2+-independent manner, and amino acid residues Ser/Arg339 and Asp/Asn421 in CTLD domain contribute to their differential binding abilities to polysaccharides isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (GLPS-F3). The Ser339 (CLEC18A) → Arg339 (CLEC18A-1) mutation completely abolishes CLEC18A-1 binding to GLPS-F3, and a sugar competition assay shows that CLEC18 preferentially binds to fucoidan, β-glucans, and galactans. Because proteins with the SCP/TAPS/CAP domain are able to bind sterol and acidic glycolipid, and are involved in sterol transport and β-amyloid aggregation, it would be interesting to investigate whether CLEC18 modulates host immunity via binding to glycolipids, and are also involved in glycolipid transportation and protein aggregation in the future. PMID:26170455

  6. A Lectin from Platypodium elegans with Unusual Specificity and Affinity for Asymmetric Complex N-Glycans*

    PubMed Central

    Benevides, Raquel Guimarães; Ganne, Géraldine; Simões, Rafael da Conceição; Schubert, Volker; Niemietz, Mathäus; Unverzagt, Carlo; Chazalet, Valérie; Breton, Christelle; Varrot, Annabelle; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; Imberty, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Lectin activity with specificity for mannose and glucose has been detected in the seed of Platypodium elegans, a legume plant from the Dalbergieae tribe. The gene of Platypodium elegans lectin A has been cloned, and the resulting 261-amino acid protein belongs to the legume lectin family with similarity with Pterocarpus angolensis agglutinin from the same tribe. The recombinant lectin has been expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded from inclusion bodies. Analysis of specificity by glycan array evidenced a very unusual preference for complex type N-glycans with asymmetrical branches. A short branch consisting of one mannose residue is preferred on the 6-arm of the N-glycan, whereas extensions by GlcNAc, Gal, and NeuAc are favorable on the 3-arm. Affinities have been obtained by microcalorimetry using symmetrical and asymmetrical Asn-linked heptasaccharides prepared by the semi-synthetic method. Strong affinity with Kd of 4.5 μm was obtained for both ligands. Crystal structures of Platypodium elegans lectin A complexed with branched trimannose and symmetrical complex-type Asn-linked heptasaccharide have been solved at 2.1 and 1.65 Å resolution, respectively. The lectin adopts the canonical dimeric organization of legume lectins. The trimannose bridges the binding sites of two neighboring dimers, resulting in the formation of infinite chains in the crystal. The Asn-linked heptasaccharide binds with the 6-arm in the primary binding site with extensive additional contacts on both arms. The GlcNAc on the 6-arm is bound in a constrained conformation that may rationalize the higher affinity observed on the glycan array for N-glycans with only a mannose on the 6-arm. PMID:22692206

  7. Studies on the specificity of the IgA-binding lectin, jacalin.

    PubMed

    Skea, D L; Christopoulous, P; Plaut, A G; Underdown, B J

    1988-01-01

    The interactions of IgA with the jackfruit lectin, jacalin, were investigated with regard to the specificity of jacalin for species and subclasses of IgA. It was found that jacalin selectively bound to human IgA1, but not to human IgA2, mouse IgA or rat IgA. Binding studies with human IgA1 fragments produced by different IgA1 proteases revealed that jacalin bound to galactose-terminal oligosaccharides in the hinge region of human IgA1. Affinity chromatography employing jacalin-Sepharose provided a means to separate the subclasses of IgA in human whey.

  8. A unique epidermal mucus lectin identified from catfish (Silurus asotus): first evidence of intelectin in fish skin slime.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Komatsu, Yukie; Sugiura, Takaya; Araki, Kyosuke; Nakamura, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    The present study reports a new type of skin mucus lectin found in catfish Silurus asotus. The lectin exhibited calcium-dependent mannose-binding activity. When mannose eluate from chromatography with mannose-conjugated agarose was analysed by SDS-PAGE, the lectin appeared as a single 35-kDa band. Gel filtration showed that the lectin forms monomers and dimers. A 1216-bp cDNA sequence obtained by RACE-PCR from the skin encoded a 308 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and fish intelectins. RT-PCR demonstrated that the lectin gene was expressed in the gill, kidney and skin. Subsequent sequencing revealed the presence of an isoform in the gills. Antiserum detected the intelectin protein in club cells in the skin and gill, renal tubules and blood plasma. Although intelectin gene expression was not induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, the intelectin showed agglutination activity against the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting that the lectin plays an important role in self-defence against bacteria in the skin surface of the catfish. These findings represent one of the few examples of characterization and functional analysis of a fish intelectin protein.

  9. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycocluster to lectin and tetanus toxin c-fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster as a powerful molecular probe for evaluating a binding event between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analysis. The fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycoclusters, [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] and [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3], possess clustered galactose and glucose surrounding the ruthenium center. Changes in FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters were measured by adding each lectin (Peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA), Concanavalin A (ConA), or Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)) or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). Following the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy- 2Gal)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increased. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] showed new emission peak and the FP value increased following the addition of ConA. Since other combinations of the metalloglycoclusters and lectin caused little change, specific bindings of galactose to PNA and glucose to ConA were proved by the FE and FP measurement. From nonlinear least-squares fitting, dissociation constants (Kd) of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to PNA was 6.1 μM, while the Kd values of [Ru(bpy)2(bpy-2Gal)] to PNA was ca. 10-4 M. Therefore, the clustered carbohydrates were proved to increase affinity to lectins. Furthermore, the FP measurements proved specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF.

  10. Fluorescence emission and polarization analyses for evaluating binding of ruthenium metalloglycoclusters to lectins and tetanus toxin C-fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tomoko; Minoura, Norihiko

    2011-03-01

    We develop a fluorescent ruthenium metalloglycocluster for use as a powerful molecular probe in evaluating the binding between carbohydrates and lectins by fluorescence emission (FE) and fluorescence polarization (FP) analyses. Changes in the FE and FP of these metalloglycoclusters are measured following the addition of lectin [peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin 120, Concanavalin A (ConA), or wheat germ agglutinin] or tetanus toxin c-fragment (TCF). After the addition of PNA, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] increases. Similarly, the FE spectrum of [Ru(bpy-2Glc)3] shows a new emission peak and the FP value increases on addition of ConA. Because other combinations of metalloglycoclusters and lectins show little change, specific binding of galactose to PNA and that of glucose to ConA are confirmed by the FE and FP measurements. Resulting dissociation constants (Kd) prove that the metalloglycoclusters with highly clustered carbohydrates show higher affinity for the respective lectins than those with less clustered carbohydrates. Furthermore, specific binding of [Ru(bpy-2Gal)3] to TCF was confirmed by the FP measurement.

  11. Association of Mannose-Binding Lectin 2 (MBL2) gene heterogeneity and its serum concentration with osteoporosis in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Kiseljaković, Emina; Hasić, Sabaheta; Valjevac, Amina; Mačkić-Đurović, Mirela; Jadrić, Radivoj; Mehić, Bakir; KuCukalić-Selimović, Elma; Ibrulj, Slavka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect prevalence of MBL2 exon 1 (codons 52, 54 and 57) genetic polymorphism in postmenopausal women in Bosnia and Herzegovina and its possible role as genetic risk factor for susceptibility to occurrence of osteoporosis in this study group. Also, we investigated association between MBL serum concentrations and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Genetic codons’ variations were determined by PCR-RFLP and MBL in serum was measured by ELISA method in 75 postmenopausal women (37 with osteoporosis and 38 apparently healthy, non-osteoporotic women serving as a control). Serum MBL levels were not significantly different between osteoporosis and control group (492 (37-565.1) and 522.6 (477-559.4) ng/mL respectively, p=0.206). Genotype frequencies were not significantly different (p=0.997) between the studied groups of postmenopausal women. Genotype frequencies A/A, A/o and o/o in osteoporosis group were 0.576; 0.405; 0.018 and in control group 0.562; 0.412; 0.026, respectively. Frequencies of A and o allele were 0.78 and 0.22 in osteoporosis and 0.77 and 0.23 in control group. The results do not suggest association of functional polymorphism of MBL2 gene and MBL serum concentration with osteoporosis in postmenopausal females. PMID:24579967

  12. The mannose-binding lectin pathway is a significant contributor to reperfusion injury in the type 2 diabetic heart

    PubMed Central

    La Bonte, Laura R.; Dokken, Betsy; Davis-Gorman, Grace; Stahl, Gregory L.; McDonagh, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The severity of ischaemic heart disease is markedly enhanced in type 2 diabetes. We recently reported that complement activation exacerbates I/R injury in the type 2 diabetic heart. The purpose of this study was to isolate and examine MBL pathway activation following I/R injury in the diabetic heart. ZLC and ZDF rats underwent 30 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 120 minutes of reperfusion. Two different groups of ZDF rats were treated with either FUT-175, a broad complement inhibitor, or P2D5, a monoclonal antibody raised against rat MBL-A. ZDF rats treated with FUT175 and P2D5 had significantly decreased myocardial infarct size, C3 deposition and neutrophil accumulation compared with untreated ZDF controls. Taken together, these findings indicate that the MBL pathway plays a key role in the severity of complement-mediated I/R injury in the type 2 diabetic heart. PMID:20216929

  13. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (float...

  14. Role of Mannose-Binding Lectin Deficiency in HIV-1 and Schistosoma Infections in a Rural Adult Population in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Zinyama-Gutsire, Rutendo B. L.; Chasela, Charles; Madsen, Hans O.; Rusakaniko, Simbarashe; Kallestrup, Per; Christiansen, Michael; Gomo, Exnevia; Ullum, Henrik; Erikstrup, Christian; Munyati, Shungu; Kurewa, Edith N.; Stray-Pedersen, Babill; Garred, Peter; Mduluza, Takafira

    2015-01-01

    Background Polymorphism in the MBL2 gene lead to MBL deficiency, which has been shown to increase susceptibility to various bacterial, viral and parasitic infections. We assessed role of MBL deficiency in HIV-1 and schistosoma infections in Zimbabwean adults enrolled in the Mupfure Schistosomiasis and HIV Cohort (MUSH Cohort). Methods HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections were determined at baseline. Plasma MBL concentration was measured by ELISA and MBL2 genotypes determined by PCR. We calculated and compared the proportions of plasma MBL deficiency, MBL2 structural variant alleles B (codon 54A>G), C (codon 57A>G), and D (codon 52T>C) as well as MBL2 promoter variants -550(H/L), -221(X/Y) and +4(P/Q) between HIV-1 and schistosoma co-infection and control groups using Chi Square test. Results We assessed 379 adults, 80% females, median age (IQR) 30 (17–41) years. HIV-1, S. haematobium and S. mansoni prevalence were 26%, 43% and 18% respectively in the MUSH baseline survey. Median (IQR) plasma MBL concentration was 800μg/L (192-1936μg/L). Prevalence of plasma MBL deficiency was 18% with high frequency of the C (codon 57G>A) mutant allele (20%). There was no significant difference in median plasma MBL levels between HIV negative (912μg/L) and HIV positive (688μg/L), p = 0.066. However plasma MBL levels at the assay detection limit of 20μg/L were more frequent among the HIV-1 infected (p = 0.007). S. haematobium and S. mansoni infected participants had significantly higher MBL levels than uninfected. All MBL2 variants were not associated with HIV-1 infection but promoter variants LY and LL were significantly associated with S. haematobium infection. Conclusion Our data indicate high prevalence of MBL deficiency, no evidence of association between MBL deficiency and HIV-1 infection. However, lower plasma MBL levels were protective against both S. haematobium and S. mansoni infections and MBL2 promoter and variants LY and LL increased susceptibility to S. haematobium infection. PMID:25830474

  15. Applications of immunocolloids in light microscopy. III. Demonstration of antigenic and lectin-binding sites in semithin resin sections.

    PubMed

    Lucocq, J M; Roth, J

    1984-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that antigens or lectin-binding sites can be localized in sections from paraffin-embedded tissues with protein A or lectins bound to colloidal gold or colloidal silver (Roth J: J Histochem Cytochem 30:691, 1982 and 31:547, 1983). In the present study the protein A-gold technique and lectin-gold complexes have been applied to semithin sections (0.5-1.5 micron) of Epon- or low temperature Lowicryl K4M-embedded rat pancreas, kidney and submandibular gland. The results show that an increase in resolution and, therefore, in amount of information can be obtained. The optimal mode of imaging was determined on sections without counterstaining. Bright-field illumination gives the maximum information about the staining signal, while phase-contrast and Nomarski differential interference contrast give predominantly structural and, to a lesser extent, staining information. Polarization epi- and transillumination microscopy is inferior in all aspects. The application of a battery of lectin-gold complexes to rat submandibular gland revealed a specific staining pattern for each lectin in acinar and excretory duct cells.

  16. Isolation of a lectin binding rhamnogalacturonan-I containing pectic polysaccharide from pumpkin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Fuming; Liu, Xinyue; St Ange, Kalib; Zhang, Anqiang; Li, Quanhong; Linhardt, Robert J

    2017-05-01

    A rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) containing pectic polysaccharide (PPc) was isolated from pumpkin following a low-temperature alkali treatment and a combination of gradual alcohol precipitation and ion-exchange. Monosaccharide compositional analysis of PPc revealed the presence of rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose, and arabinose in a molar ratio of 7.4: 25: 28: 2.6. Structural and linkage analysis by 1D NMR ((1)H NMR and (13)C NMR), and 2D NMR (COSY, TOCSY, HSQC, and elevated temperature HMBC) suggested that PPc was a RG-I-like pectic polysaccharide, branched at the C-4 of some of the (about 29% of) rhamnosyl units, with relatively long β-1,4-d-galactan side chains to which were attached, through the C-3 of β-d-Gal, terminal non reducing α-Araf units. The results of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) show that PPc binds to two types of lectin, Ricinus communis agglutinin 120 (RCA120) and Galectin-3 (Gal-3). These binding studies show quick association and slow dissociation with a moderate binding affinity between PPc and Gal-3 of 1.26μM. The interaction between PPc and Gal-3 suggest the potential use of pumpkin pectic polysaccharide as a Gal-3 inhibitor in functional food or drug development applications.

  17. Detection, purification and characterization of a lectin from freshwater green algae Spirogyra spp.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Antônia S DE; Lóssio, Cláudia F; Rangel, Anne J; Martins, Maria G Q; Nascimento, Fernando E P DO; Andrade, Maria L L DE; Cavada, Benildo S; Lacerda, Sírleis R; Nascimento, Kyria S DO

    2017-08-31

    Freshwater algae are rich sources of structurally biologically active metabolites, such as fatty acids, steroids, carotenoids and polysaccharides. Among these metabolites, lectins stand out. Lectins are proteins or glycoproteins of non-immune origin which bind to carbohydrates or glycoconjugates, without changing ligand structure. Many studies have reported on the use of Spirogyra spp. as effective bioindicators of heavy metals; however, reports on Spirogyra molecular bioprospecting are quite limited. Therefore, this study aimed to detect, isolate, purify and characterize a lectin present in the freshwater green algae Spirogyra. Presence of the lectin protein in the extract was detected by hemagglutination assays. Subsequently, the protein extract was subjected to a sugar inhibition assay to identify the lectin-specific carbohydrate. Following this, the extract was applied to a guar gum column to afford the pure lectin. The lectin was inhibited by N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-beta-D-mannose, but more strongly by D-galactose. The apparent molecular mass of the purified lectin was evaluated by Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE). Electrophoretic analysis revealed a single protein band with an apparent molecular mass of 56 kDa. Thus, it could be concluded that a lectin was purified from Spirogyra spp.

  18. A histochemical study of the distribution of lectin binding sites in the developing branchial area of the trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, M C; Blánquez, M J; González, M E

    1996-01-01

    A histochemical study of the branchial area of brown trout embryos from 35 to 71 d of incubation is reported. A battery of 6 different horseradish peroxidase-labelled lectins, the PAS reaction and Alcian blue staining were used to study the distribution of carbohydrate residues in glycoconjugates along the pharyngeal and branchial epithelia. Con A and WGA reacted at every site of the branchial region thus showing the ubiquitous presence of alpha-D-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. WGA, DBA and SBA were good markers for the hatching gland cells (HGCs) and mucous cells. Other lectins, such as PNA and UEA I, reacted only for a short time at some sites during the considered period of incubation. From 35 d until posthatching stages, a manifest strong reaction was noted both in the dorsal epithelium of branchial arches and the HGCs as shown by SBA reactivity. This may be significant with regard to the controversial origin of HGCs, which is thought to be endodermal. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8982837

  19. The cell recognition model in chlorolichens involving a fungal lectin binding to an algal ligand can be extended to cyanolichens.

    PubMed

    Vivas, M; Sacristán, M; Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    2010-07-01

    Leptogium corniculatum, a cyanolichen containing Nostoc as photobiont, produces and secretes arginase to culture medium containing arginine. This secreted arginase was pre-purified by affinity chromatography on beads of activated agarose to which a polygalactosylated urease, purified from Evernia prunastri, was attached. Arginase was eluted from the beads with 50 mm alpha-d-galactose. The eluted arginase binds preferentially to the cell surface of Nostoc isolated from this lichen thallus, although it is also able to bind, to some extent, to the cell surface of the chlorobiont isolated from E. prunastri. Previous studies in chlorolichens have shown that a fungal lectin that develops subsidiary arginase activity can be a factor in recognition of compatible algal cells through binding to a polygalactosylated urease, which acts as a lectin ligand in the algal cell wall. Our experiments demonstrate that this model can now be extended to cyanolichens.

  20. Transduction of Glycan-Lectin Binding using Near Infrared Fluorescent Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Glycan Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuel, Nigel; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Zhang, Jingqing; Boghossian, Ardemis; Mahal, Lara; Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a sensor array employing recombinant lectins as glycan recognition sites tethered via Histidine tags to Ni2+ complexes that act as fluorescent quenchers for semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a chitosan to measure binding kinetics of model glycans. Two higher-affined glycan-lectin pairs are explored: fucose (Fuc) to PA-IIL and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to GafD. The dissociation constants (KD) for these pairs as free glycans (106 and 19 μM respectively) and streptavidin-tethered (142 and 50 μM respectively) were found. The absolute detection limit for the current platform was found to be 2 μg of glycosylated protein or 100 ng of free glycan to 20 μg of lectin. Glycan detection is demonstrated at the single nanotube level (GlcNAc to GafD). Over a population of 1000 nanotubes, 289 of the SWNT sensors had signals strong enough to yield kinetic information (KD of 250 ± 10 μM). We are also able to identify the locations of ``strong-transducers'' on the basis of dissociation constant (4 sensors with KD < 10 μM) or overall signal modulation (8 sensors with > 5% quench response). The ability to pinpoint strong-binding, single sensors is promising to build a nanoarray of glycan-lectin transducers as a method to profile glycans without protein labeling or glycan liberation pretreatment steps.

  1. Lectin binding properties of liver, small intestine and tail of metamorphosing marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus Pallas 1771).

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Engin; Sengezer Inceli, Meliha; Sancar Bas, Serap

    2013-07-01

    In this present study, localization and variations of specific sugar moieties in the terminal carbohydrate chains of glycoconjugates in the small intestine, liver and tail have been investigated during the metamorphosis of Pelophylax ridibundus larvae. For this purpose, four lectins were used: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I), Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), in different larval stages of the frog. Some cells stained specifically in the intestinal mucosa and in tail epidermal cells with the lectins and their affinity changed during metamorphic transformation. For the most part, they decreased in the climax and postmetamorphic periods. It was also found that WGA, DBA and UEA-I lectins exhibited strong affinity to white blood cells in the liver and their binding affinities were the highest in prometamorphosis and they gradually decreased until the end of metamorphosis. These results suggest that the changes of lectin binding in metamorphosis may be an indication of some cellular events occurring in larval metamorphosis such as cell differentiation and damage of cell adhesion between death and differentiating cells. They also can be useful markers for detection of white blood cells in amphibian hematopoietic organs.

  2. Targeting the Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii cell wall using lectins: study of the carbohydrate-binding domain.

    PubMed

    de Brito Ximenes, Pamella; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Buonafina, Maria Daniela Silva; de Lima-Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-02-25

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is considered to be the major cause of cryptococcosis in immunosuppressed patients. Understanding cell wall glycoproteins using lectins is of medical interest and can contribute to specific therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carbohydrates on the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii clinical isolates, using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-lectin binding protocol. Thirty yeast strains stocked in the culture collection were cultivated for 2 days at 30 °C with shaking. Cells were obtained by centrifugation, washed in phosphate-buffered saline, and a suspension of 107 cells/mL was obtained. To determine the binding profile of lectins, concanavalin A (Con A), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and peanut agglutinin (PNA) conjugated to fluorescein were used. All the tested clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were intensely stained by WGA, moderately stained by Con A, and weakly stained by PNA and UEA-I. Thus, Cryptococcus can be detected in clinical specimens such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid using the fluorescent lectin WGA, which may be considered as an option for detection in cases of suspected cryptococcosis with low laboratory sensitivity. Future applications may be developed using this basic tool.

  3. Mechanisms of the insecticidal action of TEL (Talisia esculenta lectin) against Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues; de Castro, Márcia Mota; Freire, Maria das Graças Machado

    2004-06-01

    Plant lectins have insecticidal activity that is probably mediated through their ability to bind carbohydrates. To examine the influence of sugars on the insecticidal activity of a lectin from Talisia esculenta seeds (TEL), the lectin was mixed with mannose, glucose, or mannose plus glucose. Mannose abolished the insecticidal activity. Affinity chromatography showed that TEL bound to midgut proteins of the insect Callosobruchus maculatus. Immunoblotting showed that TEL recognized some proteins, probably glycoproteins, present in the midgut membrane of this insect. The principal proteases responsible for digestive proteolysis in fourth instar larvae of C. maculatus were purified by chromatography on activated thiol-Sepharose. These purified proteases were unable to digest TEL after a 15-h incubation. These results suggest that the insecticidal activity of TEL involves a specific carbohydrate-lectin interaction with glycoconjugates on the surface of digestive tract epithelial cells, as well as binding to assimilatory glycoproteins present in midgut extracts and resistance to enzymatic digestion by cysteine proteinases. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Carbohydrate profiling of fungal cell wall surface glycoconjugates of Trichophyton tonsurans and other keratinophilic filamentous fungi using lectins.

    PubMed

    Leal, André Ferraz Goiana; de Lima Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2011-11-01

    Various researchers have concluded that lectins are useful reagents for the study of fungal cell wall surface glycoconjugates. In this study, we evaluated the expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, L-fucose, D-galactose and glucose/mannose on the cell wall surface of Trichophyton tonsurans and other keratinophilic filamentous fungi, using a simple lectin-binding protocol. The fungal cultures used were isolated from soils obtained from public parks by the hair-bait technique. The lectin assays used concanavalin A (Con A), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) and peanut agglutinin (PNA), all conjugated with horseradish peroxidase. Adhesive tape was placed sticky-side down over the fungal colony, gently pressed and then removed. The fungal-tape samples were incubated with the lectin for 1 h at 4 °C. Lectin binding was visualised using 3,3-diaminobendizine (DAB) and hydrogen peroxidase. There was a high expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine on the cell wall surface of all fungi species tested, whereas the expression of L-fucose, D-galactose and glucose/mannose demonstrated inter-specific variations. The lectin-binding assay presented in this article eliminates many of the laborious steps involved in other protocols. The amount and quality of the mycelium and spores immobilised by the adhesive tapes were suitable for obtaining the carbohydrate profile in glycoconjugates of the cell wall surface of filamentous fungi. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Terminal N-Acetylgalactosamine-Specific Leguminous Lectin from Wisteria japonica as a Probe for Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Soga, Keisuke; Teruya, Futaba; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Millettia japonica was recently reclassified into the genus Wisteria japonica based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences. Because the seed of Wisteria floribunda expresses leguminous lectins with unique N-acetylgalactosamine-binding specificity, we purified lectin from Wisteria japonica seeds using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis demonstrated that unlike Wisteria floribunda and Wisteria brachybotrys lectins, which bind to both terminal N-acetylgalactosamine and galactose residues, Wisteria japonica lectin (WJA) specifically bound to both α- and β-linked terminal N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose residues on oligosaccharides and glycoproteins. Further, frontal affinity chromatography using more than 100 2-aminopyridine-labeled and p-nitrophenyl-derivatized oligosaccharides demonstrated that the ligands with the highest affinity for Wisteria japonica lectin were GalNAcβ1-3GlcNAc and GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc, with Ka values of 9.5 × 104 and 1.4 × 105 M-1, respectively. In addition, when binding was assessed in a variety of cell lines, Wisteria japonica lectin bound specifically to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells while other Wisteria lectins bound equally to all of the cell lines tested. Wisteria japonica lectin binding to EBC-1 and HEK293 cells was dramatically decreased in the presence of N-acetylgalactosamine, but not galactose, mannose, or N-acetylglucosamine, and was completely abrogated by β-hexosaminidase-digestion of these cells. These results clearly demonstrate that Wisteria japonica lectin binds to terminal N-acetylgalactosamine but not galactose. In addition, histochemical analysis of human squamous cell carcinoma tissue sections demonstrated that Wisteria japonica lectin specifically bound to differentiated cancer tissues but not normal tissue. This novel binding characteristic of Wisteria japonica lectin has the potential to become a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:24349556

  6. Localization of binding sites for concanavalin A, Ricinus communis I and Helix pomatia lectin in the Golgi apparatus of rat small intestinal absorptive cells.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, M; Ellinger, A

    1985-09-01

    Binding sites for concanvalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis I agglutinin (RCA I), and Helix pomatia lectin (HPA) were localized in the Golgi apparatus of rat small intestinal absorptive cells. A preembedment technique, a modification of the one originally used by Bernhard and Avrameas (Exp Cell Res 64:232, 1971), was employed, with horse-radish peroxidase being used for cytochemical visualization. Incubations were performed on 10 microns thick cryosections of duodenal segments that were fixed in a mixture of 4% formaldehyde and 0.5% glutaraldehyde; fixation was preceded by a 2-min rinse in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate and followed by storage in the same buffer for up to 7 days. Incubation with Con A, which binds preferably to alpha-D-mannose and alpha-D-glucose residues, caused intense reaction of the dilated cisternae of the cis Golgi side; staining was variable in intermediate and trans cisternae. RCA I, recognizing beta-D-galactose residues, could only be demonstrated in intermediate cisternae. Reaction for HPA, which indicates alpha-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues, stained intensely 1 to 2 cisternae of the cis Golgi side, as well as being localized in the peripheral regions of the cisternae of the intermediate compartment of the stacks. Deposits of reaction product covered the luminal surface of the cisternal membranes, but usually left the lumen itself, as well as lipid particles, devoid of reaction. The differences in Con A, RCA I, and HPA reactivity between cis, intermediate, and trans cisternae suggest compositional and structural differences of the carbohydrates in the respective compartments; they may reflect conversion processes that are known to occur in the oligosaccharide side chains of glycoconjugates at the Golgi complex level.

  7. Modification of the binding site(s) of lectins by an affinity column carrying an activated galactose-terminated ligand.

    PubMed

    Moroney, S E; D'Alarcao, L J; Goldmacher, V S; Lambert, J M; Blättler, W A

    1987-12-15

    An affinity column approach is described, aimed at the modification of the galactose binding site(s) of ricin in an effort to block the binding of ricin to cells. The affinity column was prepared by linking N-(2'-mercaptoethyl)lactamine to pyridyldithio-activated polyacrylamide heads. The linker between the ligand and the solid support thus contained a disulfide bond and an unmodified terminal galactose moiety. The amino group of the ligand was allowed to react with the bifunctional cross-linking reagent 2,4-dichloro-6-methoxytriazine. The lectin was then allowed to bind to the galactose functions on the activated column at pH 7.0, prior to raising the pH to 8.6 to initiate the cross-linking reaction between the ligand and the lectin. Lectin that was not covalently linked to the functionalized galactose residues on the column was eluted with galactose or lactose. Finally, the covalent ligand-lectin complexes were released from the solid support by reducing the disulfide bond between the ligand and the support. The affinity column was used in this way to modify the galactose binding site(s) of ricin. Upon release from the affinity column, blocked ricin was purified from unmodified ricin by affinity chromatography on columns of immobilized asialofetuin (a ligand to which ricin binds very tightly). The sulfhydryl group formed by cleavage of the ligand-ricin complex from the column was labeled with [3H]-N-ethylmaleimide to provide evidence that one blocking ligand was linked per ricin molecule. The blocked ricin and a conjugate of the blocked ricin with the monoclonal antibody J5 were toxic for cultures of Namalwa cells in vitro.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Species differences in lectin binding to pulmonary cells: Soybean agglutinin (SBA) as a marker of type I alveolar epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages in mini pigs.

    PubMed

    Kasper, M; Haroske, G; Müller, M

    1994-03-01

    We compared lectin staining patterns in rat and mini pig tissues of normal and fibrotic (irradiation-induced) lungs. Two lectins were studied: Dolichos biflorus (DBA) and Soybean (SBA). Both lectins strongly stained a subpopulation of alveolar macrophages. In the rat, DBA positive macrophages were a subpopulation of the SBA binding cells. In mini pig lungs, a further specific binding of DBA and SBA was observed: DBA reacted with endothelia, and SBA stained the alveolar type I cells. Double immunofluorescence experiments using a type II cell-specific cytokeratin antibody confirmed the selective reactivity of SBA with type I cells, which was also present in fibrotic areas with epithelial cell proliferation.

  9. Specific Endocytosis Blockade of Trypanosoma cruzi Exposed to a Poly-LAcNAc Binding Lectin Suggests that Lectin-Sugar Interactions Participate to Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Brosson, Sébastien; Fontaine, Frédéric; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Pays, Etienne; Bousbata, Sabrina; Salmon, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite transmitted by a triatomine insect, and causing human Chagas disease in South America. This parasite undergoes a complex life cycle alternating between non-proliferative and dividing forms. Owing to their high energy requirement, replicative epimastigotes of the insect midgut display high endocytic activity. This activity is mainly restricted to the cytostome, by which the cargo is taken up and sorted through the endosomal vesicular network to be delivered to reservosomes, the final lysosomal-like compartments. In African trypanosomes tomato lectin (TL) and ricin, respectively specific to poly-N-acetyllactosamine (poly-LacNAc) and β-D-galactose, allowed the identification of giant chains of poly-LacNAc in N-glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway. We show that in T. cruzi epimastigote forms also, glycoproteins of the endocytic pathway are characterized by the presence of N-linked glycans binding to both ricin and TL. Affinity chromatography using both TL and Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSLII), specific to non-reducing terminal residue of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), led to an enrichment of glycoproteins of the trypanosomal endocytic pathway. Incubation of live parasites with TL, which selectively bound to the cytostome/cytopharynx, specifically inhibited endocytosis of transferrin (Tf) but not dextran, a marker of fluid endocytosis. Taken together, our data suggest that N-glycan modification of endocytic components plays a crucial role in receptor-mediated endocytosis of T. cruzi. PMID:27685262

  10. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets w