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Sample records for manufacturing technology phase

  1. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.J. )

    1991-11-01

    This report documents Utility Power Group's (UPG) contract under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Specifically, the report contains the results of a manufacturing technology cost analysis based on an existing PV module production facility. It also projects the cost analysis of a future production facility based on a larger module area, a larger production rate, and the elimination of several technical obstacles. With a coordinated 18-month engineering effort, the technical obstacles could be overcome. Therefore, if solutions to the financial obstacles concerning production expansion were found, UPG would be able to manufacture PV modules at a cost of under $1.25 per watt by 1994.

  2. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS Eureka'' facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the Eureka'' facility to Chronar's batch'' plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  3. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M. )

    1992-03-01

    This report examines manufacturing multiple-band-gap, multiple- junction solar cells and photovoltaic modules. Amorphous silicon alloy material is deposited (using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition) on a stainless-steel substrate using a roll-to-roll process that is continuous and automated. Rapid thermal equilibration of the metal substrate allows rapid throughput of large-area devices in smaller production machines. Potential improvements in the design, deposition, and module fabrication process are described. Problems are also discussed that could impede using these potential improvements. Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) proposes cost and time estimates for investigating and solving these problems. Manufacturing modules for less than $1.00 per peak watt and stable module efficiencies of greater than 10% are near-term goals proposed by ECD. 18 refs.

  4. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Somberg, H. )

    1991-11-01

    This report describes existing integrated processes for solar cell manufacturing and lists as the primary opportunity for improvement the following areas: low-cost silicon sheets with improved characteristics; improved large-scale and automated solar cell processes that can lead to cell efficiencies in the range of 14% (encapsulated) for direct-cast wafers; improved handling and lamination of large-area modules for the emerging utility market. The proposed solutions can lead to finished module costs on the order of $1.55 per square meter or a selling price of less than $2.00/Watt. The problems that may be considered generic to the industry and that have been addressed in this work are as follows: gettering and passivation of silicon wafers; spray-on passivation layers; dual antireflection coatings; ink-jet printing of metallizations; and automated handling of large-area modules and associated vertical lamination. 14 refs.

  5. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Easoz, J.R.; Herlocher, R.H. )

    1991-12-01

    This report examines the cost-effective manufacture of dendritic-web-based photovoltaic modules. It explains how process changes can increase production and reduce manufacturing costs. Long-range benefits of these improved processes are also discussed. Problems are identified that could impede increasing production and reducing costs; approaches to solve these problems are presented. These approaches involve web growth throughput, cell efficiency, process yield, silicon use, process control, automation, and module efficiency. Also discussed are the benefits of bifacial module design, unique to the dendritic web process.

  6. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

  7. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project: Phase 1 subcontractors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Phase I portion of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project, the problem identification phase, was completed in mid-1991. This work involved competitive bidding that was open to any US firm with existing manufacturing capabilities, regardless of material or module design. In early 1991, subcontracts were awarded to 22 of approximately 40 bidders. Each subcontract was funded at a level of up to $50,000 and a duration of three months. The problems identified by the research in this phase of the program represent opportunities for industrial participants to improve their manufacturing processes, reduce manufacturing costs, increase product performance, or develop a foundation for scaling up US-based manufacturing plant capacities. Many of these opportunities have since been detailed in the approaches that these organizations suggested for Phase 2 (the problem solution phase) research and development (R&D). It is not. anticipated that any additional Phase I solicitation will be issued because Phase I was intended to help the US Department of Energy (DOE) characterize the status and needs of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry and encourage the industry to examine and prioritize required manufacturing line improvements. Phase I subcontracted research included five subcontractors working on flat-plate crystalline silicon technology, eleven working on flat-plate thin-film modules (one in thin-film crystalline silicon, six in amorphous silicon. and four in polycrystalline thin films), six working on concentrator systems, and two working on general equipment/production options. (Two of the participants each worked in two areas).

  8. Manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is at the core of Sandia National Laboratories' advanced manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process. The center's capabilities in product and process development are summarized in the following disciplines: (1) mechanical - rapid prototyping, manufacturing engineering, machining and computer-aided manufacturing, measurement and calibration, and mechanical and electronic manufacturing liaison; (2) electronics - advanced packaging for microelectronics, printed circuits, and electronic fabrication; and (3) materials - ceramics, glass, thin films, vacuum technology, brazing, polymers, adhesives, composite materials, and process analysis.

  9. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  10. Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, James L.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high school industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in manufacturing technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to manufacturing, materials processing, personnel management, production management,…

  11. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology, phase 2A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.; Volltrauer, H.

    1994-04-01

    Utility Power Group (UPG) and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS), continued work to develop their manufacturing lines. UPG focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase 1. APS focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks while continuing process quality control, and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55-W (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility.

  12. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1997-02-01

    The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

  13. Manufacturing Technology for Apparel Automation. Phases 1 and 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-15

    release; DiELECTE distribution is unlimited. DC3~18,. , DEC 3 1 W7 H Prepared for Defense Logistics Agency Production Management Support Office DLA-PR...the modules developed do not do this, then the apparel industry will not buy the units ., A primary constraint in this project is the requirement that...Technology for Apparel Automation, April 86. Project management shifts in its requirements between phases. After setting up the initial Management Master

  14. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

  15. Manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L

    1998-01-01

    The mission of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at LLNL, to conduct their future business. The specific goals were (1) to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) to construct general purpose process models that have wide applicability; (3) to document their findings and models in journals; (4) to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) to develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance their collective understanding of fabrication processes. In support of this mission, two projects were reported here, each of which explores a way to bring higher precision to the manufacturing challenges that we face over the next few years. The first, ''A Spatial-Frequency-Domain Approach to Designing a Precision Machine Tools,'' is an overall view of how they design machine tools and instruments to make or measure workpieces that are specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of the residual errors of the workpiece surface. This represents an improvement of an ''error budget,'' a design tool that saw significant development in the early 1980's, and has been in active use since then. The second project, ''Micro-Drilling of ICF Capsules,'' is an attempt to define the current state in commercial industry for drilling small holes, particularly laser-drilling. The report concludes that 1-{micro}m diameter holes cannot currently be drilled to high aspect ratios, and then defines the engineering challenges that will have to be overcome to machine holes small enough for NIF capsules.

  16. Manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. A.; Floyd, H. L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L.

    1993-08-01

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high-voltage varistors. A selective laser sintering process automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves the performance of a photoresist stripper (a simulation on a Cray supercomputer reveals the path of a uniform plasma). Improved mathematical models will help make the dream of low-cost ceramic composites come true.

  17. Progress in phases 2 and 3 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project (PVMaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C E; Mitchell, R L; Mooney, G D; Herwig, L O; Hasti, D; Sellers, R

    1993-10-01

    This first year of the process-specific activities of the Photo- voltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project has been completed, and the first subcontracts for teamed efforts on R&D of a general nature have been awarded. A second solicitation for process-specific research and development (R&D) is in the evaluation stage for award of subcontracts. This paper describes the technical accomplishments of the first process-specific subcontracts (Phase 2A), the status of the teamed research (Phase 3A), and the status of the solicitation for the second process-specific solicitation (Phases 2B).

  18. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John

    2016-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) is developing and maturing innovative and advanced manufacturing technologies that will enable more capable and lower-cost spacecraft, launch vehicles and infrastructure to enable exploration missions. The technologies will utilize cutting edge materials and emerging capabilities including metallic processes, additive manufacturing, composites, and digital manufacturing. The AMT project supports the National Manufacturing Initiative involving collaboration with other government agencies.

  19. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 1. Final technical report, 1 May 1991--10 May 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by the Chronar Corporation, prepared by Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) for Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Development project. Amorphous silicon is chosen as the PV technology that Chronar Corporation and APS believe offers the greatest potential for manufacturing improvements, which, in turn, will result in significant cost reductions and performance improvements in photovoltaic products. The APS ``Eureka`` facility was chosen as the manufacturing system that can offer the possibility of achieving these production enhancements. The relationship of the ``Eureka`` facility to Chronar`s ``batch`` plants is discussed. Five key areas are also identified that could meet the objectives of manufacturing potential that could lead to improved performance, reduced manufacturing costs, and significantly increased production. The projected long-term potential benefits of these areas are discussed, as well as problems that may impede the achievement of the hoped-for developments. A significant number of the problems discussed are of a generic nature and could be of general interest to the industry. The final section of this document addresses the cost and time estimates for achieving the solutions to the problems discussed earlier. Emphasis is placed on the number, type, and cost of the human resources required for the project.

  20. Exploring Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iley, John; And Others

    These teacher's materials for an eight-unit course were developed to help students develop technological literacy, career exploration, and problem-solving skills relative to the manufacturing industries. The eight units include an overview of manufacturing, manufacturing enterprises and systems, manufacturing materials and selection, manufacturing…

  1. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  2. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  3. Manufacturing and producibility technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.; Dreshfield, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Activities of the manufacturing/producibility working group within the Advanced High-Pressure O2/H2 Technology Program are summarized. The objectives of the M/P working group are: to develop and evaluate process and manufacturing techniques for advanced propulsion hardware design and selected materials; and to optimize the producibility of (SSME) components and assemblies by improved performance, increased life, greater reliability, and/or reduced cost. The technologies being developed include: plasma arc, laser, and inertia welding; combustion chamber and turbine blade coatings; coating processes; high performance alloy electroforming; and process control technology.

  4. Illinois Manufacturing Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffe, Roger; And Others

    This manufacturing technology curriculum involves students in learning problem-solving, communication, team building, quality control, safety, math, science, and technical skills. The document begins with a section on implementation, which gives background information on the purposes and development of the curriculum, explains its rationale,…

  5. Manufacturing Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the cluster concept, manufacturing technology. One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, it suggests activities that allow students (1) to become familiar with and use some of the tools, materials, and processes…

  6. Manufacturing Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the cluster concept, manufacturing technology. One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, it suggests activities that allow students (1) to become familiar with and use some of the tools, materials, and processes…

  7. Illinois Manufacturing Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffe, Roger; And Others

    This manufacturing technology curriculum involves students in learning problem-solving, communication, team building, quality control, safety, math, science, and technical skills. The document begins with a section on implementation, which gives background information on the purposes and development of the curriculum, explains its rationale,…

  8. Clean manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brooman, E.W.

    1996-04-01

    Compliance with environmental regulations now applies to the military industrial base just as it does to the industrial manufacturing base. In response, the Department of Defense has developed the National Defense Center for Environmental Excellence (NDCEE) program. This program focuses on a comprehensive approach to pollution prevention and other high-priority environmental issues, such as waste treatment, disposal, and remediation. Its goal is to help both the military and industry comply with regulations by implementing cost-effective, clean manufacturing technologies. Concurrent Technologies Corporation operates the NDCEE program for the DoD, and has established a demonstration factory to demonstrate, evaluate, and validate state-of-the-art and near-commercial technologies with full-scale parts. This article describes some of the developments being evaluated for processes that prevent pollution and/or minimize waste.

  9. MANUFACTURING METHODS FOR PHASE SHIFTERS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MANUFACTURING), (*PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, FERRITES , GARNET, DIGITAL SYSTEMS, X BAND, C BAND, S BAND, RADAR EQUIPMENT, MAGNETIC MATERIALS, YTTRIUM COMPOUNDS, GADOLINIUM COMPOUNDS, ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, IRON COMPOUNDS, OXIDES.

  10. Desktop Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Desktop manufacturing is the use of data from a computer-assisted design system to construct actual models of an object. Emerging processes are stereolithography, laser sintering, ballistic particle manufacturing, laminated object manufacturing, and photochemical machining. (SK)

  11. Desktop Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Desktop manufacturing is the use of data from a computer-assisted design system to construct actual models of an object. Emerging processes are stereolithography, laser sintering, ballistic particle manufacturing, laminated object manufacturing, and photochemical machining. (SK)

  12. Training for New Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James

    1988-01-01

    Examines the effects of computer-based manufacturing technologies on employment opportunities and job skills. Describes the establishment of the Industrial Technology Institute in Michigan to develop and utilize advanced manufacturing technologies, and the institute's relationship to the state's community colleges. Reviews lessons learned from…

  13. Training for New Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James

    1988-01-01

    Examines the effects of computer-based manufacturing technologies on employment opportunities and job skills. Describes the establishment of the Industrial Technology Institute in Michigan to develop and utilize advanced manufacturing technologies, and the institute's relationship to the state's community colleges. Reviews lessons learned from…

  14. Wireless technology for integrated manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Manges, W.W.; Allgood, G.O.; Shourbaji, A.A.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the ground breaking work in Oak Ridge facilities that now leads us to the brink of the wireless revolution in manufacturing. The focus is on solving tough technological problems necessary for success and addressing the critical issues of throughput, security, reliability, and robustness in applying wireless technology to manufacturing processes. Innovative solutions to these problems are highlighted through detailed designs and testbed implementations that demonstrate key concepts. The DOE-Oak Ridge complex represented by the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technologies (ORCMT) continues to develop these technologies and will continue to focus on solving tough manufacturing problems.

  15. Photovoltaic Cz silicon manufacturing technology improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.L. )

    1994-06-30

    Siemens Solar Industries (SSI) began a three-year, three-phase cost shared contract in March 1992 to demonstrate significant cost reductions and improvements in manufacturing technology. The work has focused on near-term projects for implementation in the SSI Czochralski (Cz) manufacturing facility in Camarillo, California. The work has been undertaken to increase the commercial viability and volume of photovoltaic manufacturing by evaluating the most significant cost categories and then lowering the cost of each item through experimentation, materials refinement, and better industrial engineering. The initial phase of the program has concentrated in the areas of crystal growth, wafer technology, module development, and environmental, safety, and health issues.

  16. Photovoltaic Cz silicon manufacturing technology improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, Theresa L.

    1996-01-01

    Siemens Solar Industries (SSI) began a three-year, three-phase cost shared contract in March 1992 to demonstrate significant cost reductions and improvements in manufacturing technology. The work has focused on near-term projects for implementation in the SSI Czochralski (Cz) manufacturing facility in Camarillo, California. The work has been undertaken to increase the commercial viability and volume of photovoltaic manufacturing by evaluating the most significant cost categories and then lowering the cost of each item through experimentation, materials refinement, and better industrial engineering. The program has concentrated in the areas of crystal growth, wafer technology, module development and environmental, safety and health issues.

  17. Technology: Manufacturing, Transportation, Construction, Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The technology-based student activities in this curriculum resource book are intended to be incorporated into any industrial arts/technology education program. The activities are classified according to one of four technological systems--construction, communications, manufacturing, and transportation. Within the four parts of the guide, individual…

  18. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology - Phase 2A. Annual subcontract report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.

    1995-01-01

    Utility Power Group (UPG), and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) have conducted efforts in developing their manufacturing lines. UPG has focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase I. APS has focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks, while continuing the process and quality control and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55 watt (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility. In the APS Trenton EUREKA manufacturing facility, APS has: (1) Developed high throughput lamination procedures; (2) Optimized existing module designs; (3) Developed new module designs for architectural applications; (4) Developed enhanced deposition parameter control; (5) Designed equipment required to manufacture new EUREKA modules developed during Phase II; (6) Improved uniformity of thin-film materials deposition; and (7) Improved the stabilized power output of the APS EP50 EUREKA module to 55 watts. In the APS Fairfield EUREKA manufacturing facility, APS has: (1) Introduced the new products developed under Phase I into the APS Fairfield EUREKA module production line; (2) Increased the extent of automation in the production line; (3) Introduced Statistical Process Control to the module production line; and (4) Transferred-progress made in the APS Trenton facility into the APS Fairfield facility.

  19. Technology for Manufacturing Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Ground Processing Scheduling System (GPSS) was developed by Ames Research Center, Kennedy Space Center and divisions of the Lockheed Company to maintain the scheduling for preparing a Space Shuttle Orbiter for a mission. Red Pepper Software Company, now part of PeopleSoft, Inc., commercialized the software as their ResponseAgent product line. The software enables users to monitor manufacturing variables, report issues and develop solutions to existing problems.

  20. Manufacturing: workers, technology, and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumia, Ronald

    1995-11-01

    Manufacturing is a challenging activity. One must coordinate many activities to achieve success. There appears to be no magic formula which ensure quality. Simple prescriptions for all of manufacturing ills have been suggested, but the theory works better than the practice. This paper explores manufacturing from the standpoint of the interactions of workers, management, and the technology they use in their jobs. These three factors form a complex system, and to optimize the system is virtually impossible without a greater level of understanding. Technology is clearly one factor which makes a company excel, but it is not the only factor. Technology cannot be looked upon as the savior of manufacturing, but as one component of a complex system.

  1. Using Science to 'Manufacture' Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabato, Jorge A.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the ethical and sociopolitical problems arising from "manufactured technology." This technology is produced by a new proletariat of scientists, engineers and technical assistants using their working capacity to generate knowledge and convert it into a commercial commodity essential to the production and marketing of goods and services…

  2. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulton, William R.; Meieran, Eugene S.; Tummala, Rao R.

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found that, after four decades of development in electronics and manufacturing technologies, Japanese electronics companies are leaders in the development, support, and management of complex, low-cost packaging and assembly technologies used in the production of a broad range of consumer electronics products. The electronics industry's suppliers provide basic materials and equipment required for electronic packaging applications. Panelists concluded that some Japanese firms could be leading U.S. competitors by as much as a decade in these areas. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure is an integral part of its microelectronics industry's success.

  3. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulton, William R.; Meieran, Eugene S.; Tummala, Rao R.

    1995-01-01

    The JTEC panel found that, after four decades of development in electronics and manufacturing technologies, Japanese electronics companies are leaders in the development, support, and management of complex, low-cost packaging and assembly technologies used in the production of a broad range of consumer electronics products. The electronics industry's suppliers provide basic materials and equipment required for electronic packaging applications. Panelists concluded that some Japanese firms could be leading U.S. competitors by as much as a decade in these areas. Japan's technology and manufacturing infrastructure is an integral part of its microelectronics industry's success.

  4. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology, Phase 2A. Semiannual subcontract report, 1 May 1993--31 October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.; Volltrauer, H.

    1994-04-01

    Utility Power Group (UPG) and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS), continued work to develop their manufacturing lines. UPG focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase 1. APS focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks while continuing process quality control, and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55-W (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility.

  5. Turbine airfoil manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kortovich, C.

    1995-10-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of the gas turbine engine is directly related to the turbine inlet temperatures. The ability to increase these temperatures has occurred as a result of improvements in materials, design, and processing techniques. A generic sequence indicating the relationship of these factors to temperature capability is schematically shown in Figure 1 for aircraft engine and land based engine materials. A basic contribution that is not captured by the Figure is the significant improvement in process and manufacturing capability that has accompanied each of these innovations. It is this capability that has allowed the designs and innovations to be applied on a high volume, cost effective scale in the aircraft gas turbine market.

  6. Rhenium Rocket Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion Branch has a research and technology program to develop high-temperature (2200 C), iridium-coated rhenium rocket chamber materials for radiation-cooled rockets in satellite propulsion systems. Although successful material demonstrations have gained much industry interest, acceptance of the technology has been hindered by a lack of demonstrated joining technologies and a sparse materials property data base. To alleviate these concerns, we fabricated rhenium to C-103 alloy joints by three methods: explosive bonding, diffusion bonding, and brazing. The joints were tested by simulating their incorporation into a structure by welding and by simulating high-temperature operation. Test results show that the shear strength of the joints degrades with welding and elevated temperature operation but that it is adequate for the application. Rhenium is known to form brittle intermetallics with a number of elements, and this phenomena is suspected to cause the strength degradation. Further bonding tests with a tantalum diffusion barrier between the rhenium and C-103 is planned to prevent the formation of brittle intermetallics.

  7. Exploring Technology Education: Exploring Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joerschke, John D.

    These instructional materials include a teacher's guide designed to assist instructors in organizing and presenting a unit of study on manufacturing technology and a student guide. The materials are based on the curriculum-alignment concept of first stating the objectives, developing instructional strategies for teaching those objectives, and then…

  8. Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    2017-01-01

    The Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility (CoMET) at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) paves the way for innovative wind turbine components and accelerated manufacturing. Available for use by industry partners and university researchers, the 10,000-square-foot facility expands NREL's composite manufacturing research capabilities by enabling researchers to design, prototype, and test composite wind turbine blades and other components -- and then manufacture them onsite. Designed to work in conjunction with NREL's design, analysis, and structural testing capabilities, the CoMET facility expedites manufacturing innovation.

  9. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilden, K. S.; Harris, C. G.; Flynn, B. W.; Gessel, M. G.; Scholz, D. B.; Stawski, S.; Winston, V.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program is to develop the technology required for cost-and weight-efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements, and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of stringer-stiffened and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant-section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements cocured to skin structures. Significant process development efforts included AFP, braiding, RTM, autoclave cure, and core blanket fabrication for both sandwich and stiffened-skin structure. Outer-mold-line and inner-mold-line tooling was developed for sandwich structures and stiffened-skin structure. The effect of design details, process control and tool design on repeatable, dimensionally stable, structure for low cost barrel assembly was assessed. Subcomponent panels representative of crown, keel, and side quadrant panels were fabricated to assess scale-up effects and manufacturing anomalies for full-scale structures. Manufacturing database including time studies, part quality, and manufacturing plans were generated to support the development of designs and analytical models to access cost, structural performance, and dimensional tolerance.

  10. Human Issues in Manufacturing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    conventional mass- production manufacturing and the benefits of lean manufacturing . The text details the results of a five-year, multi national study...data and comparisons between mass and lean manufacturing . The key objective is to "illustrate the transition from mass to lean production with...of reference for the transition from current manufacturing systems to the goal state of lean manufacturing . Manufacturing before change is referred to

  11. Non-Autoclave (Prepreg) Manufacturing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-09

    Non-Autoclave ( Prepreg ) Manufacturing Technology Gary G. Bond, John M. Griffith, Gail L. Hahn The Boeing Company Chris Bongiovanni, Jack Boyd Cytec...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Non-Autoclave ( Prepreg ) Manufacturing Technology 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...AeroStructures, Manufacturing & Support Technologies 4 Targets for Third Generation Vacuum-Bag-Only Prepreg Processing Wet Tg Cure Temp Out Time % Porosity

  12. Research on advanced photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.; Eberspacher, C. )

    1991-11-01

    This report outlines opportunities for significantly advancing the scale and economy of high-volume manufacturing of high-efficiency photovoltaic (PV) modules. We propose to pursue a concurrent effort to advance existing crystalline silicon module manufacturing technology and to implement thin film CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) module manufacturing. This combination of commercial-scale manufacturing of high-efficiency crystalline silicon modules and of pilot-scale manufacturing of low-cost thin film CIS technology will support continued, rapid growth of the US PV industry.

  13. Challenges in teaching modern manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngaile, Gracious; Wang, Jyhwen; Gau, Jenn-Terng

    2015-07-01

    Teaching of manufacturing courses for undergraduate engineering students has become a challenge due to industrial globalisation coupled with influx of new innovations, technologies, customer-driven products. This paper discusses development of a modern manufacturing course taught concurrently in three institutions where students collaborate in executing various projects. Lectures are developed to contain materials featuring advanced manufacturing technologies, R&D trends in manufacturing. Pre- and post-surveys were conducted by an external evaluator to assess the impact of the course on increase in student's knowledge of manufacturing; increase students' preparedness and confidence in effective communication and; increase students' interest in pursuing additional academic studies and/or a career path in manufacturing and high technology. The surveyed data indicate that the students perceived significant gains in manufacturing knowledge and preparedness in effective communication. The study also shows that implementation of a collaborative course within multiple institutions requires a robust and collective communication platform.

  14. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic manufacturing technology - phase 2A. Semiannual subcontract report, May 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Duran, G.; Mackamul, K.; Metcalf, D.

    1995-10-01

    The objectives for this task are to integrate and test the automated encapsulation system designed in the second year of this effort. Once the system is fully integrated, UPG will collect and analyze data from continuous production runs employing the advanced encapsulation materials and processes utilized in the manufacture of POWERGLASS modules. Representative modules encapsulated utilizing the automated station will then be submitted for qualification (NREL/TR-213-3624) testing. This task is anticipated to result in a 98% yield and a cost reduction of 60% (cumulative) in the UPG encapsulation process.

  15. Organizational Considerations for Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRuntz, Bruce D.; Turner, Roger M.

    2003-01-01

    In the last several decades, the United States has experienced a decline in productivity, while the world has seen a maturation of the global marketplace. Nations have moved manufacturing strategy and process technology issues to the top of management priority lists. The issues surrounding manufacturing technologies and their implementations have…

  16. Advanced manufacturing: Technology and international competitiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-02-01

    Dramatic changes in the competitiveness of German and Japanese manufacturing have been most evident since 1988. All three countries are now facing similar challenges, and these challenges are clearly observed in human capital issues. Our comparison of human capital issues in German, Japanese, and US manufacturing leads us to the following key judgments: Manufacturing workforces are undergoing significant changes due to advanced manufacturing technologies. As companies are forced to develop and apply these technologies, the constituency of the manufacturing workforce (especially educational requirements, contingent labor, job content, and continuing knowledge development) is being dramatically and irreversibly altered. The new workforce requirements which result due to advanced manufacturing require a higher level of worker sophistication and responsibility.

  17. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (1) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (2) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994.

  18. Challenges in Teaching Modern Manufacturing Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngaile, Gracious; Wang, Jyhwen; Gau, Jenn-Terng

    2015-01-01

    Teaching of manufacturing courses for undergraduate engineering students has become a challenge due to industrial globalisation coupled with influx of new innovations, technologies, customer-driven products. This paper discusses development of a modern manufacturing course taught concurrently in three institutions where students collaborate in…

  19. FMS: The New Wave of Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) are described as a marriage of all of the latest technologies--robotics, numerical control, CAD/CAM (computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing), etc.--into a cost-efficient, optimized production process yielding the greatest flexibility in making various parts. A typical curriculum to teach FMS…

  20. Challenges in Teaching Modern Manufacturing Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngaile, Gracious; Wang, Jyhwen; Gau, Jenn-Terng

    2015-01-01

    Teaching of manufacturing courses for undergraduate engineering students has become a challenge due to industrial globalisation coupled with influx of new innovations, technologies, customer-driven products. This paper discusses development of a modern manufacturing course taught concurrently in three institutions where students collaborate in…

  1. FMS: The New Wave of Manufacturing Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Industrial Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Flexible manufacturing systems (FMS) are described as a marriage of all of the latest technologies--robotics, numerical control, CAD/CAM (computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing), etc.--into a cost-efficient, optimized production process yielding the greatest flexibility in making various parts. A typical curriculum to teach FMS…

  2. Emerging technologies in arthroplasty: additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kulesha, Gene; Kester, Mark; Mont, Michael A

    2014-06-01

    Additive manufacturing is an industrial technology whereby three-dimensional visual computer models are fabricated into physical components by selectively curing, depositing, or consolidating various materials in consecutive layers. Although initially developed for production of simulated models, the technology has undergone vast improvements and is currently increasingly being used for the production of end-use components in various aerospace, automotive, and biomedical specialties. The ability of this technology to be used for the manufacture of solid-mesh-foam monolithic and coated components of complex geometries previously considered unmanufacturable has attracted the attention of implant manufacturers, bioengineers, and orthopedic surgeons. Currently, there is a paucity of reports describing this fabrication method in the orthopedic literature. Therefore, we aimed to briefly describe this technology, some of the applications in other orthopedic subspecialties, its present use in hip and knee arthroplasty, and concerns with the present form of the technology. As there are few reports of clinical trials presently available, the true benefits of this technology can only be realized when studies evaluating the clinical and radiographic outcomes of cementless implants manufactured with additive manufacturing report durable fixation, less stress shielding, and better implant survivorship. Nevertheless, the authors believe that this technology holds great promise and may potentially change the conventional methods of casting, machining, and tooling for implant manufacturing in the future. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. The photovoltaic manufacturing technology project: A government/industry partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Mooney, G.D.

    1991-12-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a government/industry photovoltaic manufacturing research and development (R D) project composed of partnerships between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. It is designed to assist the US PV industry in improving manufacturing processes, accelerating manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, increasing commercial product performance, and generally laying the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing plant capabilities. The project is being carried out in three separate phases, each focused on a specific approach to solving the problems identified by the industrial participants. These participants are selected through competitive procurements. Furthermore, the PVMaT project has been specifically structured to ensure that these PV manufacturing R D subcontract awards are selected with no intention of either directing funding toward specific PV technologies (e.g., amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, etc.), or spreading the awards among a number of technologies (e.g., one subcontract in each area). Each associated subcontract under any phase of this project is, and will continue to be, selected for funding on its own technical and cost merits. Phase 1, the problem identification phase, was completed early in 1991. Phase 2 is now under way. This is the solution phase of the project and addresses problems of specific manufacturers. The envisioned subcontracts under Phase 2 may be up to three years in duration and will be highly cost-shared between the US government and US industrial participants. Phase 3, is also under way. General issues related to PV module development will be studied through various teaming arrangements. 25 refs.

  4. The photovoltaic manufacturing technology project: A government/industry partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Mooney, G.D.

    1991-12-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a government/industry photovoltaic manufacturing research and development (R&D) project composed of partnerships between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. It is designed to assist the US PV industry in improving manufacturing processes, accelerating manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, increasing commercial product performance, and generally laying the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing plant capabilities. The project is being carried out in three separate phases, each focused on a specific approach to solving the problems identified by the industrial participants. These participants are selected through competitive procurements. Furthermore, the PVMaT project has been specifically structured to ensure that these PV manufacturing R&D subcontract awards are selected with no intention of either directing funding toward specific PV technologies (e.g., amorphous silicon, polycrystalline thin films, etc.), or spreading the awards among a number of technologies (e.g., one subcontract in each area). Each associated subcontract under any phase of this project is, and will continue to be, selected for funding on its own technical and cost merits. Phase 1, the problem identification phase, was completed early in 1991. Phase 2 is now under way. This is the solution phase of the project and addresses problems of specific manufacturers. The envisioned subcontracts under Phase 2 may be up to three years in duration and will be highly cost-shared between the US government and US industrial participants. Phase 3, is also under way. General issues related to PV module development will be studied through various teaming arrangements. 25 refs.

  5. Overview of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C E; Mitchell, R L; Mooney, G D

    1993-08-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a historic government/industry photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing R&D partnership composed of joint efforts between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy) and members of the US PV industry. The project`s ultimate goal is to ensure that the US industry retains and extends its world leadership role in the manufacture and commercial development of PV components and systems. PVMaT is designed to do this by helping the US PV industry improve manufacturing processes, accelerate manufacturing cost reductions for PV modules, improve commercial product performance, and lay the groundwork for a substantial scale-up of US-based PV manufacturing capacities. Phase 1 of the project, the problem identification phase, was completed in early 1991. Phase 2, the problem solution phase, which addresses process-specific problems of specific manufacturers, is now underway with an expected duration of 5 years. Phase 3 addresses R&D problems that are relatively common to a number of PV companies or the PV industry as a whole. These ``generic`` problem areas are being addressed through a teamed research approach.

  6. Efficient manufacturing technology of metal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jizhen; Wu, Yanxiong; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Liping; Wang, Lingjie; Qu, Hemeng

    2015-10-01

    The efficient manufacturing technologies greatly accelerate the development and production process. Optical components have higher precision requirements than mechanical parts. This provides great challenge for rapid manufacturing. Metallic optical system is featured high resolution, wide spectral range, light weight, compact design, low cost and short manufacturing period. Reflective mirrors and supporting structures can be made from the same material to improve athermal performance of the system. Common materials for metal mirrors in optical applications include aluminum, copper, beryllium, aluminum beryllium alloy and so on. Their physical characteristics and relative advantages are presented. Most kinds of metals have good machinability and can be manufactured by many kinds of producing methods. This makes metallic optical system saving 30%~60% cost and time than others. The manufacturing process of metal mirror is different due to its working spectral. The metal mirror can be directly manufactured by single point diamond turning. This is an outstanding technique in point of ultra-precision as well as economical manufacture of mirrors. The roughness values and form accuracy of optical surfaces after diamond turning can satisfy the quality level for applications in the near infrared and infrared range. And for visible light spectral the turning structures must be removed with a smoothing procedure in order to minimize the scatter losses. Some smoothing methods to obtain visible quality metal mirrors are given in this paper. Some new manufacturing technology, such as 3D printing, can be used for metallic optical system and several promising techniques are presented.

  7. Advanced manufacturing technologies on color plasma displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsui, Keiichi

    2000-06-01

    The mass production of the color plasma display started from 1996. However, since the price of the panel is still expensive, PDPs are not in widespread use at home. It is necessary to develop the new and low-cost manufacturing technologies to reduce the price of the panel. This paper describes some of the features of new fabrication technologies of PDPs.

  8. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that ``competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.`` Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  9. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.'' Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  10. A review of advanced manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, T.

    1981-03-01

    Joining techniques, hot forming technology, forging technology, investment casting, small cooling hole manufacturing, combustor technology, quality assurance, and chip forming machining of gas turbine engine components are discussed. Electron and laser beam welding; laser hard facing techniques; automatic TIG and plasma welding; diffusion brazing of titanium and nickel alloys; heated die forming: blow forming; superplastic forming; fan and compressor blade forging; and wheel and disk forging from powder superalloys are described.

  11. The USAF Manufacturing Technology Program Status Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    segment at a minimum thick- mercial manufacturing industry . It is ness of 0.010 inches for the Fl19 advanced fighter engine , part of the four-program...technology transfer program, specifically how MT has emphasized transitioning technology to industry , promoted development of dual-use technology, and...Project Engineers : The Defense Production Act Title III is a Department of John Blevins Defense program which seeks to maintain or develop indus- WL/MTD

  12. Composite fuselage crown panel manufacturing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willden, Kurtis; Metschan, S.; Grant, C.; Brown, T.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial fuselage structures contain significant challenges in attempting to save manufacturing costs with advanced composite technology. Assembly issues, material costs, and fabrication of elements with complex geometry are each expected to drive the cost of composite fuselage structures. Boeing's efforts under the NASA ACT program have pursued key technologies for low-cost, large crown panel fabrication. An intricate bond panel design and manufacturing concepts were selected based on the efforts of the Design Build Team (DBT). The manufacturing processes selected for the intricate bond design include multiple large panel fabrication with the Advanced Tow Placement (ATP) process, innovative cure tooling concepts, resin transfer molding of long fuselage frames, and utilization of low-cost material forms. The process optimization for final design/manufacturing configuration included factory simulations and hardware demonstrations. These efforts and other optimization tasks were instrumental in reducing cost by 18 percent and weight by 45 percent relative to an aluminum baseline. The qualitative and quantitative results of the manufacturing demonstrations were used to assess manufacturing risks and technology readiness.

  13. IMPROVED EQUIPMENT CLEANING IN COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES (PHASE I)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a Phase I study to characterize current equipment cleaning practices in the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry, to identify alternative cleaning technologies, and to identify demonstrable technologies and estimate their emissions imp...

  14. IMPROVED EQUIPMENT CLEANING IN COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING FACILITIES (PHASE I)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a Phase I study to characterize current equipment cleaning practices in the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry, to identify alternative cleaning technologies, and to identify demonstrable technologies and estimate their emissions imp...

  15. Emerging Materials Technologies That Matter to Manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    A brief overview of emerging materials technologies. Exploring the weight reduction benefit of replacing Carbon Fiber with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) in Polymer Composites. Review of the benign purification method developed for CNT sheets. The future of manufacturing will include the integration of computational material design and big data analytics, along with Nanomaterials as building blocks.

  16. Photovoltaic industry manufacturing technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vanecek, D.; Diver, M.; Fernandez, R.

    1998-08-01

    This report contains the results of the Photovoltaic (PV) Industry Manufacturing Technology Assessment performed by the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) of the University of Texas at Arlington for the National Renewable Energy laboratory. ARRI surveyed eleven companies to determine their state-of-manufacturing in the areas of engineering design, operations management, manufacturing technology, equipment maintenance, quality management, and plant conditions. Interviews with company personnel and plant tours at each of the facilities were conducted and the information compiled. The report is divided into two main segments. The first part of the report presents how the industry as a whole conforms to ``World Class`` manufacturing practices. Conclusions are drawn from the results of a survey as to the areas that the PV industry can improve on to become more competitive in the industry and World Class. Appendix A contains the questions asked in the survey, a brief description of the benefits to performing this task and the aggregate response to the questions. Each company participating in the assessment process received the results of their own facility to compare against the industry as a whole. The second part of the report outlines opportunities that exist on the shop floor for improving Process Equipment and Automation Strategies. Appendix B contains the survey that was used to assess each of the manufacturing processes.

  17. Additive manufacturing: technology, applications and research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Nannan; Leu, Ming C.

    2013-09-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technology has been researched and developed for more than 20 years. Rather than removing materials, AM processes make three-dimensional parts directly from CAD models by adding materials layer by layer, offering the beneficial ability to build parts with geometric and material complexities that could not be produced by subtractive manufacturing processes. Through intensive research over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the development and commercialization of new and innovative AM processes, as well as numerous practical applications in aerospace, automotive, biomedical, energy and other fields. This paper reviews the main processes, materials and applications of the current AM technology and presents future research needs for this technology.

  18. Additive manufacturing technology in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Scott C; Moore, Michael G

    2016-10-01

    Technological advances have been part and parcel of modern reconstructive surgery, in that practitioners of this discipline are continually looking for innovative ways to perfect their craft and improve patient outcomes. We are currently in a technological climate wherein advances in computers, imaging, and science have coalesced with resulting innovative breakthroughs that are not merely limited to improved outcomes and enhanced patient care, but may provide novel approaches to training the next generation of reconstructive surgeons. New developments in software and modeling platforms, imaging modalities, tissue engineering, additive manufacturing, and customization of implants are poised to revolutionize the field of reconstructive surgery. The interface between technological advances and reconstructive surgery continues to expand. Additive manufacturing techniques continue to evolve in an effort to improve patient outcomes, decrease operative time, and serve as instructional tools for the training of reconstructive surgeons.

  19. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenshan; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods.

  20. Ubiquitous Robotic Technology for Smart Manufacturing System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Liyu; Qiu, Qiang; Cao, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    As the manufacturing tasks become more individualized and more flexible, the machines in smart factory are required to do variable tasks collaboratively without reprogramming. This paper for the first time discusses the similarity between smart manufacturing systems and the ubiquitous robotic systems and makes an effort on deploying ubiquitous robotic technology to the smart factory. Specifically, a component based framework is proposed in order to enable the communication and cooperation of the heterogeneous robotic devices. Further, compared to the service robotic domain, the smart manufacturing systems are often in larger size. So a hierarchical planning method was implemented to improve the planning efficiency. A test bed of smart factory is developed. It demonstrates that the proposed framework is suitable for industrial domain, and the hierarchical planning method is able to solve large problems intractable with flat methods. PMID:27446206

  1. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  2. Technology transfer and international development: Materials and manufacturing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Policy oriented studies on technological development in several relatively advanced developing countries were conducted. Priority sectors defined in terms of technological sophistication, capital intensity, value added, and export potential were studied in Brazil, Venezuela, Israel, and Korea. The development of technological policy alternatives for the sponsoring country is assessed. Much emphasis is placed on understanding the dynamics of the sectors through structured interviews with a large sample of firms in the leading manufacturing and materials processing sectors.

  3. Manufacturing technology: A Sandia Technology Bulletin, Volume 1, No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Maydew, R.C.; Leonard, J.A.; Hey, N.S.

    1990-08-01

    Welcome to this first issue of Manufacturing Technology, one of three new technology bulletins published at Sandia National Laboratories in which we seek to share information with US industry about applications of technology. Inside this issue: industry/DOE/Sandia agreement to strengthen specialty metals competitiveness; silicon micromachining produces microscopic parts; Sandia develops state-of-the-art capacitor winding machine; new robotic system spells finis to manual edge finishing; and milling assistant speeds numerically controlled machine programming.

  4. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  5. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  6. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  7. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  8. 48 CFR 235.006-70 - Manufacturing Technology Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manufacturing Technology... CONTRACTING 235.006-70 Manufacturing Technology Program. In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 2521(d), for acquisitions under the Manufacturing Technology Program— (a) Award all contracts using competitive...

  9. Small Scale Turbopump Manufacturing Technology and Material Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, Erika; Morgan, Kristin; Wells, Doug; Zimmerman, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As part of an internal research and development project, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing a high specific impulse 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 pump-fed engine testbed with the capability to throttle 10:1. A Fuel Turbopump (FTP) with the ability to operate across a speed range of 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm was developed and analyzed. This small size and flight-like Fuel Turbopump has completed the design and analysis phase and is currently in the manufacturing phase. This paper highlights the manufacturing and processes efforts to fabricate an approximately 20-lb turbopump with small flow passages, intricately bladed components and approximately 3-in diameter impellers. As a result of the small scale and tight tolerances of the hardware on this turbopump, several unique manufacturing and material challenges were encountered. Some of the technologies highlighted in this paper include the use of powder metallurgy technology to manufacture small impellers, electron beam welding of a turbine blisk shroud, and casting challenges. The use of risk reduction efforts such as non-destructive testing (NDT) and evaluation (NDE), fractography, material testing, and component spin testing are also discussed in this paper.

  10. [Hunting shot - evolution of manufacturing technology].

    PubMed

    Bochyński, Piotr; Kuliczkowski, Maciej; Karpiewska, Anna; Turkiewicz, Mariola; Dobosz, Tadeusz

    Hunting shot are 1.2-10 mm diameter balls, usually made of lead alloys, forming a cluster projectile used in smoothbore hunting shotguns. Shot may also be used in pistol and revolver ammunition, in which it can constitute structural element of the projectile. Shot pellets may also be made of other materials and have other shapes. The aim of this paper is to aggregate information on the topic available from a number of different sources. It is hoped that such information will be useful for forensic ballistics experts. Historical development of pellets and their manufacturing technology from the 15th century is presented.

  11. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology (PVMAT) improvements for ENTECH's concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, M.J. , Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, Texas 75261-2246 )

    1994-06-30

    With significant assistance from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Labs (Sandia), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), our technical team has been developing, field-testing, refining, and commercializing linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator technology for the past 15 years (Table I). In 1991 we completed Phase 1 of a DOE-sponsored Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. We are now performing Phase 2A of our PVMaT project. The key objective of our PVMaT project is to design, develop, and implement improved manufacturing processes for our fourth-generation concentrator module. The improved processes are being engineered to simultaneously achieve enhanced product quality (i.e., improved module efficiency, reliability, and field lifetime), higher production volume (10 MV/year initial rate), and lower production costs ($1.25/W[sub peak] goal). Under our PVMaT project, we have made significant improvements in manufacturing technology for our fourth-generation concentrator module, and the key results to date are summarized in the following paragraphs.

  12. ENABLING SMART MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECISION-MAKING SUPPORT.

    PubMed

    Helu, Moneer; Libes, Don; Lubell, Joshua; Lyons, Kevin; Morris, K C

    2016-01-01

    Smart manufacturing combines advanced manufacturing capabilities and digital technologies throughout the product lifecycle. These technologies can provide decision-making support to manufacturers through improved monitoring, analysis, modeling, and simulation that generate more and better intelligence about manufacturing systems. However, challenges and barriers have impeded the adoption of smart manufacturing technologies. To begin to address this need, this paper defines requirements for data-driven decision making in manufacturing based on a generalized description of decision making. Using these requirements, we then focus on identifying key barriers that prevent the development and use of data-driven decision making in industry as well as examples of technologies and standards that have the potential to overcome these barriers. The goal of this research is to promote a common understanding among the manufacturing community that can enable standardization efforts and innovation needed to continue adoption and use of smart manufacturing technologies.

  13. ENABLING SMART MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECISION-MAKING SUPPORT

    PubMed Central

    Helu, Moneer; Libes, Don; Lubell, Joshua; Lyons, Kevin; Morris, KC

    2017-01-01

    Smart manufacturing combines advanced manufacturing capabilities and digital technologies throughout the product lifecycle. These technologies can provide decision-making support to manufacturers through improved monitoring, analysis, modeling, and simulation that generate more and better intelligence about manufacturing systems. However, challenges and barriers have impeded the adoption of smart manufacturing technologies. To begin to address this need, this paper defines requirements for data-driven decision making in manufacturing based on a generalized description of decision making. Using these requirements, we then focus on identifying key barriers that prevent the development and use of data-driven decision making in industry as well as examples of technologies and standards that have the potential to overcome these barriers. The goal of this research is to promote a common understanding among the manufacturing community that can enable standardization efforts and innovation needed to continue adoption and use of smart manufacturing technologies. PMID:28649678

  14. Heliostat Manufacturing for Near-Term Markets: Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-21

    This report describes a project by Science Applications International Corporation and its subcontractors Boeing/Rocketdyne and Bechtel Corp. to develop manufacturing technology for production of SAIC stretched membrane heliostats. The project consists of three phases, of which two are complete. This first phase had as its goals to identify and complete a detailed evaluation of manufacturing technology, process changes, and design enhancements to be pursued for near-term heliostat markets. In the second phase, the design of the SAIC stretched membrane heliostat was refined, manufacturing tooling for mirror facet and structural component fabrication was implemented, and four proof-of-concept/test heliostats were produced and installed in three locations. The proposed plan for Phase III calls for improvements in production tooling to enhance product quality and prepare increased production capacity. This project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Manufacturing Technology Program (SolMaT).

  15. Galvanometer scanning technology for laser additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xi; Li, Jin; Lucas, Mark

    2017-02-01

    A galvanometer laser beam scanning system is an essential element in many laser additive manufacturing (LAM) technologies including Stereolithography (SLA), Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Understanding the laser beam scanning techniques and recent innovations in this field will greatly benefit the 3D laser printing system integration and technology advance. One of the challenges to achieve high quality 3D printed parts is due to the non-uniform laser power density delivered on the materials caused by the acceleration and deceleration movements of the galvanometer at ends of the hatching and outlining patterns. One way to solve this problem is to modulate the laser power as the function of the scanning speed during the acceleration or deceleration periods. Another strategy is to maintain the constant scanning speed while accurately coordinating the laser on and off operation throughout the job. In this paper, we demonstrate the high speed, high accuracy and low drift digital scanning technology that incorporates both techniques to achieve uniform laser density with minimal additional process development. With the constant scanning speed method, the scanner not only delivers high quality and uniform results, but also a throughput increase of 23% on a typical LAM job, compared to that of the conventional control method that requires galvanometer acceleration and deceleration movements.

  16. CVD-Enabled Graphene Manufacture and Technology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrated manufacturing is arguably the most challenging task in the development of technology based on graphene and other 2D materials, particularly with regard to the industrial demand for “electronic-grade” large-area films. In order to control the structure and properties of these materials at the monolayer level, their nucleation, growth and interfacing needs to be understood to a level of unprecedented detail compared to existing thin film or bulk materials. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as the most versatile and promising technique to develop graphene and 2D material films into industrial device materials and this Perspective outlines recent progress, trends, and emerging CVD processing pathways. A key focus is the emerging understanding of the underlying growth mechanisms, in particular on the role of the required catalytic growth substrate, which brings together the latest progress in the fields of heterogeneous catalysis and classic crystal/thin-film growth. PMID:26240694

  17. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Yarborough, Kenneth D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  18. Overcoming Barriers to Technology Adoption in Small Manufacturing Enterprises (SMEs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    7 3.4 Adopting a Control-System-Modeling Tool.................................................8 3.5 Adapting Ecommerce and Manufacturing Execution...demonstration projects, workforce development, and technology development activities to document the benefits of these technologies and the steps needed to...SMEs to support defense manufacturers by demonstrating the benefits of implementing commercially available software and information technologies

  19. Towards a Lifecycle Information Framework and Technology in Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Thomas; Feeney, Allison Barnard; Helu, Moneer; Camelio, Jaime A

    2017-06-01

    Industry has been chasing the dream of integrating and linking data across the product lifecycle and enterprises for decades. However, industry has been challenged by the fact that the context in which data is used varies based on the function / role in the product lifecycle that is interacting with the data. Holistically, the data across the product lifecycle must be considered an unstructured data-set because multiple data repositories and domain-specific schema exist in each phase of the lifecycle. This paper explores a concept called the Lifecycle Information Framework and Technology (LIFT). LIFT is a conceptual framework for lifecycle information management and the integration of emerging and existing technologies, which together form the basis of a research agenda for dynamic information modeling in support of digital-data curation and reuse in manufacturing. This paper provides a discussion of the existing technologies and activities that the LIFT concept leverages. Also, the paper describes the motivation for applying such work to the domain of manufacturing. Then, the LIFT concept is discussed in detail, while underlying technologies are further examined and a use case is detailed. Lastly, potential impacts are explored.

  20. [Manufacture of diamond blades via microsystem technology].

    PubMed

    Spraul, Christoph W; Ertl, Stephan; Strobel, Stefan; Gretzschel, Ralph; Schirmer, Enrico; Rösch, Rudolf; Lingenfelder, Christian; Lang, Gerhard K

    2003-04-01

    The application of diamond knives has steadily increased in ophthalmic surgery. However, the geometry of the blade, its thickness and the sharpness of the cutting edge are limited by the abrasive diamond polishing process, e. g. the crystalline morphology of the bulk material and the grinding powder used. A new generation of diamond blades is presented herewith allowing free choice of blade shape and thickness and possessing excellent sharpness due to a new polishing process. The new production method is based on a high-quality CVD (chemical vapour deposition) diamond film of some tenths of microns thickness, deposited on a silicon wafer as microchip technology. The mechanical properties of this synthetic diamond film are almost equal to those of a natural diamond and the surface of this film is mirror-like after deposition without requiring post-polishing. The shape of the blade can be freely defined and is transferred into the diamond film by a plasma polishing process adopted from microsystem technology. The new production method results in highly reproducible diamond blades. Concave blades and round shapes can now be realised without the restrictions of the conventional production process. The force-free fabrication method even allows realisation of miniaturized blades (e. g. width < 0.125 mm, thickness < 50 microm) far beyond the possibilities of conventional diamond blade production. Plasma polishing by means of gas atoms results in extreme sharpness with the cutting edge radius in the range of approx. 3 nm. Utilising microsystem technology we were able to manufacture reproducible artificial diamond blades. The new process offers for the first time surgeons a possibility of designing blades with a geometry close to their personal needs. Furthermore, the potential of facet-free ergonomically shaped diamond blades may stimulate further improvements towards novel surgical techniques.

  1. Recent progress in the photovoltaic manufacturing technology project (PVMaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C.E.; Mitchell, R.L.; Thomas, H. ); Herwig, L.O. ); Ruby, D.S. ); Sellers, R.

    1994-12-09

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project was initiated in 1990 to help the US photovoltaic (PV) industry extend its world leadership role in manufacturing and commercially developing PV modules and systems. It is being conducted in several phases, staggered to support industry progress. The four most recently awarded subcontracts (Phase 2B) are now completing their first year of research. They include two subcontracts on CdTe, one on Spheral Solar[trademark] Cells, and one on cast polysilicon. These subcontracts represent new technology additions to the PVMaT Project. Subcontracts initiated in earlier phases are nearing completion, and their progress is summarized. An additional phase of PVMaT, Phase 4A, is being initiated which will emphasize product-driven manufacturing research and development. The intention of Phase 4A is to emphasize improvement and cost reduction in the manufacture of full-system PV products. The work areas may include, but are not limited to, issues such as improvement of module manufacturing processes; system and system component packaging, integration, manufacturing, and assembly; product manufacturing flexibility; and balance-of-system development with the goal of product manufacturing improvements.

  2. Parts-on-Demand: Manufacturing Technology and Technology Transfer Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-31

    applicable technolo- "gy in all the required functions, applied to all of the generic part types. For example, one can buy a computer numerically -controlled...This will mesh perfectly with the current rise in information technology: office automation, CAD, CAM, CAE, numerical control, robotics, and inte...Nippon Denso : from a suits of 40 models, batchc; *.f one to 40,000 can be made on one day’s notice. "Design for POD manufacture and POD assembly" do not

  3. Power sources manufactures association : power technology roadmap workshop - 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, John S.

    2006-03-01

    The Power Sources Manufacturers Association (PSMA) is pleased to announce the release of the latest Power Technology Roadmap Workshop Report. This Fifth Edition Workshop Report includes presentations and discussions from the workshop as seen by the participants that included many of the industry's most influential members representing end-users, power supply manufacturers, component suppliers, consultants and academia. This report provides detailed projections for the next three to four years of various technologies in a quantitative form. There was special emphasis on how the increasing use of digital technologies will affect the industry in the next four years. The technology trend analysis and the roadmap is provided for the following specific product families expected to be the areas of largest market growth: (1) Ac-dc front end power supplies--1 kW from a single phase ac source; (2) External ac-dc power supplies; (3) Dc-dc bus converters; and (4) Non-isolated dc-dc converters. Bruce Miller, Chairman of PSMA, stated that 'the Power Technology Roadmap Workshop Report is an extensive document that analyzes and provides projections for most major technical parameters for a specific power supply. It is a unique document as it contains technology/parametric trends in a roadmap fashion from a variety of diverse sources, giving significant depth to its content. No such information is available from any other source'. The Power Technology Roadmap Workshop Report is available at no cost as to PSMA Regular and Associate members and at a reduced price to Affiliate members as a benefit of membership. The report will be offered to non-members at a price of $2490. For further information or to buy a copy of the report, please visit the publications page or the PSMA website or contact the Association Office.

  4. Improving drug manufacturing with process analytical technology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Licinia O; Alves, Teresa P; Cardoso, Joaquim P; Menezes, José C

    2006-01-01

    Within the process analytical technology (PAT) framework, as presented in the US Food and Drug Administration guidelines, the aim is to design, develop and operate processes consistently to ensure a pre-defined level of quality at the end of the manufacturing process. Three PAT implementation scenarios can be envisaged. Firstly, PAT could be used in its most modest version (in an almost non-PAT manner) to simply replace an existing quality control protocol (eg, using near-infrared spectroscopy for an in-process quality control, such as moisture content). Secondly, the use of in-process monitoring and process analysis could be integrated to enhance process understanding and operation for an existing industrial process. Thirdly, PAT could be used extensively and exclusively throughout development, scale-up and full-scale production of a new product and process. Although the first type of implementations are well known, reports of the second and third types remain scarce. Herein, results obtained from PAT implementations of the second and third types are described for two industrial processes for preparing bulk active pharmaceutical ingredients, demonstrating the benefits in terms of increased process understanding and process control.

  5. The technology base for agile manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brost, R. C.; Strip, D. R.; Eicker, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    The effective use of information is a critical problem faced by manufacturing organizations that must respond quickly to market changes. As product runs become shorter, rapid and efficient development of product manufacturing facilities becomes crucial to commercial success. Effective information utilization is a key element to successfully meeting these requirements. This paper reviews opportunities for developing technical solutions to information utilization problems within a manufacturing enterprise and outlines a research agenda for solving these problems.

  6. The Potential for High Technology Manufacturing in Nonmetropolitan Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, David L.; And Others

    This paper asks whether manufacturers of high technology are locating production facilities in nonmetropolitan areas and, if so, which industries and geographical areas are affected. It identifies high-technology manufacturers and estimates national employment trends for the sector from 1975 to 1982. National and regional employment data for…

  7. The Air Force Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH): Technology transfer methodology as exemplified by the radar transmit/receive module program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, Tracy; Ridgely, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Manufacturing Technology program is involved with the improvement of radar transmit/receive modules for use in active phased array radars for advanced fighter aircraft. Improvements in all areas of manufacture and test of these modules resulting in order of magnitude improvements in the cost of and the rate of production are addressed, as well as the ongoing transfer of this technology to the Navy.

  8. Technological Impacts: Manufacturing and the Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2012-01-01

    For the past two decades, and recently with the economic recession, the media has emphasized the decline of manufacturing in the United States and other developed countries. In the U.S., some initially blamed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) for this decline. Hearing that manufacturing is on the decline, one might reason that its…

  9. Manufacturing Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Theodore J.

    This curriculum for a 1-semester or 1-year course in manufacturing is designed to give students experience in applying knowledge from other courses and some basic production skills as they become involved in a manufacturing enterprise. Course content is organized around the laboratory activities necessary to organize and operate a process to mass…

  10. Manufacturing Systems. Curriculum Guide for Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Theodore J.

    This curriculum for a 1-semester or 1-year course in manufacturing is designed to give students experience in applying knowledge from other courses and some basic production skills as they become involved in a manufacturing enterprise. Course content is organized around the laboratory activities necessary to organize and operate a process to mass…

  11. Technological Impacts: Manufacturing and the Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Vincent W.

    2012-01-01

    For the past two decades, and recently with the economic recession, the media has emphasized the decline of manufacturing in the United States and other developed countries. In the U.S., some initially blamed the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) for this decline. Hearing that manufacturing is on the decline, one might reason that its…

  12. Alternating phase-shifted mask for logic gate levels, design, and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebmann, Lars W.; Graur, Ioana C.; Leipold, William C.; Oberschmidt, James M.; O'Grady, David S.; Regaill, Denis

    1999-07-01

    While the benefits of alternating phase shifted masks in improving lithographic process windows at increased resolution are well known throughout the lithography community, broad implementation of this potentially powerful technique has been slow due to the inherent complexity of the layout design and mask manufacturing process. This paper will review a project undertaken at IBM's Semiconductor Research and Development Center and Mask Manufacturing and Development facility to understand the technical and logistical issues associated with the application of alternating phase shifted mask technology to the gate level of a full microprocessor chip. The work presented here depicts an important milestone toward integration of alternating phase shifted masks into the manufacturing process by demonstrating an automated design solution and yielding a functional alternating phase shifted mask. The design conversion of the microprocessor gate level to a conjugate twin shifter alternating phase shift layout was accomplished with IBM's internal design system that automatically scaled the design, added required phase regions, and resolved phase conflicts. The subsequent fabrication of a nearly defect free phase shifted mask, as verified by SEM based die to die inspection, highlights the maturity of the alternating phase shifted mask manufacturing process in IBM's internal mask facility. Well defined and recognized challenges in mask inspection and repair remain and the layout of alternating phase shifted masks present a design and data preparation overhead, but the data presented here demonstrate the feasibility of designing and building manufacturing quality alternating phase shifted masks for the gate level of a microprocessor.

  13. Energy intensity, electricity consumption, and advanced manufacturing-technology usage

    SciTech Connect

    Doms, M.E.; Dunne, T.

    1995-07-01

    This article reports on the relationship between the usage of advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs) and energy consumption patterns in manufacturing plants. Using data from the Survey of Manufacturing Technology and the 1987 Census of Manufactures, we model the energy intensity and the electricity intensity of plants as functions of AMT usage and plant age. The main findings are that plants that utilize AMTs are less-energy intensive than plants not using AMTs, but consume proportionately more electricity as a fuel source. Additionally, older plants are generally more energy intensive and rely on fossil fuels to a greater extent than younger plants. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Incentives White Papers for Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-15

    capabilities, the design, and the manufacture of weapon systems. The defense industrial community is, more and more, a glob- ally competitive ...will also improve the global competitiveness of our U.S. industrial base. As manufacturing capabilities continue to globalize, overseas sources have...risks and rewards. DoD should work with stakeholders to address the competitive concerns of industry participants. For many organizations

  15. Gas-phase impregnation of porous media with pyrocarbon as a promising trend in the manufacturing technology of carbon-graphite materials and products for reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gurin, V.A.; Zelensky, V.F.; Konotop, Yu.F.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents some special features of producing carbon-graphite materials by gas-phase methods. Main differences between these methods and the traditional one of graphite fabrication are discussed; basic characteristics of the equipment available at the KIPT are given. The HTGR type reactors need radiation resistant grades of graphite with a normal operation guaranteed for a specified time.

  16. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH's concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.; Perry, J.L.; Jackson, M.C.; Walters, R.R. )

    1991-11-01

    This final technical report documents ENTECH's Phase 1 contract with Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Under this project we prepared a detailed description of our current manufacturing process for making our unique linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator modules. In addition, we prepared a detailed description of an improved manufacturing process, which will simultaneously increase module production rates, enhance module quality, and substantially reduce module costs. We also identified potential problems in implementing the new manufacturing process, and we proposed solutions to these anticipated problems. Before discussing the key results of our program, however, we present a brief description of our unique photovoltaic technology. The key conclusion of our PVMAT Phase 1 study is that our module technology, without further breakthroughs, can realistically meet the near-term DOE goal of 12 cents/kWh levelized electricity cost, provided that we successfully implement the new manufacturing process at a production volume of at least 10 megawatts per year. The key recommendation from our Phase 1 study is to continue our PVMaT project into Phase 2A, which is directed toward the actual manufacturing technology development required for our new module production process. 15 refs.

  17. PV Cz silicon manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 April 1992--31 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under a 3-year contract to demonstrate significant cost reductions and improvements in manufacturing technology. The work focused on near-term projects for implementation in the Siemens Solar Industries Czochralski (Cz) manufacturing facility in Camarillo, California. The work was undertaken to increase the commercial viability and volume of photovoltaic manufacturing by evaluating the most significant cost categories and then lowering the cost of each item through experimentation, materials refinement, and better industrial engineering. The initial phase of the program concentrated on the areas of crystal growth; wafer technology; and environmental, safety, and health issues.

  18. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  19. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  20. Arizona Industrial Arts Manufacturing Technology. Teacher's Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Milton; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist junior and senior high school vocational instructors in presenting a course in manufacturing technology. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and a bibliography. The following competencies are covered: the historical development of manufacturing (the…

  1. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile for computer-integrated manufacturing technology begins with definitions for four occupations: manufacturing technician, quality technician, mechanical engineering technician, and computer-assisted design/drafting (CADD) technician. A chart lists competencies by unit and indicates whether entire or partial unit is…

  2. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  3. Arizona Industrial Arts Manufacturing Technology. Teacher's Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Milton; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist junior and senior high school vocational instructors in presenting a course in manufacturing technology. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and a bibliography. The following competencies are covered: the historical development of manufacturing (the…

  4. Virtual Manufacturing Techniques Designed and Applied to Manufacturing Activities in the Manufacturing Integration and Technology Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shearrow, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    One of the identified goals of EM3 is to implement virtual manufacturing by the time the year 2000 has ended. To realize this goal of a true virtual manufacturing enterprise the initial development of a machinability database and the infrastructure must be completed. This will consist of the containment of the existing EM-NET problems and developing machine, tooling, and common materials databases. To integrate the virtual manufacturing enterprise with normal day to day operations the development of a parallel virtual manufacturing machinability database, virtual manufacturing database, virtual manufacturing paradigm, implementation/integration procedure, and testable verification models must be constructed. Common and virtual machinability databases will include the four distinct areas of machine tools, available tooling, common machine tool loads, and a materials database. The machine tools database will include the machine envelope, special machine attachments, tooling capacity, location within NASA-JSC or with a contractor, and availability/scheduling. The tooling database will include available standard tooling, custom in-house tooling, tool properties, and availability. The common materials database will include materials thickness ranges, strengths, types, and their availability. The virtual manufacturing databases will consist of virtual machines and virtual tooling directly related to the common and machinability databases. The items to be completed are the design and construction of the machinability databases, virtual manufacturing paradigm for NASA-JSC, implementation timeline, VNC model of one bridge mill and troubleshoot existing software and hardware problems with EN4NET. The final step of this virtual manufacturing project will be to integrate other production sites into the databases bringing JSC's EM3 into a position of becoming a clearing house for NASA's digital manufacturing needs creating a true virtual manufacturing enterprise.

  5. Applied Physics Modules Selected for Manufacturing and Metal Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Gene

    Designed for individualized use in an applied physics course in postsecondary vocational-technical education, this series of eighteen learning modules is equivalent to the content of two quarters of a five-credit hour class in manufacturing engineering technology, machine tool and design technology, welding technology, and industrial plastics…

  6. Applied Physics Modules Selected for Manufacturing and Metal Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Gene

    Designed for individualized use in an applied physics course in postsecondary vocational-technical education, this series of eighteen learning modules is equivalent to the content of two quarters of a five-credit hour class in manufacturing engineering technology, machine tool and design technology, welding technology, and industrial plastics…

  7. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge is strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-04-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  8. Changing Manufacturing Technology and Jobs in Defense Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Richard P.

    1983-01-01

    Provides information on the current status of computer-assisted manufacturing, current employment, and plans for new technology in three defense-related industries: aircraft, shipbuilding, and ordnance. (SK)

  9. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  10. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  11. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  12. Border Scouting the New Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, James

    A discussion is provided of how breakthroughs in the application of computers in the manufacturing of automobiles affect the development of community college programs, with particular emphasis on how Michigan community colleges have developed a capacity to respond to changes in this field. First, the paper explains what computer-based…

  13. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    battery box, the plastic components exhibited no deterioration or distortion. Drivers and mechanics preferred the plastic battery box, step-cover, and...Hayes Co. The blades were manufactured to meet the specification requirements. Evaluation included metallographic structure, mechanical properties and...evaluation of this material for mechanical and ballistic properties . A need exists for an industrial facility capable of produciug, on a commercial

  14. Manufacturing Methods and Technology. Project Execution Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    CUMBUSTIUN AIR FUlk THE KLTENE FURNACE WAS PRJVEN. FINAL RPT BEING PRINTED. 5 8C 4281 A6 UNLULLED PRODUCER GAS FOR KETENE MANUFACTURE EQUIP *AS INSTALLED...Wil Watson Cdr, Naval Sea Systems Command, Attn: Mr. T. Draschil, Code SEA-05R23 . Cdr, Naval Weapons Ctr, Attn: Code 36404 Air Force: Cdr, Air

  15. Copper Disk Manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This king-size copper disk, manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center (SOMTC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is a special mold for making high resolution monitor screens. This master mold will be used to make several other molds, each capable of forming hundreds of screens that have a type of lens called a Fresnel lens. Weighing much less than conventional optics, Fresnel lenses have multiple concentric grooves, each formed to a precise angle, that together create the curvature needed to focus and project images. MSFC leads NASA's space optics manufacturing technology development as a technology leader for diamond turning. The machine used to manufacture this mold is among many one-of-a-kind pieces of equipment of MSFC's SOMTC.

  16. Description of CE Technology for the Manufacturing Optimization (MO) system

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-19

    engineering technology by applying existing DICE Tools to other technology areas, in this case design for manufacturing and assembly ( DFMA ). The DICE tools and...methods are evolving so evaluation of the existing DICE tools must be performed, and the tools that support the DFMA environment will be considered...case Design for Manufacturing and Assembly ( DFMA ). The DICE tools proposed for use under the MO program included ROSE Database Management System (DBMS

  17. Precision manufacture of phase-change perfluorocarbon droplets using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martz, Thomas D; Sheeran, Paul S; Bardin, David; Lee, Abraham P; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-11-01

    Liquid perfluorocarbon droplets have been of interest in the medical acoustics community for use as acoustically activated particles for tissue occlusion, imaging and therapeutics. To date, methods to produce liquid perfluorocarbon droplets typically result in a polydisperse size distribution. Because the threshold of acoustic activation is a function of diameter, there would be benefit from a monodisperse population to preserve uniformity in acoustic activation parameters. Through use of a microfluidic device with flow-focusing technology, the production of droplets of perfluoropentane with a uniform size distribution is demonstrated. Stability studies indicate that these droplets are stable in storage for at least two weeks. Acoustic studies illustrate the thresholds of vaporization as a function of droplet diameter, and a logarithmic relationship is observed between acoustic pressure and vaporization threshold within the size ranges studied. Droplets of uniform size have very little variability in acoustic vaporization threshold. Results indicate that microfluidic technology can enable greater manufacturing control of phase-change perfluorocarbons for acoustic droplet vaporization applications.

  18. Precision Manufacture of Phase-Change Perfluorocarbon Droplets using Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Thomas D.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Bardin, David; Lee, Abraham P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid perfluorocarbon droplets have been of interest in the medical acoustics community for use as acoustically activated particles for tissue occlusion, imaging, and therapeutics. To date, methods to produce liquid perfluorocarbon droplets typically result in a polydisperse size distribution. Since the threshold of acoustic activation is a function of diameter, there would be benefit from a monodisperse population to preserve uniformity in acoustic activation parameters. Through the use of a microfluidic device with flow focusing technology, the production of droplets of perfluoropentane with a uniform size distribution is demonstrated. Stability studies indicate that these droplets are stable in storage for at least two weeks. Acoustic studies illustrate the thresholds of vaporization as a function of droplet diameter, and a logarithmic relationship is observed between acoustic pressure and vaporization threshold within the size ranges studied. Droplets of uniform size have very little variability in acoustic vaporization threshold. Results indicate that microfluidic technology can enable greater manufacturing control of phase change perfluorocarbons for acoustic droplet vaporization applications. PMID:21963036

  19. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizingmore » the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.« less

  20. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizing the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.

  1. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Execution Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    PRODUCTION. 81 9909 PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR SI Mb PwR TRANSISTORS AS THE CONCENTRATION OF IKTEGRATED CIRCUITS INCREASES THE HEAT DENSITY IS...FLUIDS RESULTS IN HIGH MACHINING COSTS AND STOCKING OF MANY FLUIDS. 6 81 7966 MANUFACTURE OF TRITIUM POWERED RADIDLUMI NOUS LAMPS CURRENT METHODS...OF CONTROLLING MOISTURE CONTENT, SEALING AND ALUMINIZING TRITIUM LAMPS ARE BELIEVED RESPONSIBLE FOR THE PRESENT LACK OF DEPENDABILITY. 6 81 7985

  2. Silicon Film[trademark] photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bottenberg, W.R.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Lampo, S.; Mulligan, W.E.; Barnett, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work on a project to develop an advanced low-cost manufacturing process for a new utility-scale flatplate module based on thin active layers of polycrystalline silicon on a low-cost substrate. This is called the Silicon-Film[trademark] process. This new power module is based on a new large solar cell that is 675 cm[sup 2] in area. Eighteen of these solar cells form a 170-W module. Twelve ofthese modules form a 2-kW array. The program has three components: (1) development of a Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer machine that can manufacture wafer 675 cm[sup 2] in size with a total product cost reductionof 70%; (2) development of an advanced solar cell manufacturing process that will turn the Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer into a 14%-efficient solar cell; and (3) development of an advanced module design based on these large-area, efficient silicon solar cells with an average power of 170 watts. The completion of these three tasks will lead to a new power module designed for utility and other power applications with asubstantially lower cost.

  3. The Effect of the Implementation of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies on Training in the Manufacturing Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castrillon, Isabel Dieguez; Cantorna, Ana I. Sinde

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the factors that determine personnel-training efforts in companies introducing advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs). The study provides empirical evidence from a sector with high rates of technological modernisation. Design/methodology/approach: "Ad hoc" survey of 90…

  4. The Effect of the Implementation of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies on Training in the Manufacturing Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castrillon, Isabel Dieguez; Cantorna, Ana I. Sinde

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the factors that determine personnel-training efforts in companies introducing advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs). The study provides empirical evidence from a sector with high rates of technological modernisation. Design/methodology/approach: "Ad hoc" survey of 90…

  5. Cost analysis methodology: Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project. Annual subcontract report, 11 March 1991--11 November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Whisnant, R.A.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes work done under Phase 1 of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project. PVMaT is a five-year project to support the translation of research and development in PV technology into the marketplace. PVMaT, conceived as a DOE/industry partnership, seeks to advanced PV manufacturing technologies, reduce PV module production costs, increase module performance, and expand US commercial production capacities. Under PVMaT, manufacturers will propose specific manufacturing process improvements that may contribute to the goals of the project, which is to lessen the cost, thus hastening entry into the larger scale, grid-connected applications. Phase 1 of the PVMaT project is to identify obstacles and problems associated with manufacturing processes. This report describes the cost analysis methodology required under Phase 1 that will allow subcontractors to be ranked and evaluated during Phase 2.

  6. A new application for food customization with additive manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenó, L.; Vallicrosa, G.; Delgado, J.; Ciurana, J.

    2012-04-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies have emerged as a freeform approach capable of producing almost any complete three dimensional (3D) objects from computer-aided design (CAD) data by successively adding material layer by layer. Despite the broad range of possibilities, commercial AM technologies remain complex and expensive, making them suitable only for niche applications. The developments of the Fab@Home system as an open AM technology discovered a new range of possibilities of processing different materials such as edible products. The main objective of this work is to analyze and optimize the manufacturing capacity of this system when producing 3D edible objects. A new heated syringe deposition tool was developed and several process parameters were optimized to adapt this technology to consumers' needs. The results revealed in this study show the potential of this system to produce customized edible objects without qualified personnel knowledge, therefore saving manufacturing costs compared to traditional technologies.

  7. Impact of advanced manufacturing technology on prosthetic and orthotic practice.

    PubMed

    Jones, D

    1988-04-01

    Radical changes in the technology applied to prosthetics and orthotics are being proposed. This paper attempts to define the scope and character of advanced manufacturing technology and examines the rehabilitation problems which are or could be tackled. Lower-limb prosthetics has been the major area under investigation so far, but orthopaedic footwear, spinal orthotics and custom seating for the disabled have also been investigated using similar technological approaches. The whole process of patient measurement, device design, and component manufacture is conceived as an integrated system relying upon shape or tissue property sensing, computer based device design and computer-numerically-controlled or robot manufacturing processes. The aim is to retain flexibility for custom design which is necessary to provide for individual patients, and yet improve the rapidity and precision of overall device manufacture and service delivery.

  8. Development of Recuperator Manufacturing Techniques. Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    DRSTA-RCKM U.S. ARMY TANK- AUTOMOTIVE COMMAND RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER Warren, Michigan 48090 Ž oo• O gOCO/c SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...Strtfniri_ ("T fnh497 II. CONTROLLING OFFIdE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE US Army Tank Automotive Command C7 ’’V. /-9.3 Metals/Welding Subfunction 13...DAAK30-79-C-O045 (PHASE II) Prepared by AVCO LYCOMING DIVISION 550 South Main Street Stratford. Connecticut 06497 for U.S. ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE COMMAND

  9. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    controlled equipment. Body armor such as bullet proof vests and helmets require complex surfaces to fit the hirnian anatomy . The production of...semiconductor houses. Diodes of this type are employed as phase shifters in the CAMEL phased array radar antenna, and in the Cobra Dane microwave antenna

  10. Manufacturing Methods and Technology. Project Summary Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    HCL -0.00 to -0.9 -0.57 Electroless copper £ oper Oi 0.0r4 EDTA - 0.5 1 a t 1:100 -0.3 to -1.8 -0.54 Fonaldehyde WNE 0.0 EDTA 0.1 N’ON 1:000 -0.3 to...of 500 devices per week. Thin film silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) dielectric and an aluminum copper (Al-Cu) alloy conductor metallization were epitaxially...in a single vacuum cycle. The fol- lowing significant manufacturing techniques and material improvements were made: Aluminum copper alloy was

  11. Manufacturing technology methodology for propulsion system parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, M. M.

    1992-07-01

    A development history and a current status evaluation are presented for lost-wax casting of such gas turbine engine components as turbine vanes and blades. The most advanced such systems employ computer-integrated manufacturing methods for high process repeatability, reprogramming versatility, and feedback monitoring. Stereolithography-based plastic model 3D prototyping has also been incorporated for the wax part of the investment casting; it may ultimately be possible to produce the 3D prototype in wax directly, or even to create a ceramic mold directly. Nonintrusive inspections are conducted by X-radiography and neutron radiography.

  12. Hybrid Additive Manufacturing Technologies - An Analysis Regarding Potentials and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merklein, Marion; Junker, Daniel; Schaub, Adam; Neubauer, Franziska

    Imposing the trend of mass customization of lightweight construction in industry, conventional manufacturing processes like forming technology and chipping production are pushed to their limits for economical manufacturing. More flexible processes are needed which were developed by the additive manufacturing technology. This toolless production principle offers a high geometrical freedom and an optimized utilization of the used material. Thus load adjusted lightweight components can be produced in small lot sizes in an economical way. To compensate disadvantages like inadequate accuracy and surface roughness hybrid machines combining additive and subtractive manufacturing are developed. Within this paper the principles of mainly used additive manufacturing processes of metals and their possibility to be integrated into a hybrid production machine are summarized. It is pointed out that in particular the integration of deposition processes into a CNC milling center supposes high potential for manufacturing larger parts with high accuracy. Furthermore the combination of additive and subtractive manufacturing allows the production of ready to use products within one single machine. Additionally actual research for the integration of additive manufacturing processes into the production chain will be analyzed. For the long manufacturing time of additive production processes the combination with conventional manufacturing processes like sheet or bulk metal forming seems an effective solution. Especially large volumes can be produced by conventional processes. In an additional production step active elements can be applied by additive manufacturing. This principle is also investigated for tool production to reduce chipping of the high strength material used for forming tools. The aim is the addition of active elements onto a geometrical simple basis by using Laser Metal Deposition. That process allows the utilization of several powder materials during one process what

  13. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology report, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, A.V.; Lillington, D.R.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes subcontracted research by Spectrolab, Inc., to address tasks outlined in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Letter of solicitation RC-0-10057. These tasks include the potential of making photovoltaics (PV) a more affordable energy source, as set forth in the goal of the PVMaT project. Spectrolab believes that the DOE cost goals can be met using three different types of cells: (1) silicon concentrator cells, (2) high efficiency GaAs concentrator cells, and (3) mechanically stacked multijunction cells.

  14. National Survey of Computer Aided Manufacturing in Industrial Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidari, Farzin

    The current status of computer-aided manufacturing in the 4-year industrial technology programs in the United States was studied. All industrial technology department chairs were mailed a questionnaire divided into program information, equipment information, and general comments sections. The questionnaire was designed to determine the subjects…

  15. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    threshold. Work on the hybrid package included substitution of a welded lid for a soldered lid. This change would permit delidding, rework and resealing . A...the rigid requirements of tracked vehicles. This effort was conducted in two phases. In phase I of this effort, a weld-deposited hard-face aluminum...develop- ment. Initial efforts were concentrated on fabricating three types of pack sintered preforms: a simple cross-shaped preform which would require

  16. EUVL mask manufacturing: technologies and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letzkus, Florian; Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Sailer, Holger; Dersch, Uwe; Holfeld, Christian

    2005-11-01

    Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) is the favourite next generation lithography candidate for IC device manufacturing with feature sizes beyond 32nm. Different stacks and manufacturing concepts have been published for the fabrication of the reflective EUVL masks. Patterning processes for two different absorber-buffer combinations on top of the reflective multi layer mirror have been developed. A TaN/SiO2 absorber-buffer stack was provided by supplier A and TaBN/Cr by supplier B. In addition both absorbers were covered by an anti reflective coating (ARC) layer. An e-beam patterned 300nm thick film of Fuji FEP171 was used as resist mask. We optimized the etching processes for maximum selectivities between absorber, buffer and capping layers on the one hand and rectangular profiles and low etch bias on the other hand. While both TaN based absorbers have been dry etched in an UNAXIS mask etcher III, wet and dry etch steps have been evaluated for the two different buffer layers. The minimum feature size of lines and holes in our test designs was 100nm. After freezing the processes a proximity correction was determined considering both, the influence of electron scattering due to e-beam exposure and the influence of the patterning steps. Due to the correction an outstanding linearity and iso/dense bias on different test designs was achieved. Various masks for printing experiments at the small-field Micro Exposure Tool (MET) in Berkeley and the fabrication of the ASML α-tool setup mask within the European MEDEA+ EXTUMASK project were done using the developed processes. Finally, we will compare and discuss the results of the two stack approaches.

  17. Phase 1 Development Testing of the Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Nicholas L.; Eddleman, David E.; Calvert, Marty R.; Bullard, David B.; Martin, Michael A.; Wall, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Additive Manufacturing Development Breadboard Engine (BBE) is a pressure-fed liquid oxygen/pump-fed liquid hydrogen (LOX/LH2) expander cycle engine that was built and operated by NASA at Marshall Space Flight Center's East Test Area. The breadboard engine was conceived as a technology demonstrator for the additive manufacturing technologies for an advanced upper stage prototype engine. The components tested on the breadboard engine included an ablative chamber, injector, main fuel valve, turbine bypass valve, a main oxidizer valve, a mixer and the fuel turbopump. All parts minus the ablative chamber were additively manufactured. The BBE was successfully hot fire tested seven times. Data collected from the test series will be used for follow on demonstration tests with a liquid oxygen turbopump and a regeneratively cooled chamber and nozzle.

  18. Overview of current additive manufacturing technologies and selected applications.

    PubMed

    Horn, Timothy J; Harrysson, Ola L A

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional printing or rapid prototyping are processes by which components are fabricated directly from computer models by selectively curing, depositing or consolidating materials in successive layers. These technologies have traditionally been limited to the fabrication of models suitable for product visualization but, over the past decade, have quickly developed into a new paradigm called additive manufacturing. We are now beginning to see additive manufacturing used for the fabrication of a range of functional end use components. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolution of additive manufacturing from its roots in accelerating product development to its proliferation into a variety of fields. Here, we focus on some of the key technologies that are advancing additive manufacturing and present some state of the art applications.

  19. Manufacturing Road Map for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Joshua; Harrysson, Ola; Shirwaiker, Rohan; Starly, Binil; Wysk, Richard; Cohen, Paul; Allickson, Julie; Yoo, James

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Regenerative Medicine Foundation Annual Conference held on May 6 and 7, 2014, had a vision of assisting with translating tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM)-based technologies closer to the clinic. This vision was achieved by assembling leaders in the field to cover critical areas. Some of these critical areas included regulatory pathways for regenerative medicine therapies, strategic partnerships, coordination of resources, developing standards for the field, government support, priorities for industry, biobanking, and new technologies. The final day of this conference featured focused sessions on manufacturing, during which expert speakers were invited from industry, government, and academia. The speakers identified and accessed roadblocks plaguing the field where improvements in advanced manufacturing offered many solutions. The manufacturing sessions included (a) product development toward commercialization in regenerative medicine, (b) process challenges to scale up manufacturing in regenerative medicine, and (c) infrastructure needs for manufacturing in regenerative medicine. Subsequent to this, industry was invited to participate in a survey to further elucidate the challenges to translation and scale-up. This perspective article will cover the lessons learned from these manufacturing sessions and early results from the survey. We also outline a road map for developing the manufacturing infrastructure, resources, standards, capabilities, education, training, and workforce development to realize the promise of TERM. PMID:25575525

  20. Manufacturing road map for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine technologies.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Joshua; Harrysson, Ola; Shirwaiker, Rohan; Starly, Binil; Wysk, Richard; Cohen, Paul; Allickson, Julie; Yoo, James; Atala, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    The Regenerative Medicine Foundation Annual Conference held on May 6 and 7, 2014, had a vision of assisting with translating tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM)-based technologies closer to the clinic. This vision was achieved by assembling leaders in the field to cover critical areas. Some of these critical areas included regulatory pathways for regenerative medicine therapies, strategic partnerships, coordination of resources, developing standards for the field, government support, priorities for industry, biobanking, and new technologies. The final day of this conference featured focused sessions on manufacturing, during which expert speakers were invited from industry, government, and academia. The speakers identified and accessed roadblocks plaguing the field where improvements in advanced manufacturing offered many solutions. The manufacturing sessions included (a) product development toward commercialization in regenerative medicine, (b) process challenges to scale up manufacturing in regenerative medicine, and (c) infrastructure needs for manufacturing in regenerative medicine. Subsequent to this, industry was invited to participate in a survey to further elucidate the challenges to translation and scale-up. This perspective article will cover the lessons learned from these manufacturing sessions and early results from the survey. We also outline a road map for developing the manufacturing infrastructure, resources, standards, capabilities, education, training, and workforce development to realize the promise of TERM. ©AlphaMed Press.

  1. Incorporating DSA in multipatterning semiconductor manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Yasmine; Torres, J. A.; Ma, Yuansheng; Mitra, Joydeep; Gupta, Puneet

    2015-03-01

    Multi-patterning (MP) is the process of record for many sub-10nm process technologies. The drive to higher densities has required the use of double and triple patterning for several layers; but this increases the cost of the new processes especially for low volume products in which the mask set is a large percentage of the total cost. For that reason there has been a strong incentive to develop technologies like Directed Self Assembly (DSA), EUV or E-beam direct write to reduce the total number of masks needed in a new technology node. Because of the nature of the technology, DSA cylinder graphoepitaxy only allows single-size holes in a single patterning approach. However, by integrating DSA and MP into a hybrid DSA-MP process, it is possible to come up with decomposition approaches that increase the design flexibility, allowing different size holes or bar structures by independently changing the process for every patterning step. A simple approach to integrate multi-patterning with DSA is to perform DSA grouping and MP decomposition in sequence whether it is: grouping-then-decomposition or decomposition-then-grouping; and each of the two sequences has its pros and cons. However, this paper describes why these intuitive approaches do not produce results of acceptable quality from the point of view of design compliance and we highlight the need for custom DSA-aware MP algorithms.

  2. Transfer of advanced manufacturing technologies to eastern Kentucky industries

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, J.A.; Kruzich, R.

    1988-05-01

    This study concludes that there are opportunities to provide assistance in the adoption of manufacturing technologies for small- and medium-sized firms in eastern Kentucky. However, the new markets created by Toyota are not adequate to justify a directed technology transfer program targeting the auto supply industry in eastern Kentucky because supplier markets have been determined for some time, and manufacturers in eastern Kentucky were not competitive in this early selection process. The results of the study strongly reinforce a reorientation of state business-assistance programs. The study also concludes that the quality and quantity of available labor is a pervasive problem in eastern Kentucky and has particular relevance as the economy changes. The study also investigated what type of technology-transfer programs would be appropriate to assist manufacturing firms in eastern Kentucky and if there were a critical number of firms to make such a program feasible.

  3. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    is diborane (B2), the second intermediate product is decaborane ( B10 ), and the final product is NHC (also known as carborane). In a previous project...375 3135, Callery Chemical Company had been awarded a contract to develop a scalable process for the conversion of B2 to B10 . This additional...Callery developed a vapor phase pyrolysis method for converting B2 to B10 in a unique convective circulation reactor. The final process step, conversion

  4. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Summary Reports

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Cermalloy Sn62 was selected and for consistency used throughout the effort. Several adhesives for bonding PCB to TM4P were evaluated. Abelfilm 504 Adhesive ... adhesives to be used. 41 Phase III was concerned with environmental testing. Tests were conducted Oil fifty-eight PCBs assembled with leadless chip carriers...CIRCUIT BOARD ADHESIVE COPPER TMP Figure I - Sectional View of a Simplified LCC/PCB Interconnection System SUMMARY S This effort’s objective was to

  5. Biomedical technology transfer: A manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Transfer of technology from non-commercial institutions to industry has played an important role in the development of medical electronics. It is a difficult process, but if the ideas are sound, if clear medical benefits exist and if there is good fit with business plans and the strengths and goals of both parties are complementary, it can work well. In the evaluation process it is considered whether the device meets general tests for suitability for the company, whether there are opportunities for proprietary or patent protection, and whether the medical benefits are self evident or the acceptance period is apt to be long.

  6. Technology planning for flexible manufacturing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudakov, A. D.; Falevich, B. Y.

    1984-12-01

    The machine building industry features a new type of equipment, the flexible technological systems for machining. These systems are based on the use of machine tools with CNC, linked to a central controlling computer and an automated transport and stockpiling system. To improve the effectiveness of integrated operation of the system's equipment, the software of the central computer includes an applied program package directed toward the performance of automated planning functions, which, together with the operating documentation, makes up a system of operational calendar planning.

  7. Biomedical technology transfer: A manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Transfer of technology from non-commercial institutions to industry has played an important role in the development of medical electronics. It is a difficult process, but if the ideas are sound, if clear medical benefits exist and if there is good fit with business plans and the strengths and goals of both parties are complementary, it can work well. In the evaluation process it is considered whether the device meets general tests for suitability for the company, whether there are opportunities for proprietary or patent protection, and whether the medical benefits are self evident or the acceptance period is apt to be long.

  8. [INVITED] Laser-induced forward transfer: A high resolution additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Philippe; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Among the additive manufacturing techniques, laser-induced forward transfer addresses the challenges of printing thin films in solid phase or small volume droplets in liquid phase with very high resolution. This paper reviews the physics of this process and explores the pros and cons of this technology versus other digital printing technologies. The main field of applications are printed electronics, organic electronics and tissue engineering, and the most promising short terms ones concern digital laser printing of sensors and conductive tracks. Future directions and emerging areas of interest are discussed such as printing solid from a liquid phase and 3D digital nanomanufacturing.

  9. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing and Evaluating Rocket Engine Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Erin M.; Hardin, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing and evaluation techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As we enter into a new space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt new and innovative techniques for manufacturing and evaluating hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) and white light scanning are being adopted and evaluated for their use on J-2X, with hopes of employing both technologies on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powdered metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. The white light technique is a non-invasive method that can be used to inspect for geometric feature alignment. Both the DMLS manufacturing method and the white light scanning technique have proven to be viable options for manufacturing and evaluating rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of these techniques is recommended.

  10. Technology needs of small and medium size manufacturers

    SciTech Connect

    Kohls, J.B.

    1986-03-01

    The equipment needs and technical requirements of both large and small manufacturers are similar but the application and integration of them is different. The peaks and valleys of the manufacturing business cause greater risks for the small manufacturers. Therefore, equipment purchases must be justified over relatively short payback periods. Most of the real benefit from implementing new manufacturing equipment comes from the organization and discipline required by the planning and control functions of these new systems. These types of benefits, if understood, can be utilized without extensive purchases of new equipment and the related financial risks. Therefore, in marketing technology to these companies today, it is imperative to remember the importance of marketing the traditional mission of business management: planning and control.

  11. Spacesuit glove manufacturing enhancements through the use of advanced technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadogan, David; Bradley, David; Kosmo, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The sucess of astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA) on orbit is highly dependent upon the performance of their spacesuit gloves.A study has recently been conducted to advance the development and manufacture of spacesuit gloves. The process replaces the manual techniques of spacesuit glove manufacture by utilizing emerging technologies such as laser scanning, Computer Aided Design (CAD), computer generated two-dimensional patterns from three-dimensionl surfaces, rapid prototyping technology, and laser cutting of materials, to manufacture the new gloves. Results of the program indicate that the baseline process will not increase the cost of the gloves as compared to the existing styles, and in production, may reduce the cost of the gloves. perhaps the most important outcome of the Laserscan process is that greater accuracy and design control can be realized. Greater accuracy was achieved in the baseline anthropometric measurement and CAD data measurement which subsequently improved the design feature. This effectively enhances glove performance through better fit and comfort.

  12. Spacesuit glove manufacturing enhancements through the use of advanced technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadogan, David; Bradley, David; Kosmo, Joseph

    The sucess of astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA) on orbit is highly dependent upon the performance of their spacesuit gloves.A study has recently been conducted to advance the development and manufacture of spacesuit gloves. The process replaces the manual techniques of spacesuit glove manufacture by utilizing emerging technologies such as laser scanning, Computer Aided Design (CAD), computer generated two-dimensional patterns from three-dimensionl surfaces, rapid prototyping technology, and laser cutting of materials, to manufacture the new gloves. Results of the program indicate that the baseline process will not increase the cost of the gloves as compared to the existing styles, and in production, may reduce the cost of the gloves. perhaps the most important outcome of the Laserscan process is that greater accuracy and design control can be realized. Greater accuracy was achieved in the baseline anthropometric measurement and CAD data measurement which subsequently improved the design feature. This effectively enhances glove performance through better fit and comfort.

  13. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing Rocket Engine Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, E. M.; Eddleman, D. E.; Reynolds, D. C.; Hardin, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As the United States enters into the next space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt innovative techniques for manufacturing hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, rapid manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) are being adopted and evaluated for their use on NASA s Space Launch System (SLS) upper stage engine, J-2X, with hopes of employing this technology on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powder metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently hot-fire tested a J-2X gas generator (GG) discharge duct that was manufactured using DMLS. The duct was inspected and proof tested prior to the hot-fire test. Using a workhorse gas generator (WHGG) test fixture at MSFC's East Test Area, the duct was subjected to extreme J-2X hot gas environments during 7 tests for a total of 537 seconds of hot-fire time. The duct underwent extensive post-test evaluation and showed no signs of degradation. DMLS manufacturing has proven to be a viable option for manufacturing rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of this manufacturing method is recommended.

  14. Copper Disk Manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows Wes Brown, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) lead diamond tuner, an expert in the science of using diamond-tipped tools to cut metal, inspecting the mold's physical characteristics to ensure the uniformity of its more than 6,000 grooves. This king-size copper disk, manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center (SOMTC) at MSFC, is a special mold for making high resolution monitor screens. This master mold will be used to make several other molds, each capable of forming hundreds of screens that have a type of lens called a fresnel lens. Weighing much less than conventional optics, fresnel lenses have multiple concentric grooves, each formed to a precise angle, that together create the curvature needed to focus and project images. The MSFC leads NASA's space optics manufacturing technology development as a technology leader for diamond turning. The machine used to manufacture this mold is among many one-of-a-kind pieces of equipment of MSFC's SOMTC.

  15. Copper Disk Manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows Wes Brown, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) lead diamond tuner, an expert in the science of using diamond-tipped tools to cut metal, inspecting the mold's physical characteristics to ensure the uniformity of its more than 6,000 grooves. This king-size copper disk, manufactured at the Space Optics Manufacturing and Technology Center (SOMTC) at MSFC, is a special mold for making high resolution monitor screens. This master mold will be used to make several other molds, each capable of forming hundreds of screens that have a type of lens called a fresnel lens. Weighing much less than conventional optics, fresnel lenses have multiple concentric grooves, each formed to a precise angle, that together create the curvature needed to focus and project images. The MSFC leads NASA's space optics manufacturing technology development as a technology leader for diamond turning. The machine used to manufacture this mold is among many one-of-a-kind pieces of equipment of MSFC's SOMTC.

  16. Integrated study of sustainability technological-economic in manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peinado, B.; Sevilla, L.; Sebastián, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, some of the key aspects to consider during a manufacturing process are the ones related to its energy study. Choosing the most appropriate process allows to optimize not only technological and economic, but also it influence in sustainability and suitability of the process. In the current work a comparative technological-economic analysis between forming processes and machining processes is developed. We can find that drawing (forming process) has more advantages in most cases.

  17. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Program Plan, CY 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    FACTURING METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAr rANAL m M E 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) John Petrone N/A / P JPERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND...readiness posture through computer integrated manufacturing, computer- aided modeling of forming operations, and storage techniques for pro- duction...addressed include pro- duction scheduling (8131), process modeling (8130), group technology (7949), performance measurement (8132) and a computer

  18. Modeling Manufacturing Processes to Mitigate Technological Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Manges, W.W.

    1999-10-24

    An economic model is a tool for determining the justifiable cost of new sensors and subsystems with respect to value and operation. This process balances the R and D costs against the expense of maintaining current operations and allows for a method to calculate economic indices of performance that can be used as control points in deciding whether to continue development or suspend actions. The model can also be used as an integral part of an overall control loop utilizing real-time process data from the sensor groups to make production decisions (stop production and repair machine, continue and warn of anticipated problems, queue for repairs, etc.). This model has been successfully used and deployed in the CAFE Project. The economic model was one of seven (see Fig. 1) elements critical in developing an investment strategy. It has been successfully used in guiding the R and D activities on the CAFE Project, suspending activities on three new sensor technologies, and continuing development o f two others. The model has also been used to justify the development of a new prognostic approach for diagnosing machine health using COTS equipment and a new algorithmic approach. maintaining current operations and allows for a method to calculate economic indices of performance that can be used as control points in deciding whether to continue development or suspend actions. The model can also be used as an integral part of an overall control loop utilizing real-time process data from the sensor groups to make production decisions (stop production and repair machine, continue and warn of anticipated problems, queue for repairs, etc.).

  19. Chemical, electrochemical, and technological aspects of sodium chlorate manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, K.; Tilak, B.V.

    1984-07-01

    A critical review of the chemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering principles involved in the production of sodium chlorate is presented. Various chlorate manufacturing technologies were discussed, with emphasis on materials of construction, and trends towards developing cost and energy effective methods for producing sodium chlorate.

  20. Manufacturing Technology Continuation Project--FY 92. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago City Colleges, IL. Richard J. Daley Coll.

    A project to identify metalworking subsectors (multiple spindle screw machining and gears machining) for inclusion in the Manufacturing Technology Preparation Program is the subject of this report. The project accomplished the following: developed five courses in multiple spindle, secured large donations of equipment and tooling, established a…

  1. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  2. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  3. Ramp Technology and Intelligent Processing in Small Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rentz, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    To address the issues of excessive inventories and increasing procurement lead times, the Navy is actively pursuing flexible computer integrated manufacturing (FCIM) technologies, integrated by communication networks to respond rapidly to its requirements for parts. The Rapid Acquisition of Manufactured Parts (RAMP) program, initiated in 1986, is an integral part of this effort. The RAMP program's goal is to reduce the current average production lead times experienced by the Navy's inventory control points by a factor of 90 percent. The manufacturing engineering component of the RAMP architecture utilizes an intelligent processing technology built around a knowledge-based shell provided by ICAD, Inc. Rules and data bases in the software simulate an expert manufacturing planner's knowledge of shop processes and equipment. This expert system can use Product Data Exchange using STEP (PDES) data to determine what features the required part has, what material is required to manufacture it, what machines and tools are needed, and how the part should be held (fixtured) for machining, among other factors. The program's rule base then indicates, for example, how to make each feature, in what order to make it, and to which machines on the shop floor the part should be routed for processing. This information becomes part of the shop work order. The process planning function under RAMP greatly reduces the time and effort required to complete a process plan. Since the PDES file that drives the intelligent processing is 100 percent complete and accurate to start with, the potential for costly errors is greatly diminished.

  4. Ramp Technology and Intelligent Processing in Small Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rentz, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    To address the issues of excessive inventories and increasing procurement lead times, the Navy is actively pursuing flexible computer integrated manufacturing (FCIM) technologies, integrated by communication networks to respond rapidly to its requirements for parts. The Rapid Acquisition of Manufactured Parts (RAMP) program, initiated in 1986, is an integral part of this effort. The RAMP program's goal is to reduce the current average production lead times experienced by the Navy's inventory control points by a factor of 90 percent. The manufacturing engineering component of the RAMP architecture utilizes an intelligent processing technology built around a knowledge-based shell provided by ICAD, Inc. Rules and data bases in the software simulate an expert manufacturing planner's knowledge of shop processes and equipment. This expert system can use Product Data Exchange using STEP (PDES) data to determine what features the required part has, what material is required to manufacture it, what machines and tools are needed, and how the part should be held (fixtured) for machining, among other factors. The program's rule base then indicates, for example, how to make each feature, in what order to make it, and to which machines on the shop floor the part should be routed for processing. This information becomes part of the shop work order. The process planning function under RAMP greatly reduces the time and effort required to complete a process plan. Since the PDES file that drives the intelligent processing is 100 percent complete and accurate to start with, the potential for costly errors is greatly diminished.

  5. Benefits from the U.S. photovoltaic manufacturing technology project

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.L.; Witt, C.E.; Thomas, H.P.

    1996-05-01

    This paper examines the goals of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project and its achievements in recapturing the investment by the photovoltaic (PV) industry and the public in this research. The PVMaT project was initiated in 1990 with the goal of enhancing the world-wide competitiveness of the U.S. PV industry. Based on the authors analysis, PVMaT has contributed to PV module manufacturing process improvements, increased product value, and reductions in the price of today`s PV products. An evaluation of success in this project was conducted using data collected from 10 of the PVMaT industrial participants in late fiscal year (FY) 1995. These data indicate a reduction of 56% in the weighted average module manufacturing costs from 1992 to 1996. During this same period, U.S. module manufacturing capacity has increased by more than a factor of 6. Finally, the analysis indicates that both the public and the manufacturers will recapture the funds expended in R&D manufacturing improvements well before the year 2000.

  6. A review of the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing program

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.H.; Neal, R.E.; Cobb, C.K.

    1996-10-01

    Addressing a technical plan developed in consideration with major US manufacturers, software and hardware providers, and government representatives, the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) program is leveraging the expertise and resources of industry, universities, and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy leap-ahead manufacturing technologies. One of the TEAM program`s goals is to transition products from design to production faster, more efficiently, and at less cost. TEAM`s technology development strategy also provides all participants with early experience in establishing and working within an electronic enterprise that includes access to high-speed networks and high-performance computing and storage systems. The TEAM program uses the cross-cutting tools it collects, develops, and integrates to demonstrate and deploy agile manufacturing capabilities for three high-priority processes identified by industry: material removal, sheet metal forming, electro-mechanical assembly. This paper reviews the current status of the TEAM program with emphasis upon TEAM`s information infrastructure.

  7. Manufacturing of microcirculation phantoms using rapid prototyping technologies.

    PubMed

    Buchoux, Anthony; Valluri, Prashant; Smith, Stewart; Stokes, Adam A; Hoskins, Peter R; Sboros, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a method for the manufacturing of a microcirculation phantom that may be used to investigate hemodynamics using optics based methods. We made an Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) negative mold, manufactured in a Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) printer, embedded it in Polydimethysilioxane (PDMS) and dissolved it from within using acetone. We successfully made an enlarged three-dimensional (3D) network of microcirculation, and tested it using red blood cell (RBC) analogues. This phantom may be used for testing medical imaging technology.

  8. Further Structural Intelligence for Sensors Cluster Technology in Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mekid, Samir

    2006-01-01

    With the ever increasing complex sensing and actuating tasks in manufacturing plants, intelligent sensors cluster in hybrid networks becomes a rapidly expanding area. They play a dominant role in many fields from macro and micro scale. Global object control and the ability to self organize into fault-tolerant and scalable systems are expected for high level applications. In this paper, new structural concepts of intelligent sensors and networks with new intelligent agents are presented. Embedding new functionalities to dynamically manage cooperative agents for autonomous machines are interesting key enabling technologies most required in manufacturing for zero defects production.

  9. Ultrasonic Phased Array Tools for Large Area Composite Inspection during Maintenance and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, J.; Lamarre, A.; Roach, D.

    2009-03-01

    Aircraft manufacturers, maintenance service providers, and airline operators have recently started to use ultrasonic phased-array technology to ensure the quality of their composite parts during maintenance and manufacturing. Olympus NDT has developed various solutions with its phased-array instruments like the OmniScan PA and the Focus LT to meet the most demanding requirements. These tools combined with composite specific software features provide greater productivity with respect to scanning and defect characterization such as sizing while maintaining a high degree of reliability. This paper summarizes the advantages and the benefits obtained by the use of this technology on samples provided by the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center (AANC) operated by Sandia National Labs.

  10. The Photovolatic Manufacturing Technology project (PVMaT) after three years

    SciTech Connect

    Witt, C E; Mitchell, R L; Thomas, H; Herwig, L O

    1994-08-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project (PVMaT) is a government/industry research and development (R&D) partnership involving joint efforts between the federal government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and members of the US photovoltaic (PV) industry. The project`s goal is to assist US industry in retaining and extending its world leadership role in the manufacture and commercial development of PV components and systems. PVMaT is being carried out in three separate phases, each designed to address separate R&D requirements for achieving PVMaT goals. Phase 1 was a problem identification phase of about 3 months duration. In Phase 1, the status and needs of the US PV manufacturing industry were identified, and the development of a Phase 2 procurement responsive to the industry`s needs was begun. Phase 1 was completed in 1991. Problem solution began in 1992, under Phase 2A, when DOE awarded multiyear subcontracts. Technical accomplishments for PVMaT 2A are presented in this paper. Subcontracts were recently awarded for a second, overlapping, and similar process-specific solicitation (PVMaT 2B). The activities of these new subcontracts are also described. Two subcontracts presently comprise the Phase 3 effort. Phase 3 addresses R&D problems that are relatively common to a number of PV companies or the PV industry as a whole. A teamed research approach is being used to improve automated module manufacturing lines and encapsulation materials used in module manufacturing. The first year`s work on these subcontracts is also described in this paper.

  11. Composites Materials and Manufacturing Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, J. H.; Tate, L. C.; Gaddis, S. W.; Neal, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant advantages in space applications. Weight reduction is imperative for deep space systems. However, the pathway to deployment of composites alternatives is problematic. Improvements in the materials and processes are needed, and extensive testing is required to validate the performance, qualify the materials and processes, and certify components. Addressing these challenges could lead to the confident adoption of composites in space applications and provide spin-off technical capabilities for the aerospace and other industries. To address the issues associated with composites applications in space systems, NASA sponsored a Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) entitled, "Composites Materials and Manufacturing Technologies for Space Applications," the proceedings of which are summarized in this Conference Publication. The NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate and the Game Changing Program chartered the meeting. The meeting was hosted by the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM)-a public/private partnership between NASA, the State of Louisiana, Louisiana State University, industry, and academia, in association with the American Composites Manufacturers Association. The Louisiana Center for Manufacturing Sciences served as the coordinator for the TIM.

  12. Evaluation Of Electrochemical Machining Technology For Surface Improvements In Additive Manufactured Components

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Carver, Keith

    2015-09-23

    ORNL Manufacturing Demonstration Facility worked with ECM Technologies LLC to investigate the use of precision electro-chemical machining technology to polish the surface of parts created by Arcam electron beam melting. The goals for phase one of this project have been met. The project goal was to determine whether electro-chemical machining is a viable method to improve the surface finish of Inconel 718 parts fabricated using the Arcam EBM method. The project partner (ECM) demonstrated viability for parts of both simple and complex geometry. During the course of the project, detailed process knowledge was generated. This project has resulted in the expansion of United States operations for ECM Technologies.

  13. The USAF Manufacturing Technology: Program Status Report. Spring 1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    modernization, also sat on the Technical Track Highlights panel. More than 70 government and industry exhib- Diana Carlin moderated a session on Composites...MT’s For more information or to register, contact IBP programs have made major strides in Tracy Tapia at Universal Technology Corporation, transitioning...Corporation Diana Carlin Preferred Spares (MATCOPS) El Segundo, CA (937) 255-7277 F33615-91-C-5717 March 1997 Design and Manufacture of Low Cost Boeing Company

  14. Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S.; Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L.

    2011-01-17

    The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

  15. Advanced manufacturing technologies for the BeCOAT telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Michael N.; Rajic, Slobodan; Seals, Roland D.

    1994-02-01

    The beryllium cryogenic off-axis telescope (BeCOAT) uses a two-mirror, non re-imaging, off- axis, Ritchey Chretian design with all-beryllium optics, structures and baffles. The purpose of this telescope is the system level demonstration of advanced manufacturing technologies for optics, optical benches, and baffle assemblies. The key issues that are addressed are single point diamond turning of beryllium optics, survivable fastening techniques, minimum beryllium utilization, and technologies leading to self-aligning, all-beryllium optical systems.

  16. Phase and Radial Motion in a Transverse Electric Quadrupole - Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Billen, James; Crandall, Ken; Young, Lloyd

    2010-06-25

    ParmteqM comprises a group of codes (PARMTEQ, RFQUICK, CURLI, PARI, PARMTEQM, READVG and VANES) that are used to design high-performance radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linacs. PARMTEQ is an acronym for "Phase and Radial Motion in a Transverse Electric Quadrupole". These codes are necessary to design the RFQ vane profile and analyze the beam performance including the effects of higher order multipole field components and image charges. Multi-particle simulations are supported in Version 3. PARMTEQM, VANES and READVG specifically provide manufacturing support to generate CNC machining instructions for the fabrication of vane profiles.

  17. Mixed technologies of artistic ceramics processing for the jewelery manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsenko, L. E.; Arventyeva, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    The need for the study of different technologies of the jewellery manufacture is due to the demand of the modern world in a variety of high-quality environmentally friendly products. While working with ceramics, it is possible to get the product, which is unique in its form, a wide range of colors, possibility of harmoniously combining it with a number of other modern materials. Images of ancient birds are used, stages of technology, which allow connecting the ceramics and metal, the technology for working with underglaze paints are represented, application limits associated with a particular operation of the product (fragility) are analyzed in the research. The society need for exclusive products determines the relevance of different materials connection, the characteristics research of their compounds, while working with them. The research objective is a bird image stylized design for a piece of jewellery, different materials compounds, the substantiation of technology of its manufacturing “narikomi” technique. Also, the research objective includes the development of the technology stages, allowing the connection of ceramic and metal to get jewellery that is unique in its form, a wide range of colors, a possibility of harmonious combination of it with a number of other modern materials.

  18. Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2011-05-15

    The goal of the Development of High Temperature Capacitor Technology and Manufacturing Capability program was to mature a production-ready supply chain for reliable 250°C FPE (fluorinated polyester) film capacitors by 2011. These high-temperature film capacitors enable both the down hole drilling and aerospace industries by enabling a variety of benefits including: - Deeper oil exploration in higher temperature and pressure environments - Enabling power electronic and control equipment to operate in higher temperature environments - Enabling reduced cooling requirements of electronics - Increasing reliability and life of capacitors operating below rated temperature - Enabling capacitors to handle higher electrical losses without overheating. The key challenges to bringing the FPE film capacitors to market have been manufacturing challenges including: - FPE Film is difficult to handle and wind, resulting in poor yields - Voltage breakdown strength decreases when the film is wound into capacitors (~70% decrease) - Encapsulation technologies must be improved to enable higher perature operation - Manufacturing and test cycle time is very long As a direct result of this program most of the manufacturing challenges have been met. The FPE film production metalization and winding yield has increased to over 82% from 70%, and the voltage breakdown strength of the wound capacitors has increased 270% to 189 V/μm. The high temperature packaging concepts are showing significant progress including promising results for lead attachments and hermetic packages at 200°C and non-hermetic packages at 250°C. Manufacturing and test cycle time will decrease as the market for FPE capacitors develops.

  19. Advanced excimer laser technologies enable green semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Yoo, Youngsun; Minegishi, Yuji; Hisanaga, Naoto; Enami, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    "Green" has fast become an important and pervasive topic throughout many industries worldwide. Many companies, especially in the manufacturing industries, have taken steps to integrate green initiatives into their high-level corporate strategies. Governments have also been active in implementing various initiatives designed to increase corporate responsibility and accountability towards environmental issues. In the semiconductor manufacturing industry, there are growing concerns over future environmental impact as enormous fabs expand and new generation of equipments become larger and more powerful. To address these concerns, Gigaphoton has implemented various green initiatives for many years under the EcoPhoton™ program. The objective of this program is to drive innovations in technology and services that enable manufacturers to significantly reduce both the financial and environmental "green cost" of laser operations in high-volume manufacturing environment (HVM) - primarily focusing on electricity, gas and heat management costs. One example of such innovation is Gigaphoton's Injection-Lock system, which reduces electricity and gas utilization costs of the laser by up to 50%. Furthermore, to support the industry's transition from 300mm to the next generation 450mm wafers, technologies are being developed to create lasers that offer double the output power from 60W to 120W, but reducing electricity and gas consumption by another 50%. This means that the efficiency of lasers can be improve by up to 4 times in 450mm wafer production environments. Other future innovations include the introduction of totally Heliumfree Excimer lasers that utilize Nitrogen gas as its replacement for optical module purging. This paper discusses these and other innovations by Gigaphoton to enable green manufacturing.

  20. Development of manufacturing technologies for hard optical ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fess, Edward; DeFisher, Scott; Cahill, Mike; Wolfs, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Hard ceramic optical materials such as sapphire, ALON, Spinel, or PCA can present a significant challenge in manufacturing precision optical components due to their tough mechanical properties. These are also the same mechanical properties that make them desirable materials when used in harsh environments. Premature tool wear or tool loading during the grinding process is a common result of these tough mechanical properties. Another challenge is the requirement to create geometries that conform to the platforms they reside in, but still achieve optical window tolerances for wavefront. These shapes can be complex and require new technologies to control sub aperture finishing techniques in a deterministic fashion. In this paper we will present three technologies developed at OptiPro Systems to address the challenges associated with these materials and complex geometries. The technologies presented will show how Ultrasonic grinding can reduce grinding load by up to 50%, UltraForm Finishing (UFF) and UltraSmooth Finishing (USF) technologies can accurately figure and finish these shapes, and how all of them can be controlled deterministically, with utilizing metrology feedback, by a new Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software package developed by OptiPro called ProSurf.

  1. Rigid-Flex Printed Circuit Manufacturing process. A Project of the Manufacturing Technology Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-30

    002- L -0146601SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF TNIS PAGE (011ioe Data Bntered) UNCLASSIFIED SUc~hfTY cLAIsaicooricoi OF THIS PACE (IIo "a Mu9.,erva...n I irt I Olut I Av- ’ji L ~ iii1’_ t PREFACE Advances in manufacturing technology are continuing to be made as both new materials and processing...Peel, Laminate Exhibit 10 6 5 4 1 2 3 Cost 5 6 3 4 2 1 L Facility Rating 4 5 2 6 3 1 Indicates Failure/Test Requirements I/ Indicates After Etching T

  2. Chlorine Free Technology for Solar-Grade Silicon Manufacturing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Strebkov, D. S.; Pinov, A. P.; Zadde, V. V.; Lebedev, E. N.; Belov, E. P.; Efimov, N. K.; Kleshevnikova, S. I.; Touryan, K.; Bleak, D.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the development of the solar energy industry, a significant increase of polysilicon feedstock (PSF) production will be required in near future. The creation of special technology of solar grade polysilicon feedstock production is an important problem. Today, semiconductor-grade polysilicon is mainly manufactured using the trichlorosilane (SiHCl3) distillation and reduction. The feed-stock for trichlorosilane is metallurgical-grade silicon, the product of reduction of natural quartzite (silica). This polysilicon production method is characterized by high energy consumption and large amounts of wastes, containing environmentally harmful chlorine based compounds. In the former USSR the principles of industrial method for production of monosilane and polycrystalline silicon by thermal decomposition of monosilane were founded. This technology was proved in industrial scale at production of gaseous monosilane and PSF. We offered new chlorine free technology (CFT). Originality and novelty of the process were confirmed by Russian and US patents.

  3. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer and Training Initiative (ECMT3I) Technology Transfer Model Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM.

    The Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer and Training Initiative (ECMT3I) is a cooperative effort among education and research institutions in New Mexico to analyze problems in transferring environmental technologies from Department of Energy laboratories to small and medium enterprises (SME's). The goal of the ECMT3I is to…

  4. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO RICO Pt. 510, App. A Appendix A to Part 510—Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In This appendix contains a listing of all manufacturing industries...

  5. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO RICO Pt. 510, App. A Appendix A to Part 510—Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In This appendix contains a listing of all manufacturing industries...

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO RICO Pt. 510, App. A Appendix A to Part 510—Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In This appendix contains a listing of all manufacturing industries...

  7. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO RICO Pt. 510, App. A Appendix A to Part 510—Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In This appendix contains a listing of all manufacturing industries...

  8. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 510 - Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT IN PUERTO RICO Pt. 510, App. A Appendix A to Part 510—Manufacturing Industries Eligible for Minimum Wage Phase-In This appendix contains a listing of all manufacturing industries...

  9. Cost Savings Analysis Guidelines for Manufacturing Technology Projects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-28

    84-C- 7078 Modification PO0002, CLIN 002AB Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited Prepared for MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OFFICE Applied...8217 2828 Pennsylvania Ave, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20007 28 June 1985 Final Report for 1985 -. Contract Number N00024-84-C- 7078 - FrJUIUModification P00002...osecription of Items quantity Cost of Handling Cost per" nr far USED P r -) cost (+ O- Year I + or - -014: 0tilities. Templates"" 0 0 0 Rnumal Roster Cutters

  10. Cranioplasty prosthesis manufacturing based on reverse engineering technology.

    PubMed

    Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej; Karbowski, Krzysztof; Moskała, Marek; Polak, Jarosław; Pyrich, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with large focal skull bone loss after craniectomy are referred for cranioplasty. Reverse engineering is a technology which creates a computer-aided design (CAD) model of a real structure. Rapid prototyping is a technology which produces physical objects from virtual CAD models. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of these technologies in cranioplasty prosthesis manufacturing. CT was performed on 19 patients with focal skull bone loss after craniectomy, using a dedicated protocol. A material model of skull deficit was produced using computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and individually pre-operatively adjusted polypropylene-polyester prosthesis was prepared. In a control group of 20 patients a prosthesis was manually adjusted to each patient by a neurosurgeon during surgery, without using CT-based reverse engineering/rapid prototyping. In each case, the prosthesis was implanted into the patient. The mean operating times in both groups were compared. In the group of patients with reverse engineering/rapid prototyping-based cranioplasty, the mean operating time was shorter (120.3 min) compared to that in the control group (136.5 min). The neurosurgeons found the new technology particularly useful in more complicated bone deficits with different curvatures in various planes. Reverse engineering and rapid prototyping may reduce the time needed for cranioplasty neurosurgery and improve the prosthesis fitting. Such technologies may utilize data obtained by commonly used spiral CT scanners. The manufacturing of individually adjusted prostheses should be commonly used in patients planned for cranioplasty with synthetic material.

  11. Cranioplasty prosthesis manufacturing based on reverse engineering technology

    PubMed Central

    Chrzan, Robert; Urbanik, Andrzej; Karbowski, Krzysztof; Moskała, Marek; Polak, Jarosław; Pyrich, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Most patients with large focal skull bone loss after craniectomy are referred for cranioplasty. Reverse engineering is a technology which creates a computer-aided design (CAD) model of a real structure. Rapid prototyping is a technology which produces physical objects from virtual CAD models. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of these technologies in cranioplasty prosthesis manufacturing. Material/Methods CT was performed on 19 patients with focal skull bone loss after craniectomy, using a dedicated protocol. A material model of skull deficit was produced using computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and individually pre-operatively adjusted polypropylene-polyester prosthesis was prepared. In a control group of 20 patients a prosthesis was manually adjusted to each patient by a neurosurgeon during surgery, without using CT-based reverse engineering/rapid prototyping. In each case, the prosthesis was implanted into the patient. The mean operating times in both groups were compared. Results In the group of patients with reverse engineering/rapid prototyping-based cranioplasty, the mean operating time was shorter (120.3 min) compared to that in the control group (136.5 min). The neurosurgeons found the new technology particularly useful in more complicated bone deficits with different curvatures in various planes. Conclusions Reverse engineering and rapid prototyping may reduce the time needed for cranioplasty neurosurgery and improve the prosthesis fitting. Such technologies may utilize data obtained by commonly used spiral CT scanners. The manufacturing of individually adjusted prostheses should be commonly used in patients planned for cranioplasty with synthetic material. PMID:22207125

  12. Crossword Puzzle Makes It Fun: Introduce Green Manufacturing in Wood Technology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iley, John L.; Hague, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable, or "green," manufacturing and its practices are becoming more and more a part of today's industry, including wood product manufacturing. This article provides introductory information on green manufacturing in wood technology and a crossword puzzle based on green manufacturing terms. The authors use the puzzle at the college level to…

  13. Crossword Puzzle Makes It Fun: Introduce Green Manufacturing in Wood Technology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iley, John L.; Hague, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable, or "green," manufacturing and its practices are becoming more and more a part of today's industry, including wood product manufacturing. This article provides introductory information on green manufacturing in wood technology and a crossword puzzle based on green manufacturing terms. The authors use the puzzle at the college level to…

  14. Cement manufacture and the environment - Part I: Chemistry and technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oss, H. G.; Padovani, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Hydraulic (chiefly portland) cement is the binding agent in concrete and mortar and thus a key component of a country's construction sector. Concrete is arguably the most abundant of all manufactured solid materials. Portland cement is made primarily from finely ground clinker, which itself is composed dominantly of hydraulically active calcium silicate minerals formed through high-temperature burning of limestone and other materials in a kiln. This process requires approximately 1.7 tons of raw materials perton of clinker produced and yields about 1 ton of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, of which calcination of limestone and the combustion of fuels each contribute about half. The overall level of CO2 output makes the cement industry one of the top two manufacturing industry sources of greenhouse gases; however, in many countries, the cement industry's contribution is a small fraction of that from fossil fuel combustion by power plants and motor vehicles. The nature of clinker and the enormous heat requirements of its manufacture allow the cement industry to consume a wide variety of waste raw materials and fuels, thus providing the opportunity to apply key concepts of industrial ecology, most notably the closing of loops through the use of by-products of other industries (industrial symbiosis). In this article, the chemistry and technology of cement manufacture are summarized. In a forthcoming companion article (part II), some of the environmental challenges and opportunities facing the cement industry are described. Because of the size and scope of the U.S. cement industry, the analysis relies primarily on data and practices from the United States.

  15. Continuous roll-to-roll a-Si photovoltaic manufacturing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work performed by ECD to advance its roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic manufacturing technologies; to reduce the module production costs; to increase the stabilized module performance; and to expand the commercial capacity utilizing ECD technology. The 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD's earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1/W[sub p]. Major efforts during Phase I are (1) the optimization of the high-performance back-reflector system, (2) the optimization of a-Si-Ge narrow band-gap solar cell, and (3) the optimization of the stable efficiency of the module. The goal is to achieve a stable 8% efficient 0.3-m [times] 1.2-m (1-ft [times] 4-ft) module. Also, the efforts include work on a proprietary, high-deposition-rate, microwave plasma, CVD manufacturing technology; and on the investigation of material cost reduction.

  16. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects....

  17. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects....

  18. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects....

  19. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects....

  20. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects....

  1. Intelligent Processing Equipment Developments Within the Navy's Manufacturing Technology Centers of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanzetta, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Navy has had an active Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program aimed at developing advanced production processes and equipment since the late-1960's. During the past decade, however, the resources of the MANTECH program were concentrated in Centers of Excellence. Today, the Navy sponsors four manufacturing technology Centers of Excellence: the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF); the Electronics Manufacturing Productivity Facility (EMPF); the National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT); and the Center of Excellence for Composites Manufacturing Technology (CECMT). This paper briefly describes each of the centers and summarizes typical Intelligent Equipment Processing (IEP) projects that were undertaken.

  2. Intelligent Processing Equipment Developments Within the Navy's Manufacturing Technology Centers of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanzetta, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Navy has had an active Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program aimed at developing advanced production processes and equipment since the late-1960's. During the past decade, however, the resources of the MANTECH program were concentrated in Centers of Excellence. Today, the Navy sponsors four manufacturing technology Centers of Excellence: the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF); the Electronics Manufacturing Productivity Facility (EMPF); the National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT); and the Center of Excellence for Composites Manufacturing Technology (CECMT). This paper briefly describes each of the centers and summarizes typical Intelligent Equipment Processing (IEP) projects that were undertaken.

  3. Electron Beam Melting Manufacturing Technology for Individually Manufactured Jaw Prosthesis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Suska, Felicia; Kjeller, Göran; Tarnow, Peter; Hryha, Eduard; Nyborg, Lars; Snis, Anders; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-08-01

    In the field of maxillofacial reconstruction, additive manufacturing technologies, specifically electron beam melting (EBM), offer clinicians the potential for patient-customized design of jaw prostheses, which match both load-bearing and esthetic demands. The technique allows an innovative, functional design, combining integrated porous regions for bone ingrowth and secondary biological fixation with solid load-bearing regions ensuring the biomechanical performance. A patient-specific mandibular prosthesis manufactured using EBM was successfully used to reconstruct a patient's mandibular defect after en bloc resection. Over a 9-month follow-up period, the patient had no complications. A short operating time, good esthetic outcome, and high level of patient satisfaction as measured by quality-of-life questionnaires-the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 (30-item quality-of-life core questionnaire) and H&N35 (head and neck cancer module)-were reported for this case. Individually planned and designed EBM-produced prostheses may be suggested as a possible future alternative to fibular grafts or other reconstructive methods. However, the role of porosity, the role of geometry, and the optimal combination of solid and porous parts, as well as surface properties in relation to soft tissues, should be carefully evaluated in long-term clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Photovoltaic Czochralski silicon manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 April 1993--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jester, T.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes work performed under a 3-year, 3-phase, cost-share contract to demonstrate significant cost reductions and improvements in manufacturing technology. The objective of the program is to reduce costs in photovoltaic manufacturing by approximately 10% per year. The work was focused in three main areas: (1) silicon crystal growth and thin wafer technology; (2) silicon cell processing; and (3) silicon module fabrication and environmental, safety, and health issues. During this reporting period, several significant improvements were achieved. The crystal growing operation improved significantly with an increase in growth capacity due to larger crucibles, higher polysilicon packing density, and high pull speeds. Wafer processing with wire saws progressed rapidly, and the operation is completely converted to wire saw wafer processing. The wire saws yield almost 50% more wafers per inch in production, thus improving manufacturing volume by 50% without any additional expense in crystal growth. Cell processing improvements focused on better understanding the contact paste and firing processes. Module designs for lower material and labor costs began with the focus on a new junction box, larger modules with larger cells, and a less costly framing technique. In addition, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) usage was completely eliminated in the Siemens manufacturing facility during this period, resulting in significant reductions in the cost of caustic waste treatment.

  5. Experience Scaling Up Manufacturing of Emerging Photovoltaic Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G. W.; Skinner, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report examines two important generic photovoltaic technologies at particularly revealing stages of development, i.e., the stages between R&D and stable commercial production and profitable sales. Based on two historical cases, it attempts to shed light on the difference between: (1) costs and schedules validated by actual manufacturing and market experience, and (2) estimated costs and schedules that rely on technology forecasts and engineering estimates. The amorphous Silicon case also identifies some of the costs that are incurred in meeting specific market requirements, while the Cadmium Telluride case identifies many of the operational challenges involved in transferring R&D results to production. The transition between R&D and commercial success takes a great deal of time and money for emerging energy conversion technologies in general. The experience reported here can be instructive to those managing comparable efforts, and to their investors. It can also be instructive to R&D managers responsible for positioning such new technologies for commercial success.

  6. 77 FR 43864 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Rhodes Technologies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Rhodes Technologies... the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of the basic...

  7. Phase transformation considerations during process development and manufacture of solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Geoff G Z; Law, Devalina; Schmitt, Eric A; Qiu, Yihong

    2004-02-23

    The quality and performance of a solid oral dosage form depends on the choice of the solid phase, the formulation design, and the manufacturing process. The potential for process-induced solid phase transformations must be evaluated during design and development of formulations and manufacturing processes. This article briefly reviews the basic principles of polymorphism, defines the classes of phase transformation and the underlying transformation mechanisms, and discusses respective kinetic factors. The potential phase transformations associated with common unit operations employed in manufacturing solid oral dosage forms are highlighted. Specific examples are given to illustrate the importance of solid phases, and process-induced phase transitions in formulation and process development.

  8. Dispersion of Heat Flux Sensors Manufactured in Silicon Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ziouche, Katir; Lejeune, Pascale; Bougrioua, Zahia; Leclercq, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the dispersion performances related to the manufacturing process of heat flux sensors realized in CMOS (Complementary metal oxide semi-conductor) compatible 3-in technology. In particular, we have studied the performance dispersion of our sensors and linked these to the physical characteristics of dispersion of the materials used. This information is mandatory to ensure low-cost manufacturing and especially to reduce production rejects during the fabrication process. The results obtained show that the measured sensitivity of the sensors is in the range 3.15 to 6.56 μV/(W/m2), associated with measured resistances ranging from 485 to 675 kΩ. The dispersions correspond to a Gaussian-type distribution with more than 90% determined around average sensitivity Se¯ = 4.5 µV/(W/m2) and electrical resistance R¯ = 573.5 kΩ within the interval between the average and, more or less, twice the relative standard deviation. PMID:27294929

  9. The research of the modern aspheric manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Geng; Hui, Changshun; Zhang, Jian

    2002-09-01

    Aspheric optical elements have been applied in many kinds of advanced optical systems especially in military and space optic fields accompanied by the development of the optic science. Ultra-precision aspheric surface can improve the optical performance effectively. It also can reduce the dimensions and the weights of the systems, which is the major advantage of it. In order to achieve the high-precision aspheric surfaces, some methods of the aspheric fabrication and metrology have been generated such as the diamond turning, molding, holography and some other special polishing manners based on the traditional craft production and measurement. In this article we described the manufacturing methods of aspheric element in brief and then we posed one way of the production about the aspheric surface. We introduce not only the manufacturing machine and measuring instrument about this kind of element but also the optical and mechanical parameters about the grinding and polishing, as well as technology of the process control. All devices compose a cycle of the production that is flexible and convenient to generate aspheric elements. It attribute to the high-speed production and improvement of efficiency in the factory.

  10. Current and emerging cell culture manufacturing technologies for influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Milián, Ernest; Kamen, Amine A

    2015-01-01

    Annually, influenza virus infects millions of people worldwide. Vaccination programs against seasonal influenza infections require the production of hundreds of million doses within a very short period of time. The influenza vaccine is currently produced using a technology developed in the 1940s that relies on replicating the virus in embryonated hens' eggs. The monovalent viral preparation is inactivated and purified before being formulated in trivalent or tetravalent influenza vaccines. The production process has depended on a continuous supply of eggs. In the case of pandemic outbreaks, this mode of production might be problematic because of a possible drastic reduction in the egg supply and the low flexibility of the manufacturing process resulting in a lack of supply of the required vaccine doses in a timely fashion. Novel production systems using mammalian or insect cell cultures have emerged to overcome the limitations of the egg-based production system. These industrially well-established production systems have been primarily selected for a faster and more flexible response to pandemic threats. Here, we review the most important cell culture manufacturing processes that have been developed in recent years for mass production of influenza vaccines.

  11. Current and Emerging Cell Culture Manufacturing Technologies for Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Milián, Ernest; Kamen, Amine A.

    2015-01-01

    Annually, influenza virus infects millions of people worldwide. Vaccination programs against seasonal influenza infections require the production of hundreds of million doses within a very short period of time. The influenza vaccine is currently produced using a technology developed in the 1940s that relies on replicating the virus in embryonated hens' eggs. The monovalent viral preparation is inactivated and purified before being formulated in trivalent or tetravalent influenza vaccines. The production process has depended on a continuous supply of eggs. In the case of pandemic outbreaks, this mode of production might be problematic because of a possible drastic reduction in the egg supply and the low flexibility of the manufacturing process resulting in a lack of supply of the required vaccine doses in a timely fashion. Novel production systems using mammalian or insect cell cultures have emerged to overcome the limitations of the egg-based production system. These industrially well-established production systems have been primarily selected for a faster and more flexible response to pandemic threats. Here, we review the most important cell culture manufacturing processes that have been developed in recent years for mass production of influenza vaccines. PMID:25815321

  12. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SEDIMENT SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY, ART'S MANUFACTURING, SPLIT CORE SAMPLER FOR SUBMERGED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Split Core Sampler for Submerged Sediments (Split Core Sampler) designed and fabricated by Arts Manufacturing & Supply, Inc., was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in April and May 1999 at ...

  13. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SEDIMENT SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY, ART'S MANUFACTURING, SPLIT CORE SAMPLER FOR SUBMERGED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The Split Core Sampler for Submerged Sediments (Split Core Sampler) designed and fabricated by Arts Manufacturing & Supply, Inc., was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in April and May 1999 at ...

  14. Novel concepts and technologies for manufacturing optical microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Bauer, Hans-Dieter; Drews, Dietrich; Lacher, Manfred

    1998-08-01

    The development and fabrication of micro-optical devices are of increasing importance in the field of data- and telecommunication networks capable of transmitting multimedia signals with high bit rates. Miniature optical sensors such as spectrometers and interferometers are another example for rapidly growing markets with a wide range of applications in biotechnology, chemistry, pharmacy, environmental technology, and automation, to namely only the most obvious. Various technologies are used for the development and fabrication of such devices. However, the success of the resulting product heavily depends on its price. Therefore, the techniques for the manufacture of micro-optical devices are at least as important as the product itself. In this presentation fabrication concepts and technologies will be discussed. By fabrication we naturally mean more than the production of a master that allows mass-production of the product. Among the criteria are also the pros and cons of the material to be used, automated assembly aspects, the compatibility with existing components or systems etc.

  15. Accelerating Industrial Adoption of Metal Additive Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanian, Kenneth; McDonald, Tom

    2016-03-01

    While metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology has clear benefits, there are still factors preventing its adoption by industry. These factors include the high cost of metal AM systems, the difficulty for machinists to learn and operate metal AM machines, the long approval process for part qualification/certification, and the need for better process controls; however, the high AM system cost is the main barrier deterring adoption. In this paper, we will discuss an America Makes-funded program to reduce AM system cost by combining metal AM technology with conventional computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools. Information will be provided on how an Optomec-led team retrofitted a legacy CNC vertical mill with laser engineered net shaping (LENS®—LENS is a registered trademark of Sandia National Labs) AM technology, dramatically lowering deployment cost. The upgraded system, dubbed LENS Hybrid Vertical Mill, enables metal additive and subtractive operations to be performed on the same machine tool and even on the same part. Information on the LENS Hybrid system architecture, learnings from initial system deployment and continuing development work will also be provided to help guide further development activities within the materials community.

  16. Fabrication of biochip based on CD/DVD manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Xu, Bin; Li, Lihua; Yan, Mingming; Pan, Longfa

    2009-08-01

    Biochip is a kind of nano/microfluidic chip based on biology system. All advanced microfluidic are moving into small micro-meter and nano-meter scale and need a low cost and high production manufacturing method. The history and situation of biochips as well as the situation of optical storage industry, including the difficulties which producers face to, are surveyed. The advantages and disadvantages for the fabricating method of biochip based on CD/DVD production line are put forward. Once the low cost technology is developed, it will be able to speed up biotech research as well as revival of optical storage industry and make use of the unemployed optical instruments.

  17. Advanced Manufacturing Technologies (AMT): Additive Manufactured Hot Fire Planning and Testing in GRC Cell 32 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fikes, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to hot fire test an additively manufactured thrust chamber assembly TCA (injector and thrust chamber). GRC will install the additively manufactured Inconel 625 injector, two additively manufactured (SLM) water cooled Cu-Cr thrust chamber barrels and one additively manufactured (SLM) water cooled Cu-Cr thrust chamber nozzle on the test stand in Cell 32 and perform hot fire testing of the integrated TCA.

  18. Technology Reinvestment Project Manufacturing Education and Training. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Bond, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    The manufacturing education program is a joint program between the University of Alabama in Huntsville's (UAH) College of Engineering and Alabama A&M University's (AAMLJ) School of Engineering and Technology. The objective of the program is to provide more hands-on experiences to undergraduate engineering and engineering technology students. The scope of work consisted of. Year 1, Task 1: Review courses at Alabama Industrial Development Training (AIDT); Task 2: Review courses at UAH and AAMU; Task 3: Develop new lab manuals; Task 4: Field test manuals; Task 5: Prepare annual report. Year 2, Task 1: Incorporate feedback into lab manuals; Task 2 : Introduce lab manuals into classes; Task 3: Field test manuals; Task 4: Prepare annual report. Year 3, Task 1: Incorporate feedback into lab manuals; Task 2: Introduce lab manuals into remaining classes; Task 3: Conduct evaluation with assistance of industry; Task 4: Prepare final report. This report only summarizes the activities of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The activities of Alabama A&M University are contained in a separate report.

  19. Impacts of advanced manufacturing technology on parametric estimating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, Paul G.

    1989-12-01

    The introduction of advanced manufacturing technology in the aerospace industry poses serious challenges for government cost analysts. Traditionally, the analysts have relied on parametric estimating techniques for both planning and budgeting. Despite its problems, this approach has proven to be a remarkably useful and robust tool for estimating new weapon system costs. However, rapid improvements in both product and process technology could exacerbate current difficulties, and diminish the utility of the parametric approach. This paper reviews some weakness associated with parametrics, then proceeds to examine how specific aspects of the factory of the future may further impact parametric estimating, and suggests avenues of research for their resolution. This paper is an extended version of Cost Estimating for the Factory of the Future. Parametric estimating is a method by which aggregated costs are derived as a function of high-level product characteristics or parameters. The resulting equations are known as cost estimating relationships (CERs). Such equations are particularly useful when detailed technical specifications are not available.

  20. Low-temperature deposition manufacturing: A novel and promising rapid prototyping technology for the fabrication of tissue-engineered scaffold.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Daming; Huang, Jianghong; Wei, You; Xiong, Jianyi; Zhu, Weimin; Duan, Li; Chen, Jielin; Sun, Rong; Wang, Daping

    2017-01-01

    Developed in recent years, low-temperature deposition manufacturing (LDM) represents one of the most promising rapid prototyping technologies. It is not only based on rapid deposition manufacturing process but also combined with phase separation process. Besides the controlled macropore size, tissue-engineered scaffold fabricated by LDM has inter-connected micropores in the deposited lines. More importantly, it is a green manufacturing process that involves non-heating liquefying of materials. It has been employed to fabricate tissue-engineered scaffolds for bone, cartilage, blood vessel and nerve tissue regenerations. It is a promising technology in the fabrication of tissue-engineered scaffold similar to ideal scaffold and the design of complex organs. In the current paper, this novel LDM technology is introduced, and its control parameters, biomedical applications and challenges are included and discussed as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rare resource supply crisis and solution technology for semiconductor manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hitomi; Hu, Sophia; Yoo, Youngsun; Takahisa, Kenji; Enami, Tatsuo

    2016-03-01

    There are growing concerns over future environmental impact and earth resource shortage throughout the world and in many industries. Our semiconductor industry is not excluded. "Green" has become an important topic as production volume become larger and more powerful. Especially, the rare gases are widely used in semiconductor manufacturing because of its inertness and extreme chemical stability. One major component of an Excimer laser system is Neon. It is used as a buffer gas for Argon (Ar) and Krypton (Kr) gases used in deep ultraviolet (DUV) lithography laser systems. Since Neon gas accounting for more than 96% of the laser gas mixture, a fairly large amount of neon gas is consumed to run these DUV lasers. However, due to country's instability both in politics and economics in Ukraine, the main producer of neon gas today, supply reduction has become an issue and is causing increasing concern. This concern is not only based on price increases, but has escalated to the point of supply shortages in 2015. This poses a critical situation for the semiconductor industry, which represents the leading consumer of neon gas in the world. Helium is another noble gas used for Excimer laser operation. It is used as a purge gas for optical component modules to prevent from being damaged by active gases and impurities. Helium has been used in various industries, including for medical equipment, linear motor cars, and semiconductors, and is indispensable for modern life. But consumption of helium in manufacturing has been increased dramatically, and its unstable supply and price rise has been a serious issue today. In this article, recent global supply issue of rare resources, especially Neon gas and Helium gas, and its solution technology to support semiconductor industry will be discussed.

  2. Developing novel 3D antennas using advanced additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaee, Milad

    In today's world of wireless communication systems, antenna engineering is rapidly advancing as the wireless services continue to expand in support of emerging commercial applications. Antennas play a key role in the performance of advanced transceiver systems where they serve to convert electric power to electromagnetic waves and vice versa. Researchers have held significant interest in developing this crucial component for wireless communication systems by employing a variety of design techniques. In the past few years, demands for electrically small antennas continues to increase, particularly among portable and mobile wireless devices, medical electronics and aerospace systems. This trend toward smaller electronic devices makes the three dimensional (3D) antennas very appealing, since they can be designed in a way to use every available space inside the devise. Additive Manufacturing (AM) method could help to find great solutions for the antennas design for next generation of wireless communication systems. In this thesis, the design and fabrication of 3D printed antennas using AM technology is studied. To demonstrate this application of AM, different types of antennas structures have been designed and fabricated using various manufacturing processes. This thesis studies, for the first time, embedded conductive 3D printed antennas using PolyLactic Acid (PLA) and Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) for substrate parts and high temperature carbon paste for conductive parts which can be a good candidate to overcome the limitations of direct printing on 3D surfaces that is the most popular method to fabricate conductive parts of the antennas. This thesis also studies, for the first time, the fabrication of antennas with 3D printed conductive parts which can contribute to the new generation of 3D printed antennas.

  3. Microstructural characterization and influence of manufacturing parameters on technological properties of vitreous ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Njoya, D.; Hajjaji, M.; Bacaoui, A.; Njopwouo, D.

    2010-03-15

    Microstructure of vitreous ceramic samples manufactured from kaolinitic-clay and feldspars raw materials from Cameroon was investigated in the range 1150-1250 deg. C by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and by measuring some technological properties. Moreover, the simultaneous influence of feldspars content, heating temperature and soaking time on water absorption and firing shrinkage was evaluated by adopting the response surface methodology (Doehlert matrix), using the New Efficient Methodology for Research using Optimal Design (NEMROD) software. The results show that a spinel phase, mullite, glassy phase and some amount of hematite were formed. However, the spinel phase and potassic feldspar, as compared to the sodic one, disappeared at moderate firing temperature and soaking time. Apparently, mullite developed from spinel phase, which is formed from the demixion of metakaolin. On the other hand, it is found that the effects of fluxing content and firing temperature on the measured properties were almost similar and more influent than soaking time. Antagonistic and synergetic interactions existed between the considered parameters, and their importance differed for the considered properties. By using this mathematical tool, suitable operating conditions for manufacturing vitreous bodies were determined.

  4. Short fiber-reinforced cementitious composites manufactured by extrusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bin

    The use of short fibers in the cement-based composites is more preferable due to the simplicity and economic nature in fabrication. The short fiber-reinforced cementitious composite (SFRCC) manufactured by the extrusion method show a great improvement in both strength and toughness as compared to the fiber-reinforced composites made by traditional casting methods. This improvement can be attributed to the achievement of low porosity and good interfacial bond in SFRCC under high shear and compressive stress during the extrusion process. In the present study, products of cylinders, sheets, pipes and honeycomb panels incorporating various mineral admixtures such as slag, silica fume, and metakaolin have been manufactured by the extrusion technology. Two kinds of short fibers, ductile polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and stronger but less ductile glass fibers, were used as the reinforcement in the products. After the specimens were extruded, tension, bending and impact tests were performed to study the mechanical properties of these products. The rheology test was performed for each mix to determine its viscoelastic properties. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) technology were employed to get an insight view of the mechanism. A freezing and thawing experiment (ASTM C666) was also carried to investigate the durability of the specimens. Based on these experimental results, the reinforcing behaviors of these two short fibers were investigated. The enhancing effects of silica fume and metakaolin on the extrudates were compared and discussed. Finally, the optimum amount of silica fume and slag was proposed. Since the key point for a successful extrusion is the properly designed rheology which controls both internal and external flow properties of extrudate, a nonlinear viscoelastic model was applied to investigate the rheological behavior of a movable fresh cementitious composite in an extruder channel. The velocity profile of the

  5. Computer vision challenges and technologies for agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molley, Perry A.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, a Department of Energy laboratory, is responsible for maintaining the safety, security, reliability, and availability of the nuclear weapons stockpile for the United States. Because of the changing national and global political climates and inevitable budget cuts, Sandia is changing the methods and processes it has traditionally used in the product realization cycle for weapon components. Because of the increasing age of the nuclear stockpile, it is certain that the reliability of these weapons will degrade with time unless eventual action is taken to repair, requalify, or renew them. Furthermore, due to the downsizing of the DOE weapons production sites and loss of technical personnel, the new product realization process is being focused on developing and deploying advanced automation technologies in order to maintain the capability for producing new components. The goal of Sandia's technology development program is to create a product realization environment that is cost effective, has improved quality and reduced cycle time for small lot sizes. The new environment will rely less on the expertise of humans and more on intelligent systems and automation to perform the production processes. The systems will be robust in order to provide maximum flexibility and responsiveness for rapidly changing component or product mixes. An integrated enterprise will allow ready access to and use of information for effective and efficient product and process design. Concurrent engineering methods will allow a speedup of the product realization cycle, reduce costs, and dramatically lessen the dependency on creating and testing physical prototypes. Virtual manufacturing will allow production processes to be designed, integrated, and programed off-line before a piece of hardware ever moves. The overriding goal is to be able to build a large variety of new weapons parts on short notice. Many of these technologies that are being developed are also

  6. Metal-Matrix Composites Prepared by Paper-Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Claudia; Aneziris, Christos G.; Pranke, Katja

    2016-01-01

    In this work, metal-matrix composites were prepared via paper-manufacturing technology using metastable austenitic steel powder of type 16-7-3 (Cr-Mn-Ni in wt pct) and magnesia partially stabilized zirconia reinforcing particles. The influence of the process parameters on the paper web formation and the resulting properties of the MMCs were studied and solids retention of >90 wt pct was achieved. During filtration of the aqueous fiber-filler suspension, the steel particles were incorporated in the fiber network, and steel clusters were formed. Calendering had a positive influence on the porosity, bulk density, and tensile strength of the green paper sheets. Within this contribution, the debinding process for the metal-matrix paper sheets was in focus. A debinding rate of 0.5 K/min to 733 K (460 °C) with a dwell time of 90 minutes was sufficient to completely remove cellulose fibers. The sintered composites attained a tensile strength of up to 177 N/mm2 at a total porosity of 66 pct.

  7. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Optical Communications, Optronic Devices Manufacturing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to the well layer. At W = 4 /im or less, a single peak near field pattern is obtained with a drop in Ith. Over an extremely narrow width , the clad ...for the composition of the growth film and In to melt them. Usually, in the fabrication of a wafer for a Fabry-Perot laser , an InP single crystal is...Production Technology for AlGaAs/GaAs Quantum-Well Laser 31 InGaAsP/InP DFB Laser Manufacturing Process Technology 40 Planar Type InGaAs-APD

  8. Factors that influence the rejection of new manufacturing technologies and concepts

    Treesearch

    Kristen G. Hoff; Timothy J. Greene; Timothy J. Greene

    1998-01-01

    New manufacturing technologies or concepts often are adopted to improve a firm's competitive advantage over other firms in the same industry. The benefits that a firm expects to receive as a result of that adoption are presumed to outweigh the risk factors that accompany the adoption of a new manufacturing technology. Much research has been conducted to...

  9. Solder technology in the manufacturing of electronic products

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.

    1993-08-01

    The electronics industry has relied heavily upon the use of soldering for both package construction and circuit assembly. The solder attachment of devices onto printed circuit boards and ceramic microcircuits has supported the high volume manufacturing processes responsible for low cost, high quality consumer products and military hardware. Defects incurred during the manufacturing process are minimized by the proper selection of solder alloys, substrate materials and process parameters. Prototyping efforts are then used to evaluate the manufacturability of the chosen material systems. Once manufacturing feasibility has been established, service reliability of the final product is evaluated through accelerated testing procedures.

  10. Manufacturing three-dimensional nickel titanium articles using layer-by-layer laser-melting technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkovsky, I. V.; Yadroitsev, I. A.; Smurov, I. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    Specific features of layer-by-layer synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) nickel titanium (NiTi, nitinol) articles by selective laser melting (SLM) technology have been studied. Nonporous 3D nitinol articles have been obtained for the first time in a single technological cycle. A necessary condition was that the NiTi powder medium was heated to 500°C during sintering. The structure and composition of intermetallic phases in SLM-synthesized samples have been studied by optical metallography, microhardness measurements, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis techniques. Optimum SLM regimes for manufacturing NiTi articles and promising medical applications of this material are considered.

  11. Manufacturing technology in the Danish pig slaughter industry.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, Lars

    2010-02-01

    The Danish pig meat industry is very export oriented. Ninety per cent of the production of the big cooperative slaughterhouses is exported to more than 100 countries all over the world. This poses a requirement for the industry to be globally competitive in the sense of quality, product safety and--of course--price. A big challenge for the industry is therefore to maintain sufficient low unit costs in spite of the high factor costs of Denmark. In particular the high labour costs must be accompanied by correspondingly high labour productivity. And, it should be emphasized, this high labour productivity must be achieved without compromising the concern for good working conditions of the employees in the manufacturing. Technology is one of the means to achieve this combination of good working conditions and high labour productivity. One of the most important benefits from automation is the improved working environment. Pig slaughtering, cutting and boning is traditionally very labour intensive and requires hard and repetitive work. For many people a job in a slaughterhouse is therefore not their first choice. This situation can be changed by automation, which will not only reduce arduous and repetitive work but in addition will introduce more motivating jobs in terms of planning, supervision and control of the new technology. Automation will also improve the hygiene and thereby the food safety. This applies in particular to the clean slaughter line where cross contamination between carcasses is reduced because of less manual handling and because the tools in the machines can be sterilised more effectively between each carcass. Automated processes are more accurate and repeatable than manual work. For some processes, in particular in cutting and boning, this will enhance the product yield. New technology can also improve the animal welfare. The group-stunning system and mechanised lairage systems are examples of that. Improved animal welfare has an ethical value in

  12. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  13. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature SiO2 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  14. Automated Manufacturing/Robotics Technology: Certificate and Associate Degree Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuay, Paul L.

    A description is provided of the Automated Manufacturing/Robotics program to be offered at Delaware County Community College beginning in September 1984. Section I provides information on the use of reprogramable industrial robots in manufacturing and the rapid changes in production that can be effected through the application of automated…

  15. Manufacturing mesenchymal stromal cells for phase I clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Mei, Zhuyong; da Graca Cabreira-Hansen, Maria; Klis, Mariola; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yali; Durett, April G; Zheng, Xingwu; Wang, Yongping; Gee, Adrian P; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells capable of differentiating into adipocytes, osteoblasts and chondroblasts as well as secreting a vast array of soluble mediators. This potentially makes MSCs important mediators of a variety of therapeutic applications. They are actively under evaluation for immunomodulatory purposes such as graft-versus-host disease and Crohn's disease as well as regenerative applications such as stroke and congestive heart failure. We report our method of generating clinical-grade MSCs together with suggestions gathered from manufacturing experience in our Good Manufacturing Practices facility. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Approach to characterize manufacture tolerances of two-dimensional cross-phase grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Ke

    2013-10-01

    Two-dimensional cross-phase grating (CPG), diffracting the incident wave into (+1,+1), (+1,-1), (-1,-1), and (-1,+1) orders diffraction light, is used as a wavefront shearing element in cross-phase grating lateral shearing interferometer. However, the manufacture errors always exist, and they produce unwanted diffraction orders in the process of CPG manufacture. The appearance of the unwanted orders will increase the background noise of the interferogram and may affect the accuracy of the interferogram analysis. So, it is necessary to analyze the influences of manufacture errors and to determine the manufacture tolerances to remove the effect. A method based on Fourier transform analysis is presented to characterize manufacture tolerances of CPG. In this method, first, the normalized intensity distribution produced by CPG with manufacture errors in the far field is obtained. In addition, relative intensity of other unwanted orders to (+1,-1) order diffraction light of the four replicas is calculated, respectively. According to the relative intensity, the influences due to different types of manufacture errors can be evaluated, and the manufacture tolerances can also be determined. Using the proposed method, the manufacture tolerances of CPG at 632.8 nm are determined. Experimental evaluation of the proposed method using the manufactured CPG at 632.8 nm is also carried out.

  17. Emerging technology: A key enabler for modernizing pharmaceutical manufacturing and advancing product quality.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas F; Yu, Lawrence X; Lee, Sau L

    2016-07-25

    Issues in product quality have produced recalls and caused drug shortages in United States (U.S.) in the past few years. These quality issues were often due to outdated manufacturing technologies and equipment as well as lack of an effective quality management system. To ensure consistent supply of safe, effective and high-quality drug products available to the patients, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) supports modernizing pharmaceutical manufacturing for improvements in product quality. Specifically, five new initiatives are proposed here to achieve this goal. They include: (i) advancing regulatory science for pharmaceutical manufacturing; (ii) establishing a public-private institute for pharmaceutical manufacturing innovation; (iii) creating incentives for investment in the technological upgrade of manufacturing processes and facilities; (iv) leveraging external expertise for regulatory quality assessment of emerging technologies; and (v) promoting the international harmonization of approaches for expediting the global adoption of emerging technologies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Advantage management strategy in competition via technological race perspective: empirical evidence from the Taiwanese manufacturing industry.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tsu-Yi; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Shih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the advantage management strategies of a firm regarding the technological race in the manufacturing sector. This is to reveal whether firms adopt a catch-up or leapfrogging strategy in the competition for innovation. The results show that competition is fierce in the Taiwanese manufacturing industry. Taiwanese manufacturing firms (mostly SMEs) tend to adopt the "catch-up" strategy to keep up with their competitors in order to remain in the technological race. The result indicates that, under financial constraints, Taiwanese manufacturing firms attempt to invest in R&D to catch up with their rivals or to avoid being eliminated from the race.

  19. Advantage Management Strategy in Competition via Technological Race Perspective: Empirical Evidence from the Taiwanese Manufacturing Industry

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsu-Yi; Hsiao, Yu-Ju; Wu, Shih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the advantage management strategies of a firm regarding the technological race in the manufacturing sector. This is to reveal whether firms adopt a catch-up or leapfrogging strategy in the competition for innovation. The results show that competition is fierce in the Taiwanese manufacturing industry. Taiwanese manufacturing firms (mostly SMEs) tend to adopt the “catch-up” strategy to keep up with their competitors in order to remain in the technological race. The result indicates that, under financial constraints, Taiwanese manufacturing firms attempt to invest in R&D to catch up with their rivals or to avoid being eliminated from the race. PMID:25295307

  20. Technology Solutions for New Manufactured Homes: Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Manufactured Home Builders (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2013-11-01

    The Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program (NEEM) administrator, have been collaborating to conduct research on new specifications that would improve on the energy requirements of a NEEM home. In its role as administrator, NEW administers the technical specs, performs research and engineering analysis, implements ongoing construction quality management procedures, and maintains a central database with home tracking. This project prototyped and assessed the performances of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that are not commonly deployed in the manufacturing setting. The package of measures is able to reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50 percent over typical manufactured homes produced in the northwest.

  1. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 7 January 1994--6 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Weisiger, D.; Albright, S.P.; Brines, J.; Thompson, R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by Golden Photon, Inc. (GPI), to conduct research under the PVMaT program, Phase 2B. The objective of the research is to advance GPI`s manufacturing technology, reduce module production costs, increase average module performance, and identify ways to expand production capacity. More specifically, the tasks established for Phase I were to design and install leasehold improvements for the 2-MW production line; to improve and develop product design, efficiency, and marketability; to ensure uninterrupted qualified supplies and raw materials for production; to address environmental, health, and safety issues encountered during production of photovoltaic modules; and to reduce the cost of manufacturing modules. During the first half of this reporting period, the development, design, and debugging of cell interconnection equipment critical to start-up was completed. During the second and third quarters, the primary focus was on the substrate deposition steps (tin oxide, cadmium sulfide, and cadmium telluride) and cell interconnection steps (division). In general, process development, engineering, and quality teams continued to focus on identifying, baselining, and improving (through redesign) actual process equipment operation parameters to meet the required PV panel specifications and improve process throughput rates and yields.

  2. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) improvements for ENTECH`s concentrator module. Final technical report, 9 January 1991--14 April 1991

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.; Perry, J.L.; Jackson, M.C.; Walters, R.R.

    1991-11-01

    This final technical report documents ENTECH`s Phase 1 contract with Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Under this project we prepared a detailed description of our current manufacturing process for making our unique linear Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator modules. In addition, we prepared a detailed description of an improved manufacturing process, which will simultaneously increase module production rates, enhance module quality, and substantially reduce module costs. We also identified potential problems in implementing the new manufacturing process, and we proposed solutions to these anticipated problems. Before discussing the key results of our program, however, we present a brief description of our unique photovoltaic technology. The key conclusion of our PVMAT Phase 1 study is that our module technology, without further breakthroughs, can realistically meet the near-term DOE goal of 12 cents/kWh levelized electricity cost, provided that we successfully implement the new manufacturing process at a production volume of at least 10 megawatts per year. The key recommendation from our Phase 1 study is to continue our PVMaT project into Phase 2A, which is directed toward the actual manufacturing technology development required for our new module production process. 15 refs.

  3. Docking automation related technology, Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Jatko, W.B.; Goddard, J.S.; Gleason, S.S.; Ferrell, R.K.

    1995-04-01

    This report generalizes the progress for Phase II of the Docking Automated Related Technologies task component within the Modular Artillery Ammunition Delivery System (MAADS) technology demonstrator of the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV) project. This report also covers development activity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period from January to July 1994.

  4. Technology Transfer: Federal Efforts to Enhance the Competitiveness of Small Manufacturers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    manufacturers , we visited each of these MTCS to interview "* MTC officials; "* state technology extension officials in Ohio, New York, and South Caro- lina to...three centers located in Cleveland, Ohio; Troy, New York; and Columbia, South Carolina. All three centers initially proposed to transfer advanced...Competing in Manufacturing (Feb. 1990). 3Economic Policy Institute, Modernizing Manufacturing : New Policies to Build Industrial Extension Services

  5. An Introduction to Intelligent Processing Programs Developed by the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Paul G.; Sny, Linda C.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has numerous on-going manufacturing and integration development programs (machine tools, composites, metals, assembly, and electronics) which are instrumental in improving productivity in the aerospace industry, but more importantly, have identified strategies and technologies required for the integration of advanced processing equipment. An introduction to four current Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate (ManTech) manufacturing areas is provided. Research is being carried out in the following areas: (1) machining initiatives for aerospace subcontractors which provide for advanced technology and innovative manufacturing strategies to increase the capabilities of small shops; (2) innovative approaches to advance machine tool products and manufacturing processes; (3) innovative approaches to advance sensors for process control in machine tools; and (4) efforts currently underway to develop, with the support of industry, the Next Generation Workstation/Machine Controller (Low-End Controller Task).

  6. An Introduction to Intelligent Processing Programs Developed by the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, Paul G.; Sny, Linda C.

    1992-01-01

    The Air Force has numerous on-going manufacturing and integration development programs (machine tools, composites, metals, assembly, and electronics) which are instrumental in improving productivity in the aerospace industry, but more importantly, have identified strategies and technologies required for the integration of advanced processing equipment. An introduction to four current Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate (ManTech) manufacturing areas is provided. Research is being carried out in the following areas: (1) machining initiatives for aerospace subcontractors which provide for advanced technology and innovative manufacturing strategies to increase the capabilities of small shops; (2) innovative approaches to advance machine tool products and manufacturing processes; (3) innovative approaches to advance sensors for process control in machine tools; and (4) efforts currently underway to develop, with the support of industry, the Next Generation Workstation/Machine Controller (Low-End Controller Task).

  7. Organic transistors manufactured using inkjet technology with subfemtoliter accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi, Yoshiaki; Zschieschang, Ute; Klauk, Hagen; Someya, Takao

    2008-01-01

    A major obstacle to the development of organic transistors for large-area sensor, display, and circuit applications is the fundamental compromise between manufacturing efficiency, transistor performance, and power consumption. In the past, improving the manufacturing efficiency through the use of printing techniques has inevitably resulted in significantly lower performance and increased power consumption, while attempts to improve performance or reduce power have led to higher process temperatures and increased manufacturing cost. Here, we lift this fundamental limitation by demonstrating subfemtoliter inkjet printing to define metal contacts with single-micrometer resolution on the surface of high-mobility organic semiconductors to create high-performance p-channel and n-channel transistors and low-power complementary circuits. The transistors employ an ultrathin low-temperature gate dielectric based on a self-assembled monolayer that allows transistors and circuits on rigid and flexible substrates to operate with very low voltages. PMID:18362348

  8. Structure and technology of manufacturing in Texas and Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.H.; Long, W.T. III

    1987-01-01

    The oil price decline since late 1985 affects manufacturing more in Texas and Louisiana than in the rest of the US. The primary reason for this is that the manufacturing sector in these two states relies more heavily on energy - both as a factor input and as a source of output demand. Secondly, based on this study's results, inputs are more easily substituted in Texas and Louisiana's manufacturing. An implication is that the expected employment losses from reduced energy industry demand are likely to be intensified by the substitution of lower-priced energy for labor. In addition, capital subsidies provided as part of state economic development efforts may not have the effect of increasing labor demand in Texas and Louisiana. 3 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Lessons Learned from the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D and Thin Film PV Partnership Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.; Mitchell, R.; Zweibel, K.

    2006-09-01

    As the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Program initiates new cost-shared solar energy R&D under the Solar America Initiative (SAI), it is useful to analyze the experience gained from cost-shared R&D projects that have been funded through the program to date. This report summarizes lessons learned from two DOE-sponsored photovoltaic (PV) projects: the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology/PV Manufacturing R&D (PVMaT/PVMR&D) project and the Thin-Film PV Partnership project. During the past 10-15 years, these two projects have invested roughly $330 million of government resources in cost-shared R&D and leveraged another $190 million in private-sector PV R&D investments. Following a description of key findings and brief descriptions of the PVMaT/PVMR&D and Thin-Film PV Partnership projects, this report presents lessons learned from the projects.

  10. An Evaluation of the Manufacturing Technology Partnership (MTP) Program. Technical Report No. 96-007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Kevin

    The Manufacturing Technology Program (MTP) is a partnership between General Motors, the United Auto Workers, and the public schools in Flint, Michigan, that originated as a preapprenticeship program and has since expanded into a program preparing youth for manufacturing. The programs' effectiveness was examined through a comparison group-based…

  11. An Evaluation of the Manufacturing Technology Partnership (MTP) Program. Technical Report No. 96-007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollenbeck, Kevin

    The Manufacturing Technology Program (MTP) is a partnership between General Motors, the United Auto Workers, and the public schools in Flint, Michigan, that originated as a preapprenticeship program and has since expanded into a program preparing youth for manufacturing. The programs' effectiveness was examined through a comparison group-based…

  12. Modern Technologies of Manufacturing Nonwovens and Cotton's Realistic Scope of Utilization in Nonwovens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Modern nonwoven manufacturing technologies are broadly classified into the so-called “Dry” and “Wet” production lines. As the names imply, the dry line generally does not involve any liquid and the wet line always involves some kind of liquid, generally water. Further, the manufacturing of nonwovens...

  13. Metering technology enters new phase

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, T.

    1995-08-01

    Automated metering technology (AMT) is emerging from the limited function of automatic meter-reading to collect useful information that can be used to improve customer service and increase profitability. Specifically, AMT: eliminates monthly usage estimating for customers in hard-to-read areas; eliminates meter reading direct labor costs; provides 24-hour-a-day access to residential, industrial and commercial customers, eliminating intrusion on private property; provides the utility with a load (usage) profile for each customer; provides real-time pricing; provides real-time alarms for outages and meter-tampering. In the competitive environment of deregulation, linking utilities and their customers through two-way communications will be one of the keys to offering the kinds of services and products that will differentiate utilities and satisfy customers. Data collected using AMT can be used to develop customer profiles, enabling the utility to offer customized service packages to individual customers. AMT tends to reduce complaints about bills and increase customer satisfaction.

  14. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Project Execution Report, Second CY 81

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-15

    A ««/- ©fco RIA-82- U112 ..o AO^V TECHNICAL U.S. ARMY i LIBRARY MATERIEL DEVELOPMENT AND READINESS COMMAND AD4 i/^/ofco MANUFACTURING ETHODS...DIVISION ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 61299 3 OF 3 — 1 - AD NUMBER: A114060 —48 - SBI SITE HOLDING SYMBOL: DSMC TRAL RIA-82- U112 -- 2

  15. Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers these occupations: manufacturing technician, computer-assisted design and drafting (CADD) technician, quality technician, and mechanical technician. Section 1 provides occupation definitions. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes---abbreviations for grade level…

  16. Training a New Breed of Automated Manufacturing Technology Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainter, Jack J.

    1986-01-01

    A boom in industrial robotics has led numerous vocational institutions to launch extensive training programs in this specialty. ITT Educational Services offers two curriculum programs to train future manufacturing engineers. The firm's national director describes this model curriculum for meeting the needs of today's workforce. (JN)

  17. Training a New Breed of Automated Manufacturing Technology Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainter, Jack J.

    1986-01-01

    A boom in industrial robotics has led numerous vocational institutions to launch extensive training programs in this specialty. ITT Educational Services offers two curriculum programs to train future manufacturing engineers. The firm's national director describes this model curriculum for meeting the needs of today's workforce. (JN)

  18. Manufacturing Methods and Technology Application of High Energy Laser Welding Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    bead shape and appearance to welds made by the automatic GTAW process. 4. Lens-to-Work Distance The effect of lens to workpiece distance is...REPORT RL-82-2 0 MANUFACTURING METHODS AND TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION _OF HIGH ENERGY LASER WELDING PROCESS 0John V. Melonas Structures Directorate, U S...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Manufacturing Methods and Technology Application Final Technical Report of High Energy Laser Welding

  19. Meeting Modern Manufacturing Technology Face-to-Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson, David; Filsinger, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The "attractor magnet" curricula in the Interdisciplinary Program at Suncoast Community High School (Florida) include drafting, technology, engineering technology, and communications technology. As an alternative to comprehensive high schools, it provides challenging college-prep programs to a diverse population. (JOW)

  20. The strategic relevance of manufacturing technology: An overall quality concept to promote innovation preventing drug shortage.

    PubMed

    Panzitta, Michele; Ponti, Mauro; Bruno, Giorgio; Cois, Giancarlo; D'Arpino, Alessandro; Minghetti, Paola; Mendicino, Francesca Romana; Perioli, Luana; Ricci, Maurizio

    2017-01-10

    Manufacturing is the bridge between research and patient: without product, there is no clinical outcome. Shortage has a variety of causes, in this paper we analyse only causes related to manufacturing technology and we use shortage as a paradigm highliting the relevance of Pharmaceutical Technology. Product and process complexity and capacity issues are the main challenge for the Pharmaceutical Industry Supply chain. Manufacturing Technology should be acknowledged as a R&D step and as a very important matter during University degree in Pharmacy and related disciplines, promoting collaboration between Academia and Industry, measured during HTA step and rewarded in terms of price and reimbursement. The above elements are not yet properly recognised, and manufacturing technology is taken in to consideration only when a shortage is in place. In a previous work, Panzitta et al. proposed to perform a full technology assessment at the Health Technological Assessment stage, evaluating three main technical aspects of a medicine: manufacturing process, physicochemical properties, and formulation characteristics. In this paper, we develop the concept of manufacturing appraisal, providing a technical overview of upcoming challenges, a risk based approach and an economic picture of shortage costs. We develop also an overall quality concept, not limited to GMP factors but broaden to all elements leading to a robust supply and promoting technical innovation.

  1. Leveraging costs and reducing risk in the development of optics manufacturing technological thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potts, Joe

    1992-01-01

    The Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) program has exerted a strong and lasting influence on the U.S. defense industrial base for more than 25 years. The defense industrial base can be described as the aggregate ability to provide the manufacturing technology, research, development, and resources necessary to produce defense material. The Army's MANTECH program is designed to develop manufacturing thrusts (such as optics) that will result in the development of new and improved manufacturing processes. The Joint Logistics Commanders' assessment of the precision optics industrial base emphasized the need to modernize optics fabrication techniques and equipment. As a result of the study, the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA), the Department of the Army, and several academic institutions have collaborated to establish and support the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) at the University of Rochester. Through this successful collaboration of knowledge and resources, participants are able to leverage and reduce the cost, risk, and difficulty of developing new automated optics manufacturing systems and supporting technologies. The optics manufacturing thrust is now in its second year and support from industrial, academic, and government participants continues to increase.

  2. Development of an Improved Process for Installation Projects of High Technology Manufacturing Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Sarah V.

    2014-04-30

    High technology manufacturing equipment is utilized at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to support nuclear missions. This is undertaken from concept initiation where equipment is designed and then taken through several review phases, working closely with system engineers (SEs) responsible for each of the affected systems or involved disciplines (from gasses to HVAC to structural, etc.). After the design is finalized it moves to procurement and custom fabrication of the equipment and equipment installation, including all of the paperwork involved. Not only are the engineering and manufacturing aspects important, but also the scheduling, financial forecasting, and planning portions that take place initially and are sometimes modified as the project progresses should requirements, changes or additions become necessary. The process required to complete a project of this type, including equipment installation, is unique and involves numerous steps to complete. These processes can be improved and recent work on the Direct Current Arc (DC Arc) Glovebox Design, Fabrication and Installation Project provides an opportunity to identify some important lessons learned (LL) that can be implemented in the future for continued project improvement and success.

  3. New concept single screw compressors and their manufacture technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Q.; Liu, F.; Chang, L.; Feng, C.; Peng, C.; Xie, J.; van den Broek, M.

    2017-08-01

    Single screw compressors were generally acknowledged as one of the nearly perfect machines by compressor researchers and manufacturers. However the rapid wear of the star-wheel in a single screw compressor during operation is a key reason why it hasn’t previously joined the main current compressors’ market. After more than ten years of effective work, the authors of this paper have proposed a new concept single screw compressor whose mesh-couple profile is enveloped with multi-column. Also a new design method and manufacture equipment for this kind of compressor have been developed and are described in this paper. A lot of prototype tests and a long period of industrial operations under full loading conditions have shown that the mesh-couple profiles of the new concept single compressors have excellent anti-wearness.

  4. Technology Development for Millimeter Wave Phased Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    design would use the technology of integration-the same technology that has brought us computing power at such a low cost. The integrated phased array ...circuitry and/or the feed network, which can degrade sidelobe levels or polarization. A Two Layer Substrate Figure 2.8 shows a possible two-layer design ...feed substrates. Coupling is again through aper- tures in the ground plane of the antenna substrate. This design also allows the use of a low dielectric

  5. Manufacturing Methods & Technology. Project Execution Report. Second Half CY79.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    LIFE-SPAN, SLUDGE VOLUME MUST BE MINIMIZED, 5 80 1355 MANUFACTURING PLANTS TOXIC EFFULUENT/EMISSIUN PRETREATMENT THE PuLLUTANqT DISCHARGE PERMIT...ADDE) IN ?N D HALFp CY79 (C(hrT INUkU) 5 80 1354 SLUDGE VOLUME RLDUCTIUN AND DISPOSAL PROCESS STUDY MCA POLLUTION ABATEMENT FACILITIES UNUFR...CONSTRUCTION AT PINE BLUFF ARSENWL DISCHARGE INTO A SETTLING LAGOON HAVING A FIVE YEAR CAPACITY BUT NO CLEAN OUT OR SLUDGE DISPOSAL EQUIPMENT, TO EXTEND LAGOON

  6. Method of manufacture of single phase ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Singh, J.P.; Poeppel, R.B.; Goretta, K.C.; Chen, N.

    1995-03-28

    A ceramic superconductor is produced by close control of oxygen partial pressure during sintering of the material. The resulting microstructure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} indicates that sintering kinetics are enhanced at reduced p(O{sub 2}) and that because of second phase precipitates, grain growth is prevented. The density of specimens sintered at 910 C increased from 79 to 94% theoretical when p(O{sub 2}) was decreased from 0.1 to 0.0001 MPa. The increase in density with decrease in p(O{sub 2}) derives from enhanced sintering kinetics, due to increased defect concentration and decreased activation energy of the rate-controlling species undergoing diffusion. Sintering at 910 C resulted in a fine-grain microstructure, with an average grain size of about 4 {mu}m. Post sintering annealing in a region of stability for the desired phase converts the second phases and limits grain growth. The method of pinning grain boundaries by small scale decompositive products and then annealing to convert its product to the desired phase can be used for other complex asides. Such a microstructure results in reduced microcracking, strengths as high as 230 MPa and high critical current density capacity. 25 figures.

  7. Method of manufacture of single phase ceramic superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Jitrenda P.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Chen, Nan

    1995-01-01

    A ceramic superconductor is produced by close control of oxygen partial pressure during sintering of the material. The resulting microstructure of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x indicates that sintering kinetics are enhanced at reduced p(O.sub.2) and that because of second phase precipitates, grain growth is prevented. The density of specimens sintered at 910.degree. C. increased from 79 to 94% theoretical when p(O.sub.2) was decreased from 0.1 to 0.0001 MPa. The increase in density with decrease in p(O.sub.2) derives from enhanced sintering kinetics, due to increased defect concentration and decreased activation energy of the rate-controlling species undergoing diffusion. Sintering at 910.degree. C resulted in a fine-grain microstructure, with an average grain size of about 4 .mu.m. Post sintering annealing in a region of stability for the desired phase converts the second phases and limits grain growth. The method of pinning grain boundaries by small scale decompositive products and then annealing to convert its product to the desired phase can be used for other complex asides. Such a microstructure results in reduced microcracking, strengths as high as 230 MPa and high critical current density capacity.

  8. Acoustically enhanced remediation, Phase 2: Technology scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Iovenitti, J.L.; Hill, D.G.; Rynne, T.M.; Spadaro, J.F.; Hutchinson, W.; Illangasakere, T.

    1996-12-31

    Weiss Associates is conducting the following three phase program investigating the in-situ application of acoustically enhanced remediation (AER) of contaminated unconsolidated soil and ground water under both saturated and unsaturated conditions: Phase I-- laboratory scale parametric investigation; Phase II--technology Scaling; and Phase III--large scale field tests. AER addresses the need for NAPL (either lighter or denser than water: LNAPL or DNAPL, respectively) in high and low permeability sediments, and the remediation of other types of subsurface contaminants (e.g., metals, radionuclides) in low permeability soils. This program has been placed in the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) DNAPL product. Phase I indicated that AER could be used to effectively remediate NAPL in high permeability soil, and that removal of NAPL from low permeability soil could be increased since the water flux through these soils was significantly increased. Phase II, Technology Scaling, the subject of this paper, focused on (1) evaluating the characteristics of an AER field deployment system, (2) developing DNAPL flow and transport performance data under acoustic excitation, (3) predicting the effect of acoustic remediation in three-dimensional unconsolidated hydrogeologic conditions, (4) conducting an engineering analysis of acoustical sources, and (5) identifying candidate field site(s) for large-scale field testing of the technology.

  9. Array Phase Shifters: Theory and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    While there are a myriad of applications for microwave phase shifters in instrumentation and metrology, power combining, amplifier linearization, and so on, the most prevalent use is in scanning phased-array antennas. And while this market continues to be dominated by military radar and tracking platforms, many commercial applications have emerged in the past decade or so. These new and potential applications span low-Earth-orbit (LEO) communications satellite constellations and collision warning radar, an aspect of the Intelligent Vehicle Highway System or Automated Highway System. In any case, the phase shifters represent a considerable portion of the overall antenna cost, with some estimates approaching 40 percent for receive arrays. Ferrite phase shifters continue to be the workhorse in military-phased arrays, and while there have been advances in thin film ferrite devices, the review of this device technology in the previous edition of this book is still highly relevant. This chapter will focus on three types of phase shifters that have matured in the past decade: GaAs MESFET monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS), and thin film ferroelectric-based devices. A brief review of some novel devices including thin film ferrite phase shifters and superconducting switches for phase shifter applications will be provided. Finally, the effects of modulo 2 phase shift limitations, phase errors, and transient response on bit error rate degradation will be considered.

  10. Present Status and Future Growth of Advanced Maintenance Technology and Strategy in US Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaoning; Weiss, Brian A.; Siegel, David; Lee, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this paper are to 1) examine the current practices of diagnostics, prognostics, and maintenance employed by United States (U.S.) manufacturers to achieve productivity and quality targets and 2) to understand the present level of maintenance technologies and strategies that are being incorporated into these practices. A study is performed to contrast the impact of various industry-specific factors on the effectiveness and profitability of the implementation of prognostics and health management technologies, and maintenance strategies using both surveys and case studies on a sample of U.S. manufacturing firms ranging from small to mid-sized enterprises (SMEs) to large-sized manufacturing enterprises in various industries. The results obtained provide important insights on the different impacts of specific factors on the successful adoption of these technologies between SMEs and large manufacturing enterprises. The varying degrees of success with respect to current maintenance programs highlight the opportunity for larger manufacturers to improve maintenance practices and consider the use of advanced prognostics and health management (PHM) technology. This paper also provides the existing gaps, barriers, future trends, and roadmaps for manufacturing PHM technology and maintenance strategy. PMID:28058173

  11. Present Status and Future Growth of Advanced Maintenance Technology and Strategy in US Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaoning; Weiss, Brian A; Siegel, David; Lee, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The goals of this paper are to 1) examine the current practices of diagnostics, prognostics, and maintenance employed by United States (U.S.) manufacturers to achieve productivity and quality targets and 2) to understand the present level of maintenance technologies and strategies that are being incorporated into these practices. A study is performed to contrast the impact of various industry-specific factors on the effectiveness and profitability of the implementation of prognostics and health management technologies, and maintenance strategies using both surveys and case studies on a sample of U.S. manufacturing firms ranging from small to mid-sized enterprises (SMEs) to large-sized manufacturing enterprises in various industries. The results obtained provide important insights on the different impacts of specific factors on the successful adoption of these technologies between SMEs and large manufacturing enterprises. The varying degrees of success with respect to current maintenance programs highlight the opportunity for larger manufacturers to improve maintenance practices and consider the use of advanced prognostics and health management (PHM) technology. This paper also provides the existing gaps, barriers, future trends, and roadmaps for manufacturing PHM technology and maintenance strategy.

  12. Nanoparticle Phosphors Manufactured Using the Bicontinuous Cubic Phase Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-18

    be lipids. Some typical surfactants userul in forming bicontinuous cubic phases include sodium diethyl hexylsulphosuccinate (AOT). potassium...CaS, SrS, Zn.Cd.-.S, Y,0:, Y202S, Zn2Si04, Y3A15012, Y3(AlGa)5012, Y2Si05, LaOCl, InB03, Gd202S, ZnGa204, yttrium niobate , TAG and YAGAG. 4 Some

  13. Engineering and manufacturing of pharmaceutical co-crystals: a review of solvent-free manufacturing technologies.

    PubMed

    Ross, S A; Lamprou, D A; Douroumis, D

    2016-07-07

    Design and synthesis of pharmaceutical cocrystals have received great interest in recent years. Cocrystallization of drug substances offers a tremendous opportunity for the development of new drug products with superior physical and pharmacological properties such as solubility, stability, hydroscopicity, dissolution rates and bioavailability. It is now possible to engineer and develop cocrystals via 'green chemistry' and environmentally friendly approaches such as solid-state synthesis in the absence of organic solvents. In addition, significant efforts have been directed towards computational screening, cocrystal manufacturing in a continuous manner and real-time monitoring for quality purposes by using various analytical tools. Pharmaceutical cocrystals are not fully exploited yet and there is a lot of ground to cover before they can be successfully utilized as medical products.

  14. Technology: Report of the Project 2061 Phase I Technology Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James R.

    This is one of five panel reports that have been prepared as part of the first phase of Project 2061, a long-term, multipurpose undertaking of the American Association for the Advancement of Science designed to help reform science, mathematics, and technology education in the United States. Major sections included are: (1) "Introduction"…

  15. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Thomas R.

    The Boeing Company contracted with the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory to evaluate its student internship program, part of a "school-to-work" effort modeled after the nationally recognized Tech Prep initiative. The company's involvement in the Tech Prep Program has been implemented in three phases: (1) the initial phase helped…

  16. A manufacturing method for multi-layer polysilicon surface-micromachining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced manufacturing technology which provides multi-layered polysilicon surface micromachining technology for advanced weapon systems is presented. Specifically, the addition of another design layer to a 4 levels process to create a 5 levels process allows consideration of fundamentally new architecture in designs for weapon advanced surety components.

  17. Assuring process safety in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Gary R; Edwards, Victor H; Robertson, Mark; Shah, Kamal

    2007-04-11

    This paper outlines the critical issues to be addressed in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) manufacturing technology to a licensee. Process safety management (PSM) is of critical importance because of the toxicity, flammability and reactivity of HCN. The critical issues are based on experience that DuPont has gained (1) while safely manufacturing hydrogen cyanide for over 50 years, and (2) while DuPont has safely licensed HCN technology to other firms at locations around the world. DuPont's HCN experience has been combined with Aker Kvaerner's project engineering experience to insure the safe transfer of HCN technology to a licensee.

  18. Glass technology involved in the manufacture of magnetometer components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergen, G.

    1972-01-01

    Glass technology has developed quicker and less costly techniques in sealing and vacuum processing which result in improved lamps and bulbs, thus producing a less costly and more reliable instrument package.

  19. Technology Roadmap for Energy Reduction in Automotive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2008-09-01

    U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), in collaboration with the United States Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR), hosted a technology roadmap workshop in Troy, Michigan in May 2008. The purpose of the workshop was to explore opportunities for energy reduction, discuss the challenges and barriers that might need to be overcome, and identify priorities for future R&D. The results of the workshop are presented in this report.

  20. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  1. Application of ICME Methods for the Development of Rapid Manufacturing Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald-Immer, T.; Göhler, T.; Fischersworring-Bunk, A.; Körner, C.; Osmanlic, F.; Bauereiß, A.

    Rapid manufacturing technologies are lately gaining interest as alternative manufacturing method. Due to the large parameter sets applicable in these manufacturing methods and their impact on achievable material properties and quality, support of the manufacturing process development by the use of simulation is highly attractive. This is especially true for aerospace applications with their high quality demands and controlled scatter in the resulting material properties. The applicable simulation techniques to these manufacturing methods are manifold. The paper will focus on the melt pool simulation for a SLM (selective laser melting) process which was originally developed for EBM (electron beam melting). It will be discussed in the overall context of a multi-scale simulation within a virtual process chain.

  2. Raman spectroscopy as a process analytical technology for pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Esmonde-White, Karen A; Cuellar, Maryann; Uerpmann, Carsten; Lenain, Bruno; Lewis, Ian R

    2017-01-01

    Adoption of Quality by Design (QbD) principles, regulatory support of QbD, process analytical technology (PAT), and continuous manufacturing are major factors effecting new approaches to pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing. In this review, we highlight new technology developments, data analysis models, and applications of Raman spectroscopy, which have expanded the scope of Raman spectroscopy as a process analytical technology. Emerging technologies such as transmission and enhanced reflection Raman, and new approaches to using available technologies, expand the scope of Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical manufacturing, and now Raman spectroscopy is successfully integrated into real-time release testing, continuous manufacturing, and statistical process control. Since the last major review of Raman as a pharmaceutical PAT in 2010, many new Raman applications in bioprocessing have emerged. Exciting reports of in situ Raman spectroscopy in bioprocesses complement a growing scientific field of biological and biomedical Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy has made a positive impact as a process analytical and control tool for pharmaceutical manufacturing and bioprocessing, with demonstrated scientific and financial benefits throughout a product's lifecycle.

  3. A study on Aerosol jet printing technology in LED module manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudorfer, Andreas; Tscherner, Martin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hartmann, Paul; Seferis, Ioannis E.; Zych, Eugeniusz; Wenzl, Franz P.

    2016-09-01

    State of the art fabrication of LED modules based on chip-on-board (COB) technology comprises some shortcomings both with respect to the manufacturing process itself but also with regard to potential sources of failures and manufacturing impreciseness. One promising alternative is additive manufacturing, a technology which has gained a lot of attention during the last years due to its materials and cost saving capabilities. Especially direct-write technologies like Aerosol jet printing have demonstrated advantages compared to other technological approaches when printing high precision layers or high precision electronic circuits on substrates which, as an additional advantage, also can be flexible and 3D shaped. Based on test samples and test structures manufactured by Aerosol jet printing technology, in this context we discuss the potentials of additive manufacturing in various aspects of LED module fabrication, ranging from the deposition of the die-attach material, wire bond replacement by printed electrical connects as well as aspects of high-precision phosphor layer deposition for color conversion and white light generation.

  4. Phase plate technology for laser marking of magnetic discs

    DOEpatents

    Neuman, B.; Honig, J.; Hackel, L.; Dane, C.B.; Dixit, S.

    1998-10-27

    An advanced design for a phase plate enables the distribution of spots in arbitrarily shaped patterns with very high uniformity and with a continuously or near-continuously varying phase pattern. A continuous phase pattern eliminates large phase jumps typically expected in a grating that provides arbitrary shapes. Large phase jumps increase scattered light outside of the desired pattern, reduce efficiency and can make the grating difficult to manufacture. When manufacturing capabilities preclude producing a fully continuous grating, the present design can be easily adapted to minimize manufacturing errors and maintain high efficiencies. This continuous grating is significantly more efficient than previously described Dammann gratings, offers much more flexibility in generating spot patterns and is easier to manufacture and replicate than a multi-level phase grating. 3 figs.

  5. Phase plate technology for laser marking of magnetic discs

    DOEpatents

    Neuman, Bill; Honig, John; Hackel, Lloyd; Dane, C. Brent; Dixit, Shamasundar

    1998-01-01

    An advanced design for a phase plate enables the distribution of spots in arbitrarily shaped patterns with very high uniformity and with a continuously or near-continuously varying phase pattern. A continuous phase pattern eliminates large phase jumps typically expected in a grating that provides arbitrary shapes. Large phase jumps increase scattered light outside of the desired pattern, reduce efficiency and can make the grating difficult to manufacture. When manufacturing capabilities preclude producing a fully continuous grating, the present design can be easily adapted to minimize manufacturing errors and maintain high efficiencies. This continuous grating is significantly more efficient than previously described Dammann gratings, offers much more flexibility in generating spot patterns and is easier to manufacture and replicate than a multi-level phase grating.

  6. NASA's Additive Manufacturing Development Materials Science to Technology Infusion - Connecting the Digital Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John

    2017-01-01

    At NASA, the first steps of the Journey to Mars are well underway with the development of NASA's next generation launch system and investments in research and technologies that should increase the affordability, capability, and safety of exploration activities. Additive Manufacturing presents a disruptive opportunity for NASA to design and manufacture hardware with new materials at dramatically reduced cost and schedule. Opportunities to incorporate additive manufacturing align very well with NASA missions and with most NASA programs related to space, science, and aeronautics. The Agency also relies on many partnerships with other government agencies, industry and academia.

  7. Impact of information technology on productivity and efficiency in Iranian manufacturing industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abri, Amir Gholam; Mahmoudzadeh, Mahmoud

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of information technology (IT) on the productivity and efficiency of manufacturing industries in Iran. So, the data will be collected from 23 Iranian manufacturing industries during "2002-2006" and the methods such as DEA and panel data used to study the subject. Results obtained by the above two methods represent that IT has a positive and statistically significant effect on the productivity of manufacturing industries. It will be more in high IT-intensive industries than the other industries. But, there is no significant difference between the growth of labor productivity in IT-producing and IT-using industries.

  8. Technology verification phase. Dynamic isotope power system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, D.G.

    1982-03-10

    The Phase I requirements of the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) program were to make a detailed Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) for an isotope fueled organic Rankine cycle power system and to build and test a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) which simulated as closely as possible the operational characteristics of the FSCD. The activities and results of Phase II, the Technology Verification Phase, of the program are reported. The objectives of this phase were to increase system efficiency to 18.1% by component development, to demonstrate system reliability by a 5000 h endurance test and to update the flight system design. During Phase II, system performance was improved from 15.1% to 16.6%, an endurance test of 2000 h was performed while the flight design analysis was limited to a study of the General Purpose Heat Source, a study of the regenerator manufacturing technique and analysis of the hardness of the system to a laser threat. It was concluded from these tests that the GDS is basically prototypic of a flight design; all components necessary for satisfactory operation were demonstrated successfully at the system level; over 11,000 total h of operation without any component failure attested to the inherent reliability of this type of system; and some further development is required, specifically in the area of performance. (LCL)

  9. Sustainable Precision Green Manufacturing Technologies for Indirect Fire Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-31

    100 48 Prototype Laser Ignition System equipment 100 49 M119A2 Digital Fire Control equipment Phase 4 Spanning Yoke 100 50 Digital Fire Control...109.3 ADIM Weapon Parts- -3-Shaft 100 109.4 ADIM Weapon Parts- -4-Alpine Bearings 100 109.5 ADIM Weapon Parts- 5-Ledex Solenoids 100 109.6 ADIM Weapon

  10. Alternating phase shift mask technology for 65nm logic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, Kishore K.; Henrichs, Sven; Qiu, Wei; Chavez, Joas L.; Liu, Yi-Ping; Ghadiali, Firoz; Yung, Karmen; Wilcox, Nathan; Silva, Mary; Ma, Jian; Qu, Ping; Irvine, Brian; Yun, Henry; Cheng, Wen-Hao; Farnsworth, Jeff

    2006-03-01

    Alternating Phase Shift Mask (APSM) Technology has been developed and successfully implemented for the poly gate of 65nm node Logic application at Intel. This paper discusses the optimization of the mask design rules and fabrication process in order to enable high volume manufacturability. Intel's APSM technology is based on a dual sided trenched architecture. To meet the stringent OPC requirements associated with patterning of narrow gates required for the 65nm node, Chrome width between the Zero and Pi aperture need to be minimized. Additionally, APSM lithography has an inherently low MEEF that furthermore, drives a narrower Chrome line as compared to the Binary approach. The double sided trenched structure with narrow Chrome lines are mechanically vulnerable and prone to damage when exposed to conventional mask processing steps. Therefore, new processing approaches were developed to minimize the damage to the patterned mask features. For example, cleaning processes were optimized to minimize Chrome & quartz damage while retaining the cleaning effectiveness. In addition, mask design rules were developed which ensured manufacturability. The narrow Chrome regions between the zero and Pi apertures severely restrict the tolerance for the placement of the second level resists edges with respect to the first level. UV Laser Writer based resist patterning capability, capable of providing the required Overlay tolerance, was developed, An AIMS based methodology was used to optimize the undercut and minimize the aerial image CD difference between the Zero and Pi apertures.

  11. Regional manufacturing technology development for the small manufacturer. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shanks, B.A.; Patz, D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this CRADA was to provide a mechanism whereby private sector companies within the State of Florida could access the vast technological resources available at the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Largo, Florida. This assistance was focused on assisting companies within the region to become more globally competitive. The State of Florida Department of Commerce, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) Specialty Components and LMES Oak Ridge, provided companies with up to four days of technical assistance at no charge. As a result of those interactions, there has been an economic impact of $13.7 million dollars reported, and 138 jobs retained or created over the life of the CRADA. Although this has not been the most successful of all the technical assistance CRADAs, it has proven, because of the number of assistances, to be very successful.

  12. Isotope separation and advanced manufacturing technology. Volume 2, No. 2, Semiannual report, April--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Tehmanu; Carpenter, J.

    1993-12-31

    This is the second issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives of the ISAM Program include: the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) process, and advanced manufacturing technologies which include industrial laser materials processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. Topics included in this issue are: production plant product system conceptual design, development and operation of a solid-state switch for thyratron replacement, high-performance optical components for high average power laser systems, use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy for control of uranium vaporization rates, a two-dimensional time dependent hydrodynamical ion extraction model, and design of a formaldehyde photodissociation process for carbon and oxygen isotope separation.

  13. Prepreg and Melt Infiltration Technology Developed for Affordable, Robust Manufacturing of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Petko, Jeannie F.

    2004-01-01

    Affordable fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with multifunctional properties are critically needed for high-temperature aerospace and space transportation applications. These materials have various applications in advanced high-efficiency and high-performance engines, airframe and propulsion components for next-generation launch vehicles, and components for land-based systems. A number of these applications require materials with specific functional characteristics: for example, thick component, hybrid layups for environmental durability and stress management, and self-healing and smart composite matrices. At present, with limited success and very high cost, traditional composite fabrication technologies have been utilized to manufacture some large, complex-shape components of these materials. However, many challenges still remain in developing affordable, robust, and flexible manufacturing technologies for large, complex-shape components with multifunctional properties. The prepreg and melt infiltration (PREMI) technology provides an affordable and robust manufacturing route for low-cost, large-scale production of multifunctional ceramic composite components.

  14. Improvements in process performance for immersion technology high volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafus, K.; Shimoaoki, T.; Enomoto, M.; Shite, H.; Otsuka, T.; Kosugi, H.; Shibata, T.; Mallmann, J.; Maas, R.; Verspaget, C.; van der Heijden, E.; van Setten, E.; Finders, J.; Wang, S.; Boudou, N.; Zoldesi, C.

    2009-03-01

    Through collaborative efforts ASML and TEL are continuously improving the process performance for the LITHIUS Pro -i/ TWINSCAN XT:1900Gi litho cluster. In previous work from this collaboration, TEL and ASML have investigated the CDU and defectivity performance for the 45nm node with high through put processing. CDU performance for both memory and logic illumination conditions were shown to be on target for ITRS roadmap specifications. Additionally, it was shown that the current defect metrology is able to measure the required defect size of 30nm with a 90% capture rate. For the target through put of 180wph, no added impact to defectivity was seen from the multi-module processing on the LITHIUS Pro -i, using a topcoat resist process. For increased productivity, a new bevel cut strategy was investigated and shown to have no adverse impact while increasing the usable wafer surface. However, with the necessity of double patterning for at least the next technology node, more stringent requirements are necessary to prevent, in the worst case, doubling of the critical dimension variation and defectivity. In this work, improvements in process performance with regards to critical dimension uniformity and defectivity are investigated to increase the customer's productivity and yield for whichever double patterning scheme is utilized. Specifically, TEL has designed, evaluated and proven the capability of the latest technology hardware for post exposure bake and defect reduction. For the new post exposure bake hardware, process capability data was collected for 40nm CD targets. For defectivity reduction, a novel concept in rinse technology and processing was investigated on hydrophobic non top coat resists processes. Additionally, improvements to reduce micro bridging were evaluated. Finally bevel rinse hardware to prevent contamination of the immersion scanner was tested.

  15. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Proceedings of the REAPS Technical Symposium. Paper No. 3: Navy Manufacturing Technology Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    ANTICIPATED NEEDS OF THE FLEET, OUR AIM IS TO INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY, AND DECREASE LEAD TIMES, BY APPLYING NEW TECHNOLOGY IN THE MANUFACTURING ARENA, To...PROGRAM David H. Carstater Deputy Director Navy Manufacturing Technology Washington, D.C. Mr. Carstater holds a degree in chemical engineering from...Bucknell University, and has an extensive background in Navy weapons manufacturing technology at field and managerial levels. Prior to his present

  16. Advanced Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    manufacturing will enable the mass customization of products and create new market opportunities in the commercial sector. Flexible manufacturing ...the mass customization of products and create new market opportunities in the commercial sector. One of the most promising flexible manufacturing ... manufacturing , increase efficiency and productivity. Research in leading edge technologies continues to promise exciting new manufacturing methods

  17. Technological innovation capability in Malaysian-owned resource-based manufacturing companies: Early findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razali, Nur Fhathyhah; Mohd Suradi, Nur Riza; Ahmad Shahabuddin, Faridatul Azna; Ismail, Wan Rosmanira; Abidin, Norkisme Zainal; Ahmad, Nor Amalina; Mustafa, Zainol

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to identify the determinants of technological innovation capability of Malaysian-owned companies in the resources-based manufacturing, to identify the relationship between technological innovation capability (TIC) and technological innovation performance (TIP) for the resource-based manufacturing. Furthermore, this study also aims to identify innovation capability factors that need more emphasis and improvements from the respective authority. The scope of the study covers four industries which are petrochemical industries, pharmaceutical industries, palm oil-based industries and food processing industries which are located in the state of Selangor. Descriptive analysis, correlation analysis and performance capability analysis were used in this study. It was found that, technological innovation capabilities (TIC) for companies in the resource-based manufacturing are moderate. Factors such as policies capability, human resources capability and facilities capability have a positive relationship with the performance of technological innovation (TIP). These findings will help the government in making decisions and better implementation of policies to strengthen the competitiveness of the company, particularly in resource-based manufacturing.

  18. PowerLight Corporation Lean Manufacturing, PV Manufacturing R&D Phase I Report: 6 December 2001--31 March 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, L; Botkin, J.

    2005-06-01

    PowerLight Corporation (PowerLight) has completed Phase I of its PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract, ''PowerGuard Lean Manufacturing,'' Subcontract No. NDO-1-30628-04. The overall technical goal of this project was to reduce the cost of PowerGuard manufacturing while simultaneously improving product quality. This will enable PowerLight to scale up production capacity as the market for PowerGuard continues to grow. Through the introduction of world-class lean manufacturing techniques, PowerLight was to cut out waste in the manufacturing process of PowerGuard. The manufacturing process was to be overhauled with an objective of removing as much as possible those steps that do not add value to the product. Quality of finished goods was also to be improved through the use of statistical process control and error-proofing in the manufacturing process. Factory operations were also to be addressed to streamline those factory activities that support the manufacturing process. This report de tails the progress made toward the above listed goals during the first phase of this subcontract.

  19. New and improved technology for manufacture of GMT primary mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Wook; Burge, James H.; Davis, Jonathan M.; Martin, Hubert M.; Tuell, Michael T.; Graves, Logan R.; West, Steve C.

    2016-07-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) primary mirror consists of seven 8.4 m light-weight honeycomb mirrors that are being manufactured at the Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab (RFCML), University of Arizona. In order to manufacture the largest and most aspheric astronomical mirrors various high precision fabrication technologies have been developed, researched and implemented at the RFCML. The unique 8.4 m (in mirror diameter) capacity fabrication facilities are fully equipped with large optical generator (LOG), large polishing machine (LPM), stressed lap, rigid conformal lap (RC lap) and their process simulation/optimization intelligence called MATRIX. While the core capability and key manufacturing technologies have been well demonstrated by completing the first GMT off-axis segment, there have been significant hardware and software level improvements in order to improve and enhance the GMT primary mirror manufacturing efficiency. The new and improved manufacturing technology plays a key role to realize GMT, the next generation extremely large telescope enabling new science and discoveries, with high fabrication efficiency and confidence.

  20. Phase anisotropy measurements in multilayer dielectric laser mirrors during their manufacture process and corrections introduced in the produced lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Alexander I.; Likholit, Nikolaj I.

    2004-02-01

    In this paper on the basis of the development and manufacture experience of two-mode lasers, i.e. two-frequency laser with linear orthogonal polarizations of generated waves (used in heterodyne interferometry) and four-frequency ring lasers with linear orthogonal mode polarizations (used in differential laser gyros) described and analyzed are: a new measurement and control method of multilayer dielectric mirrors phase anisotropy during the deposition (by analyzing the mirror surface-reflected two-frequency radiation with linear orthogonal components), block diagram of control measurement device based on the two-frequency laser used in the vacuum-evaporation plant as well as a measurement signal shaping algorithm and the proposed measurement method accuracy characteristics. The correction methods of multilayer dielectric mirrors phase anisotropy (and laser orthogonally polarized waves difference beat frequency) used in the manufacture proces of two-mode lasers (linear and ring) are reviewed. At the stage of vacuum technological processing of the laser, soldered to a vacuum-exhaust station (or after its cutting off from the station) a predetermined generated wave beat frequency by using a special SHF mirror processing is achieved as well as mirror phase anisoptropy stabilization and drift decrease of the relevant beat frequency of the orthogonally polarized waves during laser operation is provided.

  1. The future of pharmaceutical manufacturing in the context of the scientific, social, technological and economic evolution.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Sven

    2016-07-30

    Healthcare provision is one of the import elements of modern societies. Life sciences and technology has made substantial progress over the past century and is continuing to evolve exponentially in many different areas. The use of genotypic and phenotypic information in drug discovery and drug therapy, the increasing wealth around the world, growing patient involvement through information and communication technology and finally innovations in pharmaceutical manufacturing technology are transforming the provision of healthcare. The adoption of this new science and technology is going to happen due to the synergistic effects and visible benefits for the society and healthcare systems. The different aspects driving advanced pharmaceutical manufacturing are reviewed to identify future research direction to assure overall acceptance and adoption into healthcare practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality control of laser- and powder bed-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, Sebastian; Bechmann, Florian; Lindner, Stefan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Craeghs, Tom

    The quality of metal components manufactured by laser- and powder bed-based additive manufacturing technologies has continuously been improved over the last years. However, to establish this production technology in industries with very high quality standards the accessibility of prevalent quality management methods to all steps of the process chain needs still to be enhanced. This publication describes which tools are and will be available to fulfil those requirements from the perspective of a laser machine manufacturer. Generally five aspects of the part building process are covered by separate Quality Management (QM) modules: the powder quality, the temperature management, the process gas atmosphere, the melt pool behaviour and the documentation module. This paper sets the focus on melt pool analysis and control.

  3. Roll forming technology for manufacturing axisymmetric automotive components

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Bieh, T.G.; Yang, H.s.; Brown, K.R.; Kaibyshev, R.O.; Petrov, E.N.

    1997-10-28

    A unique roll forming technology that permits complex axisymmetric components, such as automobile wheels and turbine disks, to be formed in a single forming operation, has been developed by two Russian Institute, the Institute of Technical Physics of the Russian Federal Nuclear Center and the Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems. This process was used to fabricate automobile wheels from a Russian AVT alloy, a 6010 aluminum alloy equivalent. The process included steps of isothermal roll forming of preforms into wheels shapes, all at 430C for the AVT alloy. The microstructure and mechanical properties were evaluated at various locations in the finished wheels by optical metallography and tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Tensile properties were obtained by stain-rate change tests and tensile tests to failure at high strain rates. Microstructure and mechanical propertied of the preforms and blanks were also evaluated. The results indicate that dynamically recovered microstructures were developed during the processing, which showed relatively high strain rate sensitivity and rendered sufficiently plasticity at the elevated temperature for wheel fabrication process.

  4. Restoring visual perception using microsystem technologies: engineering and manufacturing perspectives.

    PubMed

    Krisch, I; Hosticka, B J

    2007-01-01

    Microsystem technologies offer significant advantages in the development of neural prostheses. In the last two decades, it has become feasible to develop intelligent prostheses that are fully implantable into the human body with respect to functionality, complexity, size, weight, and compactness. Design and development enforce collaboration of various disciplines including physicians, engineers, and scientists. The retina implant system can be taken as one sophisticated example of a prosthesis which bypasses neural defects and enables direct electrical stimulation of nerve cells. This micro implantable visual prosthesis assists blind patients to return to the normal course of life. The retina implant is intended for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa or macular degeneration. In this contribution, we focus on the epiretinal prosthesis and discuss topics like system design, data and power transfer, fabrication, packaging and testing. In detail, the system is based upon an implantable micro electro stimulator which is powered and controlled via a wireless inductive link. Microelectronic circuits for data encoding and stimulation are assembled on flexible substrates with an integrated electrode array. The implant system is encapsulated using parylene C and silicone rubber. Results extracted from experiments in vivo demonstrate the retinotopic activation of the visual cortex.

  5. Research status of the manufacturing technology and application properties of Bi-2223/Ag tapes at Innost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, H. P.; Han, Z.; Zhang, J. S.; Liu, T.; Liu, L.; Li, M. Y.; Fang, J.; Liu, Q.; Zheng, Y. K.

    2004-10-01

    The first production line of Bi-2223/Ag tapes in China has been installed in the end of 2001 with an annual production capacity of 200 km at Innova Superconductor Technology Co., Ltd. (Innost). Bi-2223/Ag tapes can be manufactured reproducibly with length up to 1 km, critical current Ic over 90 A (77 K, 0 T) and engineering critical current density Je over 9 kA/cm 2. Innost's Bi-2223/Ag tapes are being used for producing China's first HTS power cable system (30 m, 3 phase, 35 kV/25 kA), which will be put into trial operation next year. Also, Innost's products will be used for other research projects of HTS applications such as HTS motor, HTS magnet and HTS transformer in China. In order to meet the requirements of HTS applications, tremendous research efforts have been made not only in enhancing the performance and uniformity of the Bi-2223/Ag tapes, but also in improving their application properties, which include reducing AC losses and thermal conductivity, increasing insulating properties and so on. Methods for improving productivity and yield will be also introduced.

  6. Laboratory 3.0: Manufacturing Technologies Laboratory Virtualization with a Student-Centred Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabregat-Sanjuan, Albert; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Ferrando Piera, Francesc; De la Flor López, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a blended-learning strategy for improving the teaching method applied in the laboratory subject Manufacturing Technologies. The teaching method has been changed from a predominantly teacher-centred to an active learning system with a student-centred focus and e-learning activities. In face-to-face classes, a game-based learning…

  7. Status of Fuel Development and Manufacturing for Space Nuclear Reactors at BWX Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Husser, D.L.; Mohr, T.C.; Richardson, W.C.

    2004-02-04

    New advanced nuclear space propulsion systems will soon seek a high temperature, stable fuel form. BWX Technologies Inc (BWXT) has a long history of fuel manufacturing. UO2, UCO, and UCx have been fabricated at BWXT for various US and international programs. Recent efforts at BWXT have focused on establishing the manufacturing techniques and analysis capabilities needed to provide a high quality, high power, compact nuclear reactor for use in space nuclear powered missions. To support the production of a space nuclear reactor, uranium nitride has recently been manufactured by BWXT. In addition, analytical chemistry and analysis techniques have been developed to provide verification and qualification of the uranium nitride production process. The fabrication of a space nuclear reactor will require the ability to place an unclad fuel form into a clad structure for assembly into a reactor core configuration. To this end, BWX Technologies has reestablished its capability for machining, GTA welding, and EB welding of refractory metals. Specifically, BWX Technologies has demonstrated GTA welding of niobium flat plate and EB welding of niobium and Nb-1Zr tubing. In performing these demonstration activities, BWX Technologies has established the necessary infrastructure to manufacture UO2, UCx, or UNx fuel, components, and complete reactor assemblies in support of space nuclear programs.

  8. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Evaluation Report (1994-95).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Changhua; Owens, Thomas R.

    An evaluation was conducted of the Boeing Company's summer internship program for students enrolled in a manufacturing technology program after grades 11, 12, and 13 (first year of community college). The evaluation included the following activities: a review of documents describing the internship structure, student selection process, and…

  9. Challenges in Implementing Design-Led Technologies in Small Manufacturing Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Huw; Dorrington, Peter; Lewis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines some of the challenges of implementing design-led technologies, such as computer-aided design (CAD), in the context of small manufacturing companies. The research is based on university-company collaborations in the UK using the Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) model, and the paper adopts a case-study approach based on…

  10. Status of Fuel Development and Manufacturing for Space Nuclear Reactors at BWX Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, W. J.; Husser, D. L.; Mohr, T. C.; Richardson, W. C.

    2004-02-01

    New advanced nuclear space propulsion systems will soon seek a high temperature, stable fuel form. BWX Technologies Inc (BWXT) has a long history of fuel manufacturing. UO2, UCO, and UCx have been fabricated at BWXT for various US and international programs. Recent efforts at BWXT have focused on establishing the manufacturing techniques and analysis capabilities needed to provide a high quality, high power, compact nuclear reactor for use in space nuclear powered missions. To support the production of a space nuclear reactor, uranium nitride has recently been manufactured by BWXT. In addition, analytical chemistry and analysis techniques have been developed to provide verification and qualification of the uranium nitride production process. The fabrication of a space nuclear reactor will require the ability to place an unclad fuel form into a clad structure for assembly into a reactor core configuration. To this end, BWX Technologies has reestablished its capability for machining, GTA welding, and EB welding of refractory metals. Specifically, BWX Technologies has demonstrated GTA welding of niobium flat plate and EB welding of niobium and Nb-1Zr tubing. In performing these demonstration activities, BWX Technologies has established the necessary infrastructure to manufacture UO2, UCx, or UNx fuel, components, and complete reactor assemblies in support of space nuclear programs.

  11. The Impact of Trade Liberalization and Information Technology on India's Manufacturing Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Shruti

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is an investigation into how trade liberalization and the adoption of information technology have impacted labour and productivity in India's manufacturing sector respectively. The second chapter analyses the relationship between India's liberalization of tariffs on imported intermediate inputs (henceforth input tariff…

  12. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  13. The Boeing Company's Manufacturing Technology Student Internship. Final Evaluation Report for 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Tom

    A study evaluated The Boeing Company's Student Internship Program for students enrolled in a manufacturing technology program. The programs in the Seattle (Washington) and Portland (Oregon) areas provided students with three progressive internship levels offered in the summers of grades 11, 12, and 13 (the first year of community college). The…

  14. 75 FR 13766 - Food and Drug Administration and Process Analytical Technology for Pharma Manufacturing: Food and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration and Process Analytical Technology for Pharma Manufacturing: Food and Drug Administration--Partnering With Industry; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug...

  15. Challenges in Implementing Design-Led Technologies in Small Manufacturing Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millward, Huw; Dorrington, Peter; Lewis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines some of the challenges of implementing design-led technologies, such as computer-aided design (CAD), in the context of small manufacturing companies. The research is based on university-company collaborations in the UK using the Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) model, and the paper adopts a case-study approach based on…

  16. An Analysis of Manufacturing Engineering Technology Programs throughout Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John T.

    A study examined the extent to which postsecondary institutions in Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio were addressing the needs of industry for those individuals desiring to enter the field of manufacturing engineering technology. The population for the study included all those schools in the three target states that were identified by a directory…

  17. Engineering Technology Programs Courses Guide for Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This guide describes the requirements for courses in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) that are part of engineering technology programs conducted in vocational-technical schools in Georgia. The guide is organized in five sections. The first section provides a rationale for occupations in design and in production,…

  18. The Impact of Trade Liberalization and Information Technology on India's Manufacturing Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Shruti

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is an investigation into how trade liberalization and the adoption of information technology have impacted labour and productivity in India's manufacturing sector respectively. The second chapter analyses the relationship between India's liberalization of tariffs on imported intermediate inputs (henceforth input tariff…

  19. An Analysis of Manufacturing Engineering Technology Programs throughout Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, John T.

    A study examined the extent to which postsecondary institutions in Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio were addressing the needs of industry for those individuals desiring to enter the field of manufacturing engineering technology. The population for the study included all those schools in the three target states that were identified by a directory…

  20. Modelling of teeth of a gear transmission for modern manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monica, Z.; Banaś, W.; Ćwikla, G.; Topolska, S.

    2017-08-01

    The technological process of manufacturing of gear wheels is influenced by many factors. It is designated depending on the type of material from which the gear is to be produced, its heat treatment parameters, the required accuracy, the geometrical form and the modifications of the tooth. Therefor the parameters selection process is not easy and moreover it is unambiguous. Another important stage of the technological process is the selection of appropriate tools to properly machine teeth in the operations of both roughing and finishing. In the presented work the focus is put first of all on modern production methods of gears using technologically advanced instruments in comparison with conventional tools. Conventional processing tools such as gear hobbing cutters or Fellows gear-shaper cutters are used from the beginning of the machines for the production of gear wheels. With the development of technology and the creation of CNC machines designated for machining of gears wheel it was also developed the manufacturing technology as well as the design knowledge concerning the technological tools. Leading manufacturers of cutting tools extended the range of tools designated for machining of gears on the so-called hobbing cutters with inserted cemented carbide tips. The same have be introduced to Fellows gear-shaper cutters. The results of tests show that is advantaged to use hobbing cutters with inserted cemented carbide tips for milling gear wheels with a high number of teeth, where the time gains are very high, in relation to the use of conventional milling cutters.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, C. LEE COOK DIVISION, DOVER CORPORATION, STATIC PAC (TM) SYSTEM, PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Static Pac System, Phase II, natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by the C. Lee Cook Division, Dover Corporation. The Static Pac System is designed to seal th...

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, C. LEE COOK DIVISION, DOVER CORPORATION, STATIC PAC (TM) SYSTEM, PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Static Pac System, Phase II, natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by the C. Lee Cook Division, Dover Corporation. The Static Pac System is designed to seal th...

  3. Pharmacy on demand: New technologies to enable miniaturized and mobile drug manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Lewin, John J; Choi, Eugene J; Ling, Geoffrey

    2016-01-15

    Developmental pharmaceutical manufacturing systems and techniques designed to overcome the shortcomings of traditional batch processing methods are described. Conventional pharmaceutical manufacturing processes do not adequately address the needs of military and civilian patient populations and healthcare providers. Recent advances within the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Battlefield Medicine program suggest that miniaturized, flexible platforms for end-to-end manufacturing of pharmaceuticals are possible. Advances in continuous-flow synthesis, chemistry, biological engineering, and downstream processing, coupled with online analytics, automation, and enhanced process control measures, pave the way for disruptive innovation to improve the pharmaceutical supply chain and drug manufacturing base. These new technologies, along with current and ongoing advances in regulatory science, have the future potential to (1) permit "on demand" drug manufacturing on the battlefield and in other austere environments, (2) enhance the level of preparedness for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear threats, (3) enhance health authorities' ability to respond to natural disasters and other catastrophic events, (4) minimize shortages of drugs, (5) address gaps in the orphan drug market, (6) support and enable the continued drive toward precision medicine, and (7) enhance access to needed medications in underserved areas across the globe. Modular platforms under development by DARPA's Battlefield Medicine program may one day improve the safety, efficiency, and timeliness of drug manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on optics integrated manufacture technology based on Windows DNA-OM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Min; Yang, Li; Wang, Yong-jan

    2006-02-01

    As the shortcoming and insufficiency of CNC systems applied in optics manufacturing, a design and application based on Windows DNA-OM is presented. After introducing the prime principles and logic structures of Windows DNA-OM, a specific solution of optics integrated manufacture based on this framework is discussed in detail. In this solution, the OPC(OLE for Process Control) technology based on COM(Component Object Model) of Microsoft company is used for CNC equipment in the workshop, and this could provide a general interface for communication of hetero-structure CNC equipment of workshop and so all hetero-structure CNC can be accessed in a simple way. The experience and knowledge of optic manufacturing is stored and integrated in Windows DNA-OM Data part, this data part can guide optics manufacture. By completing this data part, an optics manufacture expert system can be realized. Then the prime characteristics of the integrated manufacture system are given. Finally this system is proved to has a good flexibility and opening, ease realizing, low cost and high feasibility.

  5. Post Processing Methods used to Improve Surface Finish of Products which are Manufactured by Additive Manufacturing Technologies: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, N. N.; Mulay, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes open the possibility to go directly from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to a physical prototype. These prototypes are used as test models before it is finalized as well as sometimes as a final product. Additive Manufacturing has many advantages over the traditional process used to develop a product such as allowing early customer involvement in product development, complex shape generation and also save time as well as money. Additive manufacturing also possess some special challenges that are usually worth overcoming such as Poor Surface quality, Physical Properties and use of specific raw material for manufacturing. To improve the surface quality several attempts had been made by controlling various process parameters of Additive manufacturing and also applying different post processing techniques on components manufactured by Additive manufacturing. The main objective of this work is to document an extensive literature review in the general area of post processing techniques which are used in Additive manufacturing.

  6. Advanced manufacturing technology effectiveness: A review of literature and some issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Sanjeev; Grover, Sandeep

    2012-09-01

    Advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) provides advantages to manufacturing managers in terms of flexibility, quality, reduced delivery times, and global competitiveness. Although a large number of publications had presented the importance of this technology, only a few had delved into related literature review. Considering the importance of this technology and the recent contributions by various authors, the present paper conducts a more comprehensive review. Literature was reviewed in a way that will help researchers, academicians, and practitioners to take a closer look at the implementation, evaluation, and justification of the AMT. The authors reviewed various papers, proposed a different classification scheme, and identified certain gaps that will provide hints for further research in AMT management.

  7. Evolution of the Advanced Manufacturing Trades Training Program and the Advanced Technology Academy

    SciTech Connect

    GALLEGOS, PHILLIP L.; FORREST, CARLA M.

    2002-11-01

    In an effort to recruit and retain skilled workers in the Manufacturing Science and Technology Center (14000), an innovative and highly diverse team at Sandia National Laboratories and the U.S. Department of Energy joined with concerned community constitutents, such as Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute and the Albuquerque Public Schools, to offer mentoring and on-the-job training to qualified students in high schools and community colleges. Now, within several years of its inception, the educational program called the Advanced Manufacturing Trades Training Program is a model in the community and the nation, while enabling Sandia to have valuable trained and skilled employees to meet its national mission and workforce demands.

  8. Innovative and Efficient Manufacturing Technologies for Highly Advanced Composite Pressure Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Birte; Regnet, Martin; Bickelaier, Stefan; Henne, Florian; Sause, Markus G. R.; Schmidt, Thomas; Geiss, Gunter

    2014-06-01

    The currently ongoing development project at MT Aerospace (MTA) deals with a cost efficient manufacturing process for space structures. Thermoplastic fibre placement, which was identified as one of the most forward-looking technologies, promises advantages such as shorter cycle times and a high level of automation. In addition to the manufacturing method, research activities on non-destructive inspection methods and on acoustic emission analysis are performed. The analysis of the components will also be improved using advanced modelling approaches. The capability of the processes and methods will be shown on the basis of a scaled solid rocket motor casing.

  9. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  10. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  11. 3D Metal Printing - Additive Manufacturing Technologies for Frameworks of Implant-Borne Fixed Dental Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Revilla León, M; Klemm, I M; García-Arranz, J; Özcan, M

    2017-09-01

    An edentulous patient was rehabilitated with maxillary metal-ceramic and mandibular metal-resin implant-supported fixed dental prosthesis (FDP). Metal frameworks of the FDPs were fabricated using 3D additive manufacturing technologies utilizing selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) processes. Both SLM and EBM technologies were employed in combination with computer numerical control (CNC) post-machining at the implant interface. This report highlights the technical and clinical protocol for fabrication of FDPs using SLM and EBM additive technologies. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  12. The advanced manufacturing science and technology program. FY 95 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.

    1996-03-01

    This is the Fiscal Year 1995 Annual Report for the Advanced Manufacturing Science and Technology (AMST) sector of Los Alamos Tactical Goal 6, Industrial Partnering. During this past fiscal year, the AMST project leader formed a committee whose members represented the divisions and program offices with a manufacturing interest to examine the Laboratory`s expertise and needs in manufacturing. From a list of about two hundred interest areas, the committee selected nineteen of the most pressing needs for weapon manufacturing. Based upon Los Alamos mission requirements and the needs of the weapon manufacturing (Advanced Design and Production Technologies (ADaPT)) program plan and the other tactical goals, the committee selected four of the nineteen areas for strategic planning and possible industrial partnering. The areas selected were Casting Technology, Constitutive Modeling, Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation, and Polymer Aging and Lifetime Prediction. For each area, the AMST committee formed a team to write a roadmap and serve as a partnering technical consultant. To date, the roadmaps have been completed for each of the four areas. The Casting Technology and Polymer Aging teams are negotiating with specific potential partners now, at the close of the fiscal year. For each focus area we have created a list of existing collaborations and other ongoing partnering activities. In early Fiscal Year 1996, we will continue to develop partnerships in these four areas. Los Alamos National Laboratory instituted the tactical goals for industrial partnering to focus our institutional resources on partnerships that enhance core competencies and capabilities required to meet our national security mission of reducing the nuclear danger. The second industry sector targeted by Tactical Goal 6 was the chemical industry. Tactical Goal 6 is championed by the Industrial Partnership Office.

  13. Analysis of Impact of 3D Printing Technology on Traditional Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Niyan; Chen, Qi; Liao, Linzhi; Wang, Xin

    With quiet rise of 3D printing technology in automobile, aerospace, industry, medical treatment and other fields, many insiders hold different opinions on its development. This paper objectively analyzes impact of 3D printing technology on mold making technology and puts forward the idea of fusion and complementation of 3D printing technology and mold making technology through comparing advantages and disadvantages of 3D printing mold and traditional mold making technology.

  14. Design and manufacturing of ear prosthesis by means of rapid prototyping technology.

    PubMed

    De Crescenzio, F; Fantini, M; Ciocca, L; Persiani, F; Scotti, R

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the complete procedure to design and construct reusable moulds for implant-based ear prosthesis and manufacture substructures by means of a computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) procedure and rapid prototyping (RP) technology is presented. The scan of the healthy ear, the virtual superimposition of its mirrored image on to the defective side, and the rapid manufacturing of the substructure and of the mould eliminate several steps of traditional procedures (wax, stone, try-in). Moreover, the precise design and customization of the substructure is presented, with the original and engineered shape for the retention of the silicone. The time and cost saving results of this protocol are presented together with a discussion of the main design features that make the prosthesis a stable and reproducible system to improve rehabilitation of patients with auricular defects or absence.

  15. Mask manufacturing of advanced technology designs using multi-beam lithography (part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael; Ham, Young; Dillon, Brian; Kasprowicz, Bryan; Hur, Ik Boum; Park, Joong Hee; Choi, Yohan; McMurran, Jeff; Kamberian, Henry; Chalom, Daniel; Klikovits, Jan; Jurkovic, Michal; Hudek, Peter

    2016-09-01

    As optical lithography is extended into 10nm and below nodes, advanced designs are becoming a key challenge for mask manufacturers. Techniques including advanced optical proximity correction (OPC) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) result in structures that pose a range of issues across the mask manufacturing process. Among the new challenges are continued shrinking sub-resolution assist features (SRAFs), curvilinear SRAFs, and other complex mask geometries that are counter-intuitive relative to the desired wafer pattern. Considerable capability improvements over current mask making methods are necessary to meet the new requirements particularly regarding minimum feature resolution and pattern fidelity. Advanced processes using the IMS Multi-beam Mask Writer (MBMW) are feasible solutions to these coming challenges. In this paper, Part 2 of our study, we further characterize an MBMW process for 10nm and below logic node mask manufacturing including advanced pattern analysis and write time demonstration.

  16. Structural and morphological approach of Co-Cr dental alloys processed by alternative manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porojan, Sorin; Bîrdeanu, Mihaela; Savencu, Cristina; Porojan, Liliana

    2017-08-01

    The integration of digitalized processing technologies in traditional dental restorations manufacturing is an emerging application. The objective of this study was to identify the different structural and morphological characteristics of Co-Cr dental alloys processed by alternative manufacturing techniques in order to understand the influence of microstructure on restorations properties and their clinical behavior. Metallic specimens made of Co-Cr dental alloys were prepared using traditional casting (CST), and computerized milling (MIL), selective laser sintering (SLS) and selective laser melting (SLM). The structural information of the samples was obtained by X-ray diffraction, the morphology and the topography of the samples were investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscope. Given that the microstructure was significantly different, further differences in the clinical behavior of prosthetic restorations manufactured using additive techniques are anticipated.

  17. Mask manufacturing of advanced technology designs using multi-beam lithography (Part 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael; Ham, Young; Dillon, Brian; Kasprowicz, Bryan; Hur, Ik Boum; Park, Joong Hee; Choi, Yohan; McMurran, Jeff; Kamberian, Henry; Chalom, Daniel; Klikovits, Jan; Jurkovic, Michal; Hudek, Peter

    2016-10-01

    As optical lithography is extended into 10nm and below nodes, advanced designs are becoming a key challenge for mask manufacturers. Techniques including advanced Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) and Inverse Lithography Technology (ILT) result in structures that pose a range of issues across the mask manufacturing process. Among the new challenges are continued shrinking Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs), curvilinear SRAFs, and other complex mask geometries that are counter-intuitive relative to the desired wafer pattern. Considerable capability improvements over current mask making methods are necessary to meet the new requirements particularly regarding minimum feature resolution and pattern fidelity. Advanced processes using the IMS Multi-beam Mask Writer (MBMW) are feasible solutions to these coming challenges. In this paper, we study one such process, characterizing mask manufacturing capability of 10nm and below structures with particular focus on minimum resolution and pattern fidelity.

  18. [The use of CAD/CAM and rapid fabrication technologies in prosthesis and orthotics manufacturing].

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, O

    2012-01-01

    Modern CAD/CAM and rapid fabrication technologies used in the prosthesis and orthotics manufacturing are based on 3D scanning, 3D reconstruction and computer aided fabrication. Paper approaches a study on the manufacture of customised orthosis (foot insole) through CAD/CAM and rapid fabrication technologies, using most economical devices and software available in Romania. Paper describes a method used in the data acquisition, reconstruction and fabrication of a foot insole made of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS). Data acquisition is accomplished using non contact 3D scanner with structured light. Structured-light 3D scanner is a device for scanning the three dimensional shape of an anatomical surface using projected light patterns and a camera system. All working steps from 3D scanning to computer aided fabrication of the foot insole through rapid ptototyping are described. Peculiar attention has been given to the image processing steps from 3D reconstruction to the final 3D CAD modelling of the foot insole. The approached method showed a good accuracy in scanning of anatomic surfaces and in speeding up fabrication of leg orthosis. The 3D printer was able to build durable ABS thermoplastic insoles without post treatment. Approached fabrication method showed the advantages of manufacturing of orthosis and prosthesis components through CAD/CAM and Rapid Fabrication technologies. New prosthetic laboratories may be equipped with Rapid Fabrication technologies like 3D scanners and 3D printers.

  19. Manufacturing the Future: Federal Priorities for Manufacturing Research and Development. Report of the Interagency Working Group on Manufacturing R&D, Committee on Technology, National Science and Technology Council

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...ADDRESS(ES) Executive Office of the President,National Science and Technology Council,Washington,DC 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9...and virtual elimination of vehicular emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases. Low- cost, high-volume manufacturing processes and development

  20. COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Scandrol

    2003-10-01

    Universal Aggregates, LLC proposes to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the Universal Aggregates share is $12.3 (63%). The project team consists of CONSOL Energy Inc., P.J. Dick, Inc., SynAggs, LLC, and Universal Aggregates, LLC. The Birchwood Facility will transform 115,000 tons per year of spray dryer by-products that are currently being disposed of in an offsite landfill into 167,000 tons of a useful product, lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight and medium weight masonry blocks. In addition to the environmental benefits, the Birchwood Facility will create nine (9) manufacturing jobs plus additional employment in the local trucking industry to deliver the aggregate to customers or reagents to the facility. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one (21) spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray dryer by-product to economically justify the installation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing facility. Industry sources believe that as additional scrubbing is required, dry FGD technologies will be the technology of choice. Letters from potential lightweight aggregate customers indicate that there is a market for the product once the commercialization barriers are eliminated by this demonstration project.

  1. COMMERCIAL DEMONSTRATION OF THE MANUFACTURED AGGREGATE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY UTILIZING SPRAY DRYER ASH

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Scandrol

    2003-04-01

    Universal Aggregates, LLC proposes to design, construct and operate a lightweight aggregate manufacturing plant at the Birchwood Power Facility in King George, Virginia. The installation and start-up expenses for the Birchwood Aggregate Facility are $19.5 million. The DOE share is $7.2 million (37%) and the Universal Aggregates share is $12.3 (63%). The project team consists of CONSOL Energy Inc., P.J. Dick, Inc., SynAggs, LLC, and Universal Aggregates, LLC. The Birchwood Facility will transform 115,000 tons per year of spray dryer by-products that are currently being disposed of in an offsite landfill into 167,000 tons of a useful product, lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight aggregates that can be used to manufacture lightweight and medium weight masonry blocks. In addition to the environmental benefits, the Birchwood Facility will create eight (8) manufacturing jobs plus additional employment in the local trucking industry to deliver the aggregate to customers or reagents to the facility. A successful demonstration would lead to additional lightweight aggregate manufacturing facilities in the United States. There are currently twenty-one (21) spray dryer facilities operating in the United States that produce an adequate amount of spray dryer by-product to economically justify the installation of a lightweight aggregate manufacturing facility. Industry sources believe that as additional scrubbing is required, dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies will be the technology of choice. Letters from potential lightweight aggregate customers indicate that there is a market for the product once the commercialization barriers are eliminated by this demonstration project.

  2. Performance assessment of the phased remediation of a former gas manufacturing plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. P.; Shields, A.

    2003-04-01

    The remediation of a former manufactured gas plant in the north of England is the subject of a multi-disciplinary research programme into the hydro-biological controls on the transport and remediation of organic pollutants. Production of town gas at the 0.7ha site started in the 1850s and was operational for about a hundred years, with production on site ceasing forty years ago. The aquifer beneath the site is an unconfined fine grained sand, with depth to groundwater of approximately 1m. Following an initial remedial phase, which involved the removal of major contaminant sources (tar tanks and gasholder bases), groundwater contamination remains. Target contaminants include phenols, BTEX and light fraction polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). A second phase of remedial work involved pilot scale testing of both air sparging and oxygen releasing technologies. Two pilot scale air-sparging tests were carried out. In both cases the tests lasting between 3 days and one week showed significant reductions in dissolved BTEX, phenol and naphthalene concentrations. Maximum concentration reduction rates at the end of sparging were 1.3 mg.L-1day-1 BTEX range hydrocarbons, 0.78 mg.L-1day-1 naphthalene and 0.9 mg.L-1day-1 phenol. As a result of the pilot scale trials, a full scale air sparging aeration barrier was installed at the site, and has been operational since August 1999. Periodic measurements of dissolved organic and inorganic components, along with highly detailed time series of temperature, electrical conductivity, Eh, pH, dissolved oxygen along with groundwater heads have been obtained for the sparge system. These data have been supplemented with measurements of PAH and BTEX biodegradative activity using sediment 14C mineralisation assays and monitoring of the temporal variation in both biodegradative activity and diversity through the application of Filters for the Recovery Of Groundwater Samples (FROGS). FROGS enable the extraction of nucleic acids from

  3. The hydrogen technology assessment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, Addison

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this phase 1 report is to begin to form the information base of the economics and energy uses of hydrogen-related technologies on which the members of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) can build a hydrogen vision of the future. The secondary goal of this report is the development of NHA positions on national research, development, and demonstration opportunities. The third goal, with the aid of the established hydrogen vision and NHA positions, is to evaluate ongoing federal research goals and activities. The evaluations will be performed in a manner that compares the costs associated with using systems that achieve those goals against the cost of performing those tasks today with fossil fuels. From this ongoing activity should emerge an NHA information base, one or more hydrogen visions of the future, and cost and performance targets for hydrogen applications to complete in the market place.

  4. Key technologies for manufacturing and processing sheet materials: A global perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeri, Mahmoud Y.

    2001-02-01

    Modern industrial technologies continue to seek new materials and processes to produce products that meet design and functional requirements. Sheet materials made from ferrous and non-ferrous metals, laminates, composites, and reinforced plastics constitute a large percentage of today’s products, components, and systems. Major manufacturers of sheet products include automotive, aerospace, appliance, and food-packaging industries. The Second Global Symposium on Innovations in Materials Processing & Manufacturing: Sheet Materials is organized to provide a forum for presenting advances in sheet processing and manufacturing by worldwide researchers and engineers from industrial, research, and academic centers. The symposium, sponsored by the TMS Materials Processing & Manufacturing Division (MPMD), was planned for the 2001 TMS Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 11 15, 2001. This article is a review of key papers submitted for publication in the concurrent volume. The selected papers present significant developments in the rapidly expanding areas of advanced sheet materials, innovative forming methods, industrial applications, primary and secondary processing, composite processing, and numerical modeling of manufacturing processes.

  5. An esthetics rehabilitation with computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Mazaro, Josá Vitor Quinelli; de Mello, Caroline Cantieri; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina; Santiago, Joel Ferreira; Amoroso, Andressa Paschoal; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a case of a rehabilitation involving Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD-CAM) system in implant supported and dental supported prostheses using zirconia as framework. The CAD-CAM technology has developed considerably over last few years, becoming a reality in dental practice. Among the widely used systems are the systems based on zirconia which demonstrate important physical and mechanical properties of high strength, adequate fracture toughness, biocompatibility and esthetics, and are indicated for unitary prosthetic restorations and posterior and anterior framework. All the modeling was performed by using CAD-CAM system and prostheses were cemented using resin cement best suited for each situation. The rehabilitation of the maxillary arch using zirconia framework demonstrated satisfactory esthetic and functional results after a 12-month control and revealed no biological and technical complications. This article shows the important of use technology CAD/CAM in the manufacture of dental prosthesis and implant-supported.

  6. Utilization of UV Curing Technology to Significantly Reduce the Manufacturing Cost of LIB Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Voelker, Gary; Arnold, John

    2015-11-30

    Previously identified novel binders and associated UV curing technology have been shown to reduce the time required to apply and finish electrode coatings from tens of minutes to less than one second. This revolutionary approach can result in dramatic increases in process speeds, significantly reduced capital (a factor of 10 to 20) and operating costs, reduced energy requirements, and reduced environmental concerns and costs due to the virtual elimination of harmful volatile organic solvents and associated solvent dryers and recovery systems. The accumulated advantages of higher speed, lower capital and operating costs, reduced footprint, lack of VOC recovery, and reduced energy cost is a reduction of 90% in the manufacturing cost of cathodes. When commercialized, the resulting cost reduction in Lithium batteries will allow storage device manufacturers to expand their sales in the market and thereby accrue the energy savings of broader utilization of HEVs, PHEVs and EVs in the U.S., and a broad technology export market is also envisioned.

  7. Manufacturing microsystems-on-a-chip with 5-level surface micromachining technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1998-05-01

    An agile microsystem manufacturing technology has been developed that provides unprecedented 5 levels of independent polysilicon surface-micromachine films for the designer. Typical surface-micromachining processes offer a maximum of 3 levels, making this the most complex surface-micromachining process technology developed to date. Leveraged from the extensive infrastructure present in the microelectronics industry, the manufacturing method of polysilicon surface-micromachining offers similar advantages of high-volume, high-reliability, and batch-fabrication to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as has been accomplished with integrated circuits (ICs). These systems, comprised of microscopic-sized mechanical elements, are laying the foundation for a rapidly expanding, multi-billion dollar industry 2 which impacts the automotive, consumer product, and medical industries to name only a few.

  8. MATERIALS, FABRICATION, AND MANUFACTURING OF MICRO/NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES FOR PHASE-CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, M; Gerasopoulos, K; Maroo, SC; Hart, AJ

    2014-07-23

    This article describes the most prominent materials, fabrication methods, and manufacturing schemes for micro- and nanostructured surfaces that can be employed to enhance phase-change heat transfer phenomena. The numerous processes include traditional microfabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, lithography, and etching, as well as template-assisted and template-free nanofabrication techniques. The creation of complex, hierarchical, and heterogeneous surface structures using advanced techniques is also reviewed. Additionally, research needs in the field and future directions necessary to translate these approaches from the laboratory to high-performance applications are identified. Particular focus is placed on the extension of these techniques to the design of micro/nanostructures for increased performance, manufacturability, and reliability. The current research needs and goals are detailed, and potential pathways forward are suggested.

  9. Simulating The Technological Movements Of The Equipment Used For Manufacturing Prosthetic Devices Using 3D Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicea, Anca-Lucia

    2015-09-01

    The paper presents the process of building geometric and kinematic models of a technological equipment used in the process of manufacturing devices. First, the process of building the model for a six axes industrial robot is presented. In the second part of the paper, the process of building the model for a five-axis CNC milling machining center is also shown. Both models can be used for accurate cutting processes simulation of complex parts, such as prosthetic devices.

  10. The method of manufacture of nylon dental partially removable prosthesis using additive technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, R. N.; Korobkina, A. I.; Platonov, E. V.; Saleeva, G. T.

    2014-12-01

    The article is devoted to the topic of creating new methods of dental prosthesis. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of using additive technology to create nylon prosthesis. As a result of experimental studies, was made a sample of nylon partially removable prosthesis using 3D printing has allowed to simplify, accelerate and reduce the coat of manufacturing high-precision nylon dentures.

  11. Impression technique for a complete-arch prosthesis with multiple implants using additive manufacturing technologies.

    PubMed

    Revilla-León, Marta; Sánchez-Rubio, José Luis; Oteo-Calatayud, Jesús; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-11-23

    This article describes an impression technique for a complete-arch prosthesis supported by multiple implants where additive manufacturing technologies were used to fabricate a splinting framework and a custom tray. The technique presented uses a shim method to control the homogenous splinting acrylic resin and impression material during the procedure, thereby reducing laboratory and chairside time and the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed.

  12. Materials and Manufacturing Technology Directorate Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch (Overview)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Thermal Sciences & Materials Research for Aerospace Materials and Manufacturing Technology Directorate Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch...SUBTITLE An Overview of Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch Research (AFRL/RXBT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER... Materials Branch Air Force Research Laboratory WPAFB, Dayton, Ohio, USA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S

  13. Prototype Manufacturing Technologies: Conversion of Munitions Components into Higher Value Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-21

    sustainable green coating technologies. Th e optical processes for laser welding em ployed expedited the m anufacturing process and increased precision and...will enable the development of rapi d response preci sion manufacturing t echnologies usi ng a num ber of unique material options Current...delivery of the product to the customer. After a review of the current state of the art for lighter weight materials as well as the practicality of

  14. Environmentally benign manufacturing of compact disc stampers [Final Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    Optical data storage is currently a $10B/yr. business. With the introduction of the high capacity Digital Versatile Disc (D/D) as well as the continued growth of CD-Audio and CD-ROM worldwide sales of optical data products as a whole are growing at rate of more than 10% per year. In North America, more than 2.5 billion optical discs will be sold in 1998. By 1999, the numbers of optical discs produced for the North American market will grow to almost three billion. The optical disc manufacturing industry is dominated by Asian and European companies (e.g. Sony of Japan and Philips of Netherlands). Prism Corporation has created a process that could significantly improve US competitiveness in the business of optical disc production. The objectives of the Phase II STTR project were to build and test an ion machining system (IMS) for stamper fabrication, prove overall manufacturing system feasibility by fabrication stampers and replicas, and evaluate alternative materials and alternative process parameters to optimize the process. During tie period of the Phase II project Prism Corporation was able to meet these objectives. In the course of doing so, adjustments had been made to better the project and in turn the final product. An ion machining system was designed and built that produced stampers ready for the molding process. Also, many control steps in the manufacturing process were studied to improve the current process and make it even more compatible with the industry standards, fitting seamlessly into current manufacturing lines.

  15. From technology transfer to local manufacturing: China's emergence in the global wind power industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Joanna Ingram

    This dissertation examines the development of China's large wind turbine industry, including the players, the status of the technology, and the strategies used to develop turbines for the Chinese market. The primary goals of this research project are to identify the models of international technology transfer that have been used among firms in China's wind power industry; examine to what extent these technology transfers have contributed to China's ability to locally manufacture large wind turbine technology; and evaluate China's ability to become a major player in the global wind industry. China is a particularly important place to study the opportunities for and dynamics of clean energy development due to its role in global energy consumption. China is the largest coal consuming and producing nation in the world, and consequently the second largest national emitter of carbon dioxide after only the United States. Energy consumption and carbon emissions are growing rapidly, and China is expected to surpass the US and become the largest energy consuming nation and carbon dioxide emitter in coming decades. The central finding of this dissertation is that even though each firm involved in the large wind turbine manufacturing industry in China has followed a very different pathway of technology procurement for the Chinese market, all of the firms are increasing the utilization of locally-manufactured components, and many are doing so without transferring turbine technology or the associated intellectual property. Only one fully Chinese-owned firm, Goldwind, has succeeded in developing a commercially available large wind turbine for the Chinese market. No Chinese firms or foreign firms are manufacturing turbines in China for export overseas, though many have stated plans to do so. There already exists a possible niche market for the smaller turbines that are currently being made in China, particularly in less developed countries that are looking for less expensive

  16. 3D Systems' Technology Overview and New Applications in Manufacturing, Engineering, Science, and Education.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Trevor J; Andrews, Mike; Weislogel, Mark; Moeck, Peter; Stone-Sundberg, Jennifer; Birkes, Derek; Hoffert, Madeline Paige; Lindeman, Adam; Morrill, Jeff; Fercak, Ondrej; Friedman, Sasha; Gunderson, Jeff; Ha, Anh; McCollister, Jack; Chen, Yongkang; Geile, John; Wollman, Andrew; Attari, Babak; Botnen, Nathan; Vuppuluri, Vasant; Shim, Jennifer; Kaminsky, Werner; Adams, Dustin; Graft, John

    2014-09-01

    Since the inception of 3D printing, an evolutionary process has taken place in which specific user and customer needs have crossed paths with the capabilities of a growing number of machines to create value-added businesses. Even today, over 30 years later, the growth of 3D printing and its utilization for the good of society is often limited by the various users' understanding of the technology for their specific needs. This article presents an overview of current 3D printing technologies and shows numerous examples from a multitude of fields from manufacturing to education.

  17. 3D Systems' Technology Overview and New Applications in Manufacturing, Engineering, Science, and Education

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Mike; Weislogel, Mark; Moeck, Peter; Stone-Sundberg, Jennifer; Birkes, Derek; Hoffert, Madeline Paige; Lindeman, Adam; Morrill, Jeff; Fercak, Ondrej; Friedman, Sasha; Gunderson, Jeff; Ha, Anh; McCollister, Jack; Chen, Yongkang; Geile, John; Wollman, Andrew; Attari, Babak; Botnen, Nathan; Vuppuluri, Vasant; Shim, Jennifer; Kaminsky, Werner; Adams, Dustin; Graft, John

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Since the inception of 3D printing, an evolutionary process has taken place in which specific user and customer needs have crossed paths with the capabilities of a growing number of machines to create value-added businesses. Even today, over 30 years later, the growth of 3D printing and its utilization for the good of society is often limited by the various users' understanding of the technology for their specific needs. This article presents an overview of current 3D printing technologies and shows numerous examples from a multitude of fields from manufacturing to education. PMID:28473997

  18. Blade technology program for large wind turbines, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muser, D.

    1984-10-01

    A research program for the development and construction of rotor blades is presented. The project includes investigation and design of blade concepts, compilation of materials properties of fiber reinforced plastics, and manufacturing and testing of critical blade sections. The following parts are produced and tested to check the manufacturing technology: element for load introduction, shell section in sandwich-spar technology, filament-wound D-spar in carbon fiber reinforced epoxy, and filament-wound D-spar with rear profile box in tube-winding technology. It is shown that the carbon and glass fiber reinforced plastics blade with wound D-spar is optimum. This blade has the lowest mass that can be economically manufactured by automatic filament winding.

  19. George E. Pake Prize: A Few Challenges in the Evolution of Semiconductor Device/Manufacturing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Robert

    In the early 1980s, the semiconductor industry faced the related challenges of ``scaling through the one-micron barrier'' and converting single-level-metal NMOS integrated circuits to multi-level-metal CMOS. Multiple advances in lithography technology and device materials/process integration led the way toward the deep-sub-micron transistors and interconnects that characterize today's electronic chips. In the 1990s, CMOS scaling advanced at an accelerated pace enabled by rapid advances in many aspects of optical lithography. However, the industry also needed to continue the progress in manufacturing on ever-larger silicon wafers to maintain economy-of-scale trends. Simultaneously, the increasing complexity and absolute-precision requirements of manufacturing compounded the necessity for new processes, tools, and control methodologies. This talk presents a personal perspective on some of the approaches that addressed the aforementioned challenges. In particular, early work on integrating silicides, lightly-doped-drain FETs, shallow recessed isolation, and double-level metal will be discussed. In addition, some pioneering efforts in deep-UV lithography and single-wafer processing will be covered. The latter will be mainly based on results from the MMST Program - a 100 M +, 5-year R&D effort, funded by DARPA, the U.S. Air Force, and Texas Instruments, that developed a wide range of new technologies for advanced semiconductor manufacturing. The major highlight of the program was the demonstration of sub-3-day cycle time for manufacturing 350-nm CMOS integrated circuits in 1993. This was principally enabled by the development of: (1) 100% single-wafer processing, including rapid-thermal processing (RTP), and (2) computer-integrated-manufacturing (CIM), including real-time, in-situ process control.

  20. Cost-Effective Additive Manufacturing in Space: HELIOS Technology Challenge Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVieneni, Alayna; Velez, Carlos Andres; Benjamin, David; Hollenbeck, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the HELIOS Technology Challenge Guide. This document is intended to serve as a general road map for participants of the HELIOS Technology Challenge [HTC] Program and the associated inaugural challenge: HTC-01: Cost-Effective Additive Manufacturing in Space. Please note that this guide is not a rule book and is not meant to hinder the development of innovative ideas. Its primary goal is to highlight the objectives of the HTC-01 Challenge and to describe possible solution routes and pitfalls that such technology may encounter in space. Please also note that participants wishing to demonstrate any hardware developed under this program during any future HELIOS Technology Challenge showcase event(s) may be subject to event regulations to be published separately at a later date.

  1. A new technology for manufacturing scheduling derived from space system operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, R. S.; Willoughby, J. K.

    1993-01-01

    A new technology for producing finite capacity schedules has been developed in response to complex requirements for operating space systems such as the Space Shuttle, the Space Station, and the Deep Space Network for telecommunications. This technology has proven its effectiveness in manufacturing environments where popular scheduling techniques associated with Materials Resources Planning (MRPII) and with factory simulation are not adequate for shop-floor work planning and control. The technology has three components. The first is a set of data structures that accommodate an extremely general description of a factory's resources, its manufacturing activities, and the constraints imposed by the environment. The second component is a language and set of software utilities that enable a rapid synthesis of functional capabilities. The third component is an algorithmic architecture called the Five Ruleset Model which accommodates the unique needs of each factory. Using the new technology, systems can model activities that generate, consume, and/or obligate resources. This allows work-in-process (WIP) to be generated and used; it permits constraints to be imposed or intermediate as well as finished goods inventories. It is also possible to match as closely as possible both the current factory state and future conditions such as promise dates. Schedule revisions can be accommodated without impacting the entire production schedule. Applications have been successful in both discrete and process manufacturing environments. The availability of a high-quality finite capacity production planning capability enhances the data management capabilities of MRP II systems. These schedules can be integrated with shop-floor data collection systems and accounting systems. Using the new technology, semi-custom systems can be developed at costs that are comparable to products that do not have equivalent functional capabilities and/or extensibility.

  2. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this three-year program is to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. Two specific objectives of this program are to reduce the manufacturing cost for polycrystalline silicon PV modules to less than $1.20/watt and to increase the manufacturing capacity by a factor of three.

  3. Trial of Engineer Educating of Manufacturing Field in Kagoshima National College of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Itaru; Hombu, Mitsuyuki; Kusuhara, Yoshito; Kashine, Kenji; Sakasegawa, Eiichi; Tashima, Daisuke; Fukidome, Hiromi

    In Kagoshima National College of Technology, based on investigation with “the job boost measure investigation work in a power supply area” undertaken in the 2005 fiscal year, we accepted the trust from Kyushu Bureau of Economy, Trade and Industry, and undertook “the small-and-medium-sized-enterprises personnel educating work which utilized the technical college etc.” for three years from the 2006 fiscal year to the 2008 fiscal year. As the trial of engineer educating according to the electrical engineering concept to the manufacturing field based on a conventional result, we act as a professor of the base technique for applying alternative energy (a fuel cell and a solar cell) in which social needs are powerful these days, and aim at aiming at cultivation of the problem-solving type engineer who can contribute to a low carbon society through manufacturing, we undertook this work according to the manufacturing bearer educating work (personnel educating and secured work of the manufacturing field) in the 2009 fiscal year of National Federation of Small Business Associations.

  4. Pin-in-paste DFM constraints in vapor phase soldering technology for optoelectronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotog, I.; Varzaru, G.; Turcu, C.; Cucu, T. C.; Svasta, P.; Vasile, A.

    2009-01-01

    The topical trends in the field of electronic equipments developing are a large integration on pcb support for different types of components and devices, including optoelectronic type, from small to medium power, in condition of reducing physical dimensions, in order to create new electronic products in short time at lower manufacturing cost. The condition for economical success for a product is to assure the product, even from the conception stage, with a high level of quality by reducing the product cost; to conclude, designing according with production possibilities by using Design For Manufacturing (DFM) concept. This desideratum depends on the conception and design of the product. According to DFM concept, a successful project assures design requirements for the system and finally for printed circuit boards (PCB), accomplishes the assembling technology constraints defined by international standards in the field of electronic packaging, such as IPC or Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive. Active from July 1, 2006, the RoHS Directive 2002/95/EC adopted in February 2003 by the European Union, and adopted in Romania by HG - 992/2005, completed by HG - 816/2006, call forth important consequences in assembling technologies. In order to minimize manufacturing cost, Pin-In-Paste offers solutions for complete assembling of high complexity PCBs in Vapor Phase Technology using only one reflow machine avoiding overheating of the assemblies relatively to infrared reflow oven. Starting from RoHS consequences analysis, especially thermal profile, the paper presents the applied research performed in the assembling lines on VPS machine in order to define the design requirements for Pin-In-Paste dedicated stencils and PCBs, experiments result and conclusions regarding DFM requirements for lead-free assembling technologies of optoelectronic components. Finally, scientific and practical conclusions shall be drawn to configure the optimum implementation way for Pin

  5. Arcjet thruster research and technology, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Steven C.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate analytically and experimentally the operation, performance, and lifetime of arcjet thrusters operating between 0.5 and 3.0 kW with catalytically decomposed hydrazine (N2H4) and to begin development of the requisite power control unit (PCU) technology. Fundamental analyses were performed of the arcjet nozzle, the gas kinetic reaction effects, the thermal environment, and the arc stabilizing vortex. The VNAP2 flow code was used to analyze arcjet nozzle performance with non-uniform entrance profiles. Viscous losses become dominant beyond expansion ratios of 50:1 because of the low Reynolds numbers. A survey of vortex phenomena and analysis techniques identified viscous dissipation and vortex breakdown as two flow instabilities that could affect arcjet operation. The gas kinetics code CREK1D was used to study the gas kinetics of high temperature N2H4 decomposition products. The arc/gas energy transfer is a non-equilibrium process because of the reaction rate constants and the short gas residence times. A thermal analysis code was used to guide design work and to provide a means to back out power losses at the anode fall based on test thermocouple data. The low flow rate and large thermal masses made optimization of a regenerative heating scheme unnecessary.

  6. Emerging Communication Technologies (ECT) Phase 4 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Marin, Jose A.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The Emerging Communication Technology (ECT) project investigated three First Mile communication technologies in support of NASA s Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG), and the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These First Mile technologies have the purpose of interconnecting mobile users with existing Range Communication infrastructures on a 24/7 basis. ECT is a continuation of the Range Information System Management (RISM) task started in 2002. This is the fourth year of the project.

  7. Manufacturing Solid Dosage Forms from Bulk Liquids Using the Fluid-bed Drying Technology.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianping; Lu, Y I; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Solid dosage forms are better than liquid dosage forms in many ways, such as improved physical and chemical stability, ease of storage and transportation, improved handling properties, and patient compliance. Therefore, it is required to transform dosage forms of liquid origins into solid dosage forms. The functional approaches are to absorb the liquids by solid excipients or through drying. The conventional drying technologies for this purpose include drying by heating, vacuum-, freeze- and spray-drying, etc. Among these drying technologies, fluidbed drying emerges as a new technology that possesses unique advantages. Fluid-bed drying or coating is highly efficient in solvent removal, can be performed at relatively low temperatures, and is a one-step process to manufacture formulations in pellet forms. In this article, the status of the art of manufacturing solid dosage forms from bulk liquids by fluid-bed drying technology was reviewed emphasizing on its application in solid dispersion, inclusion complexes, self-microemulsifying systems, and various nanoscale drug delivery systems.

  8. Life Cycle Assessment of Titania Perovskite Solar Cell Technology for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyi; Gao, Xianfeng; Deng, Yelin; Li, Bingbing; Yuan, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells have attracted enormous attention in recent years due to their low cost and superior technical performance. However, the use of toxic metals, such as lead, in the perovskite dye and toxic chemicals in perovskite solar cell manufacturing causes grave concerns for its environmental performance. To understand and facilitate the sustainable development of perovskite solar cell technology from its design to manufacturing, a comprehensive environmental impact assessment has been conducted on titanium dioxide nanotube based perovskite solar cells by using an attributional life cycle assessment approach, from cradle to gate, with manufacturing data from our laboratory-scale experiments and upstream data collected from professional databases and the literature. The results indicate that the perovskite dye is the primary source of environmental impact, associated with 64.77% total embodied energy and 31.38% embodied materials consumption, contributing to more than 50% of the life cycle impact in almost all impact categories, although lead used in the perovskite dye only contributes to about 1.14% of the human toxicity potential. A comparison of perovskite solar cells with commercial silicon and cadmium-tellurium solar cells reveals that perovskite solar cells could be a promising alternative technology for future large-scale industrial applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Combat Ration Advanced Manufacturing Technology Demonstration (CRAMTD). ’Generic Inspection-Statistical Process Control System for a Combat Ration Manufacturing Facility’. Short Term Project (STP) Number 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    ADVANCED FOOD TECHNOLOGY* Cook College N.J. Agricultural Experiment Station New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 Principal Investigators: Drs., T-C. Lee H...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey REPORT NUMBER The Center for Advanced Food Technology FTR 11.0...DOD. It was recommended that qualitities relevant to food manufacturing control be quantified (Funded as DAAK60-92-C-0087); that key hardware and

  10. Manufacturing process applications team (MATeam)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangs, E. R.; Meyer, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    Activities of the manufacturing applications team (MATeam) in effecting widespread transfer of NASA technology to aid in the solution of manufacturing problems in the industrial sector are described. During the program's first year of operation, 450 companies, industry associations, and government agencies were contacted, 150 manufacturing problems were documented, and 20 potential technology transfers were identified. Although none of the technology transfers has been commercialized and put in use, several are in the applications engineering phase, and others are in the early stages of implementation. The technology transfer process is described and guidelines used for the preparation of problems statements are included.

  11. 3D Printing, Additive Manufacturing, and Solid Freeform Fabrication: The Technologies of the Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaman, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Starting in the late 1980's, several new technologies were created that have the potential to revolutionize manufacturing. These technologies are, for the most part, additive processes that build up parts layer by layer. In addition, the processes that are being touted for hard-core manufacturing are primarily laser or e-beam based processes. This presentation gives a brief history of Additive Manufacturing and gives an assessment for these technologies. These technologies initially grew out of a commercial need for rapid prototyping. This market has a different requirement for process and quality control than traditional manufacturing. The relatively poor process control of the existing commercial Additive Manufacturing equipment is a vestige of this history. This presentation discusses this history and improvements in quality over time. The emphasis will be on Additive Manufacturing processes that are being considered for direct manufacturing, which is a different market than the 3D Printing ``Makerbot'' market. Topics discussed include past and present machine sensors, materials, and operational methods that were used in the past and those that are used today to create manufactured parts. Finally, a discussion of new methods and future directions of AM is presented.

  12. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Manufacturer of Thin-Film Solar Modules (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    First Solar, Inc. has been collaborating with NREL since 1991, advancing its thin-film cadmium telluride solar technology to grow from a startup company to become one of the world's largest manufacturers of solar modules, and the world's largest manufacturer of thin-film solar modules.

  13. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Phase-Field Modeling of Microstructure Evolution in Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Xibing; Chou, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the microstructure evolution in the powder-bed electron beam additive manufacturing (EBAM) process is studied using phase-field modeling. In essence, EBAM involves a rapid solidification process and the properties of a build partly depend on the solidification behavior as well as the microstructure of the build material. Thus, the prediction of microstructure evolution in EBAM is of importance for its process optimization. Phase-field modeling was applied to study the microstructure evolution and solute concentration of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the EBAM process. The effect of undercooling was investigated through the simulations; the greater the undercooling, the faster the dendrite grows. The microstructure simulations show multiple columnar-grain growths, comparable with experimental results for the tested range.

  15. Survey of US Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology Program activities applicable to civilian manufacturing industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Azimi, S.A.; Conrad, J.L.; Reed, J.E.

    1985-03-01

    Intent of the survey was to identify and characterize activities potentially applicable to improving energy efficiency and overall productivity in the civilian manufacturing industries. The civilian industries emphasized were the general manufacturing industries (including fabricated metals, glass, machinery, paper, plastic, textile, and transportation equipment manufacturing) and the primary metals industries (including primary aluminum, copper, steel, and zinc production). The principal steps in the survey were to: develop overview taxonomies of the general manufacturing and primary metals industries as well as specific industry taxonomies; identify needs and opportunities for improving process energy efficiency and productivity in the industries included; identify federal programs, capabilities, and special technical expertise that might be relevant to industry's needs and opportunities; contact federal laboratories/facilities, through visits and other forms of inquiry; prepare formatted profiles (descriptions) potentially applicable work efforts; review findings with industry; and compile and evaluate industry responses.

  16. [Rapid-prototyping manufacture of human scoliosis based on laminated object technology].

    PubMed

    Nie, Wenzhong; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Zhengyu; Wang, Chengtao; Liu, Zude

    2008-12-01

    At present, doctors discuss the situation of scoliosis patients mainly through their x-ray photograph. Because of the complexity of human spine structure, it is very difficult for doctors to plan & simulate operation or instruct design of scoliosis bracket only through the x-ray photograph of patient. In this paper, the technology of forming an STL file from CT data was introduced. The solid model of a scoliosis patient was reconstructed and transferred to RPM system. A human scoliosis model with all spine anatomical structure was manufactured using laminated object manufacturing (LOM). It has important clinical value for doctors to plan & simulate operation, and it is significant for the development of integration of medicine and engineering.

  17. An experiment in remote manufacturing using the advanced communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsatsoulis, Costas; Frost, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the completed project was to develop an experiment in remote manufacturing that would use the capabilities of the ACTS satellite. A set of possible experiments that could be performed using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS), and which would perform remote manufacturing using a laser cutter and an integrated circuit testing machine are described in detail. The proposed design is shown to be a feasible solution to the offered problem and it takes into consideration the constraints that were placed on the experiment. In addition, we have developed two more experiments that are included in this report: backup of rural telecommunication networks, and remote use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data analysis for on-site collection of glacier scattering data in the Antarctic.

  18. Current information technology needs of small to medium sized apparel manufacturers and contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Wimple, C., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    This report documents recent efforts of the American Textile Partnership (AMTEX{sup TM}) Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Project to identify opportunities for cost effective enhanced information technology use by small to medium sized apparel manufacturers and contractors. Background on the AMTEX/DAMA project and objectives for the specific DAMA Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) effort are discussed in this section. The approach used to gather information about current opportunities or needs is outlined in Section 2 Approach, and relevant findings are identified and a brief analysis of the information gathered is presented in Section 3 Findings. Recommendations based on the analysis, are offered in Section 4 Recommendations, and plans are suggested for DAMA follow-on in Section 5 Future Plans. Trip reports for each of the companies visited are contained in Appendix E - Company Trip Reports. These individual reports contain the data upon which the analysis presented in Section 3 Findings is based.

  19. Manufacturing technology education development project. Project accomplishment summary for 91-Y12P-050-A1

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, S.; Smith, R.

    1996-09-25

    The purpose of the project was to provide a set of supplemental instructional equipment and materials to Tennessee high school students to raise their level of knowledge about manufacturing technologies with the hope that some of the best and brightest would choose manufacturing as a career path. The role of the Y-12 Plant was primarily technical: renovate the portable classroom; select and purchase appropriate equipment; install and test the equipment; assist in the development of the curriculum; train the initial group of teachers; and provide technical assistance where needed after the laboratory was deployed. The role of the Department of Education was to provide the mobile facility; assist in the design of the laboratory; lead the development of the curriculum; deploy the trailer; and develop the structure for administering the selection of schools, training teachers, and movement of the laboratory. The Department of Education as subcontracted with Middle Tennessee State University to handle the details of laboratory deployment.

  20. Paths of Improving the Technological Process of Manufacture of GTE Turbine Blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, R. A.; Smelov, V. G.; Bolotov, M. A.; Pronichev, N. D.

    2016-08-01

    The article provides an analysis of the problems at manufacture of blades of the turbine of gas-turbine engines and power stations is provided in article, and also paths of perfecting of technological process of manufacture of blades are offered. The analysis of the main systems of basing of blades in the course of machining and the control methods of the processed blades existing at the enterprises with the indication of merits and demerits is carried out. In work criteria in the form of the mathematical models of a spatial distribution of an allowance considering the uniform distribution of an allowance on a feather profile are developed. The considered methods allow to reduce percent of release of marriage and to reduce labor input when polishing path part of a feather of blades of the turbine.

  1. New Paradigms in International University/Industry/Government Cooperation. Canada-China Collaboration in Advanced Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulgak, Akif Asil; Liquan, He

    1996-01-01

    A Chinese university and a Canadian university collaborated on an advanced manufacturing technologies project designed to address human resource development needs in China. The project featured university/industry/government partnership and attention to environmental issues. (SK)

  2. New Paradigms in International University/Industry/Government Cooperation. Canada-China Collaboration in Advanced Manufacturing Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulgak, Akif Asil; Liquan, He

    1996-01-01

    A Chinese university and a Canadian university collaborated on an advanced manufacturing technologies project designed to address human resource development needs in China. The project featured university/industry/government partnership and attention to environmental issues. (SK)

  3. Clarification technologies for monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes: Current state and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nripen; Arunkumar, Abhiram; Chollangi, Srinivas; Tan, Zhijun George; Borys, Michael; Li, Zheng Jian

    2016-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made increasing productivity of cell cultures to meet the rapidly growing demand for antibody biopharmaceuticals through increased cell densities and longer culture times. This in turn has dramatically increased the burden of process and product related impurities on the purification processes. In addition, current trends in the biopharmaceutical industry point toward both increased productivity and targeting smaller patient populations for new indications. Taken together, these developments are driving the industry to explore alternative separation technologies as a future manufacturing strategy. Clarification technologies well established in other industries, such as flocculation and precipitation are increasingly considered as a viable solution to address this bottleneck in antibody processes. However, several technical issues need to be fully addressed including suitability as a platform application, robustness, process cost, toxicity, and clearance. This review will focus on recent efforts to incorporate new generation clarification technologies for mammalian cell cultures producing monoclonal antibodies as well as challenges to their implementation supported by a case study.

  4. Technology Needs for Reduced Design and Manufacturing Cost of Commercial Transport Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the needs in the design and manufacturing processes and identify areas where technology could impact in cost and cycle-time reduction. At the highest level, the team first identified the goals that were in line with long-range needs of the aeropropulsion industry, and to which technology and process improvements would be required to contribute. These goals are to reduce the time and costs in the development cycle of aircraft engines by a factor of two, reduce production cycle time by a factor of four, and to reduce production costs by 25%. Also, it was the intent of the team to identify the highest impact technologies that could be developed and demonstrated in five years.

  5. Technology Needs for Reduced Design and Manufacturing Cost of Commercial Transport Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the needs in the design and manufacturing processes and identify areas where technology could impact in cost and cycle-time reduction. At the highest level, the team first identified the goals that were in line with long-range needs of the aeropropulsion industry, and to which technology and process improvements would be required to contribute. These goals are to reduce the time and costs in the development cycle of aircraft engines by a factor of two, reduce production cycle time by a factor of four, and to reduce production costs by 25%. Also, it was the intent of the team to identify the highest impact technologies that could be developed and demonstrated in five years.

  6. Environmentally conscious manufacturing & technology access project: Final technical progress report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This final report is being submitted in fulfillment of the management obligations associated with the TRP/DOE grant which funded the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing & Technology Access (ECM) Project. A {open_quotes}Federal Assistance Project Status Report{close_quotes} is also being submitted with this form. This report will elaborate on the successful completion of this project in achieving and in most cases exceeding its programmatic goals and fulfilling it statutory financial match obligation. A review of the Year 1 {open_quotes}Technical Progress Report{close_quotes} and the Quarterly Reports filed during the project period, clearly portray that, in all substantive areas, the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing & Technology Access Project (ECM Project) achieved or exceeded its goals. The success of the Project is largely due to the tremendous support provided by the Center for Technology Transfer (CTT) and the Maine Metal Products Association (MMPA). Both organizations provided extensive administrative and financial support and were instrumental in promoting the work of the project within the metals industry. The programmatic oversight provided by the industry Steering Committee and the broad partnership represented on the Board of Advisors were invaluable in developing, promoting and implementing the work of the ECM Project.

  7. Progress of the Photovoltaic Technology Incubator Project Towards an Enhanced U.S. Manufacturing Base: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ullal, H.; Mitchell, R.; Keyes, B.; VanSant, K.; von Roedern, B.; Symko-Davies, M.; Kane, V.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we report on the major accomplishments of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP) Photovoltaic (PV) Technology Incubator project. The Incubator project facilitates a company's transition from developing a solar cell or PV module prototype to pilot- and large-scale U.S. manufacturing. The project targets small businesses that have demonstrated proof-of-concept devices or processes in the laboratory. Their success supports U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu's SunShot Initiative, which seeks to achieve PV technologies that are cost-competitive without subsidies at large scale with fossil-based energy sources by the end of this decade. The Incubator Project has enhanced U.S. PV manufacturing capacity and created more than 1200 clean energy jobs, resulting in an increase in American economic competitiveness. The investment raised to date by these PV Incubator companies as a result of DOE's $ 59 million investment totals nearly $ 1.3 billion.

  8. Technology optimization techniques for multicomponent optical band-pass filter manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Yuri P.; Gryaznov, Georgiy M.; Rodionov, Andrey Y.; Obrezkov, Andrey V.; Medvedev, Roman V.; Chivanov, Alexey N.

    2016-04-01

    Narrowband optical devices (like IR-sensing devices, celestial navigation systems, solar-blind UV-systems and many others) are one of the most fast-growing areas in optical manufacturing. However, signal strength in this type of applications is quite low and performance of devices depends on attenuation level of wavelengths out of operating range. Modern detectors (photodiodes, matrix detectors, photomultiplier tubes and others) usually do not have required selectivity or have higher sensitivity to background spectrum at worst. Manufacturing of a single component band-pass filter with high attenuation level of wavelength is resource-intensive task. Sometimes it's not possible to find solution for this problem using existing technologies. Different types of filters have technology variations of transmittance profile shape due to various production factors. At the same time there are multiple tasks with strict requirements for background spectrum attenuation in narrowband optical devices. For example, in solar-blind UV-system wavelengths above 290-300 nm must be attenuated by 180dB. In this paper techniques of multi-component optical band-pass filters assembly from multiple single elements with technology variations of transmittance profile shape for optimal signal-tonoise ratio (SNR) were proposed. Relationships between signal-to-noise ratio and different characteristics of transmittance profile shape were shown. Obtained practical results were in rather good agreement with our calculations.

  9. Achieving Continuous Manufacturing: Technologies and Approaches for Synthesis, Workup, and Isolation of Drug Substance May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Braatz, Richard D; Hodnett, Benjamin K; Jensen, Klavs F; Johnson, Martin D; Sharratt, Paul; Sherlock, Jon-Paul; Florence, Alastair J

    2015-03-01

    This whitepaper highlights current challenges and opportunities associated with continuous synthesis, workup, and crystallization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (drug substances). We describe the technologies and requirements at each stage and emphasize the different considerations for developing continuous processes compared with batch. In addition to the specific sequence of operations required to deliver the necessary chemical and physical transformations for continuous drug substance manufacture, consideration is also given to how adoption of continuous technologies may impact different manufacturing stages in development from discovery, process development, through scale-up and into full scale production. The impact of continuous manufacture on drug substance quality and the associated challenges for control and for process safety are also emphasized. In addition to the technology and operational considerations necessary for the adoption of continuous manufacturing (CM), this whitepaper also addresses the cultural, as well as skills and training, challenges that will need to be met by support from organizations in order to accommodate the new work flows. Specific action items for industry leaders are. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Unexpected δ-Phase Formation in Additive-Manufactured Ni-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idell, Y.; Levine, L. E.; Allen, A. J.; Zhang, F.; Campbell, C. E.; Olson, G. B.; Gong, J.; Snyder, D. R.; Deutchman, H. Z.

    2016-03-01

    An as-built and solutionized Ni-based superalloy built by additive manufacturing through a direct metal laser sintering technique is characterized to understand the microstructural differences as compared to the as-wrought alloy. Initially, each layer undergoes rapid solidification as it is melted by the laser; however, as the part is built, the underlying layers experience a variety of heating and cooling cycles that produce significant microsegregation of niobium which allows for the formation of the deleterious δ-phase. The as-built microstructure was characterized through Vickers hardness, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray microLaue diffraction. The isothermal formation and growth of the δ-phase were characterized using synchrotron-based in situ small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering experiments. These experimental results are compared with multicomponent diffusion simulations that predict the phase fraction and composition. The high residual stresses and unexpected formation of the δ-phase will require further annealing treatments to be designed so as to remove these deficiencies and obtain an optimized microstructure.

  11. Practical Education Support to Foster Engineers at Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center in Muroran Institute of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Toshiharu; Hanajima, Naohiko; Shimizu, Kazumichi; Satoh, Kohki

    To foster engineers with creative power, Muroran Institute of Technology established Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center (MEDeC) that concentrates on Monozukuri. MEDeC consists of three project groups : i) Education Support Group provides educational support for practical training classes on and off campus and PDCA (plan-do-check-action) -conscious engineering design education related to Monozukuri ; ii) Fundamental Manufacturing Research Group carries out nurture research into fundamental and innovative technology of machining and manufacturing, and iii) Regional Cooperation Group coordinates the activities in cooperation with bureau, schools and industries in and around Muroran City. MEDeC has a fully integrated collection of machine tools and hand tools for manufacturing, an atelier, a tatara workplace, implements for measurement and related equipment designed for practically teaching state-of-the-practice manufacturing methods.

  12. Application of virtual surgical planning with computer assisted design and manufacturing technology to cranio-maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linping; Patel, Pravin K; Cohen, Mimis

    2012-07-01

    Computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology today is the standard in manufacturing industry. The application of the CAD/CAM technology, together with the emerging 3D medical images based virtual surgical planning (VSP) technology, to craniomaxillofacial reconstruction has been gaining increasing attention to reconstructive surgeons. This article illustrates the components, system and clinical management of the VSP and CAD/CAM technology including: data acquisition, virtual surgical and treatment planning, individual implant design and fabrication, and outcome assessment. It focuses primarily on the technical aspects of the VSP and CAD/CAM system to improve the predictability of the planning and outcome.

  13. Application of Virtual Surgical Planning with Computer Assisted Design and Manufacturing Technology to Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pravin K.; Cohen, Mimis

    2012-01-01

    Computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology today is the standard in manufacturing industry. The application of the CAD/CAM technology, together with the emerging 3D medical images based virtual surgical planning (VSP) technology, to craniomaxillofacial reconstruction has been gaining increasing attention to reconstructive surgeons. This article illustrates the components, system and clinical management of the VSP and CAD/CAM technology including: data acquisition, virtual surgical and treatment planning, individual implant design and fabrication, and outcome assessment. It focuses primarily on the technical aspects of the VSP and CAD/CAM system to improve the predictability of the planning and outcome. PMID:22872832

  14. 3D model of filler melting with micro-beam plasma arc based on additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weilin; Yang, Tao; Yang, Ruixin

    2017-07-01

    Additive manufacturing technology is a systematic process based on discrete-accumulation principle, which is derived by the dimension of parts. Aiming at the dimension mathematical model and slicing problems in additive manufacturing process, the constitutive relations between micro-beam plasma welding parameters and the dimension of part were investigated. The slicing algorithm and slicing were also studied based on the dimension characteristics. By using the direct slicing algorithm according to the geometric characteristics of model, a hollow thin-wall spherical part was fabricated by 3D additive manufacturing technology using micro-beam plasma.

  15. Manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Hand, C.

    1981-04-01

    This report covers manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable. The scope of this effort, as reported herein, includes the following tasks and achievements: (a) Cable process optimization -- (1) Produce trial runs of confirmatory; (2) Complete lay length samples (two lays); (3) Perform optical and mechanical tests on trial confirmatory samples; and (4) Produce samples and evaluate polyurethanes (three types). (b) Use of facilities -- (1) Operate high speed strander, Kevlar braider, and extruder at production speeds. (c) Secondary performance -- (1) Evaluate low temperature performance.

  16. Effect of technological heredity on the fatigue strength in the manufacture of gas turbine engine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, G. V.; Pronichev, N. D.; Nekhoroshev, M. V.

    2017-02-01

    In the study, the task of researching of the finishing-strengthening machining stage of gas turbine engine compressor blades manufactured of titanium and nickel-chromium alloys in order to extend their service life was solved. The application of electrochemical pulse machining as a technological heredity barrier was substantiated since this method allows a considerable decrease of the residual stress and surface layer work hardening. To ensure the extended service life of blades, the conditions for the subsequent finishing-strengthening machining were identified.

  17. Basalt fiber manufacturing technology and the possibility of its use in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaeva, E.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Nikitin, V.; Cherepennikov, Yu; Lysakov, A.

    2015-11-01

    The article touches upon the technology of basalt fiber manufacturing and prospects of its use in dental practice. Two kinds of construction using basalt fiber have been proposed. The first one is a splinting construction for mobile teeth and the second one is the reinforced base for removable plate-denture. The work presents the results of the investigation of physical and mechanical properties of the constructions based on basalt fiber. It also describes the aspects of biomechanical modeling of such constructions in the ANSYS software package. The results of the investigation have proved that applying constructions using basalt fiber is highly promising for prosthetic dentistry practice.

  18. Manufacturing methods and technology for digital fault insulation of printed circuit boards, appendix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    This report describes the manufacturing technology and test system that will enable detection, identification, and location of digital faults in the advanced missile electronic system that will be used in the 1980's. Emphasis is placed on the fault diagnosis of large printed circuit boards containing complex hybrid digital microelectronic circuits. The Hughes-enhanced, state of the art, DTS-70 automatic test system installed at Redstone Arsenal as a result of this contract provides the capability to isolate digital faults in such circuit boards to the component level with a test comprehensiveness of 90% or better.

  19. Manufacturing technology development of the Powergrid{trademark} linear focus photovoltaic concentrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminar, N.; Alexander, T.; Amaya, J.; Bottenberg, W.; Carrie, P.; Chen, K.; Gilbert, D.; Guzman, P.; Hobden, P.; Ross, J.; Sahagian, J.; Rodrigues, D.; Zimmermann, J.

    1999-03-01

    This article reports manufacturing technology improvements developed for the production of the PVI Powergrid{trademark} linear focus photovoltaic concentrator as part of a PVMaT project. The improvements include the development of an advanced, acrylic plastic extrusion system for Fresnel lenses, an automated receiver station, an EVA encapsulation process, an improved collector fabrication method and a lower cost panel frame. These project improvements have prepared PVI for entrance into large-scale production of PV power generation systems. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for building 878, manufacturing science and technology, organization 14100.

    SciTech Connect

    Klossner, Kristin Ann

    2004-05-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a preliminary assessment carried out for activities and operations at Sandia National Laboratories Building 878, Manufacturing Science and Technology, Organization 14100. The goal of this assessment is to evaluate processes being carried out within the building to determine ways to reduce waste generation and resource use. The ultimate purpose of this assessment is to analyze and prioritize processes within Building 878 for more in-depth assessments and to identify projects that can be implemented immediately.

  1. SAW filter manufacture and piezoelectric materials evaluation based on printed electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-chen; Li, Kun; Xuan, Xiu-wei; Cao, Yang; Teng, Jian-fu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the silver nanoparticle ink and ink-jet printing technology are used to manufacture the surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The characteristics of three common substrate piezoelectric materials of ST-quartz, Y36°-LiTaO3 and Y128°-LiNbO3 are evaluated. The experimental results show that Y128°-LiNbO3 matches the ink much better than others. The printed SAW filter with Y128°-LiNbO3 as piezoelectric substrate is realized, and its center frequency and bandwidth are 18.4 MHz and 500 kHz, respectively.

  2. Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Annual subcontract report, 1 January 1996--31 December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes Solarex`s accomplishments during this phase of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) program. During this reporting period, Solarex researchers converted 79% of production casting stations to increase ingot size and operated them at equivalent yields and cell efficiencies; doubled the casting capacity at 20% the cost of buying new equipment to achieve the same capacity increase; operated the wire saws in a production mode with higher yields and lower costs than achieved on the ID saws; purchased additional wire saws; developed and qualified a new wire-guide coating material that doubles the wire-guide lifetime and produces significantly less scatter in wafer thickness; ran an Al paste back-surface-field process on 25% of all cells in manufacturing; completed environmental qualification of modules using cells produced by an all-print metallization process; qualified a vendor-supplied Tedlar/ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) laminate to replace the combination of separate sheets of EVA and Tedlar backsheet; substituted RTV adhesive for the 3M Very High Bond tape after several field problems with the tape; demonstrated the operation of a prototype unit to trim/lead attach/test modules; demonstrated the use of light soldering for solar cells; demonstrated the operation of a wafer pull-down system for cassetting wet wafers; and presented three PVMaT-related papers at the 25th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference.

  3. Simulation assisted pod of a phased array ultrasonic inspection in manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, N.; Feuillard, V.; Jenson, F.; Willaume, P.

    2012-05-01

    The concept of Probability of Detection (POD) is generally used to quantitatively assess performances and reliability of NDT operations for in-service operations related to damage tolerant designs. Application of the POD approach as a metric for manufacturing NDT assessment would also be relevant but the very expensive cost of such campaigns generally prevents us from doing so. However the increase in NDT simulation capability and maturity opens the field for POD demonstrations for manufacturing NDT with the help of simulation. This paper presents the example of an automated phased array ultrasonic testing procedure of Electron Beam Welding on rotative parts, as part of the PICASSO European project. POD is calculated by using the uncertainty propagation approach in CIVA. The peculiarity of uncertainties in automated NDT compared to in-service manual operations is discussed and raises questions on appropriate statistics to be used for this kind of data. Alternative estimation techniques like Box-Cox transform or quantile regression are proposed and evaluated.

  4. Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquids at Former Manufactured Gas Plants: Challenges to Modeling and Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Birak, P.S.; Miller, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    The remediation of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in porous media continues to be one of the most challenging problems facing environmental scientists and engineers. Of all the environmentally relevant DNAPLs, tars in the subsurface at former manufactured gas plants (FMGP’s) pose one of the biggest challenges due to their complex chemical composition and tendency to alter wettability. To further our understanding of these complex materials, we consulted historic documentation to evaluate the impact of gas manufacturing on the composition and physicochemical nature of the resulting tars. In the recent literature, most work to date has been focused in a relatively narrow portion of the expected range of tar materials, which has yielded a bias toward samples of relatively low viscosity and density. In this work, we consider the dissolution and movement of tars in the subsurface, models used to predict these phenomena, and approaches used for remediation. We also explore the open issues and detail important gaps in our fundamental understanding of these extraordinarily complex systems that must be resolved to reach a mature level of understanding. PMID:19176266

  5. Process Control Strategies for Dual-Phase Steel Manufacturing Using ANN and ANFIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafaeenezhad, H.; Ghanei, S.; Seyedein, S. H.; Beygi, H.; Mazinani, M.

    2014-11-01

    In this research, a comprehensive soft computational approach is presented for the analysis of the influencing parameters on manufacturing of dual-phase steels. A set of experimental data have been gathered to obtain the initial database used for the training and testing of both artificial neural networks (ANN) and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The parameters used in the strategy were intercritical annealing temperature, carbon content, and holding time which gives off martensite percentage as an output. A fraction of the data set was chosen to train both ANN and ANFIS, and the rest was put into practice to authenticate the act of the trained networks while seeing unseen data. To compare the obtained results, coefficient of determination and root mean squared error indexes were chosen. Using artificial intelligence methods, it is not necessary to consider and establish a preliminary mathematical model and formulate its affecting parameters on its definition. In conclusion, the martensite percentages corresponding to the manufacturing parameters can be determined prior to a production using these controlling algorithms. Although the results acquired from both ANN and ANFIS are very encouraging, the proposed ANFIS has enhanced performance over the ANN and takes better effect on cost-reduction profit.

  6. Technology Refresh Program Launches Phase II | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Technology Refresh Program (TRP) is an NCI-funded initiative designed to promote efficient spending on computer equipment by providing staff members with access to the latest technology to meet their computing needs, said Kyle Miller, IT coordinator, Computer and Statistical Services (C&SS), NCI at Frederick.

  7. Technology Refresh Program Launches Phase II | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Technology Refresh Program (TRP) is an NCI-funded initiative designed to promote efficient spending on computer equipment by providing staff members with access to the latest technology to meet their computing needs, said Kyle Miller, IT coordinator, Computer and Statistical Services (C&SS), NCI at Frederick.

  8. Additive Biotech-Chances, challenges, and recent applications of additive manufacturing technologies in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Krujatz, Felix; Lode, Anja; Seidel, Julia; Bley, Thomas; Gelinsky, Michael; Steingroewer, Juliane

    2017-09-07

    The diversity and complexity of biotechnological applications are constantly increasing, with ever expanding ranges of production hosts, cultivation conditions and measurement tasks. Consequently, many analytical and cultivation systems for biotechnology and bioprocess engineering, such as microfluidic devices or bioreactors, are tailor-made to precisely satisfy the requirements of specific measurements or cultivation tasks. Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer the possibility of fabricating tailor-made 3D laboratory equipment directly from CAD designs with previously inaccessible levels of freedom in terms of structural complexity. This review discusses the historical background of these technologies, their most promising current implementations and the associated workflows, fabrication processes and material specifications, together with some of the major challenges associated with using AM in biotechnology/bioprocess engineering. To illustrate the great potential of AM, selected examples in microfluidic devices, 3D-bioprinting/biofabrication and bioprocess engineering are highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Additive Manufacturing and High-Performance Computing: a Disruptive Latent Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    This presentation will discuss the relationship between recent advances in Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology, High-Performance Computing (HPC) simulation and design capabilities, and related advances in Uncertainty Quantification (UQ), and then examines their impacts upon national and international security. The presentation surveys how AM accelerates the fabrication process, while HPC combined with UQ provides a fast track for the engineering design cycle. The combination of AM and HPC/UQ almost eliminates the engineering design and prototype iterative cycle, thereby dramatically reducing cost of production and time-to-market. These methods thereby present significant benefits for US national interests, both civilian and military, in an age of austerity. Finally, considering cyber security issues and the advent of the ``cloud,'' these disruptive, currently latent technologies may well enable proliferation and so challenge both nuclear and non-nuclear aspects of international security.

  10. TOWARD LOW-COST FABRICATION OF MICROCHANNEL PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES - COST MODELING FOR MANUFACTURING DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, Steven D.; King, Dale A.; Paul, Brian

    2010-11-07

    Chemical and energy conversion systems based on microchannel process technology (MPT) demonstrate high performance in applications in which rates are controlled by diffusive heat and mass transfer flux. The performance of MPT-based heat exchangers, absorbers/desorbers and chemical reactors all benefit from process intensification and have been used in a variety of mobile energy conversion systems including fuel reformers/converters, heat pumps and waste heat scavenging technologies. The service environments typical of MPTs often require the devices to be fabricated from metals such as aluminum, titanium, stainless steel or high temperature super alloys. Flow channels and associated critical dimensions in these devices can be as small as 50 um, but generally range from 100 to 1000 um in width and height with characteristic flow channel lengths normally in the mm to cm range. High surface area architectures (e.g. wicks or textured surfaces) are often included in the flow channels as well for enhanced mass transfer and/or catalytic functionality. Fabrication of MPT devices has historically been performed using a stacked-shim approach in which individual metal sheets are first patterned with micro- and meso-scale flow channels and subsequently bonded in a stack to create an array of miniaturized, parallel flow paths. Typical proof-of-concept fabrication efforts have utilized photo chemical machining (PCM) for shim patterning and diffusion bonding or diffusion brazing for joining of shim stacks. While flexible and capable of supporting technology demonstration, however, these techniques can be expensive at prototyping volumes. The high fabrication cost associated with these prototyping processes has contributed to a perception that MPT technology is expensive and will be relegated to a small application space. Recent work at the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute (MBI) has focused on exploring the cost structure of high volume manufacturing of MPT devices in effort to

  11. Tailorable Surface Morphology of 3D Scaffolds by Combining Additive Manufacturing with Thermally Induced Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; de Wijn, Joost R; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    The functionalization of biomaterials substrates used for cell culture is gearing towards an increasing control over cell activity. Although a number of biomaterials have been successfully modified by different strategies to display tailored physical and chemical surface properties, it is still challenging to step from 2D substrates to 3D scaffolds with instructive surface properties for cell culture and tissue regeneration. In this study, additive manufacturing and thermally induced phase separation are combined to create 3D scaffolds with tunable surface morphology from polymer gels. Surface features vary depending on the gel concentration, the exchanging temperature, and the nonsolvent used. When preosteoblasts (MC-3T3 cells) are cultured on these scaffolds, a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity is measured for submicron surface topography, suggesting a potential role on early cell differentiation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  13. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jolene Mei-Jun; Chua, Chee-Kai; Chou, Siaw-Meng; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-03-13

    Advanced tissue engineering (TE) technology based on additive manufacturing (AM) can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D) environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF). From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis) of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II) was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining.

  14. Development of a direct feed fused deposition modelling technology for multi-material manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zuoxin; Salaoru, Iulia; Morris, Peter; Gibbons, Gregory J.

    2016-10-01

    Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) is one of the most widely used Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies to fabricate a three-dimensional (3D) object via melt processing of a thermoplastic filament. However, it is limited in the variety of materials that can be fed and mixed during the process. In this study, a concept of direct feed FDM technology was presented, which allowed co-feeding of multiple materials in any available form. Different materials were mixed at predetermined ratios and deposited together to form a 3D object with variable properties and functionalities that meet specific requirements. To demonstrate the capability of this AM system, heat-sensitive polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and its additives were processed. A geometry with various features was successfully manufactured with dimensions closely matching those of the design specification. The FDM processed PVOH showed insignificant thermal decomposition as it retained its original colour, flexibility, and water solubility. During the process, a fluorescent whitening agent was successfully incorporated into the polymer melt. Therefore, the printed sample exhibited a strong fluorescence effect from the UV-visible and fluorimeter results.

  15. Initiating long-term modernization programs in low-technology manufacturing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.R.; Paul, B.K.; Doherty, T.J.; Billo, R.E.

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, a planning approach is discussed for initiating and expediting modernization efforts in manufacturing environments. The approach consists of six major steps. First, staff employees from a variety of functional organizations are involved in modernization planning activities through the formation of site modernization teams used to organize and facilitate modernization planning activities. Second, initial planning exercises are expedited by identifying high-priority areas for improvement through a functional assessment. Third, data acquired from the initial assessment described above are used as input to a strategic planning workshop aimed at building managerial support for modernization plans and integrating the plant's strategic objectives with its operational modernization plan. Fourth, the site modernization team receives training in the specific modernization technologies to aid them in the selection, design, implementation and maintenance of the appropriate modernization technology. Fifth, as a means for initiating modernization efforts, the planning approach produces preliminary versions of action-oriented implementation plans thus enabling improvement actions to begin more quickly. Sixth, an overall cost-benefit analysis is done to assess the feasibility of modernization projects. Finally, by meeting the above objectives, the approach provides a foundation for future modernization efforts. Results from implementing this methodology in six manufacturing environments are discussed along with a review of benefits of the approach. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Cartilage Tissue Engineering with Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Fabricated by Indirect Additive Manufacturing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jolene Mei-Jun; Chua, Chee-Kai; Chou, Siaw-Meng; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Advanced tissue engineering (TE) technology based on additive manufacturing (AM) can fabricate scaffolds with a three-dimensional (3D) environment suitable for cartilage regeneration. Specifically, AM technology may allow the incorporation of complex architectural features. The present study involves the fabrication of 3D TE scaffolds by an indirect AM approach using silk fibroin (SF). From scanning electron microscopic observations, the presence of micro-pores and interconnected channels within the scaffold could be verified, resulting in a TE scaffold with both micro- and macro-structural features. The intrinsic properties, such as the chemical structure and thermal characteristics of SF, were preserved after the indirect AM manufacturing process. In vitro cell culture within the SF scaffold using porcine articular chondrocytes showed a steady increase in cell numbers up to Day 14. The specific production (per cell basis) of the cartilage-specific extracellular matrix component (collagen Type II) was enhanced with culture time up to 12 weeks, indicating the re-differentiation of chondrocytes within the scaffold. Subcutaneous implantation of the scaffold-chondrocyte constructs in nude mice also confirmed the formation of ectopic cartilage by histological examination and immunostaining. PMID:28788558

  17. Continuous roll-to-roll a-Si photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Semiannual technical progress report, 1 April 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work performed by ECD to advance its roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic manufacturing technologies; to reduce the module production costs; to increase the stabilized module performance; and to expand the commercial capacity utilizing ECD technology. The 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD`s earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1/W{sub p}. Major efforts during Phase I are (1) the optimization of the high-performance back-reflector system, (2) the optimization of a-Si-Ge narrow band-gap solar cell, and (3) the optimization of the stable efficiency of the module. The goal is to achieve a stable 8% efficient 0.3-m {times} 1.2-m (1-ft {times} 4-ft) module. Also, the efforts include work on a proprietary, high-deposition-rate, microwave plasma, CVD manufacturing technology; and on the investigation of material cost reduction.

  18. Future CIS Manufacturing Technology Development: Final Report, 8 July 1998--17 October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T. J.; Crisalle, O. D.; Li, S. S.; Holloway, P. H.

    2003-06-01

    The University of Florida served as the basis for educating 12 graduate students in the area of photovoltaics engineering and research with a focus on thin-film CIS manufacturing technologies. A critical assessment of the thermodynamic data and of the phase diagrams for the Cu-Se and In-Se binary systems were carried out. We investigated the use of two novel precursor structures that used stacked In-Se and Cu-Se binary layers instead of conventional elemental layers, followed by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to produce CIS films. We investigated the evolution of electrical and microstructural properties of sputter-deposited ZnO:Al thin films. An assessment of the thermodynamics of the pseudobinary Cu2Se-Ga2Se3 system was done by using available experimental data, as well as an empirical method for estimating interactions in semiconductor solid solutions. Optimization studies were conducted to characterize the RTP of binary bilayer precursors for CIS synthesis using a newly acquired AG Associates Heatpulse furnace. Progress was made on the calculation of the 500C isothermal section of the phase diagram of the ternary Cu-In-Se system. Pursuit of developing alternative buffer layers for Cd-free CIS-based solar cells using a chemical-bath deposition (CBD) process has resulted in specific recipes for deposition. A rigorous model has been derived to predict the metal mass fluxes produced by conical thermal effusion sources. A two-dimensional model of the heat transfer was developed to model the substrate temperature distribution in the UF PMEE Reactor that features a rotating platen/substrates and effusion sources. We have grown and characterized polycrystalline CIS epitaxial films on single-crystal GaAs substrates under conditions that enhance the influence of surface effects on the resulting films and their properties. Progress was made on the study of CIS and CGS single-crystal growth, along with accompanying morphological and compositional characterizations. We have

  19. Generalized phase shifting interferometry based on Lissajous calibration technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fengwei; Wu, Yongqian; Wu, Fan; Song, Weihong

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility and limitation of directly using the Lissajous figure and ellipse fitting technology to correct the phase extraction error in generalized data reduction algorithm (GDRA) for phase extraction of randomly phase-shifted interferograms are analyzed and discussed. By combining Lissajous calibration technology, which represents the transformative process of Lissajous ellipse to circle (ETC), with advanced iterative algorithm (AIA) we propose a novel generalized phase shifting algorithm (GPSA), and here it is abbreviated as ETCI method. The phase distribution and phase shifts that extracted from randomly phase shifted interferograms by use of ETCI are more accurate and the whole process is far faster than AIA. Additionally, proposed method is less sensitive to non-uniform background intensity and modulation amplitude. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate the performance of ETCI, and some influential factors are elaborated. The experimental results further indicate proposed method is suitable for truly random phase shifted interferograms.

  20. Achieving continuous manufacturing: technologies and approaches for synthesis, workup, and isolation of drug substance. May 20-21, 2014 Continuous Manufacturing Symposium.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Braatz, Richard D; Hodnett, Benjamin K; Jensen, Klavs F; Johnson, Martin D; Sharratt, Paul; Sherlock, Jon-Paul; Florence, Alastair J

    2015-03-01

    This whitepaper highlights current challenges and opportunities associated with continuous synthesis, workup, and crystallization of active pharmaceutical ingredients (drug substances). We describe the technologies and requirements at each stage and emphasize the different considerations for developing continuous processes compared with batch. In addition to the specific sequence of operations required to deliver the necessary chemical and physical transformations for continuous drug substance manufacture, consideration is also given to how adoption of continuous technologies may impact different manufacturing stages in development from discovery, process development, through scale-up and into full scale production. The impact of continuous manufacture on drug substance quality and the associated challenges for control and for process safety are also emphasized. In addition to the technology and operational considerations necessary for the adoption of continuous manufacturing (CM), this whitepaper also addresses the cultural, as well as skills and training, challenges that will need to be met by support from organizations in order to accommodate the new work flows. Specific action items for industry leaders are: Develop flow chemistry toolboxes, exploiting the advantages of flow processing and including highly selective chemistries that allow use of simple and effective continuous workup technologies. Availability of modular or plug and play type equipment especially for workup to assist in straightforward deployment in the laboratory. As with learning from other industries, standardization is highly desirable and will require cooperation across industry and academia to develop and implement. Implement and exploit process analytical technologies (PAT) for real-time dynamic control of continuous processes. Develop modeling and simulation techniques to support continuous process development and control. Progress is required in multiphase systems such as

  1. Air Vehicle Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0020: Prediction of Manufacturing Tolerances for Laminar Flow, Task 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TR-2007-3086 AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0020: Prediction of Manufacturing Tolerances for...NUMBER F33615-00-D-3054-0020 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AIR VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0020

  2. Preliminary definition and characterization of a solar industrial process heat technology and manufacturing plant for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Prythero, T.; Meyer, R. T.

    1980-09-01

    A solar industrial process heat technology and an associated solar systems manufacturing plant for the year 2000 has been projected, defined, and qualitatively characterized. The technology has been defined for process heat applications requiring temperatures of 300/sup 0/C or lower, with emphasis on the 150/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C range. The selected solar collector technology is a parabolic trough collector of the line-focusing class. The design, structure, and material components are based upon existing and anticipated future technological developments in the solar industry. The solar system to be manufactured and assembled within a dedicated manufacturing plant is projected to consist of the collector and the major collector components, including reflector, absorber, parabolic trough structure, support stand, tracking drive mechanism, sun-sensing device and control system, couplings, etc. Major manufacturing processes to be introduced into the year 2000 plant operations are glassmaking, silvering, electroplating and plastic-forming. These operations will generate significant environmental residuals not encountered in present-day solar manufacturing plants. Important residuals include chemical vapors, acids, toxic elements (e.g. arsenic), metallic and chemical sludges, fumes from plastics, etc. The location, design, and operations of these sophisticated solar manufacturing plants will have to provide for the management of the environmental residuals.

  3. Isotope Separation and Advanced Manufacturing Technology. ISAM semiannual report, Volume 3, Number 1, October 1993--March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.; Kan, T.

    1994-10-01

    This is the fourth issue of a semiannual report for the Isotope Separation and Advanced Materials Manufacturing (ISAM) Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Primary objectives include: (I) the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (UAVLIS) process, which is being developed and prepared for deployment as an advanced uranium enrichment capability; (II) Advanced manufacturing technologies, which include industrial laser and E-beam material processing and new manufacturing technologies for uranium, plutonium, and other strategically important materials in support of DOE and other national applications. This report features progress in the ISAM Program from October 1993 through March 1994. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Technology-design-manufacturing co-optimization for advanced mobile SoCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Da; Gan, Chock; Chidambaram, P. R.; Nallapadi, Giri; Zhu, John; Song, S. C.; Xu, Jeff; Yeap, Geoffrey

    2014-03-01

    How to maintain the Moore's Law scaling beyond the 193 immersion resolution limit is the key question semiconductor industry needs to answer in the near future. Process complexity will undoubtfully increase for 14nm node and beyond, which brings both challenges and opportunities for technology development. A vertically integrated design-technologymanufacturing co-optimization flow is desired to better address the complicated issues new process changes bring. In recent years smart mobile wireless devices have been the fastest growing consumer electronics market. Advanced mobile devices such as smartphones are complex systems with the overriding objective of providing the best userexperience value by harnessing all the technology innovations. Most critical system drivers are better system performance/power efficiency, cost effectiveness, and smaller form factors, which, in turns, drive the need of system design and solution with More-than-Moore innovations. Mobile system-on-chips (SoCs) has become the leading driver for semiconductor technology definition and manufacturing. Here we highlight how the co-optimization strategy influenced architecture, device/circuit, process technology and package, in the face of growing process cost/complexity and variability as well as design rule restrictions.

  5. Manufacturing Systems. Grades 9-10. Course #8115 (Semester). Technology Education Course Guide. Industrial Arts/Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The course materials included in this guide are intended to introduce students to the manufacturing industry and its relationships with society, individuals, and the environment. The following topics are covered in the nine learning modules: manufacturing and society and manufacturing systems; manufacturing materials and processes (types of…

  6. Optimization on manufacturing and testing technology for rectangle aperture off-axis aspheric mirror fine grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Guo, Peiji; Wang, Dongdong

    2016-10-01

    High precision aspheric surface can be obtained conveniently by using single point diamond turning technology, liquidmagnetic polishing technology and ion beam polishing technology, but the costs of manufacturing is too enormous to be widely used. In fact, in the field of optical processing, the most commonly used technical solution is still making a best fit sphere firstly compared with aspheric equation, and then remove the material on the glass to correct the error between aspheric and best fit sphere by precision grinding and precision polishing. The resolving of the best-fit sphere and the material removal, however, is a very important problem during the fabrications. The two dimensional maps of surface error between the best fit sphere and the corresponding aspheric surface shows W shaped which has the maximum removal at the center and the edge of the workpeace and gradually reduces to zero at the 70.7 percent of the diameter. In the process of deterministic optical manufacturing, the edge effect will arise because of the change of machining conditions when polishing tool locates in edge area, which will lower the surface accuracy of workpiece and debase machining efficiency. W shaped error distribution and the edge effect will make it difficult to remove the error on the edge of the workpiece. Aiming at the situation, an algorithm available for control of edge effect is proposed. Considering the requirement of minimum material removal and the control of edge effect, the radius of the anti-edge effect sphere is calculated by programming. The advantage of the algorithm is shown by the comparison of results derived from new algorithm and empirical equation. At the same time, the application in the off-axis asphere fabrications also proves the correctness of the algorithm. This algorithm is very helpful for the theory and practice of the fabrications of off-axis asphere.

  7. Broad specification fuels technology program, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Jeroszko, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted to assess the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design concepts. Emphasis was placed on establishing the viability of design modifications to current combustor concepts and the use of advanced technology concepts to facilitate operation on Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel while meeting exhaust emissions and performance specifications and maintaining acceptable durability. Three different combustor concepts, representative of progressively more aggressive technology levels, were evaluated. When operated on ERBS rather than Jet A fuel, a single stage combustor typical of that in the most recent versions of the JT9D-7 engine was found to produce excess carbon monoxide emissions at idle and elevated liner temperatures at high power levels that were projected to reduced liner life by 13 percent. The introduction of improved component technology, such as refined fuel injectors and advanced liner cooling concepts were shown to have the potential of enhancing the fuel flexibility of the single stage combustor.

  8. Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

    1995-02-26

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Silicon-film{trademark} photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 15 January 1992--15 November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bottenberg, W.R.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Lampo, S.; Mulligan, W.P.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes work under a subcontract to upgrade AstroPower, Inc.`s facility to produce 1.22-m{sup 2} Silicon-Film{trademark} PV modules with an output of 170 W{sub p}. The focus for the first year of the PVMaT Phase 2A project is to establish the baseline process capability and optimize the performance of the present machine. This first year`s activities accelerated the advance of Silicon-Film{trademark} manufacturing technology in several ways. First, the project led directly to plans to make an early introduction of a large solar cell product. The successful fabrication of 646-cm{sup 2} wafers and solar cells paved the way for dramatically increasing the power output per solar cell. Second was the establishment of a basis for the design and construction of a 2.4-MW/yr wafer machine. Another important contribution was the determination of the importance of H{sup +} implantation processes for polycrystalline silicon technologies.

  10. Variable air temperature response of gas-phase atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls near a former manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, Mark H; Scholten, Cheryl A; Compher, Kevin

    2003-09-15

    Many investigations of gas-phase atmospheric PCB show a strong relationship between concentration and air temperature, especially near PCB sources. Comparative gas-phase atmospheric PCB trends during an annual temperature regime at two sites near a former PCB manufacturing plant and nearby PCB landfills in Anniston, AL, indicate a departure from this trend. The Mars Hill sampling site, located closest to the plant and landfills, shows an annual average sigmaPCB concentration of 27 ng m(-3) (ranging from 8.7 to 82 ng m(-3)) three times the average at Carter, 1.5 km away (9 ng m(-3), ranging from 1.1 to 39). However, total PCB and congener concentrations vary more with air temperature at Carter where PCB are evaporating from surfaces during warmer weather. The slopes of the Clausius-Clapeyron plots of 18 of the most concentrated congeners representing dichloro- through heptachlorobiphenyl homologues are significantly higher at the Carter site. While some of the atmospheric PCB at Mars Hill is derived from ground surface evaporation, the source of much of it apparently is the material buried in the landfills, which has different thermal properties than surface materials and is not in equilibrium with air temperature.

  11. Chemical Laser Phase Conjugation Technology (CLPCT).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-30

    RD-AI75 205 CHEMICL LSER PHSE CONJUGARTION TECHNOLOGY (CLPCT) (U) 1/2 TRW DEFENSE RND SPRCE SYSTEMS GROUP REDONDO BERCH CR RPPLIED TECHNOLOGY DIV R...schematic 3-25 3-10 Oscillator assembly 3-26 3-11 Oscillator spatial filter 3--27 3-12 RPCL subsystem beam train schematic (baseline configuration) 3-29 3...13 RPCL-50 amplifier 3-30 3-14 Delay line/low Fresnel number filter 3-31 3-15 Diagnostics external train 3-33 3-16 Field at X-focus (uniform field on

  12. The Impact of Numerical Control Technology and Computer Aided Manufacturing on Curriculum Development in Industrial Education and Technology. A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauch, Klaus Dieter

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of Numerical Control Technology and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (NC/CAM) in American industry on industrial education and engineering technology education. The specific purpose was to identify a data base and rationale for curriculum development in NC/CAM through a comparison of views by…

  13. Reducing the manufacturing cost of tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Raymond A.; F. Bessette, Norman

    In recent years, Westinghouse Electric Corporation has made great strides in advancing tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology towards commercialization by the year 2001. In 1993, Westinghouse initiated a program to develop a `MWe-Class' (1-3 MWe) pressurized SOFC (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power system for distributed power applications because of its (1) ultra-high efficiency (˜63% net AC/LHV CH4), (2) its compatibility with a factory packaged, minimum site work philosophy, and (3) its cost effectiveness. Since then two cost studies on this market entry product performed by consultants to the US Department of Energy have confirmed Westinghouse cost studies that fully installed costs of under $1300/kWe can be achieved in the early commercialization years for such small PSOFC/GT power systems. The paper will present the results of these cost studies in the areas of cell manufacturing cost, PSOFC generator manufacturing cost, balance-of-plant (BOP) cost, and system installation cost. In addition, cost of electricity calculations will be presented.

  14. Effect of storage and LEO cycling on manufacturing technology IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Yardney Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) 50 A-hr space weight individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells were evaluated. This consisted of investigating: the effect of storage and charge/discharge cycling on cell performance. For the storage test the cells were precharged with hydrogen, by the manufacturer, to a pressure of 14.5 psia. After undergoing activation and acceptance tests, the cells were discharged at C/10 rate (5A) to 0.1 V or less. The terminals were then shorted. The cells were shipped to NASA Lewis Research Center where they were stored at room temperature in the shorted condition for 1 year. After storage, the acceptance tests were repeated at NASA Lewis. A comparison of test results indicate no significant degradation in electrical performance due to 1 year storage. For the cycle life test the regime was a 90 minute low earth orbit at deep depths of discharge (80 and 60 percent). At the 80 percent DOD the three cells failed on the average at cycle 741. Failure for this test was defined to occur when the cell voltage degraded to 1 V prior to completion of the 35 min discharge. The DOD was reduced to 60 percent. The cycle life test was continued.

  15. Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe sub 2 solar cell modules

    SciTech Connect

    Stanbery, B.J. )

    1991-11-01

    The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large-area CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS)/Cd{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y}S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin-film solar cell modules will enable 15% median efficiencies to be achieved in high-volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x{ge}0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30-year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large-area integrated thin-film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

  16. Ultra-high-precision alignment technology for lens manufacturing used for high-end optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Sebastian; Sure, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the progress in the area of modern centration technology by using digital image processing. This work is motivated by the continuously increasing demand for high-end optics. During the last years the surface lens quality has been continuously improved. Today the image quality is more determined by the manufacturing tolerances for the mechanical interface which is responsible for decenter and tilt of the lenses respectively the subgroups. Some of the aberrations are directly linked to the decenter of the lenses, Coma for example. Hence it is necessary to realize the subgroups with tolerances below lpm. To determine the decenter of a lens an auto collimation telescope is used to image the reflex of the lens surfaces onto a detector, commonly a half covert photodiode. Rotating the lens generates a sinusoidal signal, which is evaluated by a lock-in amplifier to drive two actuators to adjust the alignment chuck. Typical internal reflections caused by stray light for example disturb the current procedure in such a way that it is impossible to get a stable alignment process. Digital image processing allows us to fix these problems with image recognition. We will demonstrate how a modified auto collimation telescope in combination with the developed software algorithms made the manufacturing process more accurate, faster and useable for a broad spectrum of lenses. It has been proofed by some thousand diverse lenses that with these new technique subgroups can be centered within 0.25μm.

  17. SETEC/Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies Program: 1999 Annual and Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of work conducted by the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies Program at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) during 1999. This work was performed by one working group: the Semiconductor Equipment Technology Center (SETEC). The group's projects included Numerical/Experimental Characterization of the Growth of Single-Crystal Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}); The Use of High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) Imaging for Certifying Critical-Dimension Reference Materials Fabricated with Silicon Micromachining; Assembly Test Chip for Flip Chip on Board; Plasma Mechanism Validation: Modeling and Experimentation; and Model-Based Reduction of Contamination in Gate-Quality Nitride Reactor. During 1999, all projects focused on meeting customer needs in a timely manner and ensuring that projects were aligned with the goals of the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors sponsored by the Semiconductor Industry Association and with Sandia's defense mission. This report also provides a short history of the Sandia/SEMATECH relationship and a brief on all projects completed during the seven years of the program.

  18. Advances in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture technology.

    PubMed

    Calamia, J R

    1994-01-01

    Although the development of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology and the benefits of increased productivity became obvious in the automobile and aerospace industries in the 1970s, investigations of this technology's application in the field of dentistry did not begin until the 1980s. Only now are we beginning to see the fruits of this work with the commercial availability of some systems; the potential for this technology seems boundless. This article reviews the recent literature with emphasis on the period from June 1992 to May 1993. This review should familiarize the reader with some of the latest developments in this technology, including a brief description of some systems currently available and the clinical and economical rationale for their acceptance into the dental mainstream. This article concentrates on a particular system, the Cerec (Siemens/Pelton and Crane, Charlotte, NC) system, for three reasons: first, this system has been available since 1985 and, as a result, has a track record of almost 7 years of data. Most of the data have just recently been released and consequently, much of this year's literature on CAD-CAM is monopolized by studies using this system. Second, this system was developed as a mobile, affordable, direct chairside CAD-CAM restorative method. As such, it is of special interest to the dentist who will offer this new technology directly to the patient, providing a one-visit restoration. Third, the author is currently engaged in research using this particular system and has a working knowledge of this system's capabilities.

  19. Passivity of the bars manufactured using current technologies: laser-sintering, casting, and milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Diana; Popescu, Sabin; Pop, Daniel; Jivanescu, Anca; Todea, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Implant overdentures are often selected as therapeutic options for the treatment of edentulous mandibles. "Passive-fit" between the mesostructures and the implants plays an important role in the longevity of the implant-prosthetic assembly in the oral cavity. "Mis-fit" can cause mechanical or biological complications. The purpose of this test was to investigate the passive adaptation of the bars manufactured through different technologies, and in this respect two bars (short and long) were fabricated by each process: laser-sintering, milling, casting. The tensions induced by tightening the connection screw between the bars and the underlying implants were recorded using strain gauges and used as measuring and comparing tool in testing the bars' "passivity". The results of the test showed that the milled bars had the best "passive-fit", followed by laser-sintered bars, while cast bars had the lowest adaptation level.

  20. A technology for the calculation and manufacture of devices for shaping a proton beam in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapov, A. V.; Endzheichak, D.; Luchin, E. I.; Mitsyn, G. V.; Molokanov, A. G.; Shipulin, K. N.

    2012-11-01

    A therapeutic proton beam for an actual irradiation procedure is shaped using customized collimator leaves made out of Cerrobend, while to make the proton-beam depth-dose distribution conformal to the target volume, so-called boluses (compensators) with sophisticated shapes are calculated and then fabricated to compensate for the heterogeneities of a patient's tissues and organs in the beam path. This article describes the main stages of testing a technology for manufacturing bolus from industrial wax which was developed at the Medico-Technical Complex (MTC) at the Dzelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (DLNP JINR), by comparing the spatial dose distributions obtained under a computer simulation of proton irradiation and the actually measured ones under the experiment.

  1. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology (PVMaT). Annual subcontract report, March 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Holley, W A

    1996-01-01

    This report describes work performed under a subcontract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology Project. The objectives of this subcontract are to (1) define the problem of yellowing/browning of EVA-based encapsulants; (2) determine probable mechanisms and the role of various parameters such as heat, UV exposure, module construction, EVA interfaces, and EVA thickness, in the browning of EVA-based encapsulants; (3) develop stabilization strategies for various module constructions to protect the encapsulant from degradative failure; (4) conduct laboratory, accelerated outdoor, and field testing of encapsulant, laminated test coupons, and full modules to demonstrate the functional adequacy of the stabilization strategies; and (5) implement these strategies. This report summarizes the accomplishments related to the above goals for the reporting period.

  2. Arcjet thruster research and technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yano, Steve E.

    1991-01-01

    The principle objective of Phase 2 was to produce an engineering model N2H4 arcjet system which met typical performance, lifetime, environmental, and interface specifications required to support a 10-year N-S stationkeeping mission for a communications spacecraft. The system includes an N2H4 arcjet thruster, power conditioning unit (PCU), and the interconnecting power cable assembly. This objective was met with the successful conclusion of an extensive system test series.

  3. Application of a risk analysis method to different technologies for producing a monoclonal antibody employed in hepatitis B vaccine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Milá, Lorely; Valdés, Rodolfo; Tamayo, Andrés; Padilla, Sigifredo; Ferro, Williams

    2012-03-01

    CB.Hep-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) is used for a recombinant Hepatitis B vaccine manufacturing, which is included in a worldwide vaccination program against Hepatitis B disease. The use of this mAb as immunoligand has been addressed into one of the most efficient steps of active pharmaceutical ingredient purification process. Regarding this, Quality Risk Management (QRM) provides an excellent framework for the risk management use in pharmaceutical manufacturing and quality decision-making applications. Consequently, this study sought applying a prospective risk analysis methodology Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) as QRM tool for analyzing different CB.Hep-1 mAb manufacturing technologies. As main conclusions FMEA was successfully used to assess risks associated with potential problems in CB.Hep-1 mAb manufacturing processes. The severity and occurrence of risks analysis evidenced that the percentage of very high severe risks ranged 31.0-38.7% of all risks and the huge majority of risks have a very low occurrence level (61.9-83.3%) in all assessed technologies. Finally, additive Risk Priority Number, was descending ordered as follow: transgenic plants (2636), ascites (2577), transgenic animals (2046) and hollow fiber bioreactors (1654), which also corroborated that in vitro technology, should be the technology of choice for CB.Hep-1 mAb manufacturing in terms of risks and mAb molecule quality. Copyright © 2011 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  5. Study of mandible reconstruction using a fibula flap with application of additive manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-June; Wu, Ching-Tsai

    2014-05-06

    This study aimed to establish surgical guiding techniques for completing mandible lesion resection and reconstruction of the mandible defect area with fibula sections in one surgery by applying additive manufacturing technology, which can reduce the surgical duration and enhance the surgical accuracy and success rate. A computer assisted mandible reconstruction planning (CAMRP) program was used to calculate the optimal cutting length and number of fibula pieces and design the fixtures for mandible cutting, registration, and arrangement of the fibula segments. The mandible cutting and registering fixtures were then generated using an additive manufacturing system. The CAMRP calculated the optimal fibula cutting length and number of segments based on the location and length of the defective portion of the mandible. The mandible cutting jig was generated according to the boundary surface of the lesion resection on the mandible STL model. The fibular cutting fixture was based on the length of each segment, and the registered fixture was used to quickly arrange the fibula pieces into the shape of the defect area. In this study, the mandibular lesion was reconstructed using registered fibular sections in one step, and the method is very easy to perform. The application of additive manufacturing technology provided customized models and the cutting fixtures and registered fixtures, which can improve the efficiency of clinical application. This study showed that the cutting fixture helped to rapidly complete lesion resection and fibula cutting, and the registered fixture enabled arrangement of the fibula pieces and allowed completion of the mandible reconstruction in a timely manner. Our method can overcome the disadvantages of traditional surgery, which requires a long and different course of treatment and is liable to cause error. With the help of optimal cutting planning by the CAMRP and the 3D printed mandible resection jig and fibula cutting fixture, this all

  6. Study of mandible reconstruction using a fibula flap with application of additive manufacturing technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to establish surgical guiding techniques for completing mandible lesion resection and reconstruction of the mandible defect area with fibula sections in one surgery by applying additive manufacturing technology, which can reduce the surgical duration and enhance the surgical accuracy and success rate. Methods A computer assisted mandible reconstruction planning (CAMRP) program was used to calculate the optimal cutting length and number of fibula pieces and design the fixtures for mandible cutting, registration, and arrangement of the fibula segments. The mandible cutting and registering fixtures were then generated using an additive manufacturing system. The CAMRP calculated the optimal fibula cutting length and number of segments based on the location and length of the defective portion of the mandible. The mandible cutting jig was generated according to the boundary surface of the lesion resection on the mandible STL model. The fibular cutting fixture was based on the length of each segment, and the registered fixture was used to quickly arrange the fibula pieces into the shape of the defect area. In this study, the mandibular lesion was reconstructed using registered fibular sections in one step, and the method is very easy to perform. Results and conclusion The application of additive manufacturing technology provided customized models and the cutting fixtures and registered fixtures, which can improve the efficiency of clinical application. This study showed that the cutting fixture helped to rapidly complete lesion resection and fibula cutting, and the registered fixture enabled arrangement of the fibula pieces and allowed completion of the mandible reconstruction in a timely manner. Our method can overcome the disadvantages of traditional surgery, which requires a long and different course of treatment and is liable to cause error. With the help of optimal cutting planning by the CAMRP and the 3D printed mandible resection jig and

  7. ISS Phase One Activities and Manufacturing in Russia, France and Italy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-10-07

    Photographs documenting International Space Station (ISS) Phase One activities at the Russian Space Agency's (RSA) Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Korolov Mission Control Center and Zvezda; and ISS and Soyuz manufacturing at RSA's Khrunichev Design Center and RSC Energiya in Moscow, Russia, the French Space Agency's (CNES) INTESPACE facility in Toulouse, France, and the Italian Space Agency's (ASI) Alenia Spazio facility in Torino, Italy. Photographs were taken by Johnson Space Center Imagery and Publications Office contractors travelling from October 7 to November 4, 1996. Includes: VIEWS FROM RSC ENERGIYA'S SPACE MUSEUM: Room with a Buran model and photographic displays (17372-374). Salyut Space Station mock-up (17376). Russian propulsion engines on display (17377-378). Russian spacecraft on display (17375, 17387-398). Graphic displays (17399-405). VIEWS FROM RSC ENERGIYA MANUFACTURING FACILITIES: Unidentified facility (17379). Mir 24 crew member Michael C. Foale, suited in a Soyuz pressure suit, ingresses the Soyuz TM-26 flight article at RSC Energiya for a fit check (17380-381). Closeups of Foale inside the Soyuz during the fit check (17382-383, 17466-467). Overhead views of RSC Energiya's Building 444 manufacturing floor where docking modules and Soyuz TM spacecraft are built (17495-498). Technicians on the Building 444 manufacturing floor assembling probe and drogue docking modules (17499-500, 17504). Technicians assembling Soyuz spacecraft (17437-439). Views of other Soyuz spacecraft (17440-441). Androgynous Peripheral Docking System (APDS) mock-up (17501-503). Closeups of a control panel, possibly for the APDS mock-up (17519-528). VIEWS FROM ZVEZDA, RSA CONTRACTOR FOR SUIT DESIGN AND SOYUZ SEAT LINERS: Mir 24 crew member Foale dons a "penguin" flight suit for a fit check (17454-456). Zvezda personnel adjust Foale's Soyuz seat and seat liner (17442). Closeup of Foale, suited in a Soyuz pressure suit, sitting on a chair (17444). Zvezda personnel strap

  8. Six phase soil heating. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Six Phase Soil Heating (SPSH) was developed to remediate soils contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. SPSH is designed to enhance the removal of contaminates from the subsurface during soil vapor extraction. The innovation combines an emerging technology, six-phase electric heating, with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation systems for difficult soil and/or contaminate applications. This document describes the technology and reports on field demonstrations conducted at Savannah River and the Hanford Reservation.

  9. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates: Final technical report, July 5, 1995--December 31, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F.

    2000-03-28

    Iowa Thin Film Technologies is completing a three-phase program that has increased throughput and decreased costs in nearly all aspects of its thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing process. The overall manufacturing costs have been reduced by 61 percent through implementation of the improvements developed under this program. Development of the ability to use a 1-mil substrate, rather than the standard 2-mil substrate, results in a 50 percent cost-saving for this material. Process development on a single-pass amorphous silicon deposition system has resulted in a 37 percent throughput improvement. A wide range of process and machine improvements have been implemented on the transparent conducting oxide deposition system. These include detailed parameter optimization of deposition temperatures, process gas flows, carrier gas flows, and web speeds. An overall process throughput improvement of 275 percent was achieved based on this work. The new alignment technique was developed for the laser scriber and printer systems, which improved registration accuracy from 100 microns to 10 microns. The new technique also reduced alignment time for these registration systems significantly. This resulted in a throughput increase of 75 percent on the scriber and 600 percent on the printer. Automated techniques were designed and implemented for the module assembly processes. These include automated busbar attachment, roll-based lamination, and automated die cutting of finished modules. These processes were previously done by hand labor. Throughput improvements ranged from 200 percent to 1200 percent, relative to hand labor rates. A wide range of potential encapsulation materials were evaluated for suitability in a roll lamination process and for cost-effectiveness. A combination material was found that has a cost that is only 10 percent of the standard EVA/Tefzel cost and is suitable for medium-lifetime applications. The 20-year lifetime applications still require the more expensive

  10. Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing, 3D Laser Scanning Technology, and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management on Ship Maintenance and Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing , 3D Laser Scanning Technology, and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management on Ship...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing , 3D Laser Scanning Technology...management during operations 4 Potential Technology 3: Additive Manufacturing (“3D Printing”) 5 • 3D design/image (e.g. from 3D LS) of final part

  11. Development of 3D modeling technology for manufacturing finned ribbons from heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashkov, A. A.; Vasil'ev, E. V.; Popov, A. Y.

    2017-06-01

    The process of shaping a workpiece by a tool using the rolling method is, from the geometric point of view, a process of interaction of two conjugate surfaces. The technology of rolling finned stainless steel ribbons is close to the technology of shaping details by cutting. However, the problems of its practical implementation in the well-known papers analyzing this issue are practically not considered. As a result of the analysis of conjugate surfaces profiling methods in relation to the problem, it was concluded that it seems urgent to develop a methodology for the formation of corrugated ribbon based on 3D modeling use. The implementation of this methodology includes the creation of solid models of the product and the tool, as well as computer simulation of their shaping processes using rolling method. So, at the first stage, a 3D model of finned ribbon was developed, which was then used to produce a profile of a rolling tool. The modeling of this profile was carried out on the basis of the proposed software package in the CAD environment. The created theoretical model of the tool profile was replaced from the technological point of view by a rectilinear profile. To carry out the analysis of the obtained results, the inverse shaping problem was solved - according to the corrected profile of the tool, real profile of the corrugated ribbon is obtained. Computer modeling of extruded volumes in the process of shaping was performed. The analysis of qualitative and quantitative parameters of the extruded volumes made it possible to give recommendations on setting the increment of the tool motion parameter. Based on the results of the studies, profile parameters of the roller are assigned for its practical implementation. The proposed methodology, based on 3D-modeling, allowed to develop a technology for manufacturing finned ribbons from heat-resistant steels by rolling with high productivity, accuracy and stability of the sizes obtained.

  12. Improved manufacturing techniques for RF and laser hardening of missile domes. Phase I. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlewicz, W.T.; Mann, I.B.; Martin, P.M.; Hays, D.D.; Graybeal, A.G.

    1982-07-01

    This report summarizes key results and accomplishements during the first year of a Manufacturing Methods and Technology project to adapt an existing Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) optical coating capability developed for high-power fusion-laser applications to the case of rf and laser hardening of plastic missile domes used by the US Army (MICOM). The primary objective of the first year's work was to demonstrate rf hardening of Hellfire and Copperhead 1.06-micron missile domes by use of transparent conductive Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coatings. The project thus involved adaptation of a coating material and process developed for flat glass components used in fusion lasers to the case of hemispherical or conical heat-sensitive plastic domes used on laser-guided missiles. Specific ITO coating property goals were an electrical sheet resistance of 10 Ohms/square, a coated-dome transmission of 80% or more at 1.06 micron wavelength (compared to 90% for a bare dome), and good adhesion. The sheet resistance goal of 10 Ohms/square was expected to result in an rf attenuation of 30 dB at the frequencies of importance.

  13. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan'' undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  14. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled ``Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan`` undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  15. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  16. Summary Report on Phase I Results from the 3D Printing in Zero G Technology Demonstration Mission, Volume I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prater, T. J.; Bean, Q. A.; Beshears, R. D.; Rolin, T. D.; Werkheiser, N. J.; Ordonez, E. A.; Ryan, R. M.; Ledbetter, F. E., III

    2016-01-01

    Human space exploration to date has been confined to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a unique opportunity for researchers to prove out the technologies that will enable humans to safely live and work in space for longer periods of time and venture beyond the Earth/Moon system. The ability to manufacture parts in-space rather than launch them from Earth represents a fundamental shift in the current risk and logistics paradigm for human spaceflight. In September 2014, NASA, in partnership with Made In Space, Inc., launched the 3D Printing in Zero-G technology demonstration mission to explore the potential of additive manufacturing for in-space applications and demonstrate the capability to manufacture parts and tools on orbit using fused deposition modeling. This Technical Publication summarizes the results of testing to date of the ground control and flight prints from the first phase of this ISS payload.

  17. An Assay System for Point-of-Care Diagnosis of Tuberculosis using Commercially Manufactured PCB Technology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Daniel; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos I; Greathead, Louise; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Pantelidis, Panagiotis; Kelleher, Peter; Morgan, Hywel; Prodromakis, Themistoklis

    2017-04-06

    Rapid advances in clinical technologies, detection sensitivity and analytical throughput have delivered a significant expansion in our knowledge of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers in many common infectious diseases, such as Tuberculosis (TB). During the last decade, a significant number of approaches to TB diagnosis have been attempted at Point-of-Care (PoC), exploiting a large variation of techniques and materials. In this work, we describe an electronics-based Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (eELISA), using a Lab-on-a-Printed Circuit Board (LoPCB) approach, for TB diagnosis based on cytokine detection. The test relies upon an electrochemical (amperometric) assay, comprising a high-precision bioinstrumentation board and amperometric sensors, produced exclusively using standard PCB manufacturing processes. Electrochemical detection uses standard Au and Ag electrodes together with a bespoke, low-power, multichannel, portable data-acquisition system. We demonstrate high-performance assay chemistry performed at microfluidic volumes on Au pads directly at the PCB surface with improved limit of detection (~10 pg/mL) over standard colorimetric ELISA methods. The assay has also been implemented in plasma, showing the utility of the system for medical applications. This work is a significant step towards the development of a low-cost, portable, high-precision diagnostic and monitoring technology, which once combined with appropriate PCB-based microfluidic networks will provide complete LoPCB platforms.

  18. Development of Friction Stir Welding Technologies for In-Space Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, William R.; Cox, Chase D.; Gibson, Brian T.; Cook, George E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Wilbur, Isaac C.; Osborne, Brandon E.

    2016-08-26

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has emerged as an attractive process for fabricating aerospace vehicles. Current FSW state-of-the-art uses large machines that are not portable. However, there is a growing need for fabrication and repair operations associated with in-space manufacturing. This need stems from a desire for prolonged missions and travel beyond low-earth orbit. To address this need, research and development is presented regarding two enabling technologies. The first is a self-adjusting and aligning (SAA) FSW tool that drastically reduces the axial force that has historically been quite large. The SAA-FSW tool is a bobbin style tool that floats freely, without any external actuators, along its vertical axis to adjust and align with the workpiece s position and orientation. Successful butt welding of 1/8 in. (3.175 mm) thick aluminum 1100 was achieved in conjunction with a drastic reduction and near elimination of the axial process force. Along with the SAA-FSW, an innovative in-process monitor technique is presented in which a magnetoelastic force rate-of-change sensor is employed. The sensor consists of a magnetized FSW tool that is used to induce a voltage in a coil surrounding the tool when changes to the process forces occur. The sensor was able to detect 1/16 in. (1.5875 mm) diameter voids. It is concluded that these technologies could be applied toward the development of a portable FSW machine for use in space.

  19. Testing Starshade Manufacturing and Deployment Through NASA's Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasdin, N. J.; Shaklan, S.; Lisman, D.; Thomson, M.; Cady, E.; Lo, A.; Macintosh, B.

    2014-01-01

    An external occulter is a satellite employing a large screen, or starshade, that flies in formation with a spaceborne telescope to provide the starlight suppression needed for detecting and characterizing exoplanets. Among the advantages of using an occulter are the broadband allowed for characterization and the removal of light before entering the observatory, greatly relaxing the requirements on the telescope and instrument. In this poster we report on the results of our two Technology Development for Exoplanet Missions (TDEM) studies. In the first we examined the manufacturability and metrology of starshade petals, successfully constructing a full size petal from flight like materials and showing through precise edge shape measurements that an occulter made with petals consistent with the measured accuracy would achieve close to 10^-10 contrast. Our second TDEM tested the deployment precision of a roughly half-scale starshade. We demonstrated the deployment of an existing deployable truss outfitted with four sub-scale petals and a custom designed central hub. We showed that the system can be deployed multiple times with a repeatable positioning accuracy of the petals better than the requirement of 1.0 mm. The combined results of these two TDEM projects has significantly advanced the readiness level of occulter technology and moved the community closer to a realizable mission.

  20. Determination of Tasks Required by Graduates of Manufacturing Engineering Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirbel, Jay H.

    1993-01-01

    A Delphi panel of 14 experts identified 37 tasks performed by/qualities needed by manufacturing engineering technologists. Most important were work ethic, performance quality, communication skills, teamwork, computer applications, manufacturing basics, materials knowledge, troubleshooting, supervision, and global issues. (SK)

  1. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates. Annual technical progress report, July 5, 1996--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, F.

    1998-08-01

    Iowa Thin Film Technologies, Inc.`s (ITF) goal is to develop the most cost effective PV manufacturing process possible. To this end the authors have chosen a roll based manufacturing process with continuous deposition and monolithic integration. Work under this program is designed to meet this goal by improving manufacturing throughput and performance of the manufactured devices. Significant progress was made during Phase 2 of this program on a number of fronts. A new single pass tandem deposition machine was brought on line which allows greatly increased and improved throughput for rolls of tandem material. The TCO deposition process was improved resulting in an increase in throughput by 20%. A new alignment method was implemented on the printing process which improves throughput six fold while improving alignment from 100 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m. A roll based lamination procedure was developed and implemented on selected products which improves throughput from 20 sq. ft./hr. to 240 sq. ft./hr. A wide range of lower cost encapsulants were evaluated. A promising material was selected initially to be introduced in 5 year lifetime type products. The sum of these improvements bring the overall cost reduction resulting from this program to 49%.

  2. Two-Phase Technology at NASA/Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Since the baseline International Space Station (ISS) External Active Thermal Control System (EATCS) was changed from a two-phase mechanically pumped system to a single phase cascade system in the fall of 1993, two-phase EATCS research has continued at a low level at JSC. One of-the lessons of the ISS EATCS selection was that two-phase thermal control systems must have significantly lower power than comparable single phase systems to overcome their larger radiator area, larger line and fluid mass, and perceived higher technical risk. Therefore, research at JSC has concentrated on low power mechanically pumped two-phase EATCSs. In the presentation, the results of a study investigating the trade of single and two-phase mechanically pumped EATCSs for space vehicles will be summarized. The low power two-phase mechanically pumped EATCS system under development at JSC will be described in detail and the current design status of the subscale test unit will be reviewed. Also, performance predictions for a full size EATCS will be presented. In addition to the discussion of two-phase mechanically pumped EATCS development at JSC, two-phase technologies under development for biological water processing will be discussed. These biological water processor technologies are being prepared for a 2001 flight experiment and subsequent usage on the TransHab module on the International Space Station.

  3. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    SciTech Connect

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  4. Optical Manufacturing and Testing Requirements Identified by the NASA Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Barney, Rich; Bauman, Jill; Feinberg, Lee; Mcleese, Dan; Singh, Upendra

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, the NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) commissioned an assessment of 15 different technology areas of importance to the future of NASA. Technology assessment #8 (TA8) was Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems (SIOSS). SIOSS assess the needs for optical technology ranging from detectors to lasers, x-ray mirrors to microwave antenna, in-situ spectrographs for on-surface planetary sample characterization to large space telescopes. The needs assessment looked across the entirety of NASA and not just the Science Mission Directorate. This paper reviews the optical manufacturing and testing technologies identified by SIOSS which require development in order to enable future NASA high priority missions.

  5. A University Engagement Model for Achieving Technology Adoption and Performance Improvement Impacts in Healthcare, Manufacturing, and Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnis, David R.; Sloan, Mary Anne; Snow, L. David; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2014-01-01

    The Purdue Technical Assistance Program (TAP) offers a model of university engagement and service that is achieving technology adoption and performance improvement impacts in healthcare, manufacturing, government, and other sectors. The TAP model focuses on understanding and meeting the changing and challenging needs of those served, always…

  6. Chrysler Partners with North Lake High School in an Advanced Manufacturing Technology Program for Special Needs Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbon, Patrick J.; Kuhn, Cynthia

    1996-01-01

    Chrysler Corporation and North Lake High School cooperated to develop and deploy Advanced Manufacturing Technology for high school students identified as at risk or hard to serve. Chrysler provided curriculum that was delivered by training center instructors; teachers ensured student competence in academic areas. (JOW)

  7. Evaluation of Project Based Learning in the Area of Manufacturing and Statistics in the Degree of Industrial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buj-Corral, Irene; Marco-Almagro, Lluís; Riba, Alex; Vivancos-Calvet, Joan; Tort-Martorell, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    In the subject Project I in the second year of the Degree in Industrial Technology Engineering taught at the School of Industrial Engineering of Barcelona (ETSEIB), subgroups of 3-4 students within groups of 20 students develop a project along a semester. Results of 2 projects are presented related to manufacturing, measurement of parts and the…

  8. Chrysler Partners with North Lake High School in an Advanced Manufacturing Technology Program for Special Needs Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karbon, Patrick J.; Kuhn, Cynthia

    1996-01-01

    Chrysler Corporation and North Lake High School cooperated to develop and deploy Advanced Manufacturing Technology for high school students identified as at risk or hard to serve. Chrysler provided curriculum that was delivered by training center instructors; teachers ensured student competence in academic areas. (JOW)

  9. Research and optimization of the technological process of manufacturing a GTE blades using computer-aided design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovin, R. A.; Smelov, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    This paper discusses an approach to prediction of the generation of pouring defects using the example of a technological process of manufacturing GTE blades. A computer-based modeling system for foundry processes, ProCast, was used as a tool for this research. Possible reasons of the formation of defects were considered and the recommendations for their elimination were provided.

  10. Technology Solutions Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, First DOE Zero Energy Ready Manufactured Home

    SciTech Connect

    2016-03-01

    The country’s first Zero Energy Ready manufactured home that is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is up and running in Russellville, Alabama. The manufactured home was built by a partnership between Southern Energy Homes and the Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), which is a DOE Building America team. The effort was part of a three-home study including a standard-code manufactured home and an ENERGY STAR® manufactured home. Cooling-season results showed that the building used half the space-conditioning energy of a manufactured home built to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards. These standards are known collectively as the HUD Code, which is the building standard for all U.S. manufactured housing.

  11. Technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cell powerplant (phase 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, L.

    1979-01-01

    The status of technology for the manufacturing and testing of 1200 sq. cm cell materials, components, and stacks for on-site integrated energy systems is assessed. Topics covered include: (1) preparation of thin layers of silicon carbide; (2) definition and control schemes for volume changes in phosphoric acid fuel cells; (3) preparation of low resin content graphite phenolic resin composites; (4) chemical corrosion of graphite-phenolic resin composites in hot phosphoric acid; (5) analysis of electrical resistance of composite materials for fuel cells; and (6) fuel cell performance and testing.

  12. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

  13. Hot slumping glass technology and integration process to manufacture a grazing incidence scaled prototype for the IXO telescope modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Canestrari, R.; Conconi, P.; Citterio, O.; Civitani, M.; Dell'Orto, E.; Gallieni, D.; Pareschi, G.; Parodi, G.; Proserpio, L.; Spiga, D.

    2009-08-01

    As for all space missions, the limit imposed on the payload mass budget by the launcher is the main driver that forces the use of very lightweight optics. Considering the International X-ray Observatory (IXO) mission the present configuration has a mirror collecting area in the order of 3 m2 at 1.25 keV, 0.65 m2 at 6 keV, and 150 cm2 at 30 keV. These large collecting areas could be obtained with a mirror assembly composed of a large number of high quality glass segments each being able to deliver the required angular resolution better or equal to 5 arcsec. These segments will form a X-Ray Optical Unit (XOU), an optical subunit of the telescope, and the XOUs will be assembled to form the whole mirror system. Based on the INAF-OAB experience in the thermal slumping of thin glass optics, a possible approach for the realization of large size and lightweight X-ray mirrors is described in this paper. Moulds made in a suitable material (as for example Silicon Carbide or Fused Silica) and having the suitable (parabolic and hyperbolic) profile are used for the realization of thin glass Mirror Plates (MP), with dimensions in the range of 200- 400 mm. After a thermal cycle the slumped MPs are characterized for acceptation and handled by means of an active support using vacuum suction for the integration phase. In this phase an active optical feedback is used to ensure the correct alignment of the MPs within the XOU. The MPs are then glued in its proper position in the XOU using also suitable glass ribs for the stiffening of the whole module. An investigation in the problems and possible solutions to the slumping, measurement, integration and testing of the glass MPs into the XOU will be given, particularly with respect to a XOU scaled prototype that will be manufactured and used to assess the technology.

  14. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania.

    PubMed

    Fox, Christopher B; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K; Onu, Adrian

    2013-03-15

    Many developing countries lack or have inadequate pandemic influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, this led to delayed and inadequate vaccine coverage in the developing world. Thus, bolstering developing country influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity is urgently needed. The Cantacuzino Institute in Bucharest, Romania has been producing seasonal influenza vaccine since the 1970s, and has the capacity to produce ∼5 million doses of monovalent vaccine in the event of an influenza pandemic. Inclusion of an adjuvant in the vaccine could enable antigen dose sparing, expanding vaccine coverage and potentially allowing universal vaccination of the Romanian population and possibly neighboring countries. However, adjuvant formulation and manufacturing know-how are difficult to access. This manuscript describes the successful transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing and quality control technologies from the Infectious Disease Research Institute in Seattle, USA to the Cantacuzino Institute. By describing the challenges and accomplishments of the project, it is hoped that the knowledge and experience gained will benefit other institutes involved in similar technology transfer projects designed to facilitate increased vaccine manufacturing capacity in developing countries.

  15. N-K Manufacturing Technologies: Industrial Energy Assessment Yields Savings of More than $27,000 Per Year for Molded Plastics Company

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-09-01

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at N-K Manufacturing Technologies by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  16. Cleaner Technology in the Hard Disk Drive Manufacturing Industry: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moolla, Premchai; Chompu-inwai, Rungchat

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this research are to improve raw material and energy consumption efficiency, as well as reduce defects and the use of chemicals in the arm coil assembly process of hard disk drive manufacturing in the case study company by applying the Cleaner Technology concepts. The four main sequential steps used in this research were: (1) pre-assessment, (2) assessment, (3) feasibility study, and (4) implementation. In the first step, raw data, such as process flows, raw material usage and defects data were collected. In the second step, the loss during production and causes of loss were analyzed. Opportunities to reduce raw material, chemical and energy wastage could then be recommended. The next step was to evaluate the feasibility and potential benefits of a particular Cleaner Technology opportunity. Finally, in the last step, after a thorough evaluation and implementation of the opportunities to apply Cleaner Technology, the results showed that arm coil defects could be reduced by improving the production process using the ECRS technique. ECRS stands for Eliminate, Combine, Rearrange and Simplify. This improvement reduced arm coil defect rates from 0.48% to 0.15%, thus saving approximately 139,638 Thai Baht per month. In addition, production stoppage decision made by workers was used to increase employee involvement in defect detection. Allowing workers to participate in such a decision was an effective way to reduce defect rate and could motivate workers to produce a better quality job. This resulted in arm coil defects reducing from 0.41% to 0.025%, with about 74,562 Thai Baht per month saving. Additionally, an increase in the efficiency of electricity consumption occurred, by increasing the speed of the infrared oven conveyor belt, improving average productivity from 533 pieces/hour to 560 pieces/hour, without adversely affecting product costs and quality, thus producing products of up to the value of 206,242 Thai Baht per month. Furthermore, the new

  17. Development of Friction Stir Welding Technologies for In-Space Manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Longhurst, William R.; Cox, Chase D.; Gibson, Brian T.; ...

    2016-08-26

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has emerged as an attractive process for fabricating aerospace vehicles. Current FSW state-of-the-art uses large machines that are not portable. However, there is a growing need for fabrication and repair operations associated with in-space manufacturing. This need stems from a desire for prolonged missions and travel beyond low-earth orbit. To address this need, research and development is presented regarding two enabling technologies. The first is a self-adjusting and aligning (SAA) FSW tool that drastically reduces the axial force that has historically been quite large. The SAA-FSW tool is a bobbin style tool that floats freely, withoutmore » any external actuators, along its vertical axis to adjust and align with the workpiece s position and orientation. Successful butt welding of 1/8 in. (3.175 mm) thick aluminum 1100 was achieved in conjunction with a drastic reduction and near elimination of the axial process force. Along with the SAA-FSW, an innovative in-process monitor technique is presented in which a magnetoelastic force rate-of-change sensor is employed. The sensor consists of a magnetized FSW tool that is used to induce a voltage in a coil surrounding the tool when changes to the process forces occur. The sensor was able to detect 1/16 in. (1.5875 mm) diameter voids. It is concluded that these technologies could be applied toward the development of a portable FSW machine for use in space.« less

  18. Design and manufacture of customized dental implants by using reverse engineering and selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianyu; Zhang, Zhiguang; Chen, Xianshuai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Gong; Xu, Zhewu

    2014-11-01

    Recently a new therapeutic concept of patient-specific implant dentistry has been advanced based on computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology. However, a comprehensive study of the design and 3-dimensional (3D) printing of the customized implants, their mechanical properties, and their biomechanical behavior is lacking. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and biomechanical performance of a novel custom-made dental implant fabricated by the selective laser melting technique with simulation and in vitro experimental studies. Two types of customized implants were designed by using reverse engineering: a root-analog implant and a root-analog threaded implant. The titanium implants were printed layer by layer with the selective laser melting technique. The relative density, surface roughness, tensile properties, bend strength, and dimensional accuracy of the specimens were evaluated. Nonlinear and linear finite element analysis and experimental studies were used to investigate the stress distribution, micromotion, and primary stability of the implants. Selective laser melting 3D printing technology was able to reproduce the customized implant designs and produce high density and strength and adequate dimensional accuracy. Better stress distribution and lower maximum micromotions were observed for the root-analog threaded implant model than for the root-analog implant model. In the experimental tests, the implant stability quotient and pull-out strength of the 2 types of implants indicated that better primary stability can be obtained with a root-analog threaded implant design. Selective laser melting proved to be an efficient means of printing fully dense customized implants with high strength and sufficient dimensional accuracy. Adding the threaded characteristic to the customized root-analog threaded implant design maintained the approximate geometry of the natural root and exhibited better stress distribution and

  19. Software development for the evaluation of the ergonomic compatibility on the selection of advanced manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Macías, A; Reyes, R; Guillen, L; García, J

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) is one of the most relevant resources that companies have to achieve competitiveness and best performance. The selection of AMT is a complex problem which involves significant amount of information and uncertainty when multiple aspects must be taken into consideration. Actual models for the selection of AMT are found scarce of the Human Factors and Ergonomics perspective which can lead to a more complete and reliable decision. This paper presents the development of software that enhances the application of an Ergonomic Compatibility Evaluation Model that supports decision making processes taking into consideration ergonomic attributes of designs. Ergonomic Compatibility is a construct used in this model and it is mainly based in the concept of human-artifact compatibility on human compatible systems. Also, an Axiomatic Design approach by the use of the Information Axiom was evolved under a fuzzy environment to obtain the Ergonomic Incompatibility Content. The extension of this axiom for the evaluation of ergonomic compatibility requirements was the theoretical framework of this research. An incremental methodology of four stages was used to design and develop the software that enables to compare AMT alternatives by the evaluation of Ergonomic Compatibility Attributes.

  20. Failure analysis concepts for microelectronics technologies and manufacturing of the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boit, Christian; Weiland, Rainer; Olbrich, A.; Muehle, U.; Simmnacher, B.

    2001-04-01

    The answer of Failure Analysis (F/A) to the technological innovations in microelectronics in the past was: with a slight evolution (i.e. optical microscope -- SEM -- TEM) we can do it. The innovations around the corner today enforce a paradigm shift in F/A to match the challenges by increasing wafer sizes, decreasing feature sizes and new package concepts. This presentation highlights various aspects of the small feature size time bomb (how TEM becomes mandatory and obsolete synchronously), the completely new inline F/A approach on productive wafers inevitable from 300 nm wafer size on, and the reinvention of electrical fail site localization techniques, now from the backside of the die due to new package concepts and innumerable metal layers. Even if F/A manages to overcome all these challenges from a technical point of view, the according revolution in terms of methods, skills and tools implies a cost explosion unless F/A becomes an active part in the business process and the projects of development and manufacturing. This holds even under the assumption that a rising number of today's F/A problems will be solved by modern testing techniques. Only this way F/A can deliver custom-tailored solutions that are optimized in productivity and time to result, and that fulfill the cost reduction requirements of semiconductor products.