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Sample records for mantle heat flow

  1. Deep mantle heat flow and thermal evolution of the Earth's core based on thermo-chemical mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P.; Buffett, B.

    2004-12-01

    A coupled core-mantle evolution model that combines the global heat balance in the core with a fully-dynamical thermo-chemical mantle convection [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004 published in EPSL] is used to investigate the deep mantle heat flow that is required to sustain the magnetic field generated by the geodynamo process. Effects of a radioactive heat source due to potassium in the core are also included in the global heat balance in the Earth??s core. Two important parameters are checked in this study; (1) density variation between depleted hartzbergite and basaltic material (0 to 3 percent) and (2) concentration of radioactive potassium in the core alloy (0ppm to 400ppm). The parameter set that most closely satisfies the criteria of size of the inner core (1220km at present time) is around 2 percent of density difference in a convecting mantle and 200ppm of radioactive heat source in the core. The concentration of potassium in the core is consistent with the geochemical approach [Murthy et al., 2003] but smaller than other successful thermal evolution models [Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004]. Heat flow through the core-mantle boundary and the contribution of radioactive heat sources in the core are consistent with theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002] and geochemical constraints [Gessmann and Wood, 2002]. The power available to the geodynamo, based on the predicted heat flow through the core-mantle boundary, is approximately four times greater than the value predicted by numerical models of the geodynamo [Christensen and Kutzner, 2004] but closer to theoretical estimates [e.g. Buffett, 2002].

  2. Birch's Crustal Heat Production-Heat Flow Law: Key to Quantifying Mantle Heat Flow as a function of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, D. D.; Thakur, M.

    2007-12-01

    parameters of Birch's Law equation represent the starting place for discussions of lithospheric thermal regime and evolution. The stability of the values of intercept Qo for areas with thermal ages of Paleozoic and older prove that the lithosphere heat flow does not vary significantly with age as is demonstrated in the companion paper. The minimum mantle heat flow for preMesozoic thermal terrains is 20 - 25 mWm-2. This value is consistent with the lack of indication from xenolith data that lithosphere thickness changes with age and with theoretical models of mantle convection.

  3. Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate-scale flow: results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Richards, Mark A.; Manga, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We report results from analog laboratory experiments, in which a large-scale flow is imposed upon natural convection from a hot boundary layer at the base of a large tank of corn syrup. The experiments show that the subdivision of the convective flow into four regions provides a reasonable conceptual framework for interpreting the effects of large-scale flow on plumes. Region I includes the area of the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) that is thinned by the large-scale flow, thereby suppressing plumes. Region II encompasses the critically unstable boundary layer where plumes form. Region III is the area above the boundary layer that is devoid of plumes. Region IV comprises the area of hot upwelling and plume conduits. Quantitative analysis of our experiments results in a scaling law for heat flux from the hot boundary and for the spatial extent of plume suppression. When applied to the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB), our results suggest that large-scale mantle flow, due to sinking lithospheric plates, can locally thin the TBL and suppress plume formation over large fractions of the CMB. Approximately 30% of heat flow from the core may be due to increased heat flux from plate-scale flow. Furthermore, CMB heat flux is non-uniformly distributed along the CMB, with large areas where heat flux is increased on average by a factor of 2. As a consequence, the convective flow pattern in the outer core may be affected by CMB heat-flux heterogeneity and sensitive to changes in plate-scale mantle flow. Because of plume suppression and 'focusing' of hot mantle from the CMB into zones of upwelling flow, plume conduits (hotspots) are expected to be spatially associated with lower-mantle regions of low seismic velocities, inferred as hot upwelling mantle flow.

  4. Mantle heat flow and thermal structure of the northern block of Southern Granulite Terrain, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manglik, Ajay

    2006-07-01

    Continental shield regions are normally characterized by low-to-moderate mantle heat flow. Archaean Dharwar craton of the Indian continental shield also follows the similar global pattern. However, some recent studies have inferred significantly higher mantle heat flow for the Proterozoic northern block of Southern Granulite Terrain (SGT) in the immediate vicinity of the Dharwar craton by assuming that the radiogenic elements depleted exposed granulites constitute the 45-km-thick crust. In this study, we use four-layered model of the crustal structure revealed by integrated geophysical studies along a geo-transect in this region to estimate the mantle heat flow. The results indicate that: (i) the mantle heat flow of the northern block of SGT is 17 ± 2 mW/m 2, supporting the global pattern, and (ii) the lateral variability of 10-12 mW/m 2 in the surface heat flow within the block is of crustal origin. In terms of temperature, the Moho beneath the eastern Salem-Namakkal region appears to be at 80-100 °C higher temperature than that beneath the western Avinashi region.

  5. Abnormal high surface heat flow caused by the Emeishan mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qiang; Qiu, Nansheng; Zhu, Chuanqing

    2016-04-01

    It is commonly believed that increase of heat flow caused by a mantle plume is small and transient. Seafloor heat flow data near the Hawaiian hotspot and the Iceland are comparable to that for oceanic lithosphere elsewhere. Numerical modeling of the thermal effect of the Parana large igneous province shows that the added heat flow at the surface caused by the magmatic underplating is less than 5mW/m2. However, the thermal effect of Emeishan mantle plume (EMP) may cause the surface hear-flow abnormally high. The Middle-Late Emeishan mantle plume is located in the western Yangtze Craton. The Sichuan basin, to the northeast of the EMP, is a superimposed basin composed of Paleozoic marine carbonate rocks and Mesozoic-Cenozoic terrestrial clastic rocks. The vitrinite reflectance (Ro) data as a paleogeothermal indicator records an apparent change of thermal regime of the Sichuan basin. The Ro profiles from boreholes and outcrops which are close to the center of the basalt province exhibit a 'dog-leg' style at the unconformity between the Middle and Upper Permian, and they show significantly higher gradients in the lower subsection (pre-Middle Permian) than the Upper subsection (Upper Permian to Mesozoic). Thermal history inversion based on these Ro data shows that the lower subsection experienced a heat flow peak much higher than that of the upper subsection. The abnormal heat flow in the Sichuan basin is consistent with the EMP in temporal and spatial distribution. The high-temperature magmas from deep mantle brought heat to the base of the lithosphere, and then large amount of heat was conducted upwards, resulting in the abnormal high surface heat flow.

  6. Seismic-geodynamic constraints on three-dimensional structure, vertical flow, and heat transfer in the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forte, A.M.; Woodward, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    Joint inversions of seismic and geodynamic data are carried out in which we simultaneously constrain global-scale seismic heterogeneity in the mantle as well as the amplitude of vertical mantle flow across the 670 km seismic discontinuity. These inversions reveal the existence of a family of three-dimensional (3-D) mantle models that satisfy the data while at the same time yielding predictions of layered mantle flow. The new 3-D mantle models we obtain demonstrate that the buoyancy forces due to the undulations of the 670 km phase-change boundary strongly inhibit the vertical flow between the upper and lower mantle. The strong stabilizing effect of the 670 km topography also has an important impact on the predicted dynamic topography of the Earth's solid surface and on the surface gravity anomalies. The new 3-D models that predict strongly or partially layered mantle flow provide essentially identical fits to the global seismic data as previous models that have, until now, predicted only whole-mantle flow. The convective vertical transport of heat across the mantle predicted on the basis of the new 3-D models shows that the heat flow is a minimum at 1000 km depth. This suggests the presence at this depth of a globally defined horizon across which the pattern of lateral heterogeneity changes rapidly. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Plume's buoyancy and heat fluxes from the deep mantle estimated by an instantaneous mantle flow simulation based on the S40RTS global seismic tomography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki

    2012-11-01

    It is still an open question as to how much heat is transported from the deep mantle to the upper mantle by mantle upwelling plumes, which would impose a strong constraint on models of the thermal evolution of the earth. Here I perform numerical computations of instantaneous mantle flow based on a recent highly resolved global seismic tomography model (S40RTS), apply new simple fluid dynamics theories to the plume's radius and velocity, considering a Poiseuille flow assumption and a power-law relationship between the boundary layer thickness and Rayleigh number, and estimate the plume's buoyancy and heat fluxes from the deep lower mantle under varying plume viscosity. The results show that for some major mantle upwelling plumes with localized strong ascent velocity under the South Pacific and Africa, the buoyancy fluxes of each plume beneath the ringwoodite to perovskite + magnesiowüstite ("660-km") phase decomposition boundary are comparable to those inferred from observed hotspot swell volumes on the earth, i.e., on the order of 1 Mg s-1, when the plume viscosity is 1019-1020 Pa s. This result, together with previous numerical simulations of mantle convection and the gentle Clausius-Clapeyron slope for the 660-km phase decomposition derived from recent high-pressure measurements under dehydrated/hydrated conditions in the mantle transition zone, implies that mantle upwelling plumes in the lower mantle penetrate the 660-km phase decomposition boundary without significant loss in thermal buoyancy because of the weak thermal barrier at the 660-km boundary. The total plume heat flux under the South Pacific is estimated to be about 1 TW beneath the 660-km boundary, which is significantly smaller than the core-mantle boundary heat flux. Previously published scaling laws for the plume's radius and velocity based on a plume spacing theory, which explains well plume dynamics in three-dimensional time-dependent mantle convection, suggest that these plume fluxes depend

  8. Surface heat flow and the mantle contribution on the margins of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutorbe, Bruno; Lucazeau, Francis; Bonneville, Alain

    2008-05-01

    We present thermal data from 473 oil exploration wells in Australia and New Zealand. Approximately 2300 bottom-hole temperatures are corrected to form a homogeneous set along with 86 temperatures from reservoir tests. Thermal conductivity profiles are estimated from a set of geophysical well logs using a recently developed neural network approach. Retaining wells in which temperature and thermal conductivity data overlap over an interval greater than 1000 m, we estimate 10 heat flow values in the Taranaki basin of New Zealand and 270 values in the northwestern, western, and southern margins and in the intracontinental Canning basin of Australia. The values are in the range 30-80 mW m-2. As a result of several differences in the data and methods, our heat flow values are 10-20 mW m-2 lower compared to previously published estimates for the same wells in New Zealand. For Australia, our values are consistent with previously measured values and trends in the continental and marine regions. On the northwestern and southeastern margins, we interpret the variations as reflecting changes in the nature of the underlying basement. Consistent with onshore data, it is inferred that the Archean crust is depleted in radiogenic elements compared to Proterozoic regions and that recent volcanism affects the eastern Paleozoic area. After removing from surface heat flow the sediment contributions, including a permanent radiogenic heat component and a transient sedimentation effect, a simple crustal model suggests that mantle heat flow on the continental margin bordering the Pilbara craton is higher than below the craton itself. Moreover, heat flow corrected for the sediment contributions is markedly lower in the Petrel intracontinental basin than in the adjacent margin, although the crust is thinner below this latter region. As both are underlaid by the same basement, this observation may indicate that the mantle contribution is also higher below that margin. Such a higher mantle

  9. Time variability in Cenozoic reconstructions of mantle heat flow: plate tectonic cycles and implications for Earth's thermal evolution.

    PubMed

    Loyd, S J; Becker, T W; Conrad, C P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C; Corsetti, F A

    2007-09-04

    The thermal evolution of Earth is governed by the rate of secular cooling and the amount of radiogenic heating. If mantle heat sources are known, surface heat flow at different times may be used to deduce the efficiency of convective cooling and ultimately the temporal character of plate tectonics. We estimate global heat flow from 65 Ma to the present using seafloor age reconstructions and a modified half-space cooling model, and we find that heat flow has decreased by approximately 0.15% every million years during the Cenozoic. By examining geometric trends in plate reconstructions since 120 Ma, we show that the reduction in heat flow is due to a decrease in the area of ridge-proximal oceanic crust. Even accounting for uncertainties in plate reconstructions, the rate of heat flow decrease is an order of magnitude faster than estimates based on smooth, parameterized cooling models. This implies that heat flow experiences short-term fluctuations associated with plate tectonic cyclicity. Continental separation does not appear to directly control convective wavelengths, but rather indirectly affects how oceanic plate systems adjust to accommodate global heat transport. Given that today's heat flow may be unusually low, secular cooling rates estimated from present-day values will tend to underestimate the average cooling rate. Thus, a mechanism that causes less efficient tectonic heat transport at higher temperatures may be required to prevent an unreasonably hot mantle in the recent past.

  10. Time variability in Cenozoic reconstructions of mantle heat flow: Plate tectonic cycles and implications for Earth's thermal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Loyd, S. J.; Becker, T. W.; Conrad, C. P.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    The thermal evolution of Earth is governed by the rate of secular cooling and the amount of radiogenic heating. If mantle heat sources are known, surface heat flow at different times may be used to deduce the efficiency of convective cooling and ultimately the temporal character of plate tectonics. We estimate global heat flow from 65 Ma to the present using seafloor age reconstructions and a modified half-space cooling model, and we find that heat flow has decreased by ∼0.15% every million years during the Cenozoic. By examining geometric trends in plate reconstructions since 120 Ma, we show that the reduction in heat flow is due to a decrease in the area of ridge-proximal oceanic crust. Even accounting for uncertainties in plate reconstructions, the rate of heat flow decrease is an order of magnitude faster than estimates based on smooth, parameterized cooling models. This implies that heat flow experiences short-term fluctuations associated with plate tectonic cyclicity. Continental separation does not appear to directly control convective wavelengths, but rather indirectly affects how oceanic plate systems adjust to accommodate global heat transport. Given that today's heat flow may be unusually low, secular cooling rates estimated from present-day values will tend to underestimate the average cooling rate. Thus, a mechanism that causes less efficient tectonic heat transport at higher temperatures may be required to prevent an unreasonably hot mantle in the recent past. PMID:17720806

  11. A two Layer Convecting Mantle With Exchange : A Unified Model Based on Geochemical, Seismic and Heat Flow Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, C. J.; Jaupart, C.; Nolet, G.

    2007-12-01

    The question of layered versus whole mantle convection has been pending since early models of mantle convection (Oxburgh and Turcotte, 1967; McKenzie and Richter, 1978). In a first phase, layered mantle models appeared to be the winners, because they explained most of geochemical observations. They of course also explained the seismic focal solutions (compressive/ non compressive) in subducting plate and the heat flow constraints (Richter, 1980). Later on, the discovery that slabs could penetrate the lower mantle was considered as proof of whole mantle convection. Most numerical experiments were then developed in this context, overlooking many geochemical observations such as rare gas isotopes or radioactive elements. In this presentation, we will examine the different data one by one. a) geochemical constraints include the budget equations for Sr, Nd, Hf, isotopes, the budget equation for He, Ne, Ar, the budget for heat producing elements U, Th, K (including Th/U and K/U ratios). (Allègre and al., 1979, 1982; De Paolo and Wasserburg, 1977; O'Nions and al.,1977). b) Constrains linking geochemical observations and geodynamics. How the so-called depleted mantle is generated ? Continuities and affinities between MORB and OIB, including the Dupal and Non Dupal provinces: The non-pristine source for OIB based on Pb isotope data. The marble cake structure for upper mantle. Continental crust recycling via sediments and delamination processes. In thise respect, we emphasize the difference in statistical variance of isotope or trace element ratios in the different/types of basalts reflecting the difference in stirring intensity in their sources. We also use information from extinct radioactivities 142Nd and 129Xe. In each case, we estimate the errors for measurements and models. c) The seismic evidence of slab penetration into the lower mantle are from Creager and Jordan(1984) to Van der Hilst et al.(1991), Sparkman and al.(1993), with the counter example of non

  12. New Insights Into the Heat Sources of Mantle Plumes, or: Where Does all the Heat Come From, Heat Producing Elements, Advective or Conductive Heat Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushmer, T.; Beier, C.; Turner, S.

    2007-12-01

    Melting anomalies in the Earth's upper mantle have often been attributed to the presence of mantle plumes that may originate in the lower mantle, possibly from the core-mantle boundary. Globally, mantle plumes exhibit a large range in buoyancy flux that which is proportional to their temperature and volume. Plumes with higher buoyancy fluxes should have higher temperatures and experience higher degrees of partial melting. Excess heat in mantle plumes could reflect either a) an enrichment of the heat producing elements (HPE: U, Th, K) in their mantle source leading to an increase of heat production by radioactive decay or b) advective or conductive heat transport across the core-mantle boundary. The advective transport of heat may result in a physical contribution of material from the core to the lower mantle. If core material is incorporated into the lower mantle, mantle plumes with a higher buoyancy flux should have higher core tracers, e.g. increased 186Os and Fe concentrations. Geophysical and dynamic modelling indicate that at least Afar, Easter, Hawaii, Louisville and Samoa may all originate at the core-mantle boundary. These plumes encompass the whole range of known buoyancy fluxes from 1.2 Mgs -1(Afar) to 6.5 Mgs -1 (Hawaii) providing evidence that the buoyancy flux is largely independent of other geophysical parameters. In an effort to explore whether the heat producing elements are the cause of excess heat we looked for correlations between fractionation corrected concentrations of the HPE and buoyancy flux. Our results suggest that there is no correlation between HPE concentrations and buoyancy flux (with and without an additional correction for variable degrees of partial melting). As anticipated, K, Th and U are positively correlated with each other (e.g. Hawaii, Iceland and Galapagos have significantly lower concentrations than e.g. Tristan da Cunha, the Canary Islands and the Azores). We also find no correlation between currently available Fe

  13. Heat flow increase following the rise of mantle isotherms and crustal thinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mareschal, J. C.; Bergantz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow measurements in the western United States define a zone of high heat flow which coincides with the Basin and Range Province where extension has taken place recently. In this region, the average reduced heat flow is approx 30 mW sq. meters higher than in stable continental provinces; locally (e.g., Battle Mountain High), the heat flow anomaly can be more than 100 mW/sq meters above average. Estimates of the amount of extension range between 30% and 100% for the past 30 Ma. In the Colorado Plateau, which has been uplifted without major tectonic deformation, the heat flow is only slightly above average. Analytical calculations show that an abrupt change in heat flow at the base of the lithosphere 30 Ma ago would not affect the surface significantly. Uplift would proceed at a slow rate. A thermal perturbation at the base of a 40 km thick crust, however, would reach the surface faster and, after 30 Ma, the increase in surface heat flow would be about 75% of the amplitude of the heat flow anomaly. The number of volcanic rocks in the Basin and Range suggests that magma intrusions may provide an effective heat transfer mechanism. It can be show that if the source of the intrusions is at the base of the lithosphere, the response time will be much longer than 30 Ma, and most ot the heat transferred from the asthenosphere will be absorbed in the lithosphere.

  14. Heat sources for mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, C.; Rushmer, T.; Turner, S. P.

    2008-06-01

    Melting anomalies in the Earth's upper mantle have often been attributed to the presence of mantle plumes that may originate in the lower mantle, possibly from the core-mantle boundary. Globally, mantle plumes exhibit a large range in buoyancy flux that is proportional to their temperature and volume. Plumes with higher buoyancy fluxes should have higher temperatures and experience higher degrees of partial melting. This excess heat in mantle plumes could reflect either (1) an enrichment of the heat-producing elements (HPE: U, Th, K) in their mantle source leading to an increase of heat production by radioactive decay, (2) material transport from core to mantle (either advective or diffusive), or (3) conductive heat transport across the core-mantle boundary. The advective/diffusive transport of heat may result in a physical contribution of material from the core to the lower mantle. If core material is incorporated into the lower mantle, mantle plumes with a higher buoyancy flux should have higher core tracers, e.g., increased 186Os, 187Os, and Fe concentrations. Geophysical and dynamic modeling indicate that at least Afar, Easter, Hawaii, Louisville, and Samoa may all originate at the core-mantle boundary. These plumes encompass the whole range of known buoyancy fluxes from 0.9 Mg s-1 (Afar) to 8.7 Mg s-1 (Hawaii), providing evidence that the buoyancy flux is largely independent of other geophysical parameters. In an effort to explore whether the heat-producing elements are the cause of excess heat we looked for correlations between fractionation-corrected concentrations of the HPE and buoyancy flux. Our results suggest that there is no correlation between HPE concentrations and buoyancy flux (with and without an additional correction for variable degrees of partial melting). As anticipated, K, Th, and U are positively correlated with each other (e.g., Hawaii, Iceland, and Galapagos have significantly lower concentrations than, e.g., Tristan da Cunha, the Canary

  15. 2-D numerical simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport — implications for the He terrestrial budget and the mantle helium heat imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Maria Clara; Patriarche, Delphine; Goblet, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Because helium and heat production results from a common source, a continental 4He crustal flux of 4.65 * 10 - 14 mol m - 2 s - 1 has been estimated based on heat flow considerations. In addition, because the observed mantle He / heat flux ratio at the proximity of mid-ocean ridges (6.6 * 10 - 14 mol J - 1 ) is significantly lower than the radiogenic production ratio (1.5 * 10 - 12 mol J - 1 ), the presence of a terrestrial helium-heat imbalance was suggested. The latter could be explained by the presence of a layered mantle in which removal of He is impeded from the lower mantle [R.K. O'Nions, E.R. Oxburgh, Heat and helium in the Earth, Nature 306 (1983) 429-431; E.R. Oxburgh, R.K. O'Nions, Helium loss, tectonics, and the terrestrial heat budget, Science 237 (1987) 1583-1588]. van Keken et al. [P.E. van Keken, C.J. Ballentine, D. Porcelli, A dynamical investigation of the heat and helium imbalance, Earth Planet, Sci. Lett. 188 (2001) 421-434] have recently claimed that the helium-heat imbalance remains a robust observation. Such conclusions, however, were reached under the assumption that a steady-state regime was in place for both tracers and that their transport properties are similar at least in the upper portion of the crust. Here, through 2-D simulations of groundwater flow, heat transfer and 4He transport carried out simultaneously in the Carrizo aquifer and surrounding formations in southwest Texas, we assess the legitimacy of earlier assumptions. Specifically, we show that the driving transport mechanisms for He and heat are of a fundamentally different nature for a high range of permeabilities ( k ≤ 10 - 16 m 2) found in metamorphic and volcanic rocks at all depths in the crust. The assumption that transport properties for these two tracers are similar in the crust is thus unsound. We also show that total 4He / heat flux ratios lower than radiogenic production ratios do not reflect a He deficit in the crust or mantle original reservoir. Instead, they

  16. A Numerical Study of Energy Balances and Flow Planforms in Earth's Mantle with Radioactive Heating, the 660 km-depth Phase Boundary and Continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Gunjan

    wavelength of convective flows and mixed surface boundary conditions strongly increase the horizontal wavelength of convection. My study shows that for mixed cases the effects of the surface boundary conditions dominate the effects of the phase boundary. I show that the calculations with complete continental coverage have the most significantly decoupled lower and upper mantle flows and substantial thermal and mechanical layering. Unlike the free-slip case where the surface heat flux decreases substantially with increasing magnitude of the Clapeyron slope, surface heat flux is shown to be almost independent of the Clapeyron slope for mixed boundary condition cases. Although very different when not layered, models with free and mixed surfaces have very similar planforms with very large aspect ratio flows when run with large magnitudes of the Clapeyron slope. I also calculate the critical boundary layer Rayleigh number as a measure of the thermal resistance of the surface boundary layer. My results show that the thermal resistance in the oceanic and the continental regions of the mixed cases are similar to fully free and no-slip cases, respectively. I find that, even for purely basally heated models, the mantle becomes significantly subadiabatic in the presence of partial continental coverage. This is due to the significant horizontal advection of heat that occurs with very large aspect ratio convection cells.

  17. Exploring Geothermal Energy Potential in Ireland through 3-D Geophysical-Petrological Modelling of Surface Heat-Flow and Crustal and Upper-Mantle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known of Ireland's deep, low-enthalpy geothermal resources and the potential for space heating and/or electricity generation based on geothermal energy to displace Ireland's significant reliance on carbon-based fuels. IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a four-and-a-half year, all-island, academic-government-industry collaborative project, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a strategic and holistic understanding of Ireland's geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One of the challenges in searching for deep geothermal resources in the relatively unexplored setting of Ireland lies in identifying those areas most likely to support significantly elevated temperatures at depth. Available borehole data, although sparse and clustered around areas of mineral and hydrocarbon interest, suggest a marked regional increase in surface heat-flow across Ireland, from ~40 mW/m2 in the south to >80 mW/m2 in the north. The origins of both the observed regional heat-flow trend and local temperature anomalies have not been investigated and are not currently understood. Although variations in the structure of the crust and lithosphere have been revealed by a number of active-source seismic and teleseismic experiments, their effects on surface heat-flow have not been modelled. Bulk 3-D variation in crustal heat-production across Ireland, which may contribute significantly to the observed regional and local temperature variations, has also not been determined. We investigate the origins of Ireland's regional heat-flow trend and regional and local temperature variations using the software package LitMod. This software combines petrological and geophysical modelling of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle within an internally consistent thermodynamic-geophysical framework, where all relevant properties are functions of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. The major

  18. Convectively Driven Heat Flux Heterogeneity in Europa's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Bryan; Schubert, G.; Palguta, J.

    2006-09-01

    Features on the surface of Europa may reflect non-uniform heating in an underlying ocean due to variations in heat flux at the mantle surface. Pore water convection can generate a spatially heterogeneous heat flux in a fractured, permeable mantle, as illustrated in 2-D computer simulations of the thermal evolution of Europa. The model uses three layers - core, silicate mantle, and H2O (liquid and frozen). Processes active in the model include radiogenic heating, tidal dissipative heating (TDH), thermal diffusion, latent heat of melting and pore water convection. Starting from a cold Europa, radiogenic heating and TDH produce a temperature profile ranging from a peak near 1150 oC in the deep interior to 15 oC at the mantle surface, overlain by an 80 km deep ocean layer at 3 oC, capped by an ice shell approximately 20 km thick. This structure provides initial conditions for our pore water convection simulation. Mantle permeability is based on Earth values. An initial, very strong flow gives way to a weaker quasi-steady pattern of convection in the mantle's porosity. Plumes rise from the mantle at a roughly 10o spacing, through the ocean layer up to the base of the ice. These are typically 50 - 100 km wide at the base of the ice. Plume heat flux is 10-12 W/m2 during the initial transient, but later drops to about 0.5 - 1.5 W/m2. Heating at the base of the ice shell is spatially heterogeneous, but only strong enough to produce significant melt-through during the initial transient. However, strong spatial heterogeneity of basal heating of the ice shell could significantly influence convection in the ice phase. This work was supported by a grant from the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory and by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  19. On the role of the porous shell of the solid core of the earth in the anomalous heat and mass flow to the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A.

    2013-03-15

    The model of the pressure-induced first-order phase transition of a metal melt to the metallicglass state considers a thermodynamically nonequilibrium porous near-surface shell of the solid core of the Earth, which contacts cyclonic vortices in the liquid core. Anomalous flows of heat and light-material mass to the mantle from the solid core at these contact points are calculated. These anomalous flows are shown to be comparable with the observed ones under the assumption of a rapid increase in the melt viscosity at pressures of 1-10 Mbar, which is characteristic of a solid core. In this case, the porous layer permeability may be very low.

  20. Sharp Thermal Transition in the Forearc Mantle Wedge as a Consequence of Nonlinear Mantle Wedge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, I.; Wang, K.; Jiangheng, H.

    2009-12-01

    . The change is even more abrupt if the dislocation-creep rheology is applied to both the mantle wedge and interface. The abrupt onset of interface coupling and the bimodal flow behaviour leads to a sharp thermal transition between the cold stagnant and hot flowing parts of the forearc mantle wedge, explaining the observed attenuation structure of the forearc mantle wedge. The onset of interface coupling at 70-80 km depth can explain the location of the sharp attenuation increase and also the observed surface heat flow pattern and petrologically and geochemically constrained mantle temperatures beneath the arc in most subduction zones. In Mariana, where attenuation in the wedge nose is relatively high, the effect of the cold wedge nose on attenuation is likely to be offset by a high degree of serpentinization as evidenced by wide-spread serpentine mud volcanism (Wada and Wang, 2009, G-cubed, in press).

  1. Superplumes from the core-mantle boundary to the lithosphere: implications for heat flux.

    PubMed

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Gung, Yuancheng

    2002-04-19

    Three-dimensional modeling of upper-mantle anelastic structure reveals that thermal upwellings associated with the two superplumes, imaged by seismic elastic tomography at the base of the mantle, persist through the upper-mantle transition zone and are deflected horizontally beneath the lithosphere. This explains the unique transverse shear wave isotropy in the central Pacific. We infer that the two superplumes may play a major and stable role in supplying heat and horizontal flow to the low-viscosity asthenospheric channel, lubricating plate motions and feeding hot spots. We suggest that more heat may be carried through the core-mantle boundary than is accounted for by hot spot fluxes alone.

  2. Upper-Mantle Flow Driven Dynamic Topography in Eastern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Eken, Tuna; Hakan Gogus, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia is characterized by 2 km plateau uplift -in the last 10 Myrs-, high surface heat flow distribution, shallow Curie-point depth, anomalous gravity field. Seismological observations indicate relatively high Pn and Sn attenuation and significant low seismic velocity anomalies in the region. Moreover, the surface geology is associated predominantly with volcanic rocks in which melt production through mantle upwelling (following lithospheric delamination) has been suggested. It has been long known that the topographic loading in the region cannot be supported by crustal thickness (~45 km) based on the principle of Airy isostasy. Recent global geodynamic studies carried out for evaluating the post-collisional processes imply that there is an explicit dynamic uplift in Eastern Anatolia and its adjacent regions. In this study we investigate the instantaneous dynamic topography driven by 3-D upper-mantle flow in Eastern Anatolia. For this purpose we conducted numerous thermo-mechanical models using a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. The available P-wave tomography data extracted along 10 profiles were used to obtain depth-dependent density anomalies in the region. We present resulting dynamic topography maps and estimated 3D mantle flow velocity vectors along these 2-D cross sections for each profile. The residual topography based on crustal thickness and observed topography was calculated and compared with other independent datasets concerning geological deformation and dynamic topography predictions. The results indicate an upper mantle driven dynamic uplift correlated with the under-compensated characteristic in Eastern Anatolia. We discuss our results combined with 3D mantle flow by considering seismic anisotropy studies in the region. Initial results indicate that high dynamic uplift and the localized low Pn velocities in concurrence with Pn anisotropy structures show nearly spatial coherence in Eastern Anatolia.

  3. Petrologically-constrained thermo-chemical modelling of cratonic upper mantle consistent with elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface waves and MT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. G.; Afonso, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth comprises a single physio-chemical system that we interrogate from its surface and/or from space making observations related to various physical and chemical parameters. A change in one of those parameters affects many of the others; for example a change in velocity is almost always indicative of a concomitant change in density, which results in changes to elevation, gravity and geoid observations. Similarly, a change in oxide chemistry affects almost all physical parameters to a greater or lesser extent. We have now developed sophisticated tools to model/invert data in our individual disciplines to such an extent that we are obtaining high resolution, robust models from our datasets. However, in the vast majority of cases the different datasets are modelled/inverted independently of each other, and often even without considering other data in a qualitative sense. The LitMod framework of Afonso and colleagues presents integrated inversion of geoscientific data to yield thermo-chemical models that are petrologically consistent and constrained. Input data can comprise any combination of elevation, geoid, surface heat flow, seismic surface wave (Rayleigh and Love) data and receiver function data, and MT data. The basis of LitMod is characterization of the upper mantle in terms of five oxides in the CFMAS system and a thermal structure that is conductive to the LAB and convective along the adiabat below the LAB to the 410 km discontinuity. Candidate solutions are chosen from prior distributions of the oxides. For the crust, candidate solutions are chosen from distributions of crustal layering, velocity and density parameters. Those candidate solutions that fit the data within prescribed error limits are kept, and are used to establish broad posterior distributions from which new candidate solutions are chosen. Examples will be shown of application of this approach fitting data from the Kaapvaal Craton in South Africa and the Rae Craton in northern Canada. I

  4. Mantle flow drives the subsidence of oceanic plates.

    PubMed

    Adam, Claudia; Vidal, Valérie

    2010-04-02

    The subsidence of the sea floor is generally considered a consequence of its passive cooling and densifying since its formation at the ridge and is therefore regarded as a function of lithospheric age only. However, the lithosphere is defined as the thermal boundary layer of mantle convection, which should thus determine its structure. We examined the evolution of the lithosphere structure and depth along trajectories representative of the underlying mantle flow. We show that along these flow lines, the sea-floor depth varies as the square root of the distance from the ridge (as given by the boundary-layer equation) along the entire plate, without any flattening. Contrary to previous models, no additional heat supply is required at the base of the lithosphere.

  5. Seismic evidence for a tilted mantle plume and north-south mantle flow beneath Iceland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shen, Y.; Solomon, S.C.; Bjarnason, I. Th; Nolet, G.; Morgan, W.J.; Allen, R.M.; Vogfjord, K.; Jakobsdottir, S.; Stefansson, R.; Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Shear waves converted from compressional waves at mantle discontinuities near 410- and 660-km depth recorded by two broadband seismic experiments in Iceland reveal that the center of an area of anomalously thin mantle transition zone lies at least 100 km south of the upper-mantle low-velocity anomaly imaged tomographically beneath the hotspot. This offset is evidence for a tilted plume conduit in the upper mantle, the result of either northward flow of the Icelandic asthenosphere or southward flow of the upper part of the lower mantle in a no-net-rotation reference frame. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of mantle flow in Nubia-Somalia plate divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamps, D. S.; Iaffaldano, G.; Calais, E.

    2015-01-01

    Present-day continental extension along the East African Rift System (EARS) has often been attributed to diverging sublithospheric mantle flow associated with the African Superplume. This implies a degree of viscous coupling between mantle and lithosphere that remains poorly constrained. Recent advances in estimating present-day opening rates along the EARS from geodesy offer an opportunity to address this issue with geodynamic modeling of the mantle-lithosphere system. Here we use numerical models of the global mantle-plates coupled system to test the role of present-day mantle flow in Nubia-Somalia plate divergence across the EARS. The scenario yielding the best fit to geodetic observations is one where torques associated with gradients of gravitational potential energy stored in the African highlands are resisted by weak continental faults and mantle basal drag. These results suggest that shear tractions from diverging mantle flow play a minor role in present-day Nubia-Somalia divergence.

  7. Map of Io's volcanic heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a map of Io's volcanic heat flow. Io's high heat flow is a result of intense tidal heating, which generates widespread volcanic activity. The surface expression of ongoing volcanic activity constrains the location and magnitude of tidal dissipation within Io. Tidal heating models place heating either at relatively shallow (aesthenosphere) levels, or deep in the mantle. It was thought that actual tidal heating could be approximated using a combination of these end-member models. Io's volcanic heat flow has now been mapped in sufficient detail to compare with the models. Our maps show that the distribution of heat flow is not matched by current models of deep nor shallow tidal heating, nor by any combination of these two models. We find relatively low heat flow at sub-jovian (0°W) and anti-jovian (180°W) longitudes, at odds with the pure aesthenospheric heating model. Furthermore, there are large swaths of Io's surface where there is poor correlation between the number of hot spots in an area and the power emitted. We have previously accounted for ≈54% of Io's observed heat flow. We now show that Io's anomalously warm poles, possibly the result of heat flow from deep-mantle heating, would yield the ;missing; energy (48 TW) if the polar surfaces are at temperatures of ∼90 K to ∼95 K and cover latitudes above ∼43° to ∼48° respectively. This possibility implies a ratio of deep to shallow heating of about 1:1. However, explaining regional variations in surface volcanic activity requires more detailed modeling of the location and magnitude of the internal tidal dissipation and the consequences of mantle convection and advection within Io. Future model predictions can be compared to our heat flow map.

  8. Planetary Cores Flows Driven by Mantle Libration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noir, J.; Aurnou, J.; Wicht, J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate, via a set of laboratory and numerical experiments, the flow induced inside a spherical fluid cavity by torsional oscillation of the outer shell. Our goal is to produce models of libration-driven flows within planetary cores and subsurface oceans. Such models will improve our understanding of a number of planetary bodies including Mercury, Europa, Io, Callisto, Ganymede and the Earth's Moon. Here we focus on the case of a spherical shell with either a small inner core or no inner core; moderate planetary rotation rate (Ekman number E = 10- 4); and libration frequency equal to the planetary rotation frequency ("synchronous libration"). We vary only the non-dimensional amplitude of libration α, defined as α=Δ φ (2 π flib) / Ømega, where Δ φ is the total angular displacement, flib is the libration frequency and Ømega is the background angular rotation rate. Different core flow regimes are observed as α is increased. For a small amplitude of libration (α \\ll 1)), the oscillatory motion of the outer boundary drives laminar flows that are well described as inertial modes and waves. For α ~ 0.5, azimuthal roll instabilities periodically develop and decay along the outer shell boundary during each libration cycle. These instabilities tend to develop when the outer shell is decelerating and decay when it is accelerating. By further increasing α, the flow pattern transitions from axisymmetric rolls (m=0) to wavy rolls (m ≠ 0), and then to turbulent flow. Extrapolating our present results to Mercury suggests that mantle libration can drive large-scale instabilities in its liquid metal core. The authors wish to the thank NASA's PG&G and PME Programs for reasearch funding under grant #NNG0697G.

  9. Mantle convection with continental drift and heat source around the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, H.; Kameyama, M.; Kawai, K.

    2012-12-01

    Geological studies have suggested that significant amount of granitic crustal materials have been lost from the surface by the delamination (~1.1 km^3/yr) [1], continental collision (~0.4-0.7 km^3/yr) [1, 2], and subduction at ocean-margin (~2.5-3 km^3/yr) [1, 2]. At ocean-margin subduction zones, most of the granitic materials subducted from the surface are expected to be conveyed through subduction channels by viscous drag to 270km depth [Ichikawa el al., in revision]. If so, then the subducted crustal materials might be expected to be trapped in the mid-mantle owing to the density difference from peridotitic materials induced by the phase transition from coesite to stishovite at 270km depth. In other words, strong heat source materials are most likely to be accumulated around the mantle transition zone, at least, near the plate subduction zones. In this study, we conducted two-dimensional numerical experiments of mantle convection with continental drift and a heat source placed around the mantle transition zone, in order to study the effect of the subducted granitic materials drifting around the mantle transition zone. The simulations deal with a time-dependent convection of fluid under the extended Boussinesq approximation in a model of a two-dimensional rectangular box of 2900km height and 11600km width, where a continent and heat source is imposed. We found that the addition of the heat source considerably reduces the time scale of continental drift. In the absence of the heat source, the resulting time scale is too long compared with that of the so-called supercontinent cycle, where the breakup is induced from a plume generated by an insulating effect of the continent. The heat source also causes massive mechanical mixing especially on the upper mantle. The result suggests that the heat source drifting around mantle transition zone can be a possible candidate inducing the supercontinent cycle in an appropriate time scale. [1] Clift, P. D., P. Vannucchi, and

  10. The mantle flow field beneath western North America.

    PubMed

    Silver, P G; Holt, W E

    2002-02-08

    Although motions at the surface of tectonic plates are well determined, the accompanying horizontal mantle flow is not. We have combined observations of surface deformation and upper mantle seismic anisotropy to estimate this flow field for western North America. We find that the mantle velocity is 5.5 +/- 1.5 centimeters per year due east in a hot spot reference frame, nearly opposite to the direction of North American plate motion (west-southwest). The flow is only weakly coupled to the motion of the surface plate, producing a small drag force. This flow field is probably due to heterogeneity in mantle density associated with the former Farallon oceanic plate beneath North America.

  11. Internally heated mantle convection and the thermal and degassing history of the earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David R.; Pan, Vivian

    1992-01-01

    An internally heated model of parameterized whole mantle convection with viscosity dependent on temperature and volatile content is examined. The model is run for 4l6 Gyr, and temperature, heat flow, degassing and regassing rates, stress, and viscosity are calculated. A nominal case is established which shows good agreement with accepted mantle values. The effects of changing various parameters are also tested. All cases show rapid cooling early in the planet's history and strong self-regulation of viscosity due to the temperature and volatile-content dependence. The effects of weakly stress-dependent viscosity are examined within the bounds of this model and are found to be small. Mantle water is typically outgassed rapidly to reach an equilibrium concentration on a time scale of less than 200 Myr for almost all models, the main exception being for models which start out with temperatures well below the melting temperature.

  12. Tomography-based mantle flow beneath Mongolia-Baikal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao

    2014-12-01

    Recent progress in seismic tomography of Asia allows us to explore and understand more clearly the mantle flow below the Mongolia-Baikal area. We present a tomography-based model of mantle convection that provides a good match to the residual topography. The model provides predictions on the present-day mantle flow and flow-induced asthenospheric deformation which give us new insights on the mantle dynamics in the Mongolia-Baikal area. The predicted mantle flow takes on a very similar pattern at the depths shallower or deeper than 400 km and almost opposite flow directions between the upper (shallower than 400 km) and lower (deeper than 400 km) parts. The flow pattern could be divided into the 'simple' eastern region and the 'complex' western region in the Mongolia. The upwelling originating from about 350 km depth beneath Baikal rift zone is an important possible drive force to the rifting. The seismic anisotropy cannot be simply related with asthenospheric flow and flow-induced deformation in the entire Mongolia-Baikal area, but they could be considered as an important contributor to the seismic anisotropy in the eastern region of Mongolia and around and in Sayan-Baikal orogenic belt.

  13. Mantle flow influence on the evolution of subduction systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertova, Maria; Spakman, Wim; Steinberger, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Evolution of the subducting slab has been widely investigated in the past two decades be means of numerical and laboratory modeling, including analysis of the factors controlling its behavior. However, until present, relatively little attention has been paid to the influence of the mantle flow. While for large subduction zones, due to the high slab buoyancy force, this effect might be small, mantle flow might be a primary factor controlling the evolution of a regional subduction zone. Here we investigate the impact of prescribed mantle flow on the evolution of both generic and real-Earth subduction models by means of 3D thermo-mechanical numerical modeling. The generic setup consists of a laterally symmetric subduction model using a 3000×2000×1000 km modeling domain with a lateral slab width varying from 500 to 1500 km. Non-linear rheology is implemented including diffusion, dislocation creep and a viscosity-limiter. To satisfy mass conservation, while implementing mantle inflow on some side boundaries, we keep other sides open (Chertova et al. 2012). To test the mantle flow influence on the dynamics of real-Earth subduction zone we adopt the numerical model from Chertova et al. (2014) for the evolution of the western Mediterranean subduction since 35 Ma. First, this model was tested with the arbitrary mantle flow prescribed on one of the four side boundaries or for the combination of two boundaries. In the last set of experiments, for side boundary conditions we use time-dependent estimates of actual mantle flow in the region based on Steinberger (2015) given for every 1 My. We demonstrate that for the western-Mediterranean subduction, the surrounding mantle flow is of second-order compared to slab buoyancy in controlling the dynamics of the subducting slab. Introducing mantle flow on the side boundaries might, however, improve the fit between the modeled and real slab imaged by tomography, although this may also trade-off with varying rheological parameters of

  14. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments.

  15. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranganu, Constantin

    Twenty new heat flow values are incorporated, along with 40 previously published data, into a heat flow map of Oklahoma. The new heat flow data were estimated using previous temperature measurements in boreholes made by American Petroleum Institute researchers and 1,498 thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings. The mean of 20 average thermal gradients is 30.50sp°C/km. In general, thermal gradients increase from SW (14.11sp°C/km) to NE (42.24sp°C/km). The range of 1,498 in situ thermal conductivity measurements (after corrections for anisotropy, in situ temperature, and porosity) is 0.90-6.1 W/m-K; the average is 1.68 W/m-K. Estimated near-surface heat flow (±20%) at 20 new sites in Oklahoma varies between 22 ± 4 mW/msp2 and 86 ± 17 mW/msp2; the average is 50 mW/msp2. Twenty-seven new heat-generation estimates, along with 22 previously published data, are used to create a heat generation map of Oklahoma. The range of heat production estimates is 1.1-3.5 muW/msp3, with an average of 2.5 muW/msp3. The heat flow regime in Oklahoma is primarily conductive in nature, except for a zone in northeast. Transient effects due to sedimentary processes and metamorphic/igneous activity, as well as past climatic changes, do not significantly influence the thermal state of the Oklahoma crust. Heat flow near the margins of the Arkoma and Anadarko Basins may be depressed or elevated by 5-13 mW/msp2 by refraction of heat from sedimentary rocks of relatively low thermal conductivity (1-2 W/m-K) into crystalline basement rocks of relatively high thermal conductivity (˜3-4 W/m-K). The heat generation-heat flow relationship shows a modest correlation. The relatively high heat flow (˜70-80 mW/msp2) in part of northeastern Oklahoma suggests that the thermal regime there may be perturbed by regional groundwater flow originating in the fractured outcrops of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Arbuckle Mountains.

  16. Has Northern Hemisphere Heat Flow Been Underestimated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W. D.; Majorowicz, J.; Safanda, J.; Szewczyk, J.

    2005-05-01

    We present three lines of evidence to suggest the hypothesis that heat flow in the northern hemisphere may have been underestimated by 15 to 60 percent in shallow wells due to a large post-glacial warming signal. First, temperature vs. depth (T-z) measurements in parts of Europe and North America show a systematic increase in heat flow with depth. This phenomenon is best recognized in analyses of deep (greater than 2km) boreholes in non-tectonic regions with normal to low background heat flow. In Europe, the increase in heat flow with depth has been observed by analysis of more than 1500 deep boreholes located throughout the Fennoscandian Shield, East European Platform, Danish Basin, Germany, Czech Republic, and Poland. There are significantly fewer deep boreholes in North America, but the increase in heat flow with depth appears in a suite of 759 sites in the IHFC Global Heat Flow Database for the region east of the Rocky Mountains and north of latitude 40 N. Second, surface heat flow values in southern hemisphere shields average approximately 50 mWm-2, but surface heat flow values in northern hemisphere shields average 33 mWm-2. Unless crustal radioactivity or mantle heat flow or both factors are greater in southern hemisphere continents, there is no reason for the northern and southern shield areas having similar ages to have different heat flow values. Third, two recently published surface heat flow maps show anomalously low heat flow in the Canadian Shield in a pattern that is coincident with the Wisconsinan ice sheet. The coincidence of low heat flow and ice accumulation has no geophysical basis, thus the coincidence may suggest the existence of a transient signal caused by a warming event. Recent studies of heat flow in North America indicate that in several sites, the ice base temperature was close to the pressure melting point. We hypothesize that there may have been cold ice-free periods during the Pleistocene that would account for the apparent colder

  17. Venus Heat Flow Instrument Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauken, M.; Smith, K.; Sujittosakul, S.; Li, B.; Firdosy, S.; Smrekar, S.; Morgan, P.

    2016-10-01

    A heat flux measurement instrument is being developed to determine the heat flow through the Venus surface. Heat flow measurement provides data for distinguishing between various hypotheses of planetary evolution.

  18. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  19. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  20. Heat Flow Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Heat gauges are used to measure heat flow in industrial activities. They must periodically be certified by instruments designed to provide a heat flux measurement standard. CSTAR, a NASA CCDS, and REMTECH have developed a portable heat flux checker/calibrator. The Q-CHEC can be carried to the heat gauge for certification, reducing out of service time for the gauge and eliminating the need for a replacement gauge during certification. It can provide an "end-to-end" check of the instrumentation measurement system or be used as a standalone calibrator. Because Q-CHEC offers on-site capability to detect and eliminate measurement errors, measurements do not have to be repeated, and money is saved.

  1. Lattice thermal conductivity of lower mantle minerals and heat flux from Earth’s core

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth M.; de Koker, Nico; Frost, Dan J.; McCammon, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    The amount of heat flowing from Earth’s core critically determines the thermo-chemical evolution of both the core and the lower mantle. Consisting primarily of a polycrystalline aggregate of silicate perovskite and ferropericlase, the thermal boundary layer at the very base of Earth’s lower mantle regulates the heat flow from the core, so that the thermal conductivity (k) of these mineral phases controls the amount of heat entering the lowermost mantle. Here we report measurements of the lattice thermal conductivity of pure, Al-, and Fe-bearing MgSiO3 perovskite at 26 GPa up to 1,073 K, and of ferropericlase containing 0, 5, and 20% Fe, at 8 and 14 GPa up to 1,273 K. We find the incorporation of these elements in silicate perovskite and ferropericlase to result in a ∼50% decrease of lattice thermal conductivity relative to the end member compositions. A model of thermal conductivity constrained from our results indicates that a peridotitic mantle would have k = 9.1 ± 1.2 W/m K at the top of the thermal boundary layer and k = 8.4 ± 1.2 W/m K at its base. These values translate into a heat flux of 11.0 ± 1.4 terawatts (TW) from Earth’s core, a range of values consistent with a variety of geophysical estimates. PMID:22021444

  2. Lunar heat flow: Regional prospective of the Apollo landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegler, M. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    reexamine the Apollo Heat Flow Experiment in light of new orbital data. Using three-dimensional thermal conduction models, we examine effects of crustal thickness, density, and radiogenic abundance on measured heat flow values at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites. These models show the importance of regional context on heat flux measurements. We find that measured heat flux can be greatly altered by deep subsurface radiogenic content and crustal density. However, total crustal thickness and the presence of a near-surface radiogenic-rich ejecta provide less leverage, representing only minor (<1.5 mW m-2) perturbations on surface heat flux. Using models of the crust implied by Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory results, we found that a roughly 9-13 mW m-2 mantle heat flux best approximate the observed heat flux. This equates to a total mantle heat production of 2.8-4.1 × 1011 W. These heat flow values could imply that the lunar interior is slightly less radiogenic than the Earth's mantle, perhaps implying that a considerable fraction of terrestrial mantle material was incorporated at the time of formation. These results may also imply that heat flux at the crust-mantle boundary beneath the Procellarum potassium, rare earth element, and phosphorus (KREEP) Terrane (PKT) is anomalously elevated compared to the rest of the Moon. These results also suggest that a limited KREEP-rich layer exists beneath the PKT crust. If a subcrustal KREEP-rich layer extends below the Apollo 17 landing site, required mantle heat flux can drop to roughly 7 mW m-2, underlining the need for future heat flux measurements outside of the radiogenic-rich PKT region.

  3. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Heliumisotope trends

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2007-10-07

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range province, western North America increase systematically from low, crustal values in the east to high, mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active trans-tensional deformation indicates a deformation enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere in regions even where there is no significant magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high-{sup 3}He/{sup 4}He anomalies signifying hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development.

  4. Mantle Flow Pattern and Dynamic Topography beneath the Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; King, S. D.; Adam, C. M.; Long, M. D.; Benoit, M. H.; Kirby, E.

    2015-12-01

    The complex tectonic history of the eastern US over the past billion years includes episodes of subduction and rifting associated with two complete cycles of supercontinent assembly and breakup. Both the previous global tomography models (S40RTS, SAVANI, TX2011, GyPSuM, SMEAN) and the analysis of the shear-wave splitting from the broadband seismic stations find a distinct coast-to-inland differentiation pattern in the lithosphere and upper mantle. The Mid-Atlantic Geophysical Integrative Collaboration (MAGIC) includes a dense linear seismic array from the Atlantic coast of Virginia to the western boarder of Ohio, crossing several different tectonic zones. To derive the regional mantle flow pattern along with its surface expression such as dynamic topography and aid the interpretation of the seismic observations, we are building a new geodynamic model based on ASPECT (Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth CovecTion) that uses buoyancy derived from seismic tomography along with realistic lithosphere and sub-lithosphere structure. At present, we use S40RTS and SAVANI tomography models together with the temperature-dependent viscosity to compute the mantle flow and dynamic topography. Beneath the eastern US, the upper mantle flow in our model is primarily parallel to the trend of the Appalachian belt, which is broadly consistent with the direction of the local shear-wave splitting. The dynamic topography results exhibit a coast-to-inland magnitude differentiation along the MAGIC seismic deployment. The numerical tests also show that both the magnitude and pattern of the dynamic topography are quite sensitive to the density perturbation and rigidity of the lithosphere/sub-lithosphere. Our future work involves using other tomography and viscosity models to obtain the mantle flow pattern as well as the resulting dynamic topography and geoid.

  5. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D.

    1996-12-31

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 {sup 0}C/km (average 31.2 {sup 0}C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  6. Heat flow in Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cranganu, C.; Deming, D. )

    1996-01-01

    Oklahoma is one area in which terrestrial heat flow data are sparse. The thermal state of the southern mid-continent, however, is a key to understanding several important geologic problems. These include thermal anomalies associated with Paleozoic fluid migrations and the formation of Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, the thermal evolution of the Arkoma and Anadarko sedimentary basins, and the history of hydrocarbon generation and overpressuring in the Anadarko Basin. In the late 1920s, the American Petroleum Institute made a set of equilibrium temperature logs in idle oil wells. These temperature data are generally regarded as being high quality, accurate estimates of rock temperature and they cover the entire central part of Oklahoma. Average thermal gradients in the API survey range from 14 to 43 [sup 0]C/km (average 31.2 [sup 0]C/km) over depth intervals that extend from the surface to a an average depth of 961 m. Geothermal gradients decrease from NNE to SSW. The observed change in thermal gradients could be due to a number of factors. The change in thermal gradients could simply reflect changes in lithology and thermal conductivity. Alternatively, the variation in thermal gradients could be indicative of a change in heat flow related perhaps to variations in the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the crust or heat transport by one or more regional groundwater flow systems. We are proceeding to reduce ambiguity in interpretation by estimating heat flow from thermal conductivity measurements on drill cuttings and heat production from available gamma-ray logs which penetrate basement rocks.

  7. Experimental investigation of flow-induced fabrics in rocks at upper-mantle pressures. Application to understanding mantle dynamics and seismic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, William B.

    2016-05-02

    The goal of this collaborative research effort between W.B. Durham at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and D.L. Kohlstedt and S. Mei at the University of Minnesota (UMN) was to exploit a newly developed technology for high-pressure, high-temperature deformation experimentation, namely, the deformation DIA (D-DIA), to determine the deformation behavior of a number of important upper mantle rock types including olivine, garnet, enstatite, and periclase. Experiments were carried out under both hydrous and anhydrous conditions and at both lithospheric and asthenospheric stress and temperature conditions. The result was a group of flow laws for Earth’s upper mantle that quantitatively describe the viscosity of mantle rocks from shallow depths (the lithosphere) to great depths (the asthenosphere). These flow laws are fundamental for modeling the geodynamic behavior and heat transport from depth to Earth’s surface.-

  8. Experimental investigation of flow-induced fabrics in rocks at upper-mantle pressures: Application to understanding mantle dynamics and seismic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlstedt, David L.

    2016-04-26

    The goal of this collaborative research effort between W.B. Durham at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and D.L. Kohlstedt and S. Mei at the University of Minnesota (UMN) was to exploit a newly developed technology for high-pressure, high-temperature deformation experimentation, namely, the deformation DIA (D-DIA) to determine the deformation behavior of a number of important upper mantle rock types including olivine, garnet, enstatite, and periclase. Experiments were carried out under both hydrous and anhydrous conditions and at both lithospheric and asthenospheric stress and temperature conditions. The result was a group of flow laws for Earth’s upper mantle that quantitatively describe the viscosity of mantle rocks from shallow depths (the lithosphere) to great depths (the asthenosphere). These flow laws are fundamental for modeling the geodynamic behavior and heat transport from depth to Earth’s surface.

  9. Mantle flow field in the southern Ryukyu subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Kuo, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Okinawa trough in the Ryukyu subduction system is the only active back arc basin formed within a continental lithosphere. Recent shear-wave splitting measurements show variable fast directions along the trough suggesting complex three-dimensional flow field in the mantle wedge. In this study we use numerical subduction models to explore the effects of plate thickness variations caused by non-uniform lithospheric stretching on the dynamics in the southern Ryukyu subduction system. We calculate orientations of infinite strain axes as a proxy for olivine lattice preferred orientations and orientations of seismic anisotropy. Our models demonstrate that flow patterns may vary significantly with depth near the plate edge as a result of the along-arc variations in lithospheric thickness. The model results show that the toroidal circulation around the lateral slab edge predominates at greater depths. The thick neighboring lithosphere acts as an effective barrier of the lateral mass exchanges in the shallow portion of the mantle wedge. The wedge material is drawn in horizontally toward the plate edge from the central region of the subduction zone induced by pressure gradients, opposite to the inwards lateral flow at greater depths. Model predictions for the lattice preferred orientations of olivine aggregates agree reasonably well with the observed shear-wave splitting patterns. The results suggest that the depth-varying flow field near the subduction zone edge and the westward flow components in the shallow portion of the mantle wedge may contribute to complex patterns of seismic anisotropy and arc isotopic systematics.

  10. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  11. Geodynamics of the Yellowstone hotspot and mantle plume: Seismic and GPS imaging, kinematics, and mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert B.; Jordan, Michael; Steinberger, Bernhard; Puskas, Christine M.; Farrell, Jamie; Waite, Gregory P.; Husen, Stephan; Chang, Wu-Lung; O'Connell, Richard

    2009-11-01

    Integration of geophysical and geological data show that the Yellowstone hotspot resulted from a mantle plume interacting with the overriding North America plate, a process that has highly modified continental lithosphere by magmatic and tectonic processes and produced the 16-17 Ma, 700-km-long Yellowstone-Snake River Plain (YSRP) silicic volcanic system. Accessibility of the YSRP allowed large-scale geophysical projects to seismically image the hotspot and evaluate its kinematic properties using geodetic measurements. Seismic tomography reveals a crustal magma reservoir of 8% to 15% melt, 6 km to 16 km deep, beneath the Yellowstone caldera. An upper-mantle low-P-wave-velocity body extends vertically from 80 km to 250 km beneath Yellowstone, but the anomalous body tilts 60 °WNW and extends to 660 km depth into the mantle transition zone. We interpret this conduit-shaped low-velocity body as a plume of up to - 3.5% Vp and - 5.5% Vs perturbation that corresponds to a 1-2% partial melt. Models of whole mantle convection reveal eastward upper-mantle flow beneath Yellowstone at relatively high rates of 5 cm/yr that deflects the ascending plume into its west-tilted geometry. A geodynamic model of the Yellowstone plume constrained by Vp and Vs velocities and attenuation parameters suggests low excess temperatures of up to 120 K, corresponding to a maximum 2.5% melt, and a small buoyancy flux of 0.25 Mg/s, i.e., properties of a cool, weak plume. The buoyancy flux is many times smaller than for oceanic plumes, nonetheless, plume buoyancy has produced a ~ 400-km-wide, ~ 500-m-high topographic swell centered on the Yellowstone Plateau. Contemporary deformation derived from GPS measurements reveals SW extension of 2-3 mm/yr across the Yellowstone Plateau, one-fourth of the total Basin-Range opening rate, which we consider to be part of Basin-Range intraplate extension. Locally, decadal episodes of subsidence and uplift, averaging ~ 2 cm/yr, characterize the 80-year

  12. Effects of a core/mantle chemical boundary layer with variable internal heat production on the thermal evolution of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Estimates of conductive heat flow across the core/mantle boundary suggest high heat flow values of 7-14 TW for a core/mantle temperature drop of 1000-1800 K. This level of heat flow predicts an inner core age of less than 1-2 Ga. However, some models of core/mantle thermal evolution predict late onset of inner core crystallization may require implausibly high core temperatures in the Archaean [1]. Sequestration of heat producing elements at the base of the mantle may reduce core/mantle heat flow and increase the age of the inner core [1]. In addition, Boyet and Carlson [2] reported ^{142}Nd excesses in terrestrial samples relative to chondrites, and proposed that an enriched reservoir produced by early differentiation may be "hidden" at the base of the mantle, and that this reservoir could contain up to 43% of the Earth's heat producing elements. The runaway core thermal evolution predicted by Buffett [1] for models with a relatively young inner core results from two assumptions. First, Buffett assumes that core/mantle heat flow has decreased ~3x since the onset of inner core crystallization, because the power required to drive the geodynamo today is much lower than prior to inner core crystallization. Second, Buffett treats the core/mantle boundary as a thermal boundary with strongly temperature-dependant viscosity, so that relatively small increases in core temperature result in a large decrease in boundary layer thickness and increase in core/mantle heat flow. If the core/mantle boundary is a chemical rather than purely thermal boundary the boundary layer thickness need not be time- or temperature-dependant. As a result, core/mantle heat flow is roughly linearly proportional to core-mantle ΔT, rather than exponential. Provided that modern core/mantle heat flow is greater than the heat flow required to drive the geodynamo in the absence of inner core crystallization, no significant secular evolution in core/mantle heat flow is required. Given these assumptions

  13. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  14. New Map of Io's Volcanic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have created a global map of Io's volcanic heat flow from 245 thermal sources indicative of ongoing or recent volcanic activity, and 8 additional outbursts [1,2]. We incorporate data from both spacecraft and ground-based instruments that have observed Io primarily at infrared wavelengths. This map provides a snapshot of Io's volcanic activity and distribution during the Galileo epoch. Io's volcanic activity, in terms of thermal emission from individual eruptive centres, spans nearly six orders of magnitude, from Surt in 2001 (78 TW) [3] to a faint hot spot in patera P197 (0.2 GW) [1]. We account for ≈54% of Io's yearly volcanic heat flow, which emanates from ≈2% of Io's surface [1]. Averaged heat flow from the non-active surface is 1 ± 0.2 W m2. This quantification of volcanic heat flow map provides constraints for modelling the magnitude and location of the internal heating of Io by tidal dissipation. The observed heat flow distribution is the result of interior heating and volcanic advection, the delivery of magma to the surface regardless of its depth of origin. As noted previously [1, 2] the distribution of heat flow is not uniform, which is not unexpected. The volcanic heat flow does not match the expected distributions from end-member models for both the deep-seated (mantle) heating model (which predicts enhanced polar heating) and the shallow (aesthenospheric) heating model, which predicts enhanced thermal emission at sub-jovian and anti-jovian longitudes. Intriguingly, heat flow curves using a bin size of 30 degrees show a longitudinal offset from the shallow heating model prediction of some tens of degrees [2], suggesting a more complex mixture of deep and shallow heating. Future work includes refinement of thermal emission by including temporal variability of thermal emission at individual volcanoes, and comparing the heat flow map with the Io Geological Map [4] and global topography [5]. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. Part of this

  15. Visualization of Flow Behavior in Earth Mantle Convection.

    PubMed

    Schroder, S; Peterson, J A; Obermaier, H; Kellogg, L H; Joy, K I; Hagen, H

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental characteristic of fluid flow is that it causes mixing: introduce a dye into a flow, and it will disperse. Mixing can be used as a method to visualize and characterize flow. Because mixing is a process that occurs over time, it is a 4D problem that presents a challenge for computation, visualization, and analysis. Motivated by a mixing problem in geophysics, we introduce a combination of methods to analyze, transform, and finally visualize mixing in simulations of convection in a self-gravitating 3D spherical shell representing convection in the Earth's mantle. Geophysicists use tools such as the finite element model CitcomS to simulate convection, and introduce massless, passive tracers to model mixing. The output of geophysical flow simulation is hard to analyze for domain experts because of overall data size and complexity. In addition, information overload and occlusion are problems when visualizing a whole-earth model. To address the large size of the data, we rearrange the simulation data using intelligent indexing for fast file access and efficient caching. To address information overload and interpret mixing, we compute tracer concentration statistics, which are used to characterize mixing in mantle convection models. Our visualization uses a specially tailored version of Direct Volume Rendering. The most important adjustment is the use of constant opacity. Because of this special area of application, i. e. the rendering of a spherical shell, many computations for volume rendering can be optimized. These optimizations are essential to a smooth animation of the time-dependent simulation data. Our results show how our system can be used to quickly assess the simulation output and test hypotheses regarding Earth's mantle convection. The integrated processing pipeline helps geoscientists to focus on their main task of analyzing mantle homogenization.

  16. Effects from equation of state and rheology in dissipative heating in compressible mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, David A.; Quareni, Francesca; Hong, H.-J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of compressibility on mantle convection are considered, incorporating the effects of equations of state and rheology in the dissipative heating term of the energy equation. The ways in which compression may raise the interior mantle temperature are explicitly demonstrated, and it is shown how this effect can be used to constrain some of the intrinsic parameters associated with the equation of state in the mantle. It is concluded that the coupling between variable viscosity and equation of state in dissipative heating is potentially an important mechanism in mantle convection. These findings emphasize that rheology, equation of state, and radiogenic heating are all linked to each other by nonlinear thermomechanical couplings.

  17. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  18. Subduction, back-arc spreading and global mantle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, B. H.; Oconnell, R. J.; Raefsky, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the subducted lithosphere associated with Benioff zones provides the only direct evidence about the flow in the earth's interior associated with plate motions. It is the primary objective of the present investigation to study the relation between the orientation of subducting lithosphere and the flow patterns (both local and global) near subduction zones. Most of the calculations conducted are based on simple flow models for radially symmetric, Newtonian viscous spheres. The investigation is concerned with the possibility that a simple model of global mantle flow could account for some features of subduction zones. It is found that such a model can account for the orientation of the seismic zones, and, in addition, also for features related to back-arc spreading and perhaps the maximum earthquake size.

  19. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  20. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  1. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  2. Present-day heat flow model of Mars.

    PubMed

    Parro, Laura M; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Mansilla, Federico; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-04-03

    Until the acquisition of in-situ measurements, the study of the present-day heat flow of Mars must rely on indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of the lithosphere and its mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, on scaling of heat flow variations arising from crustal thickness and topography variations, and on the heat flow derived from the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere beneath the North Polar Region. Our preferred model finds heat flows varying between 14 and 25 mW m(-2), with an average value of 19 mW m(-2). Similar results (although about ten percent higher) are obtained if we use heat flow based on the lithospheric strength of the South Polar Region. Moreover, expressing our results in terms of the Urey ratio (the ratio between total internal heat production and total heat loss through the surface), we estimate values close to 0.7-0.75, which indicates a moderate contribution of secular cooling to the heat flow of Mars (consistent with the low heat flow values deduced from lithosphere strength), unless heat-producing elements abundances for Mars are subchondritic.

  3. Present-day heat flow model of Mars

    PubMed Central

    Parro, Laura M.; Jiménez-Díaz, Alberto; Mansilla, Federico; Ruiz, Javier

    2017-01-01

    Until the acquisition of in-situ measurements, the study of the present-day heat flow of Mars must rely on indirect methods, mainly based on the relation between the thermal state of the lithosphere and its mechanical strength, or on theoretical models of internal evolution. Here, we present a first-order global model for the present-day surface heat flow for Mars, based on the radiogenic heat production of the crust and mantle, on scaling of heat flow variations arising from crustal thickness and topography variations, and on the heat flow derived from the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere beneath the North Polar Region. Our preferred model finds heat flows varying between 14 and 25 mW m−2, with an average value of 19 mW m−2. Similar results (although about ten percent higher) are obtained if we use heat flow based on the lithospheric strength of the South Polar Region. Moreover, expressing our results in terms of the Urey ratio (the ratio between total internal heat production and total heat loss through the surface), we estimate values close to 0.7–0.75, which indicates a moderate contribution of secular cooling to the heat flow of Mars (consistent with the low heat flow values deduced from lithosphere strength), unless heat-producing elements abundances for Mars are subchondritic. PMID:28367996

  4. Global Transition Zone Anisotropy and Consequences for Mantle Flow and Earth's Deep Water Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.

    2011-12-01

    The transition zone has long been at the center of the debate between multi- and single-layered convection models that directly relate to heat transport and chemical mixing throughout the mantle. It has also been suggested that the transition zone is a reservoir that collects water transported by subduction of the lithosphere into the mantle. Since water lowers mantle minerals density and viscosity, thereby modifying their rheology and melting behavior, it likely affects global mantle dynamics and the history of plate tectonics. Constraining mantle flow is therefore important for our understanding of Earth's thermochemical evolution and deep water cycle. Because it can result from deformation by dislocation creep during convection, seismic anisotropy can help us model mantle flow. It is relatively well constrained in the uppermost mantle, but its presence in the transition zone is still debated. Its detection below 250 km depth has been challenging to date because of the poor vertical resolution of commonly used datasets. In this study, we used global Love wave overtone phase velocity maps, which are sensitive to structure down to much larger depths than fundamental modes alone, and have greater depth resolution than shear wave-splitting data. This enabled us to obtain a first 3-D model of azimuthal anisotropy for the upper 800km of the mantle. We inverted the 2Ψ terms of anisotropic phase velocity maps [Visser, et al., 2008] for the first five Love wave overtones between 35s and 174s period. The resulting model shows that the average anisotropy amplitude for vertically polarized shear waves displays two main stable peaks: one in the uppermost mantle and, most remarkably, one in the lower transition zone. F-tests showed that the presence of 2Ψ anisotropy in the transition zone is required to improve the third, fourth, and fifth overtones fit. Because of parameter trade-offs, however, we cannot exclude that the anisotropy is located in the upper transition zone as

  5. Magnetic Heat Pump Containing Flow Diverters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed magnetic heat pump contains flow diverters for suppression of undesired flows. If left unchecked, undesired flows mix substantial amounts of partially heated and partially cooled portions of working fluid, effectively causing leakage of heat from heated side to cooled side. By reducing leakage of heat, flow diverters increase energy efficiency of magnetic heat pump, potentially offering efficiency greater than compressor-driven refrigerator.

  6. The role of heat source for spatio-temporal variations of mantle plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, I.; Yamagishi, Y.; Davaille, A.

    2014-12-01

    Hot mantle plumes ascending from the core-mantle boundary experience a filtering effect by the endothermic phase change at the 660-km discontinuity. Fluid dynamics predicts that some hot mantle plumes stagnate at the phase boundary and locally heat the bottom of the upper mantle. This generates the secondary plumes in the upper mantle originating hotspots volcanic activities on the Earth's surface. Recently, seismic tomographic images around the upper-lower mantle boundary showed that the horizontal scale of the low velocity regions, which corresponds to that of the thermally buoyant heat sources, is the order of 100-1000 km. Although most of the fluid dynamic theories on the thermal plumes have been developed using an assumption that the heat source effect is negligible, the behaviors of the starting plumes in the upper mantle should depend on the size of heat source, which is generated by the hotter plume from the CMB. In order to understand the effects of heater size on the starting plume generation, we have experimentally investigated the behaviors of thermally buoyant plumes using a localized heat source (circular plate heater). The combination of quantitative visualization techniques of temperature (Thermochromic Liquid Crystals) and velocity (Particle Image Velocimetry) fields reveals the transient nature of the plume evolution: a variety of the spatio-tempotal distribution of plumes. Simple scaling laws for their ascent velocity and spacing of the plumes are experimentally determined. We also estimate the onset time of the secondary plumes in the upper mantle which depends on the local characteristics of the thermal boundary layer developing at the upper-lower mantle boundary.

  7. Martian surface heat production and crustal heat flow from Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, B. C.; McLennan, S. M.; Klein, E. C.

    2011-07-01

    Martian thermal state and evolution depend principally on the radiogenic heat-producing element (HPE) distributions in the planet's crust and mantle. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft has mapped the surface abundances of HPEs across Mars. From these data, we produce the first models of global and regional surface heat production and crustal heat flow. As previous studies have suggested that the crust is a repository for approximately 50% of the radiogenic elements on Mars, these models provide important, directly measurable constraints on Martian heat generation. Our calculations show considerable geographic and temporal variations in crustal heat flow, and demonstrate the existence of anomalous heat flow provinces. We calculate a present day average surface heat production of 4.9 ± 0.3 × 10-11 W · kg-1. We also calculate the average crustal component of heat flow of 6.4 ± 0.4 mW · m-2. The crustal component of radiogenically produced heat flow ranges from <1 mW · m-2 in the Hellas Basin and Utopia Planitia regions to ˜13 mW · m-2 in the Sirenum Fossae region. These heat production and crustal heat flow values from geochemical measurements support previous heat flow estimates produced by different methodologies.

  8. Heat transport in the Hadean mantle: From heat pipes to plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankanamge, Duminda G. J.; Moore, William B.

    2016-04-01

    Plate tectonics is a unique feature of Earth, and it plays a dominant role in transporting Earth's internally generated heat. It also governs the nature, shape, and the motion of the surface of Earth. The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth has been difficult to establish observationally, and modeling of the plate breaking process has not consistently accounted for the nature of the preplate tectonic Earth. We have performed numerical simulations of heat transport in the preplate tectonic Earth to understand the transition to plate tectonic behavior. This period of time is dominated by volcanic heat transport called the heat pipe mode of planetary cooling. These simulations of Earth's mantle include heat transport by melting and melt segregation (volcanism), Newtonian temperature-dependent viscosity, and internal heating. We show that when heat pipes are active, the lithosphere thickens and lithospheric isotherms are kept flat by the solidus. Both of these effects act to suppress plate tectonics. As volcanism wanes, conduction begins to control lithospheric thickness, and large slopes arise at the base of the lithosphere. This produces large lithospheric stress and focuses it on the thinner regions of the lithosphere resulting in plate breaking events.

  9. Mantle flow pressure and the angle of subduction - Non-Newtonian corner flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tovish, A.; Schubert, G.; Luyendyk, B. P.

    1978-01-01

    Corner flows of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids are used to model the flow in a subduction zone which is viscously driven by the motions of the converging plates and the descending slab. The pressures induced by the flow tend to lift the slab up beneath the overriding plate thereby offsetting the tendency of gravity to align the slab with the vertical. The low angles of subduction observed in Peru and Central Chile may be the result of strong dynamic pressures forcing the slab up against the overriding plate. Viscous coupling between the overriding plate and the downgoing slab is essential if the nonvertical dips of slabs are a consequence of the balance between gravitational and pressure torques. For a Newtonian mantle, shear stresses and pressures on the top of the slab are comparable. If the mantle is non-Newtonian, however, the pressures greatly exceed the shear stresses, for most acute dip angles. Thus frictional forces on the top and bottom surfaces of slabs are less important in resisting slab descent into a non-Newtonian mantle than they are in resisting penetration into a Newtonian mantle.

  10. Mantle upwelling and trench-parallel mantle flow in the northern Cascade arc indicated by basalt geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, E.; Weis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Cascadia offers a unique perspective on arc magma genesis as an end-member ';hot' subduction zone in which relatively little water may be available to promote mantle melting. The youngest and hottest subducting crust (~5 Myr at the trench) occurs in the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, at the northern edge of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate [1]. Geochemical data from GVB primitive basalts provide insights on mantle melting where a slab edge coincides with high slab temperatures. In subduction zones worldwide, including the Cascades, basalts are typically calc-alkaline and produced from a depleted mantle wedge modified by slab input. However, basalts from volcanic centers overlying the northern slab edge (Salal Glacier and Bridge River Cones) are alkalic [2] and lack a trace element subduction signature [3]. The mantle source of the alkalic basalts is significantly more enriched in incompatible elements than the slab-modified depleted mantle wedge that produces calc-alkaline basalts in the southern GVB (Mt. Baker and Glacier Peak) [3]. The alkalic basalts are also generated at temperatures and pressures of up to 175°C and 1.5 GPa higher than those of the calc-alkaline basalts [3], consistent with decompression melting of fertile, hot mantle ascending through a gap in the Nootka fault, the boundary between the subducting Juan de Fuca plate and the nearly stagnant Explorer microplate. Mantle upwelling may be related to toroidal mantle flow around the slab edge, which has been identified in southern Cascadia [4]. In the GVB, the upwelling fertile mantle is not confined to the immediate area around the slab edge but has spread southward along the arc axis, its extent gradually diminishing as the slab-modified depleted mantle wedge becomes dominant. Between Salal Glacier/Bridge River and Glacier Peak ~350 km to the south, there are increases in isotopic ratios (ɛHf = 8.3 to13.0, ɛNd = 7.3 to 8.5, and 208Pb*/206*Pb* = 0.914 to 0.928) and trace element indicators of slab

  11. Joule heating in electrokinetic flow.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Xiangchun

    2008-01-01

    Electrokinetic flow is an efficient means to manipulate liquids and samples in lab-on-a-chip devices. It has a number of significant advantages over conventional pressure-driven flow. However, there exists inevitable Joule heating in electrokinetic flow, which is known to cause temperature variations in liquids and draw disturbances to electric, flow and concentration fields via temperature-dependent material properties. Therefore, both the throughput and the resolution of analytic studies performed in microfluidic devices are affected. This article reviews the recent progress on the topic of Joule heating and its effect in electrokinetic flow, particularly the theoretical and experimental accomplishments from the aspects of fluid mechanics and heat/mass transfer. The primary focus is placed on the temperature-induced flow variations and the accompanying phenomena at the whole channel or chip level.

  12. Reconciling surface plate motions with rapid three-dimensional mantle flow around a slab edge.

    PubMed

    Jadamec, Margarete A; Billen, Magali I

    2010-05-20

    The direction of tectonic plate motion at the Earth's surface and the flow field of the mantle inferred from seismic anisotropy are well correlated globally, suggesting large-scale coupling between the mantle and the surface plates. The fit is typically poor at subduction zones, however, where regional observations of seismic anisotropy suggest that the direction of mantle flow is not parallel to and may be several times faster than plate motions. Here we present three-dimensional numerical models of buoyancy-driven deformation with realistic slab geometry for the Alaska subduction-transform system and use them to determine the origin of this regional decoupling of flow. We find that near a subduction zone edge, mantle flow velocities can have magnitudes of more than ten times the surface plate motions, whereas surface plate velocities are consistent with plate motions and the complex mantle flow field is consistent with observations from seismic anisotropy. The seismic anisotropy observations constrain the shape of the eastern slab edge and require non-Newtonian mantle rheology. The incorporation of the non-Newtonian viscosity results in mantle viscosities of 10(17) to 10(18) Pa s in regions of high strain rate (10(-12) s(-1)), and this low viscosity enables the mantle flow field to decouple partially from the motion of the surface plates. These results imply local rapid transport of geochemical signatures through subduction zones and that the internal deformation of slabs decreases the slab-pull force available to drive subducting plates.

  13. Insights on slab-driven mantle flow from advances in three-dimensional modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, Margarete A.

    2016-10-01

    The wealth of seismic observations collected over the past 20 years has raised intriguing questions about the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the mantle flow field close to subduction zones and provided a valuable constraint for how the plate geometry may influence mantle flow proximal to the slab. In geodynamics, there has been a new direction of subduction zone modelling that has explored the 3D nature of slab-driven mantle flow, motivated in part by the observations from shear wave splitting, but also by the observed variations in slab geometries worldwide. Advances in high-performance computing are now allowing for an unprecedented level of detail to be incorporated into numerical models of subduction. This paper summarizes recent advances from 3D geodynamic models that reveal the complex nature of slab-driven mantle flow, including trench parallel flow, toroidal flow around slab edges, mantle upwelling at lateral slab edges, and small scale convection within the mantle wedge. This implies slab-driven mantle deformation zones occur in the asthenosphere proximal to the slab, wherein the mantle may commonly flow in a different direction and rate than the surface plates, implying laterally variable plate-mantle coupling. The 3D slab-driven mantle flow can explain, in part, the lateral transport of geochemical signatures in subduction zones. In addition, high-resolution geographically referenced models can inform the interpretation of slab structure, where seismic data are lacking. The incorporation of complex plate boundaries into high-resolution, 3D numerical models opens the door to a new avenue of research in model construction, data assimilation, and modelling workflows, and gives 3D immersive visualization a new role in scientific discovery.

  14. Seismic imaging of structural heterogeneity in Earth's mantle: evidence for large-scale mantle flow.

    PubMed

    Ritsema, J; Van Heijst, H J

    2000-01-01

    Systematic analyses of earthquake-generated seismic waves have resulted in models of three-dimensional elastic wavespeed structure in Earth's mantle. This paper describes the development and the dominant characteristics of one of the most recently developed models. This model is based on seismic wave travel times and wave shapes from over 100,000 ground motion recordings of earthquakes that occurred between 1980 and 1998. It shows signatures of plate tectonic processes to a depth of about 1,200 km in the mantle, and it demonstrates the presence of large-scale structure throughout the lower 2,000 km of the mantle. Seismological analyses make it increasingly more convincing that geologic processes shaping Earth's surface are intimately linked to physical processes in the deep mantle.

  15. Constraints on Crustal Heat Production from Heat Flow Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaupart, C.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2003-12-01

    The continental crust is an important repository of highly incompatible elements such as uranium and thorium. Exactly how much it contains is a key issue for the thermal regime of continents and for understanding how the Earth's mantle has evolved through geological time due to crust extraction. Recent estimates of the average uranium, thorium, and potassium concentrations in the continental crust vary by almost a factor of 2 (Wedepohl, 1995;Rudnick and Fountain, 1995; Taylor and McLennan, 1995; see also Chapter 3.01). These estimates are based on different assumptions regarding crustal structure and rely on different types of crustal samples, ranging from xenoliths to shales. They require an extrapolation in scale from tiny specimens to the whole crust of a geological province. Uranium and thorium tend to be located in accessory minerals and on grain boundaries, which are not related simply to bulk chemical composition. Thus, their concentrations vary on the scale of a petrological thin section, a hand sample, an outcrop, and a whole massif. In a geological province, abundant rocks such as gneisses and metasedimentary rocks are usually under-studied because of their complex origin and metamorphic history. A final difficulty is to evaluate the composition of intermediate and lower crustal levels, which are as heterogeneous as the shallow ones (e.g., Fountain and Salisbury, 1981; Clowes et al., 1992).Independent estimates of the amount of uranium and thorium in the continental crust can be obtained from heat flow data. The energy produced by the decay of these radioactive elements accounts for a large fraction of the heat flow at the surface of continents (Birch, 1954; Wasserburg et al., 1964; Clark and Ringwood, 1964; Sclater et al., 1980; Taylor and McLennan, 1995). This may be the only case where geophysical data bear directly on geochemical budgets. Since the mid-1970s, there has been much progress in our understanding of continental heat flow. The relationship

  16. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Neamtu, C.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm3 convection tank is filled with a water-based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  17. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Neamtu, C.; Limare, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2014-12-15

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm{sup 3} convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  18. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  19. Lunar heat-flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The principal components of the experiment were probes, each with twelve thermometers of exceptional accuracy and stability, that recorded temperature variations at the surface and in the regolith down to 2.5 m. The Apollo 15 experiment and the Apollo 17 probes recorded lunar surface and subsurface temperatures. These data provided a unique and valuable history of the interaction of solar energy with lunar surface and the effects of heat flowing from the deep interior out through the surface of the moon. The interpretation of these data resulted in a clearer definition of the thermal and mechanical properties of the upper two meters of lunar regolith, direct measurements of the gradient in mean temperature due to heat flow from the interior and a determination of the heat flow at the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 sites.

  20. The dynamics of plate tectonics and mantle flow: from local to global scales.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Georg; Gurnis, Michael; Burstedde, Carsten; Wilcox, Lucas C; Alisic, Laura; Ghattas, Omar

    2010-08-27

    Plate tectonics is regulated by driving and resisting forces concentrated at plate boundaries, but observationally constrained high-resolution models of global mantle flow remain a computational challenge. We capitalized on advances in adaptive mesh refinement algorithms on parallel computers to simulate global mantle flow by incorporating plate motions, with individual plate margins resolved down to a scale of 1 kilometer. Back-arc extension and slab rollback are emergent consequences of slab descent in the upper mantle. Cold thermal anomalies within the lower mantle couple into oceanic plates through narrow high-viscosity slabs, altering the velocity of oceanic plates. Viscous dissipation within the bending lithosphere at trenches amounts to approximately 5 to 20% of the total dissipation through the entire lithosphere and mantle.

  1. Pure climb creep mechanism drives flow in Earth's lower mantle.

    PubMed

    Boioli, Francesca; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick; Devincre, Benoit; Gouriet, Karine; Hirel, Pierre; Kraych, Antoine; Ritterbex, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    At high pressure prevailing in the lower mantle, lattice friction opposed to dislocation glide becomes very high, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical studies. We examine the consequences of this high resistance to plastic shear exhibited by ringwoodite and bridgmanite on creep mechanisms under mantle conditions. To evaluate the consequences of this effect, we model dislocation creep by dislocation dynamics. The calculation yields to an original dominant creep behavior for lower mantle silicates where strain is produced by dislocation climb, which is very different from what can be activated under high stresses under laboratory conditions. This mechanism, named pure climb creep, is grain-size-insensitive and produces no crystal preferred orientation. In comparison to the previous considered diffusion creep mechanism, it is also a more efficient strain-producing mechanism for grain sizes larger than ca. 0.1 mm. The specificities of pure climb creep well match the seismic anisotropy observed of Earth's lower mantle.

  2. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity were included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the sub-adjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the non-linear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The tradeoff between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models (DGRF's) is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition, a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  3. Simultaneous solution for core magnetic field and fluid flow beneath an electrically conducting mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Goerte V.; Nishihama, Masahiro

    1994-01-01

    The effects of laterally homogeneous mantle electrical conductivity have been included in steady, frozen-flux core surface flow estimation along with refinements in method and weighting. The refined method allows simultaneous solution for both the initial radial geomagnetic field component at the core-mantle boundary and the subadjacent fluid motion; it also features Gauss' method for solving the nonlinear inverse problem associated with steady motional induction. The trade-off between spatial complexity of the derived flows and misfit to the weighted Definitive Geomagnetic Reference Field models is studied for various mantle conductivity profiles. For simple flow and a fixed initial geomagnetic condition a fairly high deep-mantle conductivity performs better than either insulating or weakly conducting profiles; however, a thin, very high conductivity layer at the base of the mantle performs almost as well. Simultaneous solution for both initial geomagnetic field and fluid flow reduces the misfit per degree of freedom even more than does changing the mantle conductivity profile. Moreover, when both core field and flow are estimated, the performance of the solutions and the derived flows become insensitive to the conductivity profile.

  4. The Cascadia Paradox: Mantle flow and slab fragmentation in the Cascadia subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Maureen D.

    2016-12-01

    The pattern of mantle flow in subduction systems and the processes that control the mantle flow field represent fundamental but still poorly understood aspects of subduction dynamics. The Cascadia subduction zone is a compelling system in which to understand the controls on mantle flow, especially given the dense geophysical observations recently provided by EarthScope, GeoPRISMS, the Cascadia Initiative, and related efforts. Observations of seismic anisotropy, which provide relatively direct constraints on mantle flow, are particularly intriguing in Cascadia because they seem to yield contradictory views of the mantle flow field in different parts of the system. Specifically, observations of seismic anisotropy on the overriding plate, notably in the central portion of the backarc, apparently require a significant component of three-dimensional, toroidal flow around the slab edge. In contrast, new observations from offshore stations are compellingly explained with a simple two-dimensional entrained flow model. Recent evidence from seismic tomography for the likely fragmentation of the Cascadia slab at depth provides a further puzzle: how does a fragmented slab provide a driving force for either two-dimensional entrained flow or three-dimensional toroidal flow due to slab rollback? Resolution of this apparent paradox will require new imaging strategies as well as the integration of constraints from seismology, geodynamics, and geochemistry.

  5. Fast asthenosphere motion in high-resolution global mantle flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Ghelichkhan, Siavash; Huber, Markus; John, Lorenz; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2015-09-01

    A variety of geologic observations point to fast upper mantle flow that may exceed plate tectonic velocities by an order of magnitude. At the same time there is mounting evidence from seismology for flow-like structures in the upper 100-200 km of the mantle. Here we present a set of geodynamic simulations to link these observations. In a synthetic setting, we include asthenospheric channels of varying thickness, with an extreme case of 100 km, and a significant viscosity contrast of up to 4 orders of magnitude relative to the deeper mantle. Using our new global high-resolution code TERRA-NEO, we obtain an increase in velocity by a factor of 10 between a 1000 km thick and the very thin channel, translating into velocities of ˜ 20 cm/a within the narrow asthenosphere. We further present and verify a simple Poiseuille flow model, predicting that the upper mantle velocity scales with the inverse of the asthenosphere thickness.

  6. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  7. Seismic anisotropy and mantle flow beneath western Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masy, J.; Niu, F.; Levander, A.

    2009-12-01

    We measured shear wave splitting from SKS and SKKS data recorded by the national seismic network of Venezuela and a linear broadband PASSCAL/Rice seismic array across the Merida Andes. The linear array was installed as a second phase of the passive seismic component of the BOLIVAR project (Broadband Onshore-offshore Lithospheric Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) to better understand the complicated regional tectonics in western Venezuela. Polarization direction (φ) of the faster S wave and delay time (δt) between the fast and slow wavelets from 20 stations were obtained using a stacking method proposed by Wolfe and Silver (1998). For each station, SKS or SKKS waveform data from 2 to 36 earthquakes, mostly from the Tonga subduction zone, were selected for splitting analysis. We assumed that shear wave splitting observed at each station is caused by upper mantle seismic anisotropy beneath the station. The best splitting parameters (φ,δt) were estimated when the summed eigenvalue ratio ∑(SNRi[λ2i(φ,δt)/λ1i(φ,δt)]) of the covariance matrix of the corrected particle motion reaches its minimum. We used signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculated from a noise time window before SKS as the weight of the summation. The fast polarization directions can be divided into 3 zones, all in agreement with local GPS data: The first zone is the stations north of the dextral strike-slip Oca fault, an extinct part of the San Sebastian-El Pilar plate boundary zone. These stations show the largest split times (1.6-2.0s), oriented in a roughly EW direction, and are similar to splitting observations made further to the east along the strike slip plate boundary. Zone two is the Maracaibo block, bounded on the southeast by the right lateral Bocono fault, where split orientations are at N45°E, suggesting that the observed seismic anisotropy is likely caused by lithospheric deformation parallel to the Bocono. Zone three is east of the Bocono fault inside the

  8. High Resolution Modelling of Mantle Convective Flow Below the North American Plate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.; Rowley, D. B.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Quéré, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recent progress in joint seismic-geodynamic tomographic imaging of both thermal and compositional anomalies in Earth's mantle allows us to carry out new high-resolution calculations of the present-day mantle convective flow at all depths, from the lithosphere down to the core-mantle boundary. We are therefore able to delineate the detailed connections between fundamental geological and geophysical surface processes and the underlying mantle convection. We employ these convection calculations to consider North American continental dynamics, with a special focus on the detailed relationship between flow in upper mantle, especially in the asthenosphere, and the impact on present-day dynamic topography as well as its rate-of- change. The surface dynamics that we obtain show a clear and detailed connection to the mantle flow driven by the descent of the ancient Kula-Farallon plate system and a buoyant, actively ascending hot upwelling under the western US. Of particular importance is the relationship of the deep-seated upwelling under the Colorado Plateau as a driving force for current rifting in the Rio Grande River valley. This rifting and its temporal evolution bears a strong resemblance to the convection-induced rifting our convection model also predicts under the East African Rift system. The close similarity between these two rifts, in terms of asthenospheric flow dynamics, will be discussed.

  9. Mantle flow geometry from ridge to trench beneath the Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, Robert; Allen, Richard M.; Bastow, Ian D.; Totten, Eoghan; Richards, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic plates are underlain by a low-viscosity mantle layer, the asthenosphere. Asthenospheric flow may be induced by the overriding plate or by deeper mantle convection. Shear strain due to this flow can be inferred using the directional dependence of seismic wave speeds--seismic anisotropy. However, isolation of asthenospheric signals is challenging; most seismometers are located on continents, whose complex structure influences the seismic waves en route to the surface. The Cascadia Initiative, an offshore seismometer deployment in the US Pacific Northwest, offers the opportunity to analyse seismic data recorded on simpler oceanic lithosphere. Here we use measurements of seismic anisotropy across the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates to reconstruct patterns of asthenospheric mantle shear flow from the Juan de Fuca mid-ocean ridge to the Cascadia subduction zone trench. We find that the direction of fastest seismic wave motion rotates with increasing distance from the mid-ocean ridge to become aligned with the direction of motion of the Juan de Fuca Plate, implying that this plate influences mantle flow. In contrast, asthenospheric mantle flow beneath the Gorda Plate does not align with Gorda Plate motion and instead aligns with the neighbouring Pacific Plate motion. These results show that asthenospheric flow beneath the small, slow-moving Gorda Plate is controlled largely by advection due to the much larger, faster-moving Pacific Plate.

  10. Stability of laser heated flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, P. K. S.; Pirri, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    A local stability analysis is utilized to determine the stability of disturbances generated at each point along a nozzle of variable area ratio for a one-dimensional flow heated by laser radiation entering from the upstream direction. The governing equations for the quasi-one-dimensional flow without viscous dissipation, diffusion, and thermal conduction but including radiative heat transfer are given. The governing equations are combined to yield a relationship which governs the Mach number variation through the nozzle. The complete steady-state solution can be calculated from knowledge of the Mach number profile, the inlet conditions, and the laser power. The local stability analysis permits obtaining contour (or contours) of neutral stability. Solutions have been obtained for various nozzle configurations, but only one set of example calculations is presented. The results obtained indicate that the analysis serves as an important indicator as to where potential absorption wave phenomena may be initiated.

  11. Heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.P.; Burrus, J.; Vedova, B.D.

    1988-08-01

    More than 400 terrestrial heat flow determinations have been carried our in the western Mediterranean basins. These include results of detailed surveys in the Ligurian Sea and in the Gulf of Lions and Tyrrhenian basins, as well as sparse measurements in the Gulf of Valencia and the Algerian basin. Most of the measurements are surficial, obtained from the temperatures sensed by outrigged thermistors mounted on weight-driven probes penetrating the sediment to 3 to 10 m. Thermal conductivity was measured either on cores or in situ. The authors present a heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins based on the available geothermal results. Mean regional heat flow values range from 55 to 105 mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Lugiran and Gulf of Lions basin and from 50 to 200 m mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Tyrrhenian Sea. In the latter basin, high heat flow characterizes areas of recent intensive thinning of the continental crust and associated incipient oceanic crust formation. In the former basins, heat flow tends to increase from the Provencal coast of France to the Corsican and Sardinian margins, which may reflect on increasing heat contribution from the mantle.

  12. A review of the heat flow data of NE Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Paolo; Barkaoui, Alae-Eddine; Rimi, Abdelkrim; Verdoya, Massimo; Zarhloule, Yassine

    2016-04-01

    The Atlas chain is characterised by a SW-NE trending volcanic belt roughly extending from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea and showing activity that spans in age mainly from Middle Miocene to Quaternary (14.6-0.3 Ma). The geochemical features of volcanism are mostly intraplate and alkaline with the exception of the northeastern termination of the belt where calc-alkaline series crop out. Lithospheric thermal and density models so far proposed, constrained by heat flow, gravity anomalies, geoid, and topography data, show that the Atlas chain is not supported isostatically by a thickened crust and a thin, hot and low-density lithosphere explains the high topography. One of the possible explanations for lithospheric mantle thinning, possibly in relation with the observed alkaline volcanism, is thermal erosion produced by either small-scale convection or activation of a small mantle plume, forming part of a hot and deep mantle reservoir system extending from the Canary Islands. This paper focuses on the several geothermal data available in the northeastern sector of the volcanic belt. The occurrence of an extensive, often artesian, carbonatic reservoir hosting moderately hot groundwater might boost the temperature gradient in the overlying impermeable cover, and consequently mask the deep thermal regime. We therefore revised the available dataset and investigated the contribution of advection. Temperature data available from water and oil wells were reprocessed and analysed in combination with thermal conductivity measurements on a wide set of lithotypes. Data were filtered according to rigid selection criteria, and, in the deeper boreholes, the heat flow was inferred by taking into account the porosity variation with depth and the temperature effect on the matrix and pore-filling fluid conductivity. Moreover, the possible effect of advection was evaluated with simple analytical models which envisage the carbonatic layers as confined aquifers heated by the

  13. Laboratory convection experiments with internal, noncontact, microwave generated heating, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, Angela; Surducan, Emanoil; di Giuseppe, Erika; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia; Vilella, Kenny; Fourel, Loic; Farnetani, Cinzia; Kaminski, Edouard; Jaupart, Claude

    2014-05-01

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is controlled by secular cooling and internal heating due to the decay of radiogenic isotopes, two processes which are equivalent from the standpoint of convection dynamics. Few studies have been devoted to the intrinsic characteristics of this form of convection, which are dominated by instabilities of a single boundary layer and which involve a non-isentropic interior thermal structure. Laboratory studies of such convection have been plagued by considerable technical difficulties and have been mostly restricted to aqueous solutions with moderate values of the Prandtl number, contrary to planetary mantles. Here, we describe a new laboratory setup to generate internal heating in controlled conditions based on microwave (MW) absorption. The advantages of our technique include, but are not limited to: (1) a volumetric heat source that can be localized or distributed in space, (2) selectively heating part of the volume with time varying intensity and space distribution. Our tank prototype had horizontal dimensions of 30 cm × 30 cm and 5 cm height. A uniform and constant temperature was maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminium heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions were imposed at the tank base. Experimental fluids were hydroxyethylcellulose - water mixtures whose viscosities were varied within a wide range depending on concentration. Experimental Prandtl numbers were set at values larger than 100. Thermochromic Liquid Crystals (TLC) were used to visualize the temperature field, and the velocity field was determined using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The Rayleigh-Roberts number was varied from 105 to 107. We also conducted numerical simulations in 3D cartesian geometry using Stag-3D (Tackley 1993) to reproduce the experimental conditions, including the tank aspect ratio and the temperature dependence of physical properties. We observed that convection is driven by cold descending plumes generated at the upper

  14. A rapid burst in hotspot motion through the interaction of tectonics and deep mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Rakib; Müller, R. Dietmar; Gurnis, Michael; Williams, Simon E.; Flament, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic hotspot tracks featuring linear progressions in the age of volcanism are typical surface expressions of plate tectonic movement on top of narrow plumes of hot material within Earth’s mantle. Seismic imaging reveals that these plumes can be of deep origin—probably rooted on thermochemical structures in the lower mantle. Although palaeomagnetic and radiometric age data suggest that mantle flow can advect plume conduits laterally, the flow dynamics underlying the formation of the sharp bend occurring only in the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track in the Pacific Ocean remains enigmatic. Here we present palaeogeographically constrained numerical models of thermochemical convection and demonstrate that flow in the deep lower mantle under the north Pacific was anomalously vigorous between 100 million years ago and 50 million years ago as a consequence of long-lasting subduction systems, unlike those in the south Pacific. These models show a sharp bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track arising from the interplay of plume tilt and the lateral advection of plume sources. The different trajectories of the Hawaiian and Louisville hotspot tracks arise from asymmetric deformation of thermochemical structures under the Pacific between 100 million years ago and 50 million years ago. This asymmetric deformation waned just before the Hawaiian-Emperor bend developed, owing to flow in the deepest lower mantle associated with slab descent in the north and south Pacific.

  15. A rapid burst in hotspot motion through the interaction of tectonics and deep mantle flow.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Rakib; Müller, R Dietmar; Gurnis, Michael; Williams, Simon E; Flament, Nicolas

    2016-05-12

    Volcanic hotspot tracks featuring linear progressions in the age of volcanism are typical surface expressions of plate tectonic movement on top of narrow plumes of hot material within Earth's mantle. Seismic imaging reveals that these plumes can be of deep origin--probably rooted on thermochemical structures in the lower mantle. Although palaeomagnetic and radiometric age data suggest that mantle flow can advect plume conduits laterally, the flow dynamics underlying the formation of the sharp bend occurring only in the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track in the Pacific Ocean remains enigmatic. Here we present palaeogeographically constrained numerical models of thermochemical convection and demonstrate that flow in the deep lower mantle under the north Pacific was anomalously vigorous between 100 million years ago and 50 million years ago as a consequence of long-lasting subduction systems, unlike those in the south Pacific. These models show a sharp bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track arising from the interplay of plume tilt and the lateral advection of plume sources. The different trajectories of the Hawaiian and Louisville hotspot tracks arise from asymmetric deformation of thermochemical structures under the Pacific between 100 million years ago and 50 million years ago. This asymmetric deformation waned just before the Hawaiian-Emperor bend developed, owing to flow in the deepest lower mantle associated with slab descent in the north and south Pacific.

  16. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  17. Utilizing thermal isostasy to estimate sub-lithospheric heat flow and anomalous crustal radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Gard, M.

    2016-09-01

    While surface heat flow relates to the heat loss through the lithosphere, it can be difficult to quantify and separate the heat produced internally through radiogenic decay from the heat transferred across the base of the lithosphere by mantle convection. In this study, we apply a thermo-isostatic analysis to Australia and estimate the sub-lithospheric and radiogenic heat flow components by employing a simple 1-D conservation of energy model. We estimate an anomalous radiogenic heat production across much of eastern Australia generally accounting for >50 mW m-2, while western Australia appears to have high crustal compositionally corrected elevation, possibly related to chemical buoyancy of the mantle lithosphere. A moderately high sub-lithospheric heat flow (∼40 mW m-2) along the eastern and southeastern coast, including Tasmania, is coincident with locations of Cenozoic volcanism and supports an edge-driven convection hypothesis. However, the pattern of sub-lithospheric heat flow along the margin does not support the existence of hotspot tracks. Thermo-isostatic models such as these improve our ability to identify and quantify crustal from mantle sources of heat loss and add valuable constraints on tectonic and geodynamic models of the continental lithosphere's physical state and evolution.

  18. Inferences on flow at the base of Earth's mantle based on seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Panning, Mark; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2004-01-16

    We applied global waveform tomography to model radial anisotropy in the whole mantle. We found that in the last few hundred kilometers near the core-mantle boundary, horizontally polarized S-wave velocities (VSH) are, on average, faster (by approximately 1%) than vertically polarized S-wave velocities (VSV), suggesting a large-scale predominance of horizontal shear. This confirms that the D" region at the base of the mantle is also a mechanical boundary layer for mantle convection. A notable exception to this average signature can be found at the base of the two broad low-velocity regions under the Pacific Ocean and under Africa, often referred to as "superplumes," where the anisotropic pattern indicates the onset of vertical flow.

  19. Subducted slabs and the geoid: Constraints on mantle rheology and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, B. H.

    1983-01-01

    The total geoid anomaly which is the result of a given density contrast in a convecting viscous earth is affected by the mass anomalies associated with the flow induced deformation of the upper surface and internal compositional boundaries, as well as by the density contrast itself is discussed. If the internal density contrasts can be estimated, the depth and variation of viscosity with depth of the convecting system can be constrained. The observed long wavelength geoid is highly correlated with that predicted by a density model for seismically active subducted slabs. The amplitude of the correlation is explained if the density contrasts associated with subduction extend into the lower mantle or if subducted slabs exceeding 350 km in thickness are piled up over horizontal distances of thousands of km at the base of the upper mantle. Mantle wide convection in a mantle that has a viscosity increasing with depth provides the explanation of the long-wavelength geoid anomalies over subduction zones.

  20. Testing geodynamic models of lowermost mantle flow with a regional shear wave splitting data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. A.; Long, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Global flow models rely on a number of assumptions, including composition, temperature, viscosity, and deformation mechanism. In the upper mantle, flow models and their associated assumptions can be tested and refined with observations of seismic anisotropy, which is treated as a proxy for flow direction. Beneath the transition zone, direct observations of seismic anisotropy are scarce, except for in the lowermost ~250 km of the mantle. In this study, we utilize a comprehensive, previously published (Ford et al., 2015) shear wave splitting study in order to test a three-dimensional global geodynamic flow model (Walker et al., 2011). Our study focuses on a region of the lowermost mantle along the eastern edge of the African Superplume beneath the Afar region. We find that our observations are fit by a model which invokes slip along the (010) plane of post-perovskite with flow directed down and to the southwest. Critically, we demonstrate the ability of a regional data set to interrogate models of lower mantle flow.

  1. Fast asthenosphere motion in high-resolution global mantle flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismüller, Jens; Gmeiner, Björn; Bunge, Hans-Peter

    2016-04-01

    A variety of geologic observations point to fast upper mantle flow that may exceed plate tectonic velocities by an order of magnitude. At the same time there is mounting evidence from seismology for flow like structures in the upper 100-200 km of the mantle. Here we present a set of geodynamic simulations to link these observations. We model asthenospheric channels of varying thickness, in a range from a wide 1000 km channel to an extremely thin channel of 100 km, and viscosity contrasts between one and four orders of magnitude relative to the lower mantle. Using our new global high resolution mantle convection prototype Terra-Neo, we obtain an increase in velocity by a factor of ten between the thick and the very thin channel, translating into velocities of about 20 cm/a within the narrow asthenosphere. We further present and verify a simple Poiseuille flow model, which predicts that the upper mantle velocity scales with the inverse of the asthenosphere thickness.

  2. Microwave-based laboratory experiments for internally-heated mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Neamtu, C.; di Giuseppe, E.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E.; Jaupart, C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is mainly controlled by the amount of radioactive heat sources in their mantle, and by the geometry and efficiency of solid state thermo-chemical convection within. So far, these systems have been studied using numerical methods only and cross validation by laboratory analogous experiments has not been conducted yet. To fill this gap we perform the first laboratory experiments of mantle convection driven by microwave-generated internal heating. We use a 30×30×5 cm3 experimental tank filled with 0.5 % Natrosol in water mixture (viscosity 0.6 Pa.s at 20°C). The fluid is heated from within by a microwave device that delivers a uniform volumetric heating from 10 to 70 kW/m3; the upper boundary of the fluid is kept at constant temperature, whereas the lower boundary is adiabatic. The velocity field is determined with particle image velocimetry and the temperature field is measured using thermochromic liquid crystals which enable us to charaterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution. Numerical simulations, conducted using Stag-3D in 3D cartesian geometry, reproduce the experimental setup (i.e., boundary conditions, box aspect ratio, temperature dependence of physical parameters, internal heating rate). The successful comparison between the experimental and numerical results validates our approach of modelling internal heating using microwaves.

  3. Microwave-based laboratory experiments for internally-heated mantle convection

    SciTech Connect

    Limare, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E.; Jaupart, C.; Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Neamtu, C.

    2013-11-13

    The thermal evolution of terrestrial planets is mainly controlled by the amount of radioactive heat sources in their mantle, and by the geometry and efficiency of solid state thermo-chemical convection within. So far, these systems have been studied using numerical methods only and cross validation by laboratory analogous experiments has not been conducted yet. To fill this gap we perform the first laboratory experiments of mantle convection driven by microwave-generated internal heating. We use a 30×30×5 cm{sup 3} experimental tank filled with 0.5 % Natrosol in water mixture (viscosity 0.6 Pa.s at 20°C). The fluid is heated from within by a microwave device that delivers a uniform volumetric heating from 10 to 70 kW/m{sup 3}; the upper boundary of the fluid is kept at constant temperature, whereas the lower boundary is adiabatic. The velocity field is determined with particle image velocimetry and the temperature field is measured using thermochromic liquid crystals which enable us to charaterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution. Numerical simulations, conducted using Stag-3D in 3D cartesian geometry, reproduce the experimental setup (i.e., boundary conditions, box aspect ratio, temperature dependence of physical parameters, internal heating rate). The successful comparison between the experimental and numerical results validates our approach of modelling internal heating using microwaves.

  4. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J.; Leybourne, Matthew I.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B.

    2013-04-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated 206Pb/204Pb, 208Pb/204Pb, 86Sr/87Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system.

  5. A global view of shear wave splitting and mantle flow in subduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Maureen; Silver, Paul; Hanna, Jenny; Wirth, Erin; Kincaid, Chris; Montesi, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    The character of the mantle flow field in subduction zone regions remains poorly understood, despite its importance for our understanding of subduction dynamics. Observations of seismic anisotropy, which manifests itself in shear wave splitting, can shed light on the geometry of mantle flow in subduction zones, but placing constraints on anisotropy in various parts of the subduction system (including the overriding plate, the mantle wedge, the subducting slab, and the sub-slab mantle) remains challenging from an observational point of view. In order to identify dynamic processes that make first-order contributions to the pattern of mantle flow in subduction zones, we analyze a global compilation of shear wave splitting measurements for a variety of ray paths, including SK(K)S and teleseismic S phases as well as local S and source-side splitting from slab earthquakes. Key challenges associated with assembling such a compilation include correctly assessing and accounting for any dependence of local S splitting parameters on frequency and correctly characterizing any contribution to SKS splitting measurements from anisotropy within the subducting slab that is unrelated to active mantle flow. We present local case studies from the Japan and Izu-Bonin-Marianas subduction zones that explore frequency-dependent splitting due to heterogeneous anisotropy in the mantle wedge and that use a variety of raypath combinations to isolate the contribution from anisotropy within the slab. Keeping these results in mind, we have compiled shear wave splitting measurements from subduction zones globally from the literature and from our own work to produce estimates of average shear wave splitting parameters - and their spatial variation - for the mantle wedge and the sub-wedge region for individual subduction segments. These estimates are then compared to other parameters that describe subduction. The sub-wedge splitting signal is relatively simple and is dominated by trench

  6. Seismic evidence for rotating mantle flow around subducting slab edge associated with oceanic microplate capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Stephen G.; Audet, Pascal; L'Heureux, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    Tectonic plate reorganization at a subduction zone edge is a fundamental process that controls oceanic plate fragmentation and capture. However, the various factors responsible for these processes remain elusive. We characterize seismic anisotropy of the upper mantle in the Explorer region at the northern limit of the Cascadia subduction zone from teleseismic shear wave splitting measurements. Our results show that the mantle flow field beneath the Explorer slab is rotating anticlockwise from the convergence-parallel motion between the Juan de Fuca and the North America plates, re-aligning itself with the transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North America plates. We propose that oceanic microplate fragmentation is driven by slab stretching, thus reorganizing the mantle flow around the slab edge and further contributing to slab weakening and increase in buoyancy, eventually leading to cessation of subduction and microplate capture.

  7. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc.

    PubMed

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J; Leybourne, Matthew I; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (86)Sr/(87)Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system.

  8. Heat transport in the high-pressure ice mantle of large icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, G.; Tobie, G.; Sotin, C.; Kalousová, K.; Grasset, O.

    2017-03-01

    While the existence of a buried ocean sandwiched between surface ice and high-pressure (HP) polymorphs of ice emerges as the most plausible structure for the hundreds-of-kilometers thick hydrospheres within large icy moons of the Solar System (Ganymede, Callisto, Titan), little is known about the thermal structure of the deep HP ice mantle and its dynamics, possibly involving melt production and extraction. This has major implications for the thermal history of these objects as well as on the habitability of their ocean as the HP ice mantle is presumed to limit chemical transport from the rock component to the ocean. Here, we describe 3D spherical simulations of subsolidus thermal convection tailored to the specific structure of the HP ice mantle of large icy moons. Melt production is monitored and melt transport is simplified by assuming instantaneous extraction to the ocean above. The two controlling parameters for these models are the rheology of ice VI and the heat flux from the rock core. Reasonable end-members are considered for both parameters as disagreement remains on the former (especially the pressure effect on viscosity) and as the latter is expected to vary significantly during the moon's history. We show that the heat power produced by radioactive decay within the rock core is mainly transported through the HP ice mantle by melt extraction to the ocean, with most of the melt produced directly above the rock/water interface. While the average temperature in the bulk of the HP ice mantle is always relatively cool when compared to the value at the interface with the rock core (∼ 5 K above the value at the surface of the HP ice mantle), maximum temperatures at all depths are close to the melting point, often leading to the interconnection of a melt path via hot convective plume conduits throughout the HP ice mantle. Overall, we predict long periods of time during these moons' history where water generated in contact with the rock core is transported to

  9. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  10. Thermochemical flows couple the Earth's inner core growth to mantle heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Julien; Amit, Hagay; Hulot, Gauthier; Olson, Peter

    2008-08-07

    Seismic waves sampling the top 100 km of the Earth's inner core reveal that the eastern hemisphere (40 degrees E-180 degrees E) is seismically faster, more isotropic and more attenuating than the western hemisphere. The origin of this hemispherical dichotomy is a challenging problem for our understanding of the Earth as a system of dynamically coupled layers. Previously, laboratory experiments have established that thermal control from the lower mantle can drastically affect fluid flow in the outer core, which in turn can induce textural heterogeneity on the inner core solidification front. The resulting texture should be consistent with other expected manifestations of thermal mantle control on the geodynamo, specifically magnetic flux concentrations in the time-average palaeomagnetic field over the past 5 Myr, and preferred eddy locations in flows imaged below the core-mantle boundary by the analysis of historical geomagnetic secular variation. Here we show that a single model of thermochemical convection and dynamo action can account for all these effects by producing a large-scale, long-term outer core flow that couples the heterogeneity of the inner core with that of the lower mantle. The main feature of this thermochemical 'wind' is a cyclonic circulation below Asia, which concentrates magnetic field on the core-mantle boundary at the observed location and locally agrees with core flow images. This wind also causes anomalously high rates of light element release in the eastern hemisphere of the inner core boundary, suggesting that lateral seismic anomalies at the top of the inner core result from mantle-induced variations in its freezing rate.

  11. Seismic Anisotropy and Mantle Flow Driven by the Cocos Slab Under Southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-López, Leslie A.; Garibaldi, Berenice R.; León Soto, Gerardo; Valenzuela, Raúl W.; Escudero, Christian R.

    2016-10-01

    Shear wave splitting measurements were made using SKS and SKKS waves recorded by the Meso-American Subduction Experiment, which was deployed in southern Mexico starting at the coast of the Pacific Ocean and running north toward the Gulf of Mexico. In this segment of the Middle America Trench the oceanic Cocos plate subducts under the continental North American plate. The active volcanic arc is located at the southern end of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Unlike most subduction zones, however, the volcanic arc is not subparallel to the trench. In the fore-arc, between the trench and the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the Cocos slab subducts subhorizontally. Beneath the volcanic belt, however, the slab dives steeply into the mantle. A marked difference in the orientation of the fast polarization directions is observed between the fore-arc and the back-arc. In the fore-arc the fast axes determined using SKS phases are oriented NE-SW, in the same direction as the relative motion between the Cocos and North American plates, and are approximately perpendicular to the trench. Physical conditions in the subslab mantle are consistent with the existence of A-type olivine and consequently entrained mantle flow is inferred. Strong coupling between the slab and the surrounding mantle is observed. In the back-arc SKS fast polarization directions are oriented N-S and are perpendicular to the strike of the slab. Given the high temperatures in the mantle wedge tip, the development of A-type, or similar, olivine fabric throughout the mantle wedge is expected. The orientation of the fast axes is consistent with corner flow in the mantle wedge.

  12. Effects of change in slab geometry on the mantle flow and slab fabric in Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Long, Maureen D.; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-10-01

    The effects of complex slab geometries on the surrounding mantle flow field are still poorly understood. Here we combine shear wave velocity structure with Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy to examine these effects in southern Peru, where the slab changes its geometry from steep to flat. To the south, where the slab subducts steeply, we find trench-parallel anisotropy beneath the active volcanic arc that we attribute to the mantle wedge and/or upper portions of the subducting plate. Farther north, beneath the easternmost corner of the flat slab, we observe a pronounced low-velocity anomaly. This anomaly is caused either by the presence of volatiles and/or flux melting that could result from southward directed, volatile-rich subslab mantle flow or by increased temperature and/or decompression melting due to small-scale vertical flow. We also find evidence for mantle flow through the tear north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Finally, we observe anisotropy patterns associated with the fast velocity anomalies that reveal along strike variations in the slab's internal deformation. The change in slab geometry from steep to flat contorts the subducting plate south of the Nazca Ridge causing an alteration of the slab petrofabric. In contrast, the torn slab to the north still preserves the primary (fossilized) petrofabric first established shortly after plate formation.

  13. Western US intermountain seismicity caused by changes in upper mantle flow.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thorsten W; Lowry, Anthony R; Faccenna, Claudio; Schmandt, Brandon; Borsa, Adrian; Yu, Chunquan

    2015-08-27

    Understanding the causes of intraplate earthquakes is challenging, as it requires extending plate tectonic theory to the dynamics of continental deformation. Seismicity in the western United States away from the plate boundary is clustered along a meandering, north-south trending 'intermountain' belt. This zone coincides with a transition from thin, actively deforming to thicker, less tectonically active crust and lithosphere. Although such structural gradients have been invoked to explain seismicity localization, the underlying cause of seismicity remains unclear. Here we show results from improved mantle flow models that reveal a relationship between seismicity and the rate change of 'dynamic topography' (that is, vertical normal stress from mantle flow). The associated predictive skill is greater than that of any of the other forcings we examined. We suggest that active mantle flow is a major contributor to seismogenic intraplate deformation, while gravitational potential energy variations have a minor role. Seismicity localization should occur where convective changes in vertical normal stress are modulated by lithospheric strength heterogeneities. Our results on deformation processes appear consistent with findings from other mobile belts, and imply that mantle flow plays a significant and quantifiable part in shaping topography, tectonics, and seismic hazard within intraplate settings.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of water flow in the mantle cavity of live Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eriko; Ohishi, Kazue; Maruyama, Tadashi; Imaizumi-Ohashi, Yoshie; Murakami, Masataka; Seo, Yoshiteru

    2014-07-01

    Water flow inside the shell of Mytilus galloprovincialis was measured by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In seawater without algal cells at 23 °C, water approached the mussel from the posterior-ventral side, and entered through the inhalant aperture at a velocity of 40-20 mm s(-1). The flow rate in the lower mantle cavity decreased to 10-20 mm s(-1), the water flowed in the anterior-dorsal direction and approached the demibranches at a velocity of 5-10 mm s(-1). After passing through the lamellae to the upper mantle cavity, the water stretched the interlamellar cavity, turned to the posterior-dorsal direction and accumulated in the epibranchial cavity. The water flows came together at the ventral side of the posterior adductor muscle. The velocity increased more to than 50 mm s(-1) in the exhalant siphon, and exhaled out in the posterior-dorsal direction. The anterior-posterior direction of the flow was imaged every 1.92 s by the inflow effect of T1-weighted MRI. The flow seemed to be constant, and no cyclic motion of the mantles or the gills was detected. Spontaneous closure of the shells caused a quick drop of the flow in the mantle cavity. In the opening process of the shells, water flow in the interlamellar cavities increased before the opening, followed by an increase of flows in the exhalant siphon and inhalant aperture with minimum delay, reaching a plateau within 1 min of the shells opening. This provides direct evidence that the lateral cilia drive water in the mussel M. galloprovincialis.

  15. Giant impacts, heterogeneous mantle heating and a past hemispheric dynamo on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, J.; Amit, H.; Choblet, G.; Langlais, B.; Tobie, G.

    2015-10-01

    The martian surface exhibits a strong dichotomy in elevation, crustal thickness and magnetization between the southern and northern hemispheres. A giant impact has been proposed as an explanation for the for-mation of the Northern Lowlands on Mars. Such an impact probably led to strong and deep mantle heat-ing which may have had implications on the magnetic evolution of the planet. We model the effects of such an impact on the martian magnetic field by imposing an impact induced thermal heterogeneity, and the sub-sequent heat flux heterogeneity, on the martian core- mantle boundary(CMB). The CMB heat flux lateral variations as well as the reduction in the mean CMB heat flux are determined by the size and geographic location of the impactor. A polar impactor leads to a north-south hemispheric magnetic dichotomy that is stronger than an east-west dichotomy created by an equatorial impactor. The amplitude of the hemispheric magnetic dichotomy is mostly controlled by the horizontal Rayleigh number Rah which represents the vigor of the convection driven by the lateral variations of the CMB heat flux. We show that, for a given Rah, an impact induced CMB heat flux heterogeneity is more efficient than a synthetic degree-1 CMB heat flux heterogeneity in generating strong hemispheric magnetic dichotomies. Large Rah values are needed to get a dichotomy as strong as the observed one, favoring a reversing paleo-dynamo for Mars. Our results imply that an impactor radius of˜1000 km could have recorded the magnetic dichotomy observed in the mar- tian crustal field only if very rapid post-impact magma cooling took place.

  16. Comparisons between seismic Earth structures and mantle flow models based on radial correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, T.H.; Puster, P. ); Glatzmaier, G.A. ); Tackley, P.J. )

    1993-09-10

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted of mantle convection in which flow through the transition zone is impeded by either a strong chemical change or an endothermic phase change. The temperature fields obtained from these models display a well defined minimum in the vertical correlation length at or near the radius where the barrier is imposed, even when the fields were filtered to low angular and radial resolutions. However, evidence for such a feature is lacking in the shear-velocity models derived by seismic tomography. This comparison suggests that any stratification induced by phase or chemical changes across the mid-mantle transition zone has a relatively small effect on the large-scale circulation of mantle material.

  17. Comparisons between seismic Earth structures and mantle flow models based on radial correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T H; Puster, P; Glatzmaier, G A; Tackley, P J

    1993-09-10

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted of mantle convection in which flow through the transition zone is impeded by either a strong chemical change or an endothermic phase change. The temperature fields obtained from these models display a well-defined minimum in the vertical correlation length at or near the radius where the barrier is imposed, even when the fields were filtered to low angular and radial resolutions. However, evidence for such a feature is lacking in the shear-velocity models derived by seismic tomography. This comparison suggests that any stratification induced by phase or chemical changes across the mid-mantle transition zone has a relatively small effect on the large-scale circulation of mantle material.

  18. Dynamics and Upper Mantle Structure Beneath the Northwestern Andes: Subduction Segments, Moho Depth, and Possible Relationships to Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, G.; Yarce, J.; Becker, T. W.; Porritt, R. W.; Cardona, A.; Poveda, E.; Posada, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    The northwestern South American plate shows a complex tectonic setting whose causes and relationship to mantle structure are still debated. We combine different techniques to elucidate some of the links between slabs and surface deformation in Colombia. Crustal structure beneath the Northern Andes was inferred from receiver functions where we find thicknesses of nearly 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera and underneath the southern volcanic area of the Central Cordillera. We infer that such crustal thickening resulted from shortening, magmatic addition, and accretion-subduction. Analyses of relative teleseismic travel time delays and estimates of residual surface topography based on our new crustal model suggest that there are at least two subduction segments underneath the area. The Caribbean slab lies at a low angle beneath northernmost Colombia and steepens beneath the Eastern Cordillera. Such steepening is indicated by negative travel time relative residuals in the area of the Bucaramanga Nest, implying a cold anomaly in the upper mantle, and by positive residual topography just off the east of this area, perhaps generated by slab-associated return flow. Results for the western Andes and the Pacific coastal plains are consistent with "normal" subduction of the Nazca plate: travel time relative residuals there are predominantly positive, and the residual topography shows an W-E gradient, going from positive at the Pacific coastline to negative at the Magdalena Valley, which separates the eastern cordillera from the rest of the Colombian Andean system. Azimuthal analysis of relative travel time residuals further suggests the presence of seismically slow materials beneath the central part of the Eastern Cordillera. Azimuthal anisotropy from SKS splitting in that region indicates that seismically fast orientations do not follow plate convergence, different from what we find for the western Colombian Andes and the Caribbean and Pacific coastal plains

  19. Giant impacts, heterogeneous mantle heating and a past hemispheric dynamo on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteux, Julien; Amit, Hagay; Choblet, Gael; Langlais, Benoît; Tobie, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    The martian surface exhibits a strong dichotomy in elevation, crustal thickness and magnetization between the southern and northern hemispheres. A giant impact has been proposed as an explanation for the formation of the Northern Lowlands on Mars. Such an impact probably led to strong and deep mantle heating which may have had implications on the magnetic evolution of the planet. We model the effects of such an impact on the martian magnetic field by imposing an impact induced thermal heterogeneity, and the subsequent heat flux heterogeneity, on the martian core-mantle boundary (CMB). The CMB heat flux lateral variations as well as the reduction in the mean CMB heat flux are determined by the size and geographic location of the impactor. A polar impactor leads to a north-south hemispheric magnetic dichotomy that is stronger than an east-west dichotomy created by an equatorial impactor. The amplitude of the hemispheric magnetic dichotomy is mostly controlled by the horizontal Rayleigh number Rah which represents the vigor of the convection driven by the lateral variations of the CMB heat flux. We show that, for a given Rah, an impact induced CMB heat flux heterogeneity is more efficient than a synthetic degree-1 CMB heat flux heterogeneity in generating strong hemispheric magnetic dichotomies. Large Rah values are needed to get a dichotomy as strong as the observed one, favoring a reversing paleo-dynamo for Mars. Our results imply that an impactor radius of ~ 1000 km could have recorded the magnetic dichotomy observed in the martian crustal field only if very rapid post-impact magma cooling took place.

  20. Mantle flow and melt migration beneath oceanic ridges: Models derived from observations in ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceuleneer, Georges; Rabinowicz, Michel

    The tectonic and volcanic features of the Earth are largely conditioned by processes taking place in the upper mantle. However our present knowledge of the mantle is essentially derived from indirect evidence. As pointed out by Oliver [1991], the promising technologies of very deep drilling and of high resolution geophysical imagery which should improve our views of the Earth's interior are still to be invented. In the meantime, to progress in the study of geological stuffs, widespread and of easy access at the Earth surface, and in their interpretation in terms of mantle processes, is not a vain task. For example, the Earth's magmatic budget is largely dominated by oceanic ridge and hotspot volcanism [e.g. Crisp, 1984]. The basaltic melts erupted there are likely produced by pressure-release induced partial melting of a peridotitic source. Consequently, their composition and distribution are expected to be sensitive to the thermal and flow structure of the mantle. Potentially, basalts constitute a widespread and abundant pool of information about mantle convection, and one of the goals pursued by petrological studies is to decipher this message [e.g. Klein and Langmuir, 1987; McKenzie and Bickle, 1988; Watson and McKenzie, 1991; Albarede, 1992, Langmuir et al., this volume; Grove et al., this volume].

  1. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J. -Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed. PMID:27436676

  2. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J-Michael

    2016-07-20

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  3. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J.-Michael

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  4. Post-Eocene Subduction Dynamics and Mantle Flow beneath Western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Zhou, Q.; Leonard, T.

    2015-12-01

    Both surface geology and mantle seismic images suggest a complex late Cenozoic history of mantle dynamics over western U.S. We try to understand this history by simulating the Farallon subduction since 40 Ma. Forward subduction models assimilating time dependent seafloor ages, plate kinematics and evolving plate boundaries suggest that the present-day 3D distribution of fast seismic anomalies below western U.S. mostly represent late Cenozoic slabs, which experienced multiple phases of segmentation during subduction because of their young age and small mechanical strength (Liu & Stegman, 2011). A major slab segmentation event occurred around mid-Miocene, with the resulting slab tear and induced asthenosphere upwelling correlating with the Steens-Columbia River flood basalts (SCRB) eruption both in space and in time (Liu & Stegman, 2012). This suggests that a mantle plume is not required for the formation of the SCRB. Segmentation of the Farallon slab generates rapid toroidal flows around the newly formed slab edges beneath the Cascadia arc. These mantle flows may affect both the pattern and composition of arc volcanism through transportation of oceanic asthenosphere material into the mantle wedge. Based on the forward model, we further test the influence of slow seismic anomalies on mantle dynamics. On the one hand, we explicitly input a deep hot anomaly to represent the putative Yellowstone plume. On the other hand, we develop a hybrid scheme that combines the adjoint inverse method with the high-resolution forward simulation approach, so that the present-day mantle seismic structure is entirely consistent with the convection model. Our preliminary results suggest that a hot plume could actively rise up only when it is several hundreds of kilometers away from the slabs, as is the case prior to 20 Ma. Subsequently, the plume is dominated by the surrounding slabs, resulting in an overall downwelling mantle flow. This suggests that a plume might have contributed to

  5. Heat flow in eastern Egypt - The thermal signature of a continental breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the heat flow in eastern Egypt were collected to provide information related to the mode and the mechanism of the Red Sea opening. The data indicate a general increase in heat flow towards the Red Sea (75-100 mW/sq m in a zone within 40 km of the coast compared with 35-55 mW/sq m inland). Moderately high heat flow (about 70 mW/sq m) was found for the Gulf of Suez. Heat production data indicate that the coastal thermal anomaly is not primarily related to crustal radiogenic heat production. Possible causes of the anomaly (one of which could be a high mantle heat flow causing a lithospheric thinning centered beneath the Red Sea) are discussed.

  6. Heat flow and convection demonstration (Apollo 14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, T. C.

    1973-01-01

    Apollo 14 Astronaut Stuart A. Roosa conducted a group of experiments during the lunar flyback on February 7, 1971, to obtain information on heat flow and convection in gases and liquids in an environment of less than 0.000001 g. Flow observations and thermal data have shown that: (1) as expected, there are convective motions caused by surface tension gradients in a plane liquid layer with a free upper surface; (2) heat flow in enclosed liquids and gases occurs mainly by diffusive heat conduction; and (3) some convective processes, whose characteristics are not fully known, add to the heat transfer. The raw data are presented, and the analysis approach is given.

  7. Magnetic fabrics reveal Upper Mantle Flow fabrics in the Troodos Ophiolite Complex, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borradaile, Graham J.; Lagroix, France

    2001-08-01

    The foliations and lineations recognized in outcrops of the Troodos mantle-sequence provide relatively few and imprecise observations of the mineral fabric. Thus, their kinematic interpretation, and any inferences about the metamorphic flow patterns are tenuous. However, every outcrop yields the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) from which we may infer the combined orientation-distribution response of silicates (pyroxene, serpentine) and magnetite. Furthermore, in many outcrops, the anisotropy of anhysteretic remanence (AARM) isolates the contribution of magnetite to the orientation-distribution. AMS and AARM each provide a magnitude ellipsoid whose principal directions define the orientation-distribution of several hundred minerals in each sample, and thus their flow fabric. Within the Troodos mantle-sequence, high-temperature, semi-cataclastic silicate flow directions were uniform through volumes of ˜1 km 3 but differ between adjacent subareas. This reflects the scale of the heterogeneity of solid-state flow. However, averaged over the entire area of ˜100 km 2, the global orientation-distribution of silicate alignments were consistent, indicating early, silicate flow up to the west, away from a spreading axis that lay east of the Troodos range. On the same regional scale, later magnetite alignments indicate flow up to the north-west. The non-horizontal and non-coaxial flow stages suggest that the mantle sequence was affected by diapiric rise in the solid-state, radiating from centres which may originally have been magma chambers. The one responsible for the recorded flow patterns may have been approximately 30 km in diameter and located SE of Mount Troodos.

  8. Fluid flow and heat transfer in polygonal micro heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Sai; Wong, Harris

    2015-11-01

    Micro heat pipes have been used to cool microelectronic devices, but their heat transfer coefficients are low compared with those of conventional heat pipes. We model heat and mass transfer in triangular, square, hexagonal, and rectangular micro heat pipes under small imposed temperature differences. A micro heat pipe is a closed microchannel filled with a wetting liquid and a long vapor bubble. When a temperature difference is applied across a micro heat pipe, the equilibrium vapor pressure at the hot end is higher than that at the cold end, and the difference drives a vapor flow. As the vapor moves, the vapor pressure at the hot end drops below the saturation pressure. This pressure drop induces continuous evaporation from the interface. Two dimensionless numbers emerge from the momentum and energy equations: the heat-pipe number H, and the evaporation exponent S. When H >> 1 and S >> 1, vapor-flow heat transfer dominates and a thermal boundary layer appears at the hot end, the thickness of which scales as L/S, where L is the half-length of the pipe. A similar boundary layer exists at the cold end. Outside the boundary layers, the temperature is uniform. We also find a dimensionless optimal pipe length Sm =Sm(H) for maximum evaporative heat transfer. Thus, our model suggests that micro heat pipes should be designed with H >> 1 and S =Sm. We calculate H and S for four published micro-heat-pipe experiments, and find encouraging support for our design criterion.

  9. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachenbruch, Arthur H.; Sass, J. H.

    1980-11-01

    200 bars. The development of the broad Coast Range heat flow anomaly southward from Cape Mendocino suggests that heat flow increases by a factor of 2 within 4 m.y. after the passage of the Mendocino Triple Junction. This passage leaves the San Andreas transform fault zone in its wake; the depth of the anomalous sources cannot be much greater than the depth of the seismogenic layer. Some of the anomalous heat may be supplied by conduction from the warmer mantle that must occur south of the Mendocino transform (where there is no subducting slab), and some might be supplied by shear heating in the fault zone. With no contribution from shear heating, extreme mantle upwelling would be required, and asthenosphere conditions should exist today at depths of only ˜20 km in the northernmost Coast Ranges. If there is an appreciable contribution from shear heating, the heat flow constraint implies that the seismogenic layer is partially decoupled at its base and that the basal traction is in the sense that resists right lateral motion on the fault(s). As a result of these basal tractions, the average shearing stress in the seismogenic layer would increase with distance from the main fault, and the seismogenic layer would offer substantial resistance to plate motion even though resistance on the main fault might be negligible. These speculative models have testable consequences.

  10. Heat Transfer Correlations for compressible flow in Micro Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, M. A.; Croce, G.

    2016-09-01

    The paper discusses the definition of dimensionless parameters useful to define a local correlation for convective heat transfer in compressible, micro scale gaseous flows. A combination of static and stagnation temperatures is chosen, as it allows to weight the temperature change related to the heat transfer and that induced by conversion of internal energy into kinetic one. The correlation offers a purely convective local Nusselt number, i.e. correlating the heat flow rate with the local flow parameters and wall surface temperature. The correlation is validated through a series of numerical computations in both counter-current and co-current micro heat exchanger configurations. The numerical computations take into account rarefaction and conjugate heat transfer effects.

  11. Plastic Flow of Pyrope at Mantle Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Li,L.; Long, H.; Weidner, D.; Raterron, P.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the abundance of garnet in deforming regions of the Earth, such as subduction zones, its rheological properties are not well defined by laboratory measurements. Here we report measurements of steady-state plastic properties of pyrope in its stability field (temperature up to 1573 K, pressure up to 6.8 GPa, strain rate {approx}10-5 s-1) using a Deformation-DIA apparatus (D-DIA) coupled with synchrotron radiation. Synthetic pyrope (Py100) and natural pyrope (Py70Alm16Gr14) are both studied in a dry environment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the run products indicates that dislocation glide, assisted by climb within grains and dynamic recrystallization for grain-boundary strain accommodation, is the dominant deformation process in pyrope. Both synthetic-and natural-pyropes' stress and strain-rate data, as measured in situ by X-ray diffraction and imaging, are best fitted with the single flow law:

  12. A New Model for Heat Flow in Extensional Basins: Estimating Radiogenic Heat Production

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, Douglas W.

    2002-06-15

    Radiogenic heat production (RHP) represents a significant fraction of surface heat flow, both on cratons and in sedimentary basins. RHP within continental crust-especially the upper crust-is high. RHP at any depth within the crust can be estimated as a function of crustal age. Mantle RHP, in contrast, is always low, contributing at most 1 to 2 mW/m{sup 2} to total heat flow. Radiogenic heat from any noncrystalline basement that may be present also contributes to total heat flow. RHP from metamorphic rocks is similar to or slightly lower than that from their precursor sedimentary rocks. When extension of the lithosphere occurs-as for example during rifting-the radiogenic contribution of each layer of the lithosphere and noncrystalline basement diminishes in direct proportion to the degree of extension of that layer. Lithospheric RHP today is somewhat less than in the distant past, as a result of radioactive decay. In modeling, RHP can be varied through time by considering the half lives of uranium, thorium, and potassium, and the proportional contribution of each of those elements to total RHP from basement. RHP from sedimentary rocks ranges from low for most evaporites to high for some shales, especially those rich in organic matter. The contribution to total heat flow of radiogenic heat from sediments depends strongly on total sediment thickness, and thus differs through time as subsidence and basin filling occur. RHP can be high for thick clastic sections. RHP in sediments can be calculated using ordinary or spectral gamma-ray logs, or it can be estimated from the lithology.

  13. The Yellowstone Hotspot and Related Plume: Volcano-Tectonics, Tomography, Kinematics, Dynamics and Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, M.; Smith, R. B.; Puskas, C.; Farrell, J.; Waite, G.

    2005-12-01

    Earth's violent forces have produced the renowned scenery and the world's largest display of geysers at Yellowstone National Park. The energy responsible for these features is related to the Yellowstone hotspot, a coupled crust-mantle magmatic system that has had a profound influence on a much larger area of the western US: the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain-Newberry volcanic field (YSRPN). The volcanic system has produced a 16 Ma track of NE-trending, time progressive, silicic-basaltic volcanism from the Snake River Plain (SNR) to Yellowstone with a mirror image of NW-trending magmatism across the high lava plains to the Newberry caldera, OR. The origin of this magmatic-tectono system has been variously ascribed to plume-plate interaction, lithosphere extension, return mantle flow, decompression melting, etc. We interpret and integrate results from modeling of data from a prototype EarthScope experiment in 1999-2002. These include crust-mantle tomography, geoid and gravity modeling, kinematics from GPS, and geodynamic models. We present a comprehensive model for the mechanism behind YSRPN that is in accordance with our observations and models, e.g. from GPS and seismology. Geodetic data show high rates of deformation at the Yellowstone Plateau, with periods of pronounced uplift and subsidence as well as significant EW extension. Seismic tomography reveals a pronounced mid-crustal P- and S-wave low velocity body of > 8% melt extending from ~6 km to 15 km beneath the caldera. This system is fed by an upper-mantle low velocity plume-like body of up to 1.5% melt in the upper 200 km. The body further extends down to the the base of the transition zone at 650 km depth, notably tilting WNW. At this depth, we estimate the excess temperature between 85 K and 120 K, depending on the water content. Using the inclined plume-geometry and the 650-km source depth we extrapolate the mantle source southwestward as a plume-head in oceanic-type lithosphere beneath the Columbia

  14. Experiments on flow focusing in soluble porous media, with applications to melt extraction from the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Kelemen, P.B.; Whitehead, J.A.; Aharonov, E.; Jordahl, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrate finite strucutres formed as a consequence of the `reactive infiltration instability` in a series of laboratory and numerical experiments with growth of solution channels parallel to the fluid flow direction. Our experiments demonstrate channel growth in the presence of an initial solution front and without an initial solution front where there is a gradient in the solubility of the solid matrix. In the gradient case, diffuse flow is unstable everywhere, channels can form and grow at any point, and channels may extend over the length scale of the gradient. As a consequence of the gradient results, we suggest that the reactive infiltration instability is important in the Earth`s mantle, where partial melts in the mantle ascend adiabatically. This hypothesis represents an important alternative to mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB) extraction in fractures, since fractures may not form in weak, viscously deforming asthenospheric mantle. We also briefly consider the effects of crystallization, rather than dissolution reactions, on the morphology of porous flow via a second set of experiments where fluid becomes supersaturated in a solid phase. This process may produce a series of walled conduits, as in our experiments. Development of a low-porosity cap overlying high porosity conduits may create hydrostatic overpressure sufficient to cause fracture and magma transport to the surface in dikes.

  15. Subducted slabs and the geoid - Constraints on mantle rheology and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    The total geoid anomaly which is the result of a given density contrast in a convecting viscous earth is affected by the mass anomalies associated with the flow induced deformation of the upper surface and internal compositional boundaries, as well as by the density contrast itself is discussed. If the internal density contrasts can be estimated, the depth and variation of viscosity with depth of the convecting system can be constrained. The observed long wavelength geoid is highly correlated with that predicted by a density model for seismically active subducted slabs. The amplitude of the correlation is explained if the density contrasts associated with subduction extend into the lower mantle or if subducted slabs exceeding 350 km in thickness are piled up over horizontal distances of thousands of km at the base of the upper mantle. Mantle wide convection in a mantle that has a viscosity increasing with depth provides the explanation of the long-wavelength geoid anomalies over subduction zones. Previously announced in STAR as N83-22874

  16. Io: Heat flow from dark volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2009-11-01

    Dark flow fields on the jovian satellite Io are evidence of current or recent volcanic activity. We have examined the darkest volcanic fields and quantified their thermal emission in order to assess their contribution to Io's total heat flow. Loki Patera, the largest single source of heat flow on Io, is a convenient point of reference. We find that dark volcanic fields are more common in the hemisphere opposite Loki Patera and this large scale concentration is manifested as a maximum in the longitudinal distribution (near ˜200 °W), consistent with USGS global geologic mapping results. In spite of their relatively cool temperatures, dark volcanic fields contribute almost as much to Io's heat flow as Loki Patera itself because of their larger areal extent. As a group, dark volcanic fields provide an asymmetric component of ˜5% of Io's global heat flow or ˜5 × 10 12 W.

  17. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  18. A regional test of global models for flow, rheology, and seismic anisotropy at the base of the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Heather A.; Long, Maureen D.

    2015-08-01

    The study of flow patterns and seismic anisotropy in the lowermost mantle is fraught with uncertainties, given the limitations in our understanding of the physical properties of the lowermost mantle and the relationships between deformation and anisotropy. Here we use a set of SKS, SKKS, and ScS splitting measurements that sample the eastern edge of the African Large Low Shear Velocity Province to test predictions of seismic anisotropy derived from previously published 3D global mantle flow models and anisotropy modeling (Walker et al., 2011). The observations can be fit by a model that invokes flow directed to the southwest with a component of downwelling in our study region, and slip that occurs along the (0 1 0) plane of post-perovskite. Most importantly, we demonstrate the ability of a regional shear wave splitting data set to test the robustness of models for flow and deformation in the lowermost mantle.

  19. The Upper Mantle Flow Field around South-Africa as Reflected by Isotopic Provinciality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyzen, C.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Ludden, J.; Humler, E.; Mevel, C.; Albarede, F.

    2006-12-01

    Isotopic studies of MORB have established the existence of broad isotopic provinces within the underlying asthenosphere, such as in the Indian Ocean (DUPAL). How these features relate to mantle circulation is, however, still unknown. The steepness of the transition between such isotopic provinces will define the geometry of the velocity field in the upper mantle. In this respect, the transition between the Indian and South Atlantic provinces, two domains that are isotopically contrasted, should be readily identifiable over this long ridge segment. Here, we present Hf isotope data for 60 samples dredged along the SWIR between 35° and 69°E. The new Hf isotope data show that the Indian asthenosphere does not spill directly into the South Atlantic upper mantle: the general decreasing southward gradient observed for ^{176}Hf/^{177}Hf down the mid- Atlantic Ridge, and also for Sr isotopes and model Th/U ratios (derived from Pb isotopes), is overprinted by material with radiogenic Sr, unradiogenic Hf and high Th/U. The Indian domain grades into the South Atlantic around Bouvet, while the South Atlantic collides with the Atlantic province around Tristan. We interpret these features to represent fronts between three adjacent isotopic provinces similar to what has been suggested for the Australian-Antarctic Discordance. The common DUPAL signature of MORB and OIB from the Indian province and the geochemistry of Gulf of Aden MORB and the Afar plume suggest that the source of this distinctive mantle component is deep and lies to the north of the province. This is also what the three-dimensional flow field computed by Behn et al. (2004) from shear-wave splitting shows with a major lower mantle upwelling radiating at the base of the asthenosphere under the Afar plume. Lower mantle gushing out from this source flows southward unimpeded along the Indian ridges, whereas it only reaches the South Atlantic ridge after first having been deflected under the deep roots of the South

  20. Mantle Flow, Dynamic Topography and Rift-Flank Uplift of Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daradich, A. L.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Willett, S. D.

    2002-12-01

    The Red Sea is flanked by highlands. To the east, the Arabian platform is broadly tilted along an axis that runs parallel to the sea, and the long tail of high topography has been described as a classic example of `rift-flank uplift' [Wernicke, 1985]. A suite of thermal and mechanical effects have been invoked to derive generic mechanisms for flank uplift and these have been applied, with varying levels of success, to the Arabian case. We propose that dynamic topography supported by large scale mantle flow beneath the Africa-Arabia system contributes significantly to the observed pattern of Arabian rift-flank uplift. Seismic tomographic images indicate the existence of large scale (anomalously slow) heterogeneity originating from the deep mantle under southern Africa and, apparently, connecting to more shallow structure beneath the East African Rift system and the Arabian plate. We predict Arabian topography driven by viscous stresses associated with this buoyant megastructure. We first convert velocity anomalies given by the seismic S-wave model S20RTS [Ritsema et al., 1999] to density anomalies using standard scaling profiles, and then input these into a 2-D mantle convection model. Normal stresses derived from the flow models are then used to compute associated profiles of surface (`dynamic') topography. These profiles reconcile the observed topography of the Arabian platform and they provide an explanation for the distinct geometry of rift-flank uplift across the two sides of the Red Sea. Our calculations do not preclude a contribution to topography from previously described thermal and/or mechanical effects; however, they indicate that future analyses of rift-flank uplift should consider the potential contribution from large scale mantle flow.

  1. Rheologic effects of crystal preferred orientation in upper mantle flow near plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, Donna; Castelnau, Olivier; Dawson, Paul; Boyce, Donald

    2016-04-01

    Observations of anisotropy provide insight into upper mantle processes. Flow-induced mineral alignment provides a link between mantle deformation patterns and seismic anisotropy. Our study focuses on the rheologic effects of crystal preferred orientation (CPO), which develops during mantle flow, in order to assess whether corresponding anisotropic viscosity could significantly impact the pattern of flow. We employ a coupled nonlinear numerical method to link CPO and the flow model via a local viscosity tensor field that quantifies the stress/strain-rate response of a textured mineral aggregate. For a given flow field, the CPO is computed along streamlines using a self-consistent texture model and is then used to update the viscosity tensor field. The new viscosity tensor field defines the local properties for the next flow computation. This iteration produces a coupled nonlinear model for which seismic signatures can be predicted. Results thus far confirm that CPO can impact flow pattern by altering rheology in directionally-dependent ways, particularly in regions of high flow gradient. Multiple iterations run for an initial, linear stress/strain-rate case (power law exponent n=1) converge to a flow field and CPO distribution that are modestly different from the reference, scalar viscosity case. Upwelling rates directly below the spreading axis are slightly reduced and flow is focused somewhat toward the axis. Predicted seismic anisotropy differences are modest. P-wave anisotropy is a few percent greater in the flow 'corner', near the spreading axis, below the lithosphere and extending 40-100 km off axis. Predicted S-wave splitting differences would be below seafloor measurement limits. Calculations with non-linear stress/strain-rate relation, which is more realistic for olivine, indicate that effects are stronger than for the linear case. For n=2-3, the distribution and strength of CPO for the first iteration are greater than for n=1, although the fast seismic

  2. Porous Flow and Diffusion of Water in the Mantle Wedge: Melting and Hydration Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    It is widely accepted that melting at volcanic arcs is primarily triggered by fluxing the mantle wedge from the dehydrating subducting slab. However, there is less concensus regarding how water moves into and within the mantle wedge. There are at least four possible mechanisms for water migration in the wedge: buoyant porous flow, diffusion through mineral crystals, advection of hydrated minerals, and compositionally buoyant diapers. The latter two mechanisms require at least one of the first two to occur to get water from the slab into the wedge before they can function. Using geodynamic models of mantle flow in a simplified subduction setting, we explore the implications of diffusion and porous flow of water in the wedge, particularly as they would affect the time for recycling water through the subduction factory and the predicted pattern of basalt hydration across the arc. The slab is assumed to dehydrate in a continuous fashion as the solubility of water in subducted oceanic crust decreases with temperature and pressure and the water then enters the wedge via one of the two transport mechanisms. Diffusion is controlled by temperature and by which minerals are present. Although olivine dominates the mantle mineral fraction, pyroxenes may control the diffusion of water in the wedge as the diffusivity of pyroxene is one or more orders of magnitude greater than olivine. Even assuming the faster diffusion rate of orthopyroxene in the models, diffusion can only be an important transport mechanism when subduction rates are slower than ~3 cm/yr. Flux melting occurs in the wedge above where the slab is ~100-160 km deep with the maximum above where the slab is ~120 km deep. Models including porous flow can result in melting at higher subduction rates provided the permeability of the mantle is greater than 10-17 m2. The true magnitude of the permeability likely varies with the corresponding porosity created by the free phase. With porous flow, melting occurs 20-30 km

  3. Pluto's Polygonal Terrain Places Lower Limit on Planetary Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, A.; Steckloff, J. K.; Melosh, H., IV; Freed, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    During its recent flyby of Pluto, New Horizons imaged an icy plains region (Sputnik Planum) whose surface is divided into polygonal blocks, ca. 20-30 km across, bordered by what appear to be shallow troughs. The lack of craters within these plains suggests they are relatively young, implying that the underlying material is recently active. The scale of these features argues against an origin by cooling and contraction. Here we investigate the alternative scenario that they are the surface manifestation of shallow convection in a thick layer of nitrogen ice. Typical Rayleigh-Bernard convective cells are approximately three times wider than the depth of the convecting layer, implying a layer depth of ca. 7-10 km. Our convection hypothesis requires that the Rayleigh number exceed a minimum of about 1000 in the nitrogen ice layer. We coupled a parameterized convection model with a temperature dependent rheology of nitrogen ice (Yamashita, 2008), finding a Rayleigh number 1500 to 7500 times critical for a plausible range of heat flows for Pluto's interior. The computed range of heat flow (3.5-5.2 mW/m2) is consistent with the radiogenic heat generated by a carbonaceous chondrite (CC) core implied by Pluto's bulk density. The minimum heat flow at the critical Rayleigh number is 0.13 mW/m2. Our model implies a core temperature of 44 K in the interior of the convecting layer. This is very close to the exothermic β-α phase transition in nitrogen ice at 35.6 K (for pure N2 ice; dissolved CO can increase this, depending on its concentration), suggesting that the warm cores of the rising convective cells may be β phase, whereas the cooler sinking limbs may be α phase. This transition may thus be observable due to the large difference in their spectral signature. Further applying our model to Pluto's putative water ice mantle, the heat flow from CC is consistent with convection in Pluto's mantle and the activity observed on its surface.

  4. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  5. Heat Flow Partitioning Between Continents and Oceans - from 2D to 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresi, L. N.; Cooper, C. M.; Lenardic, A.

    2010-12-01

    Scalings derived from thermal network theory explain how the presence of continents can influence the Earth’s overall heat loss. Intuitively, it may seem that increasing the proportion of a planet’s surface area covered by continents would decrease the efficiency of heat transfer given that continents do not participate in convective overturn. However, this ignores the potential feedback between the insulating effect of continents and the temperature-dependent viscosity of the mantle (Lenardic et al, 2005, Cooper et al, 2007). When this feedback is considered, a clear regime exists in which the partial stagnation and insulation of the surface by buoyant continental crust can lead to an increase in heat flow compared to the uninsulated case. The numerical results used to verify the scalings have mostly been conducted in two dimensions in order to cover a very wide range of Rayleigh number, fraction of continental coverage, and continental thickness. However as more recent results show that the configuration of the crust also plays a role in determining the heat flow partitioning and global heat flow (See Lenardic et al, “Continents, Super-Continents, Mantle Thermal Mixing, and Mantle Thermal Isolation” in this session), we have begun to repeat this exhaustive and exhausting 2D study in 3D. Cooper, C.M., A. Lenardic, and L.-N. Moresi "Effects of continental insulation and the partioning of heat producing elements on the Earth's heat loss." Geophys. Res. Lett., 33 ,10.1029, 2006. Lenardic, A., L.-N. Moresi, A.M. Jellinek, and M. Manga "Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents." Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 234 ,317-333, 2005.

  6. Late Cretaceous to Paleogene plate motion, mantle flow and polar wander constrained by paleomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Bono, R.

    2011-12-01

    A wide range of investigations including plate circuit analyses, comparisons of the age progression of coeval hotspots on the Pacific plate and geodynamic modeling are consistent with paleomagnetic results that indicate motion of hotspots in Earth's mantle during Late Cretaceous to Paleogene times, with important changes in the rate of motion near 50 Ma. In the Pacific, the change has been hypothesized to reflect plume dynamics and hotspot-ridge capture; in the Cretaceous the two long-lived Pacific hotspots with well-defined age progressive tracks (Hawaii and Louisville) were near ridges that subsequently waned. In the case of the Hawaiian hotspot, the ridge in question appears to have become extinct close to the time of the bend in the hotspot track. Testing whether a deeper component of Pacific mantle flow also changed near 50 Ma requires a higher resolution investigation of reference frames for absolute plate motion. Here we use select paleomagnetic data prior to and after 50 Ma to test prior inferences about absolute plate motion changes and polar wander, and use these analyses to parse components of mantle flow.

  7. Io: Heat Flow from Dark Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    We focus on the heat flow contribution from dark volcanic fields on Io. These are concentrated in the anti-Loki hemisphere. We use the areas and estimated effective temperatures of dark flucti to derive their total power.

  8. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  9. Subslab seismic anisotropy and mantle flow in the western Pacific subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C. C.; Kuo, B. Y.; Chen, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    We present source-side anisotropy for a few subduction zones in an attempt to map the mantle flow beneath the slab. Shear-wave splitting parameters of S were measured at stations towards the back of the subduction with the receiver-side anisotropy removed. We examined the observed fast directions against tilting/rotation of olivine fabric relative to the geometry of the subduction. We found that at the SW edge of the Ryukyu subduction zone the olivine fabric in the subslab mantle must rotate clockwise by 25 degrees from the slab subduction trajectory to explain the observed pattern of shear-wave splitting. This rotation echoes the deformation model of the slab when it is impinging against the Eurasian lithosphere. In the Vanuatu (New Hebrides) subduction zone, the olivine fabric may rotate dramatically to accommodate the rapid retreat of the trench and flipping of subduction polarity in the past a few Mys.

  10. How Point Defects and Dislocations Drive Flow in the Deep Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Boioli, F.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Hirel, P.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2015-12-01

    Large scale flows which are responsible for the dynamics of planetary interiors rely ultimately on the motion of lattice defects: point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries. A description of the defects at the atomic scale is necessary to describe how their mobility depend on pressure, temperature, stress. A key stage in multiscale numerical modeling is the description of the collective behavior of defects which depends not only on their mobilities, but also on their interactions. Creep mechanisms usually involve interaction between different kind of defects. In diffusion creep, grain boundaries are sources and sinks for point defects. In dislocation creep dislocations not only glide, but also climb by emitting absorbing point defects. In this presentation we describe new results on the interaction between point defects and dislocations in mantle minerals and how dislocation mobilities are affected resulting in novel deformation mechanisms in the lower mantle.

  11. Influence of mantle flow on the drainage of eastern Australia since the Jurassic Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salles, T.; Flament, N.; Müller, D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies of the past eastern Australian landscape from present-day longitudinal river profiles and from mantle flow models suggest that the interaction of plate motion with mantle convection accounts for the two phases of large-scale uplift of the region since 120 Ma. We coupled the dynamic topography predicted from one of these mantle flow models to a surface process model to study the evolution of the eastern Australian landscape since the Jurassic Period. We varied the rainfall regime, erodibility, sea level variations, dynamic topography magnitude, and elastic thickness across a series of experiments. The approach accounts for erosion and sedimentation and simulates catchment dynamics. Despite the relative simplicity of our model, the results provide insights on the fundamental links between dynamic topography and continental-scale drainage evolution. Based on temporal and spatial changes in longitudinal river profiles as well as erosion and deposition maps, we show that the motion of the Australian plate over the convecting mantle has resulted in significant reorganization of the eastern Australian drainage. The model predicts that the Murray river drained eastward between 150 and ˜120 Ma, and switched to westward draining due to the tilting of the Australian plate from ˜120 Ma. First order comparisons of eight modeled river profiles and of the catchment shape of modeled Murray-Darling Basin are in agreement with present-day observations. The predicted denudation of the eastern highlands is compatible with thermochronology data and sedimentation rates along the southern Australian margin are consistent with cumulative sediment thickness.

  12. Io: Heat flow from dark paterae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Williams, David A.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2011-03-01

    Dark paterae on the jovian satellite Io are evidence of recent volcanic activity. Some paterae appear to be entirely filled with dark volcanic material, while others have only partially darkened floors. Dark paterae have area and heat flow longitudinal distributions that are bimodal as well as anti-correlated with the longitudinal distribution of mountains on Io at a global scale. As part of our study of Io’s total heat flow, we have examined the darkest paterae and quantified their thermal emission in order to assess their contribution. This is the first time that the areas of the dark material in these paterae have been measured with such precision and correlated with their thermal emission. Dark paterae yield a significantly larger contribution to Io’s heat flow than dark volcanic fields. Dark paterae (including Loki Patera) yield at least ∼4 × 1013 W or ∼40% of Io’s total heat flow. In comparison, dark flow fields yield ∼1013 W or ∼10% of Io’s total heat flow. Of the total heat loss from dark paterae, Loki Patera alone yields ∼1013 W or ∼10% of Io’s total thermal emission.

  13. Heat flow in eastern Egypt - The thermal signature of a continental breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    It is noted that the Red Sea is a modern example of continental fragmentation and incipient ocean formation. A consistent pattern of high heat flow in the Red Sea margins and coastal zone, including Precambrian terrane up to at least 30 km from the Red Sea, has emerged from the existing data. It is noted that this pattern has important implications for the mode and mechanism of Red Sea opening. High heat flow in the Red Sea shelf requires either a high extension of the crust in this zone (probably with major basic magmatic activity) or young oceanic crust beneath this zone. High heat flow in the coastal thermal anomaly zone may be caused by lateral conduction from the offshore lithosphere and/or from high mantle heat flow. It is suggested that new oceanic crust and highly extended continental crust would be essentially indistinguishable with the available data in the Red Sea margins, and are for many purposes essentially identical.

  14. Heat-flow anomaly and residual topography in the Mascarene hotspot swell (Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, P.; Verdoya, M.

    2017-03-01

    We review the sea-bottom heat-flow determinations and present a new heat-flow observation on the Mauritius island, which is part of the long-lived Reunion hotspot track. The marine heat flow is on average 66 ± 11 mW m-2 and is consistent with the on-land value of 61 ± 18 mW m-2 found in Mauritius. Since these values do not significantly deviate from the reference cooling-plate model, lithosphere erosion does not seem a likely mechanism for the swell formation. The lack of significant reheating due to a mantle plume impacting the lithosphere base is confirmed by thermal modelling. Moreover, the coherency between on-land and marine data is argument against advective redistribution of heat near the axis of the swell. We also analyse the large-scale features of the ocean lithosphere, which are not simply a function of the plate cooling and can reflect variations in mantle dynamic topography. The predicted topography variation along the swell shows amplitude and wavelength comparable to other hotspots. Both the topographic swell magnitude and the wavelength increase northwards with the increase of the age of volcanism. The estimated flux of material from the mantle follows the same trend, being larger in the northern part of the swell. The result that residual topography and the buoyancy flux are smaller at the active volcano of Reunion could be evidence that the activity of the plume has decreased with time.

  15. Non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal heating on mantle flush events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Balachandar, S.; Steinbach, V. C.; Honda, S.; Reuteler, D. M.; Smedsmo, J. J.; Lauer, G. S.

    We have examined the non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal-heating on the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle and on mantle flush events caused by the two major phase transitions. Both two- and three-dimensional models have been employed. The mantle viscosity responds to the secular cooling through changes in the averaged temperature field. A viscosity which decreases algebraically with the average temperature has been considered. The time-dependent internal-heating is prescribed to decrease exponentially with a single decay time. We have studied the thermal histories with initial Rayleigh numbers between 2 x 107 and 108 . Flush events, driven by the non-equilibrium forcings, are much more dramatic than those produced by the equilibrium boundary conditions and constant internal heating. Multiple flush events are found under non-equilibrium conditions in which there is very little internal heating or very fast decay rates of internal-heating. Otherwise, the flush events take place in a relatively continuous fashion. Prior to massive flush events small-scale percolative structures appear in the 3D temperature fields. Time-dependent signatures, such as the surface heat flux, also exhibits high frequency oscillatory patterns prior to massive flush events. These two observations suggest that the flush event may be a self-organized critical phenomenon. The Nusselt number as a function of the time-varying Ra does not follow the Nusselt vs. Rayleigh number power-law relationship based on equilibrium (constant temperature) boundary conditions. Instead Nu(t) may vary non-monotonically with time because of the mantle flush events. Convective processes in the mantle operate quite differently under non-equilibrium conditions from its behaviour under the usual equilibrium situations.

  16. Large fluctuations of shallow seas in low-lying Southeast Asia driven by mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahirovic, Sabin; Flament, Nicolas; Dietmar Müller, R.; Seton, Maria; Gurnis, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Sundaland continental promontory, as the core of Southeast Asia, is one of the lowest lying continental regions, with half of the continental area presently inundated by a shallow sea. The role of mantle convection in driving long-wavelength topography and vertical motion of the lithosphere in this region has often been ignored when interpreting regional stratigraphy, including a widespread Late Cretaceous-Eocene unconformity, despite a consensus that Southeast Asia is presently situated over a large-amplitude dynamic topography low resulting from long-term post-Pangea subduction. We use forward numerical models to link mantle flow with surface tectonics and compare predicted trends of dynamic topography with eustasy and regional paleogeography to determine the influence of mantle convection on regional basin histories. A Late Cretaceous collision of Gondwana-derived terranes with Sundaland choked the active margin, leading to slab breakoff and a ˜10-15 Myr-long subduction hiatus. A subduction hiatus likely resulted in several hundred meters of dynamic uplift and emergence of Sundaland between ˜80 and 60 Ma and may explain the absence of a Late Cretaceous-Eocene sedimentary record. Renewed subduction from ˜60 Ma reinitiated dynamic subsidence of Sundaland, leading to submergence from ˜40 Ma despite falling long-term global sea levels. Our results highlight a complete "down-up-down" dynamic topography cycle experienced by Sundaland, with transient dynamic topography manifesting as a major regional unconformity in sedimentary basins.

  17. Multiple subduction imprints in the mantle below Italy detected in a single lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikogosian, Igor; Ersoy, Özlem; Whitehouse, Martin; Mason, Paul R. D.; de Hoog, Jan C. M.; Wortel, Rinus; van Bergen, Manfred J.

    2016-09-01

    Post-collisional magmatism reflects the regional subduction history prior to collision but the link between the two is complex and often poorly understood. The collision of continents along a convergent plate boundary commonly marks the onset of a variety of transitional geodynamic processes. Typical responses include delamination of subducting lithosphere, crustal thickening in the overriding plate, slab detachment and asthenospheric upwelling, or the complete termination of convergence. A prominent example is the Western-Central Mediterranean, where the ongoing slow convergence of Africa and Europe (Eurasia) has been accommodated by a variety of spreading and subduction systems that dispersed remnants of subducted lithosphere into the mantle, creating a compositionally wide spectrum of magmatism. Using lead isotope compositions of a set of melt inclusions in magmatic olivine crystals we detect exceptional heterogeneity in the mantle domain below Central Italy, which we attribute to the presence of continental material, introduced initially by Alpine and subsequently by Apennine subduction. We show that superimposed subduction imprints of a mantle source can be tapped during a melting episode millions of years later, and are recorded in a single lava flow.

  18. Dynamic topography, gravity and the role of lateral viscosity variations from inversion of global mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Gurnis, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Lateral viscosity variations (LVVs) in the mantle influence geodynamic processes and their surface expressions. With the observed long-wavelength geoid, free-air anomaly, gravity gradient in three directions and discrete, high-accuracy residual topography, we invert for depth- and temperature-dependent and tectonically regionalized mantle viscosity with a mantle flow model. The inversions suggest that long-wavelength gravitational and topographic signals are mainly controlled by the radial viscosity profile; the pre-Cambrian lithosphere viscosity is slightly (˜ one order of magnitude) higher than that of oceanic and Phanerozoic lithosphere; plate margins are substantially weaker than plate interiors; and viscosity has only a weak apparent, dependence on temperature, suggesting either a balancing between factors or a smoothing of actual higher amplitude, but short wavelength, LVVs. The predicted large-scale lithospheric stress regime (compression or extension) is consistent with the world stress map (thrust or normal faulting). Both recent compiled high-accuracy residual topography and the predicted dynamic topography yield ˜1 km amplitude long-wavelength dynamic topography, inconsistent with recent studies suggesting amplitudes of ˜100 to ˜500 m. Such studies use a constant, positive admittance (transfer function between topography and gravity), in contrast to the evidence which shows that the earth has a spatially and wavelength-dependent admittance, with large, negative admittances between ˜4000 and ˜104 km wavelengths.

  19. Short wavelength and high amplitude (~ 1 km) surface uplift in the western Colorado Plateau driven by recent and ongoing mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, R.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    upper mantle are driving differential uplift of the lithosphere along the western flank of the Colorado Plateau. The differential uplift across the faults and the length scale of the high mantle velocity gradient area indicate that the zone of uplift has an amplitude of ca. 1000 m and a wavelength of ca. 200 m. High amplitude and short wavelength dynamic topography reflect mantle flow forcings, suggested by the extremely sharp mantle velocity gradients, filtered through a thinned lithosphere with high heat flow and thin effective elastic thickness that suggest upper mantle melt-filled shear zone conduits. This new geologic evidence for recent and ongoing surface uplift offers an important constraint for geodynamic models which are beginning to elucidate the mantle processes that are producing dynamic topography on the western edge of the Colorado Plateau.

  20. MOTION UNDER THE OCEAN: Determining mantle flow of the Northeast Caribbean with seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintz, H. E.; Pulliam, J.

    2011-12-01

    Active plate boundaries in the Northeast Caribbean have formed a complex tectonic environment which includes transform and subduction zones. The Caribbean-North America plate boundary is one such active margin, where subduction transitions from arc- to oblique-type off the northeast coast of Puerto Rico. Several lines of evidence support the notion of a slab tear within the subducting North American plate at this transition zone, including the counter-clockwise rotation of the Puerto Rico microplate over the past 10 Ma and clusters of small seismic events. Understanding mantle flow in this region will not only help determine the nature of tectonic activity controlling these margins, but will also aid our understanding of anomalies, such as slab tears. Mantle flow and crustal deformation are believed to be the main controls of anisotropy in the lithosphere and asthenosphere. When a shear-wave passes through an anisotropic medium, it is split into a fast and slow component, with the fast shear-wave polarized along the fast direction of that medium. Shear-wave splitting is a tool used to determine the strength and direction of such anisotropy. Previous studies in the Caribbean have generally shown fast shear-wave polarization directions parallel to trenches and/or plate boundaries, indicating mantle flow around the plate (Growdon et al. 2009; Masy et al. 2011; Piñero-Feliciangeli and Kendall 2008). We have focused a detailed investigation of seismic anisotropy from 31 stations across six networks in the Northeast Caribbean to better constrain mantle flow in this region. Shear-wave splitting measurements of teleseismic core phases (e.g., SKS and SKKS) were completed using SplitLab, a Matlab° based environment created by Wüstefeld et al. (2008). This program enables the user to compare the quality of results from three splitting methods: rotation correlation (Bowman and Ando, 1987), minimum energy (Silver and Chan, 1991) and eigenvalue (Silver and Chan, 1991). Noisy

  1. How Irreversible Heat Transport Processes Drive Earth's Interdependent Thermal, Structural, and Chemical Evolution Providing a Strongly Heterogeneous, Layered Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A.; Criss, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    Because magmatism conveys radioactive isotopes plus latent heat rapidly upwards while advecting heat, this process links and controls the thermal and chemical evolution of Earth. We present evidence that the lower mantle-upper mantle boundary is a profound chemical discontinuity, leading to observed heterogeneities in the outermost layers that can be directly sampled, and construct an alternative view of Earth's internal workings. Earth's beginning involved cooling via explosive outgassing of substantial ice (mainly CO) buried with dust during accretion. High carbon content is expected from Solar abundances and ice in comets. Reaction of CO with metal provided a carbide-rich core while converting MgSiO3 to olivine via oxidizing reactions. Because thermodynamic law (and buoyancy of hot particles) indicates that primordial heat from gravitational segregation is neither large nor carried downwards, whereas differentiation forced radioactive elements upwards, formation of the core and lower mantle greatly cooled the Earth. Reference conductive geotherms, calculated using accurate and new thermal diffusivity data, require that heat-producing elements are sequestered above 670 km which limits convection to the upper mantle. These irreversible beginnings limit secular cooling to radioactive wind-down, permiting deduction of Earth's inventory of heat-producing elements from today's heat flux. Coupling our estimate for heat producing elements with meteoritic data indicates that Earth's oxide content has been underestimated. Density sorting segregated a Si-rich, peridotitic upper mantle from a refractory, oxide lower mantle with high Ca, Al and Ti contents, consistent with diamond inclusion mineralogy. Early and rapid differentiation means that internal temperatures have long been buffered by freezing of the inner core, allowing survival of crust as old as ca.4 Ga. Magmatism remains important. Melt escaping though stress-induced fractures in the rigid lithosphere imparts a

  2. Magma genesis and mantle flow at a subducting slab edge: the South Sandwich arc-basin system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leat, P. T.; Pearce, J. A.; Barker, P. F.; Millar, I. L.; Barry, T. L.; Larter, R. D.

    2004-10-01

    The intra-oceanic South Sandwich subduction system is distinctive in having a narrow slab with slab edges at its northern and southern ends. We present new geochemical data to investigate magma genesis beneath the parts of the arc and back-arc segments that lie close to the two slab edges: Kemp and Nelson seamounts at the southern edge of the South Sandwich arc, and segments E1 and E2 in the south, plus segments E9 and E10 in the north, of the East Scotia Sea. In the arc, Kemp and Nelson seamounts exhibit enhanced subduction fluxes compared to the remainder of the arc. The southernmost (Nelson) has the isotope (low Nd and high Sr isotope ratios) and elemental (ultra-high Th and Ba and high Hf/Nd ratios) characteristics of a sediment melt, or supercritical aqueous fluid, component. The more northerly (Kemp) has the same characteristics as the remainder of the arc (high Nd and slightly raised Sr isotope ratios, high Nd/Hf ratios, high Ba/Th ratios), indicative of a fluid component derived mainly from subducted crust, but has a greater mass fraction of that component than the rest of the arc. In the back-arc basin, the slab-edge segments are generally fed by more fertile mantle (E-MORB in all but E1) than the segments in the centre of the basin (N-MORB). At the edges, segments furthest from the trench (E2, E9) have small subduction components while those nearer to the trench (E1, E10) have larger subduction components and slightly more depleted mantle. We argue that several processes were important at the slab edges: roll-back of the slab, forcing sideways flow of relatively enriched mantle into the mantle wedge; convergence of the arc with the back-arc spreading centre, imparting a greater subduction component into the back-arc lavas; and anomalous heating of the subducting slab, increasing subduction fluxes and the contribution of sediment melts to the subduction component.

  3. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  4. Three-dimensional Numerical Models of Mantle Flow Through the Cocos-Nazca Slab Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M.; Fischer, K. M.

    2013-05-01

    Global slab geometry models suggest a 350 km to 1000 km spacing between the southern extent of the Cocos slab and the northern extent of the Nazca slab (Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998; Syracuse and Abers, 2006; Hayes et al., 2012). The apparent gap between the east-dipping Cocos and Nazca slabs at depth correlates to several tectonic features on the Pacific side of Central and northern South America that may limit subduction, namely the (a) Panama Fault zone, (b) incoming young lithosphere associated with the Cocos-Nazca spreading center, and (c) the Cocos, Coiba, Malpelo, and Carnegie ridges associated with the Galapogos hotspot and Cocos-Nazca spreading center (Protti et al., 1994; Johnston and Thorkelson, 1997; Gutscher et al., 1999; Abratis and Worner, 2001; Sdrolias and Muller, 2006; Mann et al., 2007; Gazel et al., 2011). In addition, on the Caribbean side of Central and northern South America, seismic data suggest that part of the Caribbean plate is subducting and dipping in a direction opposite to the Cocos and Nazca slabs (van der Hilst and Mann, 1994; Camacho et al., 2010). We construct high-resolution three-dimensional numerical models of the Cocos-Nazca subduction system to test the effects of a slab gap and variable overriding plate thickness on surface plate motion and mantle flow. The 3D tectonic configuration is generated with SlabGenerator (Jadamec and Billen, 2010, 2012) and the mantle convection code CitcomCU is used to solve for the viscous flow (Moresi and Solomatov, 1995; Zhong, 2006). The negative thermal buoyancy of the slabs drive the flow. No driving velocities are applied to the plates or any of the slabs in the model. The detailed geometries of the Cocos and Nazca slabs are constructed from seismicity and seismic tomography (Protti et al., 1994; Colombo et al., 1997; Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998; Rogers et al., 2002; Husen et al., 2003; Syracuse and Abers, 2006; Syracuse et al., 2008; Dzierma et al., 2011). Seismic tomography

  5. Permian Basin maturation: proof for pervasive magmatic heat flow in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonte, Damien; van Wees, Jan Diederik; Fattah, Rader Abdul; Nelskamp, Suzanne; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-05-01

    The area of the Permian Basin is marked by significant Stephanian-Permian magmatism that is related to the Variscanorogenic collapse, resulting in pervasive mantle upwelling. Large extrusive evidence is visible in the North German Basin and in the Central North Sea. Theoretical models for tectonic heat flow and maturity evolution show that mantle upwelling, underplating, and intrusions are likely to have a significant effect on maturity-depth trends. Tectonic modelling of selected wells shows that tectonic subsidence and exhumation can be reconciled with a significant heat flow pulse at the Stephanian-Permian, and this could well explain the widespread elevated depth gradient of maturity in Carboniferous rocks. The quantitative assessment of heat flow, which is based on a kinematic model of the process of orogenic collapse, shows that the mantle upwelling and underplating at the base of the crust proposed by earlier studies in fact provides insufficient heat flow to explain strongly elevated maturity-depth trends. However, the Southern part of the Texel IJsselmeer High shows unusually high maturation values that cannot be explained by the simple effect of burial alone. This area of high maturation is also associated with evidence of intrusive magmatic rocks. By modelling five wells in the Texel IJsselmeer High, we conclude that the burial of the sediments and a shallow intrusion in the upper crust provide an elevated heat flow mechanism that has a regional impact, consistent with observed high maturity-depth trends. In each well, the model that best matches the elevated maturity data of the Carboniferous demonstrates the impact of a large intrusion emplacement in the upper crust at the time of the collapse of the Variscan orogen. The impact of this magmatic intrusion at such a shallow depth is extremely likely to have brought the maturity to the gas window during the heat pulse, and, based on the tectonic subsidence record, the model allows us to position this

  6. Joule heating effects on electroosmotic entry flow.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Rama Aravind; Zhou, Yilong; Patel, Saurin; Kale, Akshay; Song, Yongxin; Hu, Guoqing; Xuan, Xiangchun

    2017-03-01

    Electroosmotic flow is the transport method of choice in microfluidic devices over traditional pressure-driven flow. To date, however, studies on electroosmotic flow have been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. This work presents the first experimental study of Joule heating effects on electroosmotic fluid entry from the inlet reservoir (i.e., the well that supplies fluids and samples) to the microchannel in a polymer-based microfluidic chip. Electrothermal fluid circulations are observed at the reservoir-microchannel junction, which grow in size and strength with the increasing alternating current to direct current voltage ratio. Moreover, a 2D depth-averaged numerical model is developed to understand the effects of Joule heating on fluid temperature and flow fields in electrokinetic microfluidic chips. This model overcomes the problems encountered in previous unrealistic 2D and costly 3D models, and is able to predict the observed electroosmotic entry flow patterns with a good agreement.

  7. The feasibility of inverting for flow in the lowermost mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, A.; Walpole, J.; Wookey, J. M.; Walker, A.; Forte, A. M.; Masters, G.; Kendall, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), the largest change in physical properties occurs within the Earth. Furthermore, up to a few hundred kilometres above the CMB--the region known as D″--the largest lateral variations in seismic wave speed are observed outside the upper mantle. Observations of shear wave splitting in D″ shows that these variations are dependent not only on position, but also wave propagation direction and polarisation; that is, strong seismic anisotropy is a pervasive feature of D″, just as in the upper mantle (UM). Similarly to the UM, it is frequently argued that alignment of anisotropic minerals due to flow is the cause of this. Were this the case, this anisotropy could be used to retrieve the recent strain history of the lowermost mantle. Recent modelling of mineral alignment in D″ [1,2] has shown that quite simple models of mantle flow do not produce simple anisotropy, hence one must make use of the most information about the type and orientation of anisotropy possible. Global inversion for radial anisotropy permits complete coverage of the CMB but so far has relied on core-diffracted waves (Sdiff) which are challenging to accurately interpret [3]. The assumption of radial anisotropy may also be too restrictive [4]. Shear wave splitting studies do not impose any assumed type of anisotropy but have been traditionally limited in their geographical scope. We present the results of a consistent analysis of core-reflected shear waves (ScS) for shear wave splitting, producing near-global coverage [5] of D″. Over 12,000 individual measurements are made, from ~470 events. Along well-studied paths such as beneath the Caribbean, our results agree excellently with previous work. Elsewhere, a full range of fast orientations are observed, indicating that simple SV-SH comparisons may not accurately reflect the elasticity present. We compare these results to candidate models of D″ anisotropy assuming a simple flow model derived from geophysical

  8. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  9. Effects of subduction and slab gaps on mantle flow beneath the Lesser Antilles based on observations of seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaphorst, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Baptie, Brian; Latchman, Joan L.; Bouin, Marie-Paule

    2016-04-01

    Subduction is a key process in the formation of continental crust. However, the interaction of the mantle with the subducting slab is not fully understood and varies between subduction zones. The flow geometry and stress patterns influence seismic anisotropy; since anisotropic layers lead to variations in the speed of seismic waves as a function of the direction of wave propagation, mantle flow can be constrained by investigating the structure of these anisotropic layers. In this study we investigate seismic anisotropy in the eastern Greater and the Lesser Antilles along a subduction environment, including the crust and the upper mantle as regions of interest. We use a combination of teleseismic and local events recorded at three-component broadband seismic stations on every major island in the area to observe and distinguish between anisotropy in the crust, the mantle wedge and the sub-slab mantle. Local event delay times (0.21±0.12s) do not increase with depth, indicating a crustal origin and an isotropic mantle wedge. Teleseismic delay times are larger (1.34±0.47s), indicating sub-slab anisotropy. The results suggest trench-parallel mantle flow, with the exception of trench-perpendicular alignment in narrow regions east of Puerto Rico and south of Martinique, suggesting mantle flow through gaps in the slab. This agrees with the continuous northward mantle flow that is caused by the subducting slab proposed by previous studies of that region. We were able to identify a pattern previously unseen by other studies; on St. Lucia a trench-perpendicular trend also indicated by the stations around can be observed. This pattern can be explained by a mantle flow through a gap induced by the subduction of the boundary zone between the North and South American plates. This feature has been proposed for that area using tomographic modelling (van Benthem et al., 2013). It is based on previous results by Wadge & Shepherd (1984), who observed a vertical gap in the Wadati

  10. Gravity crustal models and heat flow measurements for the Eurasia Basin, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urlaub, Morelia; Schmidt-Aursch, Mechita C.; Jokat, Wilfried; Kaul, Norbert

    2009-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean with its adjacent Nansen and Amundsen Basins is a key region for the study of mantle melting and crustal generation at ultraslow spreading rates. We use free-air gravity anomalies in combination with seismic reflection and wide-angle data to compute 2-D crustal models for the Nansen and Amundsen Basins in the Arctic Ocean. Despite the permanent pack-ice cover two geophysical transects cross both entire basins. This means that the complete basin geometry of the world’s slowest spreading system can be analysed in detail for the first time. Applying standard densities for the sediments and oceanic crystalline crust, the gravity models reveal an unexpected heterogeneous mantle with densities of 3.30 × 103, 3.20 × 103 and 3.10 × 103 kg/m3 near the Gakkel Ridge. We interpret that the upper mantle heterogeneity mainly results from serpentinisation and thermal effects. The thickness of the oceanic crust is highly variable throughout both transects. Crustal thickness of less than 1 km dominates in the oldest parts of both basins, increasing to a maximum value of 6 km near the Gakkel Ridge. Along-axis heat flow is highly variable and heat flow amplitudes resemble those observed at fast or intermediate spreading ridges. Unexpectedly, high heat flow along the Amundsen transect exceeds predicted values from global cooling curves by more than 100%.

  11. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  12. Boundary-layer mantle flow under the Dead Sea transform fault inferred from seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Rümpker, Georg; Ryberg, Trond; Bock, Günter

    2003-10-02

    Lithospheric-scale transform faults play an important role in the dynamics of global plate motion. Near-surface deformation fields for such faults are relatively well documented by satellite geodesy, strain measurements and earthquake source studies, and deeper crustal structure has been imaged by seismic profiling. Relatively little is known, however, about deformation taking place in the subcrustal lithosphere--that is, the width and depth of the region associated with the deformation, the transition between deformed and undeformed lithosphere and the interaction between lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle flow at the plate boundary. Here we present evidence for a narrow, approximately 20-km-wide, subcrustal anisotropic zone of fault-parallel mineral alignment beneath the Dead Sea transform, obtained from an inversion of shear-wave splitting observations along a dense receiver profile. The geometry of this zone and the contrast between distinct anisotropic domains suggest subhorizontal mantle flow within a vertical boundary layer that extends through the entire lithosphere and accommodates the transform motion between the African and Arabian plates within this relatively narrow zone.

  13. Heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity flow boiling.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Haruhiko

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to clarify the mechanisms of heat transfer and dryout phenomena in flow boiling under microgravity conditions. Liquid-vapor behavior in annular flow, encountered in the moderate quality region, has extreme significance for practical application in space. To clarify the gravity effect on the heat transfer observed for an upward flow in a tube, the research described here started from the measurement of pressure drop for binary gas-liquid mixture under various gravity conditions. The shear stress acting on the surface of the annular liquid film was correlated by an empirical method. Gravity effects on the heat transfer due to two-phase forced convection were investigated by the analysis of velocity and temperature profiles in the film. The results reproduce well the trends of heat transfer coefficients varying with the gravity level, quality, and mass velocity. Dryout phenomena in the moderate quality region were observed in detail by the introduction of a transparent heated tube. At heat fluxes just lower and higher than CHF value, a transition of the heat transfer coefficient was calculated from oscillating wall temperature, where a series of opposing heat transfer trends--the enhancement due to the quenching of dried areas or evaporation from thin liquid films and the deterioration due to the extension of dry patches--were observed between the passage of disturbance waves. The CHF condition that resulted from the insufficient decrease of wall temperature in the period of enhanced heat transfer was overcome by a temperature increase in the deterioration period. No clear effect of gravity on the mechanisms of dryout was observed within the range of experiments.

  14. Coupled Afterslip and Mantle Flow Following the 1992 Landers and the 1999 Hector Mine, CA Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbot, S. D.; Fialko, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the postseismic deformation following the 1992 Landers and the 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes (Mojave desert, eastern California) using all available geodetic data including GPS and InSAR time series between 1992-2009. We test the possible mechanisms of postseismic relaxation using physically-based time-dependent models of deformation driven by coseismic stress changes. Considered mechanisms include power-law viscoelastic flow in the lower crust and upper mantle, afterslip governed by a rate-dependent friction, and poroelastic rebound. For the post-Landers transient, we compare the model predictions to the campaign GPS data referenced to some chosen station within the network. We find that both afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation models can explain the data equally well. Identification of a "preferred" mechanism depends on a choice of a reference GPS station. For the post-Hector Mine transient, we isolate the postseismic signal in the GPS time series by assuming a complete relaxation 8-10 years after the rupture. Such an assumption is supported by the fact that sites that predate the earthquake returned to preseismic velocities after several years following the event, so that the velocity contribution from the late postseismic signal (after eight years) is small compared to the secular velocities. We find that models of stress-driven afterslip (assuming a velocity-neutral depth of 15 km) can explain the amplitude of surface displacements in the near field (within 50 km from the rupture). Afterslip models indicate a characteristic relaxation timescale of ~1-2 years. However, the orientation of the postseismic velocity vectors warrants the occurrence of both afterslip and viscoelastic flow in the upper mantle. The data do not require a stress-dependent viscosity, and can be explained equally well by power-law and linear Maxwell viscoelastic models. We quantify a tradeoff between the assumed thickness of the elastic layer and the viscosity of the

  15. Thermochemical evolution of the core constrained by mantle global circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, P.; Zhong, S.; Rudolph, M. L.; Deguen, R.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstructions of the Phanerozoic history of the mantle using global circulation models (mantle GCMs) that include past plate motions are used to constrain the thermochemical evolution of the core. Mantle GCMs predict that the present-day global mean heat flow at the core-mantle boundary lies in the range 80-90 mW/m^2, with low spherical harmonic degree spatial variations of 100 mW/m^2 . Based on the recently-determined high conductivity of core compounds, we infer that the present-day outer core is thermally unstable beneath 30-40% of the core-mantle boundary, including beneath the high seismic velocity regions in the lower mantle, and thermally stable elsewhere, including beneath the large low seismic velocity provinces in the lower mantle. During times of faster plate speeds and elevated core heat flow, such as in the Cretaceous, the thermally unstable portions beneath the core-mantle boundary expanded to around 60%, according to our mantle GCMs. We calculate the growth the inner core using a standard thermochemical evolution model of the core. Mantle GCM heat flow statistics predict that the inner core nucleated between 650 and 950 Ma, the older age corresponding to radioactive heating from an assumed 300 ppm of potassium in the core. In terms of energetics, we find that core-mantle boundary heat flows of 80-90 mW/m^2 are adequate for convection-driven dynamo action during inner core growth, but higher heat flow or additional energy sources may be needed to sustain the geodynamo prior to inner core nucleation

  16. Seismic Anisotropy near Hawaii - Evidence for plume-related mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, Gabi; Marzen, Rachel

    2016-04-01

    During the Hawaiian PLUME (Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Melt Experiment) deployment, we collected continuous seismic data at ten land stations and nearly 70 ocean bottom sites from 2005 through mid-2007. Both the usage broad-band seismometers as well as the central location of Hawaii with good azimuthal seismicity coverage has allowed us to conduct a comprehensive analysis of surface wave azimuthal anisotropy at periods between 20 and 100 s. We use a sub-array approach to successively fit propagating spherical wave fronts in order to obtain frequency-dependent estimates at a large number of points. We use the standard Smith-and-Dahlen parameterization to express azimuthal variations. A systematic comparison between results obtained for different truncation levels in the trigonometric expansion allows us to assess stability of the results and assign error bars. At short periods, the fast direction aligns coherently with the fossil spreading direction across the entire PLUME network. This result supports the idea that flow-aligned asthenospheric material is "frozen" to the bottom of the cooling plate as it thickens. However, at longer periods, that sense the asthenosphere below the fast direction rotates incoherently, indicating that flow in the asthenosphere is significantly perturbed from the direction of current plate motion. A published shear-wave splitting study (Collins et al., 2012) found no evidence for such an anomalous mantle flow and therefore seems inconsistent with our results. We present initial surface-wave inversion results that suggest that plume-related mantle flow does not reach into the upper lithosphere. We also present forward-modeling results attempting to reconcile both surface-wave and shear-wave splitting observations. Collins, J.A., Wolfe, C.J. and Laske, G., 2012. Shear wave splitting at the Hawaiian hots pot from the PLUME land and ocean bottom seismometer deployments, Geochem. Geophys. Geosys., 13, doi:10.1029/2011gc003881.

  17. Heterogeneities in the thickness of the elastic lithosphere of Mars: Constraints on heat flow and internal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, S.C. ); Head, J.W. )

    1990-07-10

    Derived values of the thickness of the effective elastic lithosphere on Mars are converted to estimates of lithospheric thermal gradients and surface heat flow by finding the thickness of the elastic-plastic plate having the same bending moment and curvature, subject to assumed strain rates and temperature-dependent flow laws for crustal and mantle material. Local thermal gradients and heat flow values so estimated were 10-14 K km{sup {minus}1} and 25-35 mW m{sup {minus}2}, respectively, at the time of formation of flexurally induced graben surrounding the Tharsis Montes and Alba Patera, while gradients and heat flow values of less than 5-6 K km{sup {minus}1} and 17-24 mW m{sup {minus}2}, respectively, characterized the lithosphere beneath the Isidis mascon and Olympus Mons at the time of emplacement of these loads. On the basis of the mean global thickness of the elastic lithosphere inferred to support the Tharsis rise and estimates of mantle heat production obtained from SNC meteorites, it is suggested that the present average global heat flux on Mars is in the range 15-25 mW m{sup {minus}2}. Approximately 3-5% of this heat flux during the Amazonian epoch has been contributed by excess conducted heat in the central regions of major volcanic provinces. Most likely, this excess heat flux has been delivered to the base of the lithosphere by mantle plumes. The fractional mantle heat transport contributed by plumes during the last 2 b.y. on Mars is therefore similar to that at present on Earth.

  18. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  19. The mantle wedge's transient 3-D flow regime and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, D. R.; Le Voci, G.; Goes, S.; Kramer, S. C.; Wilson, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Arc volcanism, volatile cycling, mineralization, and continental crust formation are likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure. Wedge flow is often assumed to follow a regular corner-flow pattern. However, studies that incorporate a hydrated rheology and thermal buoyancy predict internal small-scale-convection (SSC). Here, we systematically explore mantle-wedge dynamics in 3-D simulations. We find that longitudinal "Richter-rolls" of SSC (with trench-perpendicular axes) commonly occur if wedge hydration reduces viscosities to Pa s, although transient transverse rolls (with trench-parallel axes) can dominate at viscosities of Pa s. Rolls below the arc and back arc differ. Subarc rolls have similar trench-parallel and trench-perpendicular dimensions of 100-150 km and evolve on a 1-5 Myr time-scale. Subback-arc instabilities, on the other hand, coalesce into elongated sheets, usually with a preferential trench-perpendicular alignment, display a wavelength of 150-400 km and vary on a 5-10 Myr time scale. The modulating influence of subback-arc ridges on the subarc system increases with stronger wedge hydration, higher subduction velocity, and thicker upper plates. We find that trench-parallel averages of wedge velocities and temperature are consistent with those predicted in 2-D models. However, lithospheric thinning through SSC is somewhat enhanced in 3-D, thus expanding hydrous melting regions and shifting dehydration boundaries. Subarc Richter-rolls generate time-dependent trench-parallel temperature variations of up to K, which exceed the transient 50-100 K variations predicted in 2-D and may contribute to arc-volcano spacing and the variable seismic velocity structures imaged beneath some arcs.

  20. Seismic Anisotropy and Mantle Flow from Ridge to Trench Below the Gorda-Juan de Fuca Plate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Allen, R. M.; Bastow, I. D.; Richards, M. A.; Totten, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic plates are underlain by a low viscosity layer of the mantle, the asthenosphere, which flows. Flow in the asthenosphere may be induced by motion of the overriding plate, or by deeper mantle convection. Measurement of seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of seismic wave speed, is an important tool in understanding mantle structure and dynamics, and is often used to infer information about asthenospheric flow geometry. However, isolation of asthenospheric signals is challenging because most seismometers are located on the continents, whose complex structure influences seismic waves en-route to the surface. Thus the challenge is to record seismic data on oceanic lithosphere, which is much thinner and simpler. We present stacked shear wave splitting results from phases 1 to 3 of the Cascadia Initiative: An ambitious, large-scale deployment of offshore seismometers across the Gorda and Juan-de-Fuca plates. Fast splitting directions (FSD) can approximate mantle flow geometry, thus for the first time allowing an interpretation of flow beneath an ocean basin from ridge to trench. The Juan-de-Fuca plate appears able to influence mantle flow: FSD rotate towards the absolute plate motion direction (APM) with increasing distance from the ridge. In contrast, Gorda FSD align with the motion of the adjacent Pacific plate rather than Gorda APM. These observations suggest that drag caused by motion the Pacific plate controls asthenospheric flow beneath Gorda, and thus that the Gorda plate may be decoupled from the asthenosphere. We also construct a simple geodynamic model of this situation, which supports its plausibility. Our findings imply that tectonic plates must reach a minimum size and speed before they are able to exert influence on asthenospheric flow.

  1. The first deep heat flow determination in crystalline basement rocks beneath the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek; Chan, Judith; Crowell, James; Gosnold, Will; Heaman, Larry M.; Kück, Jochem; Nieuwenhuis, Greg; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Unsworth, Martyn; Walsh, Nathaniel; Weides, Simon

    2014-05-01

    relationship determined for other provinces of the Canadian Shield. However, this relationship could not be established for Q estimates from industrial temperatures data for the study area that includes the Taltson Magmatic Zone and neighbouring Buffalo High and Buffalo Utikuma domains to the west. It appears that the spatial wavelength of heat generation change is much smaller than that of heat flow. Thermal modelling of heat flow and heat generation data from the Hunt Well, using mantle heat flow contributions of 15 ± 5 mW m-2 results in lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary depth estimates of near 200 km. This mantle heat flow value is consistent with the range for the stable continental areas, 15 (±3) mW m-2.

  2. Rheology of two-phase composites: implications for flow properties of the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Nishiyama, N.; Hilairet, N.; Fiquet, G.; Tsuchiya, T.

    2011-12-01

    We examine flow properties and deformation-induced fabric evolution in two-phase composites using the deformation DIA (D-DIA) and the high-pressure x-ray tomography microscope (HPXTM) with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. Stress-strain curves were determined on an analog lower mantle material CaGeO3 perovskite (GePv) plus MgO. The sintered polycrystalline rock was synthesized from the disproportionation reaction of CaMgGeO4 (olivine) - GePv+MgO at 12 GPa and 1573 K for 4 h. The sample contains 28 vol% MgO, and is an excellent analog material for the lower mantle. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the average grain size was about 1 micron. The sample was deformed in the D-DIA at pressures from 4 to 12 GPa, temperatures 600 to 1200 K, and strain rates from 1x to 3x10-5 s-1. The maximum axial strain was 16 %. Elastic constants for GePv were calculated using first-principles with the generalized gradient corrections (GGC) technique. In order to examine effects of the second phase on flow properties, a pure GePv sample was deformed under identical conditions. Flow properties of MgO are available from our previous studies [1]. The relative stress levels in GePv and MgO in the composite sample are in general agreement with numerical simulations [2]. Another analog, a mixture of San Carlos olivine and Fe-S, was examined in the HPXTM. The strength contrast of two phases is similar to that of perovskite and ferropericlase. The initial texture was of the load-bearing framework (LBF) type, with isolated "weak" Fe-S grains sounded by "strong" silicate framework. During shear deformation, a strong shape preferred orientation began to develop in the sample at shear strains above 300%, forming an interconnected weak layer (IWL) texture. The development of deformation fabric was continuously monitored by tomographic imaging under high pressure to a maximum shear strain of 1300%. Applications of these results to dynamics of the lower mantle are discussed. [1] Uchida, T

  3. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  4. Mantle flow beneath a continental strike-slip fault: Postseismic deformation after the 1999 Hector Mine earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Wicks, C.; Thatcher, W.

    2001-01-01

    Two recent large earthquakes in the Mojave Desert, California - the magnitude 7.3 1992 Landers and magnitude 7.1 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes - have each been fog[owed by elevated crustal strain rates over periods of months and years. Geodetic data collected after the Hector Mine earthquake exhibit a temporaLLy decaying horizOntaL velocity field and a quadrant uplift pattern opposite to that expected for LocaLized shear beneath the earthquake rupture. We interpret the origin of this accelerated crustal deformation to be vigorous flow in the upper mantle in response to the stress changes generated by the earthquake. Our results suggest that transient flow in the upper mantle is a fundamental component of the earthquake cycle and that the Lower crust is a coherent stress guide coupling the upper crust with the upper mantle.

  5. Mantle Flow Implications across Easter and Southern Africa from Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, C.; Nyblade, A.; Bagley, B. C.; Mulibo, G. D.; Tugume, F.; Wysession, M. E.; Wiens, D.; van der Meijde, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present new shear wave splitting results from broadband seismic stations in Botswana and Namibia, and combine them with previous results from stations in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Angola to further examine the pattern of seismic anisotropy across southern Africa. The new results come from stations in northern Namibia and Botswana, which help to fill in large gaps in data coverage. Our preliminary results show that fast polarization directions overall trend in a NE orientation. The most noticeable measurements that deviate from this pattern are located around the Archean Tanzania Craton in eastern Africa. The general NE pattern of fast polarization directions is attributed to mantle flow linked to the African superplume. Smaller scale variations from this general direction can be explained by shape anisotropy in the lithosphere in magmatic regions in the East African rift system and to fossil anisotropy in the Precambrian lithosphere.

  6. Combined micro and macro geodynamic modelling of mantle flow: methods, potentialities and limits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last few years, geodynamic simulations aiming at reconstructing the Earth's internal dynamics have increasingly attempted to link processes occurring at the micro (i.e., strain-induced lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of crystal aggregates) and macro scale (2D/3D mantle convection). As a major outcome, such a combined approach results in the prediction of the modelled region's elastic properties that, in turn, can be used to perform seismological synthetic experiments. By comparison with observables, the geodynamic simulations can then be considered as a good numerical analogue of specific tectonic settings, constraining their deep structure and recent tectonic evolution. In this contribution, I will discuss the recent methodologies, potentialities and current limits of combined micro- and macro-flow simulations, with particular attention to convergent margins whose dynamics and deep structure is still the object of extensive studies.

  7. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  8. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  9. Subsurface heat flow in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2004-02-01

    The subsurface temperature field beneath Winnipeg, Canada, is significantly different from that of the surrounding rural areas. Downward heat flow to depths as great as 130 m has been noted in some areas beneath the city and groundwater temperatures in a regional aquifer have risen by as much as 5°C in some areas. Numerical simulation of heat transport supports the conjecture that these temperature changes can be largely attributed to heat loss from buildings and the temperature at any given point is sensitive to the distance from and the age of any buildings. The effect is most noticable when buildings are closely spaced, which is typical of urban areas. Temperature measurements in areas more than a few hundred meters away from any heated structure were only a few tenths of a degree Celsius greater than those observed outside the city, suggesting that other reasons for increases in subsurface temperature, such as changes in surface cover or climate change, may be responsible for some of the some of the observed increase in temperatures. These sources of additional heat to the subsurface make it difficult to resolve information on past climates from temperatures measured in boreholes and monitoring wells. In some areas, the temperature increases may also have an impact on geothermal energy resources. This impact might be in the form of an increase in heat pump efficiency or in the case of the Winnipeg area, a decrease in the efficiency of direct use of groundwater for cooling.

  10. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  11. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Berisford, Daniel F; Bengtson, Roger D; Raja, Laxminarayan L; Cassady, Leonard D; Chancery, William J

    2008-10-01

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  12. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-01

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  13. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  14. Heat flow and near-surface radioactivity in the Australian continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Jaeger, J.C.; Munroe, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat-flow data have been obtained at 44 sites in various parts of Australia. These include seven sites from the old (~ 2500 m.y.) Precambrian shield of Western Australia, seventeen from the younger (~ 600- 2000 m.y.) Precambrian rocks of South Australia, the Northern Territory, and Queensland, and twenty within the eastern Paleozoic and younger rocks. Thirty of the sites are located where no previous heat-flow data existed, and the remainder provide significant extensions or refinements of areas previously studied. Where the holes studied penetrated the crystalline basement rocks, or where the latter rocks were exposed within a few kilometers of the holes, the upper crustal radiogenic heat production has been estimated based on gamma-ray spectrometric determinations of U, Th, and K abundances. Three heat-flow provinces are recognized in Australia based on the linear relation (q = q* + DA0 ) between heat flow q and surface radioactivity A0. New data from the Western Australian shield support earlier studies showing that heat flow is low to normal with values ranging from 0.7 to 1.2 hfu and with the majority of values less than 1.0 hfu, and the parameters q* = 0.63 hfu and 0 = 4.5 km determined previously were confirmed. Heat flow in the Proterozoic shield of central Australia is quite variable, with values ranging between about l and 3 hfu. This variability is attributed mainly to variations in near-surface crustal radioactivity. The parameters of the heat-flow line are q* = 0.64 hfu and 0 = 11.1 km and moderately high temperatures are predicted for the lower crust and upper mantle. Previous suggestions of a band of l ow- to - normal heat flow near the coast in eastern Australia were confirmed in some areas, but the zone is interrupted in at least one region (the Sydney Basin), where heat flow is about 2.0 hfu over a large area. The reduced heat flow, q*, in the Paleozoic intrusive rocks of eastern Australia varies from about 0.8 to 2.0 hfu . This variability might

  15. Investigating seismic anisotropy beneath the Reykjanes Ridge using models of mantle flow, crystallographic evolution, and surface wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, A.; Ito, G.; Dunn, R. A.

    2013-08-01

    Surface wave studies of the Reykjanes Ridge (RR) and the Iceland hotspot have imaged an unusual and enigmatic pattern of two zones of negative radial anisotropy on each side of the RR. We test previously posed and new hypotheses for the origin of this anisotropy, by considering lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine A-type fabric in simple models with 1-D, layered structures, as well as in 2-D and 3-D geodynamic models with mantle flow and LPO evolution. Synthetic phase velocities of Love and Rayleigh waves traveling parallel to the ridge axis are produced and then inverted to mimic the previous seismic studies. Results of 1-D models show that strong negative radial anisotropy can be produced when olivine a axes are preferentially aligned not only vertically but also subhorizontally in the plane of wave propagation. Geodynamic models show that negative anisotropy on the sides of the RR can occur when plate spreading impels a corner flow, and in turn a subvertical alignment of olivine a axes, on the sides of the ridge axis. Mantle dehydration must be invoked to form a viscous upper layer that minimizes the disturbance of the corner flow by the Iceland mantle plume. While the results are promising, important discrepancies still exist between the observed seismic structure and the predictions of this model, as well as models of a variety of types of mantle flow associated with plume-ridge interaction. Thus, other factors that influence seismic anisotropy, but not considered in this study, such as power-law rheology, water, melt, or time-dependent mantle flow, are probably important beneath the Reykjanes Ridge.

  16. Controls on the Flow Regime and Thermal Structure of the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: A Systematic 2-D and 3-D Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voci, Giuseppe; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Arc volcanism at subduction zones is likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure and, hence, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the principal controls on mantle wedge conditions. Here, we build on these previous studies by undertaking the first systematic 2-D and 3-D numerical investigation, across a wide parameter-space, into how hydration and thermal buoyancy influence the wedge's flow regime and associated thermal structure, above a kinematically driven subducting plate. We find that small-scale convection (SSC), resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, or drips, off the base of the overriding lithosphere, is a typical occurrence, if: (i) viscosities are < 5×1018 Pa s; and (ii) hydrous weakening of wedge rheology extends at least 100-150 km from the trench. In 2-D models, instabilities generally take the form of 'drips'. Although along-strike averages of wedge velocities and temperature in 3-D structure are consistent with those in 2-D, fluctuations are larger in 3-D. Furthermore, in 3-D, two separate, but interacting, longitudinal Richter roll systems form (with their axes aligned perpendicular to the trench), the first below the arc region and the second below the back-arc region. These instabilities result in transient and spatial temperature fluctuations of 100-150K, which are sufficient to influence melting, the stability of hydrous minerals and the dehydration of crustal material. Furthermore, they are efficient at eroding the overriding lithosphere, particularly in 3-D and, thus, provide a means to explain observations of high heat flow and thin back-arc lithosphere at many subduction zones, if back-arc mantle is hydrated.

  17. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures are simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.

  18. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. New Insights Into the Dynamics of Wedge Areas from a 2d Numerical Study of the Effects of Shear Heating and Mantle Hydration on AN Ocean-Continent Subduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regorda, A.; Roda, M.; Marotta, A. M.; Spalla, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    To obtain new insights regarding the mechanisms that favor the exhumation of buried crustal material during ocean-continent subduction, we have developed a 2D finite element model that investigates the effects of shear heating and mantle hydration on the dynamics of wedge areas. The development of the model consists of an initial phase of active oceanic subduction and a second phase, after collision, of pure gravitational evolution; in addition, it considers 3 different velocities of active subduction. Our results show that accounting for mantle hydration is essential to produce small-scale convective flows in a wedge area with the consequent recycling and exhumation of subducted material. In addition, the dynamics of hydrated areas are strictly correlated to the thermal state at the external boundaries of the mantle wedge, and the extension of hydrated areas is independent from the subduction velocities when mantle hydration and shear heating are simultaneously considered during the active subduction phase. During the pure gravitational phase, the hydrated portion of the wedge undergoes a progressive enlargement for models with a high subduction velocity during the previous active phase. Finally, a comparison between the predicted P/T ratios and the P-T conditions recorded by markers during subduction, which show metamorphic gradients that are traditionally considered to be distinctive examples of different phases of evolution in an ocean/continent subduction complex, supports the notion that contrasting P-T conditions can contemporaneously characterize different portions of the subduction system during successive phases of modeled subduction-collision.

  20. Anomalous subglacial heat flow in central Greenland induced by the Iceland plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, Alexey G.; Rogozhina, Irina; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse; Koulakov, Ivan; Thomas, Maik

    2013-04-01

    3000 m of ice sheet thickness has ensured that central Greenland has kept it geothermal heat flow (GHF) distribution enigmatic. Some few direct ice temperature measurements from deep ice cores reveal a GHF of 50 to 60 mW/m² in the Summit region and this is noticeably above what would be expected for the underlying Early Proterozoic lithosphere. In addition, indirect estimates from zones of rapid basal melting suggest extreme anomalies 15 to 30 times continental background. Subglacial topography indicates caldera like topographic features in the zones hinting at possible volcanic activity in the past [1], and all of these observations combined hint at an anomalous lithospheric structure. Further supporting this comes from new high-resolution P-wave tomography, which shows a strong thermal anomaly in the lithosphere crossing Greenland from east to west [2]. Rock outcrops at the eastern and western end of this zone indicate significant former magmatic activity, older in the east and younger in the west. Additionally, plate modelling studies suggest that the Greenland plate passed over the mantle plume that is currently under Iceland from late Cretaceous to Neogene times, consistent with the evidence from age of magmatism. Evidence of rapid basal melt revealed by ice penetrating radar along the hypocentre of the putative plume track indicates that it continues to affect the Greenland continental geotherm today. We analyse plume-induced thermal disturbance of the present-day lithosphere and their effects on the central Greenland ice sheet by using a novel evolutionary model of the climate-ice-lithosphere-upper mantle system. Our results indicate that mantle plume-induced erosion of the lithosphere has occurred, explaining caldera-type volcanic structures, the GHF anomaly, and requiring dyke intrusion into the crust during the early Cenozoic. The residual thermo-mechanical effect of the mantle plume has raised deep-sourced heat flow by over 25 mW/m² since 60 Ma and

  1. Deep Mantle Dynamics under the North American Continent Drives Localised Flow and Stress Below the New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2007-12-01

    The origin of intraplate earthquakes represents one of the outstanding problems in modern geophysical research, and the major earthquake sequence that struck the central Mississippi River Valley in 1811-1812, the so-called New Madrid seismic sequence, has become a principal target of this research. As Johnston and Schweig (1996) have noted, the occurrence of such large magnitude earthquakes in "stable" North American crust, far from any plate boundaries, remains an enigma. To understand the possible origin of this enigmatic seismic activity we have developed a new high resolution model of mantle flow below North America. The model is constrained by simultaneously inverting global seismic and mantle-convection data sets and it includes an explicit treatment of the positive chemical buoyancy of the continental tectosphere. Moreover, it adopts a depth dependent mantle viscosity structure which reconciles both glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and convection data. The flow model successfully reproduces plate velocities and observations of surface gravity and topography, including the continent-scale quasi-linear depression (after corrections for GIA and crustal heterogeneity) extending from northern Alaska to Venezuela. The predictions also match lithospheric flow and stress fields inferred from local and regional measurements of seismic anisotropy and surface deformation. We demonstrate that these signals are largely driven by viscous flow coupled to density anomalies within the lower mantle associated with the descent of the ancient Kula-Farallon plate system. More importantly, the flow calculations elucidate how these large-scale heterogeneities give rise to flow and stress patterns below the New Madrid Seismic Zone which are favourably oriented with respect the local fault geometry in this portion of the Mississippi valley.

  2. Mantle viscosity stratification and flow geometry - Implications for surface motions on earth and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    1993-01-01

    For a fixed heat flow, the surface flow velocity of a convecting layer is not strongly sensitive to the variation of viscosity as a function of depth. Thus, the inferred absence of a low viscosity asthenosphere on Venus can not account for the limited surface motions there. The surface velocity is dependent on the convective geometry. Cartesian geometry convection can produce large surface velocities if the high viscosity surface layer is broken in places by weak zones. On the other hand, a high viscosity surface layer may inhibit the development of large surface velocities in axisymmetric convection.

  3. The Anisotropic Structure of South China Sea: Using OBS Data to Constrain Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xue, M.; Yang, T.; Liu, C.; Hua, Q.; Xia, S.; Huang, H.; Le, B. M.; Huo, D.; Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic mechanism of the formation of South China Sea (SCS) has been debated for decades. The anisotropic structure can provide useful insight into the complex evolution of SCS by indicating its mantle flow direction and strength. In this study, we employ shear wave splitting methods on two half-year seismic data collected from 10 and 6 passive source Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) respectively. These OBSs were deployed along both sides of the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS by Tongji University in 2012 and 2013 respectively, which were then successfully recovered in 2013 and 2015 respectively. Through processing and inspecting the global and regional earthquakes (with local events being processing) of the 2012 dataset, measurements are made for 2 global events and 24 regional events at 5 OBSs using the tangential energy minimization, the smallest eigenvalue minimization, as well as the correlation methods. We also implement cluster analysis on the splitting results obtained for different time windows as well as filtered at different frequency bands. For teleseismic core phases like SKS and PKS, we find the fast polarization direction beneath the central basin is approximately NE-SW, nearly parallel to the extinct ridge in the central basin of SCS. Whereas for regional events, the splitting analysis on S, PS and ScS phases shows much more complicated fast directions as the ray path varies for different phases. The fast directions observed can be divided into three groups: (1) for the events from the Eurasia plate, a gradual rotation of the fast polarization direction from NNE-SSW to NEE-SWW along the path from the inner Eurasia plate to the central SCS is observed, implying the mantle flow is controlled by the India-Eurasia collision; (2) for the events located at the junction of Pacific plate and Philippine plate, the dominant fast direction is NW-SE, almost perpendicular to Ryukyu Trench as well as sub-parallel to the absolute direction of

  4. Advances and innovations in models of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, L. H.

    2002-12-01

    More than three decades ago, Turcotte and Oxburgh published their landmark paper showing how mantle convection drives motion of the continents, with the cold thermal boundary layers representing the surface plates. Since that time, models of mantle convection have made remarkable advancements and have been applied to the interiors of the terrestrial planets and moons, with many fundamental contributions by Don Turcotte and inspired by his work. Here, I will address some of the recent advances and innovations in mantle convection, with special emphasis on ideas emerging from the application of nonlinear dynamics and chemical geodynamics. Numerical models of convection, combined with observations from heat flow, cosmochemistry, and mantle geochemistry, provide constraints on models of the composition and structure of the mantle. Geochemical and heat flow observations appear to require long-lived heterogeneity in the mantle, while numerical models of convection generally exhibit rapid mixing, creating a distinctive ``marble-cake'' texture of recycled lithosphere. A variety of models have been suggested to reconcile these diverse inferences about mantle dynamics and structure from seemingly contradictory geochemical and geophysical observations. One straightforward explanation of combined geochemical and geophysical observations is a compositionally heterogeneous lowermost mantle. A difference between the composition of the MORB source and the composition of the deep mantle is also consistent with estimates of the properties of perovskite at high pressures and temperatures. Heterogeneity in the lower mantle may take the form of a hot abyssal layer of variable thickness starting at the mid-mantle or in the lowermost mantle, or may consist of "blobs" in the lower mantle. The hot abyssal layer model has an advantage over the blob model, because hot, neutrally buoyant blobs are unlikely to persist for the long times required by chemical geodynamics. Chemical geodynamics

  5. Seismic Anisotropy and SKS Splitting in the Sangihe Subduction Zone Predicted from 3-D Mantle Flow Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Leo, J. F.; Li, Z.; Walker, A. M.; Wookey, J.; Kendall, J.; Ribe, N. M.; Tommasi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting are often interpreted as being due to strain-induced crystal alignment of olivine in the convecting upper mantle, and the polarization of the fast shear wave is frequently taken to directly indicate the direction of mantle flow. Caution must be exercised when making such inferences, as the relationship between olivine lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) and fast direction is dependent on many factors, including the entire deformation history. This is especially the case in regions where complex time-dependent mantle flow is expected, e.g., subduction zones. Observations of shear wave splitting at subduction zones are varied, ranging from trench-perpendicular to -parallel fast directions, or a combination of both. Rigorously interpreting this variety of observations requires modeling which properly accounts for LPO development in the near-slab mantle environment. To this end, we simulate olivine LPO evolution caused by defomation of polycrystalline aggregates as they deform and move along pathlines extracted from a 3-D mantle flow model at a subduction zone (Li & Ribe, 2012). The model is based on 3-D boundary-element numerical simulations of a dense fluid sheet (representing the slab) with a geometry approximating that of the Sangihe subduction zone in Indonesia, where trench-parallel fast directions have recently been measured and ascribed to trench-parallel sub-slab mantle flow (Di Leo et al., 2012). This subduction zone is unique in that it is part of the only double-sided subduction system on Earth. At the Sangihe trench, the Molucca Sea plate is subducting westwards beneath the Eurasian plate. However, this microplate is also subducting eastwards at the nearby Halmahera trench. To test whether the measured trench-parallel fast directions are due to sub-slab mantle flow, and whether this is only possible due to the double-sided geometry, we use two different flow models: one with single- and one with double-sided subduction

  6. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  7. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  8. Variations in Moho and Curie depths and heat flow in Eastern and Southeastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    The Eastern and Southeastern Asian regions witness the strongest land-ocean and lithosphere-asthenosphere interactions. The extreme diversity of geological features warrants a unified study for a better understanding of their geodynamic uniqueness and/or ubiquity from a regional perspective. In this paper we have explored a large coverage of potential field data and have detected high resolution Moho and Curie depths in the aforementioned regions. The oldest continental and oceanic domains, i.e. the North China craton and the Pacific and Indian Ocean have been found thermally perturbed by events probably linked to small-scale convection or serpentinization in the mantle and to numerous volcanic seamounts and ridges. The thermal perturbation has also been observed in proximity of the fossil ridge of the western Philippine Sea Basin, which shows anomalously small Curie depths. The western Pacific marginal seas have the lowest Moho temperature, with Curie depths generally larger than Moho depths. The contrary is true in most parts of easternmost Eurasian continent. Magmatic processes feeding the Permian Emeishan large igneous province could have also been genetically linked to deep mantle/crustal processes beneath the Sichuan Basin. The regionally elongated magnetic features and small Curie depths along the Triassic Yangtze-Indochina plate boundary suggest that the igneous province could be caused by tectonic processes along plate margins, rather than by a deep mantle plume. At the same time, we interpret the Caroline Ridge, the boundary between the Pacific and the Caroline Sea, as a structure having a continental origin, rather than as hotspot or arc volcanism. The surface heat flow is primarily modulated by a deep isotherm through thermal conduction. This concordance is emphasized along many subduction trenches, where zones of large Curie depths often correspond with low heat flow. Local or regional surface heat flow variations cannot be faithfully used in inferring

  9. Numerical Simulations of Texture Development and Associated Rheological Anisotropy in Regions of Complex Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackman, D. K.; Castelnau, O.; Becker, T. W.

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the predictions of different micromechanical approaches that have been employed recently to study mineral alignment during flow in the upper mantle. Computational capabilities are reaching a point where the potential rheological effects of such lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) can be considered as an integral part of determining the flow pattern and evolution. But, in order to have confidence in taking this next step, the detailed behavior of the different micromechanical models needs to be understood. An important consequence of LPO development is the subsequent anisotropy of the mechanical properties. Curiously, most published geophysical studies only address the elastic anisotropy, probably because of its link with the observed seismic anisotropy. The viscoplastic (or rheological) anisotropy has received much less attention, although it may have a notable influence on regional and global convective flow pattern, which in turn controls the LPO development. Micromechanical approaches aim at linking the rheological behaviour at the grain scale, associated with the activate deformation mechanisms (dislocation glide and climb, diffusion creep, "), with the overall rheology at the sample scale, including also other mechanisms such as recrystallization. This is achieved by an evaluation of the internal stress generated by the (strong) mechanical interaction between neighbour grains. All models proposed in the literature (kinematic model, finite strain model, tangent self-consistent model, lower bound model, ") make simplifying assumptions, since the mechanical problem is very complicated. One can distinguish between rather simple models that allow some freedom in deformation of individual grains, and more advanced techniques (and generally more accurate) that require a minimum number (=4) of independent slip systems (or directional deformation mechanisms) for the plastic strain to occur. In respect to this, unlike all other models

  10. Hotspot motion inferred from mantle flow models: implications on global plate reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, B.; O'Connell, R. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Hawaiian hotspot track predicted from a plate circuit, assuming that the Hawaiian hotspot is fixed relative to African hotspots, does not fit the observed track: The divergence is steadily increasing back to 43 Ma, and the predicted track does not show a bend. Here we use a model of plumes distorted by global mantle flow to compute hotspot motion, and test whether this motion can explain the misfit. Computations consistently predict a south- to southeastward motion of the Hawaiian hotspot, and a motion of about 1000 km southward during the past 80 Ma is within the range of model results. Thus, we find that our model of hotspot motion can account for the divergence from 0 to 43 Ma, but can not account for the bend and the track prior to 43 Ma. For this, both a rather sharp change in hotspot motion at 43 Ma, and a westward component of hotspot motion prior to 43 Ma would be required, and neither is predicted in the model. However, a combination of modelled hotspot motion and a relatively modest motion between W and E Antarctica - about 15 degrees clockwise rotation of W vs. E Antarctica - would permit a fit to the Hawaiian track from 80 to 43 My. The required deformation could have been accomplished entirely within continental crust, with rates similar to e.g. present extension in the western U.S., and we will argue that it is not in conflict with, but actually supported by geologic evidence.

  11. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Mantle Convection in Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tackley, Paul J.; Schubert, Gerald; Glatzmaier, Gary A.; Schenk, Paul; Ratcliff, J. Todd; Matas, J.-P.

    2001-01-01

    Io has very high surface heat flow and an abundance of volcanic activity, which are thought to be driven by nonuniform tidal heating in its interior. This nonuniform heat is transported to the base of the lithosphere by very vigorous convection in Io's silicate mantle, the form of which is presumably responsible for the distribution of surface features such as volcanoes and mountains. We here present three-dimensional spherical calculations of mantle convection in Io, in order to ascertain the likely form of this convection and the resulting distribution of heat flow at the surface and core-mantle boundary. Different models of tidal dissipation are considered: the endmember scenarios (identified by M. N. Ross and G. Schubert) of dissipation in the entire mantle, or dissipation in a thin (approximately 100-km-thick) asthenosphere, as well as the 'preferred' distribution of M. N. Ross et al. comprising 1/3 mantle and 2/3 asthenosphere heating. The thermal structure of Io's mantle and asthenosphere is found to be strongly dependent on tidal heating mode, as well as whether the mantle-asthenosphere boundary is permeable or impermeable. Results indicate a large-scale flow pattern dominated by the distribution of tidal heating, with superimposed small-scale asthenospheric instabilities that become more pronounced with increasing Rayleigh number. These small-scale instabilities spread out the surface heat flux, resulting in smaller heat flux variations with increasing Rayleigh number. Scaled to Io's Rayleigh number of O(10(exp 12)) variations of order a few percent are expected. This small but significant variation in surface heat flux may be compatible with the observed distributions of volcanic centers and mountains, which appear fairly uniform at first sight but display a discernible distribution when suitably processed. The observed distribution of volcanic centers is similar to the asthenosphere heating distribution, implying that most of the tidal heating in Io

  12. Couette and Poiseuille flows in a low viscosity asthenosphere: Effects of internal heating rate, Rayleigh number, and plate representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiels, C.; Butler, S. L.

    2015-09-01

    Mantle convection models with a low viscosity asthenosphere and high viscosity surface plates have been shown to produce very large aspect ratio convection cells like those inferred to exist in Earth's mantle and to exhibit two asthenospheric flow regimes. When the surface plate is highly mobile, the plate velocity exceeds the flow velocities in the asthenosphere and the plate drives a Couette-type flow in the asthenospheric channel. For sluggish plates, the flow velocities in the asthenosphere exceed the plate velocity and the asthenospheric flow is more Poiseuille-like. It has been shown that under certain circumstances, flows become increasingly Couette-like as the aspect ratio of the plate is increased in numerical simulations. These models also show an increase in the average surface heat flux with aspect ratio which is counterintuitive, as one would expect that large aspect ratio models would result in older and colder oceanic lithosphere. Previous investigations have used single internal heating rates and Rayleigh numbers and a plate formulation that did not preclude significant deformation within the plate. In this paper, we investigate the conditions necessary for Couette and Poiseuille asthenospheric flows and for surface heat flux to increase with plate aspect ratio by varying the internal heating rate, the Rayleigh number and the representation of surface plates in 2D mantle convection models Plates are represented as a high viscosity layer with (1) a free-slip top surface boundary condition and (2) a force-balance boundary condition that imposes a constant surface velocity within the plate. We find that for models with a free-slip surface boundary condition, the internal heating rate and Rayleigh number do not strongly affect the dominance of Couette or Poiseuille flows in the asthenosphere but the increase in surface heat flux with model aspect ratio in the Poiseuille asthenospheric flow regime increases with internal heating rate. For models using

  13. Seismological observations in Northwestern South America: Evidence for two subduction segments, contrasting crustal thicknesses and upper mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarce, Jefferson; Monsalve, Gaspar; Becker, Thorsten W.; Cardona, Agustín; Poveda, Esteban; Alvira, Daniel; Ordoñez-Carmona, Oswaldo

    2014-12-01

    The cause of tectonic deformation in northwestern South America and its link to upper mantle structure and flow are debated. We use a combination of broadband and short period travel time seismic data for P-waves to show that observations are consistent with the presence of two subduction segments in Colombia and contrasting values of crustal thickness. In Northern Colombia, at latitudes greater than 6°N, most of the seismic stations are associated with negative teleseismic travel time residuals, relative to a regional mean, suggesting that the upper mantle is seismically faster than predicted from global models. In particular, for the Caribbean coastal plains there are no signs of significant anomalies in the upper mantle, evidenced by the small magnitude of the travel time delays and subdued Pn speeds (~ 7.97 km/s). To the southeast of such plains there is an increase in magnitude of the negative travel time residuals, including the Northern Eastern Cordillera, the Perija Range and the Merida Andes. An analysis of non-isostatic residual topography, based on a model of crustal thickness in northwestern South America, is consistent with a slab-associated upper mantle flow beneath the region just east of the Bucaramanga Nest. We interpret these results to indicate the presence of a Caribbean slab, initially flat beneath the Caribbean coastal plains, and steepening sharply in the southeast, including the area of Bucaramanga. For most of the western Andean region and the Pacific coast, south of 6°N, teleseismic differential travel time residuals are predominantly positive, indicating that the upper mantle is in general seismically slower than the reference model. Beneath the Central Cordillera, just to the east of this area, the residuals become smaller and predominantly negative; residual non-isostatic topography is negative as well. These features are probably related to the effect of the Nazca subduction developing an asthenospheric wedge.

  14. The Earth's Mantle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and dynamics of the earth's mantle is discussed. Research indicates that the silicate mantle is heated by the decay of radioactive isotopes and that the heat energizes massive convention currents in the upper 700 kilometers of the ductile rock. These currents and their consequences are considered. (JN)

  15. Mantle dynamics following supercontinent formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.

    This thesis presents mantle convection numerical simulations of supercontinent formation. Approximately 300 million years ago, through the large-scale subduction of oceanic sea floor, continental material amalgamated to form the supercontinent Pangea. For 100 million years after its formation, Pangea remained relatively stationary, and subduction of oceanic material featured on its margins. The present-day location of the continents is due to the rifting apart of Pangea, with supercontinent dispersal being characterized by increased volcanic activity linked to the generation of deep mantle plumes. The work presented here investigates the thermal evolution of mantle dynamics (e.g., mantle temperatures and sub-continental plumes) following the formation of a supercontinent. Specifically, continental insulation and continental margin subduction are analyzed. Continental material, as compared to oceanic material, inhibits heat flow from the mantle. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a stationary supercontinent would elevate sub-continental mantle temperatures due to the effect of continental insulation, leading to the break-up of the continent. By modelling a vigorously convecting mantle that features thermally and mechanically distinct continental and oceanic plates, this study shows the effect of continental insulation on the mantle to be minimal. However, the formation of a supercontinent results in sub-continental plume formation due to the re-positioning of subduction zones to the margins of the continent. Accordingly, it is demonstrated that continental insulation is not a significant factor in producing sub-supercontinent plumes but that subduction patterns control the location and timing of upwelling formation. A theme throughout the thesis is an inquiry into why geodynamic studies would produce different results. Mantle viscosity, Rayleigh number, continental size, continental insulation, and oceanic plate boundary evolution are

  16. Minimal residual disease monitoring by 8-color flow cytometry in mantle cell lymphoma: an EU-MCL and LYSA study

    PubMed Central

    Cheminant, Morgane; Derrieux, Coralie; Touzart, Aurore; Schmit, Stéphanie; Grenier, Adrien; Trinquand, Amélie; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Thieblemont, Catherine; Ribrag, Vincent; Cheze, Stéphane; Sanhes, Laurence; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefrère, François; Delarue, Richard; Hoster, Eva; Dreyling, Martin; Asnafi, Vahid; Hermine, Olivier; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of minimal residual disease may guide therapeutic strategies in mantle cell lymphoma. While multiparameter flow cytometry is used for diagnosis, the gold standard method for minimal residual disease analysis is real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). In this European Mantle Cell Lymphoma network (EU-MCL) pilot study, we compared flow cytometry with RQ-PCR for minimal residual disease detection. Of 113 patients with at least one minimal residual disease sample, RQ-PCR was applicable in 97 (86%). A total of 284 minimal residual disease samples from 61 patients were analyzed in parallel by flow cytometry and RQ-PCR. A single, 8-color, 10-antibody flow cytometry tube allowed specific minimal residual disease assessment in all patients, with a robust sensitivity of 0.01%. Using this cut-off level, the true-positive-rate of flow cytometry with respect to RQ-PCR was 80%, whereas the true-negative-rate was 92%. As expected, RQ-PCR frequently detected positivity below this 0.01% threshold, which is insufficiently sensitive for prognostic evaluation and would ideally be replaced with robust quantification down to a 0.001% (10-5) threshold. In 10 relapsing patients, the transition from negative to positive by RQ-PCR (median 22.5 months before relapse) nearly always preceded transition by flow cytometry (4.5 months), but transition to RQ-PCR positivity above 0.01% (5 months) was simultaneous. Pre-emptive rituximab treatment of 2 patients at minimal residual disease relapse allowed re-establishment of molecular and phenotypic complete remission. Flow cytometry minimal residual disease is a complementary approach to RQ-PCR and a promising tool in individual mantle cell lymphoma therapeutic management. PMID:26703963

  17. Minimal residual disease monitoring by 8-color flow cytometry in mantle cell lymphoma: an EU-MCL and LYSA study.

    PubMed

    Cheminant, Morgane; Derrieux, Coralie; Touzart, Aurore; Schmit, Stéphanie; Grenier, Adrien; Trinquand, Amélie; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Thieblemont, Catherine; Ribrag, Vincent; Cheze, Stéphane; Sanhes, Laurence; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefrère, François; Delarue, Richard; Hoster, Eva; Dreyling, Martin; Asnafi, Vahid; Hermine, Olivier; Macintyre, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of minimal residual disease may guide therapeutic strategies in mantle cell lymphoma. While multiparameter flow cytometry is used for diagnosis, the gold standard method for minimal residual disease analysis is real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR). In this European Mantle Cell Lymphoma network (EU-MCL) pilot study, we compared flow cytometry with RQ-PCR for minimal residual disease detection. Of 113 patients with at least one minimal residual disease sample, RQ-PCR was applicable in 97 (86%). A total of 284 minimal residual disease samples from 61 patients were analyzed in parallel by flow cytometry and RQ-PCR. A single, 8-color, 10-antibody flow cytometry tube allowed specific minimal residual disease assessment in all patients, with a robust sensitivity of 0.01%. Using this cut-off level, the true-positive-rate of flow cytometry with respect to RQ-PCR was 80%, whereas the true-negative-rate was 92%. As expected, RQ-PCR frequently detected positivity below this 0.01% threshold, which is insufficiently sensitive for prognostic evaluation and would ideally be replaced with robust quantification down to a 0.001% (10-5) threshold. In 10 relapsing patients, the transition from negative to positive by RQ-PCR (median 22.5 months before relapse) nearly always preceded transition by flow cytometry (4.5 months), but transition to RQ-PCR positivity above 0.01% (5 months) was simultaneous. Pre-emptive rituximab treatment of 2 patients at minimal residual disease relapse allowed re-establishment of molecular and phenotypic complete remission. Flow cytometry minimal residual disease is a complementary approach to RQ-PCR and a promising tool in individual mantle cell lymphoma therapeutic management. (clinicaltrials identifiers: 00209209 and 00209222).

  18. Seismic anisotropy beneath Cascadia and the Mendocino triple junction: Interaction of the subducting slab with mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Obrebski, Mathias; Allen, Richard M.; Boyarko, Devin C.; Brudzinski, Michael R.; Porritt, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Mantle flow associated with the Cascadia subduction zone and the Mendocino Triple Junction is poorly characterized due to a lack of shear wave splitting studies compared to other subduction zones. To fill this gap data was obtained from the Mendocino and FACES seismic networks that cover the region with dense station spacing. Over a period of 11-18 months, 50 suitable events were identified from which shear wave splitting parameters were calculated. Here we present stacked splitting results at 63 of the stations. The splitting pattern is uniform trench normal (N67°E) throughout Cascadia with an average delay time of 1.25 s. This is consistent with subduction and our preferred interpretation is entrained mantle flow beneath the slab. The observed pattern and interpretation have implications for mantle dynamics that are unique to Cascadia compared to other subduction zones worldwide. The uniform splitting pattern seen throughout Cascadia ends at the triple junction where the fast directions rotate almost 90°. Immediately south of the triple junction the fast direction rotates from NW-SE near the coast to NE-SW in northeastern California. This rotation beneath northern California is consistent with flow around the southern edge of the subducting Gorda slab.

  19. Seismic Anisotropy beneath Cascadia and the Mendocino Triple Junction: Interaction of the Subducting Slab with Mantle Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, C. M.; Obrebski, M. J.; Allen, R. M.; Boyarko, D. C.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Humphreys, E.; Levander, A.; O'Driscoll, L.; Porritt, R. W.; Zhai, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Mantle flow associated with the Cascadia subduction zone and the Mendocino Triple Junction is poorly characterized due to a lack of shear wave splitting studies compared to other subduction zones. To fill this gap data was obtained from the Mendocino and FACES seismic networks that cover the region with dense station spacing. Over a period of 11-18 months, 50 suitable events were identified from which shear wave splitting parameters were calculated. Here we present stacked splitting results at 63 of the stations. The splitting pattern is uniform trench normal (N67°E) throughout Cascadia with an average delay time of 1.25 seconds. This is consistent with subduction and our preferred interpretation is entrained mantle flow beneath the slab. The observed pattern and interpretation have implications for mantle dynamics that are unique to Cascadia compared to other subduction zones worldwide. The uniformity of the splitting directions along Cascadia ends at the triple junction where the fast directions rotate almost 90°. Immediately south of the triple junction the fast direction rotates from NW-SE near the coast to NE-SW in northeastern California. This rotation beneath northern California is consistent with flow around the southern edge of the subducting Gorda as predicted by numerical and laboratory models of slab rollback.

  20. The thermal state of the Arabian plate derived from heat flow measurements in Oman and Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, Frederique; Lucazeau, Francis; Leroy, Sylvie; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Jorand, Rachel; Goutorbe, Bruno; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of the Afar plume and the rifting of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden affect the present-day thermal regime of the Arabian plate. However, the Arabian plate is a Precambrian shield covered on its eastern part by a Phanerozoic platform and its thermal regime, before the plume and rifting activities, should be similar to that of other Precambrian shields with a thick and stable lithosphere. The first heat flow measurements in the shield, in Saudi Arabia, yielded low values (35-44 mW/m2), similar to the typical shields values. Recent heat flow measurements in Jordan indicate higher values (56-66 mW/m2). As part of the YOCMAL project (YOung Conjugate MArgins Laboratory), we have conducted heat flow measurements in southern and northern Oman to obtain 10 new heat flux values in the eastern Arabian plate. We also derived 20 heat flux values in Yemen and Oman by processing thermal data from oil exploration wells. The surface heat flux in these different locations is uniformly low (45 mW/m2). The heat production in samples from the Dhofar and Socotra Precambrian basement is also low (0.7 µW/m3). Differences in heat flow between the eastern (60 mW/m2) and the western (45 mW/m2) parts of Arabia reflect differences in crustal heat production as well as a higher mantle heat flux in the west. We have calculated a steady state geotherm for the Arabian platform that intersects the isentropic temperature profile at a depth of about 150 km, consistent with the seismic observations. Seismic tomography studies of the mantle beneath Arabia also show this east-west contrast. Seismic studies have shown that the lithosphere is rather thin, 100 km or less below the shield and 150 km below the platform. The lithospheric thickness for the Arabian plate is 150 km, and the progressive thinning near the Red Sea, caused by the thermal erosion of the plume material, is too recent to be detected at the surface. The Afar plume mostly affects the base of the Arabian lithosphere along

  1. Mantle devolatilization and rheology in the framework of planetary evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franck, S.; Bounama, CH.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the thermal history of an Earth-like planet with the help of a parameterized mantle convection model including the volatile exchange between mantle and surface reservoirs. The weakening of mantle silicates by dissolved volatiles is described by a functional relationship between creep rate and water fugacity. We use flow law parameters of diffusion creep in olivine under dry and wet conditions. The mantle degassing rate is considered as directly proportional to the seafloor spreading rate, which is also dependent on the mantle heat flow. To calculate the spreading rate, we assume that the heat flow under the mid-ocean ridges is double the average mantle heat flow. The rate of regassing also depends on the seafloor spreading rate as well as on other factors like the efficiency of volatile recycling through island arc volcanism. Both mechanisms (de- and regassing) are coupled self-consistently with the help of the parameterized convection model under implementation of a temperature and volatile-content-dependent mantle viscosity.

  2. Pure climb creep mechanism drives flow in Earth’s lower mantle

    PubMed Central

    Boioli, Francesca; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick; Devincre, Benoit; Gouriet, Karine; Hirel, Pierre; Kraych, Antoine; Ritterbex, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    At high pressure prevailing in the lower mantle, lattice friction opposed to dislocation glide becomes very high, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical studies. We examine the consequences of this high resistance to plastic shear exhibited by ringwoodite and bridgmanite on creep mechanisms under mantle conditions. To evaluate the consequences of this effect, we model dislocation creep by dislocation dynamics. The calculation yields to an original dominant creep behavior for lower mantle silicates where strain is produced by dislocation climb, which is very different from what can be activated under high stresses under laboratory conditions. This mechanism, named pure climb creep, is grain-size–insensitive and produces no crystal preferred orientation. In comparison to the previous considered diffusion creep mechanism, it is also a more efficient strain-producing mechanism for grain sizes larger than ca. 0.1 mm. The specificities of pure climb creep well match the seismic anisotropy observed of Earth’s lower mantle. PMID:28345037

  3. Pattern recognition constrains mantle properties, past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, S.; Rozel, A. B.; Valentine, A. P.; Tackley, P.; Trampert, J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and modelling mantle convection requires knowledge of many mantle properties, such as viscosity, chemical structure and thermal proerties such as radiogenic heating rate. However, many of these parameters are only poorly constrained. We demonstrate a new method for inverting present day Earth observations for mantle properties. We use neural networks to represent the posterior probability density functions of many different mantle properties given the present structure of the mantle. We construct these probability density functions by sampling a wide range of possible mantle properties and running forward simulations, using the convection code StagYY. Our approach is particularly powerful because of its flexibility. Our samples are selected in the prior space, rather than being targeted towards a particular observation, as would normally be the case for probabilistic inversion. This means that the same suite of simulations can be used for inversions using a wide range of geophysical observations without the need to resample. Our method is probabilistic and non-linear and is therefore compatible with non-linear convection, avoiding some of the limitations associated with other methods for inverting mantle flow. This allows us to consider the entire history of the mantle. We also need relatively few samples for our inversion, making our approach computationally tractable when considering long periods of mantle history. Using the present thermal and density structure of the mantle, we can constrain rheological and compositional parameters such as viscosity and yield stress. We can also use the present day mantle structure to make inferences about the initial conditions for convection 4.5 Gyr ago. We can constrain initial mantle conditions including the initial concentration of heat producing elements in the mantle and the initial thickness of primordial material at the CMB. Currently we use density and temperature structure for our inversions, but we can

  4. Multstage Melting and Mantle Flow in the Galapagos Plume-Ridge Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, D.

    2010-12-01

    residue from the upper melt zone (depleted in all incompatible elements) overlying residue from the lower melt zone (depleted in volatiles, including helium). The northern Galapagos volcanoes tap either ambient upper mantle or plume that has been depleted by both stages of melting, whereas the GSC is supplied by the deeper return flow, which has only been depleted of its volatile components.

  5. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  6. Heat flow in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Peralta, C.; Barreto, W.; Rosales, L.

    2010-08-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation to study the evolution of spherically symmetric fluid distributions undergoing dissipation in the form of radial heat flow. For a model that corresponds to an incompressible fluid departing from the static equilibrium, it is not possible to go far from the initial state after the emission of a small amount of energy. Initially collapsing distributions of matter are not permitted. Emission of energy can be considered as a mechanism to avoid the collapse. If the distribution collapses initially and emits one hundredth of the initial mass only the outermost layers evolve. For a model that corresponds to a highly compressed Fermi gas, only the outermost shell can evolve with a shorter hydrodynamic time scale.

  7. The upper mantle transition region - Eclogite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The upper mantle transition region is usually considered to be peridotite which undergoes a series of phase changes involving spinel and post-spinel assemblages. There are difficulties associated with attempts to explain the 220, 400 and 670 km discontinuities in terms of phase changes in a peridotitic mantle. Moreover, in a differentiated earth there should be large quantities of eclogite in the upper mantle. Eclogite is denser than Al2O3-poor mantle to depths of 670 km, but it stays in the garnet stability field to pressures in excess of those required to transform depleted mantle to denser phases such as ilmenite and perovskite. Eclogite, therefore, remains above 670 km. The seismic properties of the transition region are more consistent with eclogite than peridotite. Most of the mantle's inventory of incompatible trace elements may be in this layer, which is a potential source region for some basalt magmas. The radioactivity in this layer is the main source of mantle heat flow, 0.7 microcalorie/sq cm-sec, and drives upper mantle convection.

  8. Numerical studies on convective stability and flow pattern in three-dimensional spherical mantle of terrestrial planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takatoshi; Kameyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    We explore thermal convection of a fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity in a basally heated 3-D spherical shell using linear stability analyses and numerical experiments, while considering the application of our results to terrestrial planets. The inner to outer radius ratio of the shell f assumed in the linear stability analyses is in the range of 0.11-0.88. The critical Rayleigh number Rc for the onset of thermal convection decreases by two orders of magnitude as f increases from 0.11 to 0.88, when the viscosity depends sensitively on the temperature, as is the case for real mantle materials. Numerical simulations carried out in the range of f = 0.11-0.55 show that a thermal boundary layer (TBL) develops both along the surface and bottom boundaries to induce cold and hot plumes, respectively, when f is 0.33 or larger. However, for smaller f values, a TBL develops only on the bottom boundary. Convection occurs in the stagnant-lid regime where the root mean square velocity on the surface boundary is less than 1 per cent of its maximum at depth, when the ratio of the viscosity at the surface boundary to that at the bottom boundary exceeds a threshold that depends on f. The threshold decreases from 106.5 at f = 0.11 to 104 at f = 0.55. If the viscosity at the base of the convecting mantle is 1020-1021 Pa s, the Rayleigh number exceeds Rc for Mars, Venus and the Earth, but does not for the Moon and Mercury; convection is unlikely to occur in the latter planets unless the mantle viscosity is much lower than 1020 Pa s and/or the mantle contains a strong internal heat source.

  9. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  10. Melting and reactive flow of a volatilized mantle beneath mid-ocean ridges: theory and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Tobias; Katz, Richard F.

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory experiments indicate that even small concentrations volatiles (H2O or CO2) in the upper mantle significantly affect the silicate melting behavior [HK96,DH06]. The presence of volatiles stabilizes volatile-rich melt at high pressure, thus vastly increasing the volume of the upper mantle expected to be partially molten [H10,DH10]. These small-degree melts have important consequences for chemical differentiation and could affect the dynamics of mantle flow. We have developed theory and numerical implementation to simulate thermo-chemically coupled magma/mantle dynamics in terms of a two-phase (rock+melt), three component (dunite+MORB+volatilized MORB) physical model. The fluid dynamics is based on McKenzie's equations [McK84], while the thermo-chemical formulation of the system is represented by a novel disequilibrium multi-component melting model based on thermo-dynamic theory [RBS11]. This physical model is implemented as a parallel, two-dimensional, finite-volume code that leverages tools from the PETSc toolkit. Application of this simulation code to a mid-ocean ridge system suggests that the methodology captures the leading-order features of both hydrated and carbonated mantle melting, including deep, low-degree, volatile-rich melt formation. Melt segregation leads to continuous dynamic thermo-chemical dis-equilibration, while phenomenological reaction rates are applied to continually move the system towards re-equilibration. The simulations will be used first to characterize volatile extraction from the MOR system assuming a chemically homogeneous mantle. Subsequently, simulations will be extended to investigate the consequences of heterogeneity in lithology [KW12] and volatile content. These studies will advance our understanding of the role of volatiles in the dynamic and chemical evolution of the upper mantle. Moreover, they will help to gauge the significance of the coupling between the deep carbon cycle and the ocean/atmosphere system. REFERENCES

  11. 3D analytical investigation of melting at lower mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabiei, F.; Cantoni, M.; Badro, J.; Dorfman, S. M.; Gaal, R.; Piet, H.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    The diamond anvil cell is a unique tool to study materials under static pressures up to several hundreds of GPa. It is possible to generate temperatures as high as several thousand degrees in the diamond anvil cell by laser heating. This allows us to achieve deep mantle conditions in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC). The small heated volume is surrounded by thermally conductive diamond anvils results in high temperature gradients which affect phase transformation and chemical distribution in the LH-DAC. Analytical characterization of samples in three dimensions is essential to fully understand phase assemblages and equilibrium in LHDAC. In this study we used San Carlos olivine as a starting material as a simple proxy to deep mantle composition. Three samples were melted at ~3000 K and at ~45 GPa for three different durations ranging from 1 to 6 minutes; two other samples were melted at 30 GPa and 70 GPa. All samples were then sliced by focused ion beam (FIB). From each slice, an electron image and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) map were acquired by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the dual beam FIB instrument. These slices were collected on one half of the heated area in each sample, from which we obtained 3D elemental and phase distribution. The other half of the heated area was used to extract a 100 nm thick section for subsequent analysis by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to obtain diffraction patterns and high resolution EDX maps. 3D reconstruction of SEM EDX results shows at least four differentiated regions in the heated area for all samples. The exact Fe and Mg compositions mentioned below are an example of the sample melted at 45 GPa for 6 minutes. The bulk of the heated are is surrounded by ferropericlase (Mg0.92, Fe0.08)O shell (Fp). Inside this shell we find a thick region of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite-structured bridgmanite (Brg) coexisting with Fp. In the center lies a Fe-rich core which is surrounded by magnesiow

  12. Helium in deep circulating groundwater in the Great Hungarian Plain: Flow dynamics and crustal and mantle helium fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, M.; Sonntag, C.; Deák, J.; Schlosser, P.

    1992-05-01

    Observed helium concentrations in deep circulating groundwater of the sedimentary basin of the Great Hungarian Plain (GHP), Hungary, cover a range of three orders of magnitude (≈4 ·10 -8 to 4 · 10 -5 ccSTP g-1). 3He /4He ratios and noble gas concentrations are used to separate helium components originating from the atmosphere, tritium decay, crustal production, and mantle degassing. The characteristic distribution of measured helium concentrations and isotope ratios can be reproduced qualitatively by a simple two-dimensional advection/diffusion model. Other simple models isolating parts of the regional flow domain (recharge, discharge, and horizontal flow) are discussed and applied to derive quantitative information on helium fluxes due to degassing of the Earth's crust /mantle and on the dynamics of groundwater flow. The estimated helium flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is lower than values derived from other deep groundwater circulation systems, probably because the relatively young upper few thousand meters of the sedimentary basin (Tertiary to Quaternary age) shield the flux from the deeper crust. The high mantle helium flux of up to 4.2 · 10 8 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is probably related to the Miocene volcanism or to continuing intrusion accompanying extension. By fitting calculated helium depth profiles to measured data in the discharge area, vertical flow velocities of the order of 1.5 mm y -1 are estimated. Assuming that a flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is representative for the entire basin, the turnover time of the regional groundwater flow system is estimated to be about 10 6 y.

  13. Mantle-circulation models with sequential data assimilation: inferring present-day mantle structure from plate-motion histories.

    PubMed

    Bunge, Hans-Peter; Richards, M A; Baumgardner, J R

    2002-11-15

    Data assimilation is an approach to studying geodynamic models consistent simultaneously with observables and the governing equations of mantle flow. Such an approach is essential in mantle circulation models, where we seek to constrain an unknown initial condition some time in the past, and thus cannot hope to use first-principles convection calculations to infer the flow history of the mantle. One of the most important observables for mantle-flow history comes from models of Mesozoic and Cenozoic plate motion that provide constraints not only on the surface velocity of the mantle but also on the evolution of internal mantle-buoyancy forces due to subducted oceanic slabs. Here we present five mantle circulation models with an assimilated plate-motion history spanning the past 120 Myr, a time period for which reliable plate-motion reconstructions are available. All models agree well with upper- and mid-mantle heterogeneity imaged by seismic tomography. A simple standard model of whole-mantle convection, including a factor 40 viscosity increase from the upper to the lower mantle and predominantly internal heat generation, reveals downwellings related to Farallon and Tethys subduction. Adding 35% bottom heating from the core has the predictable effect of producing prominent high-temperature anomalies and a strong thermal boundary layer at the base of the mantle. Significantly delaying mantle flow through the transition zone either by modelling the dynamic effects of an endothermic phase reaction or by including a steep, factor 100, viscosity rise from the upper to the lower mantle results in substantial transition-zone heterogeneity, enhanced by the effects of trench migration implicit in the assimilated plate-motion history. An expected result is the failure to account for heterogeneity structure in the deepest mantle below 1500 km, which is influenced by Jurassic plate motions and thus cannot be modelled from sequential assimilation of plate motion histories

  14. Continent-ocean chemical heterogeneity in the mantle based on seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Forte, A M; Dziewonski, A M; O'connell, R J

    1995-04-21

    Seismic models of global-scale lateral heterogeneity in the mantle show systematic differences below continents and oceans that are too large to be purely thermal in origin. An inversion of the geoid, based on a seismic model that includes viscous flow in the mantle, indicates that the differences beneath continents and oceans can be accounted for by differences in composition in the upper mantle superposed on mantle-wide thermal heterogeneities. The net continent-ocean density differences, integrated over depth, are small and cause only a low flux of mass and heat across the asthenosphere and mantle transition zone.

  15. A New Determination of Io's Heat Flow Using Diurnal Heat Balance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Rathbun, J. A.; McEwen, A. S.; Pearl, J. C.; Bastos, A.; Andrade, J.; Correia, M.; Barros, S.

    2002-01-01

    We use heat balance arguments to obtain a new estimate of Io's heat flow that does not depend on assumptions about the temperatures of its thermal anomalies. Our estimated heat flow is somewhat less than 2.2 +/- 0.9 W/sq m. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

  17. New Inferences of Earth's Mantle Viscosity Structure and Implications for Long-wavelength Structure in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, M. L.; Lekic, V.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    predictions of evolving long-wavelength thermochemical structures as well as the core-mantle boundary heat flow.

  18. Working fluid flow visualization in gravity heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapour and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about gravity heat pipe construction and processes casing inside during heat pipe operation. Experiment working fluid flow visualization is performed with two glass heat pipes with different inner diameter (13 mm and 22 mm) and filled with water. The working fluid flow visualization explains the phenomena as a working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, and vapour condensation on the wall, vapour and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  19. The vertical flow in the lowermost mantle beneath the Pacific from inversion of seismic waveforms for anisotropic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kenji; Geller, Robert J.

    2010-08-01

    It is impractical to directly constrain the elastic constants of a transversely isotropic (TI) medium using travel-time data. In contrast, as we show in this paper, the elastic constants can be determined straightforwardly by inversion of body-wave waveform data. We invert the horizontal components of observed seismic waveforms of S and ScS phases (as well as any other phases arriving in the time window) to determine the radial profile of TI shear wave velocity in the lowermost mantle beneath the Pacific. We find that the radial (SV) component is faster than the transverse (SH) component in the depth range from about 200-400 km above the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The major mineralogical components above the D″ discontinuity in this depth range are Mg-perovskite (pv) and ferropericlase (fp). The observed anisotropy can be interpreted as due to lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of either pv, fp, or both in the lowermost mantle induced by vertical flow due to thermal buoyancy, which might be related to the origin of the Hawaiian hotspot (although other possibilities such as a chemically distinct layer, LPO of post-perovskite (ppv), or LPO in counter-flow in and around a chemically dense pile cannot be excluded). We show that resolution of the velocity of SV shear waves very close to the CMB is inherently limited due to the boundary condition of zero tangential traction at the CMB; shear wave splitting studies thus cannot be used to investigate the anisotropy of the lowermost mantle.

  20. Correlation Between Mobile Continents and Elevated Temperatures in the Subcontinental Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, C.; Rozel, A. B.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rolf et al. (EPSL, 2012) and Coltice et al. (Science, 2012) have previously shown that continents exert a first order influence on Earth's mantle flow by affecting convective wavelength and surface heat flow. With stationary continents, Heron and Lowman (JGR, 2014) highlighted the decreasing role of continental insulation on subcontinental temperatures with higher Rayleigh number (Ra). However, the question whether there exists a correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle or not remains to be answered. Continental motion is attributed to the viscous stresses imparted by the convecting mantle and the extent of this motion depends on the heat budget of the mantle. Core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux, internal heating from decay of radioactive elements, and mantle cooling contribute to this heat budget. Out of these sources, CMB heat flux is not well defined. However, the recent determination of core's high thermal conductivity requires a CMB heat flow of at least 12 TW (de Koker et al., PNAS 2012; Pozzo et al., Nature 2012; Gomi et al., PEPI 2013). Thus it is necessary to characterize the impact of basal heating on mantle dynamics with mobile continents and self-consistent plate tectonics. By systematically varying parameters such as CMB temperature, continental size, mantle heating modes, and Rayleigh number; we model Boussinesq, incompressible, thermo-chemical mantle convection with 2D spherical annulus geometry using StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). We observe the aforementioned correlation irrespective of the variations in basal heating and continental size (except for very small continents). Moreover, we see episodicity between correlation-anticorrelation with increasing convective vigour. Furthermore, the effect of radioactivity in the continental crust on this correlation is investigated. At present, mobile continents in StagYY are simplified into a compositionally distinct field drifting at the top of the mantle

  1. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  2. Lithospheric stress and uppermantle dynamics in mainland China due to mantle flow based on combination of global- and regional-scale seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tao

    2016-12-01

    In order to explore the importance of mantle flow to lithospheric stress field in mainland China, seismic tomography_based mantle flow models are used to predict the most compressive principal horizontal stress directions (MCPHSDs). Considered that regional-scale seismic tomography models have higher horizontal resolution to map the mantle structure, while global-scale models can present the information out of the imaging domains of regional-scale models although this information has relatively poor horizontal resolution, the combined global- and regional-scale seismic tomography_based mantle flow models (hereafter called combined models) are mainly used in this paper. After the comparison of the observed and our predicted MCPHSDs, it is suggested that (1) a combined model, compared with a only global-scale seismic tomography_based model, could improve greatly the predictions in some regions of mainland China such as Sichuan-Yunnan, South China and North China blocks; (2) the mantle flow model driven by both plate motions and mantle density heterogeneity (hereafter called plate-density-driven model), compared with the flow model driven only by mantle density heterogeneity (hereafter called density-driven model), has much better predictions in the eastern China; (3) the presence of density variations above 250 km could better dramatically the predictions in the eastern China; and (4) sublithospheric mantle flow causes the lithosphere under compression in mainland China, and plays an important role in forming the lithospheric stress in Alashan, Qaidam, western Tibetan and eastern Tarim blocks as well as the east of the eastern China.

  3. Planetary heat flow from shallow subsurface measurements: Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Marc; Hagermann, Axel

    2016-10-01

    Planetary heat flow probes measure heat flow (depth-resolved temperature and thermal conductivity) to provide insight into the internal state of a planet. The probes have been utilized extensively on Earth, twice on the Moon, and once on the Surface of comet 67P-CG. Mars is an important target for heat flow measurement as heat flow is a critical parameter in Martian thermal history models. Earlier studies indicate that Martian planetary heat flow can be accessed at 5 m below the surface in dry regolith monitored over at least one Martian year. A one Martian year monitoring period is necessary because, in the shallow subsurface, heat flow from the interior is superposed with time varying heat flow contributions, primarily due to insolation. Given that a heat flow probe may not achieve its target depth or monitoring period, this study investigates how the depth (2-5 m), duration (0-1 Martian year) and quality of measurements influence the accuracy of planetary heat flow. An inverse model is used to show that, in the preceding scenarios, the accuracy of planetary heat flow directly estimated from depth-dependent thermal conductivity with 10-20% precision errors, temperatures with 50-100 mK precision errors and modelling uncertainties up to 500 mK, can, on average, be improved by a factor of 27 with optimization to 13%. Accuracies increase with sensor penetration depth and regolith monitoring period. Heat flow optimized from instantaneous measurements or those with the shortest regolith monitoring periods have increased accuracy where the frequency and amplitude of the temperature variation are lowest. The inverse model is based on the Function Specification Inversion method. This study demonstrates that a solution subspace can be identified within a space of uncertainties modelled for the temperature measurements and planetary heat flow: the subspace is defined by a constant log-ratio of their respective standard deviations. Optimized heat flow estimates display

  4. The silica heat flow interpretation technique: application to continental Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirlo, M. C.

    2002-06-01

    The silica heat flow interpretation technique [Swanberg, C.A. and Morgan, P., J. Geophys. Res. 117 (1979) 227-241; J. Geophys. Res. 85 (1980) 7206-7214] has been applied and tested in mainland Australia, using a database of approximately 41 000 Australian groundwater analyses. The silica geotemperature of the groundwaters was obtained by substituting the dissolved silica content of a groundwater into the quartz geothermometer equation of Truesdell [(1976) Proceedings of the Second United Nations Symposium on the Development and Use of Geothermal Resources. San Francisco, CA, USA, 20-29 May, 1975, Vol. 1]. The average silica geotemperature value for 1×1° (latitude×longitude) grid cells has been calculated and the results plotted against published traditional heat flow values for those grid cells [Cull, J.P. (1982) BMR J. Aust. Geol. Geophys. 7, 11-21], to form silica heat flow estimation models. Data exclusion criteria, based upon data quantity and statistical spread have been applied to both the groundwater data and the traditional heat flow data. This was done in order to exclude areas that were poorly categorized in terms of data quality and quantity. For the remaining data, a significant linear relationship between the groundwater geotemperature estimates and traditional heat flow measurements has been identified for four of the models with a t-test on the correlation coefficient. Estimates of regional heat flow were then made by applying the calibration models in areas with no traditional heat flow measurements but adequate groundwater data. A silica heat flow map has been constructed using one of the models and the differences between it and the traditional heat flow map evaluated. Good correlations exist between the silica heat flow map and the traditional heat flow map, except for the northwest Yilgarn, of WA, Australia, where silica heat flow data give significantly higher values than traditional data. The silica heat flow map identifies areas of high

  5. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  6. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  7. Short-Term versus Steady-State Crustal Deformation: Are Some Anomalies Driven by Transient Coupling with Mantle Flow? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, W. E.; Fouch, M. J.; Flesch, L. M.; Klein, E. C.; West, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    500 km and perhaps more. Traction rates associated with the strain rate anomaly suggest inward-directed forcing, consistent with lithosphere coupling with mantle downwelling in the vicinity of the tomography anomaly. Whether this mantle flow is associated with an actual mantle drip [West et al., 2009] or with the sinking of a remnant section of the Juan de Fuca slab remains unresolved. Nevertheless, the contraction anomaly must constitute a transient feature, since the wider deformation field is purely extensional there. The loading mechanism of this elastic strain in the Great Basin region, as well as its release, may be related to the long-wavelength crustal velocity transients described by Wernicke et al. [2008] and Wernicke and Davis [2010].

  8. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  9. Air-side flow and heat transfer in compact heat exchangers: A discussion of enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Shah, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of air flows in complex heat exchanger passages is reviewed with a focus on the heat transfer effects of boundary-layer development, turbulence, spanwise and streamwise vortices, and wake management. Each of these flow features is discussed for the plain, wavy, and interrupted passages found in contemporary compact heat exchanger designs. Results from the literature are used to help explain the role of these mechanisms in heat transfer enhancement strategies.

  10. 3D crustal-scale heat-flow regimes at a developing active margin (Taranaki Basin, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, K. F.; Funnell, R. H.; Nicol, A.; Fohrmann, M.; Bland, K. J.; King, P. R.

    2013-04-01

    The Taranaki Basin in the west of New Zealand's North Island has evolved from a rifted Mesozoic Gondwana margin to a basin straddling the Neogene convergent Australian-Pacific plate margin. However, given its proximity to the modern subduction front, Taranaki Basin is surprisingly cold when compared to other convergent margins. To investigate the effects of active margin evolution on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin we developed a 3D crustal-scale forward model using the petroleum industry-standard basin-modelling software Petromod™. The crustal structure inherited from Mesozoic Gondwana margin breakup and processes related to modern Hikurangi convergent margin initiation are identified to be the main controls on the thermal regime of the Taranaki Basin. Present-day surface heat flow across Taranaki on average is 59 mW/m2, but varies by as much as 30 mW/m2 due to the difference in crustal heat generation between mafic and felsic basement terranes alone. In addition, changes in mantle heat advection, tectonic subsidence, crustal thickening and basin inversion, together with related sedimentary processes result in variability of up to 10 mW/m2. Modelling suggests that increased heating of the upper crust due to additional mantle heat advection following the onset of subduction is an ongoing process and heating has only recently begun to reach the surface, explaining the relatively low surface heat flow. We propose that the depth of the subducted slab and related mantle convection processes control the thermal and structural regimes in the Taranaki Basin. The thermal effects of the subduction initiation process are modified and overprinted by the thickness, structure and composition of the lithosphere.

  11. P/n/ velocity and cooling of the continental lithosphere. [upper mantle compression waves in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, P. R.; Braile, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The average upper mantle compressional wave velocity and heat flow figures presently computed for continental physiographic provinces in North America exhibit an inverse relationship, and possess a statistically significant correlation coefficient. A correlation is also demonstrated between compressional wave velocity and material temperature by estimating crust-mantle boundary temperatures from heat flow values. The dependency of compressional wave velocity on temperature implies that the observed geographical distribution in upper mantle seismic velocity may be due to the temperature effect character of upper mantle compressional wave velocity variation.

  12. Heat transfer measurements of the 1983 kilauea lava flow.

    PubMed

    Hardee, H C

    1983-10-07

    Convective heat flow measurements of a basaltic lava flow were made during the 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Eight field measurements of induced natural convection were made, giving heat flux values that ranged from 1.78 to 8.09 kilowatts per square meter at lava temperatures of 1088 and 1128 degrees Celsius, respectively. These field measurements of convective heat flux at subliquidus temperatures agree with previous laboratory measurements in furnace-melted samples of molten lava, and are useful for predicting heat transfer in magma bodies and for estimating heat extraction rates for magma energy.

  13. Heat-transfer measurements of the 1983 Kilauea lava flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hardee, H.C.

    1983-10-07

    Convective heat flow measurements of a basaltic lava flow were made during the 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. Eight field measurements of induced natural convection were made, giving heat flux values that ranged from 1.78 to 8.09 kilowatts per square meter at lava temperatures of 1088 and 1128 degrees Celsius, respectively. These field measurements of convective heat flux at subliquidus temperatures agree with previous laboratory measurements in furnace-melted samples of molten lava, and are useful for predicting heat transfer in magma bodies and for estimating heat extraction rates for magma energy.

  14. Flow in the western Mediterranean shallow mantle: Insights from xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts from SE Iberia (eastern Betics, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidas, Károly; Konc, Zoltán.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Tommasi, Andréa.; Vauchez, Alain; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Marchesi, Claudio; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Acosta-Vigil, Antonio; Szabó, Csaba; Varas-Reus, María. Isabel; Gervilla, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Mantle xenoliths in Pliocene alkali basalts of the eastern Betics (SE Iberia, Spain) are spinel ± plagioclase lherzolite, with minor harzburgite and wehrlite, displaying porphyroclastic or equigranular textures. Equigranular peridotites have olivine crystal preferred orientation (CPO) patterns similar to those of porphyroclastic xenoliths but slightly more dispersed. Olivine CPO shows [100]-fiber patterns characterized by strong alignment of [100]-axes subparallel to the stretching lineation and a girdle distribution of [010]-axes normal to it. This pattern is consistent with simple shear or transtensional deformation accommodated by dislocation creep. One xenolith provides evidence for synkinematic reactive percolation of subduction-related Si-rich melts/fluids that resulted in oriented crystallization of orthopyroxene. Despite a seemingly undeformed microstructure, the CPO in orthopyroxenite veins in composite xenoliths is identical to those of pyroxenes in the host peridotite, suggesting late-kinematic crystallization. Based on these observations, we propose that the annealing producing the equigranular microstructures was triggered by melt percolation in the shallow subcontinental lithospheric mantle coeval to the late Neogene formation of veins in composite xenoliths. Calculated seismic properties are characterized by fast propagation of P waves and polarization of fast S waves parallel to olivine [100]-axis (stretching lineation). These data are compatible with present-day seismic anisotropy observations in SE Iberia if the foliations in the lithospheric mantle are steeply dipping and lineations are subhorizontal with ENE strike, implying dominantly horizontal mantle flow in the ENE-WSW direction within vertical planes, that is, subparallel to the paleo-Iberian margin. The measured anisotropy could thus reflect a lithospheric fabric due to strike-slip deformation in the late Miocene in the context of WSW tearing of the subducted south Iberian margin

  15. Flow in the uppermost mantle during back-arc spreading revealed by Ichinomegata peridotite xenoliths, NE Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satsukawa, Takako; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi

    2014-02-01

    Spinel peridotite xenoliths from the Ichinomegata Volcano (NE Japan) have distinct foliations defined by compositional layering between olivine-rich and pyroxene-rich layers as well as lineations defined by elongated spinel grains. Crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine are consistent with slip on (010)[100] and {0kl}[100]. The angles between the foliation and the olivine slip planes decrease with increasing values of the J-index (i.e. CPO strength). Such composite planar relationships within the peridotite xenoliths could result from shearing in the uppermost mantle, so that shear strains can be estimated by the angles between the foliation and the olivine slip plane in terms of simple shear strain (0.31-4.26). From these observations, we argue that a suite of the peridotite xenoliths recorded a rare snapshot of uppermost-mantle flow related to back-arc spreading during the opening of the Japan Sea. The peridotite xenoliths with higher J-indices (i.e. higher shear strain) tend to have slightly lower minimum temperatures, possibly defining a vertical strain gradient in the uppermost mantle section at the time of the volcano's eruption. The CPO data have been used to calculate the seismic properties of the xenoliths at PT conditions obtained from geothermobarometry, and are compared to field geophysical data from the literature. Our results are consistent with a roughly EW-oriented fastest P-wave propagation direction in the uppermost mantle beneath the northeast part of the Japan arc. Average samples are calculated based on three different structural reference frames; horizontal plane parallel to 1) foliation, 2) the plane containing the maximum concentration of olivine [100], and 3) P-wave maximum direction. S-wave anisotropy deduced from CPOs requires a reasonable thickness of the anisotropic layer (24.1-26.6 km), and the structural reference frame does not have significant effect on the estimation of thickness. Consequently, Ichinomegata

  16. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  17. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  18. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  19. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics.

    PubMed

    Shaw, H R

    1970-05-29

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  20. Hydrogeology of, and simulation of ground-water flow in a mantled carbonate-rock system, Cumberland Valley, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chichester, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in a highly productive and complex regolith-mantled carbonate valley in the northeastern part of the Cumberland Valley, Pa., as part of its Appalachian Valleys and Piedmont Regional Aquifer-system Analysis program. The study was designed to quantify the hydrogeologic characteristics and understand the ground-water flow system of a highly productive and complex thickly mantled carbonate valley. The Cumberland Valley is characterized by complexly folded and faulted carbonate bedrock in the valley bottom, by shale and graywacke to the north, and by red-sedimentary and diabase rocks in the east-southeast. Near the southern valley hillslope, the carbonate rock is overlain by wedge-shaped deposit of regolith, up to 450 feet thick, that is composed of residual material, alluvium, and colluvium. Locally, saturated regolith is greater than 200 feet thick. Seepage-run data indicate that stream reaches, near valley walls, are losing water from the stream, through the regolith, to the ground-water system. Results of hydrograph-separation analyses indicate that base flow in stream basins dominated by regolith-mantled carbonate rock, carbonate rock, and carbonate rock and shale are 81.6, 93.0, and 67.7 percent of total streamflow, respectively. The relative high percentage for the regolith-mantled carbonate-rock basin indicates that the regolith stores precipitation and slowly, steadily releases this water to the carbonate-rock aquifer and to streams as base flow. Anomalies in water-table gradients and configuration are a result of topography and differences in the character and distribution of overburden material, permeability, rock type, and geologic structure. Most ground-water flow is local, and ground water discharges to nearby springs and streams. Regional flow is northeastward to the Susquehanna River. Average-annual water budgets were calculated for the period of record from two continuous streamflow-gaging stations. Average

  1. Implications of Thermal Diffusity being Inversely Proportional to Temperature Times Thermal Expansivity on Lower Mantle Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, A.

    2010-12-01

    Many measurements and models of heat transport in lower mantle candidate phases contain systematic errors: (1) conventional methods of insulators involve thermal losses that are pressure (P) and temperature (T) dependent due to physical contact with metal thermocouples, (2) measurements frequently contain unwanted ballistic radiative transfer which hugely increases with T, (3) spectroscopic measurements of dense samples in diamond anvil cells involve strong refraction by which has not been accounted for in analyzing transmission data, (4) the role of grain boundary scattering in impeding heat and light transfer has largely been overlooked, and (5) essentially harmonic physical properties have been used to predict anharmonic behavior. Improving our understanding of the physics of heat transport requires accurate data, especially as a function of temperature, where anharmonicity is the key factor. My laboratory provides thermal diffusivity (D) at T from laser flash analysis, which lacks the above experimental errors. Measuring a plethora of chemical compositions in diverse dense structures (most recently, perovskites, B1, B2, and glasses) as a function of temperature provides a firm basis for understanding microscopic behavior. Given accurate measurements for all quantities: (1) D is inversely proportional to [T x alpha(T)] from ~0 K to melting, where alpha is thermal expansivity, and (2) the damped harmonic oscillator model matches measured D(T), using only two parameters (average infrared dielectric peak width and compressional velocity), both acquired at temperature. These discoveries pertain to the anharmonic aspects of heat transport. I have previously discussed the easily understood quasi-harmonic pressure dependence of D. Universal behavior makes application to the Earth straightforward: due to the stiffness and slow motions of the plates and interior, and present-day, slow planetary cooling rates, Earth can be approximated as being in quasi

  2. Heat flow meter for the diagnostics of pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussupbekov, Bekbolat R.; Karabekova, Dana Zh.; Khassenov, Ayanbergen K.; Zhirnova, Oxana; Zyska, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    Thermal methods of nondestructive testing are widely used for the analysis of the thermal insulation of underground pipelines. In heat methadone nondestructive testing, the thermal energy is distributed in the test object. Temperature field of the object's surface is a source of information on the characteristics of heat transfer. This article describes the modifications we have developed some of the heat flux sensors. A common element of these devices is the battery thermoelectric sensor special design, acting as a thermoelectric converter heat flow.

  3. Effects of flow maldistribution on the thermal performance of cross-flow micro heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonino, C.; Savino, S.

    2016-09-01

    The combined effect of viscosity- and geometry-induced flow maldistribution on the thermal performance of cross-flow micro heat exchangers is investigated with reference to two microchannel cross-sectional geometries, three solid materials, three mass flow rates and three flow nonuniformity models. A FEM procedure, specifically developed for the analysis of the heat transfer between incompressible fluids in cross-flow micro heat exchangers, is used for the numerical simulations. The computed results indicate that flow maldistribution has limited effects on microchannel bulk temperatures, at least for the considered range of operating conditions.

  4. Heat transfer and flow characteristics on a gas turbine shroud.

    PubMed

    Obata, M; Kumada, M; Ijichi, N

    2001-05-01

    The work described in this paper is an experimental investigation of the heat transfer from the main flow to a turbine shroud surface, which may be applicable to ceramic gas turbines. Three kinds of turbine shrouds are considered with a flat surface, a taper surface and a spiral groove surface opposite to the blades in an axial flow turbine of actual turbo-charger. Heat transfer measurements were performed for the experimental conditions of a uniform heat flux or a uniform wall temperature. The effects of the inlet flow angle, rotational speed, and tip clearance on the heat transfer coefficient were clarified under on- and off-design flow conditions. The mean heat transfer coefficient was correlated to the blade Reynolds number and tip clearance, and compared with an experimental correlation and measurements of a flat surface. A comparison was also made for the measurement of static pressure distributions.

  5. Double Stage Heat Transformer Controlled by Flow Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Sotelo, S.; Romero, R. J.; Rodríguez – Martínez, A.

    this paper shows the values of Flow ratio (FR) for control of an absorption double stage heat transformer. The main parameters for the heat pump system are defined as COP, FR and GTL. The control of the entire system is based in a new definition of FR. The heat balance of the Double Stage Heat Transformer (DSHT) is used for the control. The mass flow is calculated for a HPVEE program and a second program control the mass flow. The mass flow is controlled by gear pumps connected to LabView program. The results show an increment in the fraction of the recovery energy. An example of oil distillation is used for the calculation. The waste heat energy is added at the system at 70 °C. Water ™ - Carrol mixture is used in the DSHT. The recover energy is obtained in a second absorber at 128 °C with two scenarios.

  6. A source-sink model of the generation of plate tectonics from non-Newtonian mantle flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bercovici, D.

    1995-02-01

    A model of mantle convection which generates plate tectonics requires strain rate- or stress-dependent rheology in order to produce strong platelike flows with weak margins as well as strike-slip deformation and plate spin (i.e., toroidal motion). Here, we employ a simple model of source-sink driven surface flow to determine the form of such a rheology that is appropriate for Earth`s present-day plate motions. In this model, lithospheric motion is treated as shallow layer flow driven by sources and sinks which correspond to spreading centers and subduction zones, respectively. Two plate motion models are used to derive the source sink field. As originally implied in the simpler Cartesian version of this model, the classical power law rheologies do not generate platelike flows as well as the hypothetical Whitehead-Gans stick-slip rheology (which incorporates a simple self-lubrication mechanism). None of the fluid rheologies examined, however, produce more than approximately 60% of the original maximum shear. For either plate model, the viscosity fields produced by the power law rheologies are diffuse, and the viscosity lows over strike-slip shear zones or pseudo-margins are not as small as over the prescribed convergent-divergent margins. In contrast, the stick-slip rheology generates very platelike viscosity fields, with sharp gradients at the plate boundaries, and margins with almost uniformly low viscosity. Power law rheologies with high viscosity contrasts, however, lead to almost equally favorable comparisons, though these also yield the least platelike viscosity fields. This implies that the magnitude of toroidal flow and platelike strength distributions are not necessarily related and thus may present independent constraints on the determination of a self-consistent plate-mantle rheology.

  7. A source-sink model of the generation of plate tectonics from non-Newtonian mantle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, David

    1995-01-01

    A model of mantle convection which generates plate tectonics requires strain rate- or stress-dependent rheology in order to produce strong platelike flows with weak margins as well as strike-slip deformation and plate spin (i.e., toroidal motion). Here, we employ a simple model of source-sink driven surface flow to determine the form of such a rheology that is appropriate for Earth's present-day plate motions. In this model, lithospheric motion is treated as shallow layer flow driven by sources and sinks which correspond to spreading centers and subduction zones, respectively. Two plate motion models are used to derive the source sink field. As originally implied in the simpler Cartesian version of this model, the classical power law rheologies do not generate platelike flows as well as the hypothetical Whitehead-Gans stick-slip rheology (which incorporates a simple self-lubrication mechanism). None of the fluid rheologies examined, however, produce more than approximately 60% of the original maximum shear. For either plate model, the viscosity fields produced by the power law rheologies are diffuse, and the viscosity lows over strike-slip shear zones or pseudo-margins are not as small as over the prescribed convergent-divergent margins. In contrast, the stick-slip rheology generates very platelike viscosity fields, with sharp gradients at the plate boundaries, and margins with almost uniformly low viscosity. Power law rheologies with high viscosity contrasts, however, lead to almost equally favorable comparisons, though these also yield the least platelike viscosity fields. This implies that the magnitude of toroidal flow and platelike strength distributions are not necessarily related and thus may present independent constraints on the determination of a self-consistent plate-mantle rheology.

  8. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  9. ISS COLUMBUS laboratory experiment `GeoFlow I and II' -fluid physics research in microgravity environment to study convection phenomena inside deep Earth and mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph; Chossat, Pascal; Hollerbach, Rainer; Breuer, Doris; Feudel, Fred; Mutabazi, Innocent; Tuckerman, Laurette

    Overall driving mechanism of flow in inner Earth is convection in its gravitational buoyancy field. A lot of effort has been involved in theoretical prediction and numerical simulation of both the geodynamo, which is maintained by convection, and mantle convection, which is the main cause for plate tectonics. Especially resolution of convective patterns and heat transfer mechanisms has been in focus to reach the real, highly turbulent conditions inside Earth. To study specific phenomena experimentally different approaches has been observed, against the background of magneto-hydrodynamic but also on the pure hydrodynamic physics of fluids. With the experiment `GeoFlow' (Geophysical Flow Simulation) instability and transition of convection in spherical shells under the influence of central-symmetry buoyancy force field are traced for a wide range of rotation regimes within the limits between non-rotating and rapid rotating spheres. The special set-up of high voltage potential between inner and outer sphere and use of a dielectric fluid as working fluid induce an electro-hydrodynamic force, which is comparable to gravitational buoyancy force inside Earth. To reduce overall gravity in a laboratory this technique requires microgravity conditions. The `GeoFlow I' experiment was accomplished on International Space Station's module COLUM-BUS inside Fluid Science Laboratory FSL und supported by EADS Astrium, Friedrichshafen, User Support und Operations Centre E-USOC in Madrid, Microgravity Advanced Research and Support Centre MARS in Naples, as well as COLUMBUS Control Center COL-CC Munich. Running from August 2008 until January 2009 it delivered 100.000 images from FSL's optical diagnostics module; here more precisely the Wollaston shearing interferometry was used. Here we present the experimental alignment with numerical prediction for the non-rotating and rapid rotation case. The non-rotating case is characterized by a co-existence of several stationary supercritical

  10. Electron temperature and heat flow in the nightside Venus ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Mayr, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    A steady-state two-dimensional heat balance model is used to analyze the night side Venusian ionospheric electron temperatures given by the Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe. The energy calculation includes the solar EUV heating at the terminator, electron cooling to ions and neutrals, and heat conduction within the ionospheric plasma. An optimum magnetic field is derived by solving for the heat flux directions which force energy conservation while constrained by the observed temperatures within the range of 80-170 deg solar zenith angle and 160-170 km. The heat flux vectors indicate a magnetic field that connects the lower night side ionosphere to the day side ionosphere, and connects the upper ionosphere to the ionosheath. The lower ionosphere is heated through conduction of heat from the dayside, and the upper ionosphere is heated by the solar wind in the ionosheath with heat flowing downward and from the nightside to the day side.

  11. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  12. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  13. Analysis of heat transfers inside counterflow plate heat exchanger augmented by an auxiliary fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Khaled, A-R A

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost.

  14. Heat and mass transfer and hydrodynamics in swirling flows (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, A. I.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Popov, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    Research results of Russian and foreign scientists of heat and mass transfer in whirling flows, swirling effect, superficial vortex generators, thermodynamics and hydrodynamics at micro- and nanoscales, burning at swirl of the flow, and technologies and apparatuses with the use of whirling currents for industry and power generation were presented and discussed at the "Heat and Mass Transfer in Whirling Currents" 5th International Conference. The choice of rational forms of the equipment flow parts when using whirling and swirling flows to increase efficiency of the heat-power equipment and of flow regimes and burning on the basis of deep study of the flow and heat transfer local parameters was set as the main research prospect. In this regard, there is noticeable progress in research methods of whirling and swirling flows. The number of computational treatments of swirling flows' local parameters has been increased. Development and advancement of the up to date computing models and national productivity software are very important for this process. All experimental works are carried out with up to date research methods of the local thermoshydraulic parameters, which enable one to reveal physical mechanisms of processes: PIV and LIV visualization techniques, high-speed and infrared photography, high speed registration of parameters of high-speed processes, etc. There is a problem of improvement of researchers' professional skills in the field of fluid mechanics to set adequately mathematics and physics problems of aerohydrodynamics for whirling and swirling flows and numerical and pilot investigations. It has been pointed out that issues of improvement of the cooling system and thermal protection effectiveness of heat-power and heat-transfer equipment units are still actual. It can be solved successfully using whirling and swirling flows as simple low power consumption exposing on the flow method and heat transfer augmentation.

  15. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  16. Shear-wave splitting and implications for mantle flow beneath the MELT region of the east pacific rise

    PubMed

    Wolfe; Solomon

    1998-05-22

    Shear-wave splitting across the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise has been measured from records of SKS and SKKS phases on the ocean-bottom seismometers of the Mantle Electromagnetic and Tomography (MELT) Experiment. The direction of fast shear-wave polarization is aligned parallel to the spreading direction. Delay times between fast and slow shear waves are asymmetric across the rise, and off-axis values on the Pacific Plate are twice those on the Nazca Plate. Splitting on the Pacific Plate may reflect anisotropy associated with spreading-induced flow above a depth of about 100 km, as well as a deeper contribution from warm asthenospheric return flow from the Pacific Superswell region.

  17. The surface heat flow of the Arabian Shield in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, A.; Förster, H.-J.; Masarweh, R.; Masri, A.; Tarawneh, K.; Desert Group

    2007-04-01

    Surface heat flow in southern Jordan (western part of the Arabian Plate) was determined in a dense cluster of five, up to 900-m-deep boreholes that have encountered sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic (Ordovician and Silurian) age. These rocks are underlain by an igneous and metamorphic basement, which has been studied for its radiogenic heat production, along the eastern margin of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) fault system. The heat flow, calculated from continuous temperature logs and laboratory-measured thermal conductivity of drillcores and surface samples, averages to 60.3 ± 3.4 mW m -2 and contrasts the common view of the late Proterozoic-consolidated Arabian Shield constituting a low heat-flow province of ⩽45 mW m -2. Although only characterizing an area of about 300 km 2, this average is unlikely representing a positive local anomaly caused by voluminous HHP granites/rhyolites at shallow depths. Instead, a heat flow of 60 mW m -2 is considered a robust estimate of the Phanerozoic conductive surface heat flow not only for Jordan, but for the Arabian Shield in areas unaffected by younger reactivation. The large variation in conductive heat flow (36-88 mW m -2) previously observed in Jordan, southern Syria, and Saudi Arabia is irreconcilable with their broad similarity in lithosphere structure and composition and rather reflects a combination of factors including low-quality temperature data and insufficient knowledge on thermal rock properties.

  18. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  19. Different Behaviour of Heat Flow and Helium Anomalies Through the Geothermal Areas of Central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellani, S.; Magro, G.

    2005-12-01

    The high enthalpy geothermal areas and more than 30% of the Italian spas are concentrated in central Italy (Tuscany and Latium regions). A wide part of this area is affected by a large heat-flow anomaly, with maxima corresponding to the geothermal fields of Larderello, Mt. Amiata and Latera. Mt.Amiata and Latera are located in areas of quaternary quiescent volcanism, while there are no outcrops of extrusive rocks in the Larderello geothermal field. Surface heat flow in a continental area has an average value of 50-60 mW/m2. The background regional value in these geothermal areas is 120-150 mW/m2, with peaks up to 1000 mW/m2 at Larderello, 600 mW/m2 at Mt. Amiata and 300 mW/m2 at Latera. Anomalous heat flow is very often related to the presence of 3He-enriched fluids. In central Italy the He isotopic ratio (3He/4He expressed as R/Ra), in gases from cold and thermal manifestations and in geothermal wells ranges from 0.2 to 3.2 R/Ra. In particular, Larderello fluids range between 0.5 and 3.2, while the interval for Mt. Amiata and Latera fluids spans from 0.2 to 0.6. The R/Ra and heat flow profiles through central Italy, NW-SE trending, show no straightforward correlation between the two parameters. A phased correlation exists between heat flow and R/Ra relative maxima at Larderello, while they are decoupled at Mt. Amiata and Latera geothermal fields. Different heat and He transport mechanisms through the crust are the most likely explanation: mantle 3He-enriched fluids move upwards mainly via fluid filled conduits, while heat diffuses faster than He throughout the entire bulk rock. At Larderello, the almost constant values of R/Ra in geothermal wells and paleo-fluids (fluid inclusions) indicate that the contribution of hot 3He-enriched fluids must have occurred through deeply rooted faults at least in the last 1 Ma. In the Mt. Amiata area the presence of several spas, marked by low R/Ra ratios down to crustal values, could indicate the addition of radiogenic 4He. Rock

  20. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting

  1. Enhanced two phase flow in heat transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Tegrotenhuis, Ward E; Humble, Paul H; Lavender, Curt A; Caldwell, Dustin D

    2013-12-03

    A family of structures and designs for use in devices such as heat exchangers so as to allow for enhanced performance in heat exchangers smaller and lighter weight than other existing devices. These structures provide flow paths for liquid and vapor and are generally open. In some embodiments of the invention, these structures can also provide secondary heat transfer as well. In an evaporate heat exchanger, the inclusion of these structures and devices enhance the heat transfer coefficient of the evaporation phase change process with comparable or lower pressure drop.

  2. Modeling Io's Heat Flow: Constraints from Galileo PPR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    We attempt to improve on previous Io heat flow estimates by using higher resolution data from Galileo Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) and improved thermophysical models of the surface, including finite thermal inertia, the pedestal effect, and disk-resolved radiance.

  3. Heat flow measurements on the southeast coast of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyndman, R.D.; Jaeger, J.C.; Sass, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Three boreholes have been drilled for the Australian National University near the southeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. The heat flows found are 1.1, 1.0, and 1.3 ??cal/cm2sec. The errors resulting from the proximity of the sea and a lake, surface temperature change, conductivity structure and water flow have been examined. The radioactive heat production in some of the intrusive rocks of the area have also been measured. The heat flows are much lower than the values of about 2.0 found elsewhere in south eastern Australia. The lower values appear to be part of a distinct heat flow province in eastern Australia. ?? 1969.

  4. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  5. Thermal and chemical convection in planetary mantles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupeyrat, L.; Sotin, C.; Parmentier, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    Melting of the upper mantle and extraction of melt result in the formation of a less dense depleted mantle. This paper describes series of two-dimensional models that investigate the effects of chemical buoyancy induced by these density variations. A tracer particles method has been set up to follow as closely as possible the chemical state of the mantle and to model the chemical buoyant force at each grid point. Each series of models provides the evolution with time of magma production, crustal thickness, surface heat flux, and thermal and chemical state of the mantle. First, models that do not take into account the displacement of plates at the surface of Earth demonstrate that chemical buoyancy has an important effect on the geometry of convection. Then models include horizontal motion of plates 5000 km wide. Recycling of crust is taken into account. For a sufficiently high plate velocity which depends on the thermal Rayleigh number, the cell's size is strongly coupled with the plate's size. Plate motion forces chemically buoyant material to sink into the mantle. Then the positive chemical buoyancy yields upwelling as depleted mantle reaches the interface between the upper and the lower mantle. This process is very efficient in mixing the depleted and undepleted mantle at the scale of the grid spacing since these zones of upwelling disrupt the large convective flow. At low spreading rates, zones of upwelling develop quickly, melting occurs, and the model predicts intraplate volcanism by melting of subducted crust. At fast spreading rates, depleted mantle also favors the formation of these zones of upwelling, but they are not strong enough to yield partial melting. Their rapid displacement toward the ridge contributes to faster large-scale homogenization.

  6. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  7. Curie point depth and heat flow from spectral analysis of aeromagnetic data over the northern part of Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, Saada Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    The present work aims to estimate the Curie point depth and the surface heat flow for the northern part of the Western Desert using aeromagnetic data. Applying spectral analysis to aeromagnetic anomalies has provided equitable promising geological results, useful for further geothermal or petroleum exploration. The total intensity aeromagnetic map was first reduced to the north magnetic pole to correct the shape and position of different magnetic anomalies over their causative bodies. Secondly, the short wavelengths were removed to enhance the deeper long wavelengths related to the deep sources. Spectral analysis indicates that the area is underlined by an average Curie point depth of about 27 km. This implies an average thermal heat flow (53 mW/m2) lower than the average global heat flow. The investigated area was divided into eighteen blocks, where the average depths to centroid and top of the magnetic source were estimated for each block. The results of this work show a general depth increase of the magnetic boundaries from 24.5 km in the southern area to 33 km at the northern part. The calculated surface heat flow decreases from about 56 to 42 mW/m2 in the same direction. Consequently, this area is characterized by its low geothermal gradient and surface heat flow. This low geothermal gradient indicates that the upper mantle contributes to the magnetic features at the northern offshore parts. This work also recommends by deep drilling for petroleum exploration and production within the Egyptian Mediterranean Sea exploration strip.

  8. Heat flow studies in Wyoming: 1979 to 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Decker, E.R.; Buelow, K.L.; Ruscetta, C.A.

    1982-05-01

    Heat flow values and updated maps of flux in Wyoming, northern Colorado, and southern Montana are presented. It is concluded that most of the heat flow values in the Wyoming Basin-Southern Rocky Mountains region in Southern Wyoming are low or normal, excluding the Saratoga Valley; that the regional flux in the Owl Creek Mountains area is above normal; and that the Meadow Creek Basin area is in a zone of high flux. (MJF)

  9. Heat flow vs. atmospheric greenhouse on early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Postawko, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers derived a quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of an atmospheric greenhouse and internal heat flow in producing the morphological differences between earlier and later Martian terrains. The derivation is based on relationships previously derived by other researchers. The reasoning may be stated as follows: the CO2 mean residence time in the Martian atmosphere is almost certainly much shorter than the total time span over which early climate differences are thought to have been sustained. Therefore, recycling of previously degassed CO2 quickly becomes more important than the ongoing supply of juvenile CO2. If so, then the atmospheric CO2 pressure, and thereby the surface temperature, may be approximated mathematically as a function of the total degassed CO2 in the atmosphere plus buried material and the ratio of the atmospheric and regolith mean residence times. The latter ratio can also be expressed as a function of heat flow. Hence, it follows that the surface temperature may be expressed as a function of heat flow and the total amount of available CO2. However, the depth to the water table can simultaneously be expressed as a function of heat flow and the surface temperature (the boundary condition). Therefore, for any given values of total available CO2 and regolith conductivity, there exist coupled independent equations which relate heat flow, surface temperature, and the depth to the water table. This means we can now derive simultaneous values of surface temperature and the depth of the water table for any value of the heat flow. The derived relationship is used to evaluate the relative importance of the atmospheric greenhouse effect and the internal regolith thermal gradient in producing morphological changes for any value of the heat flow, and to assess the absolute importance of each of the values of the heat flow which are thought to be reasonable on independent geophysical grounds.

  10. Study on the Heat-Flow Controllable Heat Exchanger-3rd report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Hamano, Masayoshi; Yanadori, Michio

    The heat-flow controllable heat exchanger for the purpose of heat recovery through the waste hot water at the bathroom and the washing room has been developed. The system is especially available at the house of cold area and the recovery heat is used to warm the suction air conducted from ventilation device. As the result of field test, it is clarified that the heat recovery rate by the system is very large. Also, the exchanger is possible to control the amount of recorery heat. Therefore, it is considered that the exchanger is applicable in the ventilation systems used the waste hot water.

  11. Dynamics of Compressible Convection and Thermochemical Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xi

    The Earth's long-wavelength geoid anomalies have long been used to constrain the dynamics and viscosity structure of the mantle in an isochemical, whole-mantle convection model. However, there is strong evidence that the seismically observed large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the lowermost mantle are chemically distinct and denser than the ambient mantle. In this thesis, I investigated how chemically distinct and dense piles influence the geoid. I formulated dynamically self-consistent 3D spherical convection models with realistic mantle viscosity structure which reproduce Earth's dominantly spherical harmonic degree-2 convection. The models revealed a compensation effect of the chemically dense LLSVPs. Next, I formulated instantaneous flow models based on seismic tomography to compute the geoid and constrain mantle viscosity assuming thermochemical convection with the compensation effect. Thermochemical models reconcile the geoid observations. The viscosity structure inverted for thermochemical models is nearly identical to that of whole-mantle models, and both prefer weak transition zone. Our results have implications for mineral physics, seismic tomographic studies, and mantle convection modelling. Another part of this thesis describes analyses of the influence of mantle compressibility on thermal convection in an isoviscous and compressible fluid with infinite Prandtl number. A new formulation of the propagator matrix method is implemented to compute the critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding eigenfunctions for compressible convection. Heat flux and thermal boundary layer properties are quantified in numerical models and scaling laws are developed.

  12. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  13. Electroosmotic Entry Flow with Joule Heating Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakaran, Rama; Kale, Akshay; Xuan, Xiangchun

    Electrokinetic flow, which transports liquids by electroosmosis and samples by electrophoresis, is the transport method of choice in microfluidic chips over traditional pressure-driven flows. Studies on electrokinetic flows have so far been almost entirely limited to inside microchannels. Very little work has been done on the electroosmotic fluid entry from a reservoir to a microchannel, which is the origin of all fluid and sample motions in microchips. We demonstrate in this talk that strong vortices of opposite circulating directions can be generated in electroosmotic entry flows. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model of the entire microchip to predict and understand the fluid temperature and flow fields at the reservoir-microchannel junction.

  14. Continents, supercontinents, mantle thermal mixing, and mantle thermal isolation: Theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardic, A.; Moresi, L.; Jellinek, A. M.; O'Neill, C. J.; Cooper, C. M.; Lee, C. T.

    2011-10-01

    Super-continental insulation refers to an increase in mantle temperature below a supercontinent due to the heat transfer inefficiency of thick, stagnant continental lithosphere relative to thinner, subducting oceanic lithosphere. We use thermal network theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments to provide tighter physical insight into this process. We isolate two end-member dynamic regimes. In the thermally well mixed regime the insulating effect of continental lithosphere can not cause a localized increase in mantle temperature due to the efficiency of lateral mixing in the mantle. In this regime the potential temperature of the entire mantle is higher than it would be without continents, the magnitude depending on the relative thickness of continental and oceanic lithosphere (i.e., the insulating effects of continental lithosphere are communicated to the entire mantle). Thermal mixing can be short circuited if subduction zones surround a supercontinent or if the convective flow pattern of the mantle becomes spatially fixed relative to a stationary supercontinent. This causes a transition to the thermal isolation regime: The potential temperature increases below a supercontinent whereas the potential temperature below oceanic domains drops such that the average temperature of the whole mantle remains constant. Transition into this regime would thus involve an increase in the suboceanic viscosity, due to local cooling, and consequently a decrease in the rate of oceanic lithosphere overturn. Transition out of this regime can involve the unleashing of flow driven by a large lateral temperature gradient, which will enhance global convective motions. Our analysis highlights that transitions between the two states, in either direction, will effect not only the mantle below a supercontinent but also the mantle below oceanic regions. This provides a larger set of predictions that can be compared to the geologic record to help determine if a hypothesized

  15. Tomography-based, high-resolution modelling of mantle flow under North America: Implications for surface stress in the central and eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Mitrovica, J. X.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    Plate tectonics is fundamentally a 3-D process and the mantle convection stresses that drive the horizontal motions of plates also produce vertical bending stresses that generate large (km-scale) topographic undulations. The impact of these bending stresses in continental interiors is not generally recognised or well understood and yet they can provide a large (order 10 MPa) contribution to the ambient tectonic stress field. Depending on the geometrical relationship with pre-existing crustal weak zones or faults, the convection- induced surface stresses can be potentially important contributors to intraplate seismic activity, particularly in the central and eastern portions of North America. These stresses, and the associated surface undulations, evolve slowly on geological (Myr) time scales and it is therefore difficult to resolve them using space-based geodesy (e.g. GPS). We determine the impact of mantle convection on intraplate stresses in North America using a mantle flow calculation that is based on a new high-resolution tomography model that is constrained by simultaneously inverting global seismic and mantle-convection data sets (Simmons et al. 2009). The mantle flow model adopts a depth dependent mantle viscosity structure which reconciles both glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and convection data (Mitrovica and Forte 2004). The flow model successfully reproduces plate velocities and observations of surface gravity and topography. We find a large region of maximum compressive stress in the central portion of North America that is largely driven by viscous flow coupled to density anomalies associated with the descent of the ancient Kula-Farallon plate system. These flow calculations also show the long lived nature of the convection-driven compressive stresses under the Mississippi Valley region, extending from the southern Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Backarc spreading and mantle wedge flow beneath the Japan Sea: insight from Rayleigh-wave anisotropic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Dapeng

    2016-10-01

    We present the first high-resolution Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity azimuthal anisotropy tomography of the Japan subduction zone at periods of 20-150 s, which is determined using a large number of high-quality amplitude and phase data of teleseismic fundamental-mode Rayleigh waves. The obtained 2-D anisotropic phase-velocity models are then inverted for a 3-D shear-wave velocity azimuthal anisotropy tomography down to a depth of ˜300 km beneath Japan. The subducting Pacific slab is imaged as a dipping high-velocity zone with trench-parallel fast-velocity directions (FVDs) which may indicate the anisotropy arising from the normal faults produced at the outer-rise area near the Japan trench axis, overprinting the slab fossil fabric, whereas the mantle wedge generally exhibits lower velocities with trench-normal FVDs which reflect subduction-driven corner flow and anisotropy. Depth variations of azimuthal anisotropy are revealed in the big mantle wedge beneath the Japan Sea, which may reflect past deformations in the Eurasian lithosphere related to backarc spreading during 21 to 15 Ma and complex current convection in the asthenosphere induced by active subductions of both the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates.

  17. Sensing the Electrical Conductivity of the Upper Mantle and Lithosphere Using Satellite Magnetic Signal Due to Ocean Tidal Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, N. R.; Kuvshinov, A. V.; Sabaka, T. J.; Olsen, N.

    2014-12-01

    A few scientific groups convincingly demonstrated that the magnetic fields induced by the lunar semidiurnal (M2) ocean flow can be identified in magnetic satellite observations. These results support the idea to recover M2 magnetic signals from Swarm data, and to use these data for constraining lithosphere and upper mantle electrical conductivity in oceanic regions. Induction studies using ionospheric and magnetospheric primary sources with periods of about one day are sensitive to mantle conductivity at a few hundred kilometers depth because of the inductive coupling between primary and induced sources. In contrast, using oceanic tides as a signal allows studying shallower regions since the coupling is galvanic. This corresponds to global electric sounding. In this study we perform global 3-D EM numerical simulations in order to investigate the sensitivity of M2 signals to conductivity distributions at different depths. The results of sensitivity analysis are discussed, and comparison of the modelled M2 signals with those recovered by Comprehensive Inversion from one year of Swarm data is presented.

  18. Heat flow analysis in connection with thermoplastic filament winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brage, Anders; Lamrell, Charles

    1988-04-01

    In thermoplastic filament winding the calculated rate of cooling is found to be in the order of 100000 degr.C/second at the bonding interface. Short range heat flow phenomena are analyzed, and the result provides a simple rule of thumb for practice, together with a winding speed dependant correction for glass and carbon fiber composites. This enables an easy method to calculate the lower temperature limits for the process of continuous welding, as well as the upper temperature limit where resin starved laminates result from excessive resin flow due to heat buildup. The applied model of heat transfer is given in analytical expressions. Calculated results are given in several graphs.

  19. A heat-flow reconnaissance of southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Lawver, L.A.; Munroe, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow was measured at nine sites in crystalline and sedimentary rocks of SE Alaska. Seven of the sites, located between 115 and 155 km landward of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault, have heat flows significantly higher than the mean in the coastal provinces between Cape Mendocino and the Queen Charlotte Islands, and lower than the mean for 81 values within 100 km of the San Andreas transform fault, even further S. There is no evidence for heat sources that might be associated with late Cainozoic thermal events.-P.Br.

  20. Topographically driven groundwater flow and the San Andreas heat flow paradox revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for a weak San Andreas Fault includes (1) borehole heat flow measurements that show no evidence for a frictionally generated heat flow anomaly and (2) the inferred orientation of ??1 nearly perpendicular to the fault trace. Interpretations of the stress orientation data remain controversial, at least in close proximity to the fault, leading some researchers to hypothesize that the San Andreas Fault is, in fact, strong and that its thermal signature may be removed or redistributed by topographically driven groundwater flow in areas of rugged topography, such as typify the San Andreas Fault system. To evaluate this scenario, we use a steady state, two-dimensional model of coupled heat and fluid flow within cross sections oriented perpendicular to the fault and to the primary regional topography. Our results show that existing heat flow data near Parkfield, California, do not readily discriminate between the expected thermal signature of a strong fault and that of a weak fault. In contrast, for a wide range of groundwater flow scenarios in the Mojave Desert, models that include frictional heat generation along a strong fault are inconsistent with existing heat flow data, suggesting that the San Andreas Fault at this location is indeed weak. In both areas, comparison of modeling results and heat flow data suggest that advective redistribution of heat is minimal. The robust results for the Mojave region demonstrate that topographically driven groundwater flow, at least in two dimensions, is inadequate to obscure the frictionally generated heat flow anomaly from a strong fault. However, our results do not preclude the possibility of transient advective heat transport associated with earthquakes.

  1. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  2. Numerical computations of Orbiter flow fields and heating rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Li, C. P.; Houston, C. K.; Chiu, P.; Olmedo, L.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical computations of flow fields around an analytical description of the Space Shuttle Orbiter windward surface, including the root of the wing leading edge, are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of these calculations to several flow field modeling assumptions. Results of parametric flow field and boundary layer computations using the axisymmetric analogue concept to obtain three-dimensional heating rates, in conjunction with exact three-dimensional inviscid floe field solutions and two-dimensional boundary layer analysis - show the sensitivity of boundary layer edge conditions and heating rates to considerations of the inviscid flow field entropy layer, equilibrium air versus chemically and vibrationally frozen flow, and nonsimilar terms in the boundary layer computations. A cursory comparison between flow field predictions obtained from these methods and current Orbiter design methods has established a benchmark for selecting and adjusting these and future design methodologies.

  3. Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

  4. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  5. First Kinetic Reactive-Flow and Melting Calculations for Entropy Budget and Major Elements in Heterogeneous Mantle Lithologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.

    2009-12-01

    The consequences of source heterogeneity and reactive flow during melt transport in the mantle can be classified by scale. At the smallest spatial and longest temporal scales, we can assume complete equilibrium and use batch melting of homogenized sources or equilibrium porous flow treatments. At large enough spatial scale or short enough temporal scale to prevent any thermal or chemical interaction between heterogeneities or between melt and matrix, we can assume perfectly fractional melting and transport and apply simple melt-mixing calculations. At a somewhat smaller spatial or longer temporal scale, thermal but not chemical interactions are significant and various lithologies and channel/matrix systems must follow common pressure-temperature paths, with energy flows between them. All these cases are tractable to model with current tools, whether we are interested in the energy budget, major elements, trace elements, or isotopes. There remains, however, the very important range of scales where none of these simple theories applies because of partial chemical interaction among lithologies or along the flow path. Such disequilibrium or kinetic cases have only been modeled, in the case of mantle minerals and melts, for trace elements and isotopes, with fixed melting rates instead of complete energy budgets. In order to interpret volumes of magma production and major element basalt and residue compositions that might emerge from a heterogeneous mantle in this last range of scales, we must develop tools that can combine a kinetic formulation with a major element and energy-constrained thermodynamic calculation. The kinetics can be handled either with a chemical kinetic approach with rate constants for various net transfer and exchange reactions, or with a physical diffusion-limited approach. A physical diffusion-limited approach can be built with the following elements. At grain scale, spherical grains of an arbitrary number of solid phases can evolve zoning profiles

  6. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident.

  7. Correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Charitra; Rozel, Antoine; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Rolf et al. (EPSL, 2012) and Coltice et al. (Science, 2012) have previously shown that continents exert a first order influence on Earth's mantle flow by affecting convective wavelength and surface heat flow. With stationary continents, Heron and Lowman (JGR, 2014) highlighted the decreasing role of continental insulation on subcontinental temperatures with higher Rayleigh number (Ra). However, the question whether there exists a correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle or not remains to be answered. By systematically varying parameters like core-mantle boundary (CMB) temperature, continental size, and mantle heating modes (basal and internal); we model thermo-chemical mantle convection with 2D spherical annulus geometry (Hernlund and Tackley, PEPI 2008) using StagYY (Tackley, PEPI 2008). Starting with a simple incompressible model having mobile continents, we observe this correlation. Furthermore, this correlation still holds when the model complexity is gradually increased by introducing internal heating, compressibility, and melting. In general, downwellings reduce the mantle temperature away from the continents, thereby resulting in correlation between mobile continents and elevated temperatures in the subcontinental mantle. For incompressible models (Boussinesq approximation), correlation exists and the dominant degree of convection varies with the continental distribution. When internal heating is switched on, correlation is observed but it is reduced as there are less cold regions in the mantle. Even for compressible models with melting, big continents are able to focus the heat underneath them. The dominant degree of convection changes with continental breakup. Additionally, correlation is observed to be higher in the upper mantle (300 - 1000 km) compared to the lower mantle (1000 - 2890 km). At present, mobile continents in StagYY are simplified into a compositionally distinct field drifting at the top of

  8. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Luo, T. P.; Ren, T. Q.

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus.

  9. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liang, J S; Zhang, Y; Wang, D Z; Luo, T P; Ren, T Q

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus.

  10. A survey of oscillating flow in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Terrence W.; Seume, Jorge R.

    1988-01-01

    Similarity parameters for characterizing the effect of flow oscillation on wall shear stress, viscous dissipation, pressure drop and heat transfer rates are proposed. They are based on physical agruments and are derived by normalizing the governing equations. The literature on oscillating duct flows, regenerator and porous media flows is surveyed. The operating characteristics of the heat exchanger of eleven Stirling engines are discribed in terms of the similarity parameters. Previous experimental and analytical results are discussed in terms of these parameters and used to estimate the nature of the oscillating flow under engine operating conditions. The operating points for many of the modern Stirling engines are in or near the laminar to turbulent transition region. In several engines, working fluid does not pass entirely through heat exchangers during a cycle. Questions that need to be addressed by further research are identified.

  11. Relations between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Majorowicz, Jacek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The relation between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for recent maps of Europe is presented. New heat flow map of Europe (Majorowicz and Wybraniec, 2010) is based on updated database of uncorrected heat flow values to which paleoclimatic correction is applied across the continental Europe. Correction is depth dependent due to a diffusive thermal transfer of the surface temperature forcing of which glacial-interglacial history has the largest impact. This explains some very low uncorrected heat flow values 20-30 mW/m2 in the shields, shallow basin areas of the cratons, and in other areas including orogenic belts were heat flow was likely underestimated. New integrated map of the European Moho depth (Grad et al., 2009) is the first high resolution digital map for European plate understand as an area from Ural Mountains in the east to mid-Atlantic ridge in the west, and Mediterranean Sea in the south to Spitsbergen and Barents Sea in Arctic in the north. For correlation we used: onshore heat flow density data with palaeoclimatic correction (5318 locations), topography map (30 x 30 arc seconds; Danielson and Gesch, 2011) and Moho map (longitude, latitude and Moho depth, each 0.1 degree). Analysis was done in areas where data from all three datasets were available. Continental Europe area could be divided into two large domains related with Precambrian East European craton and Palaeozoic Platform. Next two smaller areas correspond to Scandinavian Caledonides and Anatolia. Presented results show different correlations between Moho depth, elevation and heat flow for all discussed regions. For each region more detailed analysis of these relation in different elevation ranges is presented. In general it is observed that Moho depth is more significant to HF then elevation. Depending on region and elevation range HF value in mW/m2 is up to two times larger than Moho depth in km, while HF relation to elevation varies much more.

  12. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  13. Low velocity crustal flow and crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan, SE Tibet, revealed by 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haopeng; Zhu, Liangbao; Su, Youjin

    2016-08-01

    We used teleseismic data recorded by a permanent seismic network in Yunnan, SE Tibet, and measured the interstation Rayleigh wave phase velocity between 10 and 60 s. A two-step inversion scheme was used to invert for the 3D S-wave velocity and azimuthal anisotropy structure of 10-110 km. The results show that there are two low velocity channels between depths of 20-30 km in Yunnan and that the fast axes are sub-parallel to the strikes of the low velocity channels, which supports the crustal flow model. The azimuthal anisotropy pattern is quite complicated and reveals a complex crust-mantle coupling mechanism in Yunnan. The N-S trending Lüzhijiang Fault separates the Dianzhong Block into two parts. In the western Dianzhong Block, the fast axis of the S-wave changes with depth, which indicates that the crust and the lithospheric mantle are decoupled. In the eastern Dianzhong Block and the western Yangtze Craton, the crust and the lithospheric mantle may be decoupled because of crustal flow, despite a coherent S-wave fast axis at depths of 10-110 km. In addition, the difference between the S-wave fast axis in the lithosphere and the SKS splitting measurement suggests that the lithosphere and the upper mantle are decoupled there. In the Baoshan Block, the stratified anisotropic pattern suggests that the crust and the upper mantle are decoupled.

  14. Heat Flow Pattern and Thermal Resistance Modeling of Anisotropic Heat Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falakzaadeh, F.; Mehryar, R.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure safe operating temperatures of the ever smaller heat generating electronic devices, drastic measures should be taken. Heat spreaders are used to increase surface area, by spreading the heat without necessarily transferring it to the ambient in the first place. The heat flow pattern is investigated in heat spreaders and the fundamental differences regarding how heat conducts in different materials is addressed. Isotropic materials are compared with anisotropic ones having a specifically higher in-plane thermal conductivity than through plane direction. Thermal resistance models are proposed for anisotropic and isotropic heat spreaders in compliance with the order of magnitude of dimensions used in electronics packaging. After establishing thermal resistance models for both the isotropic and anisotropic cases, numerical results are used to find a correlation for predicting thermal resistance in anisotropic heat spreaders with high anisotropy ratios.

  15. Heat transfer intensification by increasing vapor flow rate in flat heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinceana, Silviu; Mihai, Ioan; Beniuga, Marius; Suciu, Cornel

    2015-02-01

    Flat heat pipes have various technical applications, one of the most important being the cooling of electronic components[9]. Their continuous development is due to the fact that these devices permit heat transfer without external energetic contribution. The practical exploitation of flat heat pipes however is limited by the fact that dissipated power can only reach a few hundred watts. The present paper aims to advance a new method for the intensification of convective heat transfer. A centrifugal mini impeller, driven by a turntable which incorporates four permanent magnets was designed. These magnets are put in motion by another rotor, which in its turn includes two permanent magnets and is driven by a mini electrical motor. Rotation of the centrifugal blades generates speed and pressure increase of the cooling agent brought to vapor state within the flat micro heat pipe. It's well known that the liquid suffers biphasic transformations during heat transfer inside the heat pipe. Over the hotspot (the heat source being the electronic component) generated at one end of the heat pipe, convective heat transfer occurs, leading to sudden vaporization of the liquid. Pressures generated by newly formed vapors push them towards the opposite end of the flat heat pipe, where a finned mini heat sink is usually placed. The mini-heat exchanger is air-cooled, thus creating a cold spot, where vapors condensate. The proposed method contributes to vapor flow intensification by increasing their transport speed and thus leading to more intense cooling of the heat pipe.

  16. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  17. Salt-Enhanced Hydrothermal Convection in Europa's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, B. J.; Schubert, G.; Palguta, J.

    2006-12-01

    Features on the surface of Europa may reflect non-uniform heating in an underlying ocean due to variations in mantle heat flux. Pore water convection can generate a spatially heterogeneous heat flux, as illustrated in two dimensional computer simulations of the thermal evolution of Europa. The Europan ocean and mantle are likely to contain significant amounts of salts, which may influence hydrothermal convection. Our model uses three layers: core, silicate mantle, and H2O. Processes active in the model include radiogenic heating, tidal dissipative heating (TDH), thermal diffusion, latent heat of melting, pore water convection and salt transport. Starting from a cold uniform body, radiogenic heating and TDH produce a temperature profile ranging from a peak near 1150 oC in the deep interior to 15 oC at the mantle surface, overlain by an 80 km deep ocean layer at 3 oC, capped by an ice shell approximately 20 km thick. This structure provides initial conditions for our pore water convection simulation. For no-salt conditions, an initial, very strong flow gives way to a weaker quasi-steady pattern of convection in the mantle's porosity. Plumes rise from the mantle at a roughly 10o spacing, through the ocean layer up to the base of the ice. These are typically 50 to 100 km wide at the base of the ice. Plume heat flux is 10-12 W/m2 during the initial transient, but later drops to about 1.0 W/m2. Heating at the base of the ice shell is spatially heterogeneous, but only strong enough to produce significant melt-through during the initial transient. The addition of salt produces an enduring time- dependent convective pattern, with episodic bursts of heat flux. This work was supported by a grant from the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory and by the NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  18. Basic data for some recent Australian heat-flow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munroe, Robert J.; Sass, J.H.; Milburn, G.T.; Jaeger, J.C.; Tammemagi, H.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This report has been compiled to provide background information and detailed temperature and thermal conductivity data for the heat-flow values reported in Sass, Jaeger, and Munroe (in press). The data were collected as part of a joint heat-flow study by the Australian National University (ANU) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the direction of J. C. Jaeger (ANU) and J. H. Sass (USGS). The format is similar to that used for basic data from United States heat-flow determinations (Sass and Munroe, 1974). Each section contains a state map showing the geographic distribution of heat-flow data followed by tables which list individual temperatures, thermal conductivities, and radiogenic heat production values. A companion volume (Bunker and others, 1975) gives details of the heat-production measurements together with individual radioelement concentrations. Localities are arranged in alphabetical order within each state. The methods and techniques of measurements have been described by Sass and others (1971a, b). Unusual methods or procedures which differ markedly from these techniques are noted and described in the comments sections of the tables.

  19. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  20. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoy, M. D.; Fernandez, R.; Kononov, V. I.; Polyak, B. G.; Matveev, V. G.; Rot, A. A.

    1990-02-01

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows us to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m2 for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m2 for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  1. Percussive and Proboscis Based Lunar Heat Flow Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, E.; Zacny, K.; Kumar, N.

    2009-12-01

    The subsurface temperature of the Moon is strongly influenced by the diurnal, annual, and precession fluctuations of the insolation. Therefore, to measure the heat flow, the probe has to be inserted to a depth of at least 3m. There are a number of ways the heat flow probe can be deployed. These methods differ in many ways such as simplicity and mass of the deployment system, power required to deploy it, extent of thermal isolation between temperature sensors and between sensors themselves and surface system (deployment system, lander, electronics box etc), thermal sensor placement within the hole (radiative as opposed to conducive coupling), and methods of deployment. The percussive based heat flow probe utilizes a percussive approach to drive a small diameter (20mm) cone penetrometer to >3 meter depths, deploying ring-like thermal sensors every 30 cm. It leaves only small sensors in the borehole, maximizing measurement sensitivity by minimizing thermal coupling from the lander to the electrical tether. The proboscis based heat flow probe utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach to lower the heat flow probe, a lenticular tape, to 3 meters. The system offers extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment.

  2. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Khutorskoy, M.D.; Kononov, V.I.; Polyak, B.G. ); Fernandez, R. ); Matveev, V.G.; Rot, A.A. )

    1990-02-10

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows one to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m{sup 2} for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m{sup 2} for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  4. Temperature distribution in the crust and mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Morris, S.

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the temperature distribution in the earth, experimental constraints on the geotherm in the crust and mantle are considered. The basic form of the geotherm is interpreted on the basis of two dominant mechanisms by which heat is transported in the earth: (1) conduction through the rock, and (2) advection by thermal flow. Data reveal that: (1) the temperature distributions through continental lithosphere and through oceanic lithosphere more than 60 million years old are practically indistinguishable, (2) crustal uplift is instrumental in modifying continental geotherms, and (3) the average temperature through the Archean crust and mantle was similar to that at present. It is noted that current limitations in understanding the constitution of the lower mantle can lead to significant uncertainties in the thermal response time of the planetary interior.

  5. A heat transfer model for slug flow boiling within microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnini, Mirco; Thome, John

    2016-11-01

    We propose a novel physics-based model for the fluid mechanics and heat transfer associated with slug flow boiling in horizontal circular microchannels, to update the widely used three-zone model for the design of multi-microchannel evaporators. The flow is modelled as the cyclic passage of a liquid slug, an elongated bubble which traps a thin liquid film against the channel wall, and a dry vapor plug. The capillary flow theory, extended to incorporate evaporation effects, is applied to estimate the bubble velocity along the channel. A liquid film thickness prediction method considering bubble proximity effects, which may limit the radial extension of the film, is included. Theoretical heat transfer models accounting for the thermal inertia of the liquid film and for the recirculating flow within the liquid slug are utilized. The heat transfer model is compared to experimental data taken from three independent studies: 833 slug flow boiling data points covering R134a, R245fa and R236fa and channel diameters from 0.4 mm to 1 mm. The new model predicts more than 80% of the database to within +/- 30 % and it represents an important step toward a complete physics-based modelling of bubble dynamics and heat transfer within microchannels under evaporating flow conditions.

  6. Eddy diffusivity of heat for drag reducing turbulent pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyung K.; Ghajar, Afshin J.

    1987-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to verify the assumptions and general applicability of a new semiempirical equation for eddy diffusivity of heat proposed previously for viscoelastic turbulent pipe flows. The experiments were performed for Separan AP-273 and Polyox WSR-301 solutions with concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 ppm and Separan AP-30 with concentration of 3000 ppm in thermally fully developed turbulent flow in pipes with diameters of 1.11 and 1.88 cm I.D. under constant wall heat flux. The experiments verified the assumptions made in regard to the universality of the minimum asymptotes for friction and heat transfer. The prediction of heat transfer coefficients with the use of the proposed equation for all of the experimental data is within a maximum deviation of 30 percent.

  7. Heat transfer from cylinders in subsonic slip flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Stainback, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer in heated wires was measured using a constant temperature anemometer over a Mach number range from 0.05 to 0.4 and pressures from 0.5 to 8.0 atmospheres. The total temperature ranged from 80 to 120 F and the wire diameters were 0.00015, 0.00032, and 0.00050 inch. The heat transfer data is presented in the form of a corrected Nusselt number. Based on suggested criteria, much of the data was obtained in the slip flow regime. Therefore, the data is compared with data having comparable flow conditions. The possible application of the heat transfer data to hot wire anemometry is discussed. To this end, the sensitivity of the wires to velocity, density, and total temperature is computed and compared using two different types of correlations.

  8. Heat transfer during intermittent/slug flow in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shoham, O.; Dukler, A.E.; Taitel, Y.

    1982-08-01

    Heat transfer characteristics for two-phase gas-liquid slug flow in a horizontal pipe have been measured. The time variation of temperature, heat transfer coefficients, and heat flux is reported for the different zones of slug flow: the mixing region at the nose, the body of the slug, the liquid film, and the gas bubble behind the slug. Substantial differences in heat transfer coefficient exist between the bottom and top of the slug. This results from the fact that each slug is effectively a thermally developing entry region caused by the presence of a hot upper wall just upstream of each slug. A qualitative theory is presented which explains this behavior. 18 refs.

  9. Performance of parallel flow HeII heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Chang, Y.; Witt, R. J.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    Previous studies of HeII heat exchangers have focused on tube-in-shell designs. The present paper examines the properties of a parallel flow HeII heat exchanger formed from two 254 mm lengths of copper channel having nominal rectangular dimensions 2 mm × 4 mm. Heaters positioned at the inlets and outlets of both channels permit the simulation of a variety of physically plausible boundary conditions. An iterative numerical method, based on one-dimensional energy balances in each channel with coupling through a heat transfer term, is presented and agrees well with the experimental results. As with tube-in-shell designs, parallel flow HeII heat exchangers may exhibit unusual temperature profiles.

  10. Heat flow, deep formation temperature and thermal structure of the Tarim Basin, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Feng, Changge; Li, Xianglan

    2016-04-01

    depth are the favorable conditions for hydrocarbon generation and preservation. As far as heat budget of the Tarim Basin is concerned, the radiogenic heat from the sedimentary cover accounts only for 20 percent of the surface heat flow (~9 mW/m2), while the mantle heat flow is estimated to be low as 6~15 mW/m2; this indicates the dominant contribution of crustal radiogenic heat to the observed heat flow. Any variations in surface heat flow for the Tarim Basin can be due only to changes in crustal heat production. Thermal contrast between the Tarim Basin and Tibet Plateau, represented by a difference in surface heat flow and deep crustal temperature, is remarkable. This inherited thermal contrast can be traced as far as before the India-Asia collision. Moreover, the lithosphere beneath the Tarim Basin is sufficiently strong to resist the gravitational potential energy difference and tectonic forces from Tibet. The observed thermal and rheological contrast accounts for the differential Cenozoic deformation in the Tarim Basin and adjacent areas.

  11. Heat flow distribution and thermal structure of the Philippine Sea Plate and its adjacent areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Chen, C.; Liang, Q.; Sun, S.

    2013-12-01

    Research on the present geothermal state is an important way to understand the lithospheric geodynamics. We studied the heat flow (HF) distribution and the geothermal structure of the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) and its adjacent area (100°E~155°E, 5°S~45°N) surrounded by the East China Sea, South China Sea and the West Pacific Ocean, which is aimed to provide thermal constraints for the dynamic mechanism and tectonic evolution of the PSP. Based on the observed seafloor HF data of the study area with the latest release of CRUST1.0 crustal layered model, the lithospheric geotherm was calculated using 1D steady-state heat conduction equation. However, the obtained numerous geotherms derived from the extrapolation through heat conduction equation strongly depended on the accuracy of the measured HF data, which is limited, unevenly distributed and easily affected by local factors. Therefore, as a meaningful comparison, the temperature distributions at 25 km and 50 km depth inferred from the upper mantle shear wave velocities structure (S2.9EA) are inverted. The HF distribution shows relatively high values in Ryuku Trench and nearby Izu-Boning Trench, where the crust thicken and the mantle uplift obviously as typical transition zones. The Mariana Trench located in the east (southeast) part and the Philippine Trench in the southwest both are with low HF, which is also illustrated in the upper mantle gravity map after temperature correction. The Central Basin Ridge is with unquestionable high HF, being perpendicular to which the value decreasing. The calculated temperature maps (at depth of 25 km and 50 km) by the two methods both present that the temperature in PSP is higher than that in the Western Pacific Ocean and the west Philippine Basin is lower than the east one, which consists well with the crust age. The west half parts both of the Philippine Basin and Parece Vela Basin show low temperature, but high value in Ryuku Trench, Nankai Through, Shikoku Basin, Amami

  12. 3D numerical modeling of mantle flow, crustal dynamics and magma genesis associated with slab roll-back and tearing: The eastern Mediterranean case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menant, Armel; Sternai, Pietro; Jolivet, Laurent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gerya, Taras

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between subduction dynamics and magma genesis have been intensely investigated, resulting in several conceptual models derived from geological, geochemical and geophysical data. To provide physico-chemical constraints on these conceptual models, self-consistent numerical simulations containing testable thermo-mechanical parameters are required, especially considering the three-dimensional (3D) natural complexity of subduction systems. Here, we use a 3D high-resolution petrological and thermo-mechanical numerical model to quantify the relative contribution of oceanic and continental subduction/collision, slab roll-back and tearing to magma genesis and transport processes. Our modeling results suggest that the space and time distribution and composition of magmas in the overriding plate is controlled by the 3D slab dynamics and related asthenospheric flow. Moreover, the decrease of the bulk lithospheric strength induced by mantle- and crust-derived magmas promotes the propagation of strike-slip and extensional fault zones through the overriding crust as response to slab roll-back and continental collision. Reduction of the lithosphere/asthenosphere rheological contrast by lithospheric weakening also favors the transmission of velocities from the flowing mantle to the crust. Similarities between our modeling results and the late Cenozoic tectonic and magmatic evolution across the eastern Mediterranean region suggest an efficient control of mantle flow on the magmatic activity in this region, which in turn promotes lithospheric deformation by mantle drag via melt-induced weakening effects.

  13. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  14. Upper- Mantle Driven Dynamic Uplift in Central Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Hakan Gogus, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    Based on geological and geophysical observations and interpretations of the present-day geodynamics, we propose that mantle structures beneath the crust drive a non-isostatic component of topography in Central Anatolia. Topography residuals for the region were calculated from the isostatic component of topography according to the principle of Airy isostasy while assuming crustal block is in hydrostatic equilibrium in the mantle. For the geodynamic interpretations we ran numerous 2D thermo-mechanical models based on different temperature inputs and viscous creep strength coefficients and using available P-wave tomography data along a N-S directional profile (33oE) through Central Anatolia as an estimate on the regional mantle structure. Our models are uniformly affected by widespread NE-SW oriented mantle flow obtained in the shear-wave azimuthal anisotropy studies and predict dynamic topography based on vertical components of density-driven flow in the upper mantle mainly induced by 2D temperature variations. The dynamic topography results indicate ~1 km instantaneous uplift in concordance with the under-compensated topography in the region. The data and modelling results define the region as a plateau-like uplift, slightly inflated in southern part based on dynamic topography patterns. The dynamic topography induced by upper-mantle flow provides robust new information about the main geodynamic components by showing broad consistency with independent data sets and observables for the area; such as, asthenospheric source of volcanism, gravity data, and high surface heat flow distributions.

  15. Continents, Super-Continents, Mantle Thermal Mixing, and Mantle Thermal Isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardic, A.; Jellinek, M.; O'Neill, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Moresi, L.; Lee, C.

    2010-12-01

    Super-continental insulation refers to an increase in the temperature of the mantle below a super-continent due to the heat transfer inefficiency of thick, stagnant continental lithosphere relative to thinner, subducting oceanic lithosphere. Recent studies have reached different conclusions as to the physical viability of this hypothesized effect with some groups arguing for a large heat up (100 degrees) and others arguing that any local heating is so small as to be insignificant. We start with the position that both groups are correct, in different limits, and use a combination of thermal network theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments to provide tighter physical insight into the thermal link between continents and the mantle. We isolate two end-member dynamic regimes. In the thermally well mixed regime the insulating effect of continental lithosphere can not cause a localized increase in mantle temperature due to the efficiency of lateral mixing in the mantle. In this regime the potential temperature of the entire mantle is higher than it would be without continents (the magnitude depending on the specific properties of continental and oceanic lithosphere). Thermal mixing can be short circuited if, for example, subduction zones surround a super-coninent or if the convective flow pattern of the mantle becomes spatially fixed relative to a stationary super-continent. This causes a transition to the thermal isolation regime: The potential temperature increases below a super-coninent while the potential temperature below oceanic domains drops such that the volume averaged temperature of the whole mantle remains constant. Transition out of this regime would thus involve the unleashing of a potentially large lateral temperature gradient that would enhance global convective motions. The connection to sub-oceanic domains provides a larger set of predictions that can be compared to the post pangea geologic record to help determine if a hypothesized super

  16. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  17. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  18. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage.

  19. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  20. Heat flow and geothermal studies in the state of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Kelley, S.A.

    1985-08-01

    Existing geothermal gradient and heat flow data for the state of Washington are summarized. In addition, information on mean-annual ground surface temperatures is included. The data consist of accurate, detailed temperature-depth measurements in selected available holes throughout the state of Washington made between 1979 and 1982. Measurements of thermal conductivity on selected rock samples from these drill holes and ancillary information required to assess the significance of the data and calculate heat flow values were obtained as well. Information is presented on the mean-annual ground-surface temperatures throughout the state of Washington. 32 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. A Numerical Method for Incompressible Flow with Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sa, Jong-Youb; Kwak, Dochan

    1997-01-01

    A numerical method for the convective heat transfer problem is developed for low speed flow at mild temperatures. A simplified energy equation is added to the incompressible Navier-Stokes formulation by using Boussinesq approximation to account for the buoyancy force. A pseudocompressibility method is used to solve the resulting set of equations for steady-state solutions in conjunction with an approximate factorization scheme. A Neumann-type pressure boundary condition is devised to account for the interaction between pressure and temperature terms, especially near a heated or cooled solid boundary. It is shown that the present method is capable of predicting the temperature field in an incompressible flow.

  2. Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. ||; Shehata, A.M.; Kunugi, Tomoaki |

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

  3. Convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs - Critical and moderate He II heat flux densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Plug flow rates of entropy, heat and normal fluid in phase separators and in zero net mass flow systems are, to some extent, quite similar. A simplified analysis of critical conditions is presented in agreement with data trends. A critical temperature gradient arises on the basis of the He II two-fluid model at the stability limit constraining the thermohydrodynamics of the system. Thus, the question of critical thermodynamic fluctuations associated with nucleation versus the possibility of critical gradients in externally imposed parameters is answered in favor of the latter route toward turbulence. Furthermore, a similarity equation is presented which incorporates size dependent rates for moderate heat flow densities observed in experiments.

  4. Thermal heat-balance mode flow-to-frequency converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, Eligiusz

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents new type of thermal flow converter with the pulse frequency output. The integrating properties of the temperature sensor have been used, which allowed for realization of pulse frequency modulator with thermal feedback loop, stabilizing temperature of sensor placed in the flowing medium. The system assures balancing of heat amount supplied in impulses to the sensor and heat given up by the sensor in a continuous way to the flowing medium. Therefore the frequency of output impulses is proportional to the heat transfer coefficient from sensor to environment. According to the King's law, the frequency of those impulses is a function of medium flow velocity around the sensor. The special feature of presented solution is total integration of thermal sensor with the measurement signal conditioning system. Sensor and conditioning system are not the separate elements of the measurement circuit, but constitute a whole in form of thermal heat-balance mode flow-to-frequency converter. The advantage of such system is easiness of converting the frequency signal to the digital form, without using any additional analogue-to-digital converters. The frequency signal from the converter may be directly connected to the microprocessor input, which with use of standard built-in counters may convert the frequency into numerical value of high precision. Moreover, the frequency signal has higher resistance to interference than the voltage signal and may be transmitted to remote locations without the information loss.

  5. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the condensation of water vapor in a short tube. A numerical model of condensation heat transfer was incorporated in a flow network code. The flow network code that we have used in this paper is Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a finite volume based flow network code. Four different condensation models were presented in the paper. Soliman's correlation has been found to be the most stable in low flow rates which is of particular interest in this application. Another highlight of this investigation is conjugate or coupled heat transfer between solid or fluid. This work was done in support of NASA's International Space Station program.

  6. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shaheen, Uzma; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2015-07-15

    Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  7. MHD Casson nanofluid flow past a wedge with Newtonian heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Kartini; Hanouf, Zahir; Ishak, Anuar

    2017-02-01

    The problem of steady Casson nanofluid flow past a wedge is studied in this paper. The presence of magnetic field along with Newtonian heating at the surface is considered. The governing partial differential equations are first transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations, before being solved numerically using the Keller-box method. The effects of the wedge angle Ω from 0° (horizontal plate) to 180° (vertical plate) as well as of as the magnetic parameter M on the non-Newtonian fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are investigated. It is found that the surface temperature is slightly higher for the flow over a horizontal plate compared to that over a vertical plate. It is also found that the magnetic field decreases the surface temperature but increases the skin friction. The flow of a Newtonian fluid is found to give higher skin friction as compared to that of Casson fluid.

  8. Heat flux measurement in a high enthalpy plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Jullien, Pierre; van Ootegem, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    It is a widely used approach to measure heat flux in harsh environments like high enthalpy plasma flows, fusion plasma and rocket motor combustion chambers based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite environment. This approach strongly depends on model parameters and geometrical aspects of the sensor design. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using an identified system as a direct model. The identification of the system is performed using calibration measurements with modern laser technique and advanced data handling. The results of the identified thermo-physical system show that a non-integer model appears most adapted to this particular problem. It is concluded that the new method improves the heat flux sensor significantly and furthermore extend its application to very short measurement times.

  9. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhigang

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  10. Enhanced Phase Synchronization of Blood Flow Oscillations between Heated and Adjacent Non-heated Sacral Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2012-01-01

    The study of skin microcirculation may be used to assess risk for pressure ulcers. It is observed that local heating not only causes an increase in blood flow of the heated skin but also in the adjacent non-heated skin. The underlying physiological mechanism of this indirect vasodilation of the non-heated skin remains unclear. We hypothesized that blood flow oscillations (BFO) in the adjacent non-heated skin area synchronize with BFO in the heated skin, thus inducing a vasodilatory response. We investigated BFO in the heated and adjacent non-heated skin (12.1±1.2 cm distance) on the sacrum in 12 healthy participants. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose blood flow signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and the IMFs with power spectra over the frequency range of 0.0095–0.02 Hz, 0.02–0.05 Hz, and 0.05–0.15 Hz were chosen as the characteristic components corresponding to metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic regulations, respectively. Then, the instantaneous phase of the characteristic components was calculated using the Hilbert transform. From the time series of phase difference between a pair of characteristic components, the epochs of phase synchronization were detected. The results showed that myogenic and neurogenic BFO exhibit self-phase synchronization during the slower vasodilation of the heated skin. In the non-heated skin, the degree of synchronization of BFO is associated with the changes in blood flow. PMID:22936012

  11. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  12. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  13. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  14. Three-dimensional numerical modeling of temperature and mantle flow fields associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea plate, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yingfeng; Yoshioka, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Takumi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated temperature and mantle flow distributions associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) plate beneath southwest Japan, by constructing a three-dimensional parallelepiped model incorporating a past clockwise rotation, the bathymetry of the Philippine Sea plate, and distribution of the subducting velocity within its slab. The geometry of the subducting plate was inferred from contemporary seismic studies and was used as a slab guide integrated with historical plate rotation into the 3-D simulation. Using the model, we estimated a realistic and high-resolution temperature field on the subduction plate interface, which was constrained by a large number of heat flow data, and attempted to clarify its relationship with occurrences of megathrust earthquakes, long-term slow slip events (L-SSEs), and nonvolcanic low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). Results showed that the oblique subduction coupled with the 3-D geometry of subducting PHS plate was a key factor affecting the interplate and intraplate temperature distributions, leading to a cold anomaly in the plate interface beneath western Shikoku, the Bungo Channel, and the Kii Peninsula. Temperatures in the slab core in these regions at a depth near the continental Moho were nearly 200°C lower than that in eastern Shikoku, indicating a high thermal lateral heterogeneity within the subducting plate. The geothermal control of the LFEs beneath western Shikoku was estimated to be within a range from 400 to 700°C, and the interplate temperature for the L-SSEs with a slip larger than 15 cm beneath the Bungo Channel was estimated to be approximately 350-500°C. A large horizontal temperature gradient of 2.5 ~ °C/km was present where the LFEs occurred repeatedly. The steep temperature change was likely to be related to the metamorphic phase transformation from lawsonite or blueschist to amphibolite of hydrous minerals of the mid-ocean ridge basalt of the subducting PHS plate.

  15. Heat-flow measurements at shot points along the 1978 Saudi Arabia seismic deep-refraction line; Part II, Discussion and interpretation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gettings, M.E.

    1982-01-01

    The heat-flow profile across the Arabian Shield from Ar Riyad to Ad Darb and across the Red Sea is examined for compatibility with the lithospheric structure of the area as deduced from geologic and other geophysical data. Broad continental uplift associated with Red Sea rifting is symmetric about the Red Sea axis, and geologic and geochronologic evidence indicate that uplift has occurred mainly in the interval 25-13 Ma (mega-annum) ago. Thermal-profile changes in the upper mantle resulting from an influx of hot material associated with rifting yield the correct order of magnitude of uplift, and this mechanism is suggested as the explanation for the regional doming. A lithospheric section, constructed from seismic refraction, gravity, and regional geologic data, provides the framework for construction of thermal models. Thermal gradient measurements were made in drill holes at five shot points. Geotherms for the Shield, which assume a radiogenic heat-source distribution that decreases exponentially with depth, yield temperatures of about 450?C at a depth of 40 km (base of the crust) for shot points 2 (Sabhah) and 3. The geotherm for shot point 4 (near Bishah) yields a distinctly higher temperature (about 580?C) for the same depth. Static models used to model the heat flow in the oceanic crust of the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain either yield too small a heat flow to match the observed heat flow or give lithosphere thicknesses that are so thin as to be improbable. Dynamic (solid-state accretion) models, which account for mantle flow at the base of the lithosphere, adequately match the observed heat-flow values. In the deep-water trough of the Red Sea, which is presently undergoing active sea-floor spreading, classical models of heat flow for a moving slab with accretion at the spreading center are adequate to explain the average heat-flow level. At shot point 5 (Ad Darb), the anomalous heat flow of 2 HFU (heat-flow units) can be explained in terms of a Shield

  16. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  17. Generation of ascending flows in the Big Mantle Wedge (BMW) beneath northeast Asia induced by retreat and stagnation of subducted slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Nishioka, Ryoko

    2012-05-01

    We conducted two-dimensional numerical experiments of mantle convection with imposed kinematic motions of cold slabs, in order to study the mechanism for the generation of ascending flows in the “Big Mantle Wedge” (BMW), which has been recently proposed in order to relate the stagnant Pacific slab with the intraplate volcanism in northeast Asia. Our calculations demonstrated that the BMW is expanded oceanward in response to the retreating motion of trench and slab, which strongly affects the flows in the region. In particular, the subducting and retreating motion of slab induces a local but strong circulation near the oceanward end (or a hinge) of the stagnant slab in the BMW. Our findings suggest that ascending flows in the BMW can be triggered most easily near the hinge of the stagnant slab, which is in good agreement with the occurrence of several active intraplate volcanoes above the stagnant Pacific slab.

  18. Metal-silicate partitioning of U: Implications for the heat budget of the core and evidence for reduced U in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidester, Bethany A.; Rahman, Zia; Righter, Kevin; Campbell, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    Earth's core might require an internal heat source, such as radioactive decay, to explain the presence of the magnetic field through geologic time. To investigate whether U would be an important heat source in the core, we performed metal-silicate partitioning experiments of U at P-T (up to 67 GPa and 5400 K) conditions more relevant to a magma ocean scenario than has previously been reported. This study finds the partitioning of U to be strongly dependent on ƒO2, temperature, the S content of the metal and the SiO2 content of the silicate during core-mantle differentiation. Differentiation at mean conditions of 42-58 GPa and 3900-4200 K would put 1.4-3.5 ppb U (2-8 wt% S) in the core, amounting to a maximum of 1.4 (+1/-0.7) TW of heat 4.5 billion years ago. This is likely not enough heat to mitigate early widespread mantle melting. It was also found that U likely exists in the 2+ oxidation state in silicate melts in the deep Earth, a state which has not been previously observed in nature.

  19. Heat transfer in thin, compact heat exchangers with circular, rectangular, or pin-fin flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop have been measured of three thin, compact heat exchangers in helium gas at 3.5 MPa and higher, with Reynolds numbers of 450 to 36,000. The flow geometries for the three heat exchanger specimens were: circular tube, rectangular channel, and staggered pin fin with tapered pins. The specimens were heated radiatively at heat fluxes up to 77 W/sq cm. Correlations were developed for the isothermal friction factor as a function of Reynolds number, and for the Nusselt number as a function of Reynolds number and the ratio of wall temperature to fluid temperature. The specimen with the pin fin internal geometry had significantly better heat transfer than the other specimens, but it also had higher pressure drop. For certain conditions of helium flow and heating, the temperature more than doubled from the inlet to the outlet of the specimens, producing large changes in gas velocity, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. These changes in properties did not affect the correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number in turbulent flow.

  20. Azimuthal Stress and Heat Flux In Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ebru

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) have low radiative efficiencies and/or low accretion rates. The accreting gas may retain most of its binding energy in the form of heat. This lost energy for hot RIAFs is one of the problems heavily worked on in the literature. RIAF observations on the accretion to super massive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy) have shown that the observational data are not consistent with either advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or Bondi models. For this reason, it is very important to theoretically comprehend the physical properties of RIAFs derived from observations with a new disk/flow model. One of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). Dispersion relation is derived by using MHD equations containing heat flux term based on viscosity in the energy equation. Numerical solutions of the disk equations are done and the growth rates of the instability are calculated. This additional heat flux plays an important role in dissipation of energy. The rates of the angular momentum and heat flux which are obtained from numerical calculations of the turbulence brought about by the GVMRI are also discussed.

  1. Single phase channel flow forced convection heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, J.P.

    1999-04-01

    A review of the current knowledge of single phase forced convection channel flow of liquids (Pr > 5) is presented. Two basic channel geometries are considered, the circular tube and the rectangular duct. Both laminar flow and turbulent flow are covered. The review begins with a brief overview of the heat transfer behavior of Newtonian fluids followed by a more detailed presentation of the behavior of purely viscous and viscoelastic Non-Newtonian fluids. Recent developments dealing with aqueous solutions of high molecular weight polymers and aqueous solutions of surfactants are discussed. The review concludes by citing a number of challenging research opportunities.

  2. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  3. Numerical methods and calculations for droplet flow, heating and ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, H. A.; Sanders, B. R.; Dandy, D.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method was devised and employed to solve a variety of problems related to liquid droplet combustion. The basic transport equations of mass, momentum and energy were formulated in terms of generalized nonorthogonal coordinates, which allows for adaptive griding and arbitrary particle shape. Example problems are solved for internal droplet heating, droplet ignition and high Reynolds number flow over a droplet.

  4. Terrestrial heat flow and its role in petroleum geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, E. N.; Ivanov, I. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Abramova, R. N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an overview of mineral resources exploration survey by geothermal method based on the studies of terrestrial heat flow, anomalies varying in strike, in depth, physical behavior and in time. Applying geothermometry in oil-gas deposit exploration, based on paleotemperature modeling of sedimentation sequences was illustrated.

  5. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical constraints on heat flux across the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, A. M.; Moucha, R.; Simmons, N. A.; Grand, S. P.

    2009-05-01

    The dynamics and thermal evolution of the Earth's interior is strongly dependent on the relative contributions from internal heating in the mantle (due to radioactivity and secular cooling) and from bottom heating across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). The dynamical style of the thermal convective flow, in particular the relative importance of active, thermally buoyant upwellings and mantle cooling due to descending lithospheric plates is also strongly dependent on the amplitude of heat flux across the CMB. We are able to provide new constraints on the convectively maintained heat flux across the CMB thanks to recent progress in mapping the lateral variations in mantle temperature by jointly inverting global seismic and geodynamic data sets, in which mineral physical constraints on mantle thermal heterogeneity are also imposed (Simmons et al. 2009). We present here new models of the present-day global mantle convective flow predicted on the basis of the thermal and non-thermal (compositional) density perturbations derived from the new tomography model and using the inferences of depth-dependent, horizontally averaged mantle viscosity derived from joint inversions of glacial isostatic adjustment and mantle convection data (Forte and Mitrovica 2004). We employ this tomography- geodynamics based mantle convection model to explore the convective transport of mass (buoyancy flux) and heat (advected heat flux) across the lower and upper mantle. We show that the predictions of advected heat flux at the top of the seismic D" layer provide direct constraints on the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Our current best estimates of the present-day CMB heat flux are in excess of 10 TW. We present a sensitivity analysis showing the degree of robustness of this inference, depending on the inferred variation of mantle viscosity in the lower mantle. We also present new predictions of the present-day distribution of secular heating and cooling at different depths in

  6. Metal cooldown, flow instability, and heat transfer in two-phase hydrogen flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Miller, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Studies of the properties of five metals with varying tube-wall thickness, with or without and internal coating of trifluorochloroethylene polymer, show that wall characteristics influence flow stability, affect heat transfer coefficients, and influence the transition point from dry- to wet-wall flow.

  7. Thermo-chemical constraints on the interior structure and composition of the lunar mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuskov, Oleg L.; Kronrod, Victor A.; Kronrod, Ekaterina V.

    2014-10-01

    Based on a self-consistent thermodynamic-geophysical approach, we convert the recent seismic models of the lunar mantle to the temperature-depth profiles using Gibbs free energy minimization and petrological constraints in the Na2O-TiO2-CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system. Our calculations are unable to explain the reasonable distribution of temperature for a single homogeneous composition throughout the entire lunar mantle with concentrations of CaO and Al2O3 in the range of 2-6.5%, and FeO content between 8.5% and 13%. The results lend support to the chemically stratified lunar mantle with a change in composition from predominantly pyroxenite upper mantle depleted in Ca and Al to predominantly fertile lower mantle enriched in Ca and Al with larger amounts of garnet. Such a zoned structure places significant constraints on any theory of lunar origin. Unlike the Earth’s mantle, compositional effects play a dominant role in determining the lunar mantle temperatures of the same observational model. Seismically derived temperatures allow us to constrain thermal structure of the lunar mantle and estimate the upper mantle heat flow (3.8-4.7 mW m-2), which is not consistent with that found from the Apollo heat flow and thorium abundance measurements. Lower mantle temperatures are well below the probable solidus condition and can be evaluated at the level of 1420-1550 °C at the core-mantle boundary without requiring a melt layer. We find that regardless of the composition, the positive S-wave velocity gradient in the lunar mantle leads to a negative temperature gradient, which has no physical basis. The resulting temperature profiles provide an effective independent tool that allows us to discriminate between the available seismic and petrological models.

  8. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  9. Convection flows driven by laser heating of a liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, David; Selva, Bertrand; Chraibi, Hamza; Delabre, Ulysse; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    When a fluid is heated by the absorption of a continuous laser wave, the fluid density decreases in the heated area. This induces a pressure gradient that generates internal motion of the fluid. Due to mass conservation, convection eddies emerge in the sample. To investigate these laser-driven bulk flows at the microscopic scale, we built a setup to perform temperature measurements with a fluorescent-sensitive dye on the one hand, and measured the flow pattern at different beam powers, using a particle image velocimetry technique on the other hand. Temperature measurements were also used in numerical simulations in order to compare predictions to the experimental velocity profiles. The combination of our numerical and experimental approaches allows a detailed description of the convection flows induced by the absorption of light, which reveals a transition between a thin and a thick liquid layer regime. This supports the basis of optothermal approaches for microfluidic applications.

  10. Fluid flow and heat transfer in an air-to-water double-pipe heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical investigations on flow and heat transfer in an air-to-water double-pipe heat exchanger. The working fluids are air and water. To achieve fully developed conditions, the heat exchanger was built with additional lengths before and after the test section. The inner and outer tube was made from copper and Plexiglas, respectively. The experiments are conducted in the range of air flow Reynolds number for various cases with different water flow rate and water inlet temperature. Correlations for the Nusselt number and friction factor are presented according to experimental data. Also the commercial code ANSYS 15 is used for numerical simulation. Results show that the Nusselt number is an increasing function of Reynolds number and Prandtl number which are calculated at bulk temperature.

  11. Io: Volcanic thermal sources and global heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Williams, David A.; Radebaugh, Jani

    2012-06-01

    We have examined thermal emission from 240 active or recently-active volcanic features on Io and quantified the magnitude and distribution of their volcanic heat flow during the Galileo epoch. We use spacecraft data and a geological map of Io to derive an estimate of the maximum possible contribution from small dark areas not detected as thermally active but which nevertheless appear to be sites of recent volcanic activity. We utilize a trend analysis to extrapolate from the smallest detectable volcanic heat sources to these smallest mapped dark areas. Including the additional heat from estimates for "outburst" eruptions and for a multitude of very small ("myriad") hot spots, we account for ˜62 × 1012 W (˜59 ± 7% of Io's total thermal emission). Loki Patera contributes, on average, 9.6 × 1012 W (˜9.1 ± 1%). All dark paterae contribute 45.3 × 1012 W (˜43 ± 5%). Although dark flow fields cover a much larger area than dark paterae, they contribute only 5.6 × 1012 W (˜5.3 ± 0.6%). Bright paterae contribute ˜2.6 × 1012 W (˜2.5 ± 0.3%). Outburst eruption phases and very small hot spots contribute no more than ˜4% of Io's total thermal emission: this is probably a maximum value. About 50% of Io's volcanic heat flow emanates from only 1.2% of Io's surface. Of Io's heat flow, 41 ± 7.0% remains unaccounted for in terms of identified sources. Globally, volcanic heat flow is not uniformly distributed. Power output per unit surface area is slightly biased towards mid-latitudes, although there is a stronger bias toward the northern hemisphere when Loki Patera is included. There is a slight favoring of the northern hemisphere for outbursts where locations were well constrained. Globally, we find peaks in thermal emission at ˜315°W and ˜105°W (using 30° bins). There is a minimum in thermal emission at around 200°W (almost at the anti-jovian longitude) which is a significant regional difference. These peaks and troughs suggest a shift to the east from

  12. An engineering aerodynamic heating method for hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  13. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  14. Hiemenz flow and heat transfer of a third grade fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Bikash

    2009-03-01

    The laminar flow and heat transfer of an incompressible, third grade, electrically conducting fluid impinging normal to a plane in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The heat transfer analysis has been carried out for two heating processes, namely, (i) with prescribed surface temperature (PST-case) and (ii) prescribed surface heat flux (PHF-case). By means of the similarity transformation, the governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations and are solved by a second-order numerical technique. Effects of various non-Newtonian fluid parameters, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number on the velocity and temperature fields have been investigated in detail and shown graphically. It is found that the velocity gradient at the wall decreases as the third grade fluid parameter increases.

  15. Birch's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Francis Birch's 1952 paper started the sciences of mineral physics and physics of the Earth's interior. Birch stressed the importance of pressure, compressive strain and volume in mantle physics. Although this may seem to be an obvious lesson many modern paradoxes in the internal constitution of the Earth and mantle dynamics can be traced to a lack of appreciation for the role of compression. The effect of pressure on thermal properties such as expansivity can gravitational stratify the Earth irreversibly during accretion and can keep it chemically stratified. The widespread use of the Boussinesq approximation in mantle geodynamics is the antithesis of Birchian physics. Birch pointed out that eclogite was likely to be an important component of the upper mantle. Plate tectonic recycling and the bouyancy of oceanic crust at midmantle depths gives credence to this suggestion. Although peridotite dominates the upper mantle, variations in eclogite-content may be responsible for melting- or fertility-spots. Birch called attention to the Repetti Discontinuity near 900 km depth as an important geodynamic boundary. This may be the chemical interface between the upper and lower mantles. Recent work in geodynamics and seismology has confirmed the importance of this region of the mantle as a possible barrier. Birch regarded the transition region (TR ; 400 to 1000 km ) as the key to many problems in Earth sciences. The TR contains two major discontinuities ( near 410 and 650 km ) and their depths are a good mantle thermometer which is now being exploited to suggest that much of plate tectonics is confined to the upper mantle ( in Birch's terminology, the mantle above 1000 km depth ). The lower mantle is homogeneous and different from the upper mantle. Density and seismic velocity are very insensitive to temperature there, consistent with tomography. A final key to the operation of the mantle is Birch's suggestion that radioactivities were stripped out of the deeper parts of

  16. Two-dimensional vapor flow analysis in heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Prenger, F.C.; Busse, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code AGATHE is intended to evaluate axially symmetric heat pipes with compressible vapor flow at Mach numbers up to 1 and at all radial Reynolds numbers. The code can be used to evaluate empirical factors describing turbulence. Furthermore, heat input and output are modeled by describing liquid heat transfer loops. This method leads to nonuniform heating and cooling rates typical of actual heat pipes. Presently the code is adapted to evaluate heat pipes in tubular geometry composed of a series of heat transfer and adiabatic zones of cylindrical or conical shape. In this analysis the two-dimensional mathematical problem was reduced to a number of ordinary differential equations, which are integrated by a Runge-Kutta scheme. The reduction was achieved, first, by starting from the Navier-Stokes equation using the boundary layer approximation; this approximation introduces the main limitation of the code, restricting its use to the calculation of vapor ducts with large length-to-diameter ratios. Second, the velocity profile was simulated by a power series. The n coefficients of this series were determined such that at each axial position the radial pressure gradient was approximately zero, as specified by the boundary layer approximation.

  17. Heat flow and continental breakup: The Gulf of Elat (Aqaba)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Vonherzen, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow measurements were made in the major basins of the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), northern Red Sea. The gulf is located at the southern portion of the Dead Sea rift which is a transform plate boundary. Gradient measurements at each site were made with a probe which allows multiple penetration of the bottom during a single deployment of the instrument. Thermal conductivity was determined by needle probe measurements on sedimentary cores. The mean heat flux, about 80 mWm(-2), is significantly above the continental mean, and probably also above that from the adjacent Sinai and Arabian continental blocks. The heat flow appears to increase from north to south. Such an increase may be related to the more advanced rifting stage of the Red Sea immediately to the south, which presently includes creation of an oceanic crust. This trend also corresponds to the general trend of the deep crustal structure in the gulf. Evidence from various geophysical fields suggest a gradual thinning of the crust towards the direction of the Red Sea where a normal oceanic crust exists. The heat flow data, together with other geophysical data, indicate a propagation of mature rifting activity from the Red Sea into the Gulf of Elat. This process is acting simultaneously with the transform motion along the Dead Sea rift.

  18. Flow Visualization and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid Jet Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafar, Farial A.; Thorpe, Graham R.; Turan, Özden F.

    2012-07-01

    Equipment used to cool horticultural produce often involves three-phase porous media. The flow field and heat transfer processes that occur in such equipment are generally quantified by means of empirical relationships amongst dimensionless groups. This work represents a first step towards the goal of harnessing the power of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to better understand the heat transfer processes that occur in beds of irrigated horticultural produce. The primary objective of the present study is to use numerical predictions towards reducing the energy and cooling water requirement in cooling horticultural produce. In this paper, flow and heat transfer predictions are presented of a single slot liquid jet impinging on flat and curved surfaces using a CFD code (FLUENT) for 2D configurations. The effects of Reynolds number, nozzle to plate spacing, nozzle width, and target surface configuration have been studied. Reynolds numbers of 250, 375, 500, 700, 1000, 1500, 1800, and 1900 are studied where the liquid medium is water. Here, the Reynolds number is defined in terms of the hydraulic nozzle diameter, inlet jet velocity, and fluid kinematic viscosity. The results show that Reynolds numbers, nozzle to plate spacing, and nozzle width have a significant effect on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics, whereas the target surface configuration at the stagnation area has no substantial impact. The use of a numerical tool has resulted in a detailed investigation of these characteristics, which has not been available in the literature previously.

  19. Zoned mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Albarède, Francis; Van Der Hilst, Rob D

    2002-11-15

    We review the present state of our understanding of mantle convection with respect to geochemical and geophysical evidence and we suggest a model for mantle convection and its evolution over the Earth's history that can reconcile this evidence. Whole-mantle convection, even with material segregated within the D" region just above the core-mantle boundary, is incompatible with the budget of argon and helium and with the inventory of heat sources required by the thermal evolution of the Earth. We show that the deep-mantle composition in lithophilic incompatible elements is inconsistent with the storage of old plates of ordinary oceanic lithosphere, i.e. with the concept of a plate graveyard. Isotopic inventories indicate that the deep-mantle composition is not correctly accounted for by continental debris, primitive material or subducted slabs containing normal oceanic crust. Seismological observations have begun to hint at compositional heterogeneity in the bottom 1000 km or so of the mantle, but there is no compelling evidence in support of an interface between deep and shallow mantle at mid-depth. We suggest that in a system of thermochemical convection, lithospheric plates subduct to a depth that depends - in a complicated fashion - on their composition and thermal structure. The thermal structure of the sinking plates is primarily determined by the direction and rate of convergence, the age of the lithosphere at the trench, the sinking rate and the variation of these parameters over time (i.e. plate-tectonic history) and is not the same for all subduction systems. The sinking rate in the mantle is determined by a combination of thermal (negative) and compositional buoyancy and as regards the latter we consider in particular the effect of the loading of plates with basaltic plateaux produced by plume heads. Barren oceanic plates are relatively buoyant and may be recycled preferentially in the shallow mantle. Oceanic plateau-laden plates have a more pronounced

  20. A high performance cocurrent-flow heat pipe for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    By the introduction of a plate-and-tube separator assembly into a heat pipe vapor core, it has been demonstrated that axial transport capacity in reflux mode can be improved by up to a factor of 10. This improvement is largely the result of eliminating the countercurrent shear that commonly limits reflux heat pipe axial capacity. With benzene, axial heat fluxes up to 1800 W/sq cm were obtained in the temperature range 40 to 80 C, while heat flux densities up to 3000 W/sq cm were obtained with R-11 over the temperature range 40 to 80 C. These very high axial capacities compare favorably with liquid metal limits; the sonic limit for liquid sodium, for example, is 3000 W/sq cm at 657 C. Computational models developed for these cocurrent flow heat pipes agreed with experimental data within + or - 25%.

  1. Heat Transfer Over the Circumference of a Heated Cylinder in Transverse Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Ernst; Wenner, Karl

    1943-01-01

    A method for recording the local heat-transfer coefficients on bodies in flow was developed. The cylinder surface was kept at constant temperature by the condensation of vapor except for a narrow strip which is heated separately to the same temperature by electricity. The heat-transfer coefficient at each point was determined from the electric heat output and the temperature increase. The distribution of the heat transfer along the circumference of cylinders was recorded over a range of Reynolds numbers of from 5000 to 426,000. The pressure distribution was measured at the same time. At Reynolds numbers up to around 100,000 high maximums of the heat transfer occurred in the forward stagnation point at and on the rear side at 180C, while at around 80 the heat-transfer coefficient on both sides of the cylinder behind the forward stagnation point manifested distinct minimums. Two other maximums occurred at around 115 C behind the forward stagnation point between 170,000 and 426,000. At 426,000 the heat transfer at the location of those maximums was almost twice as great as in the forward stagnation point, and the rear half of the cylinder diffused about 60 percent of the entire heat, The tests are compared with the results of other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  2. On the self-heating phenomenon in nonmodal shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.W.; Chen, Y.; Li, Z.Y.

    2006-04-15

    In this article, the nonmodal self-heating phenomenon of linear shear flow [A. D. Rogava, Astrophys. Space Sci. 293, 189 (2004)] is investigated with an initially excited Alfvenic perturbation focusing on the factors determining the efficiency of the heating process. It is found that to get an efficient self-heating process, the initial Alfven wave must be at least partially transformed into the fast mode. This is because only the fast mode, among the three types of magnetohydrodynamic modes, can get amplified significantly by the shear flow. This requires the initial wave number along the shear to be positive so that the Spatial Fourier Harmonics can pass through the degeneration region, and also puts constraints on the plasma parameter {beta} [{beta}=C{sub S}{sup 2}/V{sub A}{sup 2}, where C{sub S} (V{sub A}) is the sound (Alfvenic) velocity]. It is shown that the self-heating function, which represents the total energy dissipated at a certain time, decreases monotonically with increasing {beta}. In addition, to get efficient heating the viscous coefficient should be in an appropriate range. A smaller viscosity results in an insufficient thermalization of the perturbation energy, while a larger one corresponds to a suppressed nonmodal amplification.

  3. Gravity-driven flow over heated, porous, wavy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, K. A.; D'Alessio, S. J. D.; Pascal, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    The method of weighted residuals for thin film flow down an inclined plane is extended to include the effects of bottom waviness, heating, and permeability in this study. A bottom slip condition is used to account for permeability and a constant temperature bottom boundary condition is applied. A weighted residual model (WRM) is derived and used to predict the combined effects of bottom waviness, heating, and permeability on the stability of the flow. In the absence of bottom topography, the results are compared to theoretical predictions from the corresponding Benney equation and also to existing Orr-Sommerfeld predictions. The excellent agreement found indicates that the model does faithfully predict the theoretical critical Reynolds number, which accounts for heating and permeability, and these effects are found to destabilize the flow. Floquet theory is used to investigate how bottom waviness influences the stability of the flow. Finally, numerical simulations of the model equations are also conducted and compared with numerical solutions of the full Navier-Stokes equations for the case with bottom permeability. These results are also found to agree well, which suggests that the WRM remains valid even when permeability is included.

  4. Predicting Turbulent Convective Heat Transfer in Fully Developed Duct Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokni, Masoud; Gatski, Thomas B.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of an explicit algebraic stress model (EASM) is assessed in predicting the turbulent flow and forced heat transfer in both straight and wavy ducts, with rectangular, trapezoidal and triangular cross-sections, under fully developed conditions. A comparison of secondary flow patterns. including velocity vectors and velocity and temperature contours, are shown in order to study the effect of waviness on flow dynamics, and comparisons between the hydraulic parameters. Fanning friction factor and Nusselt number, are also presented. In all cases. isothermal conditions are imposed on the duct walls, and the turbulent heat fluxes are modeled using gradient-diffusion type models. The formulation is valid for Reynolds numbers up to 10(exp 5) and this minimizes the need for wall functions that have been used with mixed success in previous studies of complex duct flows. In addition, the present formulation imposes minimal demand on the number of grid points without any convergence or stability problems. Criteria in terms of heat transfer and friction factor needed to choose the optimal wavy duct cross-section for industrial applications among the ones considered are discussed.

  5. Local heat transfer for subcooled flow boiling with water

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.D.; Meng, X. )

    1992-12-01

    In this paper, local heat transfer coefficients are predicted for turbulent water subcooled flow boiling through uniformly heated circular tubes. Correlations by Petukhov and by Shah are modified slightly. however, the correlation suggested by Kandlikar is improved significantly by requiring that it approach more accurate limits near the onset of fully developed boiling and the onset of nucleate boiling for subcooled flow. Excellent agreement is obtained with data corresponding to conditions of high inlet subcooling (183[degrees]C), high mass velocity (4.4 to 31.5 Mg/m[sup 2][center dot]s), and a large ratio of the axial coordinate to the diameter (95.5). The exit subcooling varies from 53.0 to 81.5[degrees]C. For smaller ratios ([lt]50.0), the accuracy decreases. In all cases, the local film temperature is the characteristic temperature. When the associated critical heat flux (CHF) data are examined in a Stanton number-Peclet number space, St [lt] 0.0065 and Pe [gt] 10[sup 5] in all cases. Comparisons with the Saha-Zuber criterion for bubble detachment show that moderately subcooled and high-velocity flows re characterized by a multiboundary layer phenomenon that includes an attached bubble layer. These results show that the bubble layer's existence can now be documented for a wide variety of fluids and conditions without flow visualizations.

  6. Measuring Heat Flow on the Moon and Mars- The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP-cubed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, T.; Grott, M.; Ho, T.; van Zoest, T.; Kargl, G.; Smrekar, S. E.; Hudson, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    With only two successful heat flow measurements performed on the surface of the Moon to date, the thermal state of the Moon remains poorly constrained. Furthermore, measurements were taken close to the boundary of the Procellarum KREEP terraine, and the obtained values may not be representative for the bulk of the planet. For Mars, no heat flow measurement is yet available. Here we will present the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP-cubed a self-penetrating, robotic heat flow probe. The instrument consists of electrical and temperature sensors that will be emplaced into the lunar subsurface by means of an electro-mechanical hammering mechanism. The instruement is foreseen to penetrate 3-5 m into the planet’s soil and will perform depth resolved measurements, from which the surface planetary heat flow can be directly deduced. The instrument has been pre-developed in two ESA funded precursor studies and has been further developed in the framework of ESA’s ExoMars mission. The current readiness level of the instrument is TRL 5.62 (ESA PDR Apr. 2009) which has been achieved with several Breadboards developed and tested between 2004 and 2009. As no drilling is required to achieve soil penetration, HP-cubed is a relatively lightweight heat flow probe, weighting less than 1800 g. It has been further studied as parts of the discovery proposals Lunette and GEMS and for the proposed Japanese lunar mission SELENE 2 The instrument consists of an electro-mechanic mole, a pay-load compartment, and a tether equipped with temperature sensors. The latter can be actively heated for thermal conductivity measurements. A tiltmeter and acceleraometer will help to track the path of the mole. The payload compartment has room for sensors such as a permittivity probe, a bore-hole camera, and/or a masspectrometer. Following deployment of the instrument, instrument operations will be split into two phases: During the penetration phase soil intrusion is achieved by means of the

  7. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  8. New and classical applications of heat flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C.

    2005-12-01

    This special issue of Journal of Geophysics and Engineering is dedicated to a collection of papers which resulted from an international workshop held in Aachen, Germany, on 4-7 October 2004, called 'New and Classical Applications of Heat Flow Studies'. This was the third in a series of topical geothermal workshops arranged by the Geothermal Working Group of the German Geophysical Society (DGG) and was organized by the Institute of Applied Geophysics at RWTH Aachen University under the auspices of the International Heat Flow Commission of the International Association of Seismology and Physics (IASPEI). The meeting was attended by some 60 scientists from 14 countries and three continents. Financial assistance, granted by DGG and IASPEI, allowed us to provide partial support for a total of eight students, young scientists and eminent researchers from eastern Europe and overseas. The convenors of the meeting were Christoph Clauser (Aachen), Thomas Kohl (Zürich) and Makoto Taniguchi (Kyoto). The main local organizers were Volker Rath (scientific programme) and Ute Kreutz (accommodation and financial affairs). The topics addressed in more than 50 oral and poster presentations indicated that today intriguing new applications of heat flow studies have emerged, complementing the classical topics of heat flow mapping and the tectonic implications of heat flow. In classical applications, for instance, thermal signatures of water flow or downward diffusion of variations in the Earth's mean temperature are considered as noise which needs to be corrected prior to further use of the data. In contrast, in several new applications it is exactly the information contained in these signatures which has been extracted and interpreted. For instance, over the past two decades, work on the most prominent of these new applications has been devoted to inverting the variation of the Earth's past mean ground surface temperature (GST). As of today, GST provided by the geothermal method has

  9. An approximate substitution principle for viscous heat conducting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greitzer, E. M.; Paterson, R. W.; Tan, C. S.

    1985-09-01

    A new, approximate substitution principle is presented for a class of steady flows in which both heat transfer and momentum interchange by viscous stresses are significant. The principle, which has important implications for the design and scaling of mixing experiments, can be regarded as an extension of the Munk and Prim substitution principle (for steady isentropic flows) to nonisentropic flows (Munk and Prim, 1947). The concepts that are developed explain the scaling and distribution of various fluid dynamic properties observed in several different types of flow mixing experiments. Calculations are done to indicate the expected regimes of applicability of the approximate principle and comparison with experiment is made to show its utility in practical situations.

  10. Bubbly flow velocity measurements near a heated cylindrical conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.; Hassan, Y.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply recent advances and improvements in the digital pulsed laser velocimetry (DPLV) technique to the analysis of two-phase bubbly flow about a cylindrical conductor emitting a constant heat flux within a transparent rectangular enclosure. Pulsed laser velocimetry is a rapidly advancing fluid flow visualization technique that determines full-field instantaneous velocity vectors of a quantitative nature such that the flow field remains undisturbed by the measurement. The DPLV method offers several significant advantages over more traditional fluid velocity measurement techniques such as hot wire/film anemometry and laser Doppler anemometry because reliable instantaneous velocity data may be acquired over substantial flow areas in a single experiment.

  11. Mantle metasomatism

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, M.; Hawkesworth, C.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of metasomatism and its role in the geochemical enrichment and depletion processes in upper mantle rocks remains contentious. This volume makes a comprehensive contribution to the study of metasomatic and enrichment processes: origin and importance in determining trace element and isotopic heterogeneity in the lithospheric mantle. It begins with a theoretical thermodynamic and experimental justification for metasomatism and proceeds to present evidence for this process from the study of mantle xenoliths. Finally the importance of metasomatism in relation to basaltic volcanism is assessed. The contents are as follows: Dynamics of Translithospheric Migration of Metasomatic Fluid and Alkaline Magma. Solubility of Major and Trace Elements in Mantle Metasomatic Fluids: Experimental Constraints. Mineralogic and Geochemical Evidence for Differing Styles of Metasomatism in Spinel Lherzolite Xenoliths: Enriched Mantle Source Regions of Basalts. Characterization of Mantle Metasomatic Fluids in Spinel Lherzolites and Alkali Clinophyroyxenites from the West Eifel and South-West Uganda. Metasomatised Harzburgites in Kimberlite and Alkaline Magmas: Enriched Resites and ''Flushed'' Lherzolites. Metasomatic and Enrichment Phenomena in Garnet-Peridotite Facies Mantle Xenoliths from the Matsoku Kimberlite Pipe Lesotho. Evidence for Mantle Metasomatism in Periodite Nodules from the Kimberley Pipes South Africa. Metasomatic and Enrichment Processes in Lithospheric Peridotites, an Effective of Asthenosphere-Lithosphere Interaction. Isotope Variations in Recent Volcanics: A Trace Element Perspective. Source Regions of Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts: Evidence for Enrichment Processes. The Mantle Source for the Hawaiian Islands: Constraints from the Lavas and Ultramafic Inclusions.

  12. Toroidal, Counter-Toroidal, and Upwelling Flow in the Mantle Wedge of the Rivera and Cocos Plates: Implications for IOB Geochemistry in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Florian; Vásquez-Serrano, Alberto; Tolson, Gustavo; Negrete-Aranda, Raquel; Contreras, Juan

    2016-10-01

    We carried out analog laboratory modeling at a scale 1:4,000,000 and computer rendering of the flow patterns in a simulated western Middle American subduction zone. The scaled model consists of a transparent tank filled with corn syrup and housing two conveyor belts made of polyethylene strips. One of the strips dips 60° and moves at a velocity of 30 mm/min simulating the Rivera plate. The other one dips 45°, moves at 90 mm/min simulating the subduction of the Cocos plate. Our scaled subduction zone also includes a gap between the simulated slabs analogous to a tear recently observed in shear wave tomography studies. An acrylic plate 3 mm thick floats on the syrup in grazing contact with the polyethylene strips and simulates the overriding North America plate. Our experiments reveal a deep toroidal flow of asthenospheric mantle through the Cocos-Rivera separation. The flow is driven by a pressure gradient associated with the down-dip differential-motion of the slabs. Similarly, low pressure generated by the fast-moving Cocos plate creates a shallow counter-toroidal flow in the uppermost 100 km of the mantle wedge. The flow draws mantle beneath the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the Jalisco block, then plunges into the deep mantle by the descending poloidal cell of the Cocos slab. Moreover, our model suggests a hydraulic jump causes an ~250 km asthenosphere upwelling around the area where intra-arc extensional systems converge in western Mexico. The upwelling eventually merges with the shallow counter-toroidal flow describing a motion in 3D space similar to an Archimedes' screw. Our results indicate the differential motion between subducting slabs drives mixing in the mantle wedge of the Rivera plate and allows the slab to steepen and retreat. Model results are in good agreement with seismic anisotropy studies and the geochemistry of lavas erupted in the Jalisco block. The model can explain the eruption of OIB lavas in the vicinity of the City of

  13. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Slush Nitrogen in Turbulent Pipe Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, K.; Ishimoto, J.; Nozawa, M.; Kura, T.; Takahashi, N.

    2008-03-01

    Slush fluids, such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen, are two-phase (solid-liquid) single-component cryogenic fluids containing solid particles in a liquid, and consequently their density and refrigerant capacity are greater than for liquid state fluid alone. This paper reports on the experimental results of the forced convection heat transfer characteristics of slush nitrogen flowing in a pipe. Heat was supplied to slush nitrogen by a heater wound around the copper pipe wall. The local heat transfer coefficient was measured in conjunction with changes in the velocity and the solid fraction. The differences in heat transfer characteristics between two-phase slush and single phase liquid nitrogen were obtained, and the decrease in heat transfer to slush nitrogen caused by the previously observed pressure drop reduction was confirmed by this study. Furthermore, for the purpose of establishing the thermal design criteria for slush nitrogen in the case of pressure drop reduction, the heat transfer correlation between the experimental results and the Sieder-Tate Equation was obtained.

  14. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  15. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high-speed flowfields.

  16. Heat flow and heat generation estimates for the Churchill basement of the Western Canadian Basin in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.D.W.; Jones, F.W.; Majorowicz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat flow through the sediments and temperatures of the Churchill province basement under the sedimentary cover are determined for 24 locations in the central part of the Prairies basin in Alberta where the vertical heat flux is approximately constant from the base of the sediments to the surface. The contribution to heat flow from heat generation in the sediments is also considered. The average heat flow through the sediments is found to be 71 mWm/sup -2/ +- 12mWm/sup -2/ which is about 30 mWm/sup -2/ higher than in the neighbouring shield area of the Churchill province, and the contribution from heat generation in the sediments to the surface heat flow is only approximately 2.5 mWm/sup -2/. The relationship between basement heat generation and heat flow is investigated, and it is found that the platform heat flow/heat generation values are in general higher than those from the Churchill province of the shield found by Drury (1985). Although for the platform and shield data, the reduced heat flow is about 40 mWm/sup -2/ and the slope is about 8km, it is apparent that the platform data alone are not good enough to establish a precise relationship.

  17. Parametric study of fluid flow and heat transfer over louvered fins of air heat pump evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muszyński, Tomasz; Kozieł, Sławomir Marcin

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional numerical investigations of the fluid flow and heat transfer have been carried out for the laminar flow of the louvered fin-plate heat exchanger, designed to work as an air-source heat pump evaporator. The transferred heat and the pressure drop predicted by simulation have been compared with the corresponding experimental data taken from the literature. Two dimensional analyses of the louvered fins with varying geometry have been conducted. Simulations have been performed for different geometries with varying louver pitch, louver angle and different louver blade number. Constant inlet air temperature and varying velocity ranging from 2 to 8 m/s was assumed in the numerical experiments. The air-side performance is evaluated by calculating the temperature and the pressure drop ratio. Efficiency curves are obtained that can be used to select optimum louver geometry for the selected inlet parameters. A total of 363 different cases of various fin geometry for 7 different air velocities were investigated. The maximum heat transfer improvement interpreted in terms of the maximum efficiency has been obtained for the louver angle of 16 ° and the louver pitch of 1.35 mm. The presented results indicate that varying louver geometry might be a convenient way of enhancing performance of heat exchangers.

  18. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well.

  19. Heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.; Rohsenow, W. M.; Houpt, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Optimization of the vertical Bridgman technique for growth of electronic materials in single crystal form was investigated. The limitations of the crystal growth configuration were experimentally determined and heat transfer related deficiencies identified. Design of an alternate system was based on the use of heat pipes separated by a gradient region. Heat transfer analyses based on one and two dimensional models indicated the necessity of a flexible gradient zone configuration. Directional melting of binary systems as encountered during seeding in melt growth was analysed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-metal interface, and the theoretical treatment numerically applied to HgCdTe and Ga doped germanium. A theoretical and experimental study of the thermal effects associated with current flow was conducted. It was found that experimental measurements of dc induced growth during crystal pulling can be used for the precise determination of the Peltier coefficient.

  20. Surface Tension-Driven Melt Flow in the Upper Mantle: An Experimental and Modeling Approach to Studying Capillary Flow of Silicate Melt Through an Olivine Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R. A.; Nimmo, F.; Hustoft, J. W.; Holtzman, B. K.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2006-12-01

    The flow of melt in partially-molten rocks has important implications for the geochemical and geophysical evolution of planetary bodies over a wide range of length scales. Surface tension is usually ignored in favor of differential stresses and buoyancy forces, but may still distribute melt over geologically interesting distances [1], particularly in small bodies such as asteroids. We have investigated experimentally the role of surface tension in the redistribution of melt. Shear deformation of synthetic mantle-type rocks composed of 76 vol% olivine, 20 vol% chromite, and 4 vol% mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) at upper mantle temperature and pressure conditions (1523 K, 300 MPa) produces anastomosing networks of melt-enriched (MORB) regions separated by melt-depleted lenses [2]. After the deformation phase of the experiment, each of three samples were statically annealed at 1523 K for 0, 10, or 100 hours to allow some MORB to redistribute back into the melt-depleted olivine plus chromite matrix via surface tension-driven capillary flow.". We modeled melt redistribution resulting from surface tension during the static anneal [3]. Using sample measurements of dihedral angle, and values for MORB and olivine viscosity from the literature (10 Pas [4] and 8x10^{12} Pas [5], [6], respectively), we are able to constrain the sample permeability by matching the model results to the experiments. Permeability is given by κ = d2φn/b. The model uses an exponential melt-dependent viscosity relation of the form ηo*10-α φ where ηo is the dry olivine viscosity, α = 25 [5], and φ is the melt fraction. We find that a permeability on the order of 10-18 m2, corresponding to n = 2 ± 0.2 and b = 7000 ± 2000, gives the best fit to the the experimental anneals. The relatively high value of b is probably due to clogging of melt paths by chromite grains (see Appendix A of Holtzmann et al.). [1] Stevenson D. J. (1986) GRL, 13, 1149-1152. [2] Holtzman B. K. et al. (2003) Science, 301

  1. Data assimilation in problems of mantle dynamics: Methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Schubert, G.; Tsepelev, I.; Korotkii, A.

    2009-05-01

    We present and compare several methods (backward advection, adjoint, and quasi-reversibility) for assimilation of geophysical and geodetic data in geodynamical models. These methods allow for incorporating observations and unknown initial conditions for mantle temperature and flow into a three- dimensional dynamic model in order to determine the initial conditions in the geological past. Once the conditions are determined the evolution of mantle structures can be restore. Using the quasi-reversibility method we reconstruct the evolution of the descending lithospheric slab beneath the south-eastern Carpathians. We show that the geometry of the mantle structures changes with time diminishing the degree of surface curvature of the structures, because the heat diffusion tends to smooth the complex thermal surfaces of mantle bodies with time. Present seismic tomography images of mantle structures do not allow definition of the sharp shapes of these structures in the past. Assimilation of mantle temperature and flow instead provides a quantitative tool to restore thermal shapes of prominent structures in the past from their diffusive shapes at present.

  2. Restoration of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, S.; Stephens, M. K.; Taylor, P. T.; Williams, D. R.; Hills, H. K.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow probes were deployed on the Apollo 15 and 17 missions as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). At each landing site, the astronauts drilled 2 holes, 10-m apart, and installed a probe in each. The holes were 1- and 1.5-m deep at the Apollo 15 site and 2.5-m deep at the Apollo 17 sites. The probes monitored surface temperature and subsurface temperatures at different depths. At the Apollo 15 site, the monitoring continued from July 1971 to January 1977. At the Apollo 17 site, it did from December 1972 to September 1977. Based on the observations made through December 1974, Marcus Langseth, the principal investigator of the heat flow experiments (HFE), determined the thermal conductivity of the lunar regolith by mathematically modeling how the seasonal temperature fluctuation propagated down through the regolith. He also determined the temperature unaffected by diurnal and seasonal thermal waves of the regolith at different depths, which yielded the geothermal gradient. By multiplying the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity, Langseth obtained the endogenic heat flow of the Moon as 21 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 15 and 16 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 17.

  3. Heat exchange at laminar flow in rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Numerical modeling of heat exchange at a laminar stationary and pulsatile flow in rectangular channels with different aspect ratios of side lengths γ has been carried out by a finite difference method for two boundary conditions: a constant wall temperature and a constant heat flux density on the wall. For the boundary condition of the first kind, the similarity of distributions of the heat flux density and shear stress on the walls over the channel perimeter has been established. The reasons for a nonmonotonous dependence of the initial thermal interval length on γ are discussed. For the boundary condition of the second kind, the difference of the Nusselt number averaged over the perimeter at γ → 0 from its value for a flow in a flat channel has been explained. An increase in the Nusselt number averaged over the perimeter and the period of oscillations has been revealed for a pulsatile flow in the quasi-stationary regime at large amplitudes of the oscillations of the velocity averaged over the cross section.

  4. Attachment-Line Heating in a Compressible Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Helen; Saric, William

    2011-11-01

    The attachment-line boundary layer on a swept wing can be subject to either an instability or contamination by wing-root turbulence. A model of the attachment-line boundary layer is first developed including compressibility and wall heating in a Falkner-Skan-Cooke class of 3-D boundary layers with Hartree parameter of 1.0. For cases otherwise subcritical to either contamination or instability, the destabilizing effect of leading-edge heating under a variety of sweep angles and flight conditions is demonstrated. The results correlate with the attachment-line Reynolds number. Because the required heating levels are reasonable and achievable to trip the flow over the wing to turbulent, one possible application of this work is in the establishing of a baseline turbulent flow (on demand) for the calibration of a laminar-flow-control health monitoring system. *Portion based on work under Framework Agreement between Airbus Americas and NIA, and opinions, findings, conclusions do not necessarily reflect views of Airbus or NIA. Support from AFOSR/NASA National Center for Hypersonic Research in Laminar-Turbulent Transition through Grant FA9550-09-1-0341 gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Nonclassical Symmetry Analysis of Heated Two-Dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Imran; Naz, Rehana; Khan, Muhammad Danish

    2015-12-01

    This article analyses the nonclassical symmetries and group invariant solution of boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flows. First, we derive the nonclassical symmetry determining equations with the aid of the computer package SADE. We solve these equations directly to obtain nonclassical symmetries. We follow standard procedure of computing nonclassical symmetries and consider two different scenarios, ξ1≠0 and ξ1=0, ξ2≠0. Several nonclassical symmetries are reported for both scenarios. Furthermore, numerous group invariant solutions for nonclassical symmetries are derived. The similarity variables associated with each nonclassical symmetry are computed. The similarity variables reduce the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in terms of similarity variables. The reduced system of ODEs are solved to obtain group invariant solution for governing boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flow problems. We successfully formulate a physical problem of heat transfer analysis for fluid flow over a linearly stretching porous plat and, with suitable boundary conditions, we solve this problem.

  6. Finite Element Modelling of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J.; Siegler, M. A.; Williams, J.

    2013-12-01

    The heat flow experiments sent on Apollo missions 15 and 17 were designed to measure the temperature gradient of the lunar regolith in order to determine the heat flux of the moon. Major problems in these experiments arose from the fact that the astronauts were not able to insert the probes below the thermal skin depth. Compounding the problem, anomalies in the data have prevented scientists from conclusively determining the temperature dependent conductivity of the soil, which enters as a linear function into the heat flow calculation, thus stymieing them in their primary goal of constraining the global heat production of the Moon. Different methods of determining the thermal conductivity have yielded vastly different results resulting in downward corrections of up to 50% in some cases from the original calculations. Along with problems determining the conductivity, the data was inconsistent with theoretical predictions of the temperature variation over time, leading some to suspect that the Apollo experiment itself changed the thermal properties of the localised area surrounding the probe. The average temperature of the regolith, according to the data, increased over time, a phenomenon that makes calculating the thermal conductivity of the soil and heat flux impossible without knowing the source of error and accounting for it. The changes, possibly resulting from as varied sources as the imprint of the Astronauts boots on the lunar surface, compacted soil around the bore stem of the probe or even heat radiating down the inside of the tube, have convinced many people that the recorded data is unusable. In order to shed some light on the possible causes of this temperature rise, we implemented a finite element model of the probe using the program COMSOL Multi-physics as well as Matlab. Once the cause of the temperature rise is known then steps can be taken to account for the failings of the experiment and increase the data's utility.

  7. Fundamental flow and heat transfer results relevant to oscillating flow regenerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.; Ross, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    Complete understanding of the operation of Stirling and other heat engine regenerators has evaded engineers working on engine development because making measurements in or near such a regenerator is so difficult. Some illumination of the physics that may be involved, however, can be found by studying fundamental experimental results in the literature, results that were examined for other applications in addition to Stirling. Preliminary reviews of literature on the subjects of oscillating flows, periodic flows and porous media have brought to light interesting papers presenting a number of phenomena that may be of importance in heat engine regenerators. Some are also relevant to flows in other Stirling heat exchangers. These topics include heat transfer during compression and expansion, enhanced conduction in oscillating laminar flows, approaches to analysis of nonuniform porous media, and heat transfer enhancement mechanisms in porous media. Each topic is briefly described and discussed in this paper, and a summary of physical phenomena that may affect regenerator performance is presented. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Slab Driven Mantle Deformation and Plate-Mantle Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadamec, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Fischer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of shear wave splitting derived from local sources in subduction zones suggest viscous flow in the mantle wedge is commonly non-parallel to both the subducting plate velocity vector and the motion of the overriding plate. However, far from the subduction zone trench, observations indicate the fast axis of shear wave splitting tends to align with the velocity vector of the surface plates. Similarly, previous 3D geodynamic models show the slab can drive local decoupling of the mantle and surface plates, in both direction and speed. This suggests that there is some distance from the trench over which there is significant decoupling of the mantle flow from surface plate motion, and that this decoupling zone then decays with continued distance from the trench, resulting in far-field plate-mantle coupling. Here we present results from geodynamic models of subduction coupled with calculations of olivine fabric deformation and synthetic splitting to 1) examine the influence of slab strength, slab dip, and non-Newtonian viscosity on the deformation fabric in the mantle wedge and subslab mantle and 2) quantify the spatial extent and intensity of this slab driven decoupling zone. We compare the deformation fabric in a 2D corner flow solution with varying dip to that of a 2D free subduction model with varying initial dip and slab strength. The results show that using an experimentally derived flow law to define viscosity (both diffusion creep and dislocation creep deformation mechanisms) has a first order effect on the viscosity structure and flow velocity in the upper mantle. The free subduction models using the composite viscosity formulation produce a zone of subduction induced mantle weakening that results in reduced viscous support of the slab and lateral variability in coupling of the mantle to the base of the surface plates. The maximum yield stress, which places an upper bound on the slab strength, can also have a significant impact on the viscosity

  9. Flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, A. A.; Mujumdar, A. S.; Saniei, N.

    Microchannels are currently being used in many areas and have high potential for applications in many other areas, which are considered realistic by experts. The application areas include medicine, biotechnology, avionics, consumer electronics, telecommunications, metrology, computer technology, office equipment and home appliances, safety technology, process engineering, robotics, automotive engineering and environmental protection. A number of these applications are introduced in this paper, followed by a critical review of the works on the flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels. The results show that the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a gas flowing in microchannels can not be adequately predicted by the theories and correlations developed for conventional sized channels. The results of theoretical and experimental works are discussed and summarized along with suggestions for future research directions.

  10. Effect of the load size on the efficiency of microwave heating under stop flow and continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Patil, Narendra G; Rebrov, Evgeny V; Eränen, Kari; Benaskar, Faysal; Meuldijk, Jan; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka; Hessel, Volker; Hulshof, Lumbertus A; Murzin, Dmitry Yu; Schouten, Jaap C

    2012-01-01

    A novel heating efficiency analysis of the microwave heated stop-flow (i.e. stagnant liquid) and continuous-flow reactors has been presented. The thermal losses to the surrounding air by natural convection have been taken into account for heating efficiency calculation of the microwave heating process. The effect of the load diameter in the range of 4-29 mm on the heating efficiency of ethylene glycol was studied in a single mode microwave cavity under continuous flow and stop-flow conditions. The variation of the microwave absorbing properties of the load with temperature was estimated. Under stop-flow conditions, the heating efficiency depends on the load diameter. The highest heating efficiency has been observed at the load diameter close to the half wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the corresponding medium. Under continuous-flow conditions, the heating efficiency increased linearly. However, microwave leakage above the propagation diameter restricted further experimentation at higher load diameters. Contrary to the stop-flow conditions, the load temperature did not raise monotonously from the inlet to outlet under continuous-flow conditions. This was due to the combined effect of lagging convective heat fluxes in comparison to volumetric heating. This severely disturbs the uniformity of the electromagnetic field in the axial direction and creates areas of high and low field intensity along the load Length decreasing the heating efficiency as compared to stop-flow conditions.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  12. SUPERSONIC AND HYPERSONIC INTERFERENCE FLOW FIELDS AND HEATING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    Small areas of high heat transfer and pressure can occur on a vehicle surface due to the influence of an impinging shock on the local flow. A method was needed to determine peak pressure and heating of these areas. This package is a system of computer programs designed to calculate two-dimensional shock interference patterns for six types of interference flows. Results also include properties of the inviscid flow field and the inviscid-viscous interaction at the surface along with peak pressure and peak heating at the impingement point. The six types of interference flow patterns considered are: 1) Type I interference patterns, occurring when two weak shocks of opposite families, BS (bow shock) and IS (impingment shock), intersect when the flow upstream of the impingement point is supersonic, or in the case of a blunt body, takes place well below the sonic point. 2) Type II interference pattern occurs when two shocks of opposite families (bow shock and impinging shock) intersect. Both shocks are weak as in type I, but are of such strength that in order to turn the flow, a Mach reflection must exist in the center of the flow field with an embedded subsonic region occurring between the intersection points (A & B) and the accompanying shear layers. Type II interference occurs on a blunt body when the impinging shock intersects the bow shock near the sonic point. 3) Type III shock interference pattern occurs when a weak impinging shock intersects a strong detached bow shock. On a blunt body the shock intersection occurs near or above the lower sonic point. 4) Type IV interference can occur when the impinging shock intersects a strong bow shock ahead of a subsonic flow region. On a blunt body this shock intersection is located between the lower sonic point and just above the body axis. The impinging shock causes a displacement of the bow shock and the formation of a supersonic jet that is embedded in the subsonic region. A jet bow shock is produced when the jet impinges

  13. Thermal invisibility based on scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, M.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bagci, H.; Amra, C.; Guenneau, S.; Alù, A.

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and numerically analyze thermal invisibility based on the concept of scattering cancellation and mantle cloaking. We show that a small object can be made completely invisible to heat diffusion waves, by tailoring the heat conductivity of the spherical shell enclosing the object. This means that the thermal scattering from the object is suppressed, and the heat flow outside the object and the cloak made of these spherical shells behaves as if the object is not present. Thermal invisibility may open new vistas in hiding hot spots in infrared thermography, military furtivity, and electronics heating reduction. PMID:25928664

  14. Flow and heat transfer of ferrofluids over a flat plate with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Khan, Z. H.; Haq, R. U.

    2015-04-01

    The present work is dedicated to analyze the flow and heat transport of ferrofluids along a flat plate subjected to uniform heat flux and slip velocity. A magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the plate. Moreover, three different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, CoFe2O4, Mn-ZnFe2O4 are incorporated within the base fluid. We have considered two different kinds of base fluids (kerosene and water) having poor thermal conductivity as compared to solid magnetic nanoparticles. Self-similar solutions are obtained and are compared with the available data for special cases. A simulation is performed for each ferrofluid mixture by considering the dominant effects of slip and uniform heat flux. It is found that the present results are in an excellent agreement with the existing literature. The variation of skin friction and heat transfer is also performed at the surface of the plate and then the better heat transfer and of each mixture is analyzed. Kerosene-based magnetite Fe3O4 provides the higher heat transfer rate at the wall as compared to the kerosene-based cobalt ferrite and Mn-Zn ferrite. It is also concluded that the primary effect of the magnetic field is to accelerate the dimensionless velocity and to reduce the dimensionless surface temperature as compared to the hydrodynamic case, thereby increasing the skin friction and the heat transfer rate of ferrofluids.

  15. Calibrated Heat Flow Model for Determining the Heat Conduction Losses in Laser Cutting of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Berger, P.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    Laser machining has great potential regarding automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts, due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing at high process speeds. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers lead to a large heat transport into the sample. This causes the formation of a heat-affected zone and a decrease of the process speed. In the present paper,an analytical heat flow model was adapted in order to understand and investigate the heat conduction losses. Thermal sensors were embedded in samples at different distances from the kerf to fit the calculated to the measured temperatures. Heat conduction losses of up to 30% of the laser power were determined. Furthermore, the energy not absorbed by the sample, the energy for sublimating the composite material in the kerf, the energy for the formation of the HAZ, and the residual heat in the sample are compared in an energy balance.

  16. Cenozoic Bimodal Volcanic Rocks of the Northeast boundary of Tibetan Plateau: implication for the collision-induced mantle flow beneath the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Mo, X.; Zhao, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Northeast boundary in Tibetan plateau are probably related to northeastward migration and upwelling of the India-Asia collision-induced asthenosphere mantle flow along the deep faults of East Kunlun and North boundary of West Qinling beneath the Tibetan plateau.

  17. Heat transfer analysis of two-phase dispersed swirl flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Ching.

    1991-01-01

    A thermodynamic nonequilibrium model was developed for a two-phase, vapor and liquid droplet, dispersed swirl flow in a vertical tube with a twisted-tape insert. It takes account of the heat transfer phenomena between two phases, and each phase with solid boundary where a variable heat flux along axial direction is imposed. A numerical method is developed to solve the system of nonlinear differential equations. The local equilibrium conditions of the fluid at the point of critical heat flux (CHF) are chosen as the initial conditions to start the numerical integration to the downstream. Wall temperature, superheat vapor temperature, heat transfer rate from two phases, and velocity distributions of two phases were predicted and analyzed, which were then verified by comparing them with the low wall-superheat heat exchanger experimental data of water-steam in the range of 900.0 {le} G {le} 1,900.0, 2.51 {le} y {le} 7.53, X{sub CHF} {ge} 0.444. Additional parametric studies of the CHF quality, mass flux, and tape-twist ratio are presented. It is found that higher mass flux, lower tape-twist ratio, and low wall-superheat will give a stronger direct wall-droplet interaction and less superheating of vapor.

  18. Visualization of heat transfer for impinging swirl flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bakirci, K.; Bilen, K.

    2007-10-15

    The objective of the experimental study was to visualize the temperature distribution and evaluate heat transfer rate on the impingement surface kept at a constant wall temperature boundary condition for the swirling (SIJ), multi-channel (MCIJ) and conventional impinging jet (CIJ) using liquid crystal technique. The swirling jet assembly consisted of a housing tube and a solid swirl generator insert which had four narrow slots machined on its surface. The swirl angle, {theta}, was set as 0 , 22.5 , 41 , 50 to change the direction and strength of the swirl in the air flow exiting the housing tube. The local Nusselt numbers of the MCIJ ({theta} = 0 ) were generally much higher than those of CIJ and SIJs. As the swirl angle increased, the radial uniformity of the heat transfer was seen compared to MCIJ and SIJ; the best results were for {theta} = 50 and the jet-to-surface distance of H/D = 14. The location of the distance of the maximum heat transfer for the swirl angles of {theta} = 41 and 50 was shifted away from the stagnation point in a radial distance of nearly r/D = 2.5. Increasing Reynolds number for same swirler angle increased the heat transfer rate on the entire surface, and increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface, but had no significant effect on the position of the individual impingement regions, but increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface. The lower Reynolds number (Re = 10 000) and the highest H/D = 14 gave much more uniform local and average heat transfer distribution on the surface, but decreased their values on the entire surface. (author)

  19. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  20. Seafloor subsidence, heat flow and water circulation within the Australian-Antarctic Discordance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geli, L. B.

    2011-12-01

    One of the last seagoing expeditions of Jean Francheteau was the Antaus Cruise of R/V Marion Dufresne, to measure heat flow within the Australian-Antarctic Discordance (AAD), an anomalously deep segment of the Southeast Indian Ridge within 120°E and 128°E. We collected 23 new data points along a 14-Ma old isochron, that were analyzed together with 19 existing measurements from the 20- to 24-Ma old crust. Most sites of measurements exhibit low heat flux (from 2 to 50 mW/m2) with near-linear temperature- depth profiles except at a few sites, where recent bottom water temperature change may have caused nonlinearity toward the sediment surface. Because the igneous basement is expected to outcrop a short distance away from any measurement site, horizontally channelized water circulation within the uppermost crust is the primary process for the widespread low heat flow values. The process may be further influenced by vertical fluid flow along numerous fault zones that crisscross the AAD seafloor. Our analysis suggests that, due to the presence of patchy sediment cover and conveniently spaced faulting (across-strike and parallel to the spreading center), seawater circulation through faults continues off-axis within the AAD and cools the crust by lateral flow of water within the upper, highly permeable crustal layer, but possibly also by lateral conductive cooling of the less permeable, lower crustal layer. Hence, we hypothesize that the two crustal layers constitute a water dominated or "wet" domain, overlying a "dry" domain that encompasses the lower crust and possibly part of the mantle. The temperature at the top of the "dry" domain being greater than zero, the temperature difference that controls the thermal contraction of the sub-crustal lithosphere is less than it would be in absence of seawater circulation. This process could explain part of the low subsidence rates documented within the AAD, as well as the abruptness of the variation in subsidence rate across

  1. In situ determination of heat flow in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Kennelly, J.P.; Wendt, W.E.; Moses, T.H.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements are the most effective, least ambiguous tools for identifying and delineating possible geothernml resources. Measurements of thermal gradient in the upper few tens of meters generally are sufficient to outline the major anomalies, but it is always desirable to combine these gradients with reliable estimates of thermal conductivity to provide data on the energy flux and to constrain models for the heat sources responsible for the observed, near-surface thermal anomalies. The major problems associated with heat-flow measurements in the geothermal exploration mode are concerned with the economics of casing and/or grouting holes, the repeated site visits necessary to obtain equilibrium temperature values, the possible legal liability associated with the disturbance of underground aquifers, the surface hazards presented by pipes protruding from the ground, and the security problems associated with leaving cased holes open for periods of weeks to months. We have developed a technique which provides reliable 'real-time' determinations of temperature, thermal conductivity, and hence, of heat flow during the drilling operation in unconsolidated sediments. A combined temperature, gradient, and thermal conductivity experiment can be carried out, by driving a thin probe through the bit about 1.5 meters into the formation in the time that would otherwise be required for a coring trip. Two or three such experiments over the depth range of, say, 50 to 150 meters provide a high-quality heat-flow determination at costs comparable to those associated with a standard cased 'gradient hole' to comparable depths. The hole can be backfilled and abandoned upon cessation of drilling, thereby eliminating the need for casing, grouting, or repeated site visits.

  2. Heat transfer and flow friction correlations for perforated plate matrix heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratna Raju, L.; Kumar, S. Sunil; Chowdhury, K.; Nandi, T. K.

    2017-02-01

    Perforated plate matrix heat exchangers (MHE) are constructed of high conductivity perforated plates stacked alternately with low conductivity spacers. They are being increasingly used in many cryogenic applications including Claude cycle or Reversed Brayton cycle cryo-refrigerators and liquefiers. Design of high NTU (number of (heat) transfer unit) cryogenic MHEs requires accurate heat transfer coefficient and flow friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic behaviour of perforated plates strongly depends on the geometrical parameters. Existing correlations, however, are mostly expressed as functions of Reynolds number only. This causes, for a given configuration, significant variations in coefficients from one correlation to the other. In this paper we present heat transfer and flow friction correlations as functions of all geometrical and other controlling variables. A FluentTM based numerical model has been developed for heat transfer and pressure drop studies over a stack of alternately arranged perforated plates and spacers. The model is validated with the data from literature. Generalized correlations are obtained through regression analysis over a large number of computed data.

  3. Influence of flow rate and heating power in effective thermal conductivity applied in borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwa, T.; Sapińska-Śliwa, A.; Wiśniowski, R.; Piechówka, Z.; Krzemień, M.; Pycha, D.; Jaszczur, M.

    2016-09-01

    In borehole heat exchanging systems one of the most important parameters necessary to estimate its efficiency is the effective thermal conductivity. One of the methods for determining it is thermal response test. Such a test may be performed with respect to various parameters. The most important ones include flow rate and heating power. The article summarizes the results of TRT research in Palecznica village, Poland which was performed in boreholes located there in the already operating installation. It presents the established methodology. Also, there is an attempt to determine the relation between the mentioned parameters and the effective thermal conductivity. The research indicates the dependence of the conductivity with the test parameters.

  4. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  5. The North American upper mantle: Density, composition, and evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, Walter D.; Kaban, Mikhail K.

    2010-12-01

    The upper mantle of North America has been well studied using various seismic methods. Here we investigate the density structure of the North American (NA) upper mantle based on the integrative use of the gravity field and seismic data. The basis of our study is the removal of the gravitational effect of the crust to determine the mantle gravity anomalies. The effect of the crust is removed in three steps by subtracting the gravitational contributions of (1) topography and bathymetry, (2) low-density sedimentary accumulations, and (3) the three-dimensional density structure of the crystalline crust as determined by seismic observations. Information regarding sedimentary accumulations, including thickness and density, are taken from published maps and summaries of borehole measurements of densities; the seismic structure of the crust is based on a recent compilation, with layer densities estimated from P-wave velocities. The resultant mantle gravity anomaly map shows a pronounced negative anomaly (-50 to -400 mGal) beneath western North America and the adjacent oceanic region and positive anomalies (+50 to +350 mGal) east of the NA Cordillera. This pattern reflects the well-known division of North America into the stable eastern region and the tectonically active western region. The close correlation of large-scale features of the mantle anomaly map with those of the topographic map indicates that a significant amount of the topographic uplift in western NA is due to buoyancy in the hot upper mantle, a conclusion supported by previous investigations. To separate the contributions of mantle temperature anomalies from mantle compositional anomalies, we apply an additional correction to the mantle anomaly map for the thermal structure of the uppermost mantle. The thermal model is based on the conversion of seismic shear-wave velocities to temperature and is consistent with mantle temperatures that are independently estimated from heat flow and heat production data. The

  6. The North American upper mantle: density, composition, and evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mooney, Walter D.; Kaban, Mikhail K.

    2010-01-01

    The upper mantle of North America has been well studied using various seismic methods. Here we investigate the density structure of the North American (NA) upper mantle based on the integrative use of the gravity field and seismic data. The basis of our study is the removal of the gravitational effect of the crust to determine the mantle gravity anomalies. The effect of the crust is removed in three steps by subtracting the gravitational contributions of (1) topography and bathymetry, (2) low-density sedimentary accumulations, and (3) the three-dimensional density structure of the crystalline crust as determined by seismic observations. Information regarding sedimentary accumulations, including thickness and density, are taken from published maps and summaries of borehole measurements of densities; the seismic structure of the crust is based on a recent compilation, with layer densities estimated from P-wave velocities. The resultant mantle gravity anomaly map shows a pronounced negative anomaly (−50 to −400 mGal) beneath western North America and the adjacent oceanic region and positive anomalies (+50 to +350 mGal) east of the NA Cordillera. This pattern reflects the well-known division of North America into the stable eastern region and the tectonically active western region. The close correlation of large-scale features of the mantle anomaly map with those of the topographic map indicates that a significant amount of the topographic uplift in western NA is due to buoyancy in the hot upper mantle, a conclusion supported by previous investigations. To separate the contributions of mantle temperature anomalies from mantle compositional anomalies, we apply an additional correction to the mantle anomaly map for the thermal structure of the uppermost mantle. The thermal model is based on the conversion of seismic shear-wave velocities to temperature and is consistent with mantle temperatures that are independently estimated from heat flow and heat production data

  7. Heat and mass transfer in turbulent flows with several recirculated flow eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, E.; Nacke, B.; Jakovics, A.; Umbrashko, A.

    2001-06-01

    Numerical modeling of the concentration and temperature distribution in axial symmetrical systems with several recirculated flow eddies, which is based on various 2D stationary k-ɛ models and commercial codes, e.g. ANSYS and FLUENT, leads to results, which are significantly different from experimental data. Therefore additional user-defined subroutines were included in the commercial program code to improve the turbulent heat and mass transfer in the zone between the recirculated flow eddies. In addition transient 3D calculations were performed to investigate scientifically the flow dynamics. Figs 9, Refs 8.

  8. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  9. Improved simulations of heat transfer in liquid metal flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.

    2011-04-01

    In liquid-metal flows, the predictions of the Nusselt number (heat transfer) by Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models of turbulence that use the assumption of a constant turbulent Prandtl number can be significantly off. Heat transfer analyses were performed with a number of turbulence models for flows in a triangular rod bundle and in a pipe, and model predictions were compared with experimental data. Emphasis was placed on the low Reynolds (low-Re) number k-{var_epsilon} model that resolves the boundary layer and does not use 'logarithmic wall functions.' The high Reynolds (high-Re) number k-{var_epsilon} model underpredicts the Nusselt number up to 30%, while the low-Re number model overpredicts it up to 34%. For high Peclet number values, the low-Re number model provides better predictions than the high-Re number model. For Peclet numbers higher than 1500, the predictions of the Reynolds stress model (RSM) are in very good agreement with experimental measurements, but for lower Peclet number values its predictions are significantly off. A relationship was developed that expresses the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the ratio of the turbulent viscosity to the molecular viscosity. With this modified turbulent Prandtl number, for the flow in the rod bundle the predictions of the low-Re number model are well within the spread of the experimental measurements. For pipe flow, the model predictions are not as sensitive to the correction of the turbulent Prandtl number as they are in the case of the flow in a bundle. The modified low-Re number model underpredicts the limited experimental data by 4%.

  10. Mechanisms of high-temperature, solid-state flow in minerals and ceramics and their bearing on the creep behavior of the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of applying laboratory silicate-flow data to the mantle, where conditions can be vastly different, is approached through a critical review of high-temperature flow mechanisms in ceramics and their relation to empirical flow laws. The intimate association of solid-state diffusion and high-temperature creep in pure metals is found to apply to ceramics as well. It is shown that in ceramics of moderate grain size, compared on the basis of self-diffusivity and elastic modulus, normalized creep rates compare remarkably well. This comparison is paralleled by the near universal occurrence of similar creep-induced structures, and it is thought that the derived empirical flow laws can be associated with dislocation creep. Creep data in fine-grained ceramics, on the other hand, are found to compare poorly with theories involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects and have not been successfully correlated by self-diffusion rates. We conclude that these fine-grained materials creep primarily by a quasi-viscous grain-boundary sliding mechanism which is unlikely to predominate in the earth's deep interior. Creep predictions for the mantle reveal that under most conditions the empirical dislocation creep behavior predominates over the mechanisms involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects. The probable role of polymorphic transformations in the transition zone is also discussed. ?? 1973.

  11. The relation between the age of the subconducting slab and the recycling of sediments into the mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, D.; Hoffman, S.

    1985-01-01

    The recycling of sediments into the mantle has become an important issue because recent papers have suggested that the geochemical inverse models of the evolution of radiogenic isotope abundances over the history of the Earth have nonunique solutions. Both the recycling of continent-derived sediments into the mantle and mixing in the mantle could produce similar geochemical effects in the mean isotopic ratios of new igneous material emplaced in continents. Recent models of Archaean heat flow and of plate tectonics during early Earth history have demonstrated that higher internal heat production of the early Earth was mainly dissipated through a higher creation rate of oceanic lithosphere. If the seafloor creation rate was higher on the early Earth, then the residence time of any one piece of oceanic lithosphere on the surface would have been shorter. It is possible that a higher rate of recycling of oceanic lithosphere into the mantle could have resulted in some transport of sediment into the mantle.

  12. Large deviations of heat flow in harmonic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Anupam; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Dhar, Abhishek

    2011-03-01

    We consider heat transport across a harmonic chain connected at its two ends to white-noise Langevin reservoirs at different temperatures. In the steady state of this system the heat Q flowing from one reservoir into the system in a finite time τ has a distribution P(Q, τ). We study the large time form of the corresponding moment generating function lange - λQrang ~ g(λ)eτμ(λ). Exact formal expressions, in terms of phonon Green's functions, are obtained for both μ(λ) and also the lowest order correction g(λ). We point out that, in general, a knowledge of both μ(λ) and g(λ) is required for finding the large deviation function associated with P(Q, τ). The function μ(λ) is known to be the largest eigenvector of an appropriate Fokker-Planck type operator and our method also gives the corresponding eigenvector exactly.

  13. Snow distribution and heat flow in the taiga

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The trees of the taiga intercept falling snow and cause it to become distributed in an uneven fashion. Around aspen and birch, cone-shaped accumulations form. Beneath large spruce trees, the snow cover is depleted, forming a bowl-shaped depression called a tree well. Small spruce trees become covered with snow, creating cavities that funnel cold air to the snow/ground interface. The depletion of snow under large spruce trees results in greater heat loss from the ground. A finite difference model suggests that heat flow from tree wells can be more than twice that of undisturbed snow. In forested watersheds, this increase can be a significant percentage of the total winter energy exchange.

  14. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  15. Theoretical investigation on thermal performance of heat pipe flat plate solar collector with cross flow heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lan; Wu, Shuang-Ying; Zhang, Qiao-Ling; Li, You-Rong

    2012-07-01

    Based on the heat transfer characteristics of absorber plate and the heat transfer effectiveness-number of heat transfer unit method of heat exchanger, a new theoretical method of analyzing the thermal performance of heat pipe flat plate solar collector with cross flow heat exchanger has been put forward and validated by comparisons with the experimental and numerical results in pre-existing literature. The proposed theoretical method can be used to analyze and discuss the influence of relevant parameters on the thermal performance of heat pipe flat plate solar collector.

  16. Heating surface material’s effect on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer of R134a

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay G. Jones

    2012-11-01

    In this study, subcooled flow boiling of R134a on copper (Cu) and stainless steel (SS) heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. By utilizing a high-speed digital camera, bubble growth rate, bubble departure size, and nucleation site density, were able to be observed and analyzed from the microscopic point of view. Macroscopic characteristics of the subcooled flow boiling, such as heat transfer coefficient, were able to be measured as well. Experimental results showed that there are no obvious difference between the copper and the stainless surface with respect to bubble dynamics, such as contact angle, growth rate and departure size. On the contrary, the results clearly showed a trend that the copper surface had a better performance than the stainless steel surface in terms of heat transfer coefficient. It was also observed that wall heat fluxes on both surfaces were found highly correlated with nucleation site density, as bubble hydrodynamics are similar on these two surfaces. The difference between these two surfaces was concluded as results of different surface thermal conductivities.

  17. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Water Flowing Shell-Side of Multitube Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yukio; Hashizume, Kenichi

    Experimental studies on heat transfer augmentation in water-flowing shell sides of counter flow multitube exchangers are presented. Various kinds of augmented tube bundles have been examined to obtain the characteristics of pressure drop and heat transfer. Data for a smooth tube bundle were a little different from those for the tube side. The pressure drop in the shell side depended on Re-0.4 and deviated from the tube side pressure drop to within +30%, while the shell side heat transfer coefficient depended on Re0.8 but about 35%. larger than that of the tube side. Furthermore the augmented tube bundles have been evaluated and compared using 21 evaluation criteria. Enhanced tube bundles, low-finned tube bundles and those with twisted tapes inserted had especially good performances. The ratios of increase in heat transfer were larger than those in pressure drop. In case of low-finned tube bundles, there seem to exist an optimum fin-pitch and an optimum relation between the fin-pitch and the pitch of twisted tapes inserted.

  18. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal history of the earth's mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1968-01-01

    A comparative study on the thermal history of the earth's mantle was made by numerical solutions of the heat equation including and excluding selective fusion of silicates. Selective fusion was approximated by melting in a multicomponent system and redistribution of radioactive elements. Effects of selective fusion on the thermal models are (1) lowering (by several hundred degrees centigrade) and stabilizing the internal temperature distribution, and (2) increasing the surface heat-flow. It was found that models with selective fusion gave results more compatible with observations of both present temperature and surface heat-flow. The results therefore suggest continuous differentiation of the earth's mantle throughout geologic time, and support the hypothesis that the earth's atmosphere, oceans, and crust have been accumulated throughout the earth's history by degassing and selective fusion of the mantle. ?? 1968.

  19. The effect of heating direction on flow boiling heat transfer of R134a in micro-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingchen; Jia, Li; Dang, Chao; Peng, Qi

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents effects of heating directions on heat transfer performance of R134a flow boiling in micro- channel heat sink. The heat sink has 30 parallel rectangular channels with cross-sectional dimensions of 500μm width 500μm depth and 30mm length. The experimental operation condition ranges of the heat flux and the mass flux were 13.48 to 82.25 W/cm2 and 373.3 to 1244.4 kg/m2s respectively. The vapor quality ranged from 0.07 to 0.93. The heat transfer coefficients of top heating and bottom heating both were up to 25 kW/m2 K. Two dominate transfer mechanisms of nucleate boiling and convection boiling were observed according to boiling curves. The experimental results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 13.9% higher than top heating in low heat flux, while in high heat flux, the heat transfer coefficient of bottom heating was 9.9%.higher than the top heating, because bubbles were harder to divorce the heating wall. And a modified correlation was provided to predict heat transfer of top heating.

  20. Newtonian heating effect in nanofluid flow by a permeable cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Khan, M. Ijaz; Waqas, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    Here characteristics of Newtonian heating in permeable stretched flow of viscous nanomaterial are investigated. Adopted nanomaterial model incorporates the phenomena of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Concept of boundary layer is employed for the formulation procedure. Convergent homotopic solutions are established for the nonlinear systems. Velocity, thermal and nanoparticles fields for nonlinear boundary value problems are computed and discussed. The velocity, temperature and concentration gradients are also evaluated. It is noticed that impacts of curvature and suction/injection parameters on skin friction coefficient are qualitatively similar. Moreover temperature distribution enhances for larger thermophoresis and Brownian motion parameters.

  1. Injected power and entropy flow in a heated granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, P.; Puglisi, A.; Barrat, A.; Trizac, E.; van Wijland, F.

    2005-10-01

    Our interest goes to the power injected in a heated granular gas and to the possibility to interpret it in terms of entropy flow. We numerically determine the distribution of the injected power by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Then, we provide a kinetic-theory approach to the computation of such a distribution function. Finally, after showing why the injected power does not satisfy a fluctuation relation à la Gallavotti-Cohen, we put forward a new quantity which does fulfill such a relation, and is not only applicable in a variety of frameworks outside the granular world, but also experimentally accessible.

  2. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  3. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  4. Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.S.; Kelley, S.A.; Blackwell, D.D.; Naeser, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    New heat-flow values for seven sites in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, were determined using high-precision temperature logs and thermal conductivity measurements from nearly 300 core plugs. Three of the sites are on the northern shelf, three sites are in the deep basin, and one site is in the frontal fault zone of the northern Wichita Mountains. The heat flow decreased from 55 to 64 mW/m2 in the north, and from 39 to 54 mW/m2 in the south, due to a decrease in heat generation in the underlying basement rock toward the south. Lateral lithologic changes in the basin, combined with the change in heat flow across the basin, resulted in an unusual pattern of thermal maturity. The vitrinite reflectance values of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford formation are highest 30-40 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. The offset in highest reflectance values is due to the contrast in thermal conductivity between the Pennsylvanian "granite wash" section adjacent to the Wichita uplift and the Pennsylvanian shale section to the north. The geothermal gradient in the low-conductivity shale section is elevated relative to the geothermal gradient in the high-conductivity "granite wash" section, thus displacing the highest temperatures to the north of the deepest part of the basin. Apatite fission-track, vitrinite reflectance, and heat-flow data were used to constrain regional aspects of the burial history of the Anadarko basin. By combining these data sets, we infer that at least 1.5 km of denudation has occurred at two sites in the deep Anadarko basin since the early to middle Cenozoic (40 ?? 10 m.y.). The timing of the onset of denudation in the southern Anadarko basin coincides with the period of late Eocene erosion observed in the southern Rocky Mountains and in the northern Great Plains. Burial history models for two wells from the deep Anadarko basin predict that shales of the Woodford formation passed through the hydrocarbon maturity window by the

  5. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  6. Modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow for decaying swirl flow in a circular pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, T.

    1998-04-01

    The economic benefits of energy and material savings have prompted and received greatest attention in order to increase convective heat transfer rates in the process equipment. In the present study, a propeller type swirl generator was developed, and its effects on heat transfer and fluid flow were investigated numerically and experimentally for air flow in a pipe. In the numerical study, for axisymmetrically, incompressible turbulent swirl flows, the Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the {kappa}-{var_epsilon} turbulent model. So that a computer program in Fortran was constructed using the SIMPLEC Algorithm. In experimental work, axial and tangential velocity distributions behind the swirl generator were measured by using hot-wire anemometry. Experimental and numerical axial and tangential velocity distributions along the pipe were compared, and good agreement was found. Axial velocity profile showed a decrement in the central portion of the pipe and an increased axial velocity was seen in near the wall. Tangential velocity profiles had a maximum value and its location moved in radially with distance. The effects of swirl flow on the heat transfer and pressure drop were also investigated experimentally.

  7. Estimation of respiratory heat flows in prediction of heat strain among Taiwanese steel workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang-Yi; Juang, Yow-Jer; Hsieh, Jung-Yu; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Chen, Chen-Peng

    2017-01-01

    International Organization for Standardization 7933 standard provides evaluation of required sweat rate (RSR) and predicted heat strain (PHS). This study examined and validated the approximations in these models estimating respiratory heat flows (RHFs) via convection ( C res) and evaporation ( E res) for application to Taiwanese foundry workers. The influence of change in RHF approximation to the validity of heat strain prediction in these models was also evaluated. The metabolic energy consumption and physiological quantities of these workers performing at different workloads under elevated wet-bulb globe temperature (30.3 ± 2.5 °C) were measured on-site and used in the calculation of RHFs and indices of heat strain. As the results show, the RSR model overestimated the C res for Taiwanese workers by approximately 3 % and underestimated the E res by 8 %. The C res approximation in the PHS model closely predicted the convective RHF, while the E res approximation over-predicted by 11 %. Linear regressions provided better fit in C res approximation ( R 2 = 0.96) than in E res approximation ( R 2 ≤ 0.85) in both models. The predicted C res deviated increasingly from the observed value when the WBGT reached 35 °C. The deviations of R