Science.gov

Sample records for map kinase cascade

  1. Sustained oscillations in the MAP kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Hell, Juliette; Rendall, Alan D

    2016-10-29

    The MAP kinase cascade is a network of enzymatic reactions arranged in layers. In each layer occurs a multiple futile cycle of phosphorylations. The fully phosphorylated substrate then serves as an enzyme for the layer below. This paper focusses on the existence of parameters for which Hopf bifurcations occur and generate periodic orbits. Furthermore it is explained how geometric singular perturbation theory allows to generalize results from simple models to more complex ones. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Dominant Mutations of Drosophila Map Kinase Kinase and Their Activities in Drosophila and Yeast Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Y. M.; Tsuda, L.; Inoue, Y. H.; Irie, K.; Adachi-Yamada, T.; Hata, M.; Nishi, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Nishida, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Eight alleles of Dsor1 encoding a Drosophila homologue of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase were obtained as dominant suppressors of the MAP kinase kinase kinase D-raf. These Dsor1 alleles themselves showed no obvious phenotypic consequences nor any effect on the viability of the flies, although they were highly sensitive to upstream signals and strongly interacted with gain-of-function mutations of upstream factors. They suppressed mutations for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs); torso (tor), sevenless (sev) and to a lesser extent Drosophila EGF receptor (DER). Furthermore, the Dsor1 alleles showed no significant interaction with gain-of-function mutations of DER. The observed difference in activity of the Dsor1 alleles among the RTK pathways suggests Dsor1 is one of the components of the pathway that regulates signal specificity. Expression of Dsor1 in budding yeast demonstrated that Dsor1 can activate yeast MAP kinase homologues if a proper activator of Dsor1 is coexpressed. Nucleotide sequencing of the Dsor1 mutant genes revealed that most of the mutations are associated with amino acid changes at highly conserved residues in the kinase domain. The results suggest that they function as suppressors due to increased reactivity to upstream factors. PMID:9136016

  3. The Potential for Signal Integration and Processing in Interacting Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, John H.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular response to environmental stimuli requires biochemical information processing through which sensory inputs and cellular status are integrated and translated into appropriate responses by way of interacting networks of enzymes. One such network, the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade is a highly conserved signal transduction module that propagates signals from cell surface receptors to various cytosolic and nuclear targets by way of a phosphorylation cascade. We have investigated the potential for signal processing within a network of interacting feed-forward kinase cascades typified by the MAP kinase cascade. A genetic algorithm was used to search for sets of kinetic parameters demonstrating representative key input-output patterns of interest. We discuss two of the networks identified in our study, one implementing the exclusive-or function (XOR) and another implementing what we refer to as an in-band detector (IBD) or two-sided threshold. These examples confirm the potential for logic and amplitude-dependent signal processing in interacting MAP kinase cascades demonstrating limited cross-talk. Specifically, the XOR function allows the network to respond to either one, but not both signals simultaneously, while the IBD permits the network to respond exclusively to signals within a given range of strength, and to suppress signals below as well as above this range. The solution to the XOR problem is interesting in that it requires only two interacting pathways, crosstalk at only one layer, and no feedback or explicit inhibition. These types of responses are not only biologically relevant but constitute signal processing modules that can be combined to create other logical functions and that, in contrast to amplification, cannot be achieved with a single cascade or with two non-interacting cascades. Our computational results revealed surprising similarities between experimental data describing the JNK/MKK4/MKK7 pathway and the solution for

  4. Selective phosphorylation of nuclear CREB by fluoxetine is linked to activation of CaM kinase IV and MAP kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tiraboschi, Ettore; Tardito, Daniela; Kasahara, Jiro; Moraschi, Stefania; Pruneri, Paolo; Gennarelli, Massimo; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2004-10-01

    Regulation of gene expression is purported as a major component in the long-term action of antidepressants. The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) is activated by chronic antidepressant treatments, although a number of studies reported different effects on CREB, depending on drug types used and brain areas investigated. Furthermore, little is known as to what signaling cascades are responsible for CREB activation, although cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) cascade was suggested to be a central player. We investigated how different drugs (fluoxetine (FLX), desipramine (DMI), reboxetine (RBX)) affect CREB expression and phosphorylation of Ser(133) in the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex (PFCX). Acute treatments did not induce changes in these mechanisms. Chronic FLX increased nuclear phospho-CREB (pCREB) far more markedly than pronoradrenergic drugs, particularly in PFCX. We investigated the function of the main signaling cascades that were shown to phosphorylate and regulate CREB. PKA did not seem to account for the selective increase of pCREB induced by FLX. All drug treatments markedly increased the enzymatic activity of nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) kinase IV (CaMKIV), a major neuronal CREB kinase, in PFCX. Activation of this kinase was due to increased phosphorylation of the activatory residue Thr196, with no major changes in the expression levels of alpha- and beta-CaM kinase kinase, enzymes that phosphorylate CaMKIV. Again in PFCX, FLX selectively increased the expression level of MAP kinases Erk1/2, without affecting their phosphorylation. Our results show that FLX exerts a more marked effect on CREB phosphorylation and suggest that CaMKIV and MAP kinase cascades are involved in this effect.

  5. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  6. Accumulation of specific sterol precursors targets a MAP kinase cascade mediating cell-cell recognition and fusion.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Martin; Lichius, Alexander; Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Johannes; Nawrath, Thorben; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Read, Nick D; Schulz, Stefan; Fleißner, André

    2016-10-18

    Sterols are vital components of eukaryotic cell membranes. Defects in sterol biosynthesis, which result in the accumulation of precursor molecules, are commonly associated with cellular disorders and disease. However, the effects of these sterol precursors on the metabolism, signaling, and behavior of cells are only poorly understood. In this study, we show that the accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain specifically disrupts cell-cell communication and fusion in the fungus Neurospora crassa Genetically identical germinating spores of this fungus undergo cell-cell fusion, thereby forming a highly interconnected supracellular network during colony initiation. Before fusion, the cells use an unusual signaling mechanism that involves the coordinated and alternating switching between signal sending and receiving states of the two fusion partners. Accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain disrupts this coordinated cell-cell communication and suppresses cell fusion. These specific sterol precursors target a single ERK-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAK-1)-signaling cascade, whereas a second MAP kinase pathway (MAK-2), which is also involved in cell fusion, is unaffected. These observations indicate that a minor specific change in sterol structure can exert a strong detrimental effect on a key signaling pathway of the cell, resulting in the absence of cell fusion.

  7. Accumulation of specific sterol precursors targets a MAP kinase cascade mediating cell–cell recognition and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Martin; Lichius, Alexander; Priegnitz, Bert-Ewald; Brandt, Ulrike; Gottschalk, Johannes; Nawrath, Thorben; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Read, Nick D.; Schulz, Stefan; Fleißner, André

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are vital components of eukaryotic cell membranes. Defects in sterol biosynthesis, which result in the accumulation of precursor molecules, are commonly associated with cellular disorders and disease. However, the effects of these sterol precursors on the metabolism, signaling, and behavior of cells are only poorly understood. In this study, we show that the accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain specifically disrupts cell–cell communication and fusion in the fungus Neurospora crassa. Genetically identical germinating spores of this fungus undergo cell–cell fusion, thereby forming a highly interconnected supracellular network during colony initiation. Before fusion, the cells use an unusual signaling mechanism that involves the coordinated and alternating switching between signal sending and receiving states of the two fusion partners. Accumulation of only ergosterol precursors with a conjugated double bond in their aliphatic side chain disrupts this coordinated cell–cell communication and suppresses cell fusion. These specific sterol precursors target a single ERK-like mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAK-1)-signaling cascade, whereas a second MAP kinase pathway (MAK-2), which is also involved in cell fusion, is unaffected. These observations indicate that a minor specific change in sterol structure can exert a strong detrimental effect on a key signaling pathway of the cell, resulting in the absence of cell fusion. PMID:27708165

  8. Protein-Protein Interactions in the Yeast Pheromone Response Pathway: Ste5p Interacts with All Members of the Map Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Printen, J. A.; Sprague-Jr., G. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the two-hybrid system of Fields and Song to identify protein-protein interactions that occur in the pheromone response pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pathway components Ste4p, Ste5p, Ste7p, Ste11p, Ste12p, Ste20p, Fus3p and Kss1p were tested in all pairwise combinations. All of the interactions we detected involved at least one member of the MAP kinase cascade that is a central element of the response pathway. Ste5p, a protein of unknown biochemical function, interacted with protein kinases that operate at each step of the MAP kinase cascade, specifically with Ste11p (an MEKK), Ste7p (an MEK), and Fus3p (a MAP kinase). This finding suggests that one role of Ste5p is to serve as a scaffold to facilitate interactions among members of the kinase cascade. In this role as facilitator, Ste5p may make both signal propagation and signal attenuation more efficient. Ste5p may also help minimize cross-talk with other MAP kinase cascades and thus ensure the integrity of the pheromone response pathway. We also found that both Ste11p and Ste7p interact with Fus3p and Kss1p. Finally, we detected an interaction between one of the MAP kinases, Kss1p, and a presumptive target, the transcription factor Ste12p. We failed to detect interactions of Ste4p or Ste20p with any other component of the response pathway. PMID:7851759

  9. MSP Hormonal Control of the Oocyte MAP Kinase Cascade and Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Youfeng; Han, Sung Min; Miller, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The MSP domain is a conserved immunoglobulin-like structure that is important for C. elegans reproduction and human motor neuron survival. C. elegans MSPs are the most abundant proteins in sperm, where they function as intracellular cytoskeletal proteins and secreted hormones. Secreted MSPs bind to multiple receptors on oocyte and ovarian sheath cell surfaces to induce oocyte maturation and sheath contraction. MSP binding stimulates oocyte MPK-1 ERK MAP Kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, but the function and mechanism are not well understood. Here we show that the Shp class protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP-2 acts in oocytes downstream of sheath/oocyte gap junctions to promote MSP-induced MPK-1 phosphorylation. PTP-2 functions in the oocyte cytoplasm, not at the cell surface to inhibit multiple RasGAPs, resulting in sustained Ras activation. We also provide evidence that MSP promotes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which act as second messengers to augment MPK-1 phosphorylation. The Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase SOD-1, an enzyme that catalyzes ROS breakdown in the cytoplasm, inhibits MPK-1 phosphorylation downstream of or in parallel to ptp-2. Our results support the model that MSP triggers PTP-2/Ras activation and ROS production to stimulate MPK-1 activity essential for oocyte maturation. We propose that secreted MSP domains and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases function antagonistically to control ROS and MAPK signaling. PMID:20380830

  10. MSP hormonal control of the oocyte MAP kinase cascade and reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Youfeng; Han, Sung Min; Miller, Michael A

    2010-06-01

    The MSP domain is a conserved immunoglobulin-like structure that is important for C. elegans reproduction and human motor neuron survival. C. elegans MSPs are the most abundant proteins in sperm, where they function as intracellular cytoskeletal proteins and secreted hormones. Secreted MSPs bind to multiple receptors on oocyte and ovarian sheath cell surfaces to induce oocyte maturation and sheath contraction. MSP binding stimulates oocyte MPK-1 ERK MAP Kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, but the function and mechanism are not well understood. Here we show that the Shp class protein-tyrosine phosphatase PTP-2 acts in oocytes downstream of sheath/oocyte gap junctions to promote MSP-induced MPK-1 phosphorylation. PTP-2 functions in the oocyte cytoplasm, not at the cell surface to inhibit multiple RasGAPs, resulting in sustained Ras activation. We also provide evidence that MSP promotes production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which act as second messengers to augment MPK-1 phosphorylation. The Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase SOD-1, an enzyme that catalyzes ROS breakdown in the cytoplasm, inhibits MPK-1 phosphorylation downstream of or in parallel to ptp-2. Our results support the model that MSP triggers PTP-2/Ras activation and ROS production to stimulate MPK-1 activity essential for oocyte maturation. We propose that secreted MSP domains and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases function antagonistically to control ROS and MAPK signaling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Three genes of the MAP kinase cascade, mek-2, mpk-1/sur-1 and let-60 ras, are required for meiotic cell cycle progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Church, D L; Guan, K L; Lambie, E J

    1995-08-01

    In the germline of Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites, meiotic cell cycle progression occurs in spatially restricted regions. Immediately after leaving the distal mitotic region, germ cells enter meiosis and thereafter remain in the pachytene stage of first meiotic prophase for an extended period. At the dorsoventral gonadal flexure, germ cells exit pachytene and subsequently become arrested in diakinesis. We have found that exit from pachytene is dependent on the function of three members of the MAP kinase signaling cascade. One of these genes, mek-2, is a newly identified C. elegans MEK (MAP kinase kinase). The other two genes, mpk-1/sur-1 (MAP kinase) and let-60 ras, were previously identified based on their roles in vulval induction and are shown here to act in combination with mek-2 to permit exit from pachytene. Through genetic mosaic analysis, we demonstrate that the expression of mpk-1/sur-1 is required within the germline to permit exit from pachytene.

  12. Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-02-01

    In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

  13. Regulation of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) drought responses by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade-mediated phosphorylation of GhWRKY59.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangjun; Li, Maoying; Wang, Ping; Cox, Kevin L; Duan, Liusheng; Dever, Jane K; Shan, Libo; Li, Zhaohu; He, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Drought is a key limiting factor for cotton (Gossypium spp.) production, as more than half of the global cotton supply is grown in regions with high water shortage. However, the underlying mechanism of the response of cotton to drought stress remains elusive. By combining genome-wide transcriptome profiling and a loss-of-function screen using virus-induced gene silencing, we identified Gossypium hirsutum GhWRKY59 as an important transcription factor that regulates the drought stress response in cotton. Biochemical and genetic analyses revealed a drought stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade consisting of GhMAP3K15-Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase 4 (GhMKK4)-Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase 6 (GhMPK6) that directly phosphorylates GhWRKY59 at residue serine 221. Interestingly, GhWRKY59 is required for dehydration-induced expression of GhMAPK3K15, constituting a positive feedback loop of GhWRKY59-regulated MAP kinase activation in response to drought stress. Moreover, GhWRKY59 directly binds to the W-boxes of DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN 2 (GhDREB2), which encodes a dehydration-inducible transcription factor regulating the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA)-independent drought response. Our study identified a complete MAP kinase cascade that phosphorylates and activates a key WRKY transcription factor, and elucidated a regulatory module, consisting of GhMAP3K15-GhMKK4-GhMPK6-GhWRKY59-GhDREB2, that is involved in controlling the cotton drought response. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Targeted downregulation of caveolin-1 is sufficient to drive cell transformation and hyperactivate the p42/44 MAP kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Volonte, D; Engelman, J A; Watanabe, G; Burk, R; Pestell, R G; Lisanti, M P

    1998-11-16

    Caveolin-1 is a principal component of caveolae membranes in vivo. Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression are lost or reduced during cell transformation by activated oncogenes. Interestingly, the human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (7q31.1). However, it remains unknown whether downregulation of caveolin-1 is sufficient to mediate cell transformation or tumorigenicity. Here, we employ an antisense approach to derive stable NIH 3T3 cell lines that express dramatically reduced levels of caveolin-1 but contain normal amounts of caveolin-2. NIH 3T3 cells harboring antisense caveolin-1 exhibit anchorage-independent growth, form tumors in immunodeficient mice and show hyperactivation of the p42/44 MAP kinase cascade. Importantly, transformation induced by caveolin-1 downregulation is reversed when caveolin-1 protein levels are restored to normal by loss of the caveolin-1 antisense vector. In addition, we show that in normal NIH 3T3 cells, caveolin-1 expression levels are tightly regulated by specific growth factor stimuli and cell density. Our results suggest that upregulation of caveolin-1 may be important in mediating contact inhibition and negatively regulating the activation state of the p42/44 MAP kinase cascade.

  15. Targeted downregulation of caveolin-1 is sufficient to drive cell transformation and hyperactivate the p42/44 MAP kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, F; Volonte, D; Engelman, J A; Watanabe, G; Burk, R; Pestell, R G; Lisanti, M P

    1998-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a principal component of caveolae membranes in vivo. Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression are lost or reduced during cell transformation by activated oncogenes. Interestingly, the human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (7q31.1). However, it remains unknown whether downregulation of caveolin-1 is sufficient to mediate cell transformation or tumorigenicity. Here, we employ an antisense approach to derive stable NIH 3T3 cell lines that express dramatically reduced levels of caveolin-1 but contain normal amounts of caveolin-2. NIH 3T3 cells harboring antisense caveolin-1 exhibit anchorage-independent growth, form tumors in immunodeficient mice and show hyperactivation of the p42/44 MAP kinase cascade. Importantly, transformation induced by caveolin-1 downregulation is reversed when caveolin-1 protein levels are restored to normal by loss of the caveolin-1 antisense vector. In addition, we show that in normal NIH 3T3 cells, caveolin-1 expression levels are tightly regulated by specific growth factor stimuli and cell density. Our results suggest that upregulation of caveolin-1 may be important in mediating contact inhibition and negatively regulating the activation state of the p42/44 MAP kinase cascade. PMID:9822607

  16. A differentially regulated AP2/ERF transcription factor gene cluster acts downstream of a MAP kinase cascade to modulate terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Paul, Priyanka; Singh, Sanjay K; Patra, Barunava; Sui, Xueyi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2017-02-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the chemotherapeutics, vincristine and vinblastine. Transcriptional regulation of TIA biosynthesis is not fully understood. The jasmonic acid (JA)-responsive AP2/ERF transcription factor (TF), ORCA3, and its regulator, CrMYC2, play key roles in TIA biosynthesis. ORCA3 forms a physical cluster with two uncharacterized AP2/ERFs, ORCA4 and 5. Here, we report that (1) the ORCA gene cluster is differentially regulated; (2) ORCA4, while overlapping functionally with ORCA3, modulates an additional set of TIA genes. Unlike ORCA3, ORCA4 overexpression resulted in dramatic increase of TIA accumulation in C. roseus hairy roots. In addition, CrMYC2 is capable of activating ORCA3 and co-regulating TIA pathway genes concomitantly with ORCA3. The ORCA gene cluster and CrMYC2 act downstream of a MAP kinase cascade that includes a previously uncharacterized MAP kinase kinase, CrMAPKK1. Overexpression of CrMAPKK1 in C. roseus hairy roots upregulated TIA pathways genes and increased TIA accumulation. This work provides detailed characterization of a TF gene cluster and advances our understanding of the transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that govern TIA biosynthesis in C. roseus.

  17. Potentiation of Mitogenic Activity of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor by Physiological Concentrations of Insulin via the MAP Kinase Cascade in Rat A10 Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hitomi; Murakami, Hitomi; Uchigata, Yasuko; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia has been shown to be associated with diabetic angiopathy. Migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are the processes required for the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we attempted to determine whether insulin affects mitogenic signaling induced by plateletderived growth factor (PDGF) in a rat VSMC cell line (A10 cells). PDGF stimulated DNA synthesis which was totally dependent on Ras, because transfection of dominant negative Ras resulted in complete loss of PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Initiation of DNA synthesis was preceded by activation of Raf-1, MEK and MAP kinases (Erk 1 and Erk2). Treatment of the cells with PD98059, an inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MEK) attenuated but did not abolish PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, suggesting that MAPK is required but not essential for DNA synthesis. PDGF also stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) and p70 S6Kinase (p70S6K) in a wortmannin-sensitive manner. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of p70S6K, markedly suppressed DNA synthesis. Low concentrations of insulin (1-10 nmol/l) alone showed little mitogenic activity and no significant effect on MAPK activity. However, the presence of insulin enhanced both DNA synthesis and MAPK activation by PDGF. The enhancing effect of insulin was not seen in cells treated with PD98059. Insulin was without effect on PDGF-stimulated activations of protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) and p70S6K. We conclude that insulin, at pathophysiologically relevant concentrations, potentiates the PDGFstimulated DNA synthesis, at least in part, by potentiating activation of the MAPK cascade. These results are consistent with the notion that hyperinsulinemia is a risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:11991199

  18. Hybrid lethality in interspecific F1 hybrid Nicotiana gossei x N. tabacum involves a MAP-kinases signalling cascade.

    PubMed

    Mino, M; Kubota, M; Nogi, T; Zhang, S; Inoue, M

    2007-05-01

    A cultured cell line, GTH4 (Nicotiana gossei Domin x N. tabacum L.), which exhibits hybrid lethality, died at 26 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C. Pharmacological experiments using inhibitors of protein phosphatases and protein kinases indicated the involvement of a protein kinase signalling pathway in the cell death process. Immunoblot analysis revealed that salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) was phosphorylated soon after the shift in temperature from 37 degrees C to 26 degrees C. Cultured cells of the hybrid of N. gossei x transgenic N. tabacum harboring a steroid (dexamethasone; DEX)-inducible NtMEK2 (DD) or NtMEK2 (KR), constitutively active and inactive forms of NtMEK2, respectively, were established. Induction of NtMEK2 (DD) by DEX in the hybrid cells induced the activation of SIPK, the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H (2)O (2)), and cell death at 37 degrees C. The activation of SIPK, generation of H (2)O (2), and cell death at 26 degrees C were compromised by DEX treatment in hybrid cells harbouring NtMEK2 (KR). This study provides evidence for the involvement of MAPK signalling in the regulation of cell death in hybrids.

  19. Spatial gradients in kinase cascade regulation.

    PubMed

    Kazmierczak, B; Lipniacki, T

    2010-11-01

    The spatiotemporal kinetics of proteins and other substrates regulate cell fate and signaling. In this study, we consider a reaction-diffusion model of interaction of membrane receptors with a two-step kinase cascade. The receptors activate the 'up-stream' kinase, which may diffuse over cell volume and activate the 'down-stream' kinase, which is also diffusing. Both kinase species and receptors are inactivated by uniformly distributed phosphatases. The positive feedback, key to the considered dynamics, arises since the up-stream kinase activates the receptors. Such a mutual interaction is characteristic for immune cell receptors. Based on the proposed model, we demonstrated that cell sensitivity (measured as a critical value of phosphatase activity at which cell maybe activated) increases with decreasing motility of receptor-interacting kinases and with increasing polarity of receptors distribution. These two effects are cooperating, the effect of receptors localisation close to one pole of the cell grows with the decreasing kinase diffusion and vanishes in the infinite diffusion limit. As the cell sensitivity increases with decreasing diffusion of receptor-interacting kinase, the overall activity of the down-stream kinase increases with its diffusion. In conclusion, the analysis of the proposed model shows that, for the fixed substrate interaction rates, spatial distribution of the surface receptors together with the motility of intracellular kinases control cell signalling and sensitivity to extracellular signals. The increase of the cell sensitivity can be achieved by (i) localisation of receptors in a small subdomain of the cell membrane, (ii) lowering the motility of receptor-interacting kinase, (iii) increasing the motility of down-stream kinases which distribute the signal over the whole cell.

  20. Kinase cascades regulating entry into apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P

    1997-01-01

    All cells are constantly exposed to conflicting environment cues that signal cell survival or cell death. Survival signals are delivered by autocrine or paracrine factors that actively suppress a default death pathway. In addition to survival factor withdrawal, cell death can be triggered by environmental stresses such as heat, UV light, and hyperosmolarity or by dedicated death receptors (e.g., FAS/APO-1 and tumor necrosis factor [TNF] receptors) that are counterparts of growth factor or survival receptors at the cell surface. One of the ways that cells integrate conflicting exogenous stimuli is by phosphorylation (or dephosphorylation) of cellular constituents by interacting cascades of serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases (and phosphatases). Survival factors (e.g., growth factors and mitogens) activate receptor tyrosine kinases and selected mitogen-activated, cyclin-dependent, lipid-activated, nucleic acid-dependent, and cyclic AMP-dependent kinases to promote cell survival and proliferation, whereas environmental stress (or death factors such as FAS/APO-1 ligand and TNF-alpha) activates different members of these kinase families to inhibit cell growth and, under some circumstances, promote apoptotic cell death. Because individual kinase cascades can interact with one another, they are able to integrate conflicting exogenous stimuli and provide a link between cell surface receptors and the biochemical pathways leading to cell proliferation or cell death. PMID:9106363

  1. Interleukin-1 activates a novel protein kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of Hsp27.

    PubMed

    Freshney, N W; Rawlinson, L; Guesdon, F; Jones, E; Cowley, S; Hsuan, J; Saklatvala, J

    1994-09-23

    An IL-1-stimulated protein kinase cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the small heat shock protein hsp27 has been identified in KB cells. It is distinct from the p42 MAP kinase cascade. An upstream activator kinase phosphorylated a 40 kDa kinase (p40) upon threonine and tyrosine residues, which in turn phosphorylated a 50 kDa kinase (p50) upon threonine (and some serine) residues. p50 phosphorylated hsp27 upon serine. p40 and p50 were purified to near homogeneity. All three components were inactivated by protein phosphatase 2A, and p40 was inactivated by protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B. The substrate specificity of p40 differed from that of p42 and p54 MAP kinases. The upstream activator was not a MAP kinase kinase. p50 resembled MAPKAPK-2 and may be identical.

  2. The MAP kinase cascade is activated prior to the induction of gliosis in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Martin, P M; Mass, M J

    1998-05-30

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) provokes microglial activation and astrocytic hypertrophy at the site of damage. The signaling events that underlie these cellular responses remain unknown. Recent evidence has implicated tyrosine phosphorylation systems, in general, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) cascade, in particular, in the mediation of growth-associated events linked to neural degeneration, such as glial action. Moreover, an increase in the mRNA coding for the 14.3.3 protein, a known regulator of the MAP kinase pathway, appears to be involved in methamphetamine neurotoxicity. To examine the potential role of these protein kinase pathways in drug-induced damage to the CNS, we used the dopaminergic neurotoxicant, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), and to damage nerve terminals in the mouse neostriatum and elicit a glial reaction. The onset of reactive gliosis then was verified by Northern blot analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA and qualified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of GFAP (protein). A single administration of MPTP (12.5 mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)) to the C57B1/66J mouse resulted in a 10-fold increase in GFAP mRNA by 1 day and a 4-fold increase in GFAP (protein) by 2 days. To determine the potential role of protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase activation in these events, blots of striatal homogenates were probed with antibodies directed against phospho-tyr 204 and phospho-thr 202, residues corresponding to the active sites of p42/44 MAP kinase. After mice were sacrificed by focused microwave irradiation to preserve steady-state phosphorylation, proteins from striatal homogenates were resolved by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoblots of these samples showed a number of phosphotyrosine-labeled bands, but there were no apparent differences between control and MPTP groups. In contrast, phospho-MAP kinase was elevated

  3. An Arabidopsis kinase cascade influences auxin-responsive cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Enders, Tara A; Frick, Elizabeth M; Strader, Lucia C

    2017-10-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are conserved mechanisms of signal transduction across eukaryotes. Despite the importance of MPK proteins in signaling events, specific roles for many Arabidopsis MPK proteins remain unknown. Multiple studies have suggested roles for MPK signaling in a variety of auxin-related processes. To identify MPK proteins with roles in auxin response, we screened mpk insertional alleles and identified mpk1-1 as a mutant that displays hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays. Further, mutants defective in the upstream MAP kinase kinase MKK3 also display hypersensitivity in auxin-responsive cell expansion assays, suggesting that this MPK cascade affects auxin-influenced cell expansion. We found that MPK1 interacts with and phosphorylates ROP BINDING PROTEIN KINASE 1 (RBK1), a protein kinase that interacts with members of the Rho-like GTPases from Plants (ROP) small GTPase family. Similar to mpk1-1 and mkk3-1 mutants, rbk1 insertional mutants display auxin hypersensitivity, consistent with a possible role for RBK1 downstream of MPK1 in influencing auxin-responsive cell expansion. We found that RBK1 directly phosphorylates ROP4 and ROP6, supporting the possibility that RBK1 effects on auxin-responsive cell expansion are mediated through phosphorylation-dependent modulation of ROP activity. Our data suggest a MKK3 • MPK1 • RBK1 phosphorylation cascade that may provide a dynamic module for altering cell expansion. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  5. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Maps

    DOE Data Explorer

    Trimble, John

    2015-12-15

    The maps in this submission include: heat flow, alkalinity, Cl, Mg, SiO2, Quaternary volcanic rocks, faults, and land ownership. All of the Oregon Cascade region. The work was done by John Trimble, in 2015, at Oregon State University.

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase--an archetypal protein kinase cascade?

    PubMed

    Hardie, D G; MacKintosh, R W

    1992-10-01

    Mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase is the central component of a protein kinase cascade which inactivates three key enzymes involved in the synthesis or release of free fatty acids and cholesterol inside the cell. The kinase cascade is activated by elevation of AMP, and perhaps also by fatty acid and cholesterol metabolites. The system may fulfil a protective function, preventing damage caused by depletion of ATP or excessive intracellular release of free lipids, a type of stress response. Recent evidence suggests that it may have been in existence for at least a billion years, since a very similar protein kinase cascade is present in higher plants. This system therefore represents an early eukaryotic protein kinase cascade, which is unique in that it is regulated by intracellular metabolites rather than extracellular signals or cell cycle events.

  7. TNF and MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sabio, Guadalupe; Davis, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) to cell surface receptors engages multiple signal transduction pathways, including three groups of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases: extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); the cJun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs); and the p38 MAP kinases. These MAP kinase signalling pathways induce a secondary response by increasing the expression of several inflammatory cytokines (including TNFα) that contribute to the biological activity of TNFα. MAP kinases therefore function both upstream and down-stream of signalling by TNFα receptors. Here we review mechanisms that mediate these actions of MAP kinases during the response to TNFα. PMID:24647229

  8. MAP kinase and pain

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Gereau, Robert W.; Malcangio, Marzia; Strichartz, Gary R.

    2008-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are important for intracellular signal transduction and play critical roles in regulating neural plasticity and inflammatory responses. The MAPK family consists of three major members: extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which represent three separate signaling pathways. Accumulating evidence shows that all three MAPK pathways contribute to pain sensitization after tissue and nerve injury via distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms. Activation (phosphorylation) of MAPKs under different persistent pain conditions results in the induction and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity via non-transcriptional and transcriptional regulation. In particular, ERK activation in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons by nociceptive activity, via multiple neurotransmitter receptors, and using different second messenger pathways plays a critical role in central sensitization by regulating the activity of glutamate receptors and potassium channels and inducing gene transcription. ERK activation in amygdala neurons is also required for inflammatory pain sensitization. After nerve injury, ERK, p38, and JNK are differentially activated in spinal glial cells (microglia vs astrocytes), leading to the synthesis of proinflammatory/pronociceptive mediators, thereby enhancing and prolonging pain. Inhibition of all three MAPK pathways has been shown to attenuate inflammatory and neuropathic pain in different animal models. Development of specific inhibitors for MAPK pathways to target neurons and glial cells may lead to new therapies for pain management. Although it is well documented that MAPK pathways can increase pain sensitivity via peripheral mechanisms, this review will focus on central mechanisms of MAPKs, especially ERK. PMID:19150373

  9. The Year in Basic Science: calmodulin kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Means, Anthony R

    2008-12-01

    This article highlights studies published during the past year that represent significant scientific achievements in the world of calmodulin kinase cascades. Calmodulin is the primary receptor for calcium present in all cells. The binding of its calcium ligand results in a conformational change in calmodulin, which allows the calcium-calmodulin complex to interact with many different targets. In the studies to be summarized in this review, the particular calmodulin cascade involved is shown to be the pathway responsible for important biological responses, including long-term memory formation, dendritic cell survival, hypercapnia, neuronal migration, synapse formation, autophagy, fatty acid oxidation, and energy balance. In some cases, the pathway was previously unknown, and the identification of the calmodulin cascade represents the definition of roles. In other cases, manipulating the cascade has suggested therapeutic approaches to certain diseases, most significantly, type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  10. Importance of MAP Kinases during Protoperithecial Morphogenesis in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Jeffree, Chris E.; Oborny, Radek; Boonyarungsrit, Patid; Read, Nick D.

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce multicellular structures filamentous fungi combine various morphogenetic programs that are fundamentally different from those used by plants and animals. The perithecium, the female sexual fruitbody of Neurospora crassa, differentiates from the vegetative mycelium in distinct morphological stages, and represents one of the more complex multicellular structures produced by fungi. In this study we defined the stages of protoperithecial morphogenesis in the N. crassa wild type in greater detail than has previously been described; compared protoperithecial morphogenesis in gene-deletion mutants of all nine mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases conserved in N. crassa; confirmed that all three MAP kinase cascades are required for sexual development; and showed that the three different cascades each have distinctly different functions during this process. However, only MAP kinases equivalent to the budding yeast pheromone response and cell wall integrity pathways, but not the osmoregulatory pathway, were essential for vegetative cell fusion. Evidence was obtained for MAP kinase signaling cascades performing roles in extracellular matrix deposition, hyphal adhesion, and envelopment during the construction of fertilizable protoperithecia. PMID:22900028

  11. P38 MAP kinase mediates apoptosis after genipin treatment in non-small-cell lung cancer H1299 cells via a mitochondrial apoptotic cascade.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Yao, Jie; Luo, Yue; Han, Yongguang; Wang, Zuobai; Du, Linfang

    2013-01-01

    Genipin, an active constituent of Gardenia fruit, has been reported to show an anti-tumor effect in several cancer cell systems. Here, we demonstrate how genipin exhibits a strong apoptotic cell death effect in human non-small-cell lung cancer H1299 cells. Genipin-mediated decrease in cell viability was observed through apoptosis as demonstrated by induction of a sub-G1 peak through flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation measured by TUNEL assay, and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose-polymerase. During genipin-induced apoptosis, the mitochondrial execution pathway was activated by caspase-9 and -3 activation as examined by a kinetic study, cytochrome c release, and a dose-dependent increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. A search for the downstream pathway reveals that genipin-induced apoptosis was mediated by an increase in phosphorylated p38MAPK expression, which further activated downstream signaling by phosphorylating ATF-2. SB203580, a p38MAPK inhibitor, markedly blocked the formation of TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in genipin-treated cells. Besides, the interference of p38MAPK inhibited Bax expression and cytochrome c release. Altogether, our observations imply that genipin causes increased levels of Bax in response to p38MAPK signaling, which results in the initiation of mitochondrial death cascade, and therefore it holds promise as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of H1299 cells.

  12. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  13. c-Jun controls the efficiency of MAP kinase signaling by transcriptional repression of MAP kinase phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprowles, Amy; Wu Yimi; Kung, H.-J.; Wisdom, Ron . E-mail: ronald.wisdom@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-15

    The mammalian JNK signaling pathway regulates the transcriptional response of cells to environmental stress, including UV irradiation. This signaling pathway is composed of a classical MAP kinase cascade; activation results in phosphorylation of the transcription factor substrates c-Jun and ATF2, and leads to changes in gene expression. The defining components of this pathway are conserved in the fission yeast S. pombe, where the genetic studies have shown that the ability of the JNK homolog Spc1 to be activated in response to UV irradiation is dependent on the presence of the transcription factor substrate Atf1. We have used genetic analysis to define the role of c-Jun in activation of the mammalian JNK signaling pathway. Our results show that optimal activation of JNK requires the presence of its transcription factor substrate c-Jun. Mutational analysis shows that the ability of c-Jun to support efficient activation of JNK requires the ability of Jun to bind DNA, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism. Consistent with this, we show that c-Jun represses the expression of several MAP kinase phosphatases. In the absence of c-Jun, the increased expression of MAP kinase phosphatases leads to impaired activation of the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases after pathway activation. The results show that one function of c-Jun is to regulate the efficiency of signaling by the ERK, p38, and JNK MAP kinases, a function that is likely to affect cellular responses to many different stimuli.

  14. Raf kinase inhibitory protein suppresses a metastasis signalling cascade involving LIN28 and let-7

    PubMed Central

    Dangi-Garimella, Surabhi; Yun, Jieun; Eves, Eva M; Newman, Martin; Erkeland, Stefan J; Hammond, Scott M; Minn, Andy J; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) negatively regulates the MAP kinase (MAPK), G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2, and NF-κB signalling cascades. RKIP has been implicated as a metastasis suppressor for prostate cancer, but the mechanism is not known. Here, we show that RKIP inhibits invasion by metastatic breast cancer cells and represses breast tumour cell intravasation and bone metastasis in an orthotopic murine model. The mechanism involves inhibition of MAPK, leading to decreased transcription of LIN28 by Myc. Suppression of LIN28 enables enhanced let-7 processing in breast cancer cells. Elevated let-7 expression inhibits HMGA2, a chromatin remodelling protein that activates pro-invasive and pro-metastatic genes, including Snail. LIN28 depletion and let-7 expression suppress bone metastasis, and LIN28 restores bone metastasis in mice bearing RKIP-expressing breast tumour cells. These results indicate that RKIP suppresses invasion and metastasis in part through a signalling cascade involving MAPK, Myc, LIN28, let-7, and downstream let-7 targets. RKIP regulation of two pluripotent stem cell genes, Myc and LIN28, highlights the importance of RKIP as a key metastasis suppressor and potential therapeutic agent. PMID:19153603

  15. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling.

  16. Universal fractional map and cascade of bifurcations type attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, M.

    2013-09-01

    We modified the way in which the Universal Map is obtained in the regular dynamics to derive the Universal α-Family of Maps depending on a single parameter α >0, which is the order of the fractional derivative in the nonlinear fractional differential equation describing a system experiencing periodic kicks. We consider two particular α-families corresponding to the Standard and Logistic Maps. For fractional α <2 in the area of parameter values of the transition through the period doubling cascade of bifurcations from regular to chaotic motion in regular dynamics corresponding fractional systems demonstrate a new type of attractors—cascade of bifurcations type trajectories.

  17. Positioning atypical protein kinase C isoforms in the UV-induced apoptotic signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Berra, E; Municio, M M; Sanz, L; Frutos, S; Diaz-Meco, M T; Moscat, J

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have documented the involvement of the atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms in important cellular functions such as cell proliferation and survival. Exposure of cells to a genotoxic stimulus that induces apoptosis, such as UV irradiation, leads to a profound inhibition of the atypical PKC activity in vivo. In this study, we addressed the relationship between this phenomenon and different proteins involved in the apoptotic response. We show that (i) the inhibition of the aPKC activity precedes UV-induced apoptosis; (ii) UV-induced aPKC inhibition and apoptosis are independent of p53; (iii) Bcl-2 proteins are potent modulators of aPKC activity; and (iv) the aPKCs are located upstream of the interleukin-converting enzyme-like protease system, which is required for the induction of apoptosis by both Par-4 (a selective aPKC inhibitor) and UV irradiation. We also demonstrate here that inhibition of aPKC activity leads to a decrease in mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity and simultaneously an increase in p38 activity. Both effects are critical for the induction of apoptosis in response to Par-4 expression and UV irradiation. Collectively, these results clarify the position of the aPKCs in the UV-induced apoptotic pathway and strongly suggest that MAP kinases play a role in this signaling cascade. PMID:9234692

  18. Geologic Map of the North Cascade Range, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, Ralph A.; Tabor, Rowland W.

    2009-01-01

    The North Cascade Range, commonly referred to as the North Cascades, is the northern part of the Cascade Range that stretches from northern California into British Columbia, where it merges with the Coast Mountains of British Columbia at the Fraser River. The North Cascades are generally characterized by exposure of plutonic and metamorphic rocks in contrast to the volcanic terrain to the south. The rocks of the North Cascades are more resistant to erosion, display greater relief, and show evidence of more pronounced uplift and recent glaciation. Although the total length of the North Cascade Range, extending north from Snoqualmie Pass in Washington, is about 200 mi (320 km), this compilation map at 1:200,000 scale covers only that part (~150 mi) in the United States. The compilation map is derived mostly from eight 1:100,000-scale quadrangle maps that include all of the North Cascade Range in Washington and a bit of the mostly volcanic part of the Cascade Range to the south (fig. 1, sheet 2). Overall, the area represented by this compilation is about 12,740 mi2 (33,000 km2). The superb alpine scenery of the North Cascade Range and its proximity to major population centers has led to designation of much of the area for recreational use or wilderness preservation. A major part of the map area is in North Cascade National Park. Other restricted use areas are the Alpine Lakes, Boulder River, Clearwater, Glacier Peak, Henry M. Jackson, Lake Chelan-Sawtooth, Mount Baker, Noisy-Diobsud, Norse Peak, and Pasayten Wildernesses and the Mount Baker, Lake Chelan, and Ross Lake National Recreation Areas. The valleys traversed by Washington State Highway 20 east of Ross Lake are preserved as North Cascades Scenic Highway. The map area is traversed by three major highways: U.S. Interstate 90, crossing Snoqualmie Pass; Washington State Highway 2, crossing Stevens Pass; and Washington State Highway 20, crossing Washington Pass. Major secondary roads, as well as a network of U

  19. Inferring missing data in satellite chlorophyll maps using turbulent cascading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottier, C.; Turiel, A.; Garcon, V.

    2009-04-01

    Oceanic turbulent flows develop complicated patterns, with eddies, filaments and shear currents. Although usually referred as chaotic, their inner organization is strongly hierarchical: turbulent flows develop cascades, which transfer properties such as energy or scalar density from larger to smaller scales. We present a novel algorithm based on the cascade and able to fill data gaps in satellite images (particularly, chlorophyll concentration maps). The first step is to show that cascade processes for chlorophyll-a concentration images take a simple, explicit form when an appropriate wavelet (here Battle-Lemarié of order 3) representation is used. A reconstruction algorithm exploiting the cascade structure is then given with a detailed description. We discuss the validity and quality of this algorithm when applied to SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua ocean color images. An application to merging data from multiple satellite missions is presented together with a demonstration of the benefit of this algorithm over two other merging methods.

  20. MAP kinases phosphorylate rice WRKY45.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Riichiro; Kishi-Kaboshi, Mitsuko; Matsushita, Akane; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Goto, Shingo; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    WRKY45 transcription factor is a central regulator of disease resistance mediated by the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway in rice. SA-activated WRKY45 protein induces the accumulation of its own mRNA. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation is still unknown. Here, we report three lines of evidence showing that a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is involved in this regulation. An inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MAPKK) suppressed the increase in WRKY45 transcript level in response to SA. Two MAPKs, OsMPK4 and OsMPK6, phosphorylated WRKY45 protein in vitro. The activity of OsMPK6 was rapidly upregulated by SA treatment in rice cells. These results suggest that WRKY45 is regulated by MAPK-dependent phosphorylation in the SA pathway.

  1. The Role of Specific Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascades in the Regulation of Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Pulak R.; Stocco, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) comprise a family of serine/threonine kinases that are activated by a large variety of extracellular stimuli and play integral roles in controlling many cellular processes, from the cell surface to the nucleus. The MAPK family includes four distinct MAPK cascades, that is, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase or stress-activated protein kinase, and ERK5. These MAPKs are essentially operated through three-tiered consecutive phosphorylation events catalyzed by a MAPK kinase kinase, a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK. MAPKs lie in protein kinase cascades. The MAPK signaling pathways have been demonstrated to be associated with events regulating the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and steroidogenesis in steroidogenic tissues. However, it has become clear that the regulation of MAPK-dependent StAR expression and steroid synthesis is a complex process and is context dependent. This paper summarizes the current level of understanding concerning the roles of the MAPK signaling cascades in the regulation of StAR expression and steroidogenesis in different steroidogenic cell models. PMID:21637381

  2. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    PubMed

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Danai, Laura V.; DiStefano, Marina T.; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B.; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C.; Czech, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo. After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. PMID:27226575

  4. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Weiyan; Li, Baohua; Li, Shujia; Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Ma, Mei; Wang, Jiyao; Gao, Jin; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development.

  5. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade MKK7-MPK6 Plays Important Roles in Plant Development and Regulates Shoot Branching by Phosphorylating PIN1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Wu, Xiaowei; Cai, Yueyue; Zhang, Yuanya; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Jiayang; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidences exhibit that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/MPK) signaling pathways are connected with many aspects of plant development. The complexity of MAPK cascades raises challenges not only to identify the MAPK module in planta but also to define the specific role of an individual module. So far, our knowledge of MAPK signaling has been largely restricted to a small subset of MAPK cascades. Our previous study has characterized an Arabidopsis bushy and dwarf1 (bud1) mutant, in which the MAP Kinase Kinase 7 (MKK7) was constitutively activated, resulting in multiple phenotypic alterations. In this study, we found that MPK3 and MPK6 are the substrates for phosphorylation by MKK7 in planta. Genetic analysis showed that MKK7-MPK6 cascade is specifically responsible for the regulation of shoot branching, hypocotyl gravitropism, filament elongation, and lateral root formation, while MKK7-MPK3 cascade is mainly involved in leaf morphology. We further demonstrated that the MKK7-MPK6 cascade controls shoot branching by phosphorylating Ser 337 on PIN1, which affects the basal localization of PIN1 in xylem parenchyma cells and polar auxin transport in the primary stem. Our results not only specify the functions of the MKK7-MPK6 cascade but also reveal a novel mechanism for PIN1 phosphorylation, establishing a molecular link between the MAPK cascade and auxin-regulated plant development. PMID:27618482

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in signaling plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are ubiquitous signaling modules in eukaryotes. Early research of plant MAPKs has been focused on their functions in immunity and stress responses. Recent studies reveal that they also play essential roles in plant growth and development downstream of receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). With only a limited number of MAPK components, multiple functional pathways initiated from different receptors often share the same MAPK components or even a complete MAPK cascade. In this review, we discuss how MAPK cascades function as molecular switches in response to spatiotemporal-specific ligand-receptor interactions and the availability of downstream substrates. In addition, we discuss other possible mechanisms governing the functional specificity of plant MAPK cascades, a question central to our understanding of MAPK functions.

  7. Dealing with osmostress through MAP kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    de Nadal, Eulàlia; Alepuz, Paula M.; Posas, Francesc

    2002-01-01

    In response to changes in the extracellular environment, cells coordinate intracellular activities to maximize their probability of survival and proliferation. Eukaryotic cells, from yeast to mammals, transduce diverse extracellular stimuli through the cell by multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. Exposure of cells to increases in extracellular osmolarity results in rapid activation of a highly conserved family of MAPKs, known as stress-activated MAPKs (SAPKs). Activation of SAPKs is essential for the induction of adaptive responses required for cell survival upon osmostress. Recent studies have begun to shed light on the broad effects of SAPK activation in the modulation of several aspects of cell physiology, ranging from the control of gene expression to the regulation of cell division. PMID:12151331

  8. Protein Scaffolds in MAP Kinase Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew D.; Sacks, David B.

    2009-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway allows cells to interpret external signals and respond in an appropriate way. Diverse cellular functions, ranging from differentiation and proliferation to migration and inflammation, are regulated by MAPK signalling. Therefore, cells have developed mechanisms by which this single pathway modulates numerous cellular responses from a wide range of activating factors. This specificity is achieved by several mechanisms, including temporal and spatial control of MAPK signalling components. Key to this control are protein scaffolds, which are multidomain proteins that interact with components of the MAPK cascade in order to assemble signalling complexes. Studies conducted on different scaffolds, in different biological systems, have shown that scaffolds exert substantial control over MAPK signalling, influencing the signal intensity, time course and, importantly, the cellular responses. Protein scaffolds, therefore, are integral elements in the modulation of the MAPK network in fundamental physiological processes. PMID:19091303

  9. The candidate MAP kinase phosphorylation substrate DPL-1 (DP) promotes expression of the MAP kinase phosphatase LIP-1 in C. elegans germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baiqing; Reinke, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    The highly-conserved, commonly used MAP kinase signaling cascade plays multiple integral roles in germline development in C. elegans. Using a functional proteomic approach, we found that the transcription factor DPL-1, a component of the LIN-35(Rb)/EFL-1(E2F)/DPL-1(DP) pathway, is a candidate phosphorylation substrate of MAP kinase. Moreover, dpl-1 genetically interacts with mpk-1(MAP kinase) to control chromosome morphology in pachytene of meiosis I, as does lin-35. However, EFL-1, the canonical DPL-1 heterodimeric partner, does not have a role in this process. Interestingly, we find that DPL-1 and EFL-1, but not LIN-35, promote the expression of a negative regulator of MPK-1, the MAP kinase phosphatase LIP-1. Two E2F consensus motifs are present upstream of the lip-1 open reading frame. Therefore the Rb/E2F/DP pathway intersects with MAP kinase signaling at multiple points to regulate different aspects of C. elegans germ cell development. These two highly conserved pathways with major regulatory roles in proliferation and differentiation likely have multiple mechanisms for cross-talk during development across many species. PMID:18304523

  10. MAP kinase activator from insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle is a protein threonine/tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Nakielny, S; Cohen, P; Wu, J; Sturgill, T

    1992-01-01

    A 'MAP kinase activator' was purified several thousand-fold from insulin-stimulated rabbit skeletal muscle, which resembled the 'activator' from nerve growth factor-stimulated PC12 cells in that it could be inactivated by incubation with protein phosphatase 2A, but not by protein tyrosine phosphatases and its apparent molecular mass was 45-50 kDa. In the presence of MgATP, 'MAP kinase activator' converted the normal 'wild-type' 42 kDa MAP kinase from an inactive dephosphorylated form to the fully active diphosphorylated species. Phosphorylation occurred on the same threonine and tyrosine residues which are phosphorylated in vivo in response to growth factors or phorbol esters. A mutant MAP kinase produced by changing a lysine at the active centre to arginine was phosphorylated in an identical manner by the 'MAP kinase activator', but no activity was generated. The results demonstrate that 'MAP kinase activator' is a protein kinase (MAP kinase kinase) and not a protein that stimulates the autophosphorylation of MAP kinase. MAP kinase kinase is the first established example of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate an exogenous protein on threonine as well as tyrosine residues. Images PMID:1318193

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5)-mediated signalling cascade regulates expression of iron superoxide dismutase gene in Arabidopsis under salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yu; Chen, Wei-hua; Jia, Wensuo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are involved in plant adaptive responses to biotic and abiotic stresses but the upstream signalling process that modulates their expression is not clear. Expression of two iron SODs, FSD2 and FSD3, was significantly increased in Arabidopsis in response to NaCl treatment but blocked in transgenic MKK5-RNAi plant, mkk5. Using an assay system for transient expression in protoplasts, it was found that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MKK5) was also activated in response to salt stress. Overexpression of MKK5 in wild-type plants enhanced their tolerance to salt treatments, while mkk5 mutant exhibited hypersensitivity to salt stress in germination on salt-containing media. Moreover, another kinase, MPK6, was also involved in the MKK5-mediated iron superoxide dismutase (FSD) signalling pathway in salt stress. The kinase activity of MPK6 was totally turned off in mkk5, whereas the activity of MPK3 was only partially blocked. MKK5 interacted with the MEKK1 protein that was also involved in the salt-induced FSD signalling pathway. These data suggest that salt-induced FSD2 and FSD3 expressions are influenced by MEKK1 via MKK5-MPK6-coupled signalling. This MAP kinase cascade (MEKK1, MKK5, and MPK6) mediates the salt-induced expression of iron superoxide dismutases.

  12. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  13. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  14. KIDFamMap: a database of kinase-inhibitor-disease family maps for kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Ta; Huang, Jhang-Wei; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Tseng, Jen-Hu; You, Syuan-Ren; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2013-01-01

    Kinases play central roles in signaling pathways and are promising therapeutic targets for many diseases. Designing selective kinase inhibitors is an emergent and challenging task, because kinases share an evolutionary conserved ATP-binding site. KIDFamMap (http://gemdock.life.nctu.edu.tw/KIDFamMap/) is the first database to explore kinase-inhibitor families (KIFs) and kinase-inhibitor-disease (KID) relationships for kinase inhibitor selectivity and mechanisms. This database includes 1208 KIFs, 962 KIDs, 55 603 kinase-inhibitor interactions (KIIs), 35 788 kinase inhibitors, 399 human protein kinases, 339 diseases and 638 disease allelic variants. Here, a KIF can be defined as follows: (i) the kinases in the KIF with significant sequence similarity, (ii) the inhibitors in the KIF with significant topology similarity and (iii) the KIIs in the KIF with significant interaction similarity. The KIIs within a KIF are often conserved on some consensus KIDFamMap anchors, which represent conserved interactions between the kinase subsites and consensus moieties of their inhibitors. Our experimental results reveal that the members of a KIF often possess similar inhibition profiles. The KIDFamMap anchors can reflect kinase conformations types, kinase functions and kinase inhibitor selectivity. We believe that KIDFamMap provides biological insights into kinase inhibitor selectivity and binding mechanisms. PMID:23193279

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Activation of the TPL-2/MEK/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade Is Regulated by IκB Kinase-Induced Proteolysis of NF-κB1 p105†

    PubMed Central

    Beinke, S.; Robinson, M. J.; Hugunin, M.; Ley, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    The MEK kinase TPL-2 (also known as Cot) is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in macrophages and consequent upregulation of genes involved in innate immune responses. In resting cells, TPL-2 forms a stoichiometric complex with NF-κB1 p105, which negatively regulates its MEK kinase activity. Here, it is shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation of primary macrophages causes the release of both long and short forms of TPL-2 from p105 and that TPL-2 MEK kinase activity is restricted to this p105-free pool. Activation of TPL-2, MEK, and ERK by LPS is also demonstrated to require proteasome-mediated proteolysis. p105 is known to be proteolysed by the proteasome following stimulus-induced phosphorylation of two serines in its PEST region by the IκB kinase (IKK) complex. Expression of a p105 point mutant, which is not susceptible to signal-induced proteolysis, in RAW264.7 macrophages impairs LPS-induced release of TPL-2 from p105 and its subsequent activation of MEK. Furthermore, expression of wild-type but not mutant p105 reconstitutes LPS stimulation of MEK and ERK phosphorylation in primary NF-κB1-deficient macrophages. Consistently, pharmacological blockade of IKK inhibits LPS-induced release of TPL-2 from p105 and TPL-2 activation. These data show that IKK-induced p105 proteolysis is essential for LPS activation of TPL-2, thus revealing a novel function of IKK in the regulation of the ERK MAP kinase cascade. PMID:15485931

  16. Identification and Analysis of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Cascades in Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heying; Ren, Suyue; Han, Yuanfang; Zhang, Qing; Qin, Ling; Xing, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signaling modules in eukaryotes, including yeasts, plants and animals. MAPK cascades are responsible for protein phosphorylation during signal transduction events, and typically consist of three protein kinases: MAPK, MAPK kinase, and MAPK kinase kinase. In this current study, we identified a total of 12 FvMAPK, 7 FvMAPKK, 73 FvMAPKKK, and one FvMAPKKKK genes in the recently published Fragaria vesca genome sequence. This work reported the classification, annotation and phylogenetic evaluation of these genes and an assessment of conserved motifs and the expression profiling of members of the gene family were also analyzed here. The expression profiles of the MAPK and MAPKK genes in different organs and fruit developmental stages were further investigated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Finally, the MAPK and MAPKK expression patterns in response to hormone and abiotic stresses (salt, drought, and high and low temperature) were investigated in fruit and leaves of F. vesca. The results provide a platform for further characterization of the physiological and biochemical functions of MAPK cascades in strawberry. PMID:28805715

  17. Effects of MAP kinase pathway and other factors on meiosis of Urechis unicinctus eggs.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin; Wang, Yong-Chao; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Peng, An; Chen, Da-Yuan; Tang, Yong-Zheng

    2005-05-01

    The eggs of Urechis unicinctus Von Drasche, an echiuroid, are arrested at P-I stage in meiosis. The meiosis is reinitiated by fertilization. Immunoblotting analysis using anti-ERK2 and anti-phospho-MAPK antibodies revealed a 44 kDa MAP kinase species that was constantly expressed in U. unicinctus eggs, quickly phosphorylated after fertilization, and dephosphorylated slowly before the completion of meiosis I. Phosphorylation of the protein was not depressed by protein synthesis inhibitor Cycloheximide (CHX), but was depressed by the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059. Under PD98059 treatment, polar body extrusion was suppressed and the function of centrosome and spindle was abnormal though GVBD was not affected, indicating that MAP kinase cascade was important for meiotic division of U. unicinctus eggs. Other discovery includes: A23187 and OA could parthenogenetically activate U. unicinctus eggs and phosphorylated 44 kDa MAP kinase species, indicating that the effect of fertilization on reinitiating meiosis and phosphorylation of 44 kDa MAP kinase specie is mediated by raising intracellular free calcium and by phosphorylation of some proteins, and that phosphotase(s) sensitive to OA is responsible for arresting U. unicinctus eggs in prophase I. diC8, an activator of PKC, accelerated the process of U. unicinctus egg meiotic division after fertilization and accelerated the dephosphorylation of 44 kDa MAP kinase specie, which implied that the acceleration effect of PKC on meiotic division was mediated by inactivation of MAP kinase cascade. Elevating cAMP/PKA level in U. unicinctus eggs had no effect on meiotic division of the eggs.

  18. HAM-5 Functions As a MAP Kinase Scaffold during Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-01-01

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every ∼8 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a recently identified scaffold for the MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway in Sordaria macrospora. How the MAK-2 oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK-2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM-5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM-5-GFP co-localized with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM-5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK-2 activity influences HAM-5 function/localization. However, MAK-2-GFP showed cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM-5 was shown to physically interact with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members for oscillation and chemotropic interactions during germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM-5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK-2 cascade to upstream factors and proteins involved in this intriguing process of

  19. Different designs of kinase-phosphatase interactions and phosphatase sequestration shapes the robustness and signal flow in the MAPK cascade

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The three layer mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade exhibits different designs of interactions between its kinases and phosphatases. While the sequential interactions between the three kinases of the cascade are tightly preserved, the phosphatases of the cascade, such as MKP3 and PP2A, exhibit relatively diverse interactions with their substrate kinases. Additionally, the kinases of the MAPK cascade can also sequester their phosphatases. Thus, each topologically distinct interaction design of kinases and phosphatases could exhibit unique signal processing characteristics, and the presence of phosphatase sequestration may lead to further fine tuning of the propagated signal. Results We have built four architecturally distinct types of models of the MAPK cascade, each model with identical kinase-kinase interactions but unique kinases-phosphatases interactions. Our simulations unravelled that MAPK cascade’s robustness to external perturbations is a function of nature of interaction between its kinases and phosphatases. The cascade’s output robustness was enhanced when phosphatases were sequestrated by their target kinases. We uncovered a novel implicit/hidden negative feedback loop from the phosphatase MKP3 to its upstream kinase Raf-1, in a cascade resembling the B cell MAPK cascade. Notably, strength of the feedback loop was reciprocal to the strength of phosphatases’ sequestration and stronger sequestration abolished the feedback loop completely. An experimental method to verify the presence of the feedback loop is also proposed. We further showed, when the models were activated by transient signal, memory (total time taken by the cascade output to reach its unstimulated level after removal of signal) of a cascade was determined by the specific designs of interaction among its kinases and phosphatases. Conclusions Differences in interaction designs among the kinases and phosphatases can differentially shape the robustness and

  20. Orexin-stimulated MAP kinase cascades are activated through multiple G-protein signalling pathways in human H295R adrenocortical cells: diverse roles for orexins A and B.

    PubMed

    Ramanjaneya, Manjunath; Conner, Alex C; Chen, Jing; Kumar, Prashanth; Brown, James E P; Jöhren, Olaf; Lehnert, Hendrik; Stanfield, Peter R; Randeva, Harpal S

    2009-08-01

    Orexins A and B (ORA and ORB) are neuropeptide hormones found throughout the central nervous system and periphery. They are required for a host of physiological processes including mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) regulation, steroidogenesis, appetite control and energy regulation. While some signalling mechanisms have been proposed for individual recombinant orexin receptors in generic mammalian cell types, it is clear that the peripheral effects of orexin are spatially and temporally complex. This study dissects the different G-protein signalling and MAPK pathways activated in a pluripotent human adrenal H295R cell line capable of all the physiological steps involved in steroidogenesis. Both extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 were phosphorylated rapidly with a subsequent decline, in a time- and dose-dependent manner, in response to both ORA and ORB. Conversely, there was little or no direct activation of the ERK5 or JNK pathway. Analysis using signalling and MAPK inhibitors as well as receptor-specific antagonists determined the precise mediators of the orexin response in these cells. Both ERK1/2 and p38 activation were predominantly G(q)- and to a lesser extent G(s)-mediated; p38 activation even had a small G(i)-component. Effects were broadly comparable for both orexin sub-types ORA and ORB and although most of the effects were transmitted through the orexin receptor-1 subtype, we did observe a role for orexin receptor-2-mediated activation of both ERK1/2 and p38. Cortisol secretion also differed in response to ORA and ORB. These data suggest multiple roles for orexin-mediated MAPK activation in an adrenal cell-line, this complexity may help to explain the diverse biological actions of orexins with wide-ranging consequences for our understanding of the mechanisms initiated by these steroidogenic molecules.

  1. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  2. Physiological roles of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase cascade in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Colomer, J; Means, A R

    2007-01-01

    Numerous hormones, growth factors and physiological processes cause a rise in cytosolic Ca2+, which is translated into meaningful cellular responses by interacting with a large number of Ca2(+)-binding proteins. The Ca2(+)-binding protein that is most pervasive in mediating these responses is calmodulin (CaM), which acts as a primary receptor for Ca2+ in all eukaryotic cells. In turn, Ca2+/CaM functions as an allosteric activator of a host of enzymatic proteins including a considerable number of protein kinases. The topic of this review is to discuss the physiological roles of a sub-set of these protein kinases which can function in cells as a Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase signaling cascade. The cascade was originally believed to consist of a CaM kinase kinase that phosphorylates and activates one of two CaM kinases, CaMKI or CaMKIV. The unusual aspect of this cascade is that both the kinase kinase and the kinase require the binding of Ca2+/CaM for activation. More recently, one of the CaM kinase kinases has been found to activate another important enzyme, the AMP-dependent protein kinase so the concept of the CaM kinase cascade must be expanded. A CaM kinase cascade is important for many normal physiological processes that when misregulated can lead to a variety of disease states. These processes include: cell proliferation and apoptosis that may conspire in the genesis of cancer; neuronal growth and function related to brain development, synaptic plasticity as well as memory formation and maintenance; proper function of the immune system including the inflammatory response, activation of T lymphocytes and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance; and the central control of energy balance that, when altered, can lead to obesity and diabetes. Although the study of the CaM-dependent kinase cascades is still in its infancy continued analysis of the pathways regulated by these Ca2(+)-initiated signaling cascades holds considerable promise for the future of disease

  3. Leishmania MAP kinases--familiar proteins in an unusual context.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases are well-known mediators of signal transduction of higher eukaryotes regulating important processes like proliferation, differentiation, stress response and apoptosis. In Leishmania, the typical three-tiered module of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways is present. However, typical activators like cell surface receptors and substrates such as RNA polymerase II transcription factors are missing. Here, I describe the set of 15 putative mitogen-activated protein kinases encoded in the Leishmania genome and discuss their potential function.

  4. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa

    DOE PAGES

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; ...

    2014-11-20

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) thatmore » can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal

  5. The mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is activated by B-Raf in response to nerve growth factor through interaction with p21ras.

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, R K; Moodie, S A; Wolfman, A; Landreth, G E

    1994-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) activates the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade through a p21ras-dependent signal transduction pathway in PC12 cells. The linkage between p21ras and MEK1 was investigated to identify those elements which participate in the regulation of MEK1 activity. We have screened for MEK activators using a coupled assay in which the MAP kinase cascade has been reconstituted in vitro. We report that we have detected a single NGF-stimulated MEK-activating activity which has been identified as B-Raf. PC12 cells express both B-Raf and c-Raf1; however, the MEK-activating activity was found only in fractions containing B-Raf. c-Raf1-containing fractions did not exhibit a MEK-activating activity. Gel filtration analysis revealed that the B-Raf eluted with an apparent M(r) of 250,000 to 300,000, indicating that it is present within a stable complex with other unidentified proteins. Immunoprecipitation with B-Raf-specific antisera quantitatively precipitated all MEK activator activity from these fractions. We also demonstrate that B-Raf, as well as c-Raf1, directly interacted with activated p21ras immobilized on silica beads. NGF treatment of the cells had no effect on the ability of B-Raf or c-Raf1 to bind to activated p21ras. These data indicate that this interaction was not dependent upon the activation state of these enzymes; however, MEK kinase activity was found to be associated with p21ras following incubation with NGF-treated samples at levels higher than those obtained from unstimulated cells. These data provide direct evidence that NGF-stimulated B-Raf is responsible for the activation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells, whereas c-Raf1 activity was not found to function within this pathway. Images PMID:7935411

  6. Cadmium-induced activation of high osmolarity glycerol pathway through its Sln1 branch is dependent on the MAP kinase kinase kinase Ssk2, but not its paralog Ssk22, in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linghuo; Cao, Chunlei; Zhang, Lilin; Lin, Wei; Xia, Jing; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Cadmium ions disrupt reactive oxygen species/Ca(2+) homeostasis and subsequently elicit cell death and adaptive signaling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Through a functional genomics approach, we have identified deletion mutants of 106 yeast genes, including three MAP kinase genes (HOG1, SLT2, and KSS1), are sensitive to a sublethal concentration of cadmium, and 64 mutants show elevated intracellular cadmium concentrations upon exposure to cadmium. Hog1 is phosphorylated, reaching a peak 30 min after the cadmium treatment. Both Sln1 and Sho1 upstream branches are involved in the cadmium-induced activation of high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway. Cadmium-induced HOG activation is dependent on the MAP kinase kinase kinase Ssk2, but not its paralog Ssk22, in the Sln1 branch.

  7. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  8. Exploring a cascade Heck-Suzuki reaction based route to kinase inhibitors using design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Ekebergh, Andreas; Lingblom, Christine; Sandin, Peter; Wennerås, Christine; Mårtensson, Jerker

    2015-03-21

    Design of Experiments (DoE) has been used to optimize a diversity oriented palladium catalyzed cascade Heck-Suzuki reaction for the construction of 3-alkenyl substituted cyclopenta[b]indole compounds. The obtained DoE model revealed a reaction highly dependent on the ligand. Guided by the model, an optimal ligand was chosen that selectively delivered the desired products in high yields. The conditions were applicable with a variety of boronic acids and were used to synthesize a library of 3-alkenyl derivatized compounds. Focusing on inhibition of kinases relevant for combating melanoma, the library was used in an initial structure-activity survey. In line with the observed kinase inhibition, cellular studies revealed one of the more promising derivatives to inhibit cell proliferation via an apoptotic mechanism.

  9. c-Kit-kinase induces a cascade of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in normal human melanocytes in response to mast cell growth factor and stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase but is down-regulated in melanomas.

    PubMed Central

    Funasaka, Y; Boulton, T; Cobb, M; Yarden, Y; Fan, B; Lyman, S D; Williams, D E; Anderson, D M; Zakut, R; Mishima, Y

    1992-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Kit, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is an important regulator of cell growth whose constitutively active oncogenic counterpart, v-kit, induces sarcomas in cats. Mutations in murine c-kit that reduce the receptor tyrosine kinase activity cause deficiencies in the migration and proliferation of melanoblasts, hematopoietic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. We therefore investigated whether c-Kit regulates normal human melanocyte proliferation and plays a role in melanomas. We show that normal human melanocytes respond to mast cell growth factor (MGF), the Kit-ligand that stimulates phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in c-Kit and induces sequential phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in several other proteins. One of the phosphorylated intermediates in the signal transduction pathway was identified as an early response kinase (mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase). Dephosphorylation of a prominent 180-kDa protein suggests that MGF also activates a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. In contrast, MGF did not induce proliferation, the cascade of protein phosphorylations, or MAP kinase activation in the majority of cells cultured from primary nodular and metastatic melanomas that grow independently of exogenous factors. In the five out of eight human melanoma lines expressing c-kit mRNAs, c-Kit was not constitutively activated. Therefore, although c-Kit-kinase is a potent growth regulator of normal human melanocytes, its activity is not positively associated with malignant transformation. Images PMID:1372524

  10. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  11. Discovery and characterization of non-ATP site inhibitors of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases.

    PubMed

    Comess, Kenneth M; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R; Gum, Rebecca J; Borhani, David W; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E; Haasch, Deanna L; Smith, Harriet T; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L; Cloutier, Timothy E; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J; Calderwood, David J; Hajduk, Philip J

    2011-03-18

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38α (involved in the formation of TNFα and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38α both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in similar fashion to Jnk-1 si

  12. Geologic map of Three Sisters volcanic cluster, Cascade Range, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    The cluster of glaciated stratovolcanoes called the Three Sisters—South Sister, Middle Sister, and North Sister—forms a spectacular 20-km-long reach along the crest of the Cascade Range in Oregon. The three eponymous stratocones, though contiguous and conventionally lumped sororally, could hardly display less family resemblance. North Sister (10,085 ft), a monotonously mafic edifice at least as old as 120 ka, is a glacially ravaged stratocone that consists of hundreds of thin rubbly lava flows and intercalated falls that dip radially and steeply; remnants of two thick lava flows cap its summit. Middle Sister (10,047 ft), an andesite-basalt-dacite cone built between 48 and 14 ka, is capped by a thick stack of radially dipping, dark-gray, thin mafic lava flows; asymmetrically glaciated, its nearly intact west flank contrasts sharply with its steep east face. Snow and ice-filled South Sister is a bimodal rhyolitic-intermediate edifice that was constructed between 50 ka and 2 ka; its crater (rim at 10,358 ft) was created between 30 and 22 ka, during the most recent of several explosive summit eruptions; the thin oxidized agglutinate that mantles its current crater rim protects a 150-m-thick pyroclastic sequence that helped fill a much larger crater. For each of the three, the eruptive volume is likely to have been in the range of 15 to 25 km³, but such estimates are fairly uncertain, owing to glacial erosion. The map area consists exclusively of Quaternary volcanic rocks and derivative surficial deposits. Although most of the area has been modified by glaciation, the volcanoes are young enough that the landforms remain largely constructional. Furthermore, twelve of the 145 eruptive units on the map are postglacial, younger than the deglaciation that was underway by about 17 ka. The most recent eruptions were of rhyolite near South Sister, about 2,000 years ago, and of mafic magma near McKenzie Pass, about 1,500 years ago. As observed by trailblazing volcanologist

  13. Cascades/Aleutian Play Fairway Analysis: Data and Map Files

    DOE Data Explorer

    Lisa Shevenell

    2015-11-15

    Contains Excel data files used to quantifiably rank the geothermal potential of each of the young volcanic centers of the Cascade and Aleutian Arcs using world power production volcanic centers as benchmarks. Also contains shapefiles used in play fairway analysis with power plant, volcano, geochemistry and structural data.

  14. The RWP-RK factor GROUNDED promotes embryonic polarity by facilitating YODA MAP kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sangho; Palmer, Travis M; Lukowitz, Wolfgang

    2011-08-09

    The division of plant zygotes is typically asymmetric, generating daughter cells with different developmental fates. In Arabidopsis, the apical daughter cell produces the proembryo, whereas the basal daughter cell forms the mostly extraembryonic suspensor. Establishment of apical and basal fates is known to depend on the YODA (YDA) mitogen-associated protein (MAP) kinase cascade and WUSCHEL-LIKE HOMEOBOX (WOX) homeodomain transcription factors. Mutations in GROUNDED (GRD) cause anatomical defects implying a partial loss of developmental asymmetry in the first division. Subsequently, suspensor-specific WOX8 expression disappears while proembryo-specific ZLL expression expands in the mutants, revealing that basal fates are confounded. GRD encodes a small nuclear protein of the RWP-RK family and is broadly transcribed in the early embryo. Loss of GRD eliminates the dominant effects of hyperactive YDA variants, indicating that GRD is required for YDA-dependent signaling in the embryo. However, GRD function is not regulated via direct phosphorylation by MAP kinases, and forced expression of GRD does not suppress the effect of yda mutations. In a strong synthetic interaction, grd;wox8;wox9 triple mutants arrest as zygotes or one-cell embryos lacking apparent polarity. The predicted transcription factor GRD acts cooperatively with WOX homeodomain proteins to establish embryonic polarity in the first division. Like YDA, GRD promotes zygote elongation and basal cell fates. GRD function is required for YDA-dependent signaling but apparently not regulated by the YDA MAP kinase cascade. Similarity of GRD to Chlamydomonas MID suggests a conserved role for small RWP-RK proteins in regulating the transcriptional programs of generative cells and the zygote. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ras, Raf, and MAP kinase in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Solus, Jason F; Kraft, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    A growing understanding of the biology and molecular mechanisms of melanoma has led to the identification of a number of driver mutations for this aggressive tumor. The most common mutations affect signaling of the Ras/Raf/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. This review will focus on mutations in genes encoding proteins that play a role in the MAPK pathway and that have been implicated in melanoma biology, such as BRAF, NRAS, and MEK (MAPK kinase), and detail the current understanding of their role in melanoma progression from a molecular biology perspective. Furthermore, this review will also consider some additional mutations in genes such as KIT, GNAQ, and GNA11, which can be seen in certain subtypes of melanoma and whose gene products interact with the MAPK pathway. In addition, the association of these molecular changes with clinical and classical histopathologic characteristics of melanoma will be outlined and their role in diagnosis of melanocytic lesions discussed. Finally, a basic overview of the current targeted therapy landscape, as far as relevant to the pathologist, will be provided.

  16. Discovery of Type II Inhibitors of TGFβ-Activated Kinase 1 (TAK1) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 2 (MAP4K2)

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Gurbani, Deepak; ...

    2014-07-17

    Here, we developed a pharmacophore model for type II inhibitors that was used to guide the construction of a library of kinase inhibitors. Kinome-wide selectivity profiling of the library resulted in the identification of a series of 4-substituted 1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines that exhibited potent inhibitory activity against two mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), TAK1 (MAP3K7) and MAP4K2, as well as pharmacologically well interrogated kinases such as p38α (MAPK14) and ABL. Further investigation of the structure–activity relationship (SAR) resulted in the identification of potent dual TAK1 and MAP4K2 inhibitors such as 1 (NG25) and 2 as well as MAP4K2 selective inhibitors such as 16more » and 17. Some of these inhibitors possess good pharmacokinetic properties that will enable their use in pharmacological studies in vivo. Lastly, a 2.4 Å cocrystal structure of TAK1 in complex with 1 confirms that the activation loop of TAK1 assumes the DFG-out conformation characteristic of type II inhibitors.« less

  17. Effect of prolonged hydroxytamoxifen treatment of MCF-7 cells on mitogen activated kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Rabenoelina, Fanjaniriana; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Duchesne, Marie-Josèphe; Freiss, Gilles; Pons, Michel; Badia, Eric

    2002-04-10

    Resistance to the antiestrogen tamoxifen is the main stumbling block for the success of breast cancer therapy. We focused our study on cellular alterations induced by a prolonged treatment with the active tamoxifen metabolite hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). We show that a prolonged OHT treatment (for up to 7 days) led to a progressive increase in the level of phosphorylated p44/42 mitogen activated kinase (MAP kinase) induced by 10(-7) M TPA stimulation, without any significant change in the protein level. This effect was also observed in MCF-7 cells grown first in medium containing dextran-coated charcoal-treated FCS (DCC medium) for 20 days prior to OHT treatment, indicating a specific effect of the antiestrogen and not an effect of estrogen deprivation. It was prevented by cotreatment with estradiol and not observed in the estrogen receptor negative HeLa cell line, suggesting that it was mediated by the estrogen receptor. TPA induced phosphorylation of MEK1/2 was also raised by OHT treatment, without any change in their protein level or Raf-1 and H-Ras levels. When the MCF-7R OHT resistant cell line was grown in antiestrogen containing medium, the level of phosphorylated p44/42 MAP kinase was also high but reversed when the antiestrogen was removed. The 2 other MAP kinase, JNK and P38 pathways were not affected in the same way by OHT treatment. In conclusion, our data reveal that a prolonged OHT treatment, by increasing p44/42 MAPK activity, affects a key step in the growth control of MCF-7 cells, although not sufficiently to overcome the growth inhibitory effect of the drug. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Redundancy in the World of MAP Kinases: All for One

    PubMed Central

    Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Frémin, Christophe; Meloche, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector components of the prototypical ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and is essential for embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. ERK1 and ERK2 homologs share similar biochemical properties but whether they exert specific physiological functions or act redundantly has been a matter of controversy. However, recent studies now provide compelling evidence in support of functionally redundant roles of ERK1 and ERK2 in embryonic development and physiology. In this review, we present a critical assessment of the evidence for the functional specificity or redundancy of MAP kinase isoforms. We focus on the ERK1/ERK2 pathway but also discuss the case of JNK and p38 isoforms. PMID:27446918

  19. Mathematical modelling of the MAP kinase pathway using proteomic datasets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tianhai; Song, Jiangning

    2012-01-01

    The advances in proteomics technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity and valuable resources to understand how living organisms execute necessary functions at systems levels. However, little work has been done up to date to utilize the highly accurate spatio-temporal dynamic proteome data generated by phosphoprotemics for mathematical modeling of complex cell signaling pathways. This work proposed a novel computational framework to develop mathematical models based on proteomic datasets. Using the MAP kinase pathway as the test system, we developed a mathematical model including the cytosolic and nuclear subsystems; and applied the genetic algorithm to infer unknown model parameters. Robustness property of the mathematical model was used as a criterion to select the appropriate rate constants from the estimated candidates. Quantitative information regarding the absolute protein concentrations was used to refine the mathematical model. We have demonstrated that the incorporation of more experimental data could significantly enhance both the simulation accuracy and robustness property of the proposed model. In addition, we used the MAP kinase pathway inhibited by phosphatases with different concentrations to predict the signal output influenced by different cellular conditions. Our predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations when the MAP kinase pathway was inhibited by phosphatase PP2A and MKP3. The successful application of the proposed modeling framework to the MAP kinase pathway suggests that our method is very promising for developing accurate mathematical models and yielding insights into the regulatory mechanisms of complex cell signaling pathways.

  20. Rewiring mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by positive feedback confers potato blight resistance.

    PubMed

    Yamamizo, Chihiro; Kuchimura, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Akira; Katou, Shinpei; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Jones, Jonathan D G; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2006-02-01

    Late blight, caused by the notorious pathogen Phytophthora infestans, is a devastating disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and during the 1840s caused the Irish potato famine and over one million fatalities. Currently, grown potato cultivars lack adequate blight tolerance. Earlier cultivars bred for resistance used disease resistance genes that confer immunity only to some strains of the pathogen harboring corresponding avirulence gene. Specific resistance gene-mediated immunity and chemical controls are rapidly overcome in the field when new pathogen races arise through mutation, recombination, or migration from elsewhere. A mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade plays a pivotal role in plant innate immunity. Here we show that the transgenic potato plants that carry a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase driven by a pathogen-inducible promoter of potato showed high resistance to early blight pathogen Alternaria solani as well as P. infestans. The pathogen attack provoked defense-related MAPK activation followed by induction of NADPH oxidase gene expression, which is implicated in reactive oxygen species production, and resulted in hypersensitive response-like phenotype. We propose that enhancing disease resistance through altered regulation of plant defense mechanisms should be more durable and publicly acceptable than engineering overexpression of antimicrobial proteins.

  1. MAP kinases Erk1/2 phosphorylate sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1a at serine 117 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Roth, G; Kotzka, J; Kremer, L; Lehr, S; Lohaus, C; Meyer, H E; Krone, W; Müller-Wieland, D

    2000-10-27

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1a is a transcription factor sensing cellular cholesterol levels and integrating gene regulatory signals mediated by MAP kinase cascades. Here we report the identification of serine 117 in SREBP-1a as the major phosphorylation site of the MAP kinases Erk1/2. This site was identified by nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry and peptide sequencing of recombinant fusion proteins phosphorylated by Erk1/2 in vitro. Serine 117 was verified as the major phosphorylation site by in vitro mutagenesis. Mutation of serine 117 to alanine abolished Erk2-mediated phosphorylation in vitro and the MAP kinase-related transcriptional activation of SREBP-1a by insulin and platelet-derived growth factor in vivo. Our data indicate that the MAP kinase-mediated effects on SREBP-1a-regulated target genes are linked to this phosphorylation site.

  2. Kinase Cascades and Ligand-Directed Signaling at the Kappa Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bruchas, Michael R.; Chavkin, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Background and Rationale The dynorphin / kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) system has been implicated as a critical component of the stress response. Stress-induced activation of dynorphin-KOR is well-known to produce analgesia, and more recently it has been implicated as a mediator of stress-induced responses including anxiety, depression, and reinstatement of drug seeking. Objective Drugs selectively targeting specific KOR signaling pathways may prove potentially useful as therapeutic treatments for mood and addiction disorders. Results KOR is a member of the seven transmembrane spanning (7TM) G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. KOR activation of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins leads to Gαi/o inhibition of adenylyl cyclase production of cAMP and releases Gβγ, which modulates the conductances of Ca+2 and K+ channels. In addition, KOR agonists activate kinase cascades including G-protein coupled Receptor Kinases (GRK) and members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family: ERK1/2, p38 and JNK. Recent pharmacological data suggests that GPCRs exist as dynamic, multi-conformational protein complexes that can be directed by specific ligands towards distinct signaling pathways. Ligand-induced conformations of KOR that evoke β–arrestin-dependent p38 MAPK activation result in aversion; whereas ligand-induced conformations that activate JNK without activating arrestin produce long-lasting inactivation of KOR signaling. Conclusions In this review, we discuss the current status of KOR signal transduction research and the data that support two novel hypotheses: 1) KOR selective partial agonists that do not efficiently activate p38 MAPK may be useful analgesics without producing the dysphoric or hallucinogenic effects of selective, highly efficacious KOR agonists and 2) KOR antagonists that do not activate JNK may be effective short-acting drugs that may promote stress-resilience. PMID:20401607

  3. PAR2 exerts local protection against acute pancreatitis via modulation of MAP kinase and MAP kinase phosphatase signaling.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Wan; Yoon, Jae Seok; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Min Goo

    2008-11-01

    During acute pancreatitis, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) can be activated by interstitially released trypsin. In the mild form of pancreatitis, PAR2 activation exerts local protection against intrapancreatic damage, whereas, in the severe form of pancreatitis, PAR2 activation mediates some systemic complications. This study aimed to identify the molecular mechanisms of PAR2-mediated protective effects against intrapancreatic damage. A mild form of acute pancreatitis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of caerulein (40 microg/kg) in rats. Effects of PAR2 activation on intrapancreatic damage and on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling were assessed. Caerulein treatment activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) within 15 min and maintained phosphorylation of ERK and JNK for 2 h in the rat pancreas. Although PAR2 activation by the pretreatment with PAR2-activating peptide (AP) itself increased ERK phosphorylation in rat pancreas, the same treatment remarkably decreased caerulein-induced activation of ERK and JNK principally by accelerating their dephosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK and JNK phosphorylation by the pretreatment with MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) or JNK inhibitors decreased caerulein-induced pancreatic damage that was similar to the effect induced by PAR2-AP. Notably, in caerulein-treated rats, PAR2-AP cotreatment highly increased the expression of a group of MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) that deactivate ERK and JNK. The above results imply that downregulation of MAP kinase signaling by MKP induction is a key mechanism involved in the protective effects of PAR2 activation on caerulein-induced intrapancreatic damage.

  4. The c-Jun kinase signaling cascade promotes glial engulfment activity through activation of draper and phagocytic function.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, J M; Doherty, J; Hackett, R; Freeman, M R

    2013-09-01

    After neuronal injury or death glial cells become reactive, exhibiting dramatic changes in morphology and patterns of gene expression and ultimately engulfing neuronal debris. Rapid clearance of degenerating neuronal material is thought to be crucial for suppression of inflammation and promotion of functional recovery. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase (dJNK) signaling is a critical in vivo mediator of glial engulfment activity. In response to axotomy, we find glial dJNK signals through a cascade involving the upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases Slipper and Tak1, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase MKK4, and ultimately the Drosophila activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional complex composed of Jra and Kayak to initiate glial phagocytosis of degenerating axons. Interestingly, loss of dJNK also blocked injury-induced upregulation of Draper levels in glia, and glial-specific overexpression of Draper was sufficient to rescue engulfment defects associated with loss of dJNK signaling. This work identifies that the dJNK pathway is a novel mediator of glial engulfment activity and a primary role for the glial Slipper/Tak1 →MKK4 →dJNK →dAP-1 signaling cascade appears to be activation of draper expression after axon injury.

  5. The c-Jun kinase signaling cascade promotes glial engulfment activity through activation of draper and phagocytic function

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, J M; Doherty, J; Hackett, R; Freeman, M R

    2013-01-01

    After neuronal injury or death glial cells become reactive, exhibiting dramatic changes in morphology and patterns of gene expression and ultimately engulfing neuronal debris. Rapid clearance of degenerating neuronal material is thought to be crucial for suppression of inflammation and promotion of functional recovery. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila c-Jun N-terminal kinase (dJNK) signaling is a critical in vivo mediator of glial engulfment activity. In response to axotomy, we find glial dJNK signals through a cascade involving the upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases Slipper and Tak1, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase MKK4, and ultimately the Drosophila activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcriptional complex composed of Jra and Kayak to initiate glial phagocytosis of degenerating axons. Interestingly, loss of dJNK also blocked injury-induced upregulation of Draper levels in glia, and glial-specific overexpression of Draper was sufficient to rescue engulfment defects associated with loss of dJNK signaling. This work identifies that the dJNK pathway is a novel mediator of glial engulfment activity and a primary role for the glial Slipper/Tak1→MKK4→dJNK→dAP-1 signaling cascade appears to be activation of draper expression after axon injury. PMID:23618811

  6. Three-dimensional structural analysis reveals a Cdk5-mediated kinase cascade regulating hepatic biliary network branching in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Dimri, Manali; Bilogan, Cassandra; Pierce, Lain X; Naegele, Gregory; Vasanji, Amit; Gibson, Isabel; McClendon, Allyson; Tae, Kevin; Sakaguchi, Takuya F

    2017-07-15

    The intrahepatic biliary network is a highly branched three-dimensional network lined by biliary epithelial cells, but how its branching patterns are precisely established is not clear. We designed a new computer-based algorithm that quantitatively computes the structural differences of the three-dimensional networks. Utilizing the algorithm, we showed that inhibition of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) led to reduced branching in the intrahepatic biliary network in zebrafish. Further, we identified a previously unappreciated downstream kinase cascade regulated by Cdk5. Pharmacological manipulations of this downstream kinase cascade produced a crowded branching defect in the intrahepatic biliary network and influenced actin dynamics in biliary epithelial cells. We generated larvae carrying a mutation in cdk5 regulatory subunit 1a (cdk5r1a), an essential activator of Cdk5. cdk5r1a mutant larvae show similar branching defects as those observed in Cdk5 inhibitor-treated larvae. A small-molecule compound that interferes with the downstream kinase cascade rescued the mutant phenotype. These results provide new insights into branching morphogenesis of the intrahepatic biliary network. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Mating and Pathogenic Development of the Smut Fungus Ustilago maydis Are Regulated by One Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Philip; Weinzierl, Gerhard; Brachmann, Andreas; Feldbrügge, Michael; Kahmann, Regine

    2003-01-01

    In the phytopathogenic fungus Ustilago maydis, pheromone-mediated cell fusion is a prerequisite for the generation of the infectious dikaryon. The pheromone signal elevates transcription of the pheromone genes and elicits formation of conjugation hyphae. Cyclic AMP and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling are involved in this process. The MAPK cascade is presumed to be composed of Ubc4 (MAPK kinase kinase), Fuz7 (MAPK kinase), and Ubc3/Kpp2 (MAPK). We isolated the kpp4 gene and found it to be allelic to ubc4. Epistasis analyses with constitutively active alleles of kpp4 and fuz7 substantiate that Kpp4, Fuz7, and Kpp2/Ubc3 are components of the same module. Moreover, we demonstrate that Fuz7 activates Kpp2 and shows interactions in vitro. Signaling via this cascade regulates expression of pheromone-responsive genes, presumably through acting on the transcription factor Prf1. Interestingly, the same cascade is needed for conjugation tube formation, and this process does not involve Prf1. In addition, fuz7 as well as kpp4 deletion strains are nonpathogenic, while kpp2 deletion mutants are only attenuated in pathogenesis. Here we show that strains expressing the unphosphorylatable allele kpp2T182A/Y184F are severely affected in tumor induction and display defects in early infection-related differentiation. PMID:14665454

  8. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meng-Ru; Chou, Cheng-Yang; Browning, Joseph A; Wilkins, Robert J; Ellory, J Clive

    2001-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl− channel. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl− channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  9. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells.

  10. Activation of MAP kinase signaling pathway in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis as biomarker of environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Châtel, A; Hamer, B; Talarmin, H; Dorange, G; Schröder, H C; Müller, W E G

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by various stressful stimuli was investigated in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. Analyses were performed in animals exposed in laboratory to selected pollutants and in mussels collected in winter and summer along the eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia). Effects of oxidative stress, induced by tributyltin, hydrogen peroxide and water soluble fraction of diesel fuel on the activation/phosphorylation of the three Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) p38, JNK and ERK using a newly developed ELISA procedure were evaluated. MAP kinase activation was analyzed 1h after exposure of mussels to chemical agents, and after recovery periods of 6 and 24h. Our results clearly indicated that pollutants generated different patterns of induction of the MAPK phosphorylation. Indeed, only pp38 and pJNK were activated with 11, 33 and 100 microg/L TBT, reaching a maximum activation after 6h in seawater following treatment of mussels with 11 microg/L TBT. Treatment with 0.074 and 0.222 mM H2O2 enhanced activation of both p38 and ERK. These two kinases were activated after 1h exposure, followed by a diminution after 6h of recovery in seawater and a reactivation after 24h. The levels of phosphorylated P38 and JNK were increased after mussel exposure with 7.5, 15 and 30% of water soluble fraction of diesel oil. P38 was activated concentration dependently at 1h exposure. Additionally, field study pointed out seasonal differences in MAP kinases activation as mussels collected during summer had a higher enzyme activation state than in winter, as well as sampling site differences which could be correlated to the industrial/tourism activity and environmental stresses (salinity). All the results converge towards MAP kinase signaling pathway being induced by various pollutants in M. galloprovincialis. This signaling cascade should be considered as a possible biomarker of environmental stress and pollution. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All

  11. Intrahypothalamic Administration of Modafinil Increases Expression of MAP-Kinase in Hypothalamus and Pons in Rats.

    PubMed

    Poot-Ake, Alwin; Mijangos-Moreno, Stephanie; Manjarrez-Martin, Danielle; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramses; Aquino-Hernandez, Pedro R; Pacheco-Pantoja, Elda; Arias-Carrion, Oscar; Sarro-Ramirez, Andrea; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria; Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Modafinil (MOD) it has to be considered as a wake-inducing drug to treat sleep disorders such as excessive sleepiness in narcolepsy, shift-work disorder, and obstructive/sleep apnea syndrome. Current evidence suggests that MOD induces waking involving the dopamine D1 receptor. However, little is known regarding the molecular elements linked in the wake-promoting actions of MOD. Since the D1 receptor activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP-K) cascade, it raises the interesting possibility that effects of MOD would depend upon the activation of MAP-K. Here we tested the expression of MAP-K in hypothalamus as well as pons after the microinjection of MOD (10 or 20 μg/1 μL) in rats into anterior hypothalamus, a wake-inducing brain area. Intrahypothalamic injections of MOD promoted MAP-K phosphorylation in hypothalamus and pons. Taken together, these results suggest that the wake-inducing compound MOD promotes the MAP-K phosphorylation.

  12. Building Keypoint Mappings on Multispectral Images by a Cascade of Classifiers with a Resurrection Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Jing, Jing; Jin, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the boosting technique for detecting objects, this paper proposes a cascade structure with a resurrection mechanism to establish keypoint mappings on multispectral images. The cascade structure is composed of four steps by utilizing best bin first (BBF), color and intensity distribution of segment (CIDS), global information and the RANSAC process to remove outlier keypoint matchings. Initial keypoint mappings are built with the descriptors associated with keypoints; then, at each step, only a small number of keypoint mappings of a high confidence are classified to be incorrect. The unclassified keypoint mappings will be passed on to subsequent steps for determining whether they are correct. Due to the drawback of a classification rule, some correct keypoint mappings may be misclassified as incorrect at a step. Observing this, we design a resurrection mechanism, so that they will be reconsidered and evaluated by the rules utilized in subsequent steps. Experimental results show that the proposed cascade structure combined with the resurrection mechanism can effectively build more reliable keypoint mappings on multispectral images than existing methods. PMID:26007729

  13. Building keypoint mappings on multispectral images by a cascade of classifiers with a resurrection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Jing, Jing; Jin, Hongbin; Qiao, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Inspired by the boosting technique for detecting objects, this paper proposes a cascade structure with a resurrection mechanism to establish keypoint mappings on multispectral images. The cascade structure is composed of four steps by utilizing best bin first (BBF), color and intensity distribution of segment (CIDS), global information and the RANSAC process to remove outlier keypoint matchings. Initial keypoint mappings are built with the descriptors associated with keypoints; then, at each step, only a small number of keypoint mappings of a high confidence are classified to be incorrect. The unclassified keypoint mappings will be passed on to subsequent steps for determining whether they are correct. Due to the drawback of a classification rule, some correct keypoint mappings may be misclassified as incorrect at a step. Observing this, we design a resurrection mechanism, so that they will be reconsidered and evaluated by the rules utilized in subsequent steps. Experimental results show that the proposed cascade structure combined with the resurrection mechanism can effectively build more reliable keypoint mappings on multispectral images than existing methods.

  14. AIK1, A Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase, Modulates Abscisic Acid Responses through the MKK5-MPK6 Kinase Cascade1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Yang, Fengbo; Zhang, Guozeng; Song, Shufei; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Miao, Yuchen

    2017-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is an evolutionarily conserved signal transduction module involved in transducing extracellular signals to the nucleus for appropriate cellular adjustment. This cascade essentially consists of three components: a MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK), a MAPK kinase, and a MAPK, connected to each other by the event of phosphorylation. Here, we report the characterization of a MAPKKK, ABA-INSENSITIVE PROTEIN KINASE1 (AIK1), which regulates abscisic acid (ABA) responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). T-DNA insertion mutants of AIK1 showed insensitivity to ABA in terms of both root growth and stomatal response. AIK1 functions in ABA responses via regulation of root cell division and elongation, as well as stomatal responses. The activity of AIK1 is induced by ABA in Arabidopsis and tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana), and the Arabidopsis protein phosphatase type 2C, ABI1, a negative regulator of ABA signaling, restricts AIK1 activity by dephosphorylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis showed that MPK3, MPK6, and AIK1 interact with MKK5. The single mutant seedlings of mpk6 and mkk5 have similar phenotypes to aik1, but mkk4 does not. AIK1 was localized in the cytoplasm and shown to activate MKK5 by protein phosphorylation, which was an ABA-activated process. Constitutively active MKK5 in aik1 mutant seedlings complements the ABA-insensitive root growth phenotype of aik1. The activity of MPK6 was increased by ABA in wild-type seedlings, but its activation by ABA was impaired in aik1 and aik1 mkk5 mutants. These findings clearly suggest that the AIK1-MKK5-MPK6 cascade functions in the ABA regulation of primary root growth and stomatal response. PMID:27913741

  15. CZK3, a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog in Cercospora zeae-maydis, regulates cercosporin biosynthesis, fungal development, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shim, Won-Bo; Dunkle, Larry D

    2003-09-01

    The fungus Cercospora zeae-maydis causes gray leaf spot of maize and produces cercosporin, a photosensitizing perylenequinone with toxic activity against a broad spectrum of organisms. However, little is known about the biosynthetic pathway or factors that regulate cercosporin production. Analysis of a cDNA subtraction library comprised of genes that are up-regulated during cercosporin synthesis revealed a sequence highly similar to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases in other fungi. Sequencing and conceptual translation of the full-length genomic sequence indicated that the gene, which we designated CZK3, contains a 4,119-bp open reading frame devoid of introns and encodes a 1,373-amino acid sequence that is highly similar to Wis4, a MAP kinase kinase kinase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Targeted disruption of CZK3 suppressed expression of genes predicted to participate in cercosporin biosynthesis and abolished cercosporin production. The disrupted mutants grew faster on agar media than the wild type but were deficient in conidiation and elicited only small chlorotic spots on inoculated maize leaves compared with rectangular necrotic lesions incited by the wild type. Complementation of disruptants with the CZK3 open reading frame and flanking sequences restored wild-type levels of conidiation, growth rate, and virulence as well as the ability to produce cercosporin. The results suggest that cercosporin is a virulence factor in C. zeae-maydis during maize pathogenesis, but the pleiotropic effects of CZK3 disruption precluded definitive conclusions.

  16. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-11-20

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal

  17. Activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinases in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, F A; Sousa, M M; Cardoso, I; do Amaral, J Barbas; Guimarães, A; Saraiva, M J

    2006-04-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the extracellular deposition of transthyretin (TTR), especially in the PNS. Given the invasiveness of nerve biopsy, salivary glands (SG) from FAP patients were used previously in microarray analysis; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) was down-regulated in FAP. Results were validated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry both in SG and in nerve biopsies of different stages of disease progression. MKP-3 was also down-regulated in FAP SG biopsies. Given the relationship between MKPs and MAPKs, the latter were investigated. Only extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) displayed increased activation in FAP SG and nerves. ERK1/2 kinase (MEK1/2) activation was also up-regulated in FAP nerves. In addition, an FAP transgenic mouse model revealed increased ERK1/2 activation in peripheral nerve affected with TTR deposition when compared to control animals. Cultured rat Schwannoma cell line treatment with TTR aggregates stimulated ERK1/2 activation, which was partially mediated by the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). Moreover, caspase-3 activation triggered by TTR aggregates was abrogated by U0126, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, indicating that ERK1/2 activation is essential for TTR aggregates-induced cytotoxicity. Taken together, these data suggest that abnormally sustained activation of ERK in FAP may represent an early signaling cascade leading to neurodegeneration.

  18. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Ming Xu, Wen; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued. PMID:26738434

  19. Geologic map of the Lassen region, Cascade Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, Michael; Muffler, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary geologic map at 1:50,000 of the Lassen region encompasses 1400 km2. The map displays many small, monogenetic volcanoes of basalt to andesite as well as three major late Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic centers that have erupted products ranging from basaltic andesite to rhyolite. The youngest of these volcanic centers is the Lassen volcanic center, active from 600,000 years B.P. to the present. A major caldera formed at 400,000 years B.P. and has subsequently been filled with silicic lavas. The Lassen geothermal system, which consists of a central vapor-dominated reservoir at a temperature of 235??C underlain by a reservoir of hot water, is centered at Bumpass Hell within Lassen Volcanic National Park.

  20. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Andrusiak, Matthew G.; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans was developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics of C. elegans in combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components in C. elegans. PMID:26907690

  1. Differential regulation of rice mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MKK) by abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kundan; Rao, Kudupudi Prabhakara; Sharma, Pallavi; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2008-10-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinase cascade plays a crucial role in various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormones, cell division and developmental processes. MAP kinase kinase being integral part of this cascade performs an important function of integrating upstream signals to mitogen activated protein kinase for further appropriate cellular responses. We here report cloning of five MAP kinase kinase members from Oryza sativa indica cultivar var. Pusa Basmati 1, namely MAP kinase kinases 1, 3, 4, 6 and 10-2. All these members, except MKK10-2 possess fully canonical motif structures of MAP kinase kinase. The deduced amino acid sequence showed changes at certain position within japonica and indica variety of rice. Analysis of transcript regulation by quantitative real time PCR revealed that these five members are differentially regulated by cold, heat, salinity and drought stresses. MAP kinase kinases 4 and 6 are strongly regulated by cold and salt stresses while MAP kinase kinase 1 is regulated by salt and drought stresses. MAP kinase kinase 10-2 is regulated only by cold stress. The study provides the indication of involvement of specific MAP kinase kinase in different abiotic stress signaling and also possible cross talks that exist during the signaling processes.

  2. The Croonian Lecture 1998. Identification of a protein kinase cascade of major importance in insulin signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes affects 3% of the European population and 140 million people worldwide, and is largely a disease of insulin resistance in which the tissues fail to respond to this hormone. This emphasizes the importance of understanding how insulin signals to the cell's interior. We have recently dissected a protein kinase cascade that is triggered by the formation of the insulin 'second messenger' phosphatidylinositide (3,4,5) trisphosphate (PtdIns (3,4,5)P3) and which appears to mediate many of the metabolic actions of this hormone. The first enzyme in the cascade is termed 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1), because it only activates protein kinase B (PKB), the next enzyme in the pathway, in the presence of PtdIns (3,4,5)P3. PKB then inactivates glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). PDK1, PKB and GSK3 regulate many physiological events by phosphorylating a variety of intracellular proteins. In addition, PKB plays an important role in mediating protection against apoptosis by survival factors, such as insulin-like growth factor-1. PMID:10212493

  3. The role of MAP2 kinases and p38 kinase in acute murine liver injury models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Min, Robert W M; Le, Khanh; Zhou, Sheng; Aghajan, Mariam; Than, Tin A; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2017-06-29

    c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mediates hepatotoxicity through interaction of its phospho-activated form with a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, Sh3bp5 or Sab, leading to dephosphorylation of intermembrane Src and consequent impaired mitochondrial respiration and enhanced ROS release. ROS production from mitochondria activates MAP3 kinases, such as MLK3 and ASK1, which continue to activate a pathway to sustain JNK activation, and amplifies the toxic effect of acetaminophen (APAP) and TNF/galactosamine (TNF/GalN). Downstream of MAP3K, in various contexts MKK4 activates both JNK and p38 kinases and MKK7 activates only JNK. The relative role of MKK4 versus 7 in liver injury is largely unexplored, as is the potential role of p38 kinase, which might be a key mediator of toxicity in addition to JNK. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) to MKK4, MKK7 and p38 (versus scrambled control) were used for in vivo knockdown, and in some experiments PMH were used after in vivo knockdown. Mice were treated with APAP or TNF/GalN and injury assessed. MKK4 and MKK7 were expressed in liver and each was efficiently knocked down with two different ASOs. Massive liver injury and ALT elevation were abrogated by MKK4 but not MKK7 ASO pretreatment in both injury models. The protection was confirmed in PMH. Knockdown of MKK4 completely inhibited basal P-p38 in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. However, ALT levels and histologic injury in APAP-treated mice were not altered with p38 knockdown versus scrambled control. p38 knockdown significantly increased P-JNK levels in cytoplasm but not mitochondria after APAP treatment. In conclusion, MKK4 is the major MAP2K, which activates JNK in acute liver injury. p38, the other downstream target of MKK4, does not contribute to liver injury from APAP or TNF/galactosamine.

  4. Preliminary Geologic Map of the Mount Hood 30- by 60-minute Quadrangle, Northern Cascade Range, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.

    1995-01-01

    This map shows the geology of the central and eastern parts of the Cascade Range in northern Oregon. The Quaternary andesitic stratovolcano of Mount Hood dominates the northwest quarter of the quadrangle, but nearly the entire area is underlain by arc-related volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Cascade Range. Most stratigraphic units were emplaced since middle Miocene time, and all are Oligocene or younger. Despite the proximity of the map area to the Portland metropolitan area, large parts remained virtually unstudied or known only from limited reconnaissance until the late 1970s. A notable exception is the area surrounding Mount Hood, where mapping and chemical analyses by Wise (1969) provided a framework for geologic interpretation. Mapping since 1975 was conducted first to understand the stratigraphy and structure of the Columbia River Basalt Group (Anderson, 1978; Vogt, 1981; J.L. Anderson, in Swanson and others, 1981; Vandiver-Powell, 1978; Burck, 1986) and later to examine the geothermal potential of Mount Hood (Priest and others, 1982). Additional mapping was completed in 1985 for a geologic map of the Cascade Range in Oregon (Sherrod and Smith, 1989). From 1987 to 1990, detailed mapping was conducted in three 15-minute quadrangles on a limited basis (D.R. Sherrod, unpublished mapping) (see fig. 1 for index to mapping). An ongoing volcanic hazards study of Mount Hood by the U.S. Geological Survey (Scott and others, 1994) has provided the catalyst for completing the geologic map of the Mount Hood 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle. As of June 1994, only two broad areas still remain largely unmapped. One of these areas, labeled 'unmapped' on the geologic map, lies in the Salmon River valley south of Zigzag along the west margin of the quadrangle. Although strata of the Columbia River Basalt Group in the Salmon River valley were mapped in detail by Burck (1986), the overlying middle and upper(?) Miocene lava flows, volcaniclastic strata, and intrusions

  5. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  6. Practical synthesis of a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Achmatowicz, Michał; Thiel, Oliver R; Wheeler, Philip; Bernard, Charles; Huang, Jinkun; Larsen, Robert D; Faul, Margaret M

    2009-01-16

    p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have attracted considerable interest as potential agents for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Herein, we describe a concise and efficient synthesis of inhibitor 1 that is based on a phthalazine scaffold. Highlights of our approach include a practical synthesis of a 1,6-disubstituted phthalazine building block 24 as well as the one-pot formation of boronic acid 27. Significant synthetic work to understand the reactivity principles of the intermediates helped in selection of the final synthetic route. Subsequent optimization of the individual steps of the final sequence led to a practical synthesis of 1.

  7. A developmentally regulated MAP kinase activated by hydration in tobacco pollen.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C; Voronin, V; Touraev, A; Vicente, O; Heberle-Bors, E

    1997-01-01

    A novel mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathway has been identified in tobacco. This pathway is developmentally regulated during pollen maturation and is activated by hydration during pollen germination. Analysis of different stages of pollen development showed that transcriptional and translational induction of MAP kinase synthesis occurs at the mid-bicellular stage of pollen maturation. However, the MAP kinase is stored in an inactive form in the mature, dry pollen grain. Kinase activation is very rapid after hydration of the dry pollen, peaking at approximately 5 min and decreasing thereafter. Immunoprecipitation of the kinase activity by an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody is consistent with the activation of a MAP kinase. The kinetics of activation suggest that the MAP kinase plays a role in the activation of the pollen grain after hydration rather than in pollen tube growth. PMID:9401129

  8. ERK1 and ERK2 Map Kinases: Specific Roles or Functional Redundancy?

    PubMed Central

    Buscà, Roser; Pouysségur, Jacques; Lenormand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The MAP kinase signaling cascade Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK has been involved in a large variety of cellular and physiological processes that are crucial for life. Many pathological situations have been associated to this pathway. More than one isoform has been described at each level of the cascade. In this review we devoted our attention to ERK1 and ERK2, which are the effector kinases of the pathway. Whether ERK1 and ERK2 specify functional differences or are in contrast functionally redundant, constitutes an ongoing debate despite the huge amount of studies performed to date. In this review we compiled data on ERK1 vs. ERK2 gene structures, protein sequences, expression levels, structural and molecular mechanisms of activation and substrate recognition. We have also attempted to perform a rigorous analysis of studies regarding the individual roles of ERK1 and ERK2 by the means of morpholinos, siRNA, and shRNA silencing as well as gene disruption or gene replacement in mice. Finally, we comment on a recent study of gene and protein evolution of ERK isoforms as a distinct approach to address the same question. Our review permits the evaluation of the relevance of published studies in the field especially when measurements of global ERK activation are taken into account. Our analysis favors the hypothesis of ERK1 and ERK2 exhibiting functional redundancy and points to the concept of the global ERK quantity, and not isoform specificity, as being the essential determinant to achieve ERK function. PMID:27376062

  9. Timing is everything: highly specific and transient expression of a MAP kinase determines auxin-induced leaf venation patterns in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Stanko, Vera; Giuliani, Concetta; Retzer, Katarzyna; Djamei, Armin; Wahl, Vanessa; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Wilson, Cathal; Heberle-Bors, Erwin; Teige, Markus; Kragler, Friedrich

    2014-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal signal transduction modules present in all eukaryotes. In plants, MAPK cascades were shown to regulate cell division, developmental processes, stress responses, and hormone pathways. The subgroup A of Arabidopsis MAPKs consists of AtMPK3, AtMPK6, and AtMPK10. AtMPK3 and AtMPK6 are activated by their upstream MAP kinase kinases (MKKs) AtMKK4 and AtMKK5 in response to biotic and abiotic stress. In addition, they were identified as key regulators of stomatal development and patterning. AtMPK10 has long been considered as a pseudo-gene, derived from a gene duplication of AtMPK6. Here we show that AtMPK10 is expressed highly but very transiently in seedlings and at sites of local auxin maxima leaves. MPK10 encodes a functional kinase and interacts with the upstream MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK) AtMKK2. mpk10 mutants are delayed in flowering in long-day conditions and in continuous light. Moreover, cotyledons of mpk10 and mkk2 mutants have reduced vein complexity, which can be reversed by inhibiting polar auxin transport (PAT). Auxin does not affect AtMPK10 expression while treatment with the PAT inhibitor HFCA extends the expression in leaves and reverses the mpk10 mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the AtMKK2-AtMPK10 MAPK module regulates venation complexity by altering PAT efficiency.

  10. Sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of quantum-cascade laser active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantzas, Konstantinos; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Patriarche, Gilles; Largeau, Ludovic; Mauguin, Olivia; Pegolotti, Giulia; Vasanelli, Angela; Calvar, Ariane; Amanti, Maria; Sirtori, Carlo; Sagnes, Isabelle

    2016-05-01

    A procedure that produces sub-nanometrically resolved chemical mappings of MOCVD-grown InGaAs/InAlAs/InP quantum cascade lasers is presented. The chemical mappings reveal that, although the structure is lattice-matched to InP, the InAlAs barriers do not attain the nominal aluminum content—48%—and are, in fact, InGaAlAs quaternaries. This information is used to adjust the aluminum precursor flow and fine-tune the composition of the barriers, resulting in a significant improvement of the fabricated lasers.

  11. Database for the Geologic Map of Upper Eocene to Holocene Volcanic and Related Rocks of the Cascade Range, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimz, Kathryn; Ramsey, David W.; Sherrod, David R.; Smith, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1979, Earth scientists of the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey have carried out multidisciplinary research in the Cascade Range. The goal of this research is to understand the geology, tectonics, and hydrology of the Cascades in order to characterize and quantify geothermal resource potential. A major goal of the program is compilation of a comprehensive geologic map of the entire Cascade Range that incorporates modern field studies and that has a unified and internally consistent explanation. This map is one of three in a series that shows Cascade Range geology by fitting published and unpublished mapping into a province-wide scheme of rock units distinguished by composition and age; map sheets of the Cascade Range in Washington (Smith, 1993) and California will complete the series. The complete series forms a guide to exploration and evaluation of the geothermal resources of the Cascade Range and will be useful for studies of volcano hazards, volcanology, and tectonics. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2569 (Sherrod and Smith, 2000). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains files to view or print the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2569.

  12. Structural basis for Mob1-dependent activation of the core Mst–Lats kinase cascade in Hippo signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Lisheng; Zheng, Yonggang; Hara, Mayuko; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2015-06-24

    The Mst–Lats kinase cascade is central to the Hippo tumor-suppressive pathway that controls organ size and tissue homeostasis. The adaptor protein Mob1 promotes Lats activation by Mst, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we show that human Mob1 binds to autophosphorylated docking motifs in active Mst2. This binding enables Mob1 phosphorylation by Mst2. Phosphorylated Mob1 undergoes conformational activation and binds to Lats1. We determine the crystal structures of phospho-Mst2–Mob1 and phospho-Mob1–Lats1 complexes, revealing the structural basis of both phosphorylation-dependent binding events. Further biochemical and functional analyses demonstrate that Mob1 mediates Lats1 activation through dynamic scaffolding and allosteric mechanisms. Thus, Mob1 acts as a phosphorylation-regulated coupler of kinase activation by virtue of its ability to engage multiple ligands. We propose that stepwise, phosphorylation-triggered docking interactions of nonkinase elements enhance the specificity and robustness of kinase signaling cascades.

  13. Structural basis for Mob1-dependent activation of the core Mst–Lats kinase cascade in Hippo signaling

    DOE PAGES

    Ni, Lisheng; Zheng, Yonggang; Hara, Mayuko; ...

    2015-06-24

    The Mst–Lats kinase cascade is central to the Hippo tumor-suppressive pathway that controls organ size and tissue homeostasis. The adaptor protein Mob1 promotes Lats activation by Mst, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we show that human Mob1 binds to autophosphorylated docking motifs in active Mst2. This binding enables Mob1 phosphorylation by Mst2. Phosphorylated Mob1 undergoes conformational activation and binds to Lats1. We determine the crystal structures of phospho-Mst2–Mob1 and phospho-Mob1–Lats1 complexes, revealing the structural basis of both phosphorylation-dependent binding events. Further biochemical and functional analyses demonstrate that Mob1 mediates Lats1 activation through dynamic scaffolding and allosteric mechanisms. Thus, Mob1more » acts as a phosphorylation-regulated coupler of kinase activation by virtue of its ability to engage multiple ligands. We propose that stepwise, phosphorylation-triggered docking interactions of nonkinase elements enhance the specificity and robustness of kinase signaling cascades.« less

  14. Tiam1-Rac1 Axis Promotes Activation of p38 MAP Kinase in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Evidence for a Requisite Role for Protein Palmitoylation.

    PubMed

    Veluthakal, Rajakrishnan; Kumar, Binit; Mohammad, Ghulam; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu; Kowluru, Renu A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence in multiple tissues, including retina, suggests generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ensuing oxidative stress as triggers for mitochondrial defects and cell apoptosis. We recently reported novel roles for Tiam1-Rac1-Nox2 axis in retinal mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death leading to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that activation of p38 MAP kinase, a stress kinase, represents the downstream signaling event to Rac1-Nox2 activation in diabetes-induced metabolic stress leading to capillary cell apoptosis. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was quantified by Western blotting in retinal endothelial cells incubated with high glucose (20 mM) for up to 96 hours, a duration where mitochondrial dysfunction and capillary cell apoptosis can be observed. NSC23766 and 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP) were used to assess the roles of Tiam1-Rac1 and palmitoylation pathways, respectively. Activation of p38 MAP kinase was observed as early as 3 hours after high glucose exposure, and continued until 96 hours. Consistent with this, p38 MAP kinase activation was significantly higher in the retina from diabetic mice compared to age-matched normal mice. NSC23766 markedly attenuated hyperglycemia-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase. Lastly, 2-BP inhibited glucose-induced Rac1, Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. Tiam1-Rac1-mediated activation of Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase constitutes early signaling events leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and the development of diabetic retinopathy. Our findings also provide the first evidence to implicate novel roles for protein palmitoylation in this signaling cascade.

  15. Tiam1-Rac1 Axis Promotes Activation of p38 MAP Kinase in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Evidence for a Requisite Role for Protein Palmitoylation

    PubMed Central

    Veluthakal, Rajakrishnan; Kumar, Binit; Mohammad, Ghulam; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu; Kowluru, Renu A.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Evidence in multiple tissues, including retina, suggests generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ensuing oxidative stress as triggers for mitochondrial defects and cell apoptosis. We recently reported novel roles for Tiam1-Rac1-Nox2 axis in retinal mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death leading to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that activation of p38 MAP kinase, a stress kinase, represents the downstream signaling event to Rac1-Nox2 activation in diabetes-induced metabolic stress leading to capillary cell apoptosis. Methods Activation of p38 MAP kinase was quantified by Western blotting in retinal endothelial cells incubated with high glucose (20 mM) for up to 96 hours, a duration where mitochondrial dysfunction and capillary cell apoptosis can be observed. NSC23766 and 2-bromopalmitate (2-BP) were used to assess the roles of Tiam1-Rac1 and palmitoylation pathways, respectively. Results Activation of p38 MAP kinase was observed as early as 3 hours after high glucose exposure, and continued until 96 hours. Consistent with this, p38 MAP kinase activation was significantly higher in the retina from diabetic mice compared to age-matched normal mice. NSC23766 markedly attenuated hyperglycemia-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase. Lastly, 2-BP inhibited glucose-induced Rac1, Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. Conclusions Tiam1-Rac1-mediated activation of Nox2 and p38 MAP kinase constitutes early signaling events leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and the development of diabetic retinopathy. Our findings also provide the first evidence to implicate novel roles for protein palmitoylation in this signaling cascade. PMID:25967961

  16. Light stimulates MSK1 activation in the suprachiasmatic nucleus via a PACAP-ERK/MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Greg Q; Lee, Boyoung; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Obrietan, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Signaling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been shown to be a key intracellular signaling event that couples light to entrainment of the mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Because many of the physiological effects of the MAPK pathway are mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-regulated kinases, it was of interest to identify kinase targets of ERK in the SCN. In this study, we examined whether mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1) is a downstream target of ERK in the SCN and whether it couples to clock gene expression. Here we show that photic stimulation during the subjective night stimulates MSK1 phosphorylation at serine 360, an event required for robust kinase activation. Activated ERK and MSK1 were colocalized in SCN cell nuclei after photic stimulation. The in vivo administration of the MAP kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor U0126 [1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(o-aminophenylmercapto) butadiene] attenuated MSK1 phosphorylation. MSK1 phosphorylation was more responsive to late-night than early-night photic stimulation, indicating that MSK1 may differentially contribute to light-induced phase advancing and phase delaying of the clock. The potential connection between pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) (a regulator of clock entrainment) and MSK1 phosphorylation was examined. PACAP infusion stimulated MSK1 phosphorylation, whereas PACAP receptor antagonist infusion attenuated light-induced MSK1 phosphorylation in the SCN. In reporter gene assays, MSK1 was shown to couple to mPeriod1 via a cAMP response element-binding protein-dependent mechanism. Together, these data identify MSK1 as both a downstream target of the MAPK cascade within the SCN and a regulator of clock gene expression.

  17. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-01-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses. PMID:9165755

  18. A Causal Gene for Seed Dormancy on Wheat Chromosome 4A Encodes a MAP Kinase Kinase.

    PubMed

    Torada, Atsushi; Koike, Michiya; Ogawa, Taiichi; Takenouchi, Yu; Tadamura, Kazuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kawaura, Kanako; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2016-03-21

    Seed germination under the appropriate environmental conditions is important both for plant species survival and for successful agriculture. Seed dormancy, which controls germination time, is one of the adaptation mechanisms and domestication traits [1]. Seed dormancy is generally defined as the absence of germination of a viable seed under conditions that are favorable for germination [2]. The seed dormancy of cultivated plants has generally been reduced during domestication [3]. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Weak dormancy may be an advantage for the productivity due to uniform emergence and a disadvantage for the risks of pre-harvest sprouting (PHS), which decreases grain quality and yield [4]. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling natural variation of seed dormancy have been identified on various chromosomes [5]. A major QTL for seed dormancy has been consistently detected on chromosome 4A [6-13]. The QTL was designated as a major gene, Phs1, which could be precisely mapped within a 2.6 cM region [14]. Here, we identified a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) gene (designated TaMKK3-A) by a map-based approach as a candidate gene for the seed dormancy locus Phs1 on chromosome 4A in bread wheat. Complementation analysis showed that transformation of a dormant wheat cultivar with the TaMKK3-A allele from a nondormant cultivar clearly reduced seed dormancy. Cultivars differing in dormancy had a single nonsynonymous amino acid substitution in the kinase domain of the predicted MKK3 protein sequence, which may be associated with the length of seed dormancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. MAPKAP kinase-2; a novel protein kinase activated by mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Stokoe, D; Campbell, D G; Nakielny, S; Hidaka, H; Leevers, S J; Marshall, C; Cohen, P

    1992-01-01

    A novel protein kinase, which was only active when phosphorylated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), has been purified 85,000-fold to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle. This MAP kinase activated protein kinase, termed MAPKAP kinase-2, was distinguished from S6 kinase-II (MAPKAP kinase-1) by its response to inhibitors, lack of phosphorylation of S6 peptides and amino acid sequence. MAPKAP kinase-2 phosphorylated glycogen synthase at Ser7 and the equivalent serine (*) in the peptide KKPLNRTLS*VASLPGLamide whose sequence is similar to the N terminus of glycogen synthase. MAPKAP kinase-2 was resolved into two monomeric species of apparent molecular mass 60 and 53 kDa that had similar specific activities and substrate specificities. Peptide sequences of the 60 and 53 kDa species were identical, indicating that they are either closely related isoforms or derived from the same gene. MAP kinase activated the 60 and 53 kDa forms of MAPKAP kinase-2 by phosphorylating the first threonine residue in the sequence VPQTPLHTSR. Furthermore, Mono Q chromatography of extracts from rat phaeochromocytoma and skeletal muscle demonstrated that two MAP kinase isoforms (p42mapk and p44mapk) were the only enzymes in these cells that were capable of reactivating MAPKAP kinase-2. These results indicate that MAP kinase activates at least two distinct protein kinases, suggesting that it represents a point at which the growth factor-stimulated protein kinase cascade bifurcates. Images PMID:1327754

  20. Early Colony Establishment in Neurospora crassa Requires a MAP Kinase Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Leeder, Abigail C.; Jonkers, Wilfried; Li, Jingyi; Glass, N. Louise

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative fusion is essential for the development of an interconnected colony in many filamentous fungi. In the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, vegetative fusion occurs between germinated conidia (germlings) via specialized structures termed “conidial anastomosis tubes” (CATs) and between hyphae within a mature colony. In N. crassa, both CAT and hyphal fusion are under the regulation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade (NRC1, MEK2, and MAK2). Here we show that the predicted downstream target of the MAK2 kinase pathway, a Ste12-like transcription factor known as PP1, regulates elements required for CAT and hyphal fusion. The PP1 regulatory network was revealed by expression profiling of wild type and the Δpp-1 mutant during conidial germination and colony establishment. To identify targets required for cell fusion more specifically, expression-profiling differences were assessed via inhibition of MAK2 kinase activity during chemotropic interactions and cell fusion. These approaches led to the identification of new targets of the cell fusion pathway that, when mutated, showed alterations in chemotropic signaling and cell fusion. In particular, conidial germlings carrying a deletion of NCU04732 (Δham-11) failed to show chemotropic interactions and cell fusion. However, signaling (as shown by oscillation of MAK2 and SO to CAT tips), chemotropism, and cell fusion were restored in Δham-11 germlings when matched with wild-type partner germlings. These data reveal novel insights into the complex process of self-signaling, germling fusion, and colony establishment in filamentous fungi. PMID:24037267

  1. Targeting chk2 kinase: molecular interaction maps and therapeutic rationale.

    PubMed

    Pommier, Yves; Sordet, Olivier; Rao, V Ashutosh; Zhang, Hongliang; Kohn, Kurt W

    2005-01-01

    Most anticancer drugs presently used clinically target genomic DNA. The selectivity of these anticancer drugs for tumor tissues is probably due to tumor-specific defects suppressing cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair, and enhancing apoptotic response in the tumor. We will review the molecular interactions within the ATM-Chk2 pathway implicating the DNA damage sensor kinases (ATM, ATR and DNA-PK), the adaptor BRCT proteins (Nbs1, Brca1, 53BP1, MDC1) and the effector kinases (Chk2, Chk1, Plk3, JNK, p38). The molecular interaction map convention (MIM) will be used for presenting this molecular network (http://discover.nci.nih.gov/mim/). A characteristic of the ATM-Chk2 pathway is its redundancy. First, ATM and Chk2 phosphorylate common substrates including p53, E2F1, BRCA1, and Chk2 itself, which suggests that Chk2 (also known as CHECK2, Cds1 in fission yeast, and Dmchk2 or Dmnk or Loki in the fruit fly) acts as a relay for ATM and/or as a salvage pathway when ATM is inactivated. Secondly, redundancy is apparent for the substrates, which can be phosphorylated/activated at similar residues by Chk2, Chk1, and the polo kinases (Plk's). Functionally, Chk2 can activate both apoptosis (via p53, E2F1 and PML) and cell cycle checkpoint (via Cdc25A and Cdc25C, p53, and BRCA1). We will review the short list of published Chk2 inhibitors. We will also propose a novel paradigm for screening interfacial inhibitors of Chk2. Chk2 inhibitors might be used to enhance the tumor selectivity of DNA targeted agents in p53-deficient tumors, and for the treatment of tumors whose growth depends on enhanced Chk2 activity.

  2. Novel screening cascade identifies MKK4 as key kinase regulating Tau phosphorylation at Ser422.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Fiona; Bohrmann, Bernd; Christensen, Klaus; Graf, Martin; Roth, Doris; Czech, Christian

    2011-11-01

    Phosphorylation of Tau at serine 422 promotes Tau aggregation. The kinase that is responsible for this key phosphorylation event has so far not been identified but could be a potential drug target for Alzheimer's disease. We describe here an assay strategy to identify this kinase. Using a combination of screening a library of 65'000 kinase inhibitors and in vitro inhibitor target profiling of the screening hits using the Ambit kinase platform, MKK4 was identified as playing a key role in Tau-S422 phosphorylation in human neuroblastoma cells.

  3. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals activate MAP kinase in human neutrophils: inhibition of MAP kinase, oxidase activation and degranulation responses of neutrophils by taxol.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J K; Tudan, C; Sahl, B; Pelech, S L; Burt, H M

    1997-01-01

    The activation of MAP kinase in human neutrophils stimulated by both uncoated and plasma-opsonized crystals of triclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) was investigated. The effect of taxol on MAP kinase activation and on the responses of neutrophils stimulated by plasma-opsonized crystals was determined. MAP kinase activation was identified and quantified in Mono Q chromatography separated fractions of neutrophils that had been incubated with CPPD crystals by measuring [gamma-32P]adenosine triphosphate (ATP) phosphorylation of myelin basic protein and using immunoblotting techniques. Human neutrophils were incubated with taxol (0-50 microM), added to plasma-opsonized CPPD (50 mg/ml) and MAP kinase activation, chemiluminescence, superoxide anion generation, lysozyme and myeloperoxidase release were monitored. Both uncoated and plasma coated CPPD crystals induced a large increase in MAP kinase activity in neutrophils over control levels within 1 min of incubation. Pretreatment of neutrophils with taxol was able to suppress this activation of MAP kinase. Taxol produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of opsonized CPPD-induced neutrophil chemiluminescence, superoxide anion production and myeloperoxide release. Taxol at 28 microM also significantly inhibited chemiluminescence, superoxide anion production and myeloperoxidase release from neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan. This is the first report of crystal-induced activation of MAP kinase in neutrophils. Microtubule-associated processes, such as signal transduction, secretion and phagocytosis are involved in particulate-induced neutrophil responses. We have suggested that the inhibitory effect of taxol observed in this work is due to its stabilizing effect on microtubules and disruption of MAP kinase activation associated with microtubules. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9176102

  4. MAP KINASE ERK 1/2 INHIBITORS INDUCE DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROSEN, M.B. and E. S. HUNTER. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. MAP kinase Erk1/2 inhibitors induce dysmorphology in mouse whole embryo culture.

    MAP Kinase signal transduction is associated with a variety ...

  5. Differential regulation of the mitogen-activated protein and stress-activated protein kinase cascades by adrenergic agonists in quiescent and regenerating adult rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, M S; Auer, K L; Jarvis, W D; Ishac, E J; Gao, B; Kunos, G; Dent, P

    1997-01-01

    To study the mechanisms by which catecholamines regulate hepatocyte proliferation after partial hepatectomy (PHX), hepatocytes were isolated from adult male rats 24 h after sham operation or two-thirds PHX and treated with catecholamines and other agonists. In freshly isolated sham cells, p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity was stimulated by the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PHE). Activation of p42 MAP kinase by growth factors was blunted by pretreatment of sham hepatocytes with glucagon but not by that with the beta2-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO). In PHX cells, the ability of PHE to activate p42 MAP kinase was dramatically reduced, whereas ISO became competent to inhibit p42 MAP kinase activation. PHE treatment of sham but not PHX and ISO treatment of PHX but not sham hepatocytes also activated the stress-activated protein (SAP) kinases p46/54 SAP kinase and p38 SAP kinase. These data demonstrate that an alpha1- to beta2-adrenergic receptor switch occurs upon PHX and results in an increase in SAP kinase versus MAP kinase signaling by catecholamines. In primary cultures of hepatocytes, ISO treatment of PHX but not sham cells inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation. In contrast, PHE treatment of sham but not PHX cells stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation, which was reduced by approximately 25 and approximately 95% with specific inhibitors of p42 MAP kinase and p38 SAP kinase function, respectively. Inhibition of the p38 SAP kinase also dramatically reduced basal [3H]thymidine incorporation. These data suggest that p38 SAP kinase plays a permissive role in liver regeneration. Alterations in the abilities of catecholamines to modulate the activities of protein kinase A and the MAP and SAP kinase pathways may represent one physiological mechanism by which these agonists can regulate hepatocyte proliferation after PHX. PMID:9199291

  6. The signalling mucin Msb2 regulates surface sensing and host penetration via BMP1 MAP kinase signalling in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Mueller, Nathalie; Hinsenkamp, Isabel; Hahn, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus that infects a wide range of fruit, vegetable and flower crops. Penetration of the host cuticle occurs via infection structures that are formed in response to appropriate plant surface signals. The differentiation of these structures requires a highly conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade including the MAP kinase BMP1. In yeast and several plant-pathogenic fungi, the signalling mucin Msb2 has been shown to be involved in surface recognition and MAP kinase activation. In this study, a B. cinerea msb2 mutant was generated and characterized. The mutant showed normal growth, sporulation, sclerotia formation and stress resistance. In the absence of nutrients, abnormal germination with multiple germ tubes was observed. In the presence of sugars, normal germination occurred, but msb2 germlings were almost unable to form appressoria or infection cushions on hard surfaces. Nevertheless, the msb2 mutant showed only a moderate delay in lesion formation on different host plants, and formed expanding lesions similar to the wild-type. Although the wild-type showed increasing BMP1 phosphorylation during the first hours of germination on hard surfaces, the phosphorylation levels in the msb2 mutant were strongly reduced. Several genes encoding secreted proteins were found to be co-regulated by BMP1 and Msb2 during germination. Taken together, B. cinerea Msb2 is likely to represent a hard surface sensor of germlings and hyphae that triggers infection structure formation via the activation of the BMP1 MAP kinase pathway. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  7. Preparation of Residual Gravity Maps for the Southern Cascade Mountains, Washington Using Fourier Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dishberger, Debra McLean

    1983-04-01

    This report represents a continuation of gravity work in the Cascade Mountains of Washington supported by the Division of Geology and Earth Resources since 1974. The purpose of this research has been collection of baseline gravity data for use in geothermal resource evaluation. Results of the Division's gravity studies to date are given in Danes and Phillips (1983a, 1983b). One of the problems encountered when analyzing gravity data is distinguishing between those parts of the data that represent geologic structures of interest, and those that do not. In many cases, the features of interest are relatively small, near-surface features, such as those sought in mineral, petroleum, or geothermal exploration. Gravity anomalies caused by such structures may be distorted or masked by anomalies caused by larger, deeper geologic structures. Gravity anomalies caused by relatively shallow, small geologic structures are termed residual anomalies. Those due to broad, deep-seated features can be described as regional anomalies. The purpose of this report is to describe a Fourier analysis method for separating residual and regional gravity anomalies from a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly field. The technique has been applied to gravity data from the Southern Cascade Mountains, Washington. Residual gravity anomaly maps at a scale of 1:250,000 are presented for various regional wavelength filters, and a power spectrum of the frequency components in the South Cascade gravity data is displayed. No attempt is made to interpret the results of this study in terms of geologic structures.

  8. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in hyperinsulinemic db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hidenori; Sohara, Eisei; Nomura, Naohiro; Chiga, Motoko; Alessi, Dario R; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2012-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome patients have insulin resistance, which causes hyperinsulinemia, which in turn causes aberrant increased renal sodium reabsorption. The precise mechanisms underlying this greater salt sensitivity of hyperinsulinemic patients remain unclear. Abnormal activation of the recently identified with-no-lysine kinase (WNK)-oxidative stress-responsive kinase 1 (OSR1)/STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK)-NaCl cotransporter (NCC) phosphorylation cascade results in the salt-sensitive hypertension of pseudohypoaldosteronism type II. Here, we report a study of renal WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC cascade activation in the db/db mouse model of hyperinsulinemic metabolic syndrome. Thiazide sensitivity was increased, suggesting greater activity of NCC in db/db mice. In fact, increased phosphorylation of OSR1/SPAK and NCC was observed. In both SpakT243A/+ and Osr1T185A/+ knock-in db/db mice, which carry mutations that disrupt the signal from WNK kinases, increased phosphorylation of NCC and elevated blood pressure were completely corrected, indicating that phosphorylation of SPAK and OSR1 by WNK kinases is required for the increased activation and phosphorylation of NCC in this model. Renal phosphorylated Akt was increased in db/db mice, suggesting that increased NCC phosphorylation is regulated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling cascade in the kidney in response to hyperinsulinemia. A phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (NVP-BEZ235) corrected the increased OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation. Another more specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor (GDC-0941) and an Akt inhibitor (MK-2206) also inhibited increased NCC phosphorylation. These results indicate that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway activates the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in db/db mice. This mechanism may play a role in the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension in human hyperinsulinemic conditions, such as the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Stimulation of receptor-associated kinase, tyrosine kinase, and MAP kinase is required for prolactin-mediated macromolecular biosynthesis and mitogenesis in Nb2 lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Carey, G B; Liberti, J P

    1995-01-10

    Lactogens [prolactin (Prl) and growth hormone] stimulate phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein, S6, in Nb2 cells by mechanisms that do not involve participation of cAMP or protein kinase A, protein kinase C, or cGMP-dependent protein kinase. However, inhibition of tyrosine kinase (TK) abrogates Prl-mediated macromolecular biosynthesis. Inasmuch as lactogen signaling may involve sequential activation of protein kinases, the effect of Prl on the well-characterized mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and S6 kinase (S6K), the enzyme responsible for S6 phosphorylation in vivo, and their relationship to Nb2 macromolecular biosynthesis and mitogenesis were investigated. The results show that MAPK stimulation is transient (peak activity, 30 min) and precedes that of S6K, which reaches a maximum at 1.5-2 h, and slowly returns towards control levels at 6 h. Both staurosporine which inhibits GH receptor-associated kinase (JAK2) and genistein (GEN), an inhibitor of membrane-associated and cytoplasmic TKs, abrogate Prl-stimulated TK, MAPK, and S6K. Rapamycin (RAP), a specific inhibitor of p70S6K, completely blocks S6K but does not affect TK and MAPK. TK and MAPK activity correlates with Prl-stimulated anabolism, i.e., protein and DNA synthesis and mitogenesis. Thus, concentrations of STR and GEN which abrogate TK and MAPK inhibit anabolism virtually 100%. However, RAP, which inhibits S6K (ca. 100%) but not TK or MAPK, only delays Prl-mediated anabolism. These results indicate that Prl signaling in Nb2 cells involves a protein kinase cascade and that regulation of receptor-associated kinase, TK, and MAPK correlates with anabolism. The role of S6K (and S6 phosphorylation) appears to be ancillary.

  10. ALTERED PHOSPHORYLATION OF MAP KINASE AFTER ACUTE EXPOSURE TO PCB153.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model of synaptic plasticity believed to encompass the physiological substrate of memory. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) signalling cascade contributes to synaptic plasticity and to long-term memory formation. Learning and LTP st...

  11. ALTERED PHOSPHORYLATION OF MAP KINASE AFTER ACUTE EXPOSURE TO PCB153.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a model of synaptic plasticity believed to encompass the physiological substrate of memory. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) signalling cascade contributes to synaptic plasticity and to long-term memory formation. Learning and LTP st...

  12. Asymmetric double-image encryption based on cascaded discrete fractional random transform and logistic maps.

    PubMed

    Sui, Liansheng; Duan, Kuaikuai; Liang, Junli; Hei, Xinhong

    2014-05-05

    A double-image encryption is proposed based on the discrete fractional random transform and logistic maps. First, an enlarged image is composited from two original images and scrambled in the confusion process which consists of a number of rounds. In each round, the pixel positions of the enlarged image are relocated by using cat maps which are generated based on two logistic maps. Then the scrambled enlarged image is decomposed into two components. Second, one of two components is directly separated into two phase masks and the other component is used to derive the ciphertext image with stationary white noise distribution by using the cascaded discrete fractional random transforms generated based on the logistic map. The cryptosystem is asymmetric and has high resistance against to the potential attacks such as chosen plaintext attack, in which the initial values of logistic maps and the fractional orders are considered as the encryption keys while two decryption keys are produced in the encryption process and directly related to the original images. Simulation results and security analysis verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed encryption scheme.

  13. The MAP kinase inhibitors, PD098059, UO126 and SB203580, inhibit IL-1β-dependent PGE2 release via mechanistically distinct processes

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Robert; Cambridge, Lisa; Hart, Lorraine A; Stevens, David A; Lindsay, Mark A; Barnes, Peter J

    2000-01-01

    In common with human bronchial epithelial cells, pulmonary A549 cells release prostaglandin (PG) E2 in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines. We have therefore used these cells to examine the effect of the selective mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors; PD098059, a mitogen activated and extracellular regulated kinase kinase (MEK) 1 inhibitor, UO126, a dual MEK1 & MEK2 inhibitor, and SB203580, a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor in the IL-1β-dependent release of PGE2.Following IL-1β treatment the extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs) and the p38 MAP kinases were rapidly phosphorylated.PD09059, UO126 and SB203580 prevented IL-1β-induced PGE2 release at doses that correlated closely with published IC50 values. Small or partial effects at the relevant doses were observed on induction of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) activity or COX-2 protein suggesting that the primary effects were at the level of arachidonate availability.Neither PD098059 nor SB203580 showed any effect on IL-1β-induced arachidonate release. We therefore speculate that the MEK1/ERK and p38 kinase cascades play a role in the functional coupling of arachidonate release to COX-2.In contrast, UO126 was highly effective at inhibiting IL-1β-dependent arachidonate release, implicating MEK2 in the activation of the PLA2 that is involved in IL-1β-dependent PGE2 release.We conclude that the MEK1, MEK2 and p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, PD098059, UO126 and SB203580, are highly potent in respect of inflammatory PG release. Finally, we conclude that these inhibitors act via mechanistically distinct processes, which may have anti-inflammatory benefits. PMID:10903976

  14. A Critical Kinase Cascade in Neurological Disorders: PI 3-K, Akt, and mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Wang, Shaohui; Maiese, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders lead to disability and death in a significant proportion of the world’s population. However, many disorders of the nervous system remain with limited effective treatments. Kinase pathways in the nervous system that involve phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) offer exciting prospects for the understanding of neurodegenerative pathways and the development of new avenues of treatment. PI 3-K, Akt, and mTOR pathways are vital cellular components that determine cell fate during acute and chronic disorders, such as Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, stroke, and trauma. Yet, the elaborate relationship among these kinases and the variable control of apoptosis and autophagy can lead to unanticipated biological and clinical outcomes. Crucial for the successful translation of PI 3-K, Akt, and mTOR into robust and safe clinical strategies will be the further elucidation of the complex roles that these kinase pathways hold in the nervous system. PMID:23144589

  15. p38 MAP kinase regulates circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia D; Ryan, Sarah M; Avey, Matthew J; Mortimer, Nathan T; Dowse, Harold; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2014-12-01

    The large repertoire of circadian rhythms in diverse organisms depends on oscillating central clock genes, input pathways for entrainment, and output pathways for controlling rhythmic behaviors. Stress-activated p38 MAP Kinases (p38K), although sparsely investigated in this context, show circadian rhythmicity in mammalian brains and are considered part of the circadian output machinery in Neurospora. We find that Drosophila p38Kb is expressed in clock neurons, and mutants in p38Kb either are arrhythmic or have a longer free-running periodicity, especially as they age. Paradoxically, similar phenotypes are observed through either transgenic inhibition or activation of p38Kb in clock neurons, suggesting a requirement for optimal p38Kb function for normal free-running circadian rhythms. We also find that p38Kb genetically interacts with multiple downstream targets to regulate circadian locomotor rhythms. More specifically, p38Kb interacts with the period gene to regulate period length and the strength of rhythmicity. In addition, we show that p38Kb suppresses the arrhythmic behavior associated with inhibition of a second p38Kb target, the transcription factor Mef2. Finally, we find that manipulating p38K signaling in free-running conditions alters the expression of another downstream target, MNK/Lk6, which has been shown to cycle with the clock and to play a role in regulating circadian rhythms. These data suggest that p38Kb may affect circadian locomotor rhythms through the regulation of multiple downstream pathways.

  16. Signalling mechanisms mediated by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt cascade in synaptic plasticity and memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Horwood, Jennifer M; Dufour, Franck; Laroche, Serge; Davis, Sabrina

    2006-06-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling cascade has classically been implicated in promoting cell survival but more recently has been shown to regulate a number of other cellular functions. In particular, studies have suggested that PI3K contributes to mechanisms associated with synaptic plasticity and memory processes but the function of this cascade in forms of synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation, remains controversial and the PI3K substrates which mediate these effects are poorly understood. Here we report that the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 infused i.c.v. in vivo blocked maintenance of long-term potentiation induced in the dentate gyrus with a single tetanus to the perforant path but not with repeated tetani. This pattern of stimulation led to rapid and transient phosphorylation of the PI3K substrate Akt at Ser473 but not at Thr308. Functional readout of partial activation of Akt was demonstrated by an increase in phosphorylation of two downstream substrates, Forkhead (FKHR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in a delayed and prolonged manner at Akt-specific phosphorylation sites. LY294002 blocked phosphorylation of Akt and the prolonged phosphorylation of FKHR and mTOR but did not impair long-term potentiation-induced phosphorylation of extracellular receptor kinase. In addition, the same i.c.v. concentration of LY294002 impaired long-term consolidation of recognition memory but not short-term recognition memory or spatial learning and repeated training in the recognition memory task overcame the deficit in consolidation. These results suggest that activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway may contribute to the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation by promoting cell survival via FKHR and protein synthesis via mTOR. Importantly, only partial activation of Akt at its Ser473 residue was necessary to mediate these effects.

  17. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade modulates T helper type 17 differentiation and functionality in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Mitri, Diletta; Sambucci, Manolo; Loiarro, Maria; De Bardi, Marco; Volpe, Elisabetta; Cencioni, Maria Teresa; Gasperini, Claudio; Centonze, Diego; Sette, Claudio; Akbar, Arne N; Borsellino, Giovanna; Battistini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade is required for the induction of a T helper type 17 (Th17) -mediated autoimmune response, which underlies the development and progression of several autoimmune diseases, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the contribution of p38 phosphorylation to human Th cell differentiation has not been clarified. Here we demonstrate that the p38 signalling pathway is implicated in the generation of Th17 lymphocytes from human CD4+ CD27+ CD45RA+ naive T cells, both in healthy donors and in patients affected by the relapsing–remitting form of MS. Our data also indicate that p38 activation is essential for interleukin-17 release from central memory lymphocytes and committed Th17 cell clones. Furthermore, CD4+ T cells isolated from individuals with relapsing–remitting MS display an altered responsiveness of the p38 cascade, resulting in increased p38 phosphorylation upon stimulation. These findings suggest that the p38 signalling pathway, by modulating the Th17 differentiation and response, is involved in the pathogenesis of MS, and open new perspectives for the use of p38 inhibitors in the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26095162

  18. Computational Insights for the Discovery of Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitors of MAP Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Yan, Chunli; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ren, Pengyu

    2014-01-01

    Due to their role in cellular signaling mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases represent targets of pharmaceutical interest. However, the majority of known MAP kinase inhibitors compete with cellular ATP and target an ATP binding pocket that is highly conserved in the 500 plus representatives of the human protein kinase family. Here we review progress toward the development of non-ATP competitive MAP kinase inhibitors for the extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), the c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3) and the p38 MAPKs (α, β, γ, and δ). Special emphasis is placed on the role of computational methods in the drug discovery process for MAP kinases. Topics include recent advances in X-ray crystallography theory that improve the MAP kinase structures essential to structure-based drug discovery, the use of molecular dynamics to understand the conformational heterogeneity of the activation loop and inhibitors discovered by virtual screening. The impact of an advanced polarizable force field such as AMOEBA used in conjunction with sophisticated kinetic and thermodynamic simulation methods is also discussed. PMID:22316156

  19. Light and circadian rhythmicity regulate MAP kinase activation in the suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Obrietan, K; Impey, S; Storm, D R

    1998-12-01

    Although the circadian time-keeping properties of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) require gene expression, little is known about the signal transduction pathways that initiate transcription. Here we report that a brief exposure to light during the subjective night, but not during the subjective day, activates the p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in the SCN. In addition, MAPK stimulation activates CREB (cAMP response element binding protein), indicating that potential downstream transcription factors are stimulated by the MAPK pathway in the SCN. We also observed striking circadian variations in MAPK activity within the SCN, suggesting that the MAPK cascade is involved in clock rhythmicity.

  20. Phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential ion channel is regulated by the phototransduction cascade and involves several protein kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Voolstra, Olaf; Bartels, Jonas-Peter; Oberegelsbacher, Claudia; Pfannstiel, Jens; Huber, Armin

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a cardinal role in regulating cellular processes in eukaryotes. Phosphorylation of proteins is controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases. We previously reported the light-dependent phosphorylation of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel at multiple sites. TRP generates the receptor potential upon stimulation of the photoreceptor cell by light. An eye-enriched protein kinase C (eye-PKC) has been implicated in the phosphorylation of TRP by in vitro studies. Other kinases and phosphatases of TRP are elusive. Using phosphospecific antibodies and mass spectrometry, we here show that phosphorylation of most TRP sites depends on the phototransduction cascade and the activity of the TRP ion channel. A candidate screen to identify kinases and phosphatases provided in vivo evidence for an involvement of eye-PKC as well as other kinases and phosphatases in TRP phosphorylation.

  1. Role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) signal transduction cascade in alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in porcine palmar lateral vein.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R E

    2001-07-01

    The mechanism of alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction is unknown, but may involve activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and/or a protein tyrosine kinase. Recently the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) cascade, often an event downstream of tyrosine kinase activation, has been shown to mediate vasoconstriction to a variety of agents. The aim of this present study was to determine the involvement of the Erk signal transduction cascade in alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction, and to confirm the involvement of activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, and protein tyrosine kinase. Contractions to the alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 in the porcine palmar lateral vein in vitro were reduced 70 - 80% by the MEK inhibitors PD98059 (10 - 50 microM) and U0126 (10 - 50 microM), indicating the involvement of the Erk signal transduction cascade. Immunoblots also demonstrated an increase in the phosphorylated (activated) form of Erk in palmar lateral vein segments after contraction with UK14304, which was inhibited by PD98059 and U0126. The calcium channel blockers nifedipine and verapamil, or removal of extracellular calcium inhibited UK14304-induced contractions and phosphorylation of Erk, demonstrating the importance of an influx of extracellular calcium. UK14304-induced contractions were inhibited by PP2 (1 - 10 microM), a selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, but not by PP3, an inactive analogue. PP2 also prevented the phosphorylation of Erk by UK14304. These data demonstrate that alpha(2) adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the porcine palmar lateral vein is dependent upon activation of the Erk signal transduction cascade, which is downstream of an influx of extracellular calcium, and activation of Src tyrosine kinases.

  2. Timing Is Everything: Highly Specific and Transient Expression of a MAP Kinase Determines Auxin-Induced Leaf Venation Patterns in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Stanko, Vera; Giuliani, Concetta; Retzer, Katarzyna; Djamei, Armin; Wahl, Vanessa; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Wilson, Cathal; Heberle-Bors, Erwin; Teige, Markus; Kragler, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal signal transduction modules present in all eukaryotes. In plants, MAPK cascades were shown to regulate cell division, developmental processes, stress responses, and hormone pathways. The subgroup A of Arabidopsis MAPKs consists of AtMPK3, AtMPK6, and AtMPK10. AtMPK3 and AtMPK6 are activated by their upstream MAP kinase kinases (MKKs) AtMKK4 and AtMKK5 in response to biotic and abiotic stress. In addition, they were identified as key regulators of stomatal development and patterning. AtMPK10 has long been considered as a pseudo-gene, derived from a gene duplication of AtMPK6. Here we show that AtMPK10 is expressed highly but very transiently in seedlings and at sites of local auxin maxima leaves. MPK10 encodes a functional kinase and interacts with the upstream MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK) AtMKK2. mpk10 mutants are delayed in flowering in long-day conditions and in continuous light. Moreover, cotyledons of mpk10 and mkk2 mutants have reduced vein complexity, which can be reversed by inhibiting polar auxin transport (PAT). Auxin does not affect AtMPK10 expression while treatment with the PAT inhibitor HFCA extends the expression in leaves and reverses the mpk10 mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the AtMKK2–AtMPK10 MAPK module regulates venation complexity by altering PAT efficiency. PMID:25064848

  3. Conservation of MAP kinase activity and MSP genes in parthenogenetic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase activation is a prerequisite for oocyte maturation, ovulation and fertilisation in many animals. In the hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, an MSP (major sperm protein) dependent pathway is utilised for MAP kinase activation and successive oocyte maturation with extracellular MSP released from sperm acting as activator. How oocyte-to-embryo transition is triggered in parthenogenetic nematode species that lack sperm, is not known. Results We investigated two key elements of oocyte-to-embryo transition, MSP expression and MAP kinase signaling, in two parthenogenetic nematodes and their close hermaphroditic relatives. While activated MAP kinase is present in all analysed nematodes irrespective of the reproductive mode, MSP expression differs. In contrast to hermaphroditic or bisexual species, we do not find MSP expression at the protein level in parthenogenetic nematodes. However, genomic sequence analysis indicates that functional MSP genes are present in several parthenogenetic species. Conclusions We present three alternative interpretations to explain our findings. (1) MSP has lost its function as a trigger of MAP kinase activation and is not expressed in parthenogenetic nematodes. Activation of the MAP kinase pathway is achieved by another, unknown mechanism. Functional MSP genes are required for occasionally emerging males found in some parthenogenetic species. (2) Because of long-term disadvantages, parthenogenesis is of recent origin. MSP genes remained intact during this short intervall although they are useless. As in the first scenario, an unknown mechanism is responsible for MAP kinase activation. (3) The molecular machinery regulating oocyte-to-embryo transition in parthenogenetic nematodes is conserved with respect to C. elegans, thus requiring intact MSP genes. However, MSP expression has been shifted to non-sperm cells and is reduced below the detection limits, but is still sufficient to

  4. Functional characterization of the three mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAP2Ks) present in the Cryphonectria parasitica genome reveals the necessity of Cpkk1 and Cpkk2, but not Cpkk3, for pathogenesis on chestnut (Castanea spp.).

    PubMed

    Moretti, Marino; Rossi, Marika; Ciuffo, Marina; Turina, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    The biological function(s) of the cpkk1, cpkk2 and cpkk3 genes, encoding the three mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAP2Ks) of Cryphonectria parasitica, the causal agent of chestnut blight, were examined through knockout strains. Cpkk1, the Mkk1 orthologue, acts in a phosphorylation cascade essential for cell integrity; Cpkk2 is the Ste7 orthologue involved in the pheromone response pathway; Cpkk3 is the Pbs2 orthologue, the MAP2K activated during the high-osmolarity response. Our analysis confirmed the role of each MAP2K in its respective signalling cascade with some peculiarities: abnormal hyphae with a reduced number of septa and thinner cell walls were observed in Δcpkk1 mutants, and a strong growth defect on solid media was evident in Δcpkk2 mutants, when compared with the controls. Virulence on chestnut was affected in both the Δcpkk1 and Δcpkk2 strains, which were also unable to complete the developmental steps essential for mating. No alterations were reported in Δcpkk3, except under hyperosmotic conditions and in the presence of fludioxonil. Δcpkk2 mutants, however, showed higher sensitivity during growth in medium containing the antibiotic G418 (Geneticin).

  5. Cascaded Fresnel holographic image encryption scheme based on a constrained optimization algorithm and Henon map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yonggang; Tang, Chen; Chen, Xia; Li, Biyuan; Xu, Wenjun; Lei, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    We propose an image encryption scheme using chaotic phase masks and cascaded Fresnel transform holography based on a constrained optimization algorithm. In the proposed encryption scheme, the chaotic phase masks are generated by Henon map, and the initial conditions and parameters of Henon map serve as the main secret keys during the encryption and decryption process. With the help of multiple chaotic phase masks, the original image can be encrypted into the form of a hologram. The constrained optimization algorithm makes it possible to retrieve the original image from only single frame hologram. The use of chaotic phase masks makes the key management and transmission become very convenient. In addition, the geometric parameters of optical system serve as the additional keys, which can improve the security level of the proposed scheme. Comprehensive security analysis performed on the proposed encryption scheme demonstrates that the scheme has high resistance against various potential attacks. Moreover, the proposed encryption scheme can be used to encrypt video information. And simulations performed on a video in AVI format have also verified the feasibility of the scheme for video encryption.

  6. Synaptic generation of an intracellular retrograde signal requires activation of the tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Stough, Shara; Kopec, Ashley M; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Cellular changes underlying memory formation can be generated in an activity-dependent manner at specific synapses. Thus an important question concerns the mechanisms by which synaptic signals communicate with the cell body to mediate these cellular changes. A monosynaptic circuit that is enhanced by sensitization in Aplysia is well-suited to study this question because three different subcellular compartments: (i) the sensorimotor SN-MN synapses, (ii) the SN projections to MNs via axonal connections, (iii) the SN cell bodies, can all be manipulated and studied independently. Here, we report that activity-dependent (AD) training in either the entire SN-MN circuit or in only the synaptic compartment, activates MAPK in a temporally and spatially specific pattern. Specifically, we find (i) MAPK activation is first transiently generated at SN-MN synapses during training, (ii) immediately after training MAPK is transiently activated in SN-MN axonal connections and persistently activated in SN cell bodies, and finally, (iii) MAPK is activated in SN cell bodies and SN-MN synapses 1h after training. These data suggest that there is an intracellularly transported retrograde signal generated at the synapse which is later responsible for delayed MAPK activation at SN somata. Finally, we find that this retrograde signal requires activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) and MEK signaling cascades at the synapses.

  7. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the R7 photoreceptor cell. Components of the signal transduction pathway activated by Sev in the R7 precursor include proteins encoded by the gap1, drk, Sos, ras1 and raf loci. In this report we present evidence that a Drosophila MAP kinase, ERK-A, is encoded by the rolled locus and is required downstream of raf in the Sev signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:8157002

  8. Differential effects of the peptides Stomagen, EPF1 and EPF2 on activation of MAP kinase MPK6 and the SPCH protein level.

    PubMed

    Jewaria, Pawan Kumar; Hara, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Betsuyaku, Shigeyuki; Sawa, Shinichiro; Sakagami, Youji; Aimoto, Saburo; Kakimoto, Tatsuo

    2013-08-01

    The positioning and density of leaf stomata are regulated by three secretory peptides, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 1 (EPF1), EPF2 and stomagen. Several lines of published evidence have suggested a regulatory pathway as follows. EPF1 and EPF2 are perceived by receptor complexes consisting of a receptor-like protein, TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM), and receptor kinases, ERECTA (ER), ERECTA-LIKE (ERL) 1 and ERL2. These receptors activate a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase module. MAP kinases phosphorylate and destabilize the transcription factor SPEECHLESS (SPCH), resulting in a decrease in the number of stomatal lineage cells. Stomagen acts antagonistically to EPF1 and EPF2. However, there is no direct evidence that EPF1 and EPF2 activate or that stomagen inactivates the MAP kinase cascade, through which they might regulate the SPCH level. Experimental modulation of these peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana would change the number of stomatal lineage cells in developing leaves, which in turn would change the expression of SPCH, making the interpretation difficult. Here we reconstructed this signaling pathway in differentiated leaf cells of Nicotiana benthamiana to examine signaling without the confounding effect of cell type change. We show that EPF1 and EPF2 are able to activate the MAP kinase MPK6, and that both EPF1 and EPF2 are able to decrease the SPCH level, whereas stomagen is able to increase it. Our data also suggest that EPF1 can be recognized by TMM together with any ER family receptor kinase, whereas EPF2 can be recognized by TMM together with ERL1 or ERL2, but not by TMM together with ER.

  9. N-acetylcysteine attenuates TNF-α-induced p38 MAP kinase activation and p38 MAP kinase-mediated IL-8 production by human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shu; Gon, Yasuhiro; Matsumoto, Ken; Takeshita, Ikuko; Horie, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) activates p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase to produce interleukin-8 (IL-8) by human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including H2O2 generated by TNF-α can act as signalling intermediates for cytokine induction; therefore, scavenging ROS by anti-oxidants is important for the regulation of cytokine production. However, the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which acts as a precursor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis, on TNF-α-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase pathway and p38 MAP kinase-mediated IL-8 production by human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells has not been determined. To clarify these issues, we examined the effect of NAC on TNF-α-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase, MAP kinase kinase (MKK) 3 and MKK6 which are upstream regulators of p38 MAP kinase, and p38 MAP kinase-mediated IL-8 production. Human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells that had been preincubated with NAC were stimulated with TNF-α and then the activation of p38 MAP kinase and MKK3/MKK6 in the cells and IL-8 concentrations in the culture supernatants were determined. Intracellular GSH levels increased in NAC-treated cells. NAC attenuated TNF-α-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase and MKK3/MKK6. NAC attenuated p38 MAP kinase-mediated IL-8 production by TNF-α-stimulated cells. These results indicate that the cellular reduction and oxidation (redox) regulated by intracellular GSH is critical for TNF-α-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase pathway and p38 MAP kinase-mediated IL-8 production by human pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, and we emphasize that anti-oxidant therapy is an important strategy for the treatment of acute lung injury. PMID:11156586

  10. Cycloheximide-induced activation of mouse eggs: effects on cdc2/cyclin B and MAP kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Moos, J; Kopf, G S; Schultz, R M

    1996-04-01

    Fertilization of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs results in resumption of meiosis and a decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities; the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity precedes the decrease in MAP kinase activity. Cycloheximide treatment of metaphase II-arrested mouse eggs also results in resumption of meiosis but bypasses the fertilization-induced Ca2+ transient. However, it is not known if cycloheximide treatment results in the same temporal changes in cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that are intimately associated with resumption of meiosis. We report that cycloheximide-treated mouse eggs manifest similar temporal changes in the decrease in both cdc2/cyclin B kinase and MAP kinase activities that occur following fertilization, although cortical granule exocytosis is not stimulated. The decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity, however, does not seem to be required for the decrease in MAP kinase activity, since the decrease in MAP kinase activity still occurs in cycloheximide-treated eggs that are also incubated in the presence of nocodazole, which inhibits cyclin B degradation and hence the decrease in cdc2/cyclin B kinase. Following removal of these drugs, cdc2/cyclin B kinase activity remains high, MAP kinase activity increases to levels similar to that in the metaphase II-arrested eggs, and a spindle(s) forms with the chromosomes aligned on a metaphase plate. Results of these experiments suggest that some other protein with a relatively short half-life, e.g. cmos, a known upstream activator of MAP kinase, may be responsible for events leading to the decrease in MAP kinase activity.

  11. A crosslinker based on a tethered electrophile for mapping kinase-substrate networks.

    PubMed

    Riel-Mehan, Megan M; Shokat, Kevan M

    2014-05-22

    Despite the continuing progress made toward mapping kinase signaling networks, there are still many phosphorylation events for which the responsible kinase has not yet been identified. We are interested in addressing this problem through forming covalent crosslinks between a peptide substrate and the corresponding phosphorylating kinase. Previously we reported a dialdehyde-based kinase-binding probe capable of such a reaction with a peptide containing a cysteine substituted for the phosphorylatable ser/thr/tyr residue. Here, we examine the yield of a previously reported dialdehyde-based probe and report that the dialdehyde-based probes possess a significant limitation in terms of crosslinked kinase-substrate product yield. To address this limitation, we developed a crosslinking scheme based on a kinase activity-based probe, and this crosslinker provides an increase in efficiency and substrate specificity, including in the context of cell lysate.

  12. Lithium and neuropsychiatric therapeutics: neuroplasticity via glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, beta-catenin, and neurotrophin cascades.

    PubMed

    Wada, Akihiko

    2009-05-01

    Mood disorders are not merely attributed to the functional defect of neurotransmission, but also are due to the structural impairment of neuroplasticity. Chronic stress decreases neurotrophin levels, precipitating or exacerbating depression; conversely, antidepressants increase expression of various neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor), thereby blocking or reversing structural and functional pathologies via promoting neurogenesis. Since the worldwide approval of lithium therapy in 1970, lithium has been used for its anti-manic, antidepressant, and anti-suicidal effects, yet the therapeutic mechanisms at the cellular level remain not-fully defined. During the last five years, multiple lines of evidence have shown that the mood stabilization and neurogenesis by lithium are due to the lithium-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), allowing accumulation of beta-catenin and beta-catenin-dependent gene transcriptional events. Altered levels of GSK-3beta and beta-catenin are associated with various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, while various classical neuropsychiatric drugs inhibit GSK-3beta and up-regulate beta-catenin expression. In addition, evidence has emerged that insulin-like growth factor-I enhances antidepression, anti-anxiety, memory, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis; antidepressants up-regulate expression of insulin-like growth factor-I, while insulin-like growth factor-I up-regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and its receptor TrkB level, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced synaptic protein levels. More importantly, physical exercise and healthy diet raise transport of peripheral circulating insulin-like growth factor I into the brain, reinforcing the expression of neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and the strength of cell survival signalings (e.g., phosphoinositide 3-kinase / Akt / GSK-3beta pathway

  13. Regulation of kinase cascade activation and heat shock protein expression by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition in doxorubicin-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bartha, Eva; Solti, Izabella; Szabo, Aliz; Olah, Gabor; Magyar, Klara; Szabados, Eszter; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Toth, Kalman; Gero, Domokos; Szabo, Csaba; Sumegi, Balazs; Halmosi, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most severe side effects of the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX). The formation of reactive oxygen species plays a critical role in the development of cardiomyopathies, and the pathophysiological cascade activates nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and kinase pathways. We characterized the effects of the PARP-inhibitor and kinase-modulator compound L-2286 in DOX-induced cardiac injury models. We studied the effect of the established superoxide dismutase-mimic Tempol and compared the effects of this agent with those of the PARP inhibitor. In the rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes, in which DOX-induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, L-2286 protected them from the DOX-induced injury in a concentration-dependent manner. In the in vivo studies, mice were pretreated (for 1 week) with L-2286 or Tempol before the DOX treatment. Both the agents improved the activation of cytoprotective kinases, Akt, phospho-specific protein kinase C ϵ, ζ/λ and suppressed the activity of cell death promoting kinases glycogen synthase kinase-3β, JNK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but the effect of PARP inhibitor was more pronounced and improved the survival as well. L-2286 activated the phosphorylation of proapoptotic transcription factor FKHR1 and promoted the expression of Hsp72 and Hsp90. These data suggest that the mode of the cytoprotective action of the PARP inhibitor may include the modulation of kinase pathways and heat shock protein expression.

  14. Integration of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1-Mediated Stress Signaling with the Akt/Protein Kinase B-IκB Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Mary C.; Goldman, Erinn H.; Cockrell, Lisa M.; Huang, Bei; Kasinski, Andrea L.; Du, Yuhong; Wang, Cun-Yu; Lin, Anning; Ichijo, Hidenori; Khuri, Fadlo

    2013-01-01

    Cellular processes are tightly controlled through well-coordinated signaling networks that respond to conflicting cues, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signals, and survival factors to ensure proper cell function. We report here a direct interaction between inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), unveiling a critical node at the junction of survival, inflammation, and stress signaling networks. IKK can be activated by growth factor stimulation or tumor necrosis factor alpha engagement. IKK forms a complex with and phosphorylates ASK1 at a sensor site, Ser967, leading to the recruitment of 14-3-3, counteracts stress signal-triggered ASK1 activation, and suppresses ASK1-mediated functions. An inhibitory role of IKK in JNK signaling has been previously reported to depend on NF-κB-mediated gene expression. Our data suggest that IKK has a dual role: a transcription-dependent and a transcription-independent action in controlling the ASK1-JNK axis, coupling IKK to ROS and ER stress response. Direct phosphorylation of ASK1 by IKK also defines a novel IKK phosphorylation motif. Because of the intimate involvement of ASK1 in diverse diseases, the IKK/ASK1 interface offers a promising target for therapeutic development. PMID:23530055

  15. Rit-mediated Stress Resistance Involves a p38-Mitogen- and Stress-activated Protein Kinase 1 (MSK1)-dependent cAMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Activation Cascade*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Geng-Xian; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    The cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) is a key regulatory factor of gene transcription, and plays an essential role in development of the central nervous system and for neuroprotection. Multiple signaling pathways have been shown to contribute to the regulation of CREB-dependent transcription, including both ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases cascades. Recent studies have identified the Ras-related small G-protein, Rit, as a central regulator of a p38-MK2-HSP27 signaling cascade that functions as a critical survival mechanism for cells adapting to stress. Here, we examine the contribution of Rit-p38 signaling to the control of stress-dependent gene transcription. Using a pheochromocytoma cell model, we find that a novel Rit-p38-MSK1/2 pathway plays a critical role in stress-mediated CREB activation. RNAi-mediated Rit silencing, or inhibition of p38 or MSK1/2 kinases, was found to disrupt stress-mediated CREB-dependent transcription, resulting in increased cell death. Furthermore, ectopic expression of active Rit stimulates CREB-Ser133 phosphorylation, induces expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and BclXL proteins, and promotes cell survival. These data indicate that the Rit-p38-MSK1/2 signaling pathway may have an important role in the stress-dependent regulation of CREB-dependent gene expression. PMID:23038261

  16. Bioelectrocatalytic sensor for triglycerides in human skin sebum based on enzymatic cascade reaction of lipase, glycerol kinase and glycerophosphate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chi Yong; Han, Yong Duk; Yoon, Jae Ho; Yoon, Hyun C

    2014-04-10

    We report the development of an electrochemical biosensor for the quantification of triglycerides in human skin sebum, based on a multienzyme cascade reaction. The presence of excessive triglycerides in human sebum is one of the leading causes of various skin ailments. However, to the best of our knowledge, no bioelectrocatalytic approach for the quantification of sebum triglycerides has been made. In order to develop triglyceride biosensor, we fabricated a multienzyme-associated electrode incorporating lipase, glycerol kinase, and glycerophosphate oxidase. Enzymes were deposited by electrostatic force and further stabilized via crosslinking between enzymes and polymer matrices. The enzyme-modified biosensing electrode maintained its bioelectrocatalytic activity for five days. An additional constraint was the limited solubility of sebum triglycerides in aqueous electrolytes, impeding the analysis. To address this issue, triglyceride samples were prepared in the form of micelles, enabling efficient sample preparation for biosensor signaling. Calibration tests revealed that the designed assay had a detection range of 15-200mg/dL of micellar triglyceride, which covered the required determination range. The developed biosensing approach was successfully used to determine triglyceride concentrations in real sebum samples of unknown triglyceride content.

  17. Strawberry consumption improves aging-associated impairments, mitochondrial biogenesis and functionality through the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Giampieri, Francesca; Alvarez-Suarez, Josè M; Cordero, Mario D; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Y; Afrin, Sadia; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; González-Paramás, Ana M; Astolfi, Paola; Rubini, Corrado; Zizzi, Antonio; Tulipani, Sara; Quiles, Josè L; Mezzetti, Bruno; Battino, Maurizio

    2017-11-01

    Dietary polyphenols have been recently proposed as activators of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway and this fact might explain the relationship between the consumption of polyphenol-rich foods and the slowdown of the progression of aging. In the present work, the effects of strawberry consumption were evaluated on biomarkers of oxidative damage and on aging-associated reductions in mitochondrial function and biogenesis for 8weeks in old rats. Strawberry supplementation increased antioxidant enzyme activities, mitochondrial biomass and functionality, and decreased intracellular ROS levels and biomarkers of protein, lipid and DNA damage (P<0.05). Furthermore, a significant (P<0.05) increase in the expression of the AMPK cascade genes, involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant defences, was also detected after strawberry intake. These in vivo results were then verified in vitro on HepG2 cells, confirming the involvement of AMPK in the beneficial effects exerted by strawberry against aging progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The MAP Kinase MPK4 Is Required for Cytokinesis in Arabidopsis thaliana[W

    PubMed Central

    Kosetsu, Ken; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Colcombet, Jean; Sasabe, Michiko; Soyano, Takashi; Takahashi, Yuji; Hirt, Heribert; Machida, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    Cytokinesis in plants is achieved by the formation of the cell plate. A pathway that includes mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase kinase and MAP kinase kinase (MAPKK) plays a key role in the control of plant cytokinesis. We show here that a MAP kinase, MPK4, is required for the formation of the cell plate in Arabidopsis thaliana. Single mutations in MPK4 caused dwarfism and characteristic defects in cytokinesis, such as immature cell plates, which became much more prominent upon introduction of a mutation in MKK6/ANQ, the MAPKK for cytokinesis, into mpk4. MKK6/ANQ strongly activated MPK4 in protoplasts, and kinase activity of MPK4 was detected in wild-type tissues that contained dividing cells but not in mkk6/anq mutants. Fluorescent protein–fused MPK4 localized to the expanding cell plates in cells of root tips. Expansion of the cell plates in mpk4 root tips appeared to be retarded. The level of MPK11 transcripts was markedly elevated in mpk4 plants, and defects in the mpk4 mpk11 double mutant with respect to growth and cytokinesis were more severe than in the corresponding single mutants. These results indicate that MPK4 is the downstream target of MKK6/ANQ in the regulation of cytokinesis in Arabidopsis and that MPK11 is also involved in cytokinesis. PMID:21098735

  19. A Cell-Autonomous Molecular Cascade Initiated by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Represses Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Houssein S.; Bergeron, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production. PMID:25225331

  20. Inhibition of the ER-kinase cascade by PD98059 and UO126 counteracts ischemic preconditioning in pig myocardium.

    PubMed

    Strohm, C; Barancik, T; Brühl, M L; Kilian, S A; Schaper, W

    2000-08-01

    Our previous studies suggested a protective role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) cascade in ischemic preconditioning (IP) in the porcine heart. To test this hypothesis further, we studied the influence of the novel specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MEK 1/2) PD98059 (PD) and UO126 (UO) in IP. The substances were infused intramyocardially and UO also systemically in anesthetized, ventilated, open-chested, male pigs. The local intramyocardial PD and UO infusions occurred before IP and during both reperfusion (RP) phases of IP via four pairs of needles (three pairs verum, one solvent) into the risk area (RA). The IP design included two cycles of 10-min left anterior descending artery (LAD) occlusion and 10 min RP, followed by 40 min of occlusion (index ischemia) and of 60 min of RP. Biopsies of the areas of drug infusion were taken after the second RP cycle of IP. By Western blot analysis, the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 and of the downstream transcription factor Elk-1 were measured, and the activities of the ERKs were tested by in gel phosphorylation. Only small infarcts were detected in the control group animals with the IP period [infarct size (IS), infarct area/risk area; IS, 2.5+/-0.1%]. Significant wedge-shaped infarcts were seen around the area of the PD and UO infusions. The effects of PD and UO were concentration dependent. The maximal dose of UO126 (7.5 mg systemically) was associated with an IS of 68.7+/-2.0%. At the end of IP, we observed a significant increase in phosphorylation and activities of ERKs. PD (50 microM) induced a 50% inhibition of ERK-1 and 56% of ERK-2 activities. Phosphorylated ERK-1 and ERK-2 were decreased after microinfusion of both PD and UO (50 microM). Microinfusion of 50 microM PD also significantly decreased the phosphorylation of Elk-1 (to 59.2+/-8.3% of control conditions). We demonstrate for the first time in vivo that the inhibition of ERKs by PD and UO results in a complete

  1. A MAP Kinase Kinase Interacts with SymRK and Regulates Nodule Organogenesis in Lotus japonicus[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Zhu, Hui; Ke, Danxia; Cai, Kai; Wang, Chao; Gou, Honglan; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    The symbiosis receptor kinase, SymRK, is required for root nodule development. A SymRK-interacting protein (SIP2) was found to form protein complex with SymRK in vitro and in planta. The interaction between SymRK and SIP2 is conserved in legumes. The SIP2 gene was expressed in all Lotus japonicus tissues examined. SIP2 represents a typical plant mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) and exhibited autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation activities. Recombinant SIP2 protein could phosphorylate casein and the Arabidopsis thaliana MAP kinase MPK6. SymRK and SIP2 could not use one another as a substrate for phosphorylation. Instead, SymRK acted as an inhibitor of SIP2 kinase when MPK6 was used as a substrate, suggesting that SymRK may serve as a negative regulator of the SIP2 signaling pathway. Knockdown expression of SIP2 via RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in drastic reduction of nodules formed in transgenic hairy roots. A significant portion of SIP2 RNAi hairy roots failed to form a nodule. In these roots, the expression levels of SIP2 and three marker genes for infection thread and nodule primordium formation were downregulated drastically, while the expression of two other MAPKK genes were not altered. These observations demonstrate an essential role of SIP2 in the early symbiosis signaling and nodule organogenesis. PMID:22353370

  2. Bidirectional Regulation of Neutrophil Migration by MAP Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Ma, Bo; Malik, Asrar B.; Tang, Haiyang; Yang, Tao; Sun, Bo; Wang, Gang; Minshall, Richard D.; Li, Yan; Zhao, Yong; Ye, Richard D.; Xu, Jingsong

    2012-01-01

    To kill invading bacteria, neutrophils must interpret spatial cues, migrate, and reach target sites. Although initiation of chemotactic migration has been extensively studied, little is known about its termination. Here we report that two mitogen-activated protein kinases played opposing roles in neutrophil trafficking. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) potentiated G protein-coupled receptor kinase GRK2 activity and inhibited neutrophil migration, whereas p38 MAPK acted as a non-canonical GRK that phosphorylated the formyl peptide receptor FPR1 and facilitated neutrophil migration by blocking GRK2 function. Therefore, the dynamic balance between Erk and p38 MAPK controls neutrophil “stop” and “go” behaviors, ensuring neutrophils precisely reach their final destination as the first line of host-defense. PMID:22447027

  3. Polyunsaturated fatty acids induce ovarian cancer cell death through ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Aiko; Yamamoto, Akane; Murota, Kaeko; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Iwamori, Masao; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2017-09-04

    Free fatty acids not only play a role in cell membrane construction and energy production but also exert diverse cellular effects through receptor and non-receptor mechanisms. Moreover, epidemiological and clinical studies have so far suggested that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) could have health benefits and the advantage as therapeutic use in cancer treatment. However, the underlying mechanisms of PUFA-induced cellular effects remained to be cleared. Here, we examined the effects of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs on cell death in ovarian cancer cell lines. ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and ω-6 PUFA, γ-linolenic acid (γ-LNA) induced cell death in KF28 cells at the levels of physiological concentrations, but not HAC2 cells. Pharmacological and biochemical analyses demonstrated that cell death induced by DHA and γ-LNA was correlated with activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases, and further an upstream MAP kinase kinase, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, which is stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, an antioxidant vitamin E attenuated PUFA-induced cell death and MAP kinase activation. These findings indicate that PUFA-induced cell death involves ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation and is a cell type-specific action. A further study of the underlying mechanisms for ROS-dependent cell death induced by PUFAs will lead to the discovery of a new target for cancer therapy or diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Rice Kinase-Protein Interaction Map1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaodong; Richter, Todd; Chen, Mei; Fujii, Hiroaki; Seo, Young Su; Xie, Mingtang; Zheng, Xianwu; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Stevenson, Rebecca A.; Dardick, Christopher; Li, Ying; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Fahong; Bartley, Laura E.; Chern, Mawsheng; Bart, Rebecca; Chen, Xiuhua; Zhu, Lihuang; Farmerie, William G.; Gribskov, Michael; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Fromm, Michael E.; Ronald, Pamela C.; Song, Wen-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Plants uniquely contain large numbers of protein kinases, and for the vast majority of the 1,429 kinases predicted in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome, little is known of their functions. Genetic approaches often fail to produce observable phenotypes; thus, new strategies are needed to delineate kinase function. We previously developed a cost-effective high-throughput yeast two-hybrid system. Using this system, we have generated a protein interaction map of 116 representative rice kinases and 254 of their interacting proteins. Overall, the resulting interaction map supports a large number of known or predicted kinase-protein interactions from both plants and animals and reveals many new functional insights. Notably, we found a potential widespread role for E3 ubiquitin ligases in pathogen defense signaling mediated by receptor-like kinases, particularly by the kinases that may have evolved from recently expanded kinase subfamilies in rice. We anticipate that the data provided here will serve as a foundation for targeted functional studies in rice and other plants. The application of yeast two-hybrid and TAPtag analyses for large-scale plant protein interaction studies is also discussed. PMID:19109415

  5. Database for the geologic map of upper Eocene to Holocene volcanic and related rocks in the Cascade Range, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, Andrew D.; Ramsey, David W.; Smith, James G.

    2014-01-01

    This digital database contains information used to produce the geologic map published as Sheet 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-2005. (Sheet 2 of Map I-2005 shows sources of geologic data used in the compilation and is available separately). Sheet 1 of Map I-2005 shows the distribution and relations of volcanic and related rock units in the Cascade Range of Washington at a scale of 1:500,000. This digital release is produced from stable materials originally compiled at 1:250,000 scale that were used to publish Sheet 1. The database therefore contains more detailed geologic information than is portrayed on Sheet 1. This is most noticeable in the database as expanded polygons of surficial units and the presence of additional strands of concealed faults. No stable compilation materials exist for Sheet 1 at 1:500,000 scale. The main component of this digital release is a spatial database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map sheet, main report text, and accompanying mapping reference sheet from Map I-2005. For more information on volcanoes in the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, or California, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

  6. Parallelizing Backpropagation Neural Network Using MapReduce and Cascading Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Jing, Weizhe; Xu, Lixiong

    2016-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is a widely used algorithm in pattern recognition, classification, and prediction fields. Among a number of neural networks, backpropagation neural network (BPNN) has become the most famous one due to its remarkable function approximation ability. However, a standard BPNN frequently employs a large number of sum and sigmoid calculations, which may result in low efficiency in dealing with large volume of data. Therefore to parallelize BPNN using distributed computing technologies is an effective way to improve the algorithm performance in terms of efficiency. However, traditional parallelization may lead to accuracy loss. Although several complements have been done, it is still difficult to find out a compromise between efficiency and precision. This paper presents a parallelized BPNN based on MapReduce computing model which supplies advanced features including fault tolerance, data replication, and load balancing. And also to improve the algorithm performance in terms of precision, this paper creates a cascading model based classification approach, which helps to refine the classification results. The experimental results indicate that the presented parallelized BPNN is able to offer high efficiency whilst maintaining excellent precision in enabling large-scale machine learning. PMID:27217823

  7. Parallelizing Backpropagation Neural Network Using MapReduce and Cascading Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Jing, Weizhe; Xu, Lixiong

    2016-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is a widely used algorithm in pattern recognition, classification, and prediction fields. Among a number of neural networks, backpropagation neural network (BPNN) has become the most famous one due to its remarkable function approximation ability. However, a standard BPNN frequently employs a large number of sum and sigmoid calculations, which may result in low efficiency in dealing with large volume of data. Therefore to parallelize BPNN using distributed computing technologies is an effective way to improve the algorithm performance in terms of efficiency. However, traditional parallelization may lead to accuracy loss. Although several complements have been done, it is still difficult to find out a compromise between efficiency and precision. This paper presents a parallelized BPNN based on MapReduce computing model which supplies advanced features including fault tolerance, data replication, and load balancing. And also to improve the algorithm performance in terms of precision, this paper creates a cascading model based classification approach, which helps to refine the classification results. The experimental results indicate that the presented parallelized BPNN is able to offer high efficiency whilst maintaining excellent precision in enabling large-scale machine learning.

  8. Fungal communication requires the MAK-2 pathway elements STE-20 and RAS-2, the NRC-1 adapter STE-50 and the MAP kinase scaffold HAM-5.

    PubMed

    Dettmann, Anne; Heilig, Yvonne; Valerius, Oliver; Ludwig, Sarah; Seiler, Stephan

    2014-11-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for the survival of unicellular organisms as well as for the development and function of multicellular tissues. Cell-to-cell signaling is also required to develop the interconnected mycelial network characteristic of filamentous fungi and is a prerequisite for symbiotic and pathogenic host colonization achieved by molds. Somatic cell-cell communication and subsequent cell fusion is governed by the MAK-2 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa, yet the composition and mode of regulation of the MAK-2 pathway are currently unclear. In order to identify additional components involved in MAK-2 signaling we performed affinity purification experiments coupled to mass spectrometry with strains expressing functional GFP-fusion proteins of the MAPK cascade. This approach identified STE-50 as a regulatory subunit of the Ste11p homolog NRC-1 and HAM-5 as cell-communication-specific scaffold protein of the MAPK cascade. Moreover, we defined a network of proteins consisting of two Ste20-related kinases, the small GTPase RAS-2 and the adenylate cyclase capping protein CAP-1 that function upstream of the MAK-2 pathway and whose signals converge on the NRC-1/STE-50 MAP3K complex and the HAM-5 scaffold. Finally, our data suggest an involvement of the striatin interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, the casein kinase 2 heterodimer, the phospholipid flippase modulators YPK-1 and NRC-2 and motor protein-dependent vesicle trafficking in the regulation of MAK-2 pathway activity and function. Taken together, these data will have significant implications for our mechanistic understanding of MAPK signaling and for homotypic cell-cell communication in fungi and higher eukaryotes.

  9. JNK3 Enzyme Binding to Arrestin-3 Differentially Affects the Recruitment of Upstream Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xuanzhi; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Kook, Seunghyi; Dalby, Kevin N.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2013-01-01

    Arrestin-3 was previously shown to bind JNK3α2, MKK4, and ASK1. However, full JNK3α2 activation requires phosphorylation by both MKK4 and MKK7. Using purified proteins we show that arrestin-3 directly interacts with MKK7 and promotes JNK3α2 phosphorylation by both MKK4 and MKK7 in vitro as well as in intact cells. The binding of JNK3α2 promotes an arrestin-3 interaction with MKK4 while reducing its binding to MKK7. Interestingly, the arrestin-3 concentration optimal for scaffolding the MKK7-JNK3α2 module is ∼10-fold higher than for the MKK4-JNK3α2 module. The data provide a mechanistic basis for arrestin-3-dependent activation of JNK3α2. The opposite effects of JNK3α2 on arrestin-3 interactions with MKK4 and MKK7 is the first demonstration that the kinase components in mammalian MAPK cascades regulate each other's interactions with a scaffold protein. The results show how signaling outcomes can be affected by the relative expression of scaffolding proteins and components of signaling cascades that they assemble. PMID:23960075

  10. Obesity-induced insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle is characterised by defective activation of p42/p44 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Alcaraz, Antonio J; Lipina, Christopher; Petrie, John R; Murphy, Michael J; Morris, Andrew D; Sutherland, Calum; Cuthbertson, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), an impaired cellular, tissue and whole body response to insulin, is a major pathophysiological defect of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although IR is closely associated with obesity, the identity of the molecular defect(s) underlying obesity-induced IR in skeletal muscle remains controversial; reduced post-receptor signalling of the insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) adaptor protein and downstream effectors such as protein kinase B (PKB) have previously been implicated. We examined expression and/or activation of a number of components of the insulin-signalling cascade in skeletal muscle of 22 healthy young men (with body mass index (BMI) range, 20-37 kg/m(2)). Whole body insulin sensitivity (M value) and body composition was determined by the hyperinsulinaemic (40 mU. min(-1).m(-2).), euglycaemic clamp and by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) respectively. Skeletal muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies were taken before and after one hour of hyperinsulinaemia and the muscle insulin signalling proteins examined by western blot and immunoprecipitation assay. There was a strong inverse relationship between M-value and BMI. The most striking abnormality was significantly reduced insulin-induced activation of p42/44 MAP kinase, measured by specific assay, in the volunteers with poor insulin sensitivity. However, there was no relationship between individuals' BMI or M-value and protein expression/phosphorylation of IRS1, PKB, or p42/44 MAP kinase protein, under basal or hyperinsulinaemic conditions. In the few individuals with poor insulin sensitivity but preserved p42/44 MAP kinase activation, other signalling defects were evident. These findings implicate defective p42/44 MAP kinase signalling as a potential contributor to obesity-related IR in a non-diabetic population, although clearly multiple signalling defects underlie obesity associated IR.

  11. Brain tissue energy dependence of CaM kinase IV cascade activation during hypoxia in the cerebral cortex of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria; Ashraf, Qazi M; Mishra, Om Prakash

    2011-03-17

    The present study aims to investigate the dependence of CaM kinase IV cascade activation during hypoxia and tests the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of CaM and CaM kinase IV, activation of CaM kinase IV and phosphorylation of CREB protein during hypoxia increases as a function of increase in cerebral tissue hypoxia as measured by decrease in tissue ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr). 3-5 days old newborn piglets were divided into normoxic (Nx, FiO₂ of 0.21 for 1h) and hypoxic (Hx, FiO₂ of 0.07 for 1h) groups. Cerebral tissue hypoxia was documented by determining the levels of high energy phosphates ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr). Cerebral cortical neuronal nuclei were isolated and purified, and tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin (Tyr⁹⁹), the activator of CaM kinase IV, and CaM kinase IV determined by Western blot using anti-phospho-(pTyr⁹⁹)-calmodulin, anti-pTyrosine and anti-CaM kinase IV antibodies. The activity of CaM kinase IV and its consequence the phosphorylation of CREB protein at Ser¹³³ were determined. The levels of ATP (μmole/g brain) ranged from 3.48 to 5.28 in Nx, and 0.41 to 2.26 in Hx. The levels of PCr (μmole/g brain) ranged from 2.46 to 3.91 in Nx and 0.72 to 1.20 in Hx. The pTyr⁹⁹ calmodulin (OD x mm²) ranged from 20.35 to 54.47.60 in Nx, and 84.52 to 181.42 in Hx (r²=0.5309 vs ATP and r²=0.6899 vs PCr). Expression of tyrosine phosphorylated CaM kinase IV ranged from 32.86 to 82.46 in Nx and 96.70 to 131.62 in Hx (r²=0.5132 vs ATP and r²=0.4335 vs PCr). The activity of CaM kinase IV (pmole/mg protein/min) ranged from 1263 to 3448 in Nx and 3767 to 6633 in Hx (r²=0.7113 vs ATP and r²=0.6182 vs PCr). The expression of p-CREB at Ser¹³³ ranged from 44.26 to 70.28 in Nx and 82.70 to 182.86 in Hx (r²=0.6621 vs ATP and r²=0.5485 vs PCr). The data show that hypoxia results in increased tyrosine phosphorylation of calmodulin (Tyr⁹⁹), increased tyrosine phosphorylation of CaM kinase IV, increased

  12. Human pre-B cell receptor signal transduction: evidence for distinct roles of PI3kinase and MAP-kinase signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Isabelle, Piec; Stella, Ibata; Céline, Alleaume-De Martel; Bissac, Eliane; Bertrand, Brassart; Rémy, Nyga; Naomi, Taylor; Vincent, Fuentes; Rochette, Jacques; Lassoued, Kaïss

    2013-01-01

    Pre-BCR acts as a critical checkpoint in B cell development. However, its signalling cascade still remains indistinctly characterised in human. We investigated pre-BCR signalling pathway to examine its regulation in normal primary pre-B lymphocytes and pre-B cell lines. In cell lines, early signalling events occurring after pre-BCR stimulation include phosphorylation of Lyn, Blk and Syk together with ZAP70, Btk, Vav, PLC-γ2 and various adaptor proteins, such as BLNK, LAB, LAT and SLP-76. Further downstream, these molecules induced activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAP-kinase resulting in an augmentation of canonical NF-κB pathways and cFos/AP1 activation. PI3K and MAPK exerted opposing effects on the pre-BCR-induced activation of the canonical NF-κB and c-Fos/AP1 pathways. Immediate nuclear export of FoxO3A and delayed import of IRF4 were additional events observed after pre-BCR crosslinking in primary cells. Pre-BCR-induced down-regulation of Rag1, Rag2, E2A and Pax5 transcripts occurred in a PI3K-dependent manner. Finally we bring evidence that pre-BCR stimulation or co stimulation with CD19 enhances cell cycle signal. PMID:25400915

  13. Human pre-B cell receptor signal transduction: evidence for distinct roles of PI3kinase and MAP-kinase signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Isabelle, Piec; Stella, Ibata; Céline, Alleaume-De Martel; Bissac, Eliane; Bertrand, Brassart; Rémy, Nyga; Naomi, Taylor; Vincent, Fuentes; Rochette, Jacques; Lassoued, Kaïss

    2013-10-01

    Pre-BCR acts as a critical checkpoint in B cell development. However, its signalling cascade still remains indistinctly characterised in human. We investigated pre-BCR signalling pathway to examine its regulation in normal primary pre-B lymphocytes and pre-B cell lines. In cell lines, early signalling events occurring after pre-BCR stimulation include phosphorylation of Lyn, Blk and Syk together with ZAP70, Btk, Vav, PLC-γ2 and various adaptor proteins, such as BLNK, LAB, LAT and SLP-76. Further downstream, these molecules induced activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAP-kinase resulting in an augmentation of canonical NF-κB pathways and cFos/AP1 activation. PI3K and MAPK exerted opposing effects on the pre-BCR-induced activation of the canonical NF-κB and c-Fos/AP1 pathways. Immediate nuclear export of FoxO3A and delayed import of IRF4 were additional events observed after pre-BCR crosslinking in primary cells. Pre-BCR-induced down-regulation of Rag1, Rag2, E2A and Pax5 transcripts occurred in a PI3K-dependent manner. Finally we bring evidence that pre-BCR stimulation or co stimulation with CD19 enhances cell cycle signal.

  14. Short-term cascaded hydroelectric system scheduling based on chaotic particle swarm optimization using improved logistic map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yaoyao; Yang, Shanlin; Xu, Qifa

    2013-07-01

    In order to solve the model of short-term cascaded hydroelectric system scheduling, a novel chaotic particle swarm optimization (CPSO) algorithm using improved logistic map is introduced, which uses the water discharge as the decision variables combined with the death penalty function. According to the principle of maximum power generation, the proposed approach makes use of the ergodicity, symmetry and stochastic property of improved logistic chaotic map for enhancing the performance of particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The new hybrid method has been examined and tested on two test functions and a practical cascaded hydroelectric system. The experimental results show that the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed CPSO algorithm in comparison with other traditional algorithms.

  15. Interferon-gamma expression by Th1 effector T cells mediated by the p38 MAP kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Rincón, M; Enslen, H; Raingeaud, J; Recht, M; Zapton, T; Su, M S; Penix, L A; Davis, R J; Flavell, R A

    1998-01-01

    Signal transduction via MAP kinase pathways plays a key role in a variety of cellular responses, including growth factor-induced proliferation, differentiation and cell death. In mammalian cells, p38 MAP kinase can be activated by multiple stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and environmental stress. Although p38 MAP kinase is implicated in the control of inflammatory responses, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Upon activation, CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th2 cells, which potentiate the humoral immune response or pro-inflammatory Th1 cells. Here, we show that pyridinyl imidazole compounds (specific inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase) block the production of interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) by Th1 cells without affecting IL-4 production by Th2 cells. These drugs also inhibit transcription driven by the IFNgamma promoter. In transgenic mice, inhibition of the p38 MAP kinase pathway by the expression of dominant-negative p38 MAP kinase results in selective impairment of Th1 responses. In contrast, activation of the p38 MAP kinase pathway by the expression of constitutivelyactivated MAP kinase kinase 6 in transgenic mice caused increased production of IFNgamma during the differentiation and activation of Th1 cells. Together, these data demonstrate that the p38 MAP kinase is relevant for Th1 cells, not Th2 cells, and that inhibition of p38 MAP kinase represents a possible site of therapeutic intervention in diseases where a predominant Th1 immune response leads to a pathological outcome. Moreover, our study provides an additional mechanism by which the p38 MAP kinase pathway controls inflammatory responses. PMID:9582275

  16. IL-1β Inhibits Connexin 43 and Disrupts Decidualization of Human Endometrial Stromal Cells through ERK1/2 and p38 MAP Kinase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Berga, Sarah L; Zou, Wei; Yook, D Grace; Pan, Joshua C; Andrade, Aurora Arroyo; Zhao, Lijuan; Sidell, Neil; Bagchi, Indrani C; Bagchi, Milan K; Taylor, Robert N

    2017-09-11

    Inflammation can interfere with endometrial receptivity. We examined how IL-1β affects expression of the uterine gap junction protein, Cx43, which is known to be critical for embryonic implantation. We used an in vitro model of human endometrial stromal cells (ESC), Western blotting and a combination of validated, selective kinase inhibitors to evaluate five canonical IL-1β signaling pathways. Cx43 and two other markers of ESC differentiation (prolactin and VEGF) were inhibited predominantly via IL-1β-activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase cascades. The findings were corroborated using siRNA to silence critical genes in either pathway. By contrast, upregulation of endogenous pro-IL-1α and -IL-1β following recombinant IL-1β treatment was mediated via the Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. The clinicopharmacological significance of our findings is that multiple signaling cascades may need to be neutralized to reverse deleterious effects of IL-1β on human endometrial function. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  17. Dependence of Mos-induced Cdc2 activation on MAP kinase function in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C Y; Ferrell, J E

    1996-01-01

    The progression of G2-arrested Xenopus laevis oocytes into meiotic M-phase is accompanied by the nearly simultaneous activation of p42 MAP kinase and Cdc2/cyclin B. This timing raises the possibility that the activation of one kinase might depend upon the other. Here we have examined whether Cdc2 activation requires p42 MAP kinase function. We have reconstituted Mos-induced Cdc2 activation in cell-free Xenopus oocyte extracts, and have found that Mos-induced Cdc2 activation requires active p42 MAP kinase, is inhibited by a MAP kinase phosphatase and is independent of protein synthesis. These findings indicate that p42 MAP kinase is an essential component of the M phase trigger in this system. Images PMID:8641282

  18. The MAP Kinase Pmk1 and Protein Kinase A Are Required for Rotenone Resistance in the Fission Yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin. PMID:20655879

  19. Regulation of a DLK-1 and p38 MAP kinase pathway by the ubiquitin ligase RPM-1 is required for presynaptic development.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Katsunori; Abrams, Benjamin; Grill, Brock; Goncharov, Alexandr; Huang, Xun; Chisholm, Andrew D; Jin, Yishi

    2005-02-11

    Synapses display a stereotyped ultrastructural organization, commonly containing a single electron-dense presynaptic density surrounded by a cluster of synaptic vesicles. The mechanism controlling subsynaptic proportion is not understood. Loss of function in the C. elegans rpm-1 gene, a putative RING finger/E3 ubiquitin ligase, causes disorganized presynaptic cytoarchitecture. RPM-1 is localized to the presynaptic periactive zone. We report that RPM-1 negatively regulates a p38 MAP kinase pathway composed of the dual leucine zipper-bearing MAPKKK DLK-1, the MAPKK MKK-4, and the p38 MAP kinase PMK-3. Inactivation of this pathway suppresses rpm-1 loss of function phenotypes, whereas overexpression or constitutive activation of this pathway causes synaptic defects resembling rpm-1(lf) mutants. DLK-1, like RPM-1, is localized to the periactive zone. DLK-1 protein levels are elevated in rpm-1 mutants. The RPM-1 RING finger can stimulate ubiquitination of DLK-1. Our data reveal a presynaptic role of a previously unknown p38 MAP kinase cascade.

  20. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  1. Cbk1 kinase and Bck2 control MAP kinase activation and inactivation during heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Kuravi, Venkata K.; Kurischko, Cornelia; Puri, Manasi; Luca, Francis C.

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cbk1 kinase is a LATS/NDR tumor suppressor orthologue and component of the Regulation of Ace2 and Morphogenesis signaling network. Cbk1 was previously implicated in regulating polarized morphogenesis, gene expression, and cell integrity. Here we establish that Cbk1 is critical for heat shock and cell wall stress signaling via Bck2, a protein associated with the Pkc1-Mpk1 cell integrity pathway. We demonstrate that cbk1 and bck2 loss-of-function mutations prevent Mpk1 kinase activation and Mpk1-dependent gene expression but do not disrupt Mpk1 Thr-190/Tyr-192 phosphorylation. Bck2 overexpression partially restores Mpk1-dependent Rlm1 transcription factor activity in cbk1 mutants, suggesting that Bck2 functions downstream of Cbk1. We demonstrate that Bck2 precisely colocalizes with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase Sdp1. During heat shock, Bck2 and Sdp1 transiently redistribute from nuclei and the cytosol to mitochondria and other cytoplasmic puncta before returning to their pre-stressed localization patterns. Significantly, Cbk1 inhibition delays the return of Bck2 and Sdp1 to their pre-stressed localization patterns and delays Mpk1 Thr-190/Tyr-192 dephosphorylation upon heat shock adaptation. We conclude that Cbk1 and Bck2 are required for Mpk1 activation during heat shock and cell wall stress and for Mpk1 dephosphorylation during heat shock adaptation. These data provide the first evidence that Cbk1 kinase regulates MAPK-dependent stress signaling and provide mechanistic insight into Sdp1 phosphatase regulation. PMID:22031291

  2. MAP kinase p38 is a novel target of CacyBP/SIP phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M; Rosińska, Sara; Filipek, Anna

    2017-03-10

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are important players in cellular signaling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that CacyBP/SIP serves as a phosphatase for one of the MAP kinases, ERK1/2. Through dephosphorylation of this kinase CacyBP/SIP modulates the transcriptional activity of Elk-1 and the activity of the CREB-BDNF pathway. In this work, using NB2a cell lysate and recombinant proteins, we show that CacyBP/SIP binds and dephosphorylates another member of the MAP kinase family, p38. Analysis of recombinant full-length CacyBP/SIP and its three major domains, N-terminal, middle CS and C-terminal SGS, indicates that the middle CS domain is responsible for p38 dephosphorylation. Moreover, we show that CacyBP/SIP might be implicated in response to oxidative stress. Dephosphorylation of phospho-p38 by CacyBP/SIP in NB2a cells treated with hydrogen peroxide is much more effective than in control ones. In conclusion, involvement of CacyBP/SIP in the regulation of p38 kinase activity, in addition to that of ERK1/2, might point to the function of CacyBP/SIP in pro-survival and pro-apoptotic pathways.

  3. A 42-kD tyrosine kinase substrate linked to chromaffin cell secretion exhibits an associated MAP kinase activity and is highly related to a 42-kD mitogen-stimulated protein in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ely, C M; Oddie, K M; Litz, J S; Rossomando, A J; Kanner, S B; Sturgill, T W; Parsons, S J

    1990-03-01

    The localization of the protein tyrosine kinase pp60c-src to the plasma membrane and to the membrane of secretory vesicles in neurally derived bovine chromaffin cells has suggested that tyrosine phosphorylations may be associated with the process of secretion. In the present study we have identified two cytosolic proteins of approximately 42 and 45 kD that become phosphorylated on tyrosine in response to secretagogue treatment. Phosphorylation of these proteins reached a maximum (3 min after stimulation) before maximum catecholamine release was observed (5-10 min after stimulation). Both secretion and tyrosine phosphorylation of p42 and p45 required extracellular Ca2+. Tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of similar Mr have previously been identified in 3T3-L1 adipocytes stimulated with insulin (MAP kinase; Ray, L. B., and T. W. Sturgill. 1987. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 84:1502-1506) and in avian and rodent fibroblasts stimulated with a variety of mitogenic agents (Cooper, J. A., D. F. Bowen-Pope, E. Raines, R. Ross, and T. Hunter. 1982. Cell. 31:263-273; Nakamura, K. D., R. Martinez, and M. J. Weber. 1983. Mol. Cell. Biol. 3:380-390). Comparisons of the secretion-associated 42-kD protein of chromaffin cells with the 42-kD protein of Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes provide evidence that these three proteins are highly related. This evidence includes comigration during one-dimensional SDS-PAGE, cochromatography using ion exchange and hydrophobic matrices, similar isoelectric points, identical cyanogen-bromide peptide maps, and cochromatography of MAP kinase activity with the tyrosine-phosphorylated form of pp42. This protein(s), which appears to be activated in a variety of cell types, may serve a common function, perhaps in signal transduction involving a cascade of kinases.

  4. p38 MAP kinase mediates nitric oxide-induced apoptosis of neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Chan, S L; Milhavet, O; Wang, S; Mattson, M P

    2001-11-16

    Neural progenitor cells (NPC) can proliferate, differentiate into neurons or glial cells, or undergo a form of programmed cell death called apoptosis. Although death of NPC occurs during development of the nervous system and in the adult, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that nitric oxide (NO) can induce death of C17.2 NPC by a mechanism requiring activation of p38 MAP kinase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caspase-3. Nitric oxide causes release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and Bcl-2 protects the neural progenitor cells against nitric oxide-induced death, consistent with a pivotal role for mitochondrial changes in controlling the cell death process. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase by SB203580 abolished NO-induced cell death, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-3, indicating that p38 activation serves as an upstream mediator in the cell death process. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 protected NPC against nitric oxide-induced apoptosis and suppressed activation of p38 MAP kinase. The ability of nitric oxide to trigger death of NPC by a mechanism involving p38 MAP kinase suggests that this diffusible gas may regulate NPC fate in physiological and pathological settings in which NO is produced.

  5. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  6. Mice lacking MAP kinase phosphatase-1 have enhanced MAP kinase activity and resistance to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Julie; Roth, Rachel J; Anderson, Ethan J; Hong, Eun-Gyoung; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Neufer, P Darrell; Shulman, Gerald I; Kim, Jason K; Bennett, Anton M

    2006-07-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) play critical roles in the pathogenesis of diabetes and obesity. The MAPKs are inactivated by MAPK phosphatases (MKPs) either in the cytosol or nucleus. Here we show that mice lacking the nuclear-localized MKP, MKP-1 (mkp-1(-/-)), have enhanced Erk, p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activities in insulin-responsive tissues as compared with wild-type mice. Although JNK promotes insulin resistance, mkp-1(-/-) mice exhibited unimpaired insulin-mediated signaling and glucose homeostasis. We reconciled these results by demonstrating that in mkp-1(-/-) mice, JNK activity was increased in the nucleus, but not the cytosol. Significantly, mkp-1(-/-) mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity due to enhanced energy expenditure, but succumb to glucose intolerance on a high fat diet. These results suggest that nuclear regulation of the MAPKs by MKP-1 is essential for the management of metabolic homeostasis in a manner that is spatially uncoupled from the cytosolic actions of the MAPKs.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor decreases prostaglandin F2α-stimulated interleukin-6 synthesis through p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Akira; Otsuka, Takanobu; Kato, Kenji; Natsume, Hideo; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Mizutani, Jun; Ito, Yoshiki; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Tokuda, Haruhiko

    2012-12-01

    We previously showed that prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) stimulates the synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, in part via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and p38 MAP kinase but not stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) among the MAP kinase superfamily in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular energy sensor, in PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. PGF(2α) time-dependently induced the phosphorylation of the AMPK α-subunit. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, dose-dependently suppressed PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 release. Compound C reduced the PGF(2α)-induced acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation. In addition, PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 release in human osteoblasts was also inhibited by compound C. The IL-6 mRNA expression induced by PGF(2α) was markedly reduced by compound C. Downregulation of the AMPK α1-subunit by short interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly suppressed the PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 release. PGF(2α)-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase was inhibited by compound C, which failed to affect the p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation. These results strongly suggest that AMPK regulates PGF(2α)-stimulated IL-6 synthesis via p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

  8. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. {yields} The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. {yields} Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. {yields} PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  9. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  10. Chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species are involved in hypersensitive response-like cell death mediated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Pike, Sharon; Pallardy, Stephen; Gassmann, Walter; Zhang, Shuqun

    2007-09-01

    Plant defense against pathogens often includes rapid programmed cell death known as the hypersensitive response (HR). Recent genetic studies have demonstrated the involvement of a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade consisting of three tobacco MAPKs, SIPK, Ntf4 and WIPK, and their common upstream MAPK kinase (MAPKK or MEK), NtMEK2. Potential upstream MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs or MEKKs) in this cascade include the orthologs of Arabidopsis MEKK1 and tomato MAPKKKalpha. Activation of the SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK pathway induces cell death with phenotypes identical to pathogen-induced HR at macroscopic, microscopic and physiological levels, including loss of membrane potential, electrolyte leakage and rapid dehydration. Loss of membrane potential in NtMEK2(DD) plants is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is preceded by disruption of metabolic activities in chloroplasts and mitochondria. We observed rapid shutdown of carbon fixation in chloroplasts after SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK activation, which can lead to the generation of ROS in chloroplasts under illumination. Consistent with a role of chloroplast-generated ROS in MAPK-mediated cell death, plants kept in the dark do not accumulate H(2)O(2) in chloroplasts after MAPK activation, and cell death is significantly delayed. Similar light dependency was observed in HR cell death induced by tobacco mosaic virus, which is known to activate the same MAPK pathway in an N-gene-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of the SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK cascade by pathogens actively promotes the generation of ROS in chloroplasts, which plays an important role in the signaling for and/or execution of HR cell death in plants.

  11. Overexpression of the MAP kinase gene OsMAPK33 enhances sensitivity to salt stress in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling cascades are activated by extracellular stimuli such as environmental stresses and pathogens in higher eukaryotic plants. To know more about MAPK signaling in plants, a MAPK cDNA clone, OsMAPK33 was isolated from rice. The gene is mainly induced by ...

  12. MAP kinase dynamics in response to pheromones in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, F; Stucke, V M; Jorritsma, G; Peter, M

    2001-12-01

    Although scaffolding is a major regulator of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, scaffolding proteins are poorly understood. During yeast mating, MAPK Fus3p is phosphorylated by MAPKK Ste7p, which is activated by MAPKKK Ste11p. This MAPK module interacts with the scaffold molecule Ste5p. Here we show that Ste11p and Ste7p were predominantly cytoplasmic proteins, while Ste5p and Fus3p were found in the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Ste5p, Ste7p and Fus3p also localized to tips of mating projections in pheromone-treated cells. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), we demonstrate that Fus3p rapidly shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm independently of pheromones, Fus3p phosphorylation and Ste5p. Membrane-bound Ste5p can specifically recruit Fus3p and Ste7p to the cell cortex. Ste5p remains stably bound at the plasma membrane, unlike activated Fus3p, which dissociates from Ste5p and translocates to the nucleus.

  13. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-03

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  14. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Ley, Steven C

    2015-06-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers. © 2015 Jacque et al.

  15. Desnitro-imidacloprid activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase cascade via the nicotinic receptor and intracellular calcium mobilization in N1E-115 cells.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2002-11-01

    Imidacloprid (IMI) is the principal neonicotinoid (the only major new class of synthetic insecticides of the past three decades). The excellent safety profile of IMI is not shared with a metabolite, desnitro-IMI (DNIMI), which displays high toxicity to mammals associated with agonist action at the alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in brain. This study examines the hypothesis that IMI, DNIMI, and (-)-nicotine activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade via primary interaction with the alpha4beta2 nAChR in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. These three nicotinic agonists induce phosphorylation of ERK (p44/p42) in a concentration-dependent manner with an optimal incubation period of 30 min. DNIMI (1 microM)-induced ERK activation is blocked by nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine but not by alpha-bungarotoxin and muscarinic antagonist atropine. This activation is prevented by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM but not by removal of external Ca(2+) using EGTA and Ca(2+)-free medium. 2-Aminoethoxy-diphenylborate, a blocker for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, inhibits DNIMI-induced ERK activation but a high level of ryanodine (to block ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release) does not. The inhibitor U-73122 for phospholipase C (to suppress IP(3) production) prevents ERK activation evoked by DNIMI. Inhibitors for protein kinase C (PKC) (GF109203X) and ERK kinase (PD98059) block this activation whereas an inhibitor (H-89) for cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase does not. Thus, neonicotinoids activate the ERK cascade triggered by primary action at the alpha4beta2 nAChR with an involvement of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization possibly mediated by IP(3). It is further suggested that intracellular Ca(2+) activates a sequential pathway from PKC to ERK.

  16. The regulation of runt-related transcription factor 2 by fibroblast growth factor-2 and connexin43 requires the inositol polyphosphate/protein kinasecascade.

    PubMed

    Niger, Corinne; Luciotti, Maria A; Buo, Atum M; Hebert, Carla; Ma, Vy; Stains, Joseph P

    2013-06-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) plays a critical role in osteoblast function and bone mass accrual, yet the identity of the second messengers communicated by Cx43 gap junctions, the targets of these second messengers and how they regulate osteoblast function remain largely unknown. We have shown that alterations of Cx43 expression in osteoblasts can impact the responsiveness to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), by modulating the transcriptional activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In this study, we examined the contribution of the phospholipase Cγ1/inositol polyphosphate/protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) cascade to the Cx43-dependent transcriptional response of MC3T3 osteoblasts to FGF2. Knockdown of expression and/or inhibition of function of phospholipase Cγ1, inositol polyphosphate multikinase, which generates inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate (InsP₄) and InsP₅, and inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1/2, which generates inositol pyrophosphates, prevented the ability of Cx43 to potentiate FGF2-induced signaling through Runx2. Conversely, overexpression of phospholipase Cγ1 and inositol hexakisphosphate kinase 1/2 enhanced FGF2 activation of Runx2 and the effect of Cx43 overexpression on this response. Disruption of these pathways blocked the nuclear accumulation of PKCδ and the FGF2-dependent interaction of PKCδ and Runx2, reducing Runx2 transcriptional activity. These data reveal that FGF2-signaling involves the inositol polyphosphate cascade, including inositol hexakisphosphate kinase (IP6K), and demonstrate that IP6K regulates Runx2 and osteoblast gene expression. Additionally, these data implicate the water-soluble inositol polyphosphates as mediators of the Cx43-dependent amplification of the osteoblast response to FGF2, and suggest that these low molecular weight second messengers may be biologically relevant mediators of osteoblast function that are communicated by Cx43-gap junctions.

  17. Light-inducible and clock-controlled expression of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 in mouse central pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Doi, Masao; Cho, Sehyung; Yujnovsky, Irene; Hirayama, Jun; Cermakian, Nicolas; Cato, Andrew C B; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP1) is a negative regulator for the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signal transduction, a key pathway that leads to the regulated expression of circadian clock genes. Here the authors analyzed mkp1 expression by in situ hybridization and found that mkp1 is a light-inducible and clock-controlled gene expressed in the central pacemaker neurons of the hypothalamic SCN. Interestingly, mkp1 presents a marked similarity to the clock core gene per1 in terms of the gene expression profiles as well as the gene promoter organization. Both mkp1 and per1 are subject to bimodal regulation in the SCN: the external light-dependent acute up-regulation and the functional clock-dependent circadian oscillation. Consistent with this, the authors show that mkp1 gene has a per1-like promoter that contains 2 functionally distinct elements: cAMP-responsive element (CRE) and E-box. CRE sites present in the mkp1 promoter constitute the functional binding sites for the CRE binding protein (CREB), which serves as an important regulator that mediates the light-induced signaling cascades in the SCN neurons. Furthermore, the authors show that the E-box present in the mkp1 promoter is necessary and sufficient for transcriptional control exerted by circadian clock core regulators that include a positive complex CLOCK/BMAL1 and a negative factor CRY1. The authors' studies on mkp1 have identified for the first time a gene encoding a phosphatase that functions in light-dependent and time-of-day-dependent manners in the mammalian central clock structure SCN.

  18. Involvement of protein kinases and calcium in the NO-signalling cascade for defence-gene induction in ozonated tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, S; Reale, L; Calderini, O; Pagiotti, R; Ederli, L

    2012-07-01

    This study analyses the signalling pathways triggered by nitric oxide (NO) in response to ozone (O(3)) fumigation of tobacco plants, with particular attention to protein kinase cascades and free cytosolic Ca(2+) in defence-gene activation. NO was visualized with the NO probe DAF-FM. Using a pharmacological approach, the effects of different inhibitors on the expression profiles of NO-dependent defence genes were monitored using RT-PCR. The assay of the kinase activity of the immunoprecipitates complexes shows that O(3) stimulates a 48 kDa salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) in an NO-dependent manner. The O(3)-induced alternative oxidase 1a (AOX1a) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase a (PALa) genes are modulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, and SIPK might have a role in this up-regulation. By contrast, protein dephosphorylation mediates pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR1a) expression in O(3)-treated tobacco plants. Ca(2+) is essential, but not sufficient, to promote NO accumulation in ozonated tobacco plants. Intracellular Ca(2+) transients are also essential for PALa up-regulation and cGMP-induced PR1a expression. Partial dependence on intracellular Ca(2+) suggests two different pathways of SA accumulation and PR1a induction. A model summarizing the signalling networks involving NO, SA, and the cellular messengers in this O(3)-induced defence gene activation is proposed.

  19. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Martin, Bryan T.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  20. The Nicotiana benthamiana mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and WRKY transcription factor participate in Nep1(Mo)-triggered plant responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huajian; Li, Deqing; Wang, Meifang; Liu, Jiewen; Teng, Wenjun; Cheng, Baoping; Huang, Qian; Wang, Min; Song, Wenwen; Dong, Suomeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2012-12-01

    Many bacterial, fungal, and oomycete species secrete necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1 (Nep1)-like proteins (NLP) that trigger programmed cell death (PCD) and innate immune responses in dicotyledonous plants. However, how NLP induce such immune responses is not understood. Here, we show that silencing of the MAPKKKα-MEK2-WIPK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade through virus-induced gene silencing compromises hydrogen peroxide accumulation and PCD induced by Nep1(Mo) from Magnaporthe oryzae. WIPK interacts with NbWRKY2, a transcription factor in Nicotiana benthamiana, in vitro and in vivo, suggesting an effector pathway that mediates Nep1(Mo)-induced cell death. Unexpectedly, salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK)- and NbWRKY2-silenced plants showed impaired Nep1(Mo)-induced stomatal closure, decreased Nep1(Mo)-promoted nitric oxide (NO) production in guard cells, and a reduction in Nep1(Mo)-induced resistance against Phytophthora nicotianae. Expression studies by real-time polymerase chain reaction suggested that the MEK2-WIPK-NbWRKY2 pathway regulated Nep1(Mo)triggered NO accumulation could be partly dependent on nitrate reductase, which was implicated in NO synthesis. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that the MAPK cascade is involved in Nep1(Mo)-triggered plant responses and MAPK signaling associated with PCD exhibits shared and distinct components with that for stomatal closure.

  1. BDNF stimulation of protein synthesis in cortical neurons requires the MAP kinase-interacting kinase MNK1.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Maja; Kenney, Justin W; Johnston, Harvey E; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D; Proud, Christopher G

    2015-01-21

    Although the MAP kinase-interacting kinases (MNKs) have been known for >15 years, their roles in the regulation of protein synthesis have remained obscure. Here, we explore the involvement of the MNKs in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-stimulated protein synthesis in cortical neurons from mice. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that BDNF-induced upregulation of protein synthesis requires MEK/ERK signaling and the downstream kinase, MNK1, which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E. Translation initiation is mediated by the interaction of eIF4E with the m(7)GTP cap of mRNA and with eIF4G. The latter interaction is inhibited by the interactions of eIF4E with partner proteins, such as CYFIP1, which acts as a translational repressor. We find that BDNF induces the release of CYFIP1 from eIF4E, and that this depends on MNK1. Finally, using a novel combination of BONCAT and SILAC, we identify a subset of proteins whose synthesis is upregulated by BDNF signaling via MNK1 in neurons. Interestingly, this subset of MNK1-sensitive proteins is enriched for functions involved in neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Additionally, we find significant overlap between our subset of proteins whose synthesis is regulated by MNK1 and those encoded by known FMRP-binding mRNAs. Together, our data implicate MNK1 as a key component of BDNF-mediated translational regulation in neurons. Copyright © 2015 Genheden et al.

  2. Optical pulse shaping based on discrete space-to-time mapping in cascaded co-directional couplers.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Hamed Pishvai; Azaña, José

    2015-09-07

    We propose and numerically validate a new design concept for on-chip optical pulse shaping based on discrete space-to-time mapping in cascaded co-directional couplers. We show that under weak-coupling conditions, the amplitude and phase of the discrete complex apodization profile of the device can be directly mapped into its temporal impulse response. In this scheme, the amplitude and phase of the apodization profile can be controlled by tuning the coupling strength and relative time delay between the couplers, respectively. The proposed concept enables direct synthesis of the target temporal waveforms over a very broad range of time-resolution, from the femtosecond to the sub-nanosecond regime, using readily feasible integrated waveguide technologies. Moreover, the device offers compactness and the potential for reconfigurability.

  3. MAP kinase-mediated stress relief that precedes and regulates the timing of transcriptional induction.

    PubMed

    Proft, Markus; Struhl, Kevin

    2004-08-06

    In yeast, hyperosmotic stress causes an immediate dissociation of most proteins from chromatin, presumably because cells are unprepared for, and initially unresponsive to, increased ion concentrations in the nucleus. Osmotic stress activates Hog1 MAP kinase, which phosphorylates at least two proteins located at the plasma membrane, the Nha1 Na+/H+ antiporter and the Tok1 potassium channel. Hog1 phosphorylation stimulates Nha1 activity, and this is crucial for the rapid reassociation of proteins with their target sites in chromatin. This initial response to hyperosmolarity precedes and temporally regulates the activation of stress-response genes that depends on Hog1 phosphorylation of transcription factors in the nucleus. Thus, a single MAP kinase coordinates temporally, spatially, and mechanistically distinct responses to stress, thereby providing very rapid stress relief that facilitates subsequent changes in gene expression that permit long-term adaptation to harsh environmental conditions.

  4. Activation of p38 MAP Kinase and JNK Pathways by UVA Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack; Bowden, G. Tim

    2014-01-01

    There are more than two million new cases of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) diagnosed each year in the United States. The clear etiological factor is chronic exposure to solar radiation from the sun. The wavelengths of solar light that reach the earth’s surface include UVB (280-320nm) which accounts for 1-10% and UVA (320-400nm) which accounts for 90-99% of the radiation. While most of the published research has focused on the effects of UVB, little is known concerning UVA-mediated signal transduction pathways and their role in skin tumor promotion and progression giving rise to squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we have focused on UVA-mediated activation of p38 MAP kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and their roles in activator protein-1 (AP-1) mediated transcription, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and Bcl-XL expression. Since p38 MAP kinase and JNK play major roles in the expression of UVA-induced AP-1, COX-2 and Bcl-XL, pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases may be useful in the chemoprevention of SCC skin cancer. PMID:21858326

  5. Cellular context–mediated Akt dynamics regulates MAP kinase signaling thresholds during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellesøy, Monica; Lorens, James B.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting angiogenesis is tightly regulated by contextual cues that affect angiogeneic growth factor signaling. Both constitutive activation and loss of Akt kinase activity in endothelial cells impair angiogenesis, suggesting that Akt dynamics mediates contextual microenvironmental regulation. We explored the temporal regulation of Akt in endothelial cells during formation of capillary-like networks induced by cell–cell contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) and vSMC-associated VEGF. Expression of constitutively active Akt1 strongly inhibited network formation, whereas hemiphosphorylated Akt1 epi-alleles with reduced kinase activity had an intermediate inhibitory effect. Conversely, inhibition of Akt signaling did not affect endothelial cell migration or morphogenesis in vSMC cocultures that generate capillary-like structures. We found that endothelial Akt activity is transiently blocked by proteasomal degradation in the presence of SMCs during the initial phase of capillary-like structure formation. Suppressed Akt activity corresponded to the increased endothelial MAP kinase signaling that was required for angiogenic endothelial morphogenesis. These results reveal a regulatory principle by which cellular context regulates Akt protein dynamics, which determines MAP kinase signaling thresholds necessary drive a morphogenetic program during angiogenesis. PMID:26023089

  6. Interdomain allosteric regulation of Polo kinase by Aurora B and Map205 is required for cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kachaner, David; Pinson, Xavier; El Kadhi, Khaled Ben; Normandin, Karine; Talje, Lama; Lavoie, Hugo; Lépine, Guillaume; Carréno, Sébastien; Kwok, Benjamin H; Hickson, Gilles R; Archambault, Vincent

    2014-10-27

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo and its human orthologue Polo-like kinase 1 fulfill essential roles during cell division. Members of the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family contain an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions. How Plks are regulated in cytokinesis is poorly understood. Here we show that phosphorylation of Polo by Aurora B is required for cytokinesis. This phosphorylation in the activation loop of the KD promotes the dissociation of Polo from the PBD-bound microtubule-associated protein Map205, which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of Polo kinase activity. This mechanism allows the release of active Polo from microtubules of the central spindle and its recruitment to the site of cytokinesis. Failure in Polo phosphorylation results in both early and late cytokinesis defects. Importantly, the antagonistic regulation of Polo by Aurora B and Map205 in cytokinesis reveals that interdomain allosteric mechanisms can play important roles in controlling the cellular functions of Plks.

  7. Dibutyltin activates MAP kinases in human natural killer cells, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Odman-Ghazi, Sabah O; Abraha, Abraham; Isom, Erica Taylor; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that dibutyltin (DBT) interferes with the function of human natural killer (NK) cells, diminishing their capacity to destroy tumor cells, in vitro. DBT is a widespread environmental contaminant and has been found in human blood. As NK cells are our primary immune defense against tumor cells, it is important to understand the mechanism by which DBT interferes with their function. The current study examines the effects of DBT exposures on key enzymes in the signaling pathway that regulates NK responsiveness to tumor cells. These include several protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAP2Ks). The results showed that in vitro exposures of NK cells to DBT had no effect on PTKs. However, exposures to DBT for as little as 10 min were able to increase the phosphorylation (activation) of the MAPKs. The DBT-induced activations of these MAPKs appear to be due to DBT-induced activations of the immediate upstream activators of the MAPKs, MAP2Ks. The results suggest that DBT-interference with the MAPK signaling pathway is a consequence of DBT exposures, which could account for DBT-induced decreases in NK function.

  8. Regulation of atypical MAP kinases ERK3 and ERK4 by the phosphatase DUSP2

    PubMed Central

    Perander, Maria; Al-Mahdi, Rania; Jensen, Thomas C.; Nunn, Jennifer A. L.; Kildalsen, Hanne; Johansen, Bjarne; Gabrielsen, Mads; Keyse, Stephen M.; Seternes, Ole-Morten

    2017-01-01

    The atypical MAP kinases ERK3 and ERK4 are activated by phosphorylation of a serine residue lying within the activation loop signature sequence S-E-G. However, the regulation of ERK3 and ERK4 phosphorylation and activity is poorly understood. Here we report that the inducible nuclear dual-specificity MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) DUSP2, a known regulator of the ERK and p38 MAPKs, is unique amongst the MKP family in being able to bind to both ERK3 and ERK4. This interaction is mediated by a conserved common docking (CD) domain within the carboxyl-terminal domains of ERK3 and ERK4 and the conserved kinase interaction motif (KIM) located within the non-catalytic amino terminus of DUSP2. This interaction is direct and results in the dephosphorylation of ERK3 and ERK4 and the stabilization of DUSP2. In the case of ERK4 its ability to stabilize DUSP2 requires its kinase activity. Finally, we demonstrate that expression of DUSP2 inhibits ERK3 and ERK4-mediated activation of its downstream substrate MK5. We conclude that the activity of DUSP2 is not restricted to the classical MAPK pathways and that DUSP2 can also regulate the atypical ERK3/4-MK5 signalling pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:28252035

  9. Sevoflurane Stimulates MAP Kinase Signal transduction through the Activation of PKC α and βII in Fetal Rat Cerebral Cortex Cultured Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takekoshi, Susumu; Nagata, Hidetaka; Osamura, R. Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a key enzyme that participates in various neuronal functions. PKC has also been identified as a target molecule for general anesthetic actions. Raf, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) have been thought to be target effectors of PKC. In the present study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of sevoflurane on PKC/MAPK cascade signaling in cultured fetal rat cerebral ­cortex neurons, prepared from embryonic day 18 fetuses. The effects of sevoflurane on the translocation of 7 PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, γ, δ, ɛ and ζ) were observed by immunoblotting using isoform-selective antibodies to PKCs. The treatment of neurons with sevoflurane induced the translocation of PKC α and PKC βII species from the cytosol to the membrane fraction, which indicated the activation of these PKC isoforms. In contrast, there was no clear change in the distribution of other PKC isoforms. We next examined whether the specific activation of PKC α and βII by sevoflurane could stimulate the MAP kinase signaling pathway in cultured neurons. Raf phosphorylation was increased by the administration of 0.25 mM sevoflurane. The phosphorylation of Raf proteins reached a maximum at 5–10 min. Subsequently, the phosphorylation of MEK proteins was increased at 10–15 min after sevoflurane treatments. That of ERK proteins was induced at 15–60 min. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ERK induced by sevoflurane was significantly decreased by the treatment of PKC inhibitor (staurosporine) and MEK inhibitor (PD98059). On the other hand, the contents of total Raf, MEK and ERK proteins were relatively constant at all times examined. To examine the ­localization of phosphorylated-ERK protein, immunohistochemical staining of sevoflurane-treated cultured neurons was performed. The phosphorylated-ERK proteins were markedly accumulated in both the cytosol of the cell body and the neurites in the neuronal cells with time after 0

  10. PD98059 and U0126 activate AMP-activated protein kinase by increasing the cellular AMP:ATP ratio and not via inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Dokladda, Kanchana; Green, Kevin A; Pan, David A; Hardie, D Grahame

    2005-01-03

    The MAP kinase pathway inhibitor U0126 caused phosphorylation and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased phosphorylation of its downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase, in HEK293 cells. This effect only occurred in cells expressing the upstream kinase, LKB1. Of two other widely used MAP kinase pathway inhibitors not closely related in structure to U0126, PD98059 also activated AMPK but PD184352 did not. U0126 and PD98059, but not PD184352, also increased the cellular ADP:ATP and AMP:ATP ratios, accounting for their ability to activate AMPK. These results suggest the need for caution in interpreting experiments conducted using U0126 and PD98059.

  11. The phosphorylation state of MAP-kinases modulates the cytotoxic response of smooth muscle cells to hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, O; Boscoboinik, D; Fiorani, M; Stäuble, B; Azzi, A

    1996-07-08

    Micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and a lethal response in growth-arrested smooth muscle cells (A7r5). The H202-induced phosphorylation of MAP-kinases was markedly lower in the presence of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors or in protein kinase C (PKC) down-regulated cells. Similarly, the toxicity of H202 was diminished by concomitant addition of either PKC or PTK inhibitors and was also lower in PKC down-regulated cells. These results are consistent with the possibility that phosphorylation of MAP-kinases is a critical event in the toxic response of cultured smooth muscle cells to H202.

  12. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L.J.

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase–Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers. PMID:25987726

  13. Expression of HopAI interferes with MAP kinase signalling in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Liu, Wende; Li, Yang; Li, Guotian; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2017-08-11

    The Pmk1 and Mps1 MAP kinases are essential for appressorium formation and plant infection in Magnaporthe oryzae. However, their exact roles during invasive growth are not clear because pmk1 and mps1 mutants are defective in penetration. To further characterize their functions after penetration, in this study we expressed the Pseudomonas syringae effector HopAI known to inactivate plant MAP kinases in M. oryzae. Constitutive expression of HopAI with the RP27 or TrpC promoter resulted in defects in hyphal growth, conidiation, appressorium penetration and pathogenicity, which is similar to the phenotype of the mps1 mutant. HopAI interacted strongly with Mps1 in vivo and expression of dominant active MKK2 partially suppressed the defects of PRP27 -HopAI transformants, which were significantly reduced in Mps1 phosphorylation. When the infection-specific MIR1 (Magnaporthe-infection-related gene-1) promoter was used to express HopAI, PMIR1 -HopAI transformants were defective in the spreading of invasive hyphae and elicited strong defense responses in penetrated plant cells. Expression of HopAI in Fusarium graminearum also mainly affected the activation of Mgv1, an Mps1 orthologue. Taken together, our results showed that Mps1 is the major intracellular target of HopAI when it is overexpressed, and MAP kinase signalling is important for cell-to-cell movement of invasive hyphae in M. oryzae. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-02-27

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation.

  15. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12039.001 PMID:26920220

  16. MAP Kinase-Mediated Negative Regulation of Symbiotic Nodule Formation in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hojin; Laffont, Carole; Frugier, Florian; Hwang, Ildoo

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades play critical roles in various cellular events in plants, including stress responses, innate immunity, hormone signaling, and cell specificity. MAPK-mediated stress signaling is also known to negatively regulate nitrogen-fixing symbiotic interactions, but the molecular mechanism of the MAPK signaling cascades underlying the symbiotic nodule development remains largely unknown. We show that the MtMKK5-MtMPK3/6 signaling module negatively regulates the early symbiotic nodule formation, probably upstream of ERN1 (ERF Required for Nodulation 1) and NSP1 (Nod factor Signaling Pathway 1) in Medicago truncatula. The overexpression of MtMKK5 stimulated stress and defense signaling pathways but also reduced nodule formation in M. truncatula roots. Conversely, a MAPK specific inhibitor, U0126, enhanced nodule formation and the expression of an early nodulation marker gene, MtNIN. We found that MtMKK5 directly activates MtMPK3/6 by phosphorylating the TEY motif within the activation loop and that the MtMPK3/6 proteins physically interact with the early nodulation-related transcription factors ERN1 and NSP1. These data suggest that the stress signaling-mediated MtMKK5/MtMPK3/6 module suppresses symbiotic nodule development via the action of early nodulation transcription factors. PMID:28152300

  17. Porins from Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Activate the Transcription Factors Activating Protein 1 and NF-κB through the Raf-1-Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Massimiliano; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Sanzari, Emma; D’Isanto, Marina; Tortora, Annalisa; Longanella, Anna; Galdiero, Stefania

    2002-01-01

    In this study we examined the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium porins to activate activating protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and we identified the AP-1-induced protein subunits. Our results demonstrate that these enzymes may participate in cell signaling pathways leading to AP-1 and NF-κB activation following porin stimulation of cells. Raf-1 was phosphorylated in response to the treatment of U937 cells with porins; moreover, the porin-mediated increase in Raf-1 phosphorylation is accompanied by the phosphorylation of MAPK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. We used three different inhibitors of phosphorylation pathways: 2′-amino-3′-methoxyflavone (PD-098059), a selective inhibitor of MEK1 activator and the MAPK cascade; 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB203580), a specific inhibitor of the p38 pathway; and 7β-acetoxy-1α,6β,9α-trihydroxy-8,13-epoxy-labd-14-en-11-one (forskolin), an inhibitor at the level of Raf-1 kinase. PD-098059 pretreatment of cells decreases AP-1 and NF-κB activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by porins, and SB203580 pretreatment of cells decreases mainly AP-1 and NF-κB activation by porins; in contrast, forskolin pretreatment of cells does not affect AP-1 and NF-κB activation following either porin or LPS stimulation. Our data suggest that the p38 signaling pathway mainly regulates AP-1 and NF-κB activation in cells treated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium porins. Antibody electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that JunD and c-Fos binding is found in cells treated with porins, in cells treated with LPS, and in unstimulated cells. However, by 30 to 60 min of stimulation, a different complex including c-Jun appears in cells treated with porins or LPS, while the Fra-2 subunit is present only after porin stimulation

  18. Porins from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium activate the transcription factors activating protein 1 and NF-kappaB through the Raf-1-mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Massimiliano; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Sanzari, Emma; D'Isanto, Marina; Tortora, Annalisa; Longanella, Anna; Galdiero, Stefania

    2002-02-01

    In this study we examined the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium porins to activate activating protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, and we identified the AP-1-induced protein subunits. Our results demonstrate that these enzymes may participate in cell signaling pathways leading to AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation following porin stimulation of cells. Raf-1 was phosphorylated in response to the treatment of U937 cells with porins; moreover, the porin-mediated increase in Raf-1 phosphorylation is accompanied by the phosphorylation of MAPK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2), p38, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. We used three different inhibitors of phosphorylation pathways: 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD-098059), a selective inhibitor of MEK1 activator and the MAPK cascade; 4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole (SB203580), a specific inhibitor of the p38 pathway; and 7beta-acetoxy-1alpha,6beta,9alpha-trihydroxy-8,13-epoxy-labd-14-en-11-one (forskolin), an inhibitor at the level of Raf-1 kinase. PD-098059 pretreatment of cells decreases AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by porins, and SB203580 pretreatment of cells decreases mainly AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation by porins; in contrast, forskolin pretreatment of cells does not affect AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation following either porin or LPS stimulation. Our data suggest that the p38 signaling pathway mainly regulates AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation in cells treated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium porins. Antibody electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that JunD and c-Fos binding is found in cells treated with porins, in cells treated with LPS, and in unstimulated cells. However, by 30 to 60 min of stimulation, a different complex including c-Jun appears in cells treated with porins or LPS, while the Fra-2 subunit is present only

  19. Combinatory action of VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways maintains endothelial-cell integrity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hanbing; Wang, Danyang; Wang, Nan; Rios, Yesenia; Huang, Haigen; Li, Song; Wu, Xinrong; Lin, Shuo

    2011-07-01

    Blood vessels normally maintain stereotyped lumen diameters and their stable structures are crucial for vascular function. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of vessel diameters and the integrity of endothelial cells. We investigated this issue in zebrafish embryos by a chemical genetics approach. Small molecule libraries were screened using live Tg(kdrl:GRCFP)(zn1) transgenic embryos in which endothelial cells are specifically labeled with GFP. By analyzing the effects of compounds on the morphology and function of embryonic blood vessels after lumen formation, PP1, a putative Src kinase inhibitor, was identified as capable of specifically reducing vascular lumen size by interrupting endothelial-cell integrity. The inhibitory effect is not due to Src or general VEGF signaling inhibition because another Src inhibitor and Src morpholino as well as several VEGFR inhibitors failed to produce a similar phenotype. After profiling a panel of 22 representative mammalian kinases and surveying published data, we selected a few possible new candidates. Combinational analysis of these candidate kinase inhibitors established that PP1 induced endothelial collapse by inhibiting both the VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways. More importantly, combinatory use of two clinically approved drugs Dasatinib and Sunitinib produced the same phenotype. This is the first study to elucidate the pathways controlling maintenance of endothelial integrity using a chemical genetics approach, indicating that endothelial integrity is controlled by the combined action of the VEGFR2 and MAP kinase pathways. Our results also suggest the possible side effect of the combination of two anticancer drugs on the circulatory system.

  20. WSC-1 and HAM-7 Are MAK-1 MAP Kinase Pathway Sensors Required for Cell Wall Integrity and Hyphal Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ci; Seiler, Stephan; Free, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    A large number of cell wall proteins are encoded in the Neurospora crassa genome. Strains carrying gene deletions of 65 predicted cell wall proteins were characterized. Deletion mutations in two of these genes (wsc-1 and ham-7) have easily identified morphological and inhibitor-based defects. Their phenotypic characterization indicates that HAM-7 and WSC-1 function during cell-to-cell hyphal fusion and in cell wall integrity maintenance, respectively. wsc-1 encodes a transmembrane protein with extensive homology to the yeast Wsc family of sensor proteins. In N. crassa, WSC-1 (and its homolog WSC-2) activates the cell wall integrity MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway. The GPI-anchored cell wall protein HAM-7 is required for cell-to-cell fusion and the sexual stages of the N. crassa life cycle. Like WSC-1, HAM-7 is required for activating MAK-1. A Δwsc-1;Δham-7 double mutant fully phenocopies mutants lacking components of the MAK-1 MAP kinase cascade. The data identify WSC-1 and HAM-7 as the major cell wall sensors that regulate two distinct MAK-1-dependent cellular activities, cell wall integrity and hyphal anastomosis, respectively. PMID:22879952

  1. Involvement of Polo-like Kinase 1 (Plk1) in Mitotic Arrest by Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase-Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (MEK-ERK-RSK1) Cascade*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Chen, Dian-Fu; Zhou, Rong; Jia, Sheng-Nan; Yang, Jin-Shu; Clegg, James S.; Yang, Wei-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Cell division is controlled through cooperation of different kinases. Of these, polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (RSK1) play key roles. Plk1 acts as a G2/M trigger, and RSK1 promotes G1 progression. Although previous reports show that Plk1 is suppressed by RSK1 during meiosis in Xenopus oocytes, it is still not clear whether this is the case during mitosis or whether Plk1 counteracts the effects of RSK1. Few animal models are available for the study of controlled and transient cell cycle arrest. Here we show that encysted embryos (cysts) of the primitive crustacean Artemia are ideal for such research because they undergo complete cell cycle arrest when they enter diapause (a state of obligate dormancy). We found that Plk1 suppressed the activity of RSK1 during embryonic mitosis and that Plk1 was inhibited during embryonic diapause and mitotic arrest. In addition, studies on HeLa cells using Plk1 siRNA interference and overexpression showed that phosphorylation of RSK1 increased upon interference and decreased after overexpression, suggesting that Plk1 inhibits RSK1. Taken together, these findings provide insights into the regulation of Plk1 during cell division and Artemia diapause cyst formation and the correlation between the activity of Plk1 and RSK1. PMID:22427657

  2. Lidar Mapping Documents Post-glacial Faulting West of the High Cascades Axis at Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, C. R.; Robinson, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascades magmatic arc lies mainly within the High Cascades graben system in the state of Oregon. Normal faults of the Klamath graben trend north into Mount Mazama, the volcano whose catastrophic eruption ~7700 cal y BP resulted in collapse of 8x10 km Crater Lake caldera. Geologic mapping of Mount Mazama (Bacon, USGS SIM 2832, 2008) delineated faults of the West Klamath Lake fault zone (WKLFZ) and their northern extensions through Crater Lake National Park west of the caldera. Outcrop patterns implied presence of normal faults farther west but dense conifer forest made discovery of subtle scarps impractical. Closer to the Cascades axis, successively decreasing offsets of mapped Mazama lava flows with decreasing age yielded a long-term vertical slip rate of ~0.3 mm/y on the principal fault segments of the WKLFZ near Crater Lake, where the youngest offset lavas are 35 ka in age. Other workers have found offset lateral moraine crests where Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) valley glaciers crossed the WKLFZ south of Crater Lake. A lidar survey of Crater Lake National Park in 2010 supported by the Oregon Lidar Consortium (Robinson, USGS Data Series 716, 2012) revealed meter-scale, dominantly N-S trending fault scarps with down-to-the-east displacement west of most previously mapped faults at the latitude of Crater Lake, increasing the known width of the fault zone there to as much as 11 km. Fault segments as long as 7-16 km form a semi-continuous system for virtually the entire 32 km N-S extent of lidar coverage. Along the western part of the fault zone, scarp height is as great as ~20 m. Scarp length and height imply that several M>6-7 earthquakes have occurred in late Pleistocene-Holocene time. Field observations show that the ignimbrite of the Mazama climactic eruption banks against or covers scarps. One fault vertically displaces a lateral moraine ~3 m. The moraine contains clasts of ~50 ka andesite and therefore likely dates from the LGM so that the most recent

  3. MST50 Is Involved in Multiple MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Li, Guotian; Zhang, Xue; Tian, Huan; Choi, Yoon-E; Andy Tao, W; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2017-02-28

    Appressorium formation plays a critical role in Magnaporthe oryzae. Mst50 is an adapter protein of the Mst11-Mst7-Pmk1 cascade that is essential for appressorium formation. To further characterize its functions, affinity purification was used to identify Mst50-interacting proteins (MIPs) in this study. Two of the MIPs are Mst11 and Mst7 that are known to interact with Mst50 for Pmk1 activation. Surprisingly, two other MIPs are Mck1 and Mkk2 that are the upstream kinases of the Mps1 pathway. Domain deletion analysis showed that the sterile alpha-motif of Mst50 but not the Ras-association domain was important for its interaction with Mck1 and responses to cell wall and oxidative stresses. The mst50 mutant was reduced in Mps1 activation under stress conditions. MIP11 encodes a RACK1 protein that also interacted with Mck1. Deletion of MIP11 resulted in defects in cell wall integrity, Mps1 phosphorylation, and plant infection. Furthermore, Mst50 interacted with histidine kinase Hik1, and the mst50 mutant was reduced in Osm1 phosphorylation. These results indicated that Mst50 is involved in all three MAPK pathways in M. oryzae although its functions differ in each pathway. Several MIPs are conserved hypothetical proteins and may be involved in responses to various signals and crosstalk among signaling pathways. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. MAP kinase signaling antagonizes PAR-1 function during polarization of the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Spilker, Annina C; Rabilotta, Alexia; Zbinden, Caroline; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Gotta, Monica

    2009-11-01

    PAR proteins (partitioning defective) are major regulators of cell polarity and asymmetric cell division. One of the par genes, par-1, encodes a Ser/Thr kinase that is conserved from yeast to mammals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, par-1 governs asymmetric cell division by ensuring the polar distribution of cell fate determinants. However the precise mechanisms by which PAR-1 regulates asymmetric cell division in C. elegans remain to be elucidated. We performed a genomewide RNAi screen and identified six genes that specifically suppress the embryonic lethal phenotype associated with mutations in par-1. One of these suppressors is mpk-1, the C. elegans homolog of the conserved mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase ERK. Loss of function of mpk-1 restored embryonic viability, asynchronous cell divisions, the asymmetric distribution of cell fate specification markers, and the distribution of PAR-1 protein in par-1 mutant embryos, indicating that this genetic interaction is functionally relevant for embryonic development. Furthermore, disrupting the function of other components of the MAPK signaling pathway resulted in suppression of par-1 embryonic lethality. Our data therefore indicates that MAP kinase signaling antagonizes PAR-1 signaling during early C. elegans embryonic polarization.

  5. Inducible Deletion of Protein Kinase Map4k4 in Obese Mice Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Liver and Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Danai, Laura V; Flach, Rachel J Roth; Virbasius, Joseph V; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Czech, Michael P

    2015-07-01

    Studies in vitro suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) attenuates insulin signaling, but confirmation in vivo is lacking since Map4k4 knockout is lethal during embryogenesis. We thus generated mice with floxed Map4k4 alleles and a tamoxifen-inducible Cre/ERT2 recombinase under the control of the ubiquitin C promoter to induce whole-body Map4k4 deletion after these animals reached maturity. Tamoxifen administration to these mice induced Map4k4 deletion in all tissues examined, causing decreased fasting blood glucose concentrations and enhanced insulin signaling to AKT in adipose tissue and liver but not in skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, however, mice generated with a conditional Map4k4 deletion in adiponectin-positive adipocytes or in albumin-positive hepatocytes displayed no detectable metabolic phenotypes. Instead, mice with Map4k4 deleted in Myf5-positive tissues, including all skeletal muscles tested, were protected from obesity-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Remarkably, these mice also showed increased insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue but not skeletal muscle, similar to the metabolic phenotypes observed in inducible whole-body knockout mice. Taken together, these results indicate that (i) Map4k4 controls a pathway in Myf5-positive cells that suppresses whole-body insulin sensitivity and (ii) Map4k4 is a potential therapeutic target for improving glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Inducible Deletion of Protein Kinase Map4k4 in Obese Mice Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Liver and Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Danai, Laura V.; Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Virbasius, Joseph V.; Garcia Menendez, Lorena; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in vitro suggest that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) attenuates insulin signaling, but confirmation in vivo is lacking since Map4k4 knockout is lethal during embryogenesis. We thus generated mice with floxed Map4k4 alleles and a tamoxifen-inducible Cre/ERT2 recombinase under the control of the ubiquitin C promoter to induce whole-body Map4k4 deletion after these animals reached maturity. Tamoxifen administration to these mice induced Map4k4 deletion in all tissues examined, causing decreased fasting blood glucose concentrations and enhanced insulin signaling to AKT in adipose tissue and liver but not in skeletal muscle. Surprisingly, however, mice generated with a conditional Map4k4 deletion in adiponectin-positive adipocytes or in albumin-positive hepatocytes displayed no detectable metabolic phenotypes. Instead, mice with Map4k4 deleted in Myf5-positive tissues, including all skeletal muscles tested, were protected from obesity-induced glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Remarkably, these mice also showed increased insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue but not skeletal muscle, similar to the metabolic phenotypes observed in inducible whole-body knockout mice. Taken together, these results indicate that (i) Map4k4 controls a pathway in Myf5-positive cells that suppresses whole-body insulin sensitivity and (ii) Map4k4 is a potential therapeutic target for improving glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. PMID:25918248

  7. Mapping hazards from glacier lake outburst floods based on modelling of process cascades at Lake 513, Carhuaz, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D.; Huggel, C.; Cochachin, A.; Guillén, S.; García, J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent warming has had enormous impacts on glaciers and high-mountain environments. Hazards have changed or new ones have emerged, including those from glacier lakes that form as glaciers retreat. The Andes of Peru have repeatedly been severely impacted by glacier lake outburst floods in the past. An important recent event occurred in the Cordillera Blanca in 2010 when an ice avalanche impacted a glacier lake and triggered an outburst flood that affected the downstream communities and city of Carhuaz. In this study we evaluate how such complex cascades of mass movement processes can be simulated coupling different physically-based numerical models. We furthermore develop an approach that allows us to elaborate corresponding hazard maps according to existing guidelines for debris flows and based on modelling results and field work.

  8. The c-mos proto-oncogene protein kinase turns on and maintains the activity of MAP kinase, but not MPF, in cell-free extracts of Xenopus oocytes and eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Nebreda, A R; Hunt, T

    1993-01-01

    During studies of the activation and inactivation of the cyclin B-p34cdc2 protein kinase (MPF) in cell-free extracts of Xenopus oocytes and eggs, we found that a bacterially expressed fusion protein between the Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein and the Xenopus c-mos protein kinase (malE-mos) activated a 42 kDa MAP kinase. The activation of MAP kinase on addition of malE-mos was consistent, whereas the activation of MPF was variable and failed to occur in some oocyte extracts in which cyclin A or okadaic acid activated both MPF and MAP kinase. In cases when MPF activation was transient, MAP kinase activity declined after MPF activity was lost, and MAP kinase, but not MPF, could be maintained at a high level by the presence of malE-mos. When intact oocytes were treated with progesterone, however, the activation of MPF and MAP kinase occurred simultaneously, in contrast to the behaviour of extracts. These observations suggest that one role of c-mos may be to maintain high MAP kinase activity in meiosis. They also imply that the activation of MPF and MAP kinase in vivo are synchronous events that normally rely on an agent that has still to be identified. Images PMID:8387916

  9. Learning at different satiation levels reveals parallel functions for the cAMP-protein kinase A cascade in formation of long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Anke; Thomas, Ulf; Müller, Uli

    2004-05-05

    Learning and memory formation in intact animals is generally studied under defined parameters, including the control of feeding. We used associative olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response in honeybees to address effects of feeding status on processes of learning and memory formation. Comparing groups of animals with different but defined feeding status at the time of conditioning reveals new and characteristic features in memory formation. In animals fed 18 hr earlier, three-trial conditioning induces a stable memory that consists of different phases: a mid-term memory (MTM), translation-dependent early long-term memory (eLTM; 1-2 d), and a transcription-dependent late LTM (lLTM; > or =3 d). Additional feeding of a small amount of sucrose 4 hr before conditioning leads to a loss of all of these memory phases. Interestingly, the basal activity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), a key player in LTM formation, differs in animals with different satiation levels. Pharmacological rescue of the low basal PKA activity in animals fed 4 hr before conditioning points to a specific function of cAMP-PKA cascade in mediating satiation-dependent memory formation. An increase in PKA activity during conditioning rescues only transcription-dependent lLTM; acquisition, MTM, and eLTM are still impaired. Thus, during conditioning, the cAMP-PKA cascade mediates the induction of the transcription-dependent lLTM, depending on the satiation level. This result provides the first evidence for a central and distinct function of the cAMP-PKA cascade connecting satiation level with learning.

  10. Mapping the structural topology of IRS family cascades through computational biology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Doss, C George Priya; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Sarkar, Bimal Kumar; Haneef, S A Syed

    2013-01-01

    Structural topologies of proteins play significant roles in analyzing their biological functions. Converting the amino acid data in a protein sequence into structural information to outline the function of a protein is a major challenge in post-genome research which can add an extra room in understanding the protein sequence-structure-function relationships. In this study, we performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of structural topology of the IRS family members such as IRS-1, IRS-2, IRS-3, IRS-4, IRS-5 and IRS-6. Based on this assessment, we found that IRS-2 encloses the highest number of α helices, β sheets and β turns in the secondary structure topology compared to IRS-1 and IRS-6. IRS family members are rich in serine or leucine residues. Among the IRS family members, the highest percentage of serine and leucine was observed in IRS-1 (15%) and IRS-5 (10%), respectively. Notably, the highest number of disulphide bonds was observed in IRS-1 (10) which is responsible for structural stability of the protein. Hydrogen bond pattern in α helices and β sheet was recorded in IRS-1, IRS-2 and IRS-6. By conservation analysis, the longest protein IRS-3 was found to be highly conserved among the IRS family members. The cluster of sequence logo present in the N terminus of these cascades was noted, and highly conserved residues in N-terminal region help in the formation of the two highly conserved domains such as PH domain and PTB domain. Results generated from this analysis will be more beneficial to researchers in understanding more about insulin signalling mechanism(s) as well as insulin resistance pathway. We discuss here that bioinformatics tools utilized in this study can play a vital role in addressing the complexity of structural topology to understand structure-function relationships in insulin signalling cascades.

  11. PSM/SH2-B distributes selected mitogenic receptor signals to distinct components in the PI3-kinase and MAP kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youping; Xu, Hu; Riedel, Heimo

    2007-02-15

    The Pro-rich, PH, and SH2 domain containing mitogenic signaling adapter PSM/SH2-B has been implicated as a cellular partner of various mitogenic receptor tyrosine kinases and related signaling mechanisms. Here, we report in a direct comparison of three peptide hormones, that PSM participates in the assembly of distinct mitogenic signaling complexes in response to insulin or IGF-I when compared to PDGF in cultured normal fibroblasts. The complex formed in response to insulin or IGF-I involves the respective peptide hormone receptor and presumably the established components leading to MAP kinase activation. However, our data suggest an alternative link from the PDGF receptor via PSM directly to MEK1/2 and consequently also to p44/42 activation, possibly through a scaffold protein. At least two PSM domains participate, the SH2 domain anticipated to link PSM to the respective receptor and the Pro-rich region in an association with an unidentified downstream component resulting in direct MEK1/2 and p44/42 regulation. The PDGF receptor signaling complex formed in response to PDGF involves PI 3-kinase in addition to the same components and interactions as described for insulin or IGF-I. PSM associates with PI 3-kinase via p85 and in addition the PSM PH domain participates in the regulation of PI 3-kinase activity, presumably through membrane interaction. In contrast, the PSM Pro-rich region appears to participate only in the MAP kinase signal. Both pathways contribute to the mitogenic response as shown by cell proliferation, survival, and focus formation. PSM regulates p38 MAP kinase activity in a pathway unrelated to the mitogenic response.

  12. Bendamustine increases interleukin-10 secretion from B cells via p38 MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Le; Yoshimoto, Keiko; Morita, Atsuho; Kameda, Hideto; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the effects of bendamustine on B cell functions and explored potential clinical applications of the drugs to autoimmune diseases. Proliferation of Ramos cells, a human B cell line, was significantly inhibited by 25-100μM of bendamustine in a dose-dependent manner. Concordantly, IgM secretion from Ramos cells was significantly inhibited at these concentrations by up to 70%. Interestingly, however, the production and secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) were dramatically (at least >10-fold) increased by bendamustine at growth inhibitory concentrations. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of IL-10 production revealed that bendamustine enhanced the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Further, Sp1 was identified as a downstream transcription factor, and the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase and Sp1 with their inhibitors led to the abrogation of bendamustine-induced IL-10 production and the DNA binding of Sp1. Importantly, when PBMC from healthy donors were cultured with bendamustine at the concentration of 30μM, under the stimulation with an anti-IgM antibody, an anti-CD40 antibody, recombinant human IL-21 (rhIL-21) and recombinant human soluble BAFF (rhsBAFF), IL-10 production by B cells (CD20+CD4-CD8-CD14-) among peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was significantly enhanced by adding bendamustine. These results collectively suggest that the p38 MAP kinase-Sp1 pathway plays a crucial role in bendamustine-induced IL-10 production by B cells. Our findings suggest a novel therapeutic possibility for autoimmune diseases through the upregulation of IL-10 which has an anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Trauma-induced expression of astrocytic thrombospondin-1 is regulated by P2 receptors coupled to protein kinase cascades.

    PubMed

    Tran, Minh Dinh; Furones-Alonso, Ofelia; Sanchez-Molano, Juliana; Bramlett, Helen Marie

    2012-08-22

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is an extracellular matrix protein produced by astrocytes, which can promote synaptogenesis. The regulation of astrocytic TSP-1 involves extracellular ATP through the activation of P2Y receptors coupled to various protein kinase signaling pathways. However, not much is known about the mechanisms regulating TSP-1 expression in primary cortical astrocytes after a traumatic brain injury. Using an in-vitro model of central nervous system trauma that stimulates the release of ATP, we found that trauma-induced expression and release of TSP-1 involved purinergic signaling as both expression and release were significantly attenuated by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulfonic acid, a P2 receptor antagonist. Further antagonist studies with reactive blue 2 point to a role for P2Y4, as reactive blue 2 is a potent antagonist for rat P2Y4 receptors. In addition, the injury-induced expression of TSP-1 was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase, whereas injury-induced release of TSP-1 was significantly blocked by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Akt. Using an in-vivo model of a moderate parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury, we found that TSP-1 levels were increased when compared with those in sham animals in the cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. We conclude that TSP-1 expression after injury can be regulated by the activation of P2 receptors coupled with protein kinase signaling pathways and suggest that purinergic signaling, by regulating TSP expression, may play an important role in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions such as those occurring during central nervous system repair.

  14. Deriving global flood hazard maps of fluvial floods through a physical model cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, F.; Dutra, E.; Wetterhall, F.; Cloke, H.

    2012-05-01

    Global flood hazard maps can be used in the assessment of flood risk in a number of different applications, including (re)insurance and large scale flood preparedness. Such global hazard maps can be generated using large scale physically based models of rainfall-runoff and river routing, when used in conjunction with a number of post-processing methods. In this study, the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) land surface model is coupled to ERA-Interim reanalysis meteorological forcing data, and resultant runoff is passed to a river routing algorithm which simulates floodplains and flood flow across the global land area. The global hazard map is based on a 30 yr (1979-2010) simulation period. A Gumbel distribution is fitted to the annual maxima flows to derive a number of flood return periods. The return periods are calculated initially for a 25 × 25 km grid, which is then reprojected onto a 1 × 1 km grid to derive maps of higher resolution and estimate flooded fractional area for the individual 25 × 25 km cells. Several global and regional maps of flood return periods ranging from 2 to 500 yr are presented. The results compare reasonably to a benchmark data set of global flood hazard. The developed methodology can be applied to other datasets on a global or regional scale.

  15. Deriving global flood hazard maps of fluvial floods through a physical model cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, F.; Dutra, E.; Wetterhall, F.; Cloke, H. L.

    2012-11-01

    Global flood hazard maps can be used in the assessment of flood risk in a number of different applications, including (re)insurance and large scale flood preparedness. Such global hazard maps can be generated using large scale physically based models of rainfall-runoff and river routing, when used in conjunction with a number of post-processing methods. In this study, the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) land surface model is coupled to ERA-Interim reanalysis meteorological forcing data, and resultant runoff is passed to a river routing algorithm which simulates floodplains and flood flow across the global land area. The global hazard map is based on a 30 yr (1979-2010) simulation period. A Gumbel distribution is fitted to the annual maxima flows to derive a number of flood return periods. The return periods are calculated initially for a 25 × 25 km grid, which is then reprojected onto a 1 × 1 km grid to derive maps of higher resolution and estimate flooded fractional area for the individual 25 × 25 km cells. Several global and regional maps of flood return periods ranging from 2 to 500 yr are presented. The results compare reasonably to a benchmark data set of global flood hazard. The developed methodology can be applied to other datasets on a global or regional scale.

  16. Deriving global flood hazard maps of fluvial floods through a physical model cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappenberger, Florian; Dutra, Emanuel; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Cloke, Hannah L.

    2013-04-01

    Global flood hazard maps can be used in the assessment of flood risk in a number of different applications, including (re)insurance and large scale flood preparedness. Such global hazard maps can be generated using large scale physically based models of rainfall-runoff and river routing, when used in conjunction with a number of post-processing methods. In this study, the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) land surface model is coupled to ERA-Interim reanalysis meteorological forcing data, and resultant runoff is passed to a river routing algorithm which simulates floodplains and flood flow across the global land area. The global hazard map is based on a 30 yr (1979-2010) simulation period. A Gumbel distribution is fitted to the annual maxima flows to derive a number of flood return periods. The return periods are calculated initially for a 25 × 25 km grid, which is then reprojected onto a 1 × 1 km grid to derive maps of higher resolution and estimate flooded fractional area for the individual 25 × 25 km cells. Several global and regional maps of flood return periods ranging from 2 to 500 yr are presented. The results compare reasonably to a benchmark data set of global flood hazard. The developed methodology can be applied to other datasets on a global or regional scale.

  17. PfIRR Interacts with HrIGF-I and Activates the MAP-kinase and PI3-kinase Signaling Pathways to Regulate Glycogen Metabolism in Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; He, Mao-xian

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways are major intracellular signaling modules and conserved among eukaryotes that are known to regulate diverse cellular processes. However, they have not been investigated in the mollusk species Pinctada fucata. Here, we demonstrate that insulin-related peptide receptor of P. fucata (pfIRR) interacts with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor I (hrIGF-I), and stimulates the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in P. fucata oocytes. We also show that inhibition of pfIRR by the inhibitor PQ401 significantly attenuates the basal and hrIGF-I-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and PI3K/Akt at amino acid residues threonine 308 and serine 473. Furthermore, our experiments show that there is cross-talk between the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways, in which MAPK kinase positively regulates the PI3K pathway, and PI3K positively regulates the MAPK cascade. Intramuscular injection of hrIGF-I stimulates the PI3K and MAPK pathways to increase the expression of pfirr, protein phosphatase 1, glucokinase, and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, decreases the mRNA expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, decreases glucose levels in hemocytes, and increases glycogen levels in digestive glands. These results suggest that the MAPK and PI3K pathways in P. fucata transmit the hrIGF-I signal to regulate glycogen metabolism. PMID:26911653

  18. Suppression of integrin activation by activated Ras or Raf does not correlate with bulk activation of ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Paul E; Oertli, Beat; Hansen, Malene; Chou, Fan-Li; Willumsen, Berthe M; Ginsberg, Mark H

    2002-07-01

    The rapid modulation of ligand-binding affinity ("activation") is a central property of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors. The Ras family of small GTP-binding proteins and their downstream effectors are key players in regulating integrin activation. H-Ras can suppress integrin activation in fibroblasts via its downstream effector kinase, Raf-1. In contrast, to H-Ras, a closely related small GTP-binding protein R-Ras has the opposite activity, and promotes integrin activation. To gain insight into the regulation of integrin activation by Ras GTPases, we created a series of H-Ras/R-Ras chimeras. We found that a 35-amino acid stretch of H-Ras was required for full suppressive activity. Furthermore, the suppressive chimeras were weak activators of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway, suggesting that the suppression of integrin activation may be independent of the activation of the bulk of ERK MAP kinase. Additional data demonstrating that the ability of H-Ras or Raf-1 to suppress integrin activation was unaffected by inhibition of bulk ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation supported this hypothesis. Thus, the suppression of integrin activation is a Raf kinase induced regulatory event that can be mediated independently of bulk activation of the ERK MAP-kinase pathway.

  19. A MAP kinase homolog, mpk-1, is involved in ras-mediated induction of vulval cell fates in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lackner, M R; Kornfeld, K; Miller, L M; Horvitz, H R; Kim, S K

    1994-01-01

    During development of the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite, the gonadal anchor cell induces nearby Pn.p cells to adopt vulval fates. The response to this signal is mediated by a receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway that has been remarkably well conserved during metazoan evolution. Because mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated by receptor tyrosine kinase pathways in vertebrate cells, we hypothesized that C. elegans MAP kinase homologs may play a role in vulval induction. Two C. elegans MAP kinase genes, mpk-1 and mpk-2 (mpk, MAP kinase), were cloned using degenerate oligonucleotide primers and PCR amplification; in parallel, genes involved in vulval induction were identified by screening for mutations that suppress the vulval defects caused by an activated let-60 ras gene. One such suppressor mutation is an allele of mpk-1. We used a new type of mosaic analysis to show that mpk-1 acts cell autonomously in the Pn.p cells. Our results show that mpk-1 plays an important functional role as an activator in ras-mediated cell signaling in vivo.

  20. PD98059, a specific MAP kinase inhibitor, attenuates multiple organ dysfunction syndrome/failure (MODS) induced by zymosan in mice.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, Rosanna; Galuppo, Maria; Mazzon, Emanuela; Paterniti, Irene; Bramanti, Placido; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2010-02-01

    PD98059 (MEK1 Inhibitor) has been shown to act in vivo as a highly selective inhibitor of MEK1 activation and the MAP kinase cascade. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of PD98059, on the development of non-septic shock caused by zymosan in mice. Mice received either intraperitoneally zymosan (500mg/kg, administered i.p. as a suspension in saline) or vehicle (0.25ml/mouse saline). PD98059 (10mg/kg) was administered 1 and 6h after zymosan administration i.p. Organ failure and systemic inflammation in mice was assessed 18h after administration of zymosan and/or PD98059. Treatment of mice with PD98059 attenuated the peritoneal exudation and the migration of polymorphonuclear cells caused by zymosan. PD98059 also attenuated the lung, liver and pancreatic injury and renal dysfunction caused by zymosan as well as the increase of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta plasma levels caused by zymosan. Immunohistochemical analysis for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), ICAM-1, P-selectin, Bax, Bcl-2 and FAS-ligand revealed positive staining in pancreatic and intestinal tissue obtained from zymosan-injected mice. The degree of staining for nitrotyrosine, iNOS, PAR, ICAM-1, P-selectin, Bax, Bcl-2 and FAS-ligand were markedly reduced in tissue sections obtained from zymosan-injected mice, which had received PD98059. Moreover treatment of mice with PD98059 (10mg/kg) attenuated the NF-kappaB activation and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) expression induced by zymosan injection. In addition, administration of zymosan caused a severe illness in the mice characterized by a systemic toxicity, significant loss of body weight and a 60% of mortality at the end of observation period. Treatment with PD98059 significantly reduced the development of systemic toxicity, the loss in body weight and the mortality (20%) caused by zymosan. This study provides evidence that PD98059 attenuates the degree of zymosan-induced non-septic shock

  1. The role of arachidonic acid/cyclooxygenase cascade, phosphodiesterase IV and Rho-kinase in H2S-induced relaxation in the mouse corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Ogulener, Nuran

    2017-08-01

    Penile corpus cavernosum is an extremely vascularized tissue and cavernosal smooth muscle tone is regulated by the balance between contractile and relaxant factor. We investigated the possible role of arachidonic acid/cyclooxygenase cascade, phosphodiesterase IV (PDEIV) and Rho-kinase in exogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced relaxation in mouse corpus cavernosum. The relaxant response to H2S (NaHS as exogenous H2S; 1-1000μM) were obtained in isolated mouse corpus cavernosum tissues which pre-contracted by phenylephrine (5μM). The effects of 4-(4-octadecylphenyl)-4-oxobutenoic acid (OBAA; 10μM), a selective phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, indomethacin (1μM), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, baicalein (10μM), a lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibitor, and proadifen (10μM), cytochrome P450 inhibitor, on the relaxant responses to H2S were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of theophylline (500μM) and rolipram (1μM), a non-selective and selective PDEIV inhibitor, and fasudil (3μM), a specific Rho-kinase inhibitor, were studied on H2S-induced relaxation. H2S-induced relaxations were significantly reduced by OBAA, indomethacin and proadifen but not baicalein. Furthermore, theophylline, rolipram and fasudil reduced H2S-induced relaxations. These results suggest that PLA2, COX, cytochrome P450, PDEIV and Rho-kinase pathway may involve in H2S-induced relaxation in mouse corpus cavernosum tissues. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of Fast Axonal Transport by Pathogenic SOD1 Involves Activation of p38 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morfini, Gerardo A.; Bosco, Daryl A.; Brown, Hannah; Gatto, Rodolfo; Kaminska, Agnieszka; Song, Yuyu; Molla, Linda; Baker, Lisa; Marangoni, M. Natalia; Berth, Sarah; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Bagnato, Carolina; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Hayward, Lawrence J.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Watterson, D. Martin; Huang, Chun-Fang; Banker, Gary; Brown, Robert H.; Brady, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Dying-back degeneration of motor neuron axons represents an established feature of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) associated with superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations, but axon-autonomous effects of pathogenic SOD1 remained undefined. Characteristics of motor neurons affected in FALS include abnormal kinase activation, aberrant neurofilament phosphorylation, and fast axonal transport (FAT) deficits, but functional relationships among these pathogenic events were unclear. Experiments in isolated squid axoplasm reveal that FALS-related SOD1 mutant polypeptides inhibit FAT through a mechanism involving a p38 mitogen activated protein kinase pathway. Mutant SOD1 activated neuronal p38 in mouse spinal cord, neuroblastoma cells and squid axoplasm. Active p38 MAP kinase phosphorylated kinesin-1, and this phosphorylation event inhibited kinesin-1. Finally, vesicle motility assays revealed previously unrecognized, isoform-specific effects of p38 on FAT. Axon-autonomous activation of the p38 pathway represents a novel gain of toxic function for FALS-linked SOD1 proteins consistent with the dying-back pattern of neurodegeneration characteristic of ALS. PMID:23776455

  3. p85 beta-PIX is required for cell motility through phosphorylations of focal adhesion kinase and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangsoon; Jung, In Duk; Chang, Won Keun; Park, Chang Gyo; Cho, Do Yeun; Shin, Eun-Young; Seo, Dong Wan; Kim, Yong Kee; Lee, Hyang Woo; Han, Jeung-Whan; Lee, Hoi Young

    2005-07-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates diverse biological responses, including cell migration, through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Recently, we have shown that LPA stimulates p21-activated kinase (PAK) that is critical for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and cell motility. Here, we provide the direct evidence that p85 beta-PIX is required for cell motility of NIH-3T3 cells by LPA through FAK and p38 MAP kinase phosphorylations. LPA induced p85 beta-PIX binding to FAK in NIH-3T3 cells that was inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, the similar inhibition of the complex formation was also observed, when the cells were transfected with either p85 beta-PIX mutant that cannot bind GIT or dominant negative mutants of Rac1 (N17Rac1) and PAK (PAK-PID). Transfection of the cells with specific p85 beta-PIX siRNA led to drastic inhibition of LPA-induced FAK phosphorylation, peripheral redistribution of p85 beta-PIX with FAK and GIT1, and cell motility. p85 beta-PIX was also required for p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation induced by LPA. Finally, dominant negative mutant of Rho (N19Rho)-transfected cells did not affect PAK activation, while the cells stably transfected with p85 beta-PIX siRNA or N17Rac1 showed the reduction of LPA-induced PAK activation. Taken together, the present data suggest that p85 beta-PIX, located downstream of Rac1, is a key regulator for the activations of FAK or p38 MAP kinase and plays a pivotal role in focal complex formation and cell motility induced by LPA.

  4. An unusual MAP kinase is required for efficient penetration of the plant surface by Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Brachmann, Andreas; Schirawski, Jan; Müller, Philip; Kahmann, Regine

    2003-01-01

    In Ustilago maydis, pathogenic development is controlled by a heterodimer of the two homeodomain proteins bW and bE. We have identified by RNA fingerprinting a b-regulated gene, kpp6, which encodes an unusual MAP kinase. Kpp6 is similar to a number of other fungal MAP kinases involved in mating and pathogenicity, but contains an additional N-terminal domain unrelated to other proteins. Transcription of the kpp6 gene yields two transcripts differing in length, but encoding proteins of identical mass. One transcript is upregulated by the bW/bE heterodimer, while the other is induced after pheromone stimulation. kpp6 deletion mutants are attenuated in pathogenicity. kpp6T355A,Y357F mutants carrying a non-activatable allele of kpp6 are more severely compromised in pathogenesis. These strains can still form appressoria, but are defective in the subsequent penetration of the plant cuticle. Kpp6 is expressed during all stages of the sexual life cycle except mature spores. We speculate that Kpp6 may respond to a plant signal and regulate the genes necessary for efficient penetration of plant tissue. PMID:12727886

  5. An unusual MAP kinase is required for efficient penetration of the plant surface by Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Brachmann, Andreas; Schirawski, Jan; Müller, Philip; Kahmann, Regine

    2003-05-01

    In Ustilago maydis, pathogenic development is controlled by a heterodimer of the two homeodomain proteins bW and bE. We have identified by RNA fingerprinting a b-regulated gene, kpp6, which encodes an unusual MAP kinase. Kpp6 is similar to a number of other fungal MAP kinases involved in mating and pathogenicity, but contains an additional N-terminal domain unrelated to other proteins. Transcription of the kpp6 gene yields two transcripts differing in length, but encoding proteins of identical mass. One transcript is upregulated by the bW/bE heterodimer, while the other is induced after pheromone stimulation. kpp6 deletion mutants are attenuated in pathogenicity. kpp6(T355A,Y357F) mutants carrying a non-activatable allele of kpp6 are more severely compromised in pathogenesis. These strains can still form appressoria, but are defective in the subsequent penetration of the plant cuticle. Kpp6 is expressed during all stages of the sexual life cycle except mature spores. We speculate that Kpp6 may respond to a plant signal and regulate the genes necessary for efficient penetration of plant tissue.

  6. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  7. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling and hazard mapping of complex cascading mass movement processes: the case of glacier lake 513, Carhuaz, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Demian; Huggel, Christian; García, Javier; Ludeña, Sebastian; Cochachin, Alejo

    2013-04-01

    that complex cascades of mass movement processes can realistically be modeled using different models and model parameters. The method to semi-automatically produce hazard maps is promising and should be applied in other case studies. Verification of model based results in the field remains an important requirement. Results from this study are important for the GLOF early warning system that is currently in an implementation phase, and for risk reduction efforts in general.

  9. Geologic map of upper Eocene to Holocene volcanic and related rocks in the Cascade Range, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.

    1993-01-01

    For geothermal reasons, the maps emphasize Quaternary volcanic rocks. Large igneous-related geothermal systems that have high temperatures are associated with Quaternary volcanic fields, and geothermal potential declines rapidly as age increases (Smith and Shaw, 1975). Most high-grade recoverable geothermal energy is likely to be associated with silicic volcanism less than 1 Ma. Lower grade (= lower temperature) geothermal resources may be associated with somewhat older rocks; however, volcanic rocks older than about 2 Ma are unlikely geothermal targets (Smith and Shaw, 1975).

  10. Multiple docking sites on substrate proteins form a modular system that mediates recognition by ERK MAP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Dave; Glossip, Danielle; Xing, Heming; Muslin, Anthony J.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    MAP kinases phosphorylate specific groups of substrate proteins. Here we show that the amino acid sequence FXFP is an evolutionarily conserved docking site that mediates ERK MAP kinase binding to substrates in multiple protein families. FXFP and the D box, a different docking site, form a modular recognition system, as they can function independently or in combination. FXFP is specific for ERK, whereas the D box mediates binding to ERK and JNK MAP kinase, suggesting that the partially overlapping substrate specificities of ERK and JNK result from recognition of shared and unique docking sites. These findings enabled us to predict new ERK substrates and design peptide inhibitors of ERK that functioned in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9925641

  11. Counteractive roles of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and a MAP kinase kinase homolog in the osmoregulation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, K; Russell, P

    1995-02-01

    With the goal of discovering the cellular functions of type 2C protein phosphatases, we have cloned and analyzed two ptc (phosphatase two C) genes, ptc2+ and ptc3+, from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Together with the previously identified ptc1+ gene, the enzymes encoded by these genes account for approximately 90% of the measurable PP2C activity in fission yeast cells. No obvious growth defects result from individual disruptions of ptc genes, but a delta ptc1 delta ptc3 double mutant displays aberrant cell morphology and temperature-sensitive cell lysis that is further accentuated in a delta ptc1 delta ptc2 delta ptc3 triple mutant. These phenotypes are almost completely suppressed by the presence of osmotic stabilizers, strongly indicating that PP2C has an important role in osmoregulation. Genetic suppression of delta ptc1 delta ptc3 lethality identified two loci, mutations of which render cells hypersensitive to high-osmolarity media. One locus is identical to wis1+, encoding a MAP kinase kinase (MEK) homolog. The Wis1 sequence is most closely related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MEK encoded by PBS2, which is required for osmoregulation. These data indicate that divergent yeasts have functionally conserved MAP kinase pathways, which are required to increase intracellular osmotic concentrations in response to osmotic stress. Moreover, our observations implicate PP2C enzymes as also having an important role in signal transduction processes involved in osmoregulation, probably acting to negatively regulate the osmosensing signal that is transmitted through Wis1 MAP kinase kinase.

  12. Hormonal activation of a kinase cascade localized at the mitochondria is required for StAR protein activity.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2009-03-05

    It is known that ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 participate in the regulation of Star gene transcription. However, their role in StAR protein post-transcriptional regulation is not described yet. In this study we analyzed the relationship between the MAPK cascade and StAR protein phosphorylation and function. We have demonstrated that (a) steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells depends on the specific of ERK1/2 activation at the mitochondria; (b) ERK1/2 phosphorylation is driven by mitochondrial PKA and constitutive MEK1/2 in this organelle; (c) active ERK1/2 interacts with StAR protein, leads to StAR protein phosphorylation at Ser(232) only in the presence of cholesterol; (d) directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) (S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR protein phosphorylation by ERK1; (e) transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A cDNA markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. We show that StAR protein is a substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cholesterol transport.

  13. The Luteinizing Hormone Receptor-Activated Extracellularly Regulated Kinase-1/2 Cascade Stimulates Epiregulin Release from Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andric, Nebojsa; Ascoli, Mario

    2008-01-01

    We examine the pathways involved in the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR)-dependent activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) network using cocultures of LHR-positive granulosa cells and LHR-negative test cells expressing an EGF receptor (EGFR)-green fluorescent protein fusion protein. Activation of the LHR in granulosa cells results in the release of EGF-like growth factors that are detected by measuring the phosphorylation of the EGFR-green fluorescent protein expressed only in the LHR-negative test cells. Using neutralizing antibodies and real-time PCR, we identified epiregulin as the main EGF-like growth factor produced upon activation of the LHR expressed in immature rat granulosa cells, and we show that exclusive inhibition or activation of the ERK1/2 cascade in granulosa cells prevents or enhances epiregulin release, respectively, with little or no effect on epiregulin expression. These results show that the LHR-stimulated ERK1/2 pathway stimulates epiregulin release. PMID:18653716

  14. Positive feedback regulation of maize NADPH oxidase by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in abscisic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Ding, Haidong; Wang, Jinxiang; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Aying; Zhang, Yun; Tan, Mingpu; Dong, Wen; Jiang, Mingyi

    2009-01-01

    In maize (Zea mays), abscisic acid (ABA)-induced H2O2 production activates a 46 kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase (p46MAPK), and the activation of p46MAPK also regulates the production of H2O2. However, the mechanism for the regulation of H2O2 production by MAPK in ABA signalling remains to be elucidated. In this study, four reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing NADPH oxidase (rboh) genes (ZmrbohA–D) were isolated and characterized in maize leaves. ABA treatment induced a biphasic response (phase I and phase II) in the expression of ZmrbohA–D and the activity of NADPH oxidase. Phase II induced by ABA was blocked by pretreatments with two MAPK kinase (MPKKK) inhibitors and two H2O2 scavengers, but phase I was not affected by these inhibitors or scavengers. Treatment with H2O2 alone also only induced phase II, and the induction was arrested by the MAPKK inhibitors. Furthermore, the ABA-activated p46MAPK was partially purified. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, the p46MAPK gene was cloned. Analysis of the tryptic peptides and the p46MAPK sequence indicate it is the known ZmMPK5. Treatments with ABA and H2O2 led to a significant increase in the activity of ZmMPK5, although ABA treatment only induced a slight increase in the expression of ZmMPK5. The data indicate that H2O2-activated ZmMPK5 is involved in the activation of phase II in ABA signalling, but not in phase I. The results suggest that there is a positive feedback loop involving NADPH oxidase, H2O2, and ZmMPK5 in ABA signalling. PMID:19592501

  15. The PTH-Gαs-Protein Kinase A Cascade Controls αNAC Localization To Regulate Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Pellicelli, Martin; Miller, Julie A.; Arabian, Alice; Gauthier, Claude; Akhouayri, Omar; Wu, Joy Y.; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    The binding of PTH to its receptor induces Gαs-dependent cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation to turn on effector kinases, including protein kinase A (PKA). The phenotype of mice with osteoblasts specifically deficient for Gαs is mimicked by a mutation leading to cytoplasmic retention of the transcriptional coregulator αNAC, suggesting that Gαs and αNAC form part of a common genetic pathway. We show that treatment of osteoblasts with PTH(1–34) or the PKA-selective activator N6-benzoyladenosine cAMP (6Bnz-cAMP) leads to translocation of αNAC to the nucleus. αNAC was phosphorylated by PKA at serine 99 in vitro. Phospho-S99-αNAC accumulated in osteoblasts exposed to PTH(1–34) or 6Bnz-cAMP but not in treated cells expressing dominant-negative PKA. Nuclear accumulation was abrogated by an S99A mutation but enhanced by a phosphomimetic residue (S99D). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that PTH(1–34) or 6Bnz-cAMP treatment leads to accumulation of αNAC at the Osteocalcin (Ocn) promoter. Altered gene dosages for Gαs and αNAC in compound heterozygous mice result in reduced bone mass, increased numbers of osteocytes, and enhanced expression of Sost. Our results show that αNAC is a substrate of PKA following PTH signaling. This enhances αNAC translocation to the nucleus and leads to its accumulation at target promoters to regulate transcription and affect bone mass. PMID:24550008

  16. Mapping Atmospheric Ammonia Emissions Using a Mobile Quantum Cascade Laser-based Open-path Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.; Tao, L.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is a key precursor to atmospheric fine particulate matter, with strong implications for regional air quality and global climate change. Despite the importance of atmospheric ammonia, its spatial/temporal variation is poorly characterized, and the knowledge of its sources, sinks, and transport is severely limited. Existing measurements suggest that traffic exhaust may provide significant amounts of ammonia in urban areas, which cause greater impacts on particulate matter formation and urban air quality. To capture the spatial and temporal variation of ammonia emissions, a portable, low power sensor with high time resolution is necessary. We have developed a portable open-path ammonia sensor with a detection limit of 0.5 ppbv ammonia for 1 s measurements. The sensor has a power consumption of about 60 W and is capable of running on a car battery continuously for 24 hours. An additional laser has been coupled to the sensor to yield concurrent N2O and CO measurements as tracers for determining various sources. The overall sensor prototype fits on a 60 cm × 20 cm aluminum breadboard. Roadside measurements indicated NH3/CO emission ratios of 4.1±5.4 ppbv/ppmv from a fleet of 320 vehicles, which agree with existing on-ramp measurements. Urban measurements in the Baltimore and Washington, DC metropolitan areas have shown significant ammonia mixing ratios concurrent with carbon monoxide levels from the morning and evening rush hours. On-road measurements of our open-path sensor have also been performed continuously from the Midwest to Princeton, NJ including urban areas such as Pittsburgh, tunnels, and relatively clean conditions. The emission ratios of ammonia against CO and/or CO2 help identify the sources and amounts of both urban and agricultural ammonia emissions. Preliminary data from both spatial mapping, monitoring, and vehicle exhaust measurements suggest that urban ammonia emissions from fossil fuel combustion are significant and may provide an

  17. Thiazolides promote apoptosis in colorectal tumor cells via MAP kinase-induced Bim and Puma activation

    PubMed Central

    Brockmann, A; Bluwstein, A; Kögel, A; May, S; Marx, A; Tschan, M P; Brunner, T

    2015-01-01

    While many anticancer therapies aim to target the death of tumor cells, sophisticated resistance mechanisms in the tumor cells prevent cell death induction. In particular enzymes of the glutathion-S-transferase (GST) family represent a well-known detoxification mechanism, which limit the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumor cells. Specifically, GST of the class P1 (GSTP1-1) is overexpressed in colorectal tumor cells and renders them resistant to various drugs. Thus, GSTP1-1 has become an important therapeutic target. We have recently shown that thiazolides, a novel class of anti-infectious drugs, induce apoptosis in colorectal tumor cells in a GSTP1-1-dependent manner, thereby bypassing this GSTP1-1-mediated drug resistance. In this study we investigated in detail the underlying mechanism of thiazolide-induced apoptosis induction in colorectal tumor cells. Thiazolides induce the activation of p38 and Jun kinase, which is required for thiazolide-induced cell death. Activation of these MAP kinases results in increased expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homologs Bim and Puma, which inducibly bind and sequester Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL leading to the induction of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Of interest, while an increase in intracellular glutathione levels resulted in increased resistance to cisplatin, it sensitized colorectal tumor cells to thiazolide-induced apoptosis by promoting increased Jun kinase activation and Bim induction. Thus, thiazolides may represent an interesting novel class of anti-tumor agents by specifically targeting tumor resistance mechanisms, such as GSTP1-1. PMID:26043078

  18. A diffusible factor involved in MAP-kinase ERK2-regulated development of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Kuwayama, H

    2000-06-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP)-kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK2) is essential for regulation of the intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level in Dictyostelium. The mutant lacking ERK2, erk2-null, is arrested at the pre-aggregation stage, but develops into a fruiting body in a mixed population of wild-type and mutant cells. This fact implies that wild-type cells provide a certain factor that is missing in erk2-null. It was clarified that both wild-type strains KAx3 and Ax2 secreted a diffusible factor that enables erk2-null to develop. The fruiting body formed from erk2-null cells was smaller than that formed by the wild-type cells and consisted of a small sorus supported by a slender stalk with a single row of vacuolated stalk cells. The resulting spores were able to germinate and multiply on a bacterial lawn, but they were unable to develop unless the factor was provided. After 8 h of starvation, wild-type cells started to secrete the factor, which had a molecular mass of less than 3 kDa and was heat stable. The effect of this factor could not be mimicked by either cAMP or folate. Adenylyl cyclase A and cell surface cAMP receptors cAR1 and cAR3 were all indispensable components for the factor to function. Considering the molecular mass and the mode of action, this factor could be a novel one. Possible targets of this factor are discussed in terms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  19. [Implication of MAP kinases in obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    Ceppo, Franck; Jager, Jennifer; Berthou, Flavien; Giorgetti-Peraldi, Sophie; Cormont, Mireille; Bost, Fréderic; Tanti, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is often associated with obesity and is a major risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes as well as cardiovascular and hepatic diseases. Insulin resistance may also increase the incidence or the aggressiveness of some cancers. Insulin resistance occurs owing to defects in insulin signaling in target tissues of this hormone. During the last ten years, it became evident that the chronic low-grade inflammatory state that develops during obesity plays an important role in insulin resistance development. Indeed, inflammatory cytokines activate several signaling pathways that impinge on the insulin signaling pathway. Among them, this review will focus on the implication of the MAP kinases JNK and ERK1/2 signaling in the development of insulin signaling alterations and will discuss the possibility to target these pathways in order to fight insulin resistance. © Société de Biologie, 2014.

  20. Oncogenic Activation of MAP Kinase by BRAF Pseudogene in Thyroid Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Minjing; Baitei, Essa Y; Alzahrani, Ali S; Al-Mohanna, Futwan; Farid, Nadir R; Meyer, Brian; Shi, Yufei

    2009-01-01

    Activating BRAF mutations have been reported in 40% of papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). The involvement of BRAF pseudogene in thyroid tumorigenesis has not previously been studied. We investigated BRAF pseudogene expression in 68 thyroid tumors: 16 multinodular goiters, 43 classic PTCs, 6 follicular variants of PTC, and 3 anaplastic thyroid carcinomas. BRAF pseudogene function was studied by Western blots, soft agar assay, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. BRAF pseudogene expression was detected in 7 multinodular goiters, 18 classic PTC, and 1 follicular variants of PTC. There is an inverse correlation between BRAF pseudogene expression and BRAF mutation. The pseudogene transcripts were more frequently detected in tumors without BRAF mutation than those with BRAF mutation. Furthermore, BRAF pseudogene expression could activate the MAP kinase signaling pathway, transform NIH3T3 cells in vitro, and induce tumors in nude mice. These data suggest that BRAF pseudogene activation may play a role in thyroid tumor development. PMID:19107232

  1. Proteolytic Degradation of SCOP in the Hippocampus Contributes to Activation of MAP Kinase and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kimiko; Phan, Trongha; Mansuy, Isabelle; Storm, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Because activation of Erk1/2 MAP kinase (MAPK) is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory, there is considerable interest in mechanisms for regulation of MAPK during memory formation. Here we report that MAPK and CREB-mediated transcription are negatively regulated by SCOP (SCN Circadian Oscillatory Protein) and that SCOP is proteolyzed by calpain when hippocampal neurons are stimulated by BDNF, KCl depolarization, or NMDA. Moreover, training for novel object memory decreases SCOP in the hippocampus. To determine if hippocampus-dependent memory is influenced by SCOP in vivo, we generated a transgenic mouse strain for the inducible overexpression of SCOP in the forebrain. Overexpression of SCOP completely blocked memory for novel objects. We conclude that degradation of SCOP by calpain contributes to activation of MAPK during memory formation. PMID:17382888

  2. Genetic analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans MAP kinase gene mpk-1.

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, M R; Kim, S K

    1998-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans mpk-1 gene encodes a MAP kinase protein that plays an important role in Ras-mediated induction of vulval cell fates. We show that mutations that eliminate mpk-1 activity result in a highly penetrant, vulvaless phenotype. A double mutant containing a gain-of-function mpk-1 mutation and a gain-of-function mek mutation (MEK phosphorylates and activates MPK-1) exhibits a multivulva phenotype. These results suggest that mpk-1 may transduce most or all of the anchor cell signal. Epistasis analysis suggests that mpk-1 acts downstream of mek-2 (encodes a MEK homolog) and upstream of lin-1 (encodes an Ets transcription factor) in the anchor cell signaling pathway. Finally, mpk-1 may act together with let-60 ras in multiple developmental processes, as mpk-1 mutants exhibit nearly the same range of developmental phenotypes as let-60 ras mutants. PMID:9725833

  3. Genetic analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans MAP kinase gene mpk-1.

    PubMed

    Lackner, M R; Kim, S K

    1998-09-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans mpk-1 gene encodes a MAP kinase protein that plays an important role in Ras-mediated induction of vulval cell fates. We show that mutations that eliminate mpk-1 activity result in a highly penetrant, vulvaless phenotype. A double mutant containing a gain-of-function mpk-1 mutation and a gain-of-function mek mutation (MEK phosphorylates and activates MPK-1) exhibits a multivulva phenotype. These results suggest that mpk-1 may transduce most or all of the anchor cell signal. Epistasis analysis suggests that mpk-1 acts downstream of mek-2 (encodes a MEK homolog) and upstream of lin-1 (encodes an Ets transcription factor) in the anchor cell signaling pathway. Finally, mpk-1 may act together with let-60 ras in multiple developmental processes, as mpk-1 mutants exhibit nearly the same range of developmental phenotypes as let-60 ras mutants.

  4. Flux Optimization in Human Specific Map-Kinase Pathways: A Systems Biology Approach to Study Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sombeet

    2010-10-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAP kinases) transduces signals that are involved in a multitude of cellular pathways and functions in response to variety of ligands and cell stimuli. Aberrant or inappropriate functions of MAPKs have now been identified in diseases ranging from Cancer to Alzheimer disease to Leshmaniasis however the pathway is still growing and little is known about the dynamics of the pathway. Here we model the MAPK metabolic pathways and thus find the key metabolites or reactions involved on perturbing which the transcription factors are affected. The approach, which we used for modeling of this pathway, is Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). Further we established the growth factors EGF, PDGF were also responsible for the determination of downstream species concentrations. Tuning the parameters gave the optimum kinetics of the growth factor for which the downstream events were at the minimum. Also the Ras and Braf steady state concentrations were significantly affected when the Growth factor kinetics were tuned. This type of study can shed light on controlling various diseases and also may be helpful for identifying important drug targets.

  5. Map kinase and PKC signaling pathways modulate NGF-mediated apoE transcription.

    PubMed

    Strachan-Whaley, Megan R; Reilly, Kate; Dobson, James; Kalisch, Bettina E

    2015-05-19

    The present study assessed the mechanisms by which nerve growth factor (NGF) increased the level of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in PC12 cells. NGF (50ng/mL) significantly increased apoE protein levels following 72h of treatment. Similarly NGF increased luciferase activity in cells transfected with a luciferase reporter construct containing a 500bp fragment of the apoE promoter, indicating NGF-induced apoE expression is regulated, at least in part, at the level of transcription. The non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(ɷ)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME; 20mM) did not attenuate the NGF-mediated increase in luciferase activity, while the inducible NOS inhibitor s-methylisothiourea (S-MIU; 2mM) partially attenuated this action of NGF. Inhibition of MAP kinase activation with 50μM U0126 or pre-treatment with the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide 1 (BIS-1; 10μM) prevented the NGF-mediated activation of the apoE promoter. Pre-treatment with the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 (5μM) partially inhibited the NGF-induced increase in luciferase activity while the Akt inhibitor LY294002 (10μM) had no effect. These data suggest NGF-induced apoE transcription requires MAP kinase and PKC activation and that these TrkA signaling pathways may be modulated by NO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MAP Kinase Phosphatase 3 (MKP3) Preserves Norepinephrine Transporter Activity by Modulating ERK1/2 Kinase-Mediated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Ole V.; Larsen, Mads B.; Amara, Susan G.

    2017-01-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) mediates the clearance of norepinephrine (NE) from the extracellular space and is a target of therapeutic antidepressants and psychostimulants. Previously we identified a MAP kinase phosphatase 3 (MKP3), as an important modulator of protein kinase C (PKC) mediated internalization of the related dopamine transporter (DAT). Here we show that MKP3 decreases PKC-mediated down regulation of NET expressed in PC12 cells. We demonstrate that this process involves a PKC-stimulated decrease of NET surface expression that is dependent on dynamin. Surprisingly, MAP kinase inhibitors have no effect on the PKC-mediated regulation of NET activity, suggesting that, like PKC-mediated regulation of the DAT, the acute activation of MAP kinases is not likely to be involved. To elucidate potential mechanisms we used a substrate trap-based assay to identify extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the predominant substrate of MKP3. Furthermore we also established that brief chemical stabilization of a modified destabilized MKP3 does not alter PKC-mediated down regulation of NET. Finally, the expression of a dominant negative version of H-Ras, an upstream activator of ERK1/2, abolishes phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-mediated down regulation of NET in a manner similar to MKP3. Taken together we propose that chronic MKP3 expression regulates surface NET through the sustained inhibition of ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling that alters gene expression in PC12 cells. This is supported by gene expression data from naïve and MKP3-expressing PC12 cells that reveal robust decreases in gene expression of several genes in the MKP3-tranfected cells. Interestingly, caveolin-1, a protein with a critical role in membrane protein trafficking is down regulated by MKP3 expression. We further show that selective silencing of the caveolin-1 gene in naïve PC12 cells attenuates PKC-mediated downregulation of NET activity, consistent with a potential role for

  7. Stronger learning recruits additional cell-signaling cascades: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) is necessary for expression of stronger contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Leach, Prescott T; Kenney, Justin W; Gould, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    Increased training often results in stronger memories but the neural changes responsible for these stronger memories are poorly understood. It is proposed here that higher levels of training that result in stronger memories recruit additional cell signaling cascades. This study specifically examined if c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) is involved in the formation of stronger fear conditioning memories. Wildtype (WT), JNK1 heterozygous (Het), and JNK1 knockout (KO) mice were fear conditioned with 1 trial, 2 trials, or 4 trials. All mice learned both contextual (hippocampus-dependent) and cued (hippocampus-independent) fear conditioning but for contextual fear conditioning only, the JNK1 KO mice did not show higher levels of learning with increased trials. That is, WT mice showed a significant linear increase in contextual fear conditioning as training trials increased from 1 to 2 to 4 trials whereas KO mice showed the same level of contextual fear conditioning as WT mice for 1 trial training but did not have increased levels of contextual fear conditioning with additional trials. These data suggest that JNK1 may not be critical for learning but when higher levels of hippocampus-dependent learning occur, JNK1 signaling is recruited and is necessary for stronger hippocampus-dependent memory formation.

  8. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Aca1 regulates virulence and differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans via the cyclic AMP-protein kinase A cascade.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Hicks, Julie K; Giles, Steven S; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway controls cell functions in response to environmental cues in organisms as diverse as yeast and mammals. In the basidiomycetous human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the cAMP pathway governs virulence and morphological differentiation. Here we identified and characterized adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, Aca1, which functions in parallel with the Galpha subunit Gpa1 to control the adenylyl cyclase (Cac1). Aca1 interacted with the C terminus of Cac1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. By molecular and genetic approaches, Aca1 was shown to play a critical role in mating by regulating cell fusion and filamentous growth in a cAMP-dependent manner. Aca1 also regulates melanin and capsule production via the Cac1-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Genetic epistasis studies support models in which Aca1 and Gpa1 are necessary and sufficient components that cooperate to activate adenylyl cyclase. Taken together, these studies further define the cAMP signaling cascade controlling virulence of this ubiquitous human fungal pathogen.

  9. The second immunoglobulin-like domain of the VEGF tyrosine kinase receptor Flt-1 determines ligand binding and may initiate a signal transduction cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Davis-Smyth, T; Chen, H; Park, J; Presta, L G; Ferrara, N

    1996-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic inducer that mediates its effects through two high affinity receptor tyrosine kinases, Flt-1 and KDR. Flt-1 is required for endothelial cell morphogenesis whereas KDR is involved primarily in mitogenesis. Flt-1 has an alternative ligand, placenta growth factor (PlGF). Both Flt-1 and KDR have seven immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains in the extracellular domain. The significance and function of these domains for ligand binding and receptor activation are unknown. Here we show that deletion of the second domain of Flt-1 completely abolishes the binding of VEGF. Introduction of the second domain of KDR into an Flt-1 mutant lacking the homologous domain restored VEGF binding. However, the ligand specificity was characteristic of the KDR receptor. We then created chimeric receptors where the first three or just the second Ig-like domains of Flt-1 replaced the corresponding domains in Flt-4, a receptor that does not bind VEGF, and analyzed their ability to bind VEGF. Both swaps conferred upon Flt-4 the ability to bind VEGF with an affinity nearly identical to that of wild-type Flt-1. Furthermore, transfected cells expressing these chimeric Flt-4 receptors exhibited increased DNA synthesis in response to VEGF or PlGF. These results demonstrate that a single Ig-like domain is the major determinant for VEGF-PlGF interaction and that binding to this domain may initiate a signal transduction cascade. Images PMID:8890165

  10. Adiponectin inhibits neutrophil apoptosis via activation of AMP kinase, PKB and ERK 1/2 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Lord, Janet M

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in the immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die by apoptosis following activation and uptake of microbes and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter a pathogen. Adiponectin exerts anti-inflammatory effects on neutrophil antimicrobial functions, but whether this abundant adipokine influences neutrophil apoptosis is unknown. Here we report that adiponectin in the physiological range (1-10 μg/ml) reduced apoptosis in resting neutrophils, decreasing caspase-3 cleavage and maintaining Mcl-1 expression by stabilizing this anti-apoptotic protein. We show that adiponectin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), protein kinase B (PKB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, PKB and ERK 1/2 ablated the pro-survival effects of adiponectin and treatment of neutrophils with an AMPK specific activator (AICAR) and AMPK inhibitor (compound C) respectively decreased and increased apoptosis. Finally, activation of AMPK by AICAR or adiponectin also decreased ceramide accumulation in the neutrophil cell membrane, a process involved in the early stages of spontaneous apoptosis, giving another possible mechanism downstream of AMPK activation for the inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis.

  11. The MAP kinase-activated protein kinase Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Xichuan; Du, Wei; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Lilin; Zhu, Zhiyan; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-06-01

    Rck2p is the Hog1p-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase required for the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to an osmotic challenge in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rck2p also regulates rapamycin sensitivity in both S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that the deletion of CaRCK2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to, and CaRck2p translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to, cell wall stresses caused by Congo red, Calcoflor White, elevated heat and zymolyase. However, the kinase activity of CaRck2p is not required for the cellular response to these cell wall stresses. Furthermore, transcripts of cell wall protein-encoding genes CaBGL2, CaHWP1 and CaXOG1 are reduced in C. albicans cells lacking CaRCK2. The deletion of CaRCK2 also reduces the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans and its virulence in a mouse model of systemic candidasis. The kinase activity of CaRck2p is required for the virulence, but not for the in vitro filamentation, in C. albicans. Therefore, Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  12. Identification of novel in vivo MAP kinase substrates in Arabidopsis thaliana through use of tandem metal oxide affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Thomas, Martin; Nukarinen, Ella; Egelhofer, Volker; Röhrig, Horst; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Conrath, Uwe; Beckers, Gerold J M

    2013-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are important for eukaryotic signal transduction. They convert extracellular stimuli (e.g. some hormones, growth factors, cytokines, microbe- or damage-associated molecular patterns) into intracellular responses while at the same time amplifying the transmitting signal. By doing so, they ensure proper performance, and eventually survival, of a given organism, for example in times of stress. MPK cascades function via reversible phosphorylation of cascade components MEKKs, MEKs, and MPKs. In plants the identity of most MPK substrates remained elusive until now. Here, we provide a robust and powerful approach to identify and quantify, with high selectivity, site-specific phosphorylation of MPK substrate candidates in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our approach represents a two-step chromatography combining phosphoprotein enrichment using Al(OH)(3)-based metal oxide affinity chromatography, tryptic digest of enriched phosphoproteins, and TiO(2)-based metal oxide affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides from complex protein samples. When applied to transgenic conditional gain-of-function Arabidopsis plants supporting in planta activation of MPKs, the approach allows direct measurement and quantification ex vivo of site-specific phosphorylation of several reported and many yet unknown putative MPK substrates in just a single experiment.

  13. Identification of Novel in vivo MAP Kinase Substrates in Arabidopsis thaliana Through Use of Tandem Metal Oxide Affinity Chromatography*

    PubMed Central

    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Thomas, Martin; Nukarinen, Ella; Egelhofer, Volker; Röhrig, Horst; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Conrath, Uwe; Beckers, Gerold J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MPK) cascades are important for eukaryotic signal transduction. They convert extracellular stimuli (e.g. some hormones, growth factors, cytokines, microbe- or damage-associated molecular patterns) into intracellular responses while at the same time amplifying the transmitting signal. By doing so, they ensure proper performance, and eventually survival, of a given organism, for example in times of stress. MPK cascades function via reversible phosphorylation of cascade components MEKKs, MEKs, and MPKs. In plants the identity of most MPK substrates remained elusive until now. Here, we provide a robust and powerful approach to identify and quantify, with high selectivity, site-specific phosphorylation of MPK substrate candidates in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our approach represents a two-step chromatography combining phosphoprotein enrichment using Al(OH)3-based metal oxide affinity chromatography, tryptic digest of enriched phosphoproteins, and TiO2-based metal oxide affinity chromatography to enrich phosphopeptides from complex protein samples. When applied to transgenic conditional gain-of-function Arabidopsis plants supporting in planta activation of MPKs, the approach allows direct measurement and quantification ex vivo of site-specific phosphorylation of several reported and many yet unknown putative MPK substrates in just a single experiment. PMID:23172892

  14. Characterization and mapping of the human rhodopsin kinase gene and screening of the gene for mutations in patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Lin, D.; Magovcevic, I.

    1994-09-01

    Rhodopsin kinase (RK) is a cytosolic enzyme in rod photoreceptors that initiates the deactivation of the phototransductions cascade by phosphorylating photoactivated rhodopsin. Although the cDNA sequence of bovine RK has been determined previously, no human cDNA or genomic sequence has thus far been available for genetic studies. In order to investigate the possible role of this candidate gene in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and allied diseases, we have isolated and characterized human cDNA and genomic clones derived from the RK locus. The coding sequence of the human gene is 1692 nucleotides in length and is split into seven exons. The human and the bovine sequence show 84% identity at the nucleotide level and 92% identity at the amino acid level. Thus far, the intronic sequences flanking each exon except for one have been determined. We have also mapped the human RK gene to chromosome 13q34 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. To our knowledge, no RP gene has as yet been linked to this region. However, since the substrate for RK (rhodopsin) and other members of the phototransduction cascade have been implicated in the pathogenesis of RP, it is conceivable that defects in RK can also cause some forms of this disease. We are evaluating this possibility by screening DNA from 173 patients with autosomal recessive RP and 190 patients with autosomal dominant RP. So far, we have found 11 patients with variant bands. In one patient with autosomal dominant RP we discovered the missense change Ser536Leu. Cosegregation studies and further sequencing of the variant bands are currently underway.

  15. Overexpression of miR-199a-5p decreases esophageal cancer cell proliferation through repression of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase-11 (MAP3K11)

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Kimberly A.; Phatak, Pornima; Mansour, Daniel; Xiao, Lan; Zou, Tongtong; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Turner, Douglas J.; Wang, Jian-Ying; Donahue, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies examining the oncogenic or tumor suppressive functions of dysregulated microRNAs (miRs) in cancer cells may also identify novel miR targets, which can themselves serve as therapeutic targets. Using array analysis, we have previously determined that miR-199a-5p was the most downregulated miR in two esophageal cancer cell lines compared to esophageal epithelial cells. MiR-199a-5p is predicted to bind mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 11 (MAP3K11) mRNA with high affinity. In this study, we observed that MAP3K11 is markedly overexpressed in esophageal cancer cell lines. Forced expression of miR-199a-5p in these cells leads to a decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of MAP3K11, due to decreased MAP3K11 mRNA stability. A direct binding interaction between miR-199a-5p and MAP3K11 mRNA is demonstrated using biotin pull-down assays and heterologous luciferase reporter constructs and confirmed by mutational analysis. Finally, forced expression of miR-199a-5p decreases proliferation of esophageal cancer cells by inducing G2/M arrest. This effect is mediated, in part, by decreased transcription of cyclin D1, due to reduced MAP3K11-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun. These findings suggest that miR-199a-5p acts as a tumor suppressor in esophageal cancer cells and that its downregulation contributes to enhanced cellular proliferation by targeting MAP3K11. PMID:26717044

  16. Role of p38 MAP Kinase Signal Transduction in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Mintu; Koul, Sweaty

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) mediate a wide variety of cellular behaviors in response to extracellular stimuli. One of the main subgroups, the p38 MAP kinases, has been implicated in a wide range of complex biologic processes, such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cell death, cell migration, and invasion. Dysregulation of p38 MAPK levels in patients are associated with advanced stages and short survival in cancer patients (e.g., prostate, breast, bladder, liver, and lung cancer). p38 MAPK plays a dual role as a regulator of cell death, and it can either mediate cell survival or cell death depending not only on the type of stimulus but also in a cell type specific manner. In addition to modulating cell survival, an essential role of p38 MAPK in modulation of cell migration and invasion offers a distinct opportunity to target this pathway with respect to tumor metastasis. The specific function of p38 MAPK appears to depend not only on the cell type but also on the stimuli and/or the isoform that is activated. p38 MAPK signaling pathway is activated in response to diverse stimuli and mediates its function by components downstream of p38. Extrapolation of the knowledge gained from laboratory findings is essential to address the clinical significance of p38 MAPK signaling pathways. The goal of this review is to provide an overview on recent progress made in defining the functions of p38 MAPK pathways with respect to solid tumor biology and generate testable hypothesis with respect to the role of p38 MAPK as an attractive target for intervention of solid tumors. PMID:24349632

  17. Torilin Inhibits Inflammation by Limiting TAK1-Mediated MAP Kinase and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Na-Mi; Kim, Seung-Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Torilin, a sesquiterpene isolated from the fruits of Torilis japonica, has shown antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, data on the mechanism of torilin action against inflammation is limited. This study aimed at determining the anti-inflammatory property of torilin in LPS-induced inflammation using in vitro model of inflammation. We examined torilin's effect on expression levels of inflammatory mediators and cytokines in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The involvement of NF-kB and AP-1, MAP kinases, and adaptor proteins were assessed. Torilin strongly inhibited LPS-induced NO release, iNOS, PGE2, COX-2, NF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and GM-CSF gene and protein expressions. In addition, MAPKs were also suppressed by torilin pretreatment. Involvement of ERK1/2, P38MAPK, and JNK1/2 was further confirmed by PD98059, SB203580, and SP600125 mediated suppression of iNOS and COX-2 proteins. Furthermore, torilin attenuated NF-kB and AP-1 translocation, DNA binding, and reporter gene transcription. Interestingly, torilin inhibited TAK1 kinase activation with the subsequent suppression of MAPK-mediated JNK, p38, ERK1/2, and AP-1 (ATF-2 and c-jun) activation and IKK-mediated I-κBα degradation, p65/p50 activation, and translocation. Together, the results revealed the suppression of NF-κB and AP-1 regulated inflammatory mediator and cytokine expressions, suggesting the test compound's potential as a candidate anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:28316375

  18. Statement of retraction. Cardioprotective effect of resveratrol via HO-1 expression involves p38 map kinase and PI-3-kinase signaling, but does not involve NFkB.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael; Roulleau, Joris

    2012-03-01

    Free Radical Research, October 2006; 40(10): 1066-1075 (Received 30 March 2006) The Editor, Editorial Board and Publisher of Free Radical Research hereby retract the following article from publication in the journal: SAMARJIT DAS, CESAR G. FRAGA & DIPAK K. DAS. 2006. Cardioprotective effect of resveratrol via HO-1 expression involves p38 map kinase and PI-3-kinase signaling, but does not involve NFkB. Free Radical Research, October 2006; 40(10): 1066-1075. This article has been found to contain fabricated data during a research misconduct investigation by the University of Connecticut Health Center. Specifically, the institution has determined that images appearing in Figure 4 of that paper contain instances of data fabrication. As a consequence, and as per accepted best practice, the article is withdrawn from all print and electronic editions.

  19. Reactive oxygen-induced carcinogenesis causes hypermethylation of p16(Ink4a) and activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Baskaran; Klafter, Robert; Miller, Mark Steven; Mansur, Claire; Mizesko, Melissa; Bai, Xianhe; LaMontagne, Kenneth; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implantation of foreign materials into mice and humans has been noted to result in the appearance of soft tissue sarcomas at the site of implantation. These materials include metal replacement joints and Dacron vascular grafts. In addition, occupational exposure to nickel has been shown to result in an increased risk of carcinogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of foreign body-induced carcinogenesis are not fully understood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to gain insight into these mechanisms, we implanted nickel sulfide into wild type C57BL/6 mice as well as a mouse heterozygous for the tumor suppressor gene, p53. Malignant fibrous histiocytomas arose in all mice, and we have characterized the profile of tumor suppressor genes and signal transduction pathways altered in these cells. RESULTS: All tumors demonstrated hypermethylation of the tumor suppressor gene p16, as well as activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signaling pathway. This knowledge may be beneficial in the prevention and treatment of tumors caused by foreign body implantation. CONCLUSIONS: Oxidative stress induced by nickel sulfide appears to cause loss of p16 and activation of MAP kinase signaling. These findings support the hypothesis of synergistic interactions between MAP kinase activation and p16 loss in carcinogenesis. PMID:11984000

  20. Panaxynol induces neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Nie, Bao-Ming; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Lu, Yang

    2006-01-05

    Panaxynol, a polyacetylene ((3R)-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diyn-3-ol; syn. falcarinol), was isolated from the lipophilic fractions of Panax notoginseng, a Chinese traditional medicinal plant. In the present study, we reported the neurotrophic effects of panaxynol on PC12D cells and mechanism involved in neurite outgrowth of the cells. Panaxynol could morphologically promote neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells, concentration-dependently reduce cell division and up-regulate molecular marker (MAP1B) expression in PC12D cells. Panaxynol induces the elevation of intracellular cAMP in PC12D cells. The neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells induced by panaxynol could be inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor RpcAMPS and by MAP kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor U0126. These observations reveal that panaxynol could induce the differentiation of PC12D cells in a process similar to but distinct from that of NGF and the panaxynol's effects were via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

  1. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase increases okadaic acid mediated AP-1 expression and DNA binding but has no effect on TRE dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, S F; Gupta, A; Bowden, G T

    1999-06-17

    By performing in vitro kinase assays we found in papilloma producing 308 mouse keratinocytes that okadaic acid elevated activities of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). This okadaic acid mediated activation of MAP kinases correlated with increased AP-1 binding to a consensus TPA responsive element (TRE) and elevated TRE dependent transcription. To determine the role of p38 MAP kinases in these processes we employed the specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB 203580. Using orthophosphate labeling we showed a decrease in phosphorylation of MAPK activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAP-K2) indicating reduced activity of p38 MAPKs utilizing this kinase as substrate. In contrast, we found that SB 203580 raised activities of ERK-1/2 and JNKs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed an increase in TRE binding activity in response to SB 203580 most likely resulting from increased expression of the major TRE binding components JunD and FosB as indicated by Western blot analyses. Increased TRE DNA binding failed to lead to increased transactivation correlating with the inability of SB 203580 to increase phosphorylation of these AP-1 proteins. These data indicate that SB 203580 sensitive p38 MAP kinases are not involved in okadaic acid mediated increases in TRE DNA binding and transactivation.

  2. [The role of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in inhibition of proliferation in human prostate carcinoma cells by raloxifene: an in vitro experiment].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Xi; Kong, Chui-Ze

    2008-01-22

    To investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human prostate carcinoma cells induced by raloxifene (RAL). Human prostate carcinoma cells of the line PC3 were cultured. RAL of the concentrations of 10(-4), 10(-5), 10(-6), and 10(-7) mol/L were added into the culture fluid. MTT method was used to detect the inhibitory rate of the PC3 proliferation. RAL of the concentrations of 10(-6) mol/L or 10(-6) mol/L +10 micromol/L PD98059, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, and 10(-6) mol/L RAL +10 micromol/L SB203580, JNK inhibitor, and RAL + SB203580, a p38 inhibitor were added respectively for 48 h, and the flow cytometry (FCM) was used to detect the cell cycle. The cell apoptosis percentage was measured by TUNEL staining. The activation of extra cellular regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), and the expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, phospho-Bcl-2 (p-Bcl-2), and caspase-3 were determined by Western blotting. The expressions of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, ERbeta, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (P21(WAF1)), and cyclinD1 mRNA were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A dose-dependent proliferation inhibition of RAL was demonstrated in the PC3 cells. A G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were induced in the PC3 cells exposed to 10(-6) mol/L RAL. 10(-6) mol/L RAL induced the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 with different time courses, but it did not induce the activation of JNK. Suppression ERK1/2 activation by treatment with PD98059 or p38 activation by treatment with SB203580 attenuated the cell-cycle arrest at the G(1) phase respectively. 48 h after the treatment of 10(-6) mol/L RAL the PC3 cells was arrested at G(1) stage, however, 48 h after the treatment of 10(-6) mol/L RAL +10 micromol/L PD98059 and 10(-6) mol/L RAL +10 micromol/L SB203580 the degree of PC3 cell arrest at the G(1) stage was lower. 18 h after the

  3. Quantitative network mapping of the human kinome interactome reveals new clues for rational kinase inhibitor discovery and individualized cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Feixiong; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Quan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-01-01

    The human kinome is gaining importance through its promising cancer therapeutic targets, yet no general model to address the kinase inhibitor resistance has emerged. Here, we constructed a systems biology-based framework to catalogue the human kinome, including 538 kinase genes, in the broader context of the human interactome. Specifically, we constructed three networks: a kinase-substrate interaction network containing 7,346 pairs connecting 379 kinases to 36,576 phosphorylation sites in 1,961 substrates, a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) containing 92,699 pairs, and an atomic resolution PPIN containing 4,278 pairs. We identified the conserved regulatory phosphorylation motifs (e.g., Ser/Thr-Pro) using a sequence logo analysis. We found the typical anticancer target selection strategy that uses network hubs as drug targets, might lead to a high adverse drug reaction risk. Furthermore, we found the distinct network centrality of kinases creates a high anticancer drug resistance risk by feedback or crosstalk mechanisms within cellular networks. This notion is supported by the systematic network and pathway analyses that anticancer drug resistance genes are significantly enriched as hubs and heavily participate in multiple signaling pathways. Collectively, this comprehensive human kinome interactome map sheds light on anticancer drug resistance mechanisms and provides an innovative resource for rational kinase inhibitor design. PMID:25003367

  4. Dysfunction of calcium/calmodulin/CaM kinase IIα cascades in the medial prefrontal cortex in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu; Li, Bin; Han, Fang; Wang, Enhua; Shi, Yuxiu

    2012-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant problem that may affect individuals who have been exposed to a traumatic event or events, including combat, violent crime or childhood abuse. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is known to be significantly involved in emotional adjustment, particularly introspection, amygdala inhibition and emotional memory. In the acute phase of severe traumatic stress, the mPFC appears to undergo a change in plasticity for a short time, which suggests that the mPFC may be the reponse-sensitizing region. Calcium (Ca2+) is one of most significant intracellular messengers; the appropriate concentration of Ca2+ is necessary for neuronal excitability. When the Ca2+ concentration increases, Ca2+, calmodulin (CaM) and CaM kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) combine together to form the Ca2+‑CaM‑CaMKIIα signaling pathway, which is important in the plasticity of the central nervous system, learning and memory, mind, behavior and other types of cognitive activities. Our team studied the changes in the Ca2+-CaM-CaMKIIα levels in the mPFC of rats following a single-prolonged stress (SPS). The SPS, a credible method for establishing a rat model of PTSD, has been internationally recognized. The free intracellular Ca2+ concentration in the mPFC in the PTSD group was significantly higher than that in the control group 1 day after SPS exposure (P<0.05) and decreased 7 days after SPS; CaM expression significantly increased, while CaMKIIα expression significantly decreased in the mPFC 1 day after SPS compared with the control group. These findings suggest dysfunction of the Ca2+-CaM-CaMKIIα cascades in the mPFC, which may relate to the pathogenesis of the abnormal functioning of the mPFC in PTSD.

  5. Analysis of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (MAP2K4) tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MAP2K4 is a putative tumor and metastasis suppressor gene frequently found to be deleted in various cancer types. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive analysis of this gene to assess its involvement in ovarian cancer. Methods We screened for mutations in MAP2K4 using High Resolution Melt analysis of 149 primary ovarian tumors and methylation at the promoter using Methylation-Specific Single-Stranded Conformation Polymorphism analysis of 39 tumors. We also considered the clinical impact of changes in MAP2K4 using publicly available expression and copy number array data. Finally, we used siRNA to measure the effect of reducing MAP2K4 expression in cell lines. Results In addition to 4 previously detected homozygous deletions, we identified a homozygous 16 bp truncating deletion and a heterozygous 4 bp deletion, each in one ovarian tumor. No promoter methylation was detected. The frequency of MAP2K4 homozygous inactivation was 5.6% overall, and 9.8% in high-grade serous cases. Hemizygous deletion of MAP2K4 was observed in 38% of samples. There were significant correlations of copy number and expression in three microarray data sets. There was a significant correlation between MAP2K4 expression and overall survival in one expression array data set, but this was not confirmed in an independent set. Treatment of JAM and HOSE6.3 cell lines with MAP2K4 siRNA showed some reduction in proliferation. Conclusions MAP2K4 is targeted by genetic inactivation in ovarian cancer and restricted to high grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas in our cohort. PMID:21575258

  6. Cardioprotective effect of resveratrol via HO-1 expression involves p38 map kinase and PI-3-kinase signaling, but does not involve NFkappaB.

    PubMed

    Das, Samarjit; Fraga, Cesar G; Das, Dipak K

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxy stilbene), a phytoalexin found in the skin and seeds of grapes, can pharmacologically precondition (PC) the heart through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent and adenosine receptors-mediated mechanism. Since NO can induce the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), we examined if HO-1 induction has a direct role in resveratrol-preconditioning of the heart. Eight groups of rats were studied during 7 days: (i) control rats; (ii) rats receiving resveratrol (gavage, 2.5 mg/kg); (iii) rats injected tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, i.p. on days 1, 3 and 6; (iv) rats injected 202190 (SB), a p38MAPK inhibitor, i.p. for 7 days; (v) rats injected 294002 (LY), a Akt inhibitor, i.p. for 7days; (vi) rats receiving resveratrol and SnPP; (vii) rats receiving resveratrol and SB; and (viii) rats receiving resveratrol and LY. After the treatments, the rats were sacrificed, and the hearts isolated and subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion. The results shown a significant cardioprotection with resveratrol as evidenced by superior post-ischemic ventricular recovery, reduced myocardial infarct size, and decreased number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes. SnPP treatment abolished the cardioprotective effect of resveratrol. Resveratrol induced the activation of nuclear factor kappa-beta(NFkappaB), the phosphorylation of p38MAP kinase beta and Akt, as well as the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase alpha; all these effects but the activation of NFkappaB, were completely reversed by treatment with SnPP. These results indicate that resveratrol generates cardioprotection by preconditioning the heart by HO-1-mediated mechanisms, which are regulated by p38MAP kinase and Akt survival signaling, but non-dependent on NFkappaB activation.

  7. Phosphorylation of MAP65-1 by Arabidopsis Aurora Kinases Is Required for Efficient Cell Cycle Progression1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Annika K.; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Kosetsu, Ken; Cedeño, Cesyen; Jaquinod, Michel; Njo, Maria; De Milde, Liesbeth; Tompa, Peter; Inzé, Dirk; Beeckman, Tom; Vantard, Marylin

    2017-01-01

    Aurora kinases are key effectors of mitosis. Plant Auroras are functionally divided into two clades. The alpha Auroras (Aurora1 and Aurora2) associate with the spindle and the cell plate and are implicated in controlling formative divisions throughout plant development. The beta Aurora (Aurora3) localizes to centromeres and likely functions in chromosome separation. In contrast to the wealth of data available on the role of Aurora in other kingdoms, knowledge on their function in plants is merely emerging. This is exemplified by the fact that only histone H3 and the plant homolog of TPX2 have been identified as Aurora substrates in plants. Here we provide biochemical, genetic, and cell biological evidence that the microtubule-bundling protein MAP65-1—a member of the MAP65/Ase1/PRC1 protein family, implicated in central spindle formation and cytokinesis in animals, yeasts, and plants—is a genuine substrate of alpha Aurora kinases. MAP65-1 interacts with Aurora1 in vivo and is phosphorylated on two residues at its unfolded tail domain. Its overexpression and down-regulation antagonistically affect the alpha Aurora double mutant phenotypes. Phospho-mutant analysis shows that Aurora contributes to the microtubule bundling capacity of MAP65-1 in concert with other mitotic kinases. PMID:27879390

  8. Phosphorylation of MAP65-1 by Arabidopsis Aurora Kinases Is Required for Efficient Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Boruc, Joanna; Weimer, Annika K; Stoppin-Mellet, Virginie; Mylle, Evelien; Kosetsu, Ken; Cedeño, Cesyen; Jaquinod, Michel; Njo, Maria; De Milde, Liesbeth; Tompa, Peter; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk; Beeckman, Tom; Vantard, Marylin; Van Damme, Daniël

    2017-01-01

    Aurora kinases are key effectors of mitosis. Plant Auroras are functionally divided into two clades. The alpha Auroras (Aurora1 and Aurora2) associate with the spindle and the cell plate and are implicated in controlling formative divisions throughout plant development. The beta Aurora (Aurora3) localizes to centromeres and likely functions in chromosome separation. In contrast to the wealth of data available on the role of Aurora in other kingdoms, knowledge on their function in plants is merely emerging. This is exemplified by the fact that only histone H3 and the plant homolog of TPX2 have been identified as Aurora substrates in plants. Here we provide biochemical, genetic, and cell biological evidence that the microtubule-bundling protein MAP65-1-a member of the MAP65/Ase1/PRC1 protein family, implicated in central spindle formation and cytokinesis in animals, yeasts, and plants-is a genuine substrate of alpha Aurora kinases. MAP65-1 interacts with Aurora1 in vivo and is phosphorylated on two residues at its unfolded tail domain. Its overexpression and down-regulation antagonistically affect the alpha Aurora double mutant phenotypes. Phospho-mutant analysis shows that Aurora contributes to the microtubule bundling capacity of MAP65-1 in concert with other mitotic kinases. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. In vivo and in vitro correlation of pulmonary MAP kinase activation following metallic exposure.

    PubMed

    Silbajoris, R; Ghio, A J; Samet, J M; Jaskot, R; Dreher, K L; Brighton, L E

    2000-06-01

    Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is a particulate pollutant produced in the combustion of fuel oil. Exposure to ROFA is associated with adverse respiratory effects in humans, induces lung inflammation in animals, and induces inflammatory mediator expression in cultured human airway epithelial cells (HAEC). ROFA has a high content of transition metals, including vanadium, a potent tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor that we have previously shown to disregulate phosphotyrosine metabolism and activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades in HAEC. In order to study MAPK activation in response to in vivo metal exposure, we used immunohistochemical methods to detect levels of phosphorylated protein tyrosines (P-Tyr) and the MAPKs ERK1/2, JNK, and P38 in lung sections from rats intratracheally exposed to ROFA. After a 1-h exposure to 500 microg ROFA, rat lungs showed no histological changes and no significant increases in immunostaining for either P-Tyr or phospho-(P-) MAPKs compared to saline-instilled controls. At 4 h of exposure, there was mild and variable inflammation in the lung, which was accompanied by an increase in specific immunostaining for P-Tyr and P-MAPKs in airway and alveolar epithelial cells and resident macrophages. By 24 h of exposure, there was a pronounced inflammatory response to ROFA instillation and a marked increase in levels of P-Tyr and P-MAPKs present within the alveolar epithelium and in the inflammatory cells, while the airway epithelium showed a continued increase in the expression of P-ERK1/2. By comparison, HAEC cultures exposed to 100 microg/ml ROFA for 20 min resulted in marked increases in P-Tyr and P-MAPKs, which persisted after 24 h of exposure. P-Tyr levels continued to accumulate for up to 24 h in HAEC exposed to ROFA. These results demonstrate in vivo activation in cell signaling pathways in response to pulmonary exposure to particulate matter, and support the relevance of in vitro studies in the identification of

  10. IκB kinase-induced interaction of TPL-2 kinase with 14-3-3 is essential for Toll-like receptor activation of ERK-1 and -2 MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Addi, Abduelhakem; Mambole-Dema, Agnes; Brender, Christine; Martin, Stephen R.; Janzen, Julia; Kjaer, Sven; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Ley, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    The MEK-1/2 kinase TPL-2 is critical for Toll-like receptor activation of the ERK-1/2 MAP kinase pathway during inflammatory responses, but it can transform cells following C-terminal truncation. IκB kinase (IKK) complex phosphorylation of the TPL-2 C terminus regulates full-length TPL-2 activation of ERK-1/2 by a mechanism that has remained obscure. Here, we show that TPL-2 Ser-400 phosphorylation by IKK and TPL-2 Ser-443 autophosphorylation cooperated to trigger TPL-2 association with 14-3-3. Recruitment of 14-3-3 to the phosphorylated C terminus stimulated TPL-2 MEK-1 kinase activity, which was essential for TPL-2 activation of ERK-1/2. The binding of 14-3-3 to TPL-2 was also indispensible for lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor by macrophages, which is regulated by TPL-2 independently of ERK-1/2 activation. Our data identify a key step in the activation of TPL-2 signaling and provide a mechanistic insight into how C-terminal deletion triggers the oncogenic potential of TPL-2 by rendering its kinase activity independent of 14-3-3 binding. PMID:24912162

  11. Inhaled ultrafine particulate matter affects CNS inflammatory processes and may act via MAP kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kleinman, M T; Araujo, J A; Nel, A; Sioutas, C; Campbell, A; Cong, P Q; Li, H; Bondy, S C

    2008-05-05

    In addition to evidence that inhalation of ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality, the brain may also constitute a site adversely effected by the environmental presence of airborne particulate matter. We have examined the association between exposure to PM and adverse CNS effects in apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) mice exposed to two levels of concentrated ultrafine particulate matter in central Los Angeles. Mice were euthanized 24h after the last exposure and brain, liver, heart, lung and spleen tissues were collected and frozen for subsequent bioassays. There was clear evidence of aberrant immune activation in the brains of exposed animals as judged by a dose-related increase in nuclear translocation of two key transcription factors, NF-kappaB and AP-1. These factors are involved in the promotion of inflammation. Increased levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were also found consequent to particulate inhalation suggesting that glial activation was taking place. In order to determine the mechanism by which these events occurred, levels of several MAP kinases involved in activation of these transcription factors were assayed by Western blotting. There were no significant changes in the proportion of active (phosphorylated) forms of ERK-1, IkB and p38. However, the fraction of JNK in the active form was significantly increased in animals receiving the lower concentration of concentrated ambient particles (CAPs). This suggests that the signaling pathway by which these transcription factors are activated involves the activation of JNK.

  12. Molecular pharmacology in a simple model system: Implicating MAP kinase and phosphoinositide signalling in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Boeckeler, Katrina; Williams, Robin S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of drug action has been the primary focus for pharmacological researchers, traditionally using rodent models. However, non-sentient model systems are now increasingly being used as an alternative approach to better understand drug action or targets. One of these model systems, the social amoeba Dictyostelium, enables the rapid ablation or over-expression of genes, and the subsequent use of isogenic cell culture for the analysis of cell signalling pathways in pharmacological research. The model also supports an increasingly important ethical view of research, involving the reduction, replacement and refinement of animals in biomedical research. This review outlines the use of Dictyostelium in understanding the pharmacological action of two commonly used bipolar disorder treatments (valproic acid and lithium). Both of these compounds regulate mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase and inositol phospholipid-based signalling by unknown means. Analysis of the molecular pathways targeted by these drugs in Dictyostelium and translation of discoveries to animal systems has helped to further understand the molecular mechanisms of these bipolar disorder treatments. PMID:21093602

  13. Sorbic acid stress activates the Candida glabrata high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jandric, Zeljkica; Gregori, Christa; Klopf, Eva; Radolf, Martin; Schüller, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Weak organic acids such as sorbic acid are important food preservatives and powerful fungistatic agents. These compounds accumulate in the cytosol and disturb the cellular pH and energy homeostasis. Candida glabrata is in many aspects similar to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, with regard to confrontation to sorbic acid, two of the principal response pathways behave differently in C. glabrata. In yeast, sorbic acid stress causes activation of many genes via the transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4. The C. glabrata homologs CgMsn2 and CgMsn4 are apparently not activated by sorbic acid. In contrast, in C. glabrata the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway is activated by sorbic acid. Here we show that the MAP kinase of the HOG pathway, CgHog1, becomes phosphorylated and has a function for weak acid stress resistance. Transcript profiling of weak acid treated C. glabrata cells suggests a broad and very similar response pattern of cells lacking CgHog1 compared to wild type which is over lapping with but distinct from S. cerevisiae. The PDR12 gene was the highest induced gene in both species and it required CgHog1 for full expression. Our results support flexibility of the response cues for general stress signaling pathways, even between closely related yeasts, and functional extension of a specific response pathway. PMID:24324463

  14. Expression profiling of MAP kinase-mediated meiotic progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Leacock, Stefanie W; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-11-10

    The LET-60 (Ras)/LIN-45 (Raf)/MPK-1 (MAP kinase) signaling pathway plays a key role in the development of multiple tissues in Caenorhabditis elegans. For the most part, the identities of the downstream genes that act as the ultimate effectors of MPK-1 signaling have remained elusive. A unique allele of mpk-1, ga111, displays a reversible, temperature-sensitive, tissue-specific defect in progression through meiotic prophase I. We performed gene expression profiling on mpk-1(ga111) animals to identify candidate downstream effectors of MPK-1 signaling in the germ line. This analysis delineated a cohort of genes whose expression requires MPK-1 signaling in germ cells in the pachytene stage of meiosis I. RNA in situ hybridization analysis shows that these genes are expressed in the germ line in an MPK-1-dependent manner and have a spatial expression pattern consistent with the location of activated MPK-1. We found that one MPK-1 signaling-responsive gene encoding a C2H2 zinc finger protein plays a role in meiotic chromosome segregation downstream of MPK-1. Additionally, discovery of genes responsive to MPK-1 signaling permitted us to order MPK-1 signaling relative to several events occurring in pachytene, including EFL-1/DPL-1 gene regulation and X chromosome reactivation. This study highlights the utility of applying global gene expression methods to investigate genes downstream of commonly used signaling pathways in vivo.

  15. Regulation of the wheat MAP kinase phosphatase 1 by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mouna; Cotelle, Valérie; Ebel, Chantal; Zaidi, Ikram; Ormancey, Mélanie; Galaud, Jean-Philippe; Hanin, Moez

    2017-04-01

    Plant MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are major regulators of MAPK signaling pathways and play crucial roles in controlling growth, development and stress responses. The presence of several functional domains in plant MKPs such as a dual specificity phosphatase catalytic domain, gelsolin, calmodulin-binding and serine-rich domains, suggests that MKPs can interact with distinct cellular partners, others than MAPKs. In this report, we identified a canonical mode I 14-3-3-binding motif (574KLPSLP579) located at the carboxy-terminal region of the wheat MKP, TMKP1. We found that this motif is well-conserved among other MKPs from monocots including Hordeum vulgare, Brachypodium distachyon and Aegilops taushii. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we provide evidence for interaction between TMKP1 and 14-3-3 proteins in wheat. Moreover, the phosphatase activity of TMKP1 is increased in a phospho-dependent manner by either Arabidopsis or yeast 14-3-3 isoforms. TMKP1 activation by 14-3-3 proteins is enhanced by Mn(2+), whereas in the presence of Ca(2+) ions, TMKP1 activation was limited to Arabidopsis 14-3-3φ (phi), an isoform harboring an EF-hand motif. Such findings strongly suggest that 14-3-3 proteins, in conjunction with specific divalent cations, may stimulate TMKP1 activity and point-out that 14-3-3 proteins bind and regulate the activity of a MKP in eukaryotes.

  16. A novel function for the MAP kinase SMA-5 in intestinal tube stability

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Florian; Gerhardus, Harald; Carberry, Katrin; Davis, Wayne; Jorgensen, Erik; Richardson, Christine; Bossinger, Olaf; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments are major cytoskeletal components whose assembly into complex networks and isotype-specific functions are still largely unknown. Caenorhabditis elegans provides an excellent model system to study intermediate filament organization and function in vivo. Its intestinal intermediate filaments localize exclusively to the endotube, a circumferential sheet just below the actin-based terminal web. A genetic screen for defects in the organization of intermediate filaments identified a mutation in the catalytic domain of the MAP kinase 7 orthologue sma-5(kc1). In sma-5(kc1) mutants, pockets of lumen penetrate the cytoplasm of the intestinal cells. These membrane hernias increase over time without affecting epithelial integrity and polarity. A more pronounced phenotype was observed in the deletion allele sma-5(n678) and in intestine-specific sma-5(RNAi). Besides reduced body length, an increased time of development, reduced brood size, and reduced life span were observed in the mutants, indicating compromised food uptake. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that the luminal pockets include the subapical cytoskeleton and coincide with local thinning and gaps in the endotube that are often enlarged in other regions. Increased intermediate filament phosphorylation was detected by two-dimensional immunoblotting, suggesting that loss of SMA-5 function leads to reduced intestinal tube stability due to altered intermediate filament network phosphorylation. PMID:27733627

  17. Aberrant Activation of p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Innate Immune Responses Is Toxic to Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cheesman, Hilary K.; Feinbaum, Rhonda L.; Thekkiniath, Jose; Dowen, Robert H.; Conery, Annie L.; Pukkila-Worley, Read

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of innate immune responses in intestinal epithelial cells underlies the pathophysiology of inflammatory disorders of the intestine. Here we examine the physiological effects of immune hyperactivation in the intestine of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We previously identified an immunostimulatory xenobiotic that protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by inducing immune effector expression via the conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway, but was toxic to nematodes developing in the absence of pathogen. To investigate a possible connection between the toxicity and immunostimulatory properties of this xenobiotic, we conducted a forward genetic screen for C. elegans mutants that are resistant to the deleterious effects of the compound, and identified five toxicity suppressors. These strains contained hypomorphic mutations in each of the known components of the p38 MAP kinase cassette (tir-1, nsy-1, sek-1, and pmk-1), demonstrating that hyperstimulation of the p38 MAPK pathway is toxic to animals. To explore mechanisms of immune pathway regulation in C. elegans, we conducted another genetic screen for dominant activators of the p38 MAPK pathway, and identified a single allele that had a gain-of-function (gf) mutation in nsy-1, the MAP kinase kinase kinase that acts upstream of p38 MAPK pmk-1. The nsy-1(gf) allele caused hyperinduction of p38 MAPK PMK-1-dependent immune effectors, had greater levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and was more resistant to killing by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to wild-type controls. In addition, the nsy-1(gf) mutation was toxic to developing animals. Together, these data suggest that the activity of the MAPKKK NSY-1 is tightly regulated as part of a physiological mechanism to control p38 MAPK-mediated innate immune hyperactivation, and ensure cellular homeostasis in C. elegans. PMID:26818074

  18. The MADD-3 LAMMER Kinase Interacts with a p38 MAP Kinase Pathway to Regulate the Display of the EVA-1 Guidance Receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Serena A; Rajendran, Luckshika; Bagg, Rachel; Barbier, Louis; van Pel, Derek M; Moshiri, Houtan; Roy, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    The proper display of transmembrane receptors on the leading edge of migrating cells and cell extensions is essential for their response to guidance cues. We previously discovered that MADD-4, which is an ADAMTSL secreted by motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, interacts with an UNC-40/EVA-1 co-receptor complex on muscles to attract plasma membrane extensions called muscle arms. In nematodes, the muscle arm termini harbor the post-synaptic elements of the neuromuscular junction. Through a forward genetic screen for mutants with disrupted muscle arm extension, we discovered that a LAMMER kinase, which we call MADD-3, is required for the proper display of the EVA-1 receptor on the muscle's plasma membrane. Without MADD-3, EVA-1 levels decrease concomitantly with a reduction of the late-endosomal marker RAB-7. Through a genetic suppressor screen, we found that the levels of EVA-1 and RAB-7 can be restored in madd-3 mutants by eliminating the function of a p38 MAP kinase pathway. We also found that EVA-1 and RAB-7 will accumulate in madd-3 mutants upon disrupting CUP-5, which is a mucolipin ortholog required for proper lysosome function. Together, our data suggests that the MADD-3 LAMMER kinase antagonizes the p38-mediated endosomal trafficking of EVA-1 to the lysosome. In this way, MADD-3 ensures that sufficient levels of EVA-1 are present to guide muscle arm extension towards the source of the MADD-4 guidance cue.

  19. The MADD-3 LAMMER Kinase Interacts with a p38 MAP Kinase Pathway to Regulate the Display of the EVA-1 Guidance Receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Serena A.; Rajendran, Luckshika; Bagg, Rachel; van Pel, Derek M.; Moshiri, Houtan; Roy, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The proper display of transmembrane receptors on the leading edge of migrating cells and cell extensions is essential for their response to guidance cues. We previously discovered that MADD-4, which is an ADAMTSL secreted by motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, interacts with an UNC-40/EVA-1 co-receptor complex on muscles to attract plasma membrane extensions called muscle arms. In nematodes, the muscle arm termini harbor the post-synaptic elements of the neuromuscular junction. Through a forward genetic screen for mutants with disrupted muscle arm extension, we discovered that a LAMMER kinase, which we call MADD-3, is required for the proper display of the EVA-1 receptor on the muscle’s plasma membrane. Without MADD-3, EVA-1 levels decrease concomitantly with a reduction of the late-endosomal marker RAB-7. Through a genetic suppressor screen, we found that the levels of EVA-1 and RAB-7 can be restored in madd-3 mutants by eliminating the function of a p38 MAP kinase pathway. We also found that EVA-1 and RAB-7 will accumulate in madd-3 mutants upon disrupting CUP-5, which is a mucolipin ortholog required for proper lysosome function. Together, our data suggests that the MADD-3 LAMMER kinase antagonizes the p38-mediated endosomal trafficking of EVA-1 to the lysosome. In this way, MADD-3 ensures that sufficient levels of EVA-1 are present to guide muscle arm extension towards the source of the MADD-4 guidance cue. PMID:27123983

  20. Rapid phosphorylation of Elk-1 transcription factor and activation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways in response to visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, B; Kaczmarek, L; Zangenehpour, S; Chaudhuri, A

    1999-06-01

    The AP-1 transcription factor, which is composed of various combinations of Fos and Jun proteins, is believed to be a key participant in molecular processes that guide activity-dependent changes in gene expression. In this study, we investigated the activity of different MAP kinases that have been implicated in AP-1 activation. We examined the activities of ERK, JNK/SAPK, and p38 MAPK along with their nuclear targets (Elk-1 and c-Jun) in rat visual cortex after light stimulation. The transcription factor Elk-1 (a possible regulator of c-fos expression) was found to be transiently modified by phosphorylation when visual stimulation was applied after a period of dark rearing. In vitro kinase assay with Elk-1 as substrate showed that light stimulation activated MAPK/ERK in visual cortex but not frontal cortex. Furthermore, ERK activation was temporally matched to onset of Elk-1 phosphorylation. The activity of JNK1 (c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1) was elevated at 2-6 h after visual exposure and was also temporally correlated to increase of endogenous P-c-Jun levels and its appearance within the AP-1 DNA-binding complex. The activities of p38 MAP kinases did not change significantly. These results demonstrate the differential engagement of MAPK signaling pathways following sensory stimulation and their relative effects upon AP-1 expression in the intact brain. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  1. Reciprocal Regulation of Aquaporin-2 Abundance and Degradation by Protein Kinase A and p38-MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nedvetsky, Pavel I.; Tabor, Vedrana; Tamma, Grazia; Beulshausen, Sven; Skroblin, Philipp; Kirschner, Aline; Mutig, Kerim; Boltzen, Mareike; Petrucci, Oscar; Vossenkämper, Anna; Wiesner, Burkhard; Bachmann, Sebastian; Rosenthal, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) modulates the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in the renal collecting duct to maintain homeostasis of body water. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R), increasing cAMP, which promotes the redistribution of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane. cAMP also increases AQP2 transcription, but whether altered degradation also modulates AQP2 protein levels is not well understood. Here, elevation of cAMP increased AQP2 protein levels within 30 minutes in primary inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells ectopically expressing AQP2, and in mouse kidneys. Accelerated transcription or translation did not explain this increase in AQP2 abundance. In IMCD cells, cAMP inhibited p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) via activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of p38-MAPK associated with decreased phosphorylation (serine 261) and polyubiquitination of AQP2, preventing proteasomal degradation. Our results demonstrate that AVP enhances AQP2 protein abundance by altering its proteasomal degradation through a PKA- and p38-MAPK–dependent pathway. PMID:20724536

  2. Fluoride Induces a Volume Reduction in CA1 Hippocampal Slices Via MAP Kinase Pathway Through Volume Regulated Anion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaekwang; Han, Young-Eun; Favorov, Oleg; Tommerdahl, Mark; Whitsel, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell volume is an important aspect of cellular homeostasis during neural activity. This volume regulation is thought to be mediated by activation of specific transporters, aquaporin, and volume regulated anion channels (VRAC). In cultured astrocytes, it was reported that swelling-induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation is required to open VRAC, which are thought to be important in regulatory volume decrease and in the response of CNS to trauma and excitotoxicity. It has been also described that sodium fluoride (NaF), a recognized G-protein activator and protein phosphatase inhibitor, leads to a significant MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. However, NaF's effect in volume regulation in the brain is not known yet. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NaF-induced volume change in rat and mouse hippocampal slices using intrinsic optical signal (IOS) recording, in which we measured relative changes in intracellular and extracellular volume as changes in light transmittance through brain slices. We found that NaF (1~5 mM) application induced a reduction in light transmittance (decreased volume) in CA1 hippocampus, which was completely reversed by MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 (10 µM). We also observed that NaF-induced volume reduction was blocked by anion channel blockers, suggesting that NaF-induced volume reduction could be mediated by VRAC. Overall, our results propose a novel molecular mechanism of NaF-induced volume reduction via MAP kinase signaling pathway by activation of VRAC. PMID:27122993

  3. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-11-26

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies.

  4. Brassinosteroid-regulated GSK3/Shaggy-like Kinases Phosphorylate Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Kinases, Which Control Stomata Development in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mamoona; Rozhon, Wilfried; Bigeard, Jean; Pflieger, Delphine; Husar, Sigrid; Pitzschke, Andrea; Teige, Markus; Jonak, Claudia; Hirt, Heribert; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroid hormones that coordinate fundamental developmental programs in plants. In this study we show that in addition to the well established roles of BRs in regulating cell elongation and cell division events, BRs also govern cell fate decisions during stomata development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In wild-type A. thaliana, stomatal distribution follows the one-cell spacing rule; that is, adjacent stomata are spaced by at least one intervening pavement cell. This rule is interrupted in BR-deficient and BR signaling-deficient A. thaliana mutants, resulting in clustered stomata. We demonstrate that BIN2 and its homologues, GSK3/Shaggy-like kinases involved in BR signaling, can phosphorylate the MAPK kinases MKK4 and MKK5, which are members of the MAPK module YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 that controls stomata development and patterning. BIN2 phosphorylates a GSK3/Shaggy-like kinase recognition motif in MKK4, which reduces MKK4 activity against its substrate MPK6 in vitro. In vivo we show that MKK4 and MKK5 act downstream of BR signaling because their overexpression rescued stomata patterning defects in BR-deficient plants. A model is proposed in which GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of MKK4 and MKK5 enables for a dynamic integration of endogenous or environmental cues signaled by BRs into cell fate decisions governed by the YODA-MKK4/5-MPK3/6 module. PMID:23341468

  5. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  6. Schistosoma mansoni infection enhances host portal vein contraction: role of potassium channels and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Araujo, F P; Quintas, L E M; Noël, F; Silva, C L M

    2007-07-01

    Murine Schistosoma mansoni infection is related to an increased contraction of portal vein in response to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The present study addressed a putative alteration of ion channels and enzymes involved in vascular contraction. In control group, either inhibition of K+ channels sensitive to ATP (K(ATP)) or Ca2+ (BK(Ca)) increased 5-HT-induced contraction, but the same did not occur in infected mice. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAP kinase markedly decreased the vascular contraction to 5-HT in the infected mice with minor effects in the control group. Accordingly, we observed a higher density of phospho-p38 MAP kinase, that refers to the fully active state of the enzyme, in portal veins from infected mice as compared to control animals. These results suggest that the reduced function of K(ATP) and BK(Ca) channels along with an increased contribution of p38 MAP kinase contribute to the increased contraction of portal veins to 5-HT observed in murine schistosomiasis.

  7. Stimulation of MAP kinase pathways after maternal IL-1beta exposure induces fetal lung fluid absorption in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Reshma; Li, Tianbo; Koshy, Shyny; Beard, LaMonta L; Sharma, Kapil; Carter, Ethan P; Garat, Chrystelle; Folkesson, Hans G

    2007-03-26

    We tested the hypothesis that maternal interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) pretreatment and induction of fetal cortisol synthesis activates MAP kinases and thereby affects lung fluid absorption in preterm guinea pigs. IL-1beta was administered subcutaneously daily to timed-pregnant guinea pigs for three days. Fetuses were obtained by abdominal hysterotomy and instilled with isosmolar 5% albumin into the lungs and lung fluid movement was measured over 1 h by mass balance. MAP kinase expression was measured by western blot. Lung fluid absorption was induced at 61 days (D) gestation and stimulated at 68D gestation by IL-1beta. Maternal IL-1beta pretreatment upregulated ERK and upstream MEK expression at both 61 and 68D gestation, albeit being much more pronounced at 61D gestation. U0126 instillation completely blocked IL-1beta-induced lung fluid absorption as well as IL-1beta-induced/stimulated ERK expression. Cortisol synthesis inhibition by metyrapone attenuated ERK expression and lung fluid absorption in IL-1beta-pretreated fetal lungs. JNK expression after maternal IL-1beta pretreatment remained unaffected at either gestation age. These data implicate the ERK MAP kinase pathway as being important for IL-1beta induction/stimulation of lung fluid absorption in fetal guinea pigs.

  8. The involvement of MAP kinases JNK and p38 in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Y. O.; Bibov, M. Y.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    The role of JNK and p38 MAP kinases in functional inactivation and necrosis of mechanoreceptor neurons as well as necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment (10 -7 M Photosens, 30 min incubation, 670 nm laser irradiation at 0.4 W/cm2) in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was studied using specific inhibitors SP600125 and SB202190, respectively. SP600125 enhanced PDT-induced apoptosis of photosensitized glial cells but did not influence PDT-induced changes in neuronal activity, density of glial nuclei around neuron body, and necrosis of receptor neurons and glial cells. SB202190 did not influence neuron activity and survival as well but reduced PDT-induced necrosis but not apoptosis of glial cells. Therefore, both MAP kinases influenced glial cells but not neurons. JNK protected glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis but did not influence necrosis and proliferation of these cells. In contrast, p38 did not influence apoptosis but contributed into PDT-induced necrosis of glial cells and PDT-induced gliosis. These MAP kinase inhibitors may be used for modulation of photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  9. Early events in the induction of apoptosis in ovarian carcinoma cells by CD437: activation of the p38 MAP kinase signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Holmes, William F; Soprano, Dianne Robert; Soprano, Kenneth J

    2003-09-25

    Retinoids have great potential in the areas of cancer therapy and chemoprevention. 6-[3-(1-admantyl)]-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid (CD437) is a conformationally restricted synthetic retinoid that has been reported to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in ovarian tumor cell lines but the entire mechanism for apoptotic induction has not been fully defined. We set out to identify the early events of CD437-induced apoptosis of the CA-OV-3 cell line and determine if these occur in a CA-OV-3 cell line resistant to CD437 (CA-CD437R). Using inhibitors for the MAP kinase cascade, we determined that MEK and p38 inhibitors could block CD437-induced apoptosis of the CA-OV-3 cell line. Moreover, treatment of CA-OV-3 and CA-CD437R cells with CD437 resulted in increased phosphorylation and activity of p38 independent of caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, p38 induced the phosphorylation of MEF2 in both CA-OV-3 and CA-CD437R cells after CD437 treatment. Finally, GFP-TR3 protein translocated to the cytosol and associated with mitochondria in both cell lines in response to CD437 treatment. This leads to depolarization of mitochondria and subsequent induction of apoptosis only in CA-OV-3 cells. These results identify a number of initial molecular events in the induction of apoptosis by CD437 in CA-OV-3 cells and demonstrate that the alteration in CA-CD437R cells, which results in resistance to CD437 maps downstream of these early events after TR3 translocation but prior to mitochondrial depolarization.

  10. Intracellular Ca2+ increase induces post-fertilization events via MAP kinase dephosphorylation in eggs of the hydrozoan jellyfish Cladonema pacificum.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Eri; Tachibana, Kazunori; Deguchi, Ryusaku

    2006-05-01

    Naturally spawned eggs of the hydrozoan jellyfish Cladonema pacificum are arrested at G1-like pronuclear stage until fertilization. Fertilized eggs of Cladonema undergo a series of post-fertilization events, including loss of sperm-attracting ability, expression of adhesive materials on the egg surface, and initiation of cell cycle leading to DNA synthesis and cleavage. Here, we investigate whether these events are regulated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) activity in Cladonema eggs. We found that MAP kinase is maintained in the phosphorylated form in unfertilized eggs. Initiation of sperm-induced Ca2+ increase, which is the first sign of fertilization, was immediately followed by MAP kinase dephosphorylation within a few minutes of fertilization. The fertilized eggs typically stopped sperm attraction by an additional 5 min and became sticky around this time. They further underwent cytokinesis yielding 2-cell embryos at approximately 1 h post-fertilization, which was preceded by DNA synthesis evidenced by BrdU incorporation into the nuclei. Injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) into unfertilized eggs, which produced a Ca2+ increase similar to that seen at fertilization, triggered MAP kinase dephosphorylation and the above post-fertilization events without insemination. Conversely, injection of BAPTA/Ca2+ into fertilized eggs at approximately 10 s after the initiation of Ca2+ increase immediately lowered the elevating Ca2+ level and inhibited the subsequent post-fertilization events. Treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), triggered the post-fertilization events in unfertilized eggs, where MAP kinase dephosphorylation but not Ca2+ increase was generated. Conversely, preinjection of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein of MAP kinase kinase kinase (Mos), which maintained the phosphorylated state of MAP kinase, blocked the post-fertilization events in

  11. INTEGRATING DETAILED SOIL SURVEY AND LANDTYPE MAPPING FOR WATERSHED SCALE ASSESSMENTS IN THE WESTERN OREGON CASCADE MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the Western Oregon Cascades is one of the most intensely managed and economically important forest regions in North America, a lack of detailed soil information has hindered watershed-scale assessments of forest productivity, water supply, sensitive wildlife species, and...

  12. INTEGRATING DETAILED SOIL SURVEY AND LANDTYPE MAPPING FOR WATERSHED SCALE ASSESSMENTS IN THE WESTERN OREGON CASCADE MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the Western Oregon Cascades is one of the most intensely managed and economically important forest regions in North America, a lack of detailed soil information has hindered watershed-scale assessments of forest productivity, water supply, sensitive wildlife species, and...

  13. The ERK/MAP kinase pathway couples light to immediate-early gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dziema, Heather; Oatis, Ben; Butcher, Greg Q; Yates, Robert; Hoyt, Kari R; Obrietan, Karl

    2003-04-01

    Signalling via the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been identified as an intermediate event coupling light to entrainment of the mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Given this observation, it was of interest to determine where within the entrainment process the MAPK pathway was functioning. In this study, we examined the role of the MAPK pathway as a regulator of light-induced gene expression in the SCN. Towards this end, we characterized the effect pharmacological disruption of the MAPK cascade has on the expression of the immediate-early genes c-Fos, JunB and EGR-1. We report that uncoupling light from MAPK pathway activation attenuated the expression of all three gene products. In the absence of photic stimulation, inhibition of the MAPK pathway did not alter basal gene product expression levels. Light-induced activation of cAMP response element (CRE)-dependent transcription, as assessed using a CRE-LacZ transgenic mouse strain, was also disrupted by blocking MAPK pathway activation. These results reveal that the MAPK cascade functions as one of the first transduction steps leading from light to rapid transcriptional activation, an essential event in the entrainment process. MAPK pathway-dependent gene expression in the SCN may result, in part, from stimulation of CRE-dependent transcription.

  14. Adhesion Regulates MAP Kinase-Ternary Complex Factor Exchange to Control a Proliferative Transcriptional Switch

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Michele A.; Cheng, Catherine Q.; Shen, Colette J.; Gao, Lin; Olarerin-George, Anthony O.; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Hogenesch, John B.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ternary complex factors (TCFs; Elk1, Net, and Sap-1) are growth factor-responsive transcription co-factors of serum response factor (SRF) and are activated by map kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation to regulate immediate early gene transcription. Although cell adhesion also can regulate immediate early genes and proliferation, the mechanism for this effect has remained unexplored. Results Restricting adhesion and spreading of G0-synchronized cells on substrates with decreasing size of micropatterned islands of fibronectin suppressed serum-induced immediate early gene expression and S-phase entry. Knockdown of Sap-1 decreased expression of the immediate early genes egr1 and fos and subsequent proliferation normally present with high adhesion, whereas knockdown of Net rescued egr1 and fos expression and proliferation normally suppressed by low adhesion. ChIP studies showed increased occupancy of egr1 and fos promoters by Sap-1 with high adhesion, while low adhesion increased Net occupancy. This switch in TCF promoter binding was regulated by an adhesion-mediated switch in MAPK activity. Increasing adhesion enhanced serum-induced JNK activity while suppressing p38 activity, leading to increased Sap-1 phosphorylation and Net dephosphorylation, and switching Net with Sap-1 at egr1 and fos promoters to support proliferation. Microarray studies confirmed this switch in TCF regulation of proliferative genes and uncovered novel gene targets and functions co-regulated by Sap-1 and Net. Conclusions These data demonstrate a key role for the TCFs in adhesion-induced transcription and proliferation, and reveals a novel MAPK/TCF transcriptional switch that controls this process. PMID:23063436

  15. Niacin decreases leukocyte myeloperoxidase: mechanistic role of redox agents and Src/p38MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Shobha H; Kamanna, Vaijinath S; Kashyap, Moti L

    2014-08-01

    Leukocyte myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a major player in the pathogenesis of various chronic diseases including atherosclerosis. This study proposes the novel concept that niacin, through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, decreases neutrophil MPO release and its activity, protects apolipoprotein-AI (apo-AI) modification and improves HDL function. Human blood leukocytes and leukocytic cell line HL-60 cells were treated with niacin, and stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Cellular and released MPO activity in the medium was measured by assessing chlorination of MPO-specific substrate. MPO protein release in the medium and apo-AI degradation was measured by Western blot analysis. Monocyte adhesion to human aortic primary endothelial cells was measured to assess biological function of HDL/apo-AI. PMA significantly increased leukocyte MPO activity in both intracellular extract and medium. Niacin (0.25-0.5 mM) decreased PMA-induced MPO activity (cellular and released in the media). Niacin also decreased MPO protein mass in the medium without affecting its mRNA expression. Increased NADPH oxidase and ROS production by PMA were also significantly inhibited by niacin. Studies with specific inhibitors suggest that ROS-dependent Src and p38MAP kinase mediate decreased MPO activity by niacin. Niacin blocked apo-AI degradation, and apo-AI from niacin treated cells decreased monocyte adhesion to aortic endothelial cells. These findings identify niacin as a potent inhibitor of leukocyte MPO release and MPO-mediated formation of dysfunctional HDL. Niacin and niacin-related chemical entities may form important therapeutic agents for MPO-mediated inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel function for the MAP kinase SMA-5 in intestinal tube stability.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Florian; Gerhardus, Harald; Carberry, Katrin; Davis, Wayne; Jorgensen, Erik; Richardson, Christine; Bossinger, Olaf; Leube, Rudolf E

    2016-12-01

    Intermediate filaments are major cytoskeletal components whose assembly into complex networks and isotype-specific functions are still largely unknown. Caenorhabditis elegans provides an excellent model system to study intermediate filament organization and function in vivo. Its intestinal intermediate filaments localize exclusively to the endotube, a circumferential sheet just below the actin-based terminal web. A genetic screen for defects in the organization of intermediate filaments identified a mutation in the catalytic domain of the MAP kinase 7 orthologue sma-5(kc1) In sma-5(kc1) mutants, pockets of lumen penetrate the cytoplasm of the intestinal cells. These membrane hernias increase over time without affecting epithelial integrity and polarity. A more pronounced phenotype was observed in the deletion allele sma-5(n678) and in intestine-specific sma-5(RNAi) Besides reduced body length, an increased time of development, reduced brood size, and reduced life span were observed in the mutants, indicating compromised food uptake. Ultrastructural analyses revealed that the luminal pockets include the subapical cytoskeleton and coincide with local thinning and gaps in the endotube that are often enlarged in other regions. Increased intermediate filament phosphorylation was detected by two-dimensional immunoblotting, suggesting that loss of SMA-5 function leads to reduced intestinal tube stability due to altered intermediate filament network phosphorylation. © 2016 Geisler et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Up-regulates Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase 1a-dependent Phosphorylation of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqing; Dahlmans, Vivian; Thali, Ramon; Preisinger, Christian; Viollet, Benoit; Voncken, J Willem; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-08-12

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor that acts to sustain cellular energy balance. Although AMPK is implicated in the regulation of a multitude of ATP-dependent cellular processes, exactly how these processes are controlled by AMPK as well as the identity of AMPK targets and pathways continues to evolve. Here we identify MAP kinase-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 1a (MNK1a) as a novel AMPK target. Specifically, we show AMPK-dependent Ser(353) phosphorylation of the human MNK1a isoform in cell-free and cellular systems. We show that AMPK and MNK1a physically interact and that in vivo MNK1a-Ser(353) phosphorylation requires T-loop phosphorylation, in good agreement with a recently proposed structural regulatory model of MNK1a. Our data suggest a physiological role for MNK1a-Ser(353) phosphorylation in regulation of the MNK1a kinase, which correlates with increased eIF4E phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Activation of the Cph1-dependent MAP kinase signaling pathway induces white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Zavala, Bernardo; Weyler, Michael; Gildor, Tsvia; Schmauch, Christian; Kornitzer, Daniel; Arkowitz, Robert; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the environmental conditions, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can undergo different developmental programs, which are controlled by dedicated transcription factors and upstream signaling pathways. C. albicans strains that are homozygous at the mating type locus can switch from the normal yeast form (white) to an elongated cell type (opaque), which is the mating-competent form of this fungus. Both white and opaque cells use the Ste11-Hst7-Cek1/Cek2 MAP kinase signaling pathway to react to the presence of mating pheromone. However, while opaque cells employ the transcription factor Cph1 to induce the mating response, white cells recruit a different downstream transcription factor, Tec1, to promote the formation of a biofilm that facilitates mating of opaque cells in the population. The switch from the white to the opaque cell form is itself induced by environmental signals that result in the upregulation of the transcription factor Wor1, the master regulator of white-opaque switching. To get insight into the upstream signaling pathways controlling the switch, we expressed all C. albicans protein kinases from a tetracycline-inducible promoter in a switching-competent strain. Screening of this library of strains showed that a hyperactive form of Ste11 lacking its N-terminal domain (Ste11(ΔN467)) efficiently stimulated white cells to switch to the opaque phase, a behavior that did not occur in response to pheromone. Ste11(ΔN467)-induced switching specifically required the downstream MAP kinase Cek1 and its target transcription factor Cph1, but not Cek2 and Tec1, and forced expression of Cph1 also promoted white-opaque switching in a Wor1-dependent manner. Therefore, depending on the activation mechanism, components of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway can be reconnected to stimulate an alternative developmental program, switching of white cells to the mating-competent opaque phase.

  19. Activation of the Cph1-Dependent MAP Kinase Signaling Pathway Induces White-Opaque Switching in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Zavala, Bernardo; Weyler, Michael; Gildor, Tsvia; Schmauch, Christian; Kornitzer, Daniel; Arkowitz, Robert; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Depending on the environmental conditions, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can undergo different developmental programs, which are controlled by dedicated transcription factors and upstream signaling pathways. C. albicans strains that are homozygous at the mating type locus can switch from the normal yeast form (white) to an elongated cell type (opaque), which is the mating-competent form of this fungus. Both white and opaque cells use the Ste11-Hst7-Cek1/Cek2 MAP kinase signaling pathway to react to the presence of mating pheromone. However, while opaque cells employ the transcription factor Cph1 to induce the mating response, white cells recruit a different downstream transcription factor, Tec1, to promote the formation of a biofilm that facilitates mating of opaque cells in the population. The switch from the white to the opaque cell form is itself induced by environmental signals that result in the upregulation of the transcription factor Wor1, the master regulator of white-opaque switching. To get insight into the upstream signaling pathways controlling the switch, we expressed all C. albicans protein kinases from a tetracycline-inducible promoter in a switching-competent strain. Screening of this library of strains showed that a hyperactive form of Ste11 lacking its N-terminal domain (Ste11ΔN467) efficiently stimulated white cells to switch to the opaque phase, a behavior that did not occur in response to pheromone. Ste11ΔN467-induced switching specifically required the downstream MAP kinase Cek1 and its target transcription factor Cph1, but not Cek2 and Tec1, and forced expression of Cph1 also promoted white-opaque switching in a Wor1-dependent manner. Therefore, depending on the activation mechanism, components of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway can be reconnected to stimulate an alternative developmental program, switching of white cells to the mating-competent opaque phase. PMID:24130492

  20. Network analysis of sediment cascades derived from a digital geomorphological map - an example from the Gradenbach catchment (Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Joachim; Heckmann, Tobias; Schrott, Lothar

    2013-04-01

    A detailed geomorphological map of the Gradenbach catchment (32 km², Schober Mountains, Austrian Alps) is presented that focuses on the sediment transfer system. Data were acquired in the field and by the interpretation of orthophotos, LIDAR data and derivatives (slope, curvature, aspect, shaded relief). The resulting digital geomorphological map contains polygon representations of landforms together with their morphometric parameters and an assessment of recent geomorphic activity. Special attention was paid to landform coupling, i.e. an additional table was constructed that indicates recently observable coupling between specific landforms (based on their ID in the database). From these data, we can obtain sediment cascades as a succession of coupled landforms along which sediment transfer occurs through the activity of various geomorphic processes. Based on this digital landform inventory the sediment transfer system is analysed using graph theory. As a rather new approach in geomorphology (already established within several disciplines; e.g. hydrology, biogeography), graph theory provides a promising framework for connectivity analysis in geomorphologic systems and powerful tools to visualise and analyse catchment-wide sediment transfer networks. Since the concept is arbitrarily scalable it can be applied to discrete land surface units (e.g. mapped landforms) or to continuous surface data (e.g. grid cells). In combination with geomorphological mapping, the concept allows for the (abstracted) visualisation of complex coupling relationships between multiple sediment storage landforms. Graph networks can be analysed at the level of nodes (e.g. the number of incoming and/or outgoing edges and their character as sediment source, sink or link), edges (e.g. importance within the network as conveyors of sediment from different sources), pathways (e.g. edge sequences leading to the catchment outlet or to storage landforms; these can be termed sediment cascades), or the

  1. Neuroprotective effects of inhibiting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, P2X receptors and the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade: a quantitative analysis in organotypical hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Rundén-Pran, E; Tansø, R; Haug, F M; Ottersen, O P; Ring, A

    2005-01-01

    Cell death was assessed by quantitative analysis of propidium iodide uptake in rat hippocampal slice cultures transiently exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an in vitro model of brain ischemia. The hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3, and fascia dentata were analyzed at different stages from 0 to 48 h after the insult. Cell death appeared at 3 h and increased steeply toward 12 h. Only a slight additional increase in propidium iodide uptake was seen at later intervals. The mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 were activated immediately after oxygen and glucose deprivation both in CA1 and in CA3/fascia dentata. Inhibition of the specific mitogen-activated protein kinase activator mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase by PD98059 or U0126 offered partial protection against oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell damage. The non-selective P2X receptor antagonist suramin gave neuroprotection of the same magnitude as the N-methyl-D-aspartate channel blocker MK-801 (approximately 70%). Neuroprotection was also observed with the P2 receptor blocker PPADS. Immunogold data indicated that hippocampal slice cultures (like intact hippocampi) express several isoforms of P2X receptors at the synaptic level, consistent with the idea that the effects of suramin and PPADS are mediated by P2X receptors. Virtually complete neuroprotection was obtained by combined blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, P2X receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase. Both P2X receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors mediate influx of calcium. Our results suggest that inhibition of P2X receptors has a neuroprotective potential similar to that of inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In contrast, our comparative analysis shows that only partial protection can be achieved by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, one of the

  2. Activation mechanisms of endothelial NF-kappaB, IKK, and MAP kinase by tert-butyl hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Young; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2005-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a major role in vascular dysfunction and age-related cardiovascular diseases. A major product of lipid peroxidation, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), has been reported to modulate vascular reactivity and cellular signaling. To better understand vascular abnormality, we set out to delineate the activation mechanism of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) by t-BHP and the regulation of MAPK in endothelial cells. The results showed that t-BHP induces NF-kappaB activation by an inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB) phosphorylation through IkappaB kinase (IKK) activation. Our data from this t-BHP study also showed increased p38 MAP kinase and ERK activity; however, interestingly, t-BHP showed no influence on JNK. Pretreatment with the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB203580 and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, PD98059, prevented t-BHP-induced increases in p65 translocation, NF-kappaB luciferase activity, and phospho-IKKalpha/beta. Data suggested that t-BHP induces NF-kappaB activation through the IKK pathway, which involves p38 MAPK and ERK activation. This study illustrates a role of t-BHP in NF-kappaB activation and MAPK related-signaling pathways. The t-BHP-induced activation of NF-kappaB and MAPK could be a major player in vascular dysfunctions, as seen in oxidative stressed responses and the vascular inflammatory process.

  3. Separating myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion using IGF-I and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB202190

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Samantha; Gross, Sean M.; David, Larry L.; Klimek, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinases play critical roles in skeletal muscle biology, but the specific processes regulated by these kinases remain poorly defined. Here we find that activity of p38α/β is important not only in early phases of myoblast differentiation, but also in later stages of myocyte fusion and myofibrillogenesis. By treatment of C2 myoblasts with the promyogenic growth factor insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, the early block in differentiation imposed by the p38 chemical inhibitor SB202190 could be overcome. Yet, under these conditions, IGF-I could not prevent the later impairment of muscle cell fusion, as marked by the nearly complete absence of multinucleated myofibers. Removal of SB202190 from the medium of differentiating myoblasts reversed the fusion block, as multinucleated myofibers were detected several hours later and reached ∼90% of the culture within 30 h. Analysis by quantitative mass spectroscopy of proteins that changed in abundance following removal of the inhibitor revealed a cohort of upregulated muscle-enriched molecules that may be important for both myofibrillogenesis and fusion. We have thus developed a model system that allows separation of myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion and should be useful in identifying specific steps regulated by p38 MAP kinase-mediated signaling in myogenesis. PMID:26246429

  4. Separating myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion using IGF-I and the p38 MAP kinase inhibitor SB202190.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Samantha; Gross, Sean M; David, Larry L; Klimek, John E; Rotwein, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The p38 MAP kinases play critical roles in skeletal muscle biology, but the specific processes regulated by these kinases remain poorly defined. Here we find that activity of p38α/β is important not only in early phases of myoblast differentiation, but also in later stages of myocyte fusion and myofibrillogenesis. By treatment of C2 myoblasts with the promyogenic growth factor insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, the early block in differentiation imposed by the p38 chemical inhibitor SB202190 could be overcome. Yet, under these conditions, IGF-I could not prevent the later impairment of muscle cell fusion, as marked by the nearly complete absence of multinucleated myofibers. Removal of SB202190 from the medium of differentiating myoblasts reversed the fusion block, as multinucleated myofibers were detected several hours later and reached ∼90% of the culture within 30 h. Analysis by quantitative mass spectroscopy of proteins that changed in abundance following removal of the inhibitor revealed a cohort of upregulated muscle-enriched molecules that may be important for both myofibrillogenesis and fusion. We have thus developed a model system that allows separation of myoblast differentiation from muscle cell fusion and should be useful in identifying specific steps regulated by p38 MAP kinase-mediated signaling in myogenesis.

  5. A MAP Kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans is required for defense against infection by opportunistic Proteus species.

    PubMed

    JebaMercy, Gnanasekaran; Vigneshwari, Loganathan; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity requires a conserved mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway that regulates the basal and pathogen-induced expression of immune effectors. Being in the group of opportunistic pathogens, Proteus spp. cause large number of nosocomial infections. Since, Proteus spp. do not cause death in wild type C. elegans, to understand the role and contribution of MAP Kinase pathway, the mutants (sek-1 and pmk-1) of this pathway were employed. Physiological experiments revealed that the Proteus spp. were able to kill MAP Kinase pathway mutant's C. elegans significantly. To understand the involvement of innate immune pathways specific players at the mRNA level, the regulation of few candidate antimicrobial genes were kinetically investigated during Proteus spp. infections. Real-time PCR analysis indicated a regulation of few candidate immune regulatory genes (F08G5.6, lys-7, nlp-29, ATF-7 and daf-16) during the course of Proteus spp. infections. In addition, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Proteus mirabilis upon exposure to mutant C. elegans showed modifications at their functional regions suggesting that the pathogen modifies its internal machinery according to the specific host for effective pathogenesis.

  6. Chemical genetic approach for kinase-substrate mapping by covalent capture of thiophosphopeptides and analysis by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Nicholas T; Wang, Beatrice T; Allen, Jasmina J; Zhang, Chao; Dar, Arvin C; Burlingame, Alma L; Shokat, Kevan M

    2010-03-01

    Mapping kinase-substrate interactions demands robust methods to rapidly and unequivocally identify substrates from complex protein mixtures. Toward this goal, we present a method in which a kinase, engineered to utilize synthetic ATPγS analogs, specifically thiophosphorylates its substrates in a complex lysate. The thiophosphate label provides a bio-orthogonal tag that can be used to affinity purify and identify labeled proteins. Following the labeling reaction, proteins are digested with trypsin; thiol-containing peptides are then covalently captured and non-thiol-containing peptides are washed from the resin. Oxidation-promoted hydrolysis, at sites of thiophosphorylation, releases phosphopeptides for analysis by tandem mass spectrometry. By incorporating two specificity gates-kinase engineering and peptide affinity purification-this method yields high-confidence substrate identifications. This method gives both the identity of the substrates and phosphorylation-site localization. With this information, investigators can analyze the biological significance of the phosphorylation mark immediately following confirmation of the kinase-substrate relationship. Here, we provide an optimized version of this technique to further enable widespread utilization of this technology. Curr. Protoc. Chem Biol. 2:15-36. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  8. Complexing of the CD-3 subunit by a monoclonal antibody activates a microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) serine kinase in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hanekom, C; Nel, A; Gittinger, C; Rheeder, A; Landreth, G

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of Jurkat T-cells with anti-CD-3 monoclonal antibodies resulted in the rapid and transient activation of a serine kinase which utilized the microtubule-associated protein, MAP-2, as a substrate in vitro. The kinase was also activated on treatment of Jurkat cells with phytohaemagglutinin, but with a different time course. The activation of the MAP-2 kinase by anti-CD-3 antibodies was dose-dependent, with maximal activity observed at concentrations of greater than 500 ng/ml. Normal human E-rosette-positive T-cells also exhibited induction of MAP-2 kinase activity during anti-CD-3 treatment. The enzyme was optimally active in the presence of 2 mM-Mn2+; lower levels of activity were observed with Mg2+, even at concentrations up to 20 mM. The kinase was partially purified by passage over DE-52 Sephacel with the activity eluting as a single peak at 0.25 M-NaCl. The molecular mass was estimated to be 45 kDa by gel filtration. The activation of the MAP-2 kinase was probably due to phosphorylation of this enzyme as treatment with alkaline phosphatase diminished its activity. These data demonstrate that the stimulation of T-cells through the CD-3 complex results in the activation of a novel serine kinase which may be critically involved in signal transduction in these cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2552997

  9. Neuronal Development in Caenorhabditis elegans Is Regulated by Inhibition of an MLK MAP Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Scott T.; Turgeon, Shane M.; Tulgren, Erik D.; Wigant, Jeanne; Rahimi, Omeed; Opperman, Karla J.; Grill, Brock

    2015-01-01

    We show that loss-of-function mutations in kinases of the MLK-1 pathway (mlk-1, mek-1, and kgb-1/jnk) function cell-autonomously in neurons to suppress defects in synapse formation and axon termination caused by rpm-1 loss of function. Our genetic analysis also suggests that the phosphatase PPM-1, like RPM-1, is a potential inhibitor of kinases in the MLK-1 pathway. PMID:25339611

  10. Phosphoproteome-based kinase activity profiling reveals the critical role of MAP2K2 and PLK1 in neuronal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei-Lei; Wang, Yong-Bo; Song, Ju-Xian; Deng, Wan-Kun; Lu, Jia-Hong; Ma, Li-Li; Yang, Chuan-Bin; Li, Min; Xue, Yu

    2017-09-21

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dysregulation of macroautophagy/autophagy may play a central role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, and the induction of autophagy protects against the toxic insults of aggregate-prone proteins by enhancing their clearance. Thus, autophagy has become a promising therapeutic target against neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling together with a computational analysis was performed to delineate the phosphorylation signaling networks regulated by 2 natural neuroprotective autophagy enhancers, corynoxine (Cory) and corynoxine B (Cory B). To identify key regulators, namely, protein kinases, we developed a novel network-based algorithm of in silico Kinome Activity Profiling (iKAP) to computationally infer potentially important protein kinases from phosphorylation networks. Using this algorithm, we observed that Cory or Cory B potentially regulated several kinases. We predicted and validated that Cory, but not Cory B, downregulated a well-documented autophagy kinase, RPS6KB1/p70S6K (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, polypeptide 1). We also discovered 2 kinases, MAP2K2/MEK2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2) and PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1), to be potentially upregulated by Cory, whereas the siRNA-mediated knockdown of Map2k2 and Plk1 significantly inhibited Cory-induced autophagy. Furthermore, Cory promoted the clearance of Alzheimer disease-associated APP (amyloid β [A4] precursor protein) and Parkinson disease-associated SNCA/α-synuclein (synuclein, α) by enhancing autophagy, and these effects were dramatically diminished by the inhibition of the kinase activities of MAP2K2 and PLK1. As a whole, our study not only developed a powerful method for the identification of important regulators from the phosphoproteomic data but also identified the important role of MAP2K2 and PLK1 in neuronal autophagy.

  11. A MAP4 kinase related to Ste20 is a nutrient-sensitive regulator of mTOR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Greg M.; Yan, Lijun; Procter, Julia; Mieulet, Virginie; Lamb, Richard F.

    2007-01-01

    The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling pathway is a key regulator of cell growth and is controlled by growth factors and nutrients such as amino acids. Although signalling pathways from growth factor receptors to mTOR have been elucidated, the pathways mediating signalling by nutrients are poorly characterized. Through a screen for protein kinases active in the mTOR signalling pathway in Drosophila we have identified a Ste20 family member (MAP4K3) that is required for maximal S6K (S6 kinase)/4E-BP1 [eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E)-binding protein 1] phosphorylation and regulates cell growth. Importantly, MAP4K3 activity is regulated by amino acids, but not the growth factor insulin and is not regulated by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Our results therefore suggest a model whereby nutrients signal to mTORC1 via activation of MAP4K3. PMID:17253963

  12. Digital data for preliminary geologic map of the Mount Hood 30- by 60-minute quadrangle, northern Cascade Range, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lina Ma,; Sherrod, David R.; Scott, William E.

    2014-01-01

    This geodatabase contains information derived from legacy mapping that was published in 1995 as U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 95-219. The main component of this publication is a geologic map database prepared using geographic information system (GIS) applications. Included are pdf files to view or print the map sheet, the accompanying pamphlet from Open-File Report 95-219, and links to the original publication, which is available as scanned files in pdf format.

  13. Inhibition of small G proteins by clostridium sordellii lethal toxin activates cdc2 and MAP kinase in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rime, H; Talbi, N; Popoff, M R; Suziedelis, K; Jessus, C; Ozon, R

    1998-12-15

    The lethal toxin (LT) from Clostridium sordellii is a glucosyltransferase that modifies and inhibits small G proteins of the Ras family, Ras and Rap, as well as Rac proteins. LT induces cdc2 kinase activation and germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) when microinjected into full-grown Xenopus oocytes. Toxin B from Clostridium difficile, that glucosylates and inactivates Rac proteins, does not induce cdc2 activation, indicating that proteins of the Ras family, Ras and/or Rap, negatively regulate cdc2 kinase activation in Xenopus oocyte. In oocyte extracts, LT catalyzes the incorporation of [14C]glucose into a group of proteins of 23 kDa and into one protein of 27 kDa. The 23-kDa proteins are recognized by anti-Rap1 and anti-Rap2 antibodies, whereas the 27-kDa protein is recognized by several anti-Ras antibodies and probably corresponds to K-Ras. Microinjection of LT into oocytes together with UDP-[14C]glucose results in a glucosylation pattern similar to the in vitro glucosylation, indicating that the 23- and 27-kDa proteins are in vivo substrates of LT. In vivo time-course analysis reveals that the 27-kDa protein glucosylation is completed within 2 h, well before cdc2 kinase activation, whereas the 23-kDa proteins are partially glucosylated at GVBD. This observation suggests that the 27-kDa Ras protein could be the in vivo target of LT allowing cdc2 kinase activation. Interestingly, inactivation of Ras proteins does not prevent the phosphorylation of c-Raf1 and the activation of MAP kinase that occurs normally around GVBD. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells induced by organotin compounds found in drinking water: involvement of MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Mundy, William R; Freudenrich, Theresa M

    2006-01-01

    Mono- and dialkyl organotin compounds are used primarily as heat stabilizers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics. Recently, monomethyltin (MMT), dimethyltin (DMT), monobutyltin (MBT), and dibutyltin (DBT) have been detected in water from homes and businesses served by PVC pipes. While trialkyl organotins such as trimethyltin (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) are well known neurotoxicants, the toxicity of the mono- and dialkyl organotins is not well described. The present study compared the cytotoxicity of organotins found in drinking water with the known neurotoxicant TMT in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, and examined the role of MAP kinase signaling in organotin-induced cell death. Twenty-four hour exposure to TMT resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability with an EC(50) of 3 microM. Exposure to MMT, DMT, and MBT at concentrations up to 10 microM had no effect. DBT, however, was very potent, and decreased cell viability with an EC(50) of 0.3 microM. Staining of organotin-treated cerebellar granule cells with the nuclear dye Syto-13 revealed that TMT and DBT, but not MMT, DMT, or MBT, produced condensation and fragmentation of chromatin characteristic of apoptosis. TMT- and DBT-induced apoptosis was confirmed using TUNEL staining and measurement of PARP cleavage. Activation of MAP kinase pathways was examined after 6 h of exposure to the organotins which induced apoptosis. Both TMT and DBT activated ERK1/2, but only TMT activated the JNK/c-Jun and p38 pathways. Pharmacologic blockade of JNK/c-Jun and p38 activation significantly decreased apoptosis produced by TMT, but not by DBT. These results show that DBT is a potent neurotoxicant in vitro, but unlike TMT, does not induce cell death via activation of MAP kinase signaling.

  15. Selective p38α MAP kinase/MAPK14 inhibition in enzymatically modified LDL-stimulated human monocytes: implications for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Twardowski, Laura; Fehr, Sarah; Aner, Christoph; Schaeffeler, Elke; Joos, Thomas; Knorpp, Thomas; Dorweiler, Bernhard; Laufer, Stefan; Schwab, Matthias; Torzewski, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The first ATP-competitive p38α MAPK/MAPK14 inhibitor with excellent in vivo efficacy and selectivity, skepinone-L, is now available. We investigated the impact of selective p38α MAPK/MAPK14 inhibition on enzymatically modified LDL (eLDL) stimulated human monocytes with its implications for atherosclerosis. Among the different p38 MAPK isoforms, p38α/MAPK14 was the predominantly expressed and activated isoform in isolated human peripheral blood monocytes. Moreover, eLDL colocalized with macrophages positive for p38α MAPK/MAPK14 in human carotid endarterectomy specimens. Using the human leukemia cell line THP-1 and/or primary monocyte-derived macrophages, skepinone-L inhibited eLDL-induced activation of the p38 MAPK pathway, inhibited eLDL induced expression of both cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) and ATP-binding cassette, subfamily A, member 1 (ABCA1), without a net effect on foam cell formation, had a cell- and time-dependent effect on eLDL-triggered apoptosis, and inhibited eLDL-stimulated secretion of IL-8 and MIP-1β/CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1β/chemokine, CC motif, ligand 4). Inhibition of a key signaling molecule of the p38 MAPK pathway, p38α MAPK/MAPK14, by selective inhibitors like skepinone-L, conclusively facilitates elucidation of the impact of the complex network of p38 MAPK signaling on atherogenesis and might provide a promising therapeutic tool to prevent inflammatory cascades in atherosclerosis.-Cheng, F., Twardowski, L., Fehr, S., Aner, C., Schaeffeler, E., Joos, T., Knorpp, T., Dorweiler, B., Laufer, S., Schwab, M., Torzewski, M. Selective p38α MAP kinase/MAPK14 inhibition in enzymatically modified LDL-stimulated human monocytes: implications for atherosclerosis.

  16. Substituted N-aryl-6-pyrimidinones: A new class of potent, selective, and orally active p38 MAP kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Devadas, Balekudru; Selness, Shaun R.; Xing, Li; Madsen, Heather M.; Marrufo, Laura D.; Shieh, Huey; Messing, Dean M.; Yang, Jerry Z.; Morgan, Heidi M.; Anderson, Gary D.; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Zhang, Jian; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Monahan, Joseph B.

    2012-02-28

    A novel series of highly potent and selective p38 MAP kinase inhibitors was developed originating from a substituted N-aryl-6-pyrimidinone scaffold. SAR studies coupled with in vivo evaluations in rat arthritis model culminated in the identification of 10 with excellent oral efficacy. Compound 10 exhibited a significantly enhanced dissolution rate compared to 1, translating to a high oral bioavailability (>90%) in rat. In animal studies 10 inhibited LPS-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in a dose-dependent manner and demonstrated robust efficacy comparable to dexamethasone in a rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model.

  17. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Spinal Inflammation Impairs Respiratory Motor Plasticity by a Spinal p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Adrianne G; Smith, Stephanie M C; Peterson, Timothy J; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-04-29

    Inflammation is characteristic of most clinical disorders that challenge the neural control of breathing. Since inflammation modulates neuroplasticity, we studied the impact of inflammation caused by prolonged intermittent hypoxia on an important form of respiratory plasticity, acute intermittent hypoxia (three, 5 min hypoxic episodes, 5 min normoxic intervals) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Because chronic intermittent hypoxia elicits neuroinflammation and pLTF is undermined by lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that one night of intermittent hypoxia (IH-1) elicits spinal inflammation, thereby impairing pLTF by a p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. pLTF and spinal inflammation were assessed in anesthetized rats pretreated with IH-1 (2 min hypoxia, 2 min normoxia; 8 h) or sham normoxia and allowed 16 h for recovery. IH-1 (1) transiently increased IL-6 (1.5 ± 0.2-fold; p = 0.02) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (2.4 ± 0.4-fold; p = 0.01) mRNA in cervical spinal homogenates, (2) elicited a sustained increase in IL-1β mRNA (2.4 ± 0.2-fold; p < 0.001) in isolated cervical spinal microglia, and (3) abolished pLTF (-1 ± 5% vs 56 ± 10% in controls; p < 0.001). pLTF was restored after IH-1 by systemic NSAID administration (ketoprofen; 55 ± 9%; p < 0.001) or spinal p38 MAP kinase inhibition (58 ± 2%; p < 0.001). IH-1 increased phosphorylated (activated) p38 MAP kinase immunofluorescence in identified phrenic motoneurons and adjacent microglia. In conclusion, IH-1 elicits spinal inflammation and impairs pLTF by a spinal p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. By targeting inflammation, we may develop strategies to manipulate respiratory motor plasticity for therapeutic advantage when the respiratory control system is compromised (e.g., sleep apnea, apnea of prematurity, spinal injury, or motor neuron disease).

  18. The gene for creatine kinase, mitochondrial 2 (sarcomeric; CKMT2), maps to chromosome 5q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, I.; Devaud, C. ); Cherif, D.; Cohen, D.; Beckmann, J.S. )

    1993-10-01

    YAC clones for the creatine kinase, mitochrondial 2 (sarcomeric; CKMT2), gene were isolated. One of these YACs was localized on chromosome 5q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. A polymorphic dinucleotide repeat (heterozygosity 0.77) was identified within the seventh intron of the CKMT2 gene. Genotyping of CEPH families allowed positioning of CKMT2 on the multipoint map of chromosome 5 between D5S424 and D5S428, distal to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) (5q12-q14). 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  20. Cadmium activates a mitogen-activated protein kinase gene and MBP kinases in rice.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chuan-Ming; Hsiao, Lin-June; Huang, Hao-Jen

    2004-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are modules involved in the transduction of extracellular signals to intracellular targets in all eukaryotes. In plants, it has been evidenced that MAPKs play a role in the signaling of biotic and abiotic stresses, plant hormones, and cell cycle cues. However, the effect of heavy metals on plant MAPKs has not been well examined. The Northern blot analysis of OsMAPK mRNA levels has shown that only OsMAPK2, but not OsMAPK3 and OsMAPK4, expressed in suspension-cultured cells in response to 100-400 microM Cd treatments. The OsMAPK2 transcripts increased within 12 h upon 400 microM Cd treatment. In addition, we found that 42- and 50-kDa MBP kinases were significantly activated by Cd treatment in rice suspension-cultured cells. And 40-, 42-, 50- and 64-kDa MBP kinases were activated in rice roots. Furthermore, GSH inhibits Cd-induced 40-kDa MBP kinase activation. By immunoblot analysis and immunoprecipitation followed by in-gel kinase assay, we confirmed that Cd-activated 42-kDa MBP kinase is a MAP kinase. Our results suggest that a MAP kinase cascade may function in the Cd-signalling pathway in rice.

  1. Rewiring MAP kinases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to regulate novel targets through ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Benjamin; Khakhar, Arjun; Nadel, Cory M; Gardner, Richard G; Seelig, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has often copied and repurposed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling module. Understanding how connections form during evolution, in disease and across individuals requires knowledge of the basic tenets that govern kinase-substrate interactions. We identify criteria sufficient for establishing regulatory links between a MAPK and a non-native substrate. The yeast MAPK Fus3 and human MAPK ERK2 can be functionally redirected if only two conditions are met: the kinase and substrate contain matching interaction domains and the substrate includes a phospho-motif that can be phosphorylated by the kinase and recruit a downstream effector. We used a panel of interaction domains and phosphorylation-activated degradation motifs to demonstrate modular and scalable retargeting. We applied our approach to reshape the signaling behavior of an existing kinase pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that a MAPK can be largely defined by its interaction domains and compatible phospho-motifs and provide insight into how MAPK-substrate connections form. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15200.001 PMID:27525484

  2. Discriminating of ATP competitive Src kinase inhibitors and decoys using self-organizing map and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aixia; Hu, Xiaoying; Wang, Kai; Sun, Jing

    2013-02-01

    A data set containing 686 Src kinase inhibitors and 1,941 Src kinase non-binding decoys was collected and used to build two classification models to distinguish inhibitors from decoys. The data set was randomly split into a training set (458 inhibitors and 972 decoys) and a test set (228 inhibitors and 969 decoys). Each molecule was represented by five global molecular descriptors and 18 2D property autocorrelation descriptors calculated using the program ADRIANA.Code. Two machine learning methods, a Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) and a support vector machine (SVM), were utilized for the training and classification. For the test set, classification accuracy (ACC) of 99.92% and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.98 were achieved for the SOM model; ACC of 99.33% and MCC of 0.98 were obtained for the SVM model. Some molecular properties, such as molecular weight, number of atoms in a molecule, hydrogen bond properties, polarizabilities, electronegativities, and hydrophobicities, were found to be important for the inhibition of Src kinase.

  3. Identification of a 115kDa MAP-kinase activated by freezing and anoxic stresses in the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Justin A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-06-15

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade regulates changes in gene transcription by transmitting extracellular stimuli from the plasma membrane to the cell nucleus and has an important role to play in organismal responses to environmental stresses. The activities of MAPKs were investigated in the marine gastropod mollusk, Littorina littorea, a species that tolerates both extracellular freezing and long term oxygen deprivation. In-gel kinase assays revealed the presence of two MAPKs in foot muscle and hepatopancreas, a 42 and a 115kDa protein. Immunoblot analysis showed that both were MAPK proteins and that one was the periwinkle homologue of p42(ERK2). Size exclusion chromatography confirmed the 115kDa size of the novel snail MAPK and its role as the dominant MAPK activity in foot muscle. In-gel kinase assays, immunoblotting with phospho-specific ERK antibody, as well as kinase activity profiles from hydroxyapatite chromatography demonstrated that p115 MAPK kinase activity was increased in foot muscle in response to in vivo freezing or anoxia exposures. The results suggest a role for this novel kinase in environmental stress response.

  4. lin-1 has both positive and negative functions in specifying multiple cell fates induced by Ras/MAP kinase signaling in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Tiensuu, Teresa; Larsen, Morten Krog; Vernersson, Emma; Tuck, Simon

    2005-10-01

    lin-1 encodes an ETS domain transcription factor that functions downstream of a Ras/MAP kinase pathway mediating induction of the 1 degrees cell fate during vulval development in the C. elegans hermaphrodite. Mutants lacking lin-1 activity display a phenotype similar to that caused by mutations that constitutively activate let-60 Ras consistent with a model in which lin-1 is a repressor of the 1 degree fate whose activity is inhibited by phosphorylation by MPK-1 MAP kinase. Here, we show that, contrary the current model, lin-1 is required positively for the proper expression of several genes regulated by the pathway in cells adopting the 1 degrees cell fate. We show that the positive requirement for lin-1 is downstream of let-60 Ras and mpk-1 MAP kinase, and that it has a focus in the vulval precursor cells themselves. lin-1 alleles encoding proteins lacking a docking site for MPK-1 MAP kinase are defective in the positive function. We also show that lin-1 apparently has both positive and negative functions during the specification of the fates of other cells in the worm requiring Ras/MAP kinase signaling.

  5. (-)-3,5-Dicaffeoyl-muco-quinic acid isolated from Aster scaber contributes to the differentiation of PC12 cells: through tyrosine kinase cascade signaling.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin Young; Lee, Pyeongjae; Kim, Hocheol; Kang, Insug; Lee, Kang Ro; Kim, Sun Yeou

    2004-01-23

    Aster scaber T. (Asteraceae) has been used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat bruises, snakebites, headaches, and dizziness. (-)-3,5-Dicaffeoyl-muco-quinic acid (DQ) isolated from A. scaber induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. It has been reported that the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk 1/2) and phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase plays a crucial role in the NGF-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. This study showed that the effect of DQ on neurite outgrowth is mediated via the Erk 1/2 and PI3 kinase-dependent pathways like NGF. Furthermore, DQ stimulated the phosphorylation of Trk A. Overall, DQ elicited the differentiation of PC12 cells through Trk A phosphorylation followed by Erk 1/2 and PI3 kinase activation.

  6. Inducible activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and improves olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-05-20

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury.

  7. QSAR Analysis of Some Antagonists for p38 map kinase Using Combination of Principal Component Analysis and Artificial Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Doosti, Elham; Shahlaei, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative relationships between structures of a set of p38 map kinase inhibitors and their activities were investigated by principal component regression (PCR) and principal componentartificial neural network (PC-ANN). Latent variables (called components) generated by principal component analysis procedure were applied as the input of developed Quantitative structure- activity relationships (QSAR) models. An exact study of predictability of PCR and PC-ANN showed that the later model has much higher ability to calculate the biological activity of the investigated molecules. Also, experimental and estimated biological activities of compounds used in model development step have indicated a good correlation. Obtained results show that a non-linear model explaining the relationship between the pIC50s and the calculated principal components (that extract from structural descriptors of the studied molecules) is superior than linear model. Some typical figures of merit for QSAR studies explaining the accuracy and predictability of the suggested models were calculated. Therefore, to design novel inhibitors of p38 map kinase with high potency and low undesired effects the developed QSAR models were used to estimate biological pIC50 of the studied compounds.

  8. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Yan, Fang; Polk, D Brent; Rao, R K

    2008-04-01

    Probiotics promote intestinal epithelial integrity and reduce infection and diarrhea. We evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-produced soluble proteins (p40 and p75) on the hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with p40 or p75 attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance and increase in inulin permeability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. p40 and p75 also prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced redistribution of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and beta-catenin from the intercellular junctions and their dissociation from the detergent-insoluble fractions. Both p40 and p75 induced a rapid increase in the membrane translocation of PKCbetaI and PKCepsilon. The attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-induced inulin permeability and redistribution of tight junction proteins by p40 and p75 was abrogated by Ro-32-0432, a PKC inhibitor. p40 and p75 also rapidly increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 in the detergent-insoluble fractions. U0126 (a MAP kinase inhibitor) attenuated the p40- and p75-mediated reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption and inulin permeability. These studies demonstrate that probiotic-secretory proteins protect the intestinal epithelial tight junctions and the barrier function from hydrogen peroxide-induced insult by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism.

  9. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Reveals MAP Kinase Phosphatases as Key ERK Pathway Regulators during Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen-Hsi; Kalkan, Tuzer; Morrisroe, Claire; Smith, Austin; Sharrocks, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells represent potentially important therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Complex interlinked transcriptional and signaling networks control the fate of these cells towards maintenance of pluripotency or differentiation. In this study we have focused on how mouse embryonic stem cells begin to differentiate and lose pluripotency and, in particular, the role that the ERK MAP kinase and GSK3 signaling pathways play in this process. Through a genome-wide siRNA screen we have identified more than 400 genes involved in loss of pluripotency and promoting the onset of differentiation. These genes were functionally associated with the ERK and/or GSK3 pathways, providing an important resource for studying the roles of these pathways in controlling escape from the pluripotent ground state. More detailed analysis identified MAP kinase phosphatases as a focal point of regulation and demonstrated an important role for these enzymes in controlling ERK activation kinetics and subsequently determining early embryonic stem cell fate decisions. PMID:23271975

  10. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Seth, A.; Yan, Fang; Polk, D.Brent; Rao, R. K.

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics promote intestinal epithelial integrity and reduce infection and diarrhea. We evaluated the effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-produced soluble proteins (p40 and p75) on the hydrogen peroxide-induced disruption of tight junctions and barrier function in Caco-2 cell monolayers. Pretreatment of cell monolayers with p40 or p75 attenuated the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in transepithelial resistance and increase in inulin permeability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. p40 and p75 also prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced redistribution of occludin, ZO-1, E-cadherin, and β-catenin from the intercellular junctions and their dissociation from the detergent-insoluble fractions. Both p40 and p75 induced a rapid increase in the membrane translocation of PKCβI and PKCε. The attenuation of hydrogen peroxide-induced inulin permeability and redistribution of tight junction proteins by p40 and p75 was abrogated by Ro-32-0432, a PKC inhibitor. p40 and p75 also rapidly increased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 in the detergent-insoluble fractions. U0126 (a MAP kinase inhibitor) attenuated the p40- and p75-mediated reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced tight junction disruption and inulin permeability. These studies demonstrate that probiotic-secretory proteins protect the intestinal epithelial tight junctions and the barrier function from hydrogen peroxide-induced insult by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:18292183

  11. Inducible Activation of ERK5 MAP Kinase Enhances Adult Neurogenesis in the Olfactory Bulb and Improves Olfactory Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M.; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury. PMID:25995470

  12. Requirement for Raf and MAP kinase function during the meiotic maturation of Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The role of Raf and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) during the maturation of Xenopus oocytes was investigated. Treatment of oocytes with progesterone resulted in a shift in the electrophoretic mobility of Raf at the onset of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which was coincident with the activation of MAPK. Expression of a kinase- defective mutant of the human Raf-1 protein (KD-RAF) inhibited progesterone-mediated MAPK activation. MAPK activation was also inhibited by KD-Raf in oocytes expressing signal transducers of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) pathway, including an activated tyrosine kinase (Tpr-Met), a receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFr), and Ha-RasV12. KD- RAF completely inhibited GVBD induced by the RTK pathway. In contrast, KD-RAF did not inhibit GVBD and the progression to Meiosis II in progesterone-treated oocytes. Injection of Mos-specific antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides inhibited MAPK activation in response to progesterone and Tpr-Met, but failed to inhibit these events in oocytes expressing an oncogenic deletion mutant of Raf-1 (delta N'Raf). Injection of antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides to Mos also reduced the progesterone- and Tpr-Met-induced electrophoretic mobility shift of Xenopus Raf. These results demonstrate that RTKs and progesterone participate in distinct yet overlapping signaling pathways resulting in the activation of maturation or M-phase promoting factor (MPF). Maturation induced by the RTK pathway requires activation of Raf and MAPK, while progesterone-induced maturation does not. Furthermore, the activation of MAPK in oocytes appears to require the expression of Mos. PMID:8335690

  13. Differential effects of UV-B and UV-C components of solar radiation on MAP kinase signal transduction pathways in epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Dhanwada, K R; Dickens, M; Neades, R; Davis, R; Pelling, J C

    1995-11-16

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a major cause of skin cancer, the most common human neoplasm. The earth's upper atmosphere absorbs the high energy UV-C wavelengths (100-280 nm), while allowing transmission of UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-400 nm). It is therefore UV-B and to some extent UV-A, that contributes to most human skin malignancies. We report that the exposure of cultured keratinocytes or skin to UV-C radiation causes activation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK). In contrast, the solar radiation associated with skin cancer (UV-B) was an ineffective activator of the ERK and JNK signal transduction pathways. Therefore, while exposure of epidermal cells to UV-C radiation under laboratory conditions causes marked activation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathways, only a low level of MAP kinase signaling is involved in the response of skin to biologically relevant solar radiation.

  14. Extracellular simian virus 40 induces an ERK/MAP kinase-independent signalling pathway that activates primary response genes and promotes virus entry.

    PubMed

    Dangoria, N S; Breau, W C; Anderson, H A; Cishek, D M; Norkin, L C

    1996-09-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) binding to growth-arrested cells activated an intracellular signalling pathway that induced the up-regulation of the primary response genes c-myc, c-jun and c-sis within 30 min and of JE within 90 min. The up-regulation of the primary response genes occurred in the presence of cycloheximide and when UV-inactivated SV40 was adsorbed to cells. SV40 binding did not activate Raf or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP/ERK1), or mobilize intracellular Ca2+. The SV40-induced up-regulation of c-myc and c-jun was blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, and by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, calphostin C, but not by expression of the MAP kinase-specific phosphatase, MKP-1. These results suggest that the SV40-induced signalling pathway includes the activities of a tyrosine kinase and a Ca(2+)-independent isoform of PKC, but not of Raf or MAP kinase. Finally, SV40 infectious entry into cells was specifically and reversibly blocked by genistein.

  15. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  16. Identification of a dual-specificity protein phosphatase that inactivates a MAP kinase from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Huang, Y.; Kieber, J.; Luan, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) play a key role in plant responses to stress and pathogens. Activation and inactivation of MAPKs involve phosphorylation and dephosphorylation on both threonine and tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. Here we report the identification of an Arabidopsis gene encoding a dual-specificity protein phosphatase capable of hydrolysing both phosphoserine/threonine and phosphotyrosine in protein substrates. This enzyme, designated AtDsPTP1 (Arabidopsis thaliana dual-specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase), dephosphorylated and inactivated AtMPK4, a MAPK member from the same plant. Replacement of a highly conserved cysteine by serine abolished phosphatase activity of AtDsPTP1, indicating a conserved catalytic mechanism of dual-specificity protein phosphatases from all eukaryotes.

  17. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  18. Predicting a small molecule-kinase interaction map: A machine learning approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We present a machine learning approach to the problem of protein ligand interaction prediction. We focus on a set of binding data obtained from 113 different protein kinases and 20 inhibitors. It was attained through ATP site-dependent binding competition assays and constitutes the first available dataset of this kind. We extract information about the investigated molecules from various data sources to obtain an informative set of features. Results A Support Vector Machine (SVM) as well as a decision tree algorithm (C5/See5) is used to learn models based on the available features which in turn can be used for the classification of new kinase-inhibitor pair test instances. We evaluate our approach using different feature sets and parameter settings for the employed classifiers. Moreover, the paper introduces a new way of evaluating predictions in such a setting, where different amounts of information about the binding partners can be assumed to be available for training. Results on an external test set are also provided. Conclusions In most of the cases, the presented approach clearly outperforms the baseline methods used for comparison. Experimental results indicate that the applied machine learning methods are able to detect a signal in the data and predict binding affinity to some extent. For SVMs, the binding prediction can be improved significantly by using features that describe the active site of a kinase. For C5, besides diversity in the feature set, alignment scores of conserved regions turned out to be very useful. PMID:21708012

  19. MFG-E8 inhibits neutrophil migration through αvβ3-integrin-dependent MAP kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    AZIZ, MONOWAR; YANG, WENG-LANG; CORBO, LANA M; CHAUNG, WAYNE W; MATSUO, SHINGO; WANG, PING

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the involvement of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor 8 (MFG-E8) in reducing neutrophil infiltration in a murine model of acute lung injury (ALI). In the present study, we aimed to delineate the mechanisms through which MFG-E8 attenuates neutrophil migration. Recombinant human MFG-E8 (rhMFG-E8) was expressed and purified in our facility. The human differentiated neutrophil cell line, dHL-60, was treated with rhMFG-E8 and cell migration assay was performed in a Boyden chamber using recombinant interleukin-8 (IL-8) as the chemoattractant. Surface CXCR2 and intracellular G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) levels were evaluated by flow cytometry or western blot analysis. The levels of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with rhMFG-E8 resulted in a significant inhibition of dHL-60 cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. There was a 46% decrease in CXCR2 expression in the rhMFG-E8-treated dHL-60 cells, which was associated with a 32% increase in GRK2 expression. In the dHL-60 cells, treatment with rhMFG-E8 promoted the phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) within 10–30 min. The use of SB203580, a p38 inhibitor, and PD98059, an ERK inhibitor, resulted in the restoration of dHL-60 cell migration which was significantly inhibited treatment with rhMFG-E8. Furthermore, blocking the MFG-E8 receptors, αvβ3/αvβ5-integrins, by anti-αv-integrin neutralizing antibody (Ab) inhibited the activation of p38 and ERK, and reversed the rhMFG-E8-induced inhibition of dHL-60 cell migration. Finally, treatment of the dHL-60 cells with SB203580 and PD98059 neutralized the rhMFG-E8-induced downregulation of CXCR2 expression and upregulation of GRK2 expression, as well as the inhibitory effects on cell migration. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism of action of MFG-E8 through which it inhibits neutrophil migration through αvβ3-integrin

  20. Evaluate ERTS imagery for mapping and detection of changes of snowcover on land and on glaciers. [North Cascades, Washington and Tweedsmuir Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Snowlines on a small (6 sq km) drainage basin were accurately measured without use of digital processing, and snow patches as small as 150 m (maximum dimension) were correctly identified, proving that the resolution of ERTS is ample for snow mapping needs. The area of snow cover on 10 individual drainage basins in the North Cascades, Washington, has been determined at 12 different times; these data can be used for more accurate forecasts of streamflow. Progress has been made in distinguishing snow in trees using multispectral analysis. Motion of the surging Tweedsmuir Glacier was measured. Velocities ranged from 2 to 88 m per day; a zone of intense crevassing also appeared to spread up and down the glacier (at about 200 m per day upglacier). This tentative result may be of great importance to an understanding of surging glacier dynamics. ERTS images also show that the most recent debris flow (20-21 August 1973) from Mount Baker can be clearly discerned and mapped, in order to monitor this potential hazard.

  1. The UV (Ribotoxic) Stress Response of Human Keratinocytes Involves the Unexpected Uncoupling of the Ras-Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Cascade from the Activated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, Mihail S.; Choi, Remy J.; Ryabinina, Olga P.; Dinh, Thanh-Hoai; Bright, Robert K.; Magun, Bruce E.

    2002-01-01

    In mammals, UVB radiation is of biological relevance primarily for the cells of the epidermis. We report here the existence of a UVB response that is specific for proliferating human epidermal keratinocytes. Unlike other cell types that also display a UVB response, keratinocytes respond to UVB irradiation with a transient but potent downregulation of the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling cascade. The downregulation of ERK precedes a profound decrease in the steady-state levels of cyclin D1, a mediator of the proliferative action of ERK. Keratinocytes exhibit high constitutive activity of the Ras-ERK signaling cascade even in culture medium lacking supplemental growth factors. The increased activity of Ras and phosphorylation of ERK in these cells are maintained by the autocrine production of secreted molecules that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Irradiation of keratinocytes increases the phosphorylation of EGFR on tyrosine residues Y845, Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, Y1148, and Y1173 above the basal levels and leads to the increased recruitment of the adaptor proteins Grb2 and ShcA and of a p55 form of the regulatory subunit of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase to the UVB-activated EGFR. Paradoxically, however, UVB causes, at the same time, the inactivation of Ras and a subsequent dephosphorylation of ERK. By contrast, the signaling pathway leading from the activated EGFR to the phosphorylation of PKB/Akt1 is potentiated by UVB. The UVB response of keratinocytes appeared to be a manifestation of the more general ribotoxic stress response inasmuch as the transduction of the UVB-generated inhibitory signal to Ras and ERK required the presence of active ribosomes at the time of irradiation. PMID:12101233

  2. Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases in Plant Metal Stress: Regulation and Responses in Comparison to Other Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Opdenakker, Kelly; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of plants to toxic concentrations of metals leads to disruption of the cellular redox status followed by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS, like hydrogen peroxide, can act as signaling molecules in the cell and induce signaling via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPK cascades are evolutionary conserved signal transduction modules, able to convert extracellular signals to appropriate cellular responses. In this review, our current understanding about MAPK signaling in plant metal stress is discussed. However, this knowledge is scarce compared to research into the role of MAPK signaling in the case of other abiotic and biotic stresses. ROS production is a common response induced by different stresses and undiscovered analogies may exist with metal stress. Therefore, further attention is given to MAPK signaling in other biotic and abiotic stresses and its interplay with other signaling pathways to create a framework in which the involvement of MAPK signaling in metal stress may be studied. PMID:22837729

  3. Combining linkage and association mapping identifies RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE1 as an essential Arabidopsis shoot regeneration gene

    PubMed Central

    Motte, Hans; Vercauteren, Annelies; Depuydt, Stephen; Landschoot, Sofie; Geelen, Danny; Werbrouck, Stefaan; Goormachtig, Sofie; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    De novo shoot organogenesis (i.e., the regeneration of shoots on nonmeristematic tissue) is widely applied in plant biotechnology. However, the capacity to regenerate shoots varies highly among plant species and cultivars, and the factors underlying it are still poorly understood. Here, we evaluated the shoot regeneration capacity of 88 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and found that the process is blocked at different stages in different accessions. We show that the variation in regeneration capacity between the Arabidopsis accessions Nok-3 and Ga-0 is determined by five quantitative trait loci (QTL): REG-1 to REG-5. Fine mapping by local association analysis identified RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN KINASE1 (RPK1), an abscisic acid-related receptor, as the most likely gene underlying REG-1, which was confirmed by quantitative failure of an RPK1 mutation to complement the high and low REG-1 QTL alleles. The importance of RPK1 in regeneration was further corroborated by mutant and expression analysis. Altogether, our results show that association mapping combined with linkage mapping is a powerful method to discover important genes implicated in a biological process as complex as shoot regeneration. PMID:24850864

  4. Co-culture with pig membrana granulosa cells modulates the activity of cdc2 and MAP kinase in maturing cattle oocytes.

    PubMed

    Motlík, J; Sutovský, P; Kalous, J; Kubelka, M; Moos, J; Schultz, R M

    1996-08-01

    Bovine cumulus-enclosed oocytes, initially cultured up to diakinesis (8 h of initial culture) or metaphase I (12 h of initial culture), were subsequently co-cultured for 6 h in contact with pig membrana granulosa (PMG) cells and then assayed for histone H1 and MAP kinase activities. In addition, the phosphorylation state of ERK 1,2 proteins was determined by Western blotting. The alterations in nuclear envelope breakdown, meiotic spindle formation and the patterns of chromosome condensation were analysed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. The diakinesis-stage oocytes (initially cultured for 8 h) already possessed high histone H1 kinase and MAP kinase activities that were correlated with condensed and partially individualised chromosomes. The ERK 1 and most ERK 2 proteins were partly phosphorylated. Following the 6 h co-culture of these oocytes with PMG a rapid decrease in MAP kinase activity and a slower decrease in histone H1 kinase occurred, as well as ERK 1 and ERK 2 dephosphorylation. Both kinase activities and ERK 1,2 phosphorylation were fully restored following the release of the oocytes from co-culture and a subsequent culture in the absence of PMG. Moreover, the clumped bivalents were reindividualised and 56% of these oocytes reached metaphase II after 20 h of culture without PMG. The metaphase I oocytes, initially cultured for 12 h, displayed a fusiform meiotic spindle and a metaphase array of chromosomal bivalents, accompanied by high levels of both histone H1 and MAP kinase activity. Co-culture of MI oocytes with PMG abolished the activity of both kinases and caused the dephosphorylation of ERK 1 and ERK 2. Furthermore, the spindle microtubules were depolymerised and the chromosomal bivalents clumped into a single mass. Neither of the protein kinase activities nor the meiotic spindle were restored following subsequent culture in the absence of PMG for up to 20 h. These observations indicate that under in vitro conditions

  5. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  6. Specialized and shared functions of the histidine kinase- and HOG1 MAP kinase-mediated signaling pathways in Alternaria alternata, a filamentous fungal pathogen of citrus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2010-10-01

    Signal transduction pathways are critical for the coordination of complex cellular processes in cells. In Alternaria alternata, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen of citrus, cloning and characterization of a gene coding a Group III histidine kinase (AaHSK1) and the yeast HOG1 ortholog (AaHOG1) showed the two genes to operate, both uniquely and synergistically, in a number of physiological and pathological functions. Systemic loss-of-function genetics in A. alternata revealed that AaHSK1 is a primary regulator for cellular resistance to sugar osmotic stress and for sensitivity to dicarboximide or phenylpyrrole fungicides. These functions were likely modulated by unknown mechanisms rather than solely by the AaHOG1-mediated pathway. AaHOG1, which conferred cellular resistance to salts and oxidative stress, also bypassed AaHSK1, even though deletion of AaHSK1 affected AaHOG1 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of AaHOG1 was increased when the fungus was treated with osmotic stress, fungicides or H(2)O(2). Fungal mutants impaired in AaHSK1, AaHOG1, AaAP1 (encoding a redox-responsive transcription factor) or AaFUS3 (encoding a MAP kinase) were all hypersensitive to 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP) or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA). An AaHOG1::sGFP (synthetic green fluorescent protein) fusion protein became localized in the nucleus in response to H(2)O(2), CHP, TIBA, fungicides, but not glucose. Glucose, however, enhanced AaHOG1 phosphorylation and nuclear localization in the AaHSK1 deficient background. Accumulation of the AaHSK1 gene transcript was negatively regulated by AaHOG1, AaAP1 or AaFUS3. AaHOG1 was necessary for fungal pathogenicity, yet AaHSK1 was completely dispensable for pathogenicity. Our results highlight a dramatic flexibility and uniqueness in the signaling pathways that are involved in responding to diverse environmental stimuli in A. alternata. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Systems Analysis of Adaptive Responses to MAP Kinase Pathway Blockade in BRAF Mutant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Brian J.; Roller, Devin; Axelrod, Mark J.; Koeppel, Alex F.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Slingluff, Craig L.; Weber, Michael J.; Mackey, Aaron J.; Gioeli, Daniel; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Fifty percent of cutaneous melanomas are driven by activated BRAFV600E, but tumors treated with RAF inhibitors, even when they respond dramatically, rapidly adapt and develop resistance. Thus, there is a pressing need to identify the major mechanisms of intrinsic and adaptive resistance and develop drug combinations that target these resistance mechanisms. In a combinatorial drug screen on a panel of 12 treatment-naïve BRAFV600E mutant melanoma cell lines of varying levels of resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway inhibition, we identified the combination of PLX4720, a targeted inhibitor of mutated BRaf, and lapatinib, an inhibitor of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, as synergistically cytotoxic in the subset of cell lines that displayed the most resistance to PLX4720. To identify potential mechanisms of resistance to PLX4720 treatment and synergy with lapatinib treatment, we performed a multi-platform functional genomics analysis to profile the genome as well as the transcriptional and proteomic responses of these cell lines to treatment with PLX4720. We found modest levels of resistance correlated with the zygosity of the BRAF V600E allele and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) mutational status. Layered over base-line resistance was substantial upregulation of many ErbB pathway genes in response to BRaf inhibition, thus generating the vulnerability to combination with lapatinib. The transcriptional responses of ErbB pathway genes are associated with a number of transcription factors, including ETS2 and its associated cofactors that represent a convergent regulatory mechanism conferring synergistic drug susceptibility in the context of diverse mutational landscapes. PMID:26405815

  8. Acetylcholine stimulates cortical precursor cell proliferation in vitro via muscarinic receptor activation and MAP kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Maric, D; Li, B S; Hu, Q; Andreadis, J D; Grant, G M; Liu, Q Y; Shaffer, K M; Chang, Y H; Zhang, L; Pancrazio, J J; Pant, H C; Stenger, D A; Barker, J L

    2000-04-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that some neurotransmitters act as growth-regulatory signals during brain development. Here we report a role for the classical neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) to stimulate proliferation of neural stem cells and stem cell-derived progenitor cells during neural cell lineage progression in vitro. Neuroepithelial cells in the ventricular zone of the embryonic rat cortex were found to express the m2 subtype of the muscarinic receptor. Neural precursor cells dissociated from the embryonic rat cortical neuroepithelium were expanded in culture with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed the presence of m2, m3 and m4 muscarinic receptor subtype transcripts, while immunocytochemistry demonstrated m2 protein. ACh and carbachol induced an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ and membrane currents in proliferating (BrdU+) cells, both of which were abolished by atropine. Exposure of bFGF-deprived precursor cells to muscarinic agonists not only increased both cell number and DNA synthesis, but also enhanced differentiation of neurons. These effects were blocked by atropine, indicating the involvement of muscarinic ACh receptors. The growth-stimulating effects were also antagonized by a panel of inhibitors of second messengers, including 1,2-bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM) to chelate cytosolic Ca2+, EGTA to complex extracellular Ca2+, pertussis toxin, which uncouples certain G-proteins, the protein kinase C inhibitor H7 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD98059. Muscarinic agonists activated MAPK, which was significantly inhibited by atropine and the same panel of inhibitors. Thus, muscarinic receptors expressed by neural precursors transduce a growth-regulatory signal during neurogenesis via pathways involving pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins, Ca2+ signalling, protein kinase C activation, MAPK phosphorylation and DNA synthesis.

  9. Activation of several MAP kinases upon stimulation of rat alveolar macrophages: role of the NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Torres, M; Forman, H J

    1999-06-15

    Zymosan-activated serum (ZAS), a source of C5a, stimulates the rat alveolar macrophages (AM) to release superoxide anion. Here we show that treatment of rat AM with ZAS induced a time-dependent increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins (116, 105-110, 82-78, 66-72, 62, 45, 42, and 38 kDa). This increase was sensitive to genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. ZAS stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of three members of a family of serine/threonine kinases known as the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), i.e., ERK1 and ERK2, as assessed by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and phosphotransferase activity, and p38 MAPK, as determined by immunoblotting with phospho-specific antibodies. In addition, ZAS induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of the SHC proteins and their association with GRB2, suggesting a role for this complex in the activation of the ERK pathway. Addition of extracellular catalase during ZAS stimulation significantly reduced the tyrosine phosphorylation response and the activation of ERK1 and ERK2 and their activator MEK1/2 while it did not affect that of p38 MAPK and MKK3/MKK6. Superoxide dismutase marginally increased the response to ZAS, supporting a role for hydrogen peroxide. In contrast to the results with AM, stimulation of human neutrophils with ZAS in the presence of catalase minimally altered the activation of ERK1 and ERK2. These data show that, in ZAS-stimulated rat AM, activation of the respiratory burst and production of hydrogen peroxide via superoxide dismutation are largely responsible for the activation of the ERK pathway through an upstream target.

  10. Phosphorylation and localization of Kss1, a MAP kinase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone response pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, D; Cook, J G; Thorner, J

    1995-01-01

    Kss1 protein kinase, and the homologous Fus3 kinase, are required for pheromone signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In MATa haploids exposed to alpha-factor, Kss1 was rapidly phosphorylated on both Thr183 and Tyr185, and both sites were required for Kss1 function in vivo. De novo protein synthesis was required for sustained pheromone-induced phosphorylation of Kss1. Catalytically inactive Kss1 mutants displayed alpha-factor-induced phosphorylation on both residues, even in kss1 delta cells; hence, autophosphorylation is not obligatory for these modifications. In kss1 delta fus3 delta double mutants, Kss1 phosphorylation was elevated even in the absence of pheromone; thus, cross-phosphorylation by Fus3 is not responsible for Kss1 activation. In contrast, pheromone-induced Kss1 phosphorylation was eliminated in mutants deficient in two other protein kinases, Ste11 and Ste7. A dominant hyperactive allele of STE11 caused a dramatic increase in the phosphorylation of Kss1, even in the absence of pheromone stimulation, but required Ste7 for this effect, suggesting an order of function: Ste11-->Ste7-->Kss1. When overproduced, Kss1 stimulated recovery from pheromone-imposed G1 arrest. Catalytic activity was essential for Kss1 function in signal transmission, but not for its recovery-promoting activity. Kss1 was found almost exclusively in the particulate material and its subcellular fractionation was unaffected by pheromone treatment. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated that Kss1 is concentrated in the nucleus and that its distribution is not altered detectably during signaling. Images PMID:7579701

  11. Lipoxin A4 antagonizes the mitogenic effects of leukotriene D4 in human renal mesangial cells. Differential activation of MAP kinases through distinct receptors.

    PubMed

    McMahon, B; Stenson, C; McPhillips, F; Fanning, A; Brady, H R; Godson, C

    2000-09-08

    The lipoxygenase-derived eicosanoids leukotrienes and lipoxins are well defined regulators of hemeodynamics and leukocyte recruitment in inflammatory conditions. Here, we describe a novel bioaction of lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)), namely inhibition of leukotriene D(4) (LTD(4))-induced human renal mesangial cell proliferation, and investigate the signal transduction mechanisms involved. LXA(4) blocked LTD(4)-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity in parallel to inhibition of LTD(4)-induced mesangial cell proliferation. Screening of a human mesangial cell cDNA library revealed expression of the recently described cys-leukotriene(1)/LTD(4) receptor. LTD(4)-induced mesangial cell proliferation required both extracellular-related signal regulated kinase (erk) and PI 3-kinase activation and may involve platelet-derived growth factor receptor transactivation. LTD(4)-stimulated the MAP kinases erk and p38 via a pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive pathway dependent on PI 3-kinase and protein kinase C activation. On screening a cDNA library, mesangial cells were found to express the previously described LXA(4) receptor. In contrast to LTD(4), LXA(4) showed differential activation of erk and p38. LXA(4) activation of erk was insensitive to PTX and PI 3-kinase inhibition, whereas LXA(4) activation of p38 was sensitive to PTX and could be blocked by the LTD(4) receptor antagonist SKF 104353. These data suggest that LXA(4) stimulation of the MAP kinase superfamily involves two distinct receptors: one shared with LTD(4) and coupled to a PTX-sensitive G protein (G(i)) and a second coupled via an alternative G protein, such as G(q) or G(12), to erk activation. These data expand on the spectrum of LXA(4) bioactions within an inflammatory milieu.

  12. Phosphorylation of P68 RNA Helicase by P38 MAP kinase contributes to colon cancer cells apoptosis induced by oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that p68 phosphorylation at threonine residues correlates with cancer cell apoptosis under the treatments of TNF-α and TRAIL (Yang, L. Mol Cancer Res Vol 3, pp 355–63 2005). Results In this report, we characterized the role of p68 phosphorylation in apoptosis induction under the treatment of oxaliplatin in the colon cancer cells. Our data suggest that oxaliplatin treatment activates p38 MAP kinase, which subsequently phosphorylates p68 at T564 and/or T446. The phosphorylation of p68, at least partially, mediates the effects of the drug on apoptosis induction, as mutations at these two sites greatly reduce the cancer cell death. Conclusion Our studies reveal an important molecular mechanism that mediates the effects of anti-cancer drug, providing a potential strategy for improving cancer treatment. PMID:23110695

  13. Regulation of endothelial protein C receptor shedding by cytokines is mediated through differential activation of MAP kinase signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2009-09-10

    The endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) plays a pivotal role in coagulation, inflammation, cell proliferation, and cancer, but its activity is markedly changed by ectodomain cleavage and release as the soluble protein (sEPCR). In this study we examined the mechanisms involved in the regulation of EPCR shedding in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), but not interferon-{gamma} and interleukin-6, suppressed EPCR mRNA transcription and cell-associated EPCR expression in HUVEC. The release of sEPCR induced by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} correlated with activation of p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). EPCR shedding was also induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, ionomycin, anisomycin, thiol oxidants or alkylators, thrombin, and disruptors of lipid rafts. Both basal and induced shedding of EPCR was blocked by the metalloproteinase inhibitors, TAPI-0 and GM6001, and by the reduced non-protein thiols, glutathione, dihydrolipoic acid, dithiothreitol, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Because other antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen species failed to block the cleavage of EPCR, a direct suppression of metalloproteinase activity seems responsible for the observed effects of reduced thiols. In summary, the shedding of EPCR in HUVEC is effectively regulated by IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha}, and downstream by MAP kinase signaling pathways and metalloproteinases.

  14. Multi-kinase inhibitors induce cutaneous toxicity through OAT6-mediated uptake and MAP3K7-driven cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Eric I.; Gibson, Alice A.; Hu, Shuiying; Vasilyeva, Aksana; Orwick, Shelley J.; Du, Guoqing; Mascara, Gerard P.; Ong, Su Sien; Chen, Taosheng; Vogel, Peter; Inaba, Hiroto; Maitland, Michael L.; Sparreboom, Alex; Baker, Sharyn D.

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi-kinase inhibitors (MKI) in oncology, such as sorafenib, is associated with a cutaneous adverse event called hand-foot skin reaction (HFSR) in which sites of pressure or friction become inflamed and painful, thus significantly impacting quality of life. The pathogenesis of MKI-induced HFSR is unknown, and the only available treatment options involve dose reduction or discontinuation of therapy, which have negative effects on primary disease management. To investigate the underlying mechanisms by which sorafenib promotes keratinocyte cytotoxicity and subsequent HFSR induction, we performed a transporter-directed RNAi screen in human epidermal keratinocytes and identified SLC22A20 (OAT6) as an uptake carrier of sorafenib. Further investigations into the intracellular mechanism of sorafenib activity through in situ kinome profiling identified the mitogen-activated protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) as a target of sorafenib that induces cell death. Finally, we demonstrate that sorafenib induced keratinocyte injury in vivo, and that this effect could be reversed by co-treatment with the OAT6 inhibitor probenecid. Collectively, our findings reveal a novel pathway that regulates the entry of some MKIs into keratinocytes and explains the basis underlying sorafenib-induced skin toxicity, with important implications for the therapeutic management of HFSR. PMID:26677977

  15. Cloning of a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase gene based on fiber strength transcriptome QTL mapping in the cotton species Gossypium barbadense.

    PubMed

    Liu, H W; Shi, R F; Wang, X F; Pan, Y X; Zang, G Y; Ma, Z Y

    2012-09-25

    Sea Island cotton (Gossypium barbadense) is highly valued for its superior fiber qualities, especially fiber strength. Based on a transcript-derived fragment originated from transcriptome QTL mapping, a fiber strength related candidate gene of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase cDNA, designated as GbPI4K, was first cloned, and its expression was characterized in the secondary cell wall thickening stage of G. barbadense fibers. The ORF of GbPI4K was found to be 1926 bp in length and encoded a predicted protein of 641 amino acid residues. The putative protein contained a clear PI3/4K kinase catalytic domain and fell into the plant type II PI4K cluster in phylogenetic analysis. In this study, the expression of cotton PI4K protein was also induced in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) as a fused protein. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the gene expressed in the root, hypocotyl and leaf of the cotton plants. Real-time RT-PCR indicated that this gene in Sea Island cotton fibers expressed 10 days longer than that in Upland cotton fibers, and the main expression difference of PI4K between Sea Island cotton and Upland cotton in fibers was located in the secondary cell wall thickening stage of the fiber. Further analysis indicated that PI4K is a crucial factor in the ability of Rac proteins to regulate phospholipid signaling pathways.

  16. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  17. Deregulated ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling promotes aneuploidy by a Fbxw7β-Aurora A pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duhamel, Stéphanie; Girondel, Charlotte; Dorn, Jonas F.; Tanguay, Pierre-Luc; Voisin, Laure; Smits, Ron; Maddox, Paul S.; Meloche, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aneuploidy is a common feature of human solid tumors and is often associated with poor prognosis. There is growing evidence that oncogenic signaling pathways, which are universally dysregulated in cancer, contribute to the promotion of aneuploidy. However, the mechanisms connecting signaling pathways to the execution of mitosis and cytokinesis are not well understood. Here, we show that hyperactivation of the ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway in epithelial cells impairs cytokinesis, leading to polyploidization and aneuploidy. Mechanistically, deregulated ERK1/2 signaling specifically downregulates expression of the F-box protein Fbxw7β, a substrate-binding subunit of the SCFFbxw7 ubiquitin ligase, resulting in the accumulation of the mitotic kinase Aurora A. Reduction of Aurora A levels by RNA interference or pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 reverts the defect in cytokinesis and decreases the frequency of abnormal cell divisions induced by oncogenic H-RasV12. Reciprocally, overexpression of Aurora A or silencing of Fbxw7β phenocopies the effect of H-RasV12 on cell division. In vivo, conditional activation of MEK2 in the mouse intestine lowers Fbxw7β expression, resulting in the accumulation of cells with enlarged nuclei. We propose that the ERK1/2/ Fbxw7β/Aurora A axis identified in this study contributes to genomic instability and tumor progression. PMID:27152455

  18. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  19. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  20. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  1. Distinct steps in yeast spore morphogenesis require distinct SMK1 MAP kinase thresholds.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, M; Briza, P; Pierce, M; Winter, E

    1999-01-01

    The SMK1 mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for spore morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the multiple aberrant spore wall assembly patterns seen even within a single smk1 null ascus, different smk1 missense mutants block in a coordinated fashion at intermediate stages. One smk1 mutant forms asci in which the four spores are surrounded only by prospore wall-like structures, while another smk1 mutant forms asci in which the spores are surrounded by inner but not outer spore wall layers. Stepwise increases in gene dosage of a hypomorphic smk1 allele allow for the completion of progressively later morphological and biochemical events and for the acquisition of distinct spore-resistance phenotypes. Furthermore, smk1 allelic spore phenotypes can be recapitulated by reducing wild-type SMK1 expression. The data demonstrate that SMK1 is required for the execution of multiple steps in spore morphogenesis that require increasing thresholds of SMK1 activity. These results suggest that quantitative changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling play a role in coordinating multiple events of a single cellular differentiation program. PMID:10101160

  2. Evaluate ERTS imagery for mapping and detection of changes of snowcover on land and on glaciers. [Cascade Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, M. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Snowlines on a small drainage basin were accurately identified on bulk ERTS-1 images without use of digital processing, and results checked with high altitude and ground-based photography. The area and approximate shape of snow patches as small as 20,000 sq m could be correctly identified with a magnifying scanning densitometer. The resolution of ERTS is more than ample for most snow mapping needs. Mount Baker, Washington, has a large crater south of the summit and an area north of the summit which emit considerable geothermal heat in the form of fumaroles and hot ground. Temperatures are being monitored using an ERTS DCS. Debris flows are occassionally released from the crater due to water saturation at the base of a heavy snowpack lying on hydrothermally altered hot ground. These debris flows present a possible hazard to life and property, as they are discharged down the Boulder Glacier toward Baker Lake, the upper of two major hydroelectric power reservoirs which are situated above the populated Skagit River Valley. ERTS-1 images show that the most recent debris flow (20-21 August 1973) can be clearly discerned and mapped. ERTS images provide another important tool for monitoring this potential hazard.

  3. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal trigger distinct signals for map family kinases and caspase activation in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Akhand, A A; Hossain, K; Mitsui, H; Kato, M; Miyata, T; Inagi, R; Du, J; Takeda, K; Kawamoto, Y; Suzuki, H; Kurokawa, K; Nakashima, I

    2001-07-01

    Carbonyl compounds with diverse carbon skeletons may be differentially related to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. In this study, we compared intracellular signals delivered into cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO), which differ only by a methyl group. Depending on their concentrations, GO and MGO promoted phosphorylations of ERK1 and ERK2, which were blocked by the protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors herbimycin A and staurosporine, thereby being PTK-dependent. GO and MGO also induced phosphorylations of JNK, p38 MAPK, and c-Jun, either PTK-dependently (GO) or -independently (MGO). Next, we found that MGO, but not GO, induced degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) as the intracellular substrate of caspase-3. Curcumin and SB203580, which inhibit JNK and p38 MAPK signaling pathways, but not herbimycin A/staurosporine, prevented the MGO-induced PARP degradation. We then found that MGO, but not GO, reduced the intracellular glutathione level, and that cysteine, but not cystine, inhibited the MGO-mediated activation of ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK, or c-Jun more extensively than did lysine or arginine. In addition, all the signals triggered by GO and MGO were blocked by amino guanidine (AG), which traps carbonyls. These results demonstrated that GO and MGO triggered two distinct signal cascades, one for PTK-dependent control of ERK and another for PTK-independent redox-linked activation of JNK/p38 MAPK and caspases in HUVECs, depending on the structure of the carbon skeleton of the chemicals.

  4. Ethylene signaling pathway and MAPK cascades are required for AAL toxin-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Mase, Keisuke; Mizuno, Takahito; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Fujii, Takayuki; Mori, Hitoshi; Kodama, Motoichiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD), known as hypersensitive response cell death, has an important role in plant defense response. The signaling pathway of PCD remains unknown. We employed AAL toxin and Nicotiana umbratica to analysis plant PCD. AAL toxin is a pathogenicity factor of the necrotrophic pathogen Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici. N. umbratica is sensitive to AAL toxin, susceptible to pathogens, and effective in Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). VIGS analyses indicated that AAL toxin-triggered cell death (ACD) is dependent upon the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase MEK2, which is upstream of both salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) responsible for ethylene (ET) synthesis. ET treatment of MEK2-silenced N. umbratica re-established ACD. In SIPK- and WIPK-silenced N. umbratica, ACD was compromised and ET accumulation was not observed. However, in contrast to the case of MEK2-silenced plants, ET treatment did not induce cell death in SIPK- and WIPK-silenced plants. This work showed that ET-dependent pathway and MAP kinase cascades are required in ACD. Our results suggested that MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascades have roles in ET biosynthesis; however, SIPK and WIPK have other roles in ET signaling or another pathway leading to cell death by AAL toxin.

  5. ERK1/2 but not p38 MAP kinase is essential for the long-term depression in mouse cerebellar slices.

    PubMed

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Kakegawa, Wataru; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2006-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is essential for synaptic plasticity and learning. In the hippocampus, three different MAPK subfamilies, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK), selectively regulate activity-dependent glutamate receptor trafficking during long-term potentiation (LTP), long-term depression (LTD), and depotentiation after LTP, respectively. Although LTP and LTD at cerebellar parallel fibre (PF)-Purkinje cell synapses are thought to be controlled by glutamate receptor trafficking, the involvement of MAPK subfamilies has not been systemically studied in cerebellar slice preparations. To clarify the role of the MAPK cascade in cerebellar LTD, we performed biochemical and electrophysiological analyses using ICR mouse cerebellar slices. Immunoblot analyses using phosphorylation-specific antibodies for MAPKs revealed that among the three MAPKs, ERK1/2 was specifically activated by phorbol ester, which could induce LTD in cerebellar slices. In addition, U0126, a specific inhibitor of the MAPK kinase-ERK1/2 pathway, abrogated the induction of LTD in cerebellar slices, whereas SB203580 and SP600125, specific inhibitors of p38 MAPK and JNK, respectively, had no effect. Although metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) has been suggested as a possible downstream target of ERK1/2 in cell-culture preparations, mGluR1-activated slow excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were not affected by U0126 treatment in slices. These findings indicate that unlike hippocampal LTD mediated by p38 MAPK, glutamate receptor trafficking during cerebellar LTD was regulated by a distinct mechanism involving ERK1/2 in slice preparations.

  6. MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOAL VEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS. 1P Zhang, UP Kodavanti. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, 1School of Vet Med, NCSU, Raleigh, NC
    Exposure to PM ma...

  7. MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOAL VEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAP KINASE SIGNALING IN PULMONARY FIBROBLASTS EXPOSED TO PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE FLUID (BALF) FROM HEALTHY AND HYPERTENSIVE RATS. 1P Zhang, UP Kodavanti. NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, 1School of Vet Med, NCSU, Raleigh, NC
    Exposure to PM ma...

  8. Combining Microinjection and Immunoblotting to Analyze MAP Kinase Phosphorylation in Single Starfish Oocytes and Eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, David J.; Hua, Wei

    The starfish oocyte has proven useful for studies involving microinjection because it is relatively large (190 μm) and optically clear. These oocytes are easily obtained from the ovary arrested at prophase of meiosis I, making them useful as a model system for the study of cell cycle-related events. In this chapter, a method for combining microinjection with immunoblotting of single cells is described. Individual starfish oocytes are injected, removed from the microinjection chamber, and analyzed by immunoblotting for the dual-phosphorylated form of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This method will allow for experiments testing the regulation of MAPK in single cells and for the manipulation of these cells by a quantitative microinjection technique.

  9. p38alpha MAP kinase as a sensor of reactive oxygen species in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dolado, Ignacio; Swat, Aneta; Ajenjo, Nuria; De Vita, Gabriella; Cuadrado, Ana; Nebreda, Angel R

    2007-02-01

    p38alpha is a stress-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates malignant transformation induced by oncogenic H-Ras, although the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Here, we show that p38alpha is not a general inhibitor of oncogenic signaling, but that it specifically modulates transformation induced by oncogenes that produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). This inhibitory effect is due to the ROS-induced activation of p38alpha early in the process of transformation, which induces apoptosis and prevents the accumulation of ROS and their carcinogenic effects. Accordingly, highly tumorigenic cancer cell lines have developed a mechanism to uncouple p38alpha activation from ROS production. Our results indicate that oxidative stress sensing plays a key role in the inhibition of tumor initiation by p38alpha.

  10. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, PD 169316, inhibits flagellar motility in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Srinivas; Mukhopadhyay, Aakash Gautam; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-09-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been demonstrated to regulate flagellar/ciliary motility of spermatozoa and miracidia of Schistosoma mansoni. However, the role of MAPKs in mediating flagella-driven motility of Leishmania donovani is unexplored. We investigated the function of MAPKs in motility regulation of L. donovani using pharmacological inhibitors and activators of various MAPKs and fast-capture videomicroscopy. Our studies have revealed that the inhibitor of p38 MAPK, PD 169316, significantly affected various motility parameters such as flagellar beat frequency, parasite swimming speed, waveform of the flagellum and resulted in reduced parasite motility. Together, our results suggest that a MAPK, similar to human p38 MAPK, is implicated in flagellar motility regulation of L. donovani. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Lack of MAP Kinase Phosphatase-1 Protects ApoE-null Mice against Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jianzhong; Chandrasekharan, Unni M.; Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Long, Eric; Morton, Richard E.; Liu, Yusen; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Multiple protein kinases have been implicated in cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the role of their counterparts — the protein phosphatases. Objective To test the hypothesis that Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is actively involved in atherogenesis. Methods and Results Mice with homozygous deficiency in MKP-1 (MKP-1−/−) were bred with ApoE-deficient mice (ApoE−/−) and the three MKP-1 genotypes (MKP-1+/+ /ApoE−/−; MKP-1+/− /ApoE−/− and MKP-1−/− /ApoE−/−) were maintained on a normal chow diet for 16-week. The three groups of mice exhibited similar body weight and serum lipid profiles; however, both MKP-1+/− and MKP-1−/− mice had significantly less aortic root atherosclerotic lesion formation than MKP-1+/+ mice. Less en face lesion was observed in 8-month old MKP-1−/− mice. The reduction in atherosclerosis was accompanied by decreased plasma levels of IL-1α and TNFα, and preceded by increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. In addition, MKP-1-null mice had higher levels of plasma SDF-1α, which negatively correlated with atherosclerotic lesion size. Immuno-histochemical analysis revealed that MKP-1 expression was enriched in macrophage-rich areas versus smooth muscle cell regions of the atheroma. Furthermore, macrophages isolated from MKP-1-null mice showed dramatic defects in their spreading/migration and impairment in ERK, but not JNK and p38, pathway activation. In line with this, MKP-1-null atheroma exhibited less macrophage content. Finally, transplantation of MKP-1-intact bone marrow into MKP-1-null mice fully rescued the wild type atherosclerotic phenotype. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that chronic deficiency of MKP-1 leads to decreased atherosclerosis via mechanisms involving impaired macrophage migration and defective ERK signalling. PMID:20093631

  12. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  13. Phospholipase C{gamma}1 stimulates transcriptional activation of the matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene via the protein kinase C/Raf/ERK cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Soon Young; Choi, Ha Young; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Son, Sang Wook; Lee, Young Han . E-mail: younghan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2007-02-16

    The phospholipid hydrolase phospholipase C{gamma}1 (PLC{gamma}1) plays a major role in regulation of cell proliferation, development, and cell motility. Overexpression of PLC{gamma}1 is associated with tumor development, and it is overexpressed in some tumors. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is a protein involved in tumor invasion and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of PLC{gamma}1 stimulates MMP-3 expression at the transcriptional level via the PKC-mediated Raf/MEK1/ERK signaling cascade. We propose that modulation of PLC{gamma}1 activity might be of value in controlling the activity of MMPs, which are important regulators of invasion and metastasis in malignant tumors.

  14. Mechano-transduction in periodontal ligament cells identifies activated states of MAP-kinases p42/44 and p38-stress kinase as a mechanism for MMP-13 expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mechano-transduction in periodontal ligament (PDL) cells is crucial for physiological and orthodontic tooth movement-associated periodontal remodelling. On the mechanistic level, molecules involved in this mechano-transduction process in PDL cells are not yet completely elucidated. Results In the present study we show by western blot (WB) analysis and/or indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) that mechanical strain modulates the amount of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-13, and induces non-coherent modulation in the amount and activity of signal transducing molecules, such as FAK, MAP-kinases p42/44, and p38 stress kinase, suggesting their mechanistic role in mechano-transduction. Increase in the amount of FAK occurs concomitant with increased levels of the focal contact integrin subunits β3 and β1, as indicated by WB or optionally by IIF. By employing specific inhibitors, we further identified p42/44 and p38 in their activated, i.e. phosphorylated state responsible for the expression of MMP-13. This finding may point to the obedience in the expression of this MMP as extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling executioner from the activation state of mechano-transducing molecules. mRNA analysis by pathway-specific RT-profiler arrays revealed up- and/or down-regulation of genes assigning to MAP-kinase signalling and cell cycle, ECM and integrins and growth factors. Up-regulated genes include for example focal contact integrin subunit α3, MMP-12, MAP-kinases and associated kinases, and the transcription factor c-fos, the latter as constituent of the AP1-complex addressing the MMP-13 promotor. Among others, genes down-regulated are those of COL-1 and COL-14, suggesting that strain-dependent mechano-transduction may transiently perturbate ECM homeostasis. Conclusions Strain-dependent mechano-/signal-transduction in PDL cells involves abundance and activity of FAK, MAP-kinases p42/44, and p38 stress kinase in conjunction with the amount of MMP-13, and integrin

  15. Protein interactome analysis of 12 mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase in rice using a yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raksha; Lee, Jae-Eun; Dangol, Sarmina; Choi, Jihyun; Yoo, Ran Hee; Moon, Jae Sun; Shim, Jae-Kyung; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is composed at least of MAP3K (for MAPK kinase kinase), MAP2K, and MAPK family modules. These components together play a central role in mediating extracellular signals to the cell and vice versa by interacting with their partner proteins. However, the MAP3K-interacting proteins remain poorly investigated in plants. Here, we utilized a yeast two-hybrid system and bimolecular fluorescence complementation in the model crop rice (Oryza sativa) to map MAP3K-interacting proteins. We identified 12 novel nonredundant interacting protein pairs (IPPs) representing 11 nonredundant interactors using 12 rice MAP3Ks (available as full-length cDNA in the rice KOME (http://cdna01.dna.affrc.go.jp/cDNA/) at the time of experimental design and execution) as bait and a rice seedling cDNA library as prey. Of the 12 MAP3Ks, only six had interacting protein partners. The established MAP3K interactome consisted of two kinases, three proteases, two forkhead-associated domain-containing proteins, two expressed proteins, one E3 ligase, one regulatory protein, and one retrotransposon protein. Notably, no MAP3K showed physical interaction with either MAP2K or MAPK. Seven IPPs (58.3%) were confirmed in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Subcellular localization of 14 interactors, together involved in nine IPPs (75%) further provide prerequisite for biological significance of the IPPs. Furthermore, GO of identified interactors predicted their involvement in diverse physiological responses, which were supported by a literature survey. These findings increase our knowledge of the MAP3K-interacting proteins, help in proposing a model of MAPK modules, provide a valuable resource for developing a complete map of the rice MAPK interactome, and allow discussion for translating the interactome knowledge to rice crop improvement against environmental factors.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of gene cascades involved in protein kinase A and C signalling in the KGN line of human ovarian granulosa tumour cells1.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Patricia G; Sirard, Marc-André

    2017-04-05

    The developmental competence of an oocyte is its capacity to resume maturation, undergo successful fertilization and reach the blastocyst stage. This competence is acquired through interaction with somatic cells of the follicle. Cumulus and granulosa cells support oocyte development while the oocyte influences follicular cell growth and differentiation. Studies suggest that follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone play an essential role in oocyte competence acquisition through signalling initiated by protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC) in granulosa cells. Using a microarray and RT-qPCR, the transcriptome of human granulosa-like tumour cells (KGN) treated for 24 h with forskolin (FSK) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was analyzed to determine the effects of PKA and PKC stimulation on gene expression. Protein-kinase-driven signalling appeared to involve five major upstream regulators, namely EGF, TGFB1, VEGF, FGF2 and HGF. Genes associations with seven major ovarian functions were identified: PTGS2, IL8 and IL6 with inflammation; STAR, CYP11A1 and CYP19A1 with steroidogenesis; VEGFC, VEGFA and CXCR4 with angiogenesis; AREG, EGFR and SPRY2 with differentiation, BAX, BCL2L12 and CASP1 with apoptosis, CCND1, CCNB1 and CCNB2 with division and MMP1, MMP9 and TIMP1 with ovulation. These results indicate overall that signalling via both PKA and PKC potentiates gene regulation of functions such as inflammation and apoptosis, while functions such as differentiation, ovulation and angiogenesis are partial to one kinase or the other. These results improve understanding of the pathways underlying the most important changes that occur in the follicle prior to ovulation.

  17. Network Modeling Reveals Cross Talk of MAP Kinases during Adaptation to Caspofungin Stress in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Altwasser, Robert; Baldin, Clara; Weber, Jakob; Guthke, Reinhard; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Brakhage, Axel A; Linde, Jörg; Valiante, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are highly conserved in eukaryotic organisms. In pathogenic fungi, their activities were assigned to different physiological functions including drug adaptation and resistance. Aspergillus fumigatus is a human pathogenic fungus, which causes life-threatening invasive infections. Therapeutic options against invasive mycoses are still limited. One of the clinically used drugs is caspofungin, which specifically targets the fungal cell wall biosynthesis. A systems biology approach, based on comprehensive transcriptome data sets and mathematical modeling, was employed to infer a regulatory network and identify key interactions during adaptation to caspofungin stress in A. fumigatus. Mathematical modeling and experimental validations confirmed an intimate cross talk occurring between the cell wall-integrity and the high osmolarity-glycerol signaling pathways. Specifically, increased concentrations of caspofungin promoted activation of these signalings. Moreover, caspofungin affected the intracellular transport, which caused an additional osmotic stress that is independent of glucan inhibition. High concentrations of caspofungin reduced this osmotic stress, and thus decreased its toxic activity. Our results demonstrated that MAPK signaling pathways play a key role during caspofungin adaptation and are contributing to the paradoxical effect exerted by this drug.

  18. Conserved regulation of MAP kinase expression by PUF RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myon-Hee; Hook, Brad; Pan, Guangjin; Kershner, Aaron M; Merritt, Christopher; Seydoux, Geraldine; Thomson, James A; Wickens, Marvin; Kimble, Judith

    2007-12-28

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PUF (for Pumilio and FBF [fem-3 binding factor]) RNA-binding proteins control many cellular processes critical for animal development and tissue homeostasis. In the present work, we report that PUF proteins act directly on MAPK/ERK-encoding mRNAs to downregulate their expression in both the Caenorhabditis elegans germline and human embryonic stem cells. In C. elegans, FBF/PUF binds regulatory elements in the mpk-1 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) and coprecipitates with mpk-1 mRNA; moreover, mpk-1 expression increases dramatically in FBF mutants. In human embryonic stem cells, PUM2/PUF binds 3'UTR elements in both Erk2 and p38alpha mRNAs, and PUM2 represses reporter constructs carrying either Erk2 or p38alpha 3' UTRs. Therefore, the PUF control of MAPK expression is conserved. Its biological function was explored in nematodes, where FBF promotes the self-renewal of germline stem cells, and MPK-1 promotes oocyte maturation and germ cell apoptosis. We found that FBF acts redundantly with LIP-1, the C. elegans homolog of MAPK phosphatase (MKP), to restrict MAPK activity and prevent apoptosis. In mammals, activated MAPK can promote apoptosis of cancer cells and restrict stem cell self-renewal, and MKP is upregulated in cancer cells. We propose that the dual negative regulation of MAPK by both PUF repression and MKP inhibition may be a conserved mechanism that influences both stem cell maintenance and tumor progression.

  19. Opposing actions of TGF{beta} and MAP kinase signaling in undifferentiated hen granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Dori C.; Haugen, Morgan J.; Johnson, A.L. . E-mail: johnson.128@nd.edu

    2005-10-21

    The present studies were conducted to establish interactions between transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} and the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family members, TGF{alpha} and betacellulin (BTC), relative to proliferation and differentiation of granulosa cells in hen ovarian follicles. Results presented demonstrate expression of TGF{beta} isoforms, plus TGF{alpha}, BTC, and ErbB receptors in prehierarchal follicles, thus establishing the potential for autocrine/paracrine signaling and cross-talk within granulosa cells at the onset of differentiation. Treatment with TGF{alpha} or BTC increases levels of TGF{beta}1 mRNA in undifferentiated granulosa cells, while the selective inhibitor of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling, U0126, reverses these effects. Moreover, TGF{beta}1 attenuates c-myc mRNA expression and granulosa cell proliferation, while TGF{alpha} blocks both these inhibitory effects. Collectively, these data provide evidence that EGF family ligands regulate both the expression and biological actions of TGF{beta}1 in hen granulosa cells, and indicate that the timely interaction of these opposing factors is an important modulator of both granulosa cell proliferation and differentiation.

  20. HIV-1 Nef assembles a Src family kinase-ZAP-70/Syk-PI3K cascade to downregulate cell-surface MHC-I.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Hui; Thomas, Laurel; Ruby, Carl E; Atkins, Katelyn M; Morris, Nicholas P; Knight, Zachary A; Scholz, Isabel; Barklis, Eric; Weinberg, Andrew D; Shokat, Kevan M; Thomas, Gary

    2007-04-19

    HIV-1 Nef, which is required for the efficient onset of AIDS, enhances viral replication and infectivity by exerting multiple effects on infected cells. Nef downregulates cell-surface MHC-I molecules by an uncharacterized PI3K pathway requiring the actions of two Nef motifs-EEEE(65) and PXXP(75). We report that the Nef EEEE(65) targeting motif enables Nef PXXP(75) to bind and activate a trans-Golgi network-localized Src family tyrosine kinase (SFK). The Nef/SFK complex then recruits and phosphorylates the tyrosine kinase ZAP-70, which binds class I PI3K to trigger MHC-I downregulation in primary CD4+ T cells. In promonocytic cells, Nef/SFK recruits the ZAP-70 homolog Syk to downregulate MHC-I, implicating this PI3K pathway in multiple HIV-1 reservoirs. Isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors repress MHC-I downregulation, identifying them as potential therapeutic agents to combat HIV-1. The discovery of this Nef-SFK-ZAP-70/Syk-PI3K signaling pathway explains the hierarchal role of the Nef motifs in effecting immunoevasion.

  1. MAP-kinase activity in etiolated Cucumis sativus cotyledons: the effect of red and far-red light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Flórez, Fagua; Vidal, Dolors; Simón, Esther

    2013-02-01

    Phytochrome (phy) signalling in plants may be transduced through protein phosphorylation. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP-kinase, MAPK) activity and the effect of R (red) and FR (far-red) light irradiation on MAPK activity were studied in etiolated Cucumis sativus L. cotyledons. By in vitro protein phosphorylation and in-gel assays with myelin basic protein (MBP), a protein band (between 48 and 45 kDa) with MAPK-like activity was detected. The addition to the phosphorylation buffer of specific protein phosphatase (PTP) inhibitors (Na(3)VO(4) and NaF) and genistein, apigenin or PD98059 as MAPK inhibitors allowed us to confirm the MAPK activity of the protein band. Irradiation of etiolated cotyledons with FR light for 5, 10 or 60 min rapidly and transiently stimulated the MAPK activity of the protein band. This suggests that there was a very low fluence response (VLFR) of phys. In addition, 15 min of R light irradiation or a sequential treatment of 15 min of R plus 5 min of FR also increased MAPK activity. The stimulatory effect of R light was also attributed to the same photoreceptor, which suggests that MAPKs are involved in phytochrome signal transduction. Protein immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting analysis with the polyclonal antibody anti-pERK1/2 (Tyr 204) and the monoclonal antibody anti-phosphotyrosine PY20 allowed us to recognize the above mentioned protein band as two proteins with molecular masses (M(r)) of approximately 47 and 45 kDa, and MAPK activity. The biochemical and immunological properties showed by the proteins detected indicated that they were members of the MAPK family phosphorylated in tyrosine residues.

  2. The adaptor-like protein ROG-1 is required for activation of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway and meiotic cell cycle progression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Yosuke; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Urushiyama, Seiichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Shirakata, Masaki; Iino, Yuichi; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Yamanashi, Yuji

    2007-03-01

    The Ras-MAP kinase pathway regulates varieties of fundamental cellular events. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this pathway is required for oocyte development; however, the nature of its up-stream regulators has remained elusive. Here, we identified a C. elegans gene, rog-1, which encodes the only protein having the IRS-type phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain in the worms. ROG-1 has no obvious domain structure aside from the PTB domain, suggesting that it could serve as an adaptor down-stream of protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of rog-1 mRNA significantly decreased brood size. rog-1(tm1031) truncation mutants showed a severe disruption in progression of developing oocytes from pachytene to diakinesis, as was seen in worms carrying a loss-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras or mpk-1 MAP kinase gene. Furthermore, let-60 Ras-regulated activation of MPK-1 in the gonad is undetectable in rog-1(tm1031) mutants. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation in the let-60 Ras gene rescues the brood size reduction and germ cell abnormality in rog-1(tm1031) worms. Consistently, rog-1 is preferentially expressed in the germ cells and its expression in the gonad is essential for oocyte development. Thus, ROG-1 is a key positive regulator of the Ras-MAP kinase pathway that permits germ cells to exit from pachytene.

  3. Role played by Disabled-2 in albumin induced MAP Kinase signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, Ramaswamy Pearson, Alexander L.; Colville-Nash, Paul; Baines, Deborah L.; Dockrell, Mark E.C.

    2008-02-15

    Albumin has been shown to activate the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in proximal tubular cells (PTECs) of the kidney. Megalin, the putative receptor for albumin has potential signalling properties. However, the mechanisms by which megalin signals are unclear. The adaptor phosphoprotein Disabled-2 (Dab2) is known to interact with the cytoplasmic tail of megalin and may be involved in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling. In this study, we investigated the role of Dab2 in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling and further studied the role of Dab2 in albumin-induced TGF{beta}-1 secretion, a MAPK dependent event. We used RNA interference to knockdown Dab2 protein abundance in HKC-8 cells a model of human PTECs. Albumin activated ERK1,2 and Elk-1 in a MEK-1 dependent manner and resulted in secretion of TGF{beta}-1. In the absence of albumin, knockdown of Dab2 resulted in a trend towards increase in pERK1,2 consistent with its putative role as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However albumin-induced ERK1,2 activation was completely abolished by Dab2 knockdown. Dab2 knockdown did not however result in inhibition of albumin-induced TGF{beta}-1 secretion. These results suggest that Dab2 is a ligand dependent bi-directional regulator of ERK1,2 activity by demonstrating that in addition to its more traditional role as an inhibitor of ERK1,2 it may also activate ERK1,2.

  4. Conserved Regulation of MAP Kinase Expression by PUF RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myon-Hee; Hook, Brad; Pan, Guangjin; Kershner, Aaron M; Merritt, Christopher; Seydoux, Geraldine; Thomson, James A; Wickens, Marvin; Kimble, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PUF (for Pumilio and FBF [fem-3 binding factor]) RNA-binding proteins control many cellular processes critical for animal development and tissue homeostasis. In the present work, we report that PUF proteins act directly on MAPK/ERK-encoding mRNAs to downregulate their expression in both the Caenorhabditis elegans germline and human embryonic stem cells. In C. elegans, FBF/PUF binds regulatory elements in the mpk-1 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR) and coprecipitates with mpk-1 mRNA; moreover, mpk-1 expression increases dramatically in FBF mutants. In human embryonic stem cells, PUM2/PUF binds 3′UTR elements in both Erk2 and p38α mRNAs, and PUM2 represses reporter constructs carrying either Erk2 or p38α 3′ UTRs. Therefore, the PUF control of MAPK expression is conserved. Its biological function was explored in nematodes, where FBF promotes the self-renewal of germline stem cells, and MPK-1 promotes oocyte maturation and germ cell apoptosis. We found that FBF acts redundantly with LIP-1, the C. elegans homolog of MAPK phosphatase (MKP), to restrict MAPK activity and prevent apoptosis. In mammals, activated MAPK can promote apoptosis of cancer cells and restrict stem cell self-renewal, and MKP is upregulated in cancer cells. We propose that the dual negative regulation of MAPK by both PUF repression and MKP inhibition may be a conserved mechanism that influences both stem cell maintenance and tumor progression. PMID:18166083

  5. Unfolded Protein Response Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways Underlie Pathogenesis of Arsenic-induced Cutaneous Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changzhao; Xu, Jianmin; Li, Fugui; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Weng, Zhiping; Wen, Jianming; Elmets, Craig A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with an enhanced risk of various cancers including skin cancer. In human skin, arsenic induces precancerous melanosis and keratosis, which may progress to basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. However, the mechanism by which these pathophysiological alterations occur remains elusive. In this study, we showed that sub-chronic arsenic exposure to SKH-1 mice induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulated by proteins, inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1), PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Arsenic activated all three UPR regulatory proteins in the skin. Arsenic induced IRE1 phosphorylation which resulted in augmented splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1) leading to its migration to the nucleus, and also enhanced transcriptional activation of downstream target proteins. Hyperphosphorylation of PERK which induces eukaryotic translation initial factor 2 α (eIF2α) in a phosphorylation-dependent manner enhanced translation of ATF4, in addition to augmenting proteolytic activation of ATF6 in arsenic-treated skin. A similar increase in the expression of CHOP was observed. Enhanced XBP-1s, ATF4 and ATF6 regulated downstream chaperones GRP94 and GRP78. Additionally, arsenic induced inflammation-related p38/MAPKAPK-2 MAPK signaling and alterations in Th-1/Th-2/Th-17 cytokines/chemokines and their receptors. Antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine blocked arsenic-induced reactive oxygen species, with a concomitant attenuation of UPR and MAPK signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine signatures. Our results identify novel pathways involved in the pathogenesis of arsenic-mediated cutaneous inflammation which may also be related to enhanced cancer risk in arsenic exposed cohorts. PMID:21911445

  6. Mitochondrial DNA is released by shock and activates neutrophils via p38 map kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Itagaki, Kiyoshi; Hauser, Carl J

    2010-07-01

    Bacterial DNA (bDNA) can activate an innate-immune stimulatory "danger" response via toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is unique among endogenous molecules in that mitochondria evolved from prokaryotic ancestors. Thus, mtDNA retains molecular motifs similar to bDNA. It is unknown, however, whether mtDNA is released by shock or is capable of eliciting immune responses like bDNA. We hypothesized shock-injured tissues might release mtDNA and that mtDNA might act as a danger-associated molecular pattern (or "alarmin") that can activate neutrophils (PMNs) and contribute to systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Standardized trauma/hemorrhagic shock caused circulation of mtDNA as well as nuclear DNA. Human PMNs were incubated in vitro with purified mtDNA or nuclear DNA, with or without pretreatment by chloroquine (an inhibitor of endosomal receptors like TLR9). Neutrophil activation was assessed as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 8 and MMP-9 release as well as p38 and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA induced PMN MMP-8/MMP-9 release and p38 phosphorylation but did not activate p44/42. Responses were inhibited by chloroquine. Nuclear DNA did not induce PMN activation. Intravenous injection of disrupted mitochondria (mitochondrial debris) into rats induced p38 MAPK activation and IL-6 and TNF-alpha accumulation in the liver. In summary, mtDNA is released into the circulation by shock. Mitochondrial DNA activates PMN p38 MAPK, probably via TLR9, inducing an inflammatory phenotype. Mitochondrial DNA may act as a danger-associated molecular pattern or alarmin after shock, contributing to the initiation of systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

  7. MAP kinase pathway gene copy alterations in NRAS/BRAF wild-type advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Orouji, Elias; Orouji, Azadeh; Gaiser, Timo; Larribère, Lionel; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Recent therapeutic advances have improved melanoma patientś clinical outcome. Novel therapeutics targeting BRAF, NRAS and cKit mutant melanomas are widely used in clinical practice. However therapeutic options in NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) /cKit(wild-type) melanoma patients are limited. Our study shows that gene copy numbers of members of the MAPK signaling pathway vary in different melanoma subgroups. NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) melanoma metastases are characterized by significant gains of MAP2K1 (MEK1) and MAPK3 (ERK1) gene loci. These additional gene copies could lead to an activation of the MAPK signaling pathway via a gene-dosage effect. Our results suggest that downstream analyses of the pMEK and pERK expression status in NRAS(wild-type) /BRAF(wild-type) melanoma patients identify patients that could benefit from targeted therapies with MEK and ERK inhibitors.

  8. Intein-mediated peptide arrays for epitope mapping and kinase/phosphatase assays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Qun; Ghosh, Inca; Kochinyan, Samvel; Sun, Luo

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are widely used for production and analysis of antibodies as well as in the study of protein modification enzymes. To circumvent the technical challenges of the existing techniques regarding peptide quantization and normalization, a new method of producing peptide arrays has been developed. This approach utilizes intein-mediated protein ligation that involves linkage of a carrier protein possessing a reactive carboxyl-terminal thioester to a peptide with an amino-terminal cysteine through a native peptide bond. Ligated protein substrates or enzyme-treated samples are arrayed on nitrocellulose membranes with a standard dot-blot apparatus and analyzed by immunoassay. This technique has improved sensitivity and reproducibility, and is suitable for various peptide-based applications. In this report, several experimental procedures including epitope mapping and the study of protein modifications were described.

  9. An Inside Job: Hacking into Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Signaling Cascades by the Intracellular Protozoan Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Bzik, David J.; Fox, Barbara A.; Butcher, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype. PMID:22104110

  10. An inside job: hacking into Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling cascades by the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Denkers, Eric Y; Bzik, David J; Fox, Barbara A; Butcher, Barbara A

    2012-02-01

    The intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii is well known for its skill at invading and living within host cells. New discoveries are now also revealing the astounding ability of the parasite to inject effector proteins into the cytoplasm to seize control of the host cell. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of one such secretory protein called ROP16. This molecule is released from rhoptries into the host cell during invasion. The ROP16 molecule acts as a kinase, directly activating both signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and STAT6 signaling pathways. In macrophages, an important and preferential target cell of parasite infection, the injection of ROP16 has multiple consequences, including downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling and macrophage deviation to an alternatively activated phenotype.

  11. Oxidized LDL activates blood platelets through CD36/NOX2–mediated inhibition of the cGMP/protein kinase G signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Magwenzi, Simbarashe; Woodward, Casey; Wraith, Katie S.; Aburima, Ahmed; Raslan, Zaher; Jones, Huw; McNeil, Catriona; Wheatcroft, Stephen; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Febbriao, Maria; Kearney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes unregulated platelet activation in dyslipidemic disorders. Although oxLDL stimulates activatory signaling, it is unclear how these events drive accelerated thrombosis. Here, we describe a mechanism for oxLDL-mediated platelet hyperactivity that requires generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under arterial flow, oxLDL triggered sustained generation of platelet intracellular ROS, which was blocked by CD36 inhibitors, mimicked by CD36-specific oxidized phospholipids, and ablated in CD36−/− murine platelets. oxLDL-induced ROS generation was blocked by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) inhibitor, gp91ds-tat, and absent in NOX2−/− mice. The synthesis of ROS by oxLDL/CD36 required Src-family kinases and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation and activation of NOX2. In functional assays, oxLDL abolished guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated signaling and inhibited platelet aggregation and arrest under flow. This was prevented by either pharmacologic inhibition of NOX2 in human platelets or genetic ablation of NOX2 in murine platelets. Platelets from hyperlipidemic mice were also found to have a diminished sensitivity to cGMP when tested ex vivo, a phenotype that was corrected by infusion of gp91ds-tat into the mice. This study demonstrates that oxLDL and hyperlipidemia stimulate the generation of NOX2-derived ROS through a CD36-PKC pathway and may promote platelet hyperactivity through modulation of cGMP signaling. PMID:25710879

  12. Deciphering the Arginine-Binding Preferences at the Substrate-Binding Groove of Ser/Thr Kinases by Computational Surface Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shimon, Avraham; Niv, Masha Y.

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinases are key signaling enzymes that catalyze the transfer of γ-phosphate from an ATP molecule to a phospho-accepting residue in the substrate. Unraveling the molecular features that govern the preference of kinases for particular residues flanking the phosphoacceptor is important for understanding kinase specificities toward their substrates and for designing substrate-like peptidic inhibitors. We applied ANCHORSmap, a new fragment-based computational approach for mapping amino acid side chains on protein surfaces, to predict and characterize the preference of kinases toward Arginine binding. We focus on positions P−2 and P−5, commonly occupied by Arginine (Arg) in substrates of basophilic Ser/Thr kinases. The method accurately identified all the P−2/P−5 Arg binding sites previously determined by X-ray crystallography and produced Arg preferences that corresponded to those experimentally found by peptide arrays. The predicted Arg-binding positions and their associated pockets were analyzed in terms of shape, physicochemical properties, amino acid composition, and in-silico mutagenesis, providing structural rationalization for previously unexplained trends in kinase preferences toward Arg moieties. This methodology sheds light on several kinases that were described in the literature as having non-trivial preferences for Arg, and provides some surprising departures from the prevailing views regarding residues that determine kinase specificity toward Arg. In particular, we found that the preference for a P−5 Arg is not necessarily governed by the 170/230 acidic pair, as was previously assumed, but by several different pairs of acidic residues, selected from positions 133, 169, and 230 (PKA numbering). The acidic residue at position 230 serves as a pivotal element in recognizing Arg from both the P−2 and P−5 positions. PMID:22125489

  13. Intracellular signal transduction pathways in the regulation of fowl sperm motility: evidence for the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) cascade.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, Koji; Omura, Yusuke; Katayama, Seiichi; Tatemoto, Hideki; Narumi, Kazunori; Tsuzuki, Yasuhiro

    2009-07-01

    The possible role of PI3-K in the reversible temperature-dependent immobilization of fowl sperm motility was investigated by using PI3-K inhibitor (LY294002) and its inactive analogue (LY303511). The existence of the PI3-K in fowl spermatozoa was also confirmed by Western blotting analysis. Fowl sperm motility in TES/NaCl buffer remained negligible at the avian body temperature of 40 degrees C but was maintained vigorously when the temperature was decreased to 30 degrees C. At 30 degrees C, no stimulation or inhibition of motility was observed after the addition of 2 mM CaCl2 and 10 microM LY294002 or LY303511: around 70-80% of spermatozoa remained motile. In contrast, at 40 degrees C, the motility of spermatozoa was activated immediately after the addition of Ca(2+), but the subsequent addition of LY294002 inhibited the motility again. The addition of LY303511 did not appreciably affect the Ca(2+)-supplemented sperm motility, which was maintained for at least 15 min. The ATP concentrations of spermatozoa after the addition of LY294002 + Ca(2+) or LY303511 + Ca(2+) were almost the same values compared with those of Ca(2+) alone at 40 degrees C, suggesting that the addition of LY294002 was not simply affecting membrane damage or inhibiting energy production in the spermatozoa, but may be acting on some part of the motility-regulating cascade. Immunoblotting of sperm extract using an antibody to PI3-K revealed a major cross-reacting protein of 85 kDa, which corresponds to the molecular weight of the subunit of PI3-K. These results suggest that PI3-K may be positively involved in the calcium-regulated maintenance of flagellar movement of fowl spermatozoa at 40 degrees C.

  14. A New MAP Kinase Protein Involved in Estradiol-Stimulated Reproduction of the Helminth Parasite Taenia crassiceps

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Galileo; Soldevila, Gloria; Ortega-Pierres, Guadalupe; Chávez-Ríos, Jesús Ramsés; Nava, Karen; Fonseca-Liñán, Rocío; López-Griego, Lorena; Hallal-Calleros, Claudia; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    MAP kinases (MAPK) are involved in the regulation of cellular processes such as reproduction and growth. In parasites, the role of MAPK has been scarcely studied. Here, we describe the participation of an ERK-like protein in estrogen-dependent reproduction of the helminth parasite Taenia crassiceps. Our results show that 17β-estradiol induces a concentration-dependent increase in the bud number of in vitro cultured cysticerci. If parasites are also incubated in presence of an ERK-inhibitor, the stimulatory effect of estrogen is blocked. The expression of ERK-like mRNA and its corresponding protein was detected in the parasite. The ERK-like protein was over-expressed by all treatments. Nevertheless, a strong induction of phosphorylation of this protein was observed only in response to 17β-estradiol. Cross-contamination by host cells was discarded by flow cytometry analysis. Parasite cells expressing the ERK-like protein were exclusively located at the subtegument tissue by confocal microscopy. Finally, the ERK-like protein was separated by bidimensional electrophoresis and then sequenced, showing the conserved TEY activation motif, typical of all known ERK 1/2 proteins. Our results show that an ERK-like protein is involved in the molecular signalling during the interaction between the host and T. crassiceps, and may be considered as target for anti-helminth drugs design. PMID:20145710

  15. Genetic activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Li, Tan; Abel, Glen M; Palmiter, Richard D; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-02-05

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of adult neurogenesis impairs the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it is not known whether increasing adult neurogenesis affects the persistence of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis are not fully defined. We recently reported that the conditional and targeted knock-out of ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions of the mouse brain attenuates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and disrupts several forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. Here, we developed a gain-of-function knock-in mouse model to specifically activate endogenous ERK5 in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain. We report that the selective and targeted activation of ERK5 increases adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus by enhancing cell survival, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic complexity. Conditional ERK5 activation also improves the performance of challenging forms of spatial learning and memory and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We conclude that enhancing signal transduction of a single signaling pathway within adult neural stem/progenitor cells is sufficient to increase adult neurogenesis and improve the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, activation of ERK5 may provide a novel therapeutic target to improve long-term memory.

  16. Rck1 up-regulates pseudohyphal growth by activating the Ras2 and MAP kinase pathways independently in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Miwha; Kang, Chang-Min; Park, Yong-Sung; Yun, Cheol-Won

    2014-02-21

    Previously, we reported that Rck1 regulates Hog1 and Slt2 activities and affects MAP kinase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, we found that Rck1 up-regulates phospho-Kss1 and phospho-Fus3. Kss1 has been known as a component in the pseudohyphal growth pathway, and we attempted to identify the function of Rck1 in pseudohyphal growth. Rck1 up-regulated Ras2 at the protein level, not the transcriptional level. Additionally, FLO11 transcription was up-regulated by RCK1 over-expression. RCK1 expression was up-regulated during growth on SLAD+1% butanol medium. On nitrogen starvation agar plates, RCK1 over-expression induced pseudohyphal growth of colonies, and cells over-expressing RCK1 showed a filamentous morphology when grown in SLAD medium. Furthermore, 1-butanol greatly induced filamentous growth when RCK1 was over-expressed. Moreover, invasive growth was activated in haploid cells when RCK1 was over-expressed. The growth defect of cells observed on 1-butanol medium was recovered when RCK1 was over-expressed. Interestingly, Ras2 and phospho-Kss1 were up-regulated by Rck1 independently. Together, these results suggest that Rck1 promotes pseudohyphal growth by activating Ras2 and Kss1 via independent pathways in S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Disassembly of microtubules and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, neuroblastoma cell proliferation, and MAP kinase tyrosine dephosphorylation by dibenzyl trisulphide.

    PubMed

    Rösner, H; Williams, L A; Jung, A; Kraus, W

    2001-08-22

    Dibenzyl trisulphide (DTS), a main lipophilic compound in Petiveria alliacea L. (Phytolaccaceae), was identified as one of the active immunomodulatory compounds in extracts of the plant. To learn more about its biological activities and molecular mechanisms, we conducted one-dimensional NMR interaction studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and tested DTS and related compounds in two well-established neuronal cell-and-tissue culture systems. We found that DTS preferentially binds to an aromatic region of BSA which is rich in tyrosyl residues. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, DTS attenuates the dephosphorylation of tyrosyl residues of MAP kinase (erk1/erk2). In the same neuroblastoma cell line and in Wistar 38 human lung fibroblasts, DTS causes a reversible disassembly of microtubules, but it did not affect actin dynamics. Probably due to the disruption of the microtubule dynamics, DTS also inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth from spinal cord explants. Related dibenzyl compounds with none, one, or two sulphur atoms were found to be significantly less effective. These data confirmed that the natural compound DTS has a diverse spectrum of biological properties, including cytostatic and neurotoxic actions in addition to immunomodulatory activities.

  18. Conditional Deletion of ERK5 MAP Kinase in the Nervous System Impairs Pheromone Information Processing and Pheromone-Evoked Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2013-01-01

    ERK5 MAP kinase is highly expressed in the developing nervous system but absent in most regions of the adult brain. It has been implicated in regulating the development of the main olfactory bulb and in odor discrimination. However, whether it plays an essential role in pheromone-based behavior has not been established. Here we report that conditional deletion of the Mapk7 gene which encodes ERK5 in mice in neural stem cells impairs several pheromone-mediated behaviors including aggression and mating in male mice. These deficits were not caused by a reduction in the level of testosterone, by physical immobility, by heightened fear or anxiety, or by depression. Using mouse urine as a natural pheromone-containing solution, we provide evidence that the behavior impairment was associated with defects in the detection of closely related pheromones as well as with changes in their innate preference for pheromones related to sexual and reproductive activities. We conclude that expression of ERK5 during development is critical for pheromone response and associated animal behavior in adult mice. PMID:24130808

  19. Activation of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Stimulates Cardiac ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels via a ROS/Calmodulin/CaMKII Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Methods and Findings Single-channel recordings of cardiac KATP channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type KATP) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H2O2 scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H2O2 also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of KATP channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac KATP channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H2O2 in

  20. Differential modulation of evoked and spontaneous glycine release from rat spinal cord glycinergic terminals by the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A transduction cascade.

    PubMed

    Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Kubota, Hisahiko; Moorhouse, Andrew J; Akaike, Norio

    2004-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying cyclic AMP modulation of action potential-dependent and -independent (spontaneous) release of glycine from terminals synapsing onto sacral dorsal commissural nucleus neurons of lamina X were studied in spinal cord slices using conventional patch-clamp recordings. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and forskolin increased the amplitude of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in a sensitive manner to protein kinase A (PKA) inhibition (with KT-5720). Direct activation (with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic-monophosphothioate, Sp-isomer) and inhibition (with adenosine 3',5'-cyclic-monophosphothioate, Rp-isomer) of PKA increased and decreased the eIPSC amplitude, respectively. Paired pulse experiments and direct injection of PKA inhibitor fragment 6-22 amide (PKI(6-22)) into the recording neuron revealed that these effects on eIPSC amplitude occurred presynaptically, indicating that evoked glycine release is regulated by presynaptic cAMP via changes in PKA activity. Increasing cAMP also increased spontaneous release of glycine, causing an increased frequency of miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). In contrast to the effects on evoked release, this response was not solely mediated via PKA, as it was not occluded by PKA inhibition, and both direct inhibition and direct activation of PKA actually enhanced mIPSC frequency. Direct inhibition of cAMP (with SQ 22536) did, however, reduce mIPSC frequency. These results suggest cAMP modulation of evoked and spontaneous release involves different presynaptic mechanisms and proteins.

  1. MAP-kinase activity necessary for TGFbeta1-stimulated mesangial cell type I collagen expression requires adhesion-dependent phosphorylation of FAK tyrosine 397.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Tomoko; Wu, Ming-Hua; Pierce, Amy; Poncelet, Anne-Christine; Varga, John; Schnaper, H William

    2007-12-01

    The signals mediating transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-stimulated kidney fibrogenesis are poorly understood. We previously reported TGFbeta-stimulated, Smad-mediated collagen production by human kidney mesangial cells, and that ERK MAP kinase activity optimizes collagen expression and enhances phosphorylation of the Smad3 linker region. Furthermore, we showed that disrupting cytoskeletal integrity decreases type I collagen production. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK, PTK2) activity could integrate these findings. Adhesion-dependent FAK Y397 phosphorylation was detected basally, whereas FAK Y925 phosphorylation was TGFbeta1-dependent. By immunocytochemistry, TGFbeta1 stimulated the merging of phosphorylated FAK with the ends of thickening stress fibers. Cells cultured on poly-L-lysine (pLL) to promote integrin-independent attachment spread less than those on control substrate and failed to demonstrate focal adhesion (FA) engagement with F-actin. FAK Y397 phosphorylation and ERK activity were also decreased under these conditions. In cells with decreased FAK Y397 phosphorylation from either plating on pLL or overexpressing a FAK Y397F point mutant, serine phosphorylation of the Smad linker region, but not of the C-terminus, was reduced. Y397F and Y925F FAK point mutants inhibited TGFbeta-induced Elk-Gal activity, but only the Y397F mutant inhibited TGFbeta-stimulated collagen-promoter activity. The inhibition by the Y397F mutant or by culture on pLL was prevented by co-transfection of constitutively active ERK MAP kinase kinase (MEK), suggesting that FAK Y397 phosphorylation promotes collagen expression via ERK MAP kinase activity. Finally, Y397 FAK phosphorylation, and both C-terminal and linker-region Smad3 phosphorylation were detected in murine TGFbeta-dependent kidney fibrosis. Together, these data demonstrate adhesion-dependent FAK phosphorylation promoting TGFbeta-induced responses to regulate collagen production.

  2. MAP kinase signaling specificity mediated by the LIN-1 Ets/LIN-31 WH transcription factor complex during C. elegans vulval induction.

    PubMed

    Tan, P B; Lackner, M R; Kim, S K

    1998-05-15

    The let-23 receptor/mpk-1 MAP kinase signaling pathway induces the vulva in C. elegans. We show that MPK-1 directly regulates both the LIN-31 winged-helix and the LIN-1 Ets transcription factors to specify the vulval cell fate. lin-31 and lin-1 act genetically downstream of mpk-1, and both proteins can be directly phosphorylated by MAP kinase. LIN-31 binds to LIN-1, and the LIN-1/LIN-31 complex inhibits vulval induction. Phosphorylation of LIN-31 by MPK-1 disrupts the LIN-1/LIN-31 complex, relieving vulval inhibition. Phosphorylated LIN-31 may also act as a transcriptional activator, promoting vulval cell fates. LIN-31 is a vulval-specific effector of MPK-1, while LIN-1 acts as a general effector. The partnership of tissue-specific and general effectors may confer specificity onto commonly used signaling pathways, creating distinct tissue-specific outcomes.

  3. Induction of MAP Kinase Homologues during Growth and Morphogenetic Development of Karnal Bunt (Tilletia indica) under the Influence of Host Factor(s) from Wheat Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Atul K.; Seneviratne, J. M.; Joshi, G. K.; Kumar, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Signaling pathways that activate different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in response to certain environmental conditions, play important role in mating type switching (Fus3) and pathogenicity (Pmk1) in many fungi. In order to determine the roles of such regulatory genes in Tilletia indica, the causal pathogen of Karnal bunt (KB) of wheat, semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR was carried out to isolate and determine the expression of MAP kinase homologues during fungal growth and development under in vitro culture. Maximum expression of TiFus3 and TiPmk1 genes were observed at 14th and 21st days of culture and decreased thereafter. To investigate whether the fungus alters the expression levels of same kinases upon interaction with plants, cultures were treated with 1% of host factors (extracted from S-2 stage of wheat spikes). Such treatment induced the expression of MAPks in time dependent manner compared to the absence of host factors. These results suggest that host factor(s) provide certain signal(s) which activate TiFus3 and TiPmk1 during morphogenetic development of T. indica. The results also provides a clue about the role of host factors in enhancing the disease potential due to induction of MAP kinases involved in fungal development and pathogenecity. PMID:22547988

  4. Roles of mitogen activated protein kinases and EGF receptor in arsenite-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Myers, Terrance Alix; Rosenberg, Martina; Chavez, Miquella; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lghudson@unm.edu

    2004-11-01

    The dermatotoxicity of arsenic is well established and epidemiological studies identify an increased incidence of keratinocytic tumors (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) associated with arsenic exposure. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-mediated skin carcinogenesis, but activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and subsequent regulation of downstream target genes may contribute to tumor promotion and progression. In this study, we investigated activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the stress-associated kinase p38 by arsenite in HaCat cells, a spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte cell line. Arsenite concentrations {>=}100 {mu}M stimulate rapid activation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. However, upon extended exposure (24 h), persistent stimulation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases was detected at low micromolar concentrations of arsenite. Although ERK and p38 were activated with similar time and concentration dependence, the mechanism of activation differed for these two MAP kinases. ERK activation by arsenite was fully dependent on the catalytic activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and partially dependent on Src-family kinase activity. In contrast, p38 activation was independent of EGF receptor or Src-family kinase activity. Arsenite-stimulated MAP kinase signal transduction resulted in increased production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an AP-1 regulated gene product. MMP-9 induction by arsenite was prevented when EGF receptor or MAP kinase signaling was inhibited. These studies indicate that EGF receptor activation is a component of arsenite-mediated signal transduction and gene expression in keratinocytes and that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite stimulate key signaling pathways upon extended exposure. Stimulation of MAP kinase cascades by arsenic and subsequent regulation of genes including c-fos, c-jun, and the matrix degrading proteases may play an important

  5. An interaction map of small-molecule kinase inhibitors with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutants in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xinghao; Shen, Shengping; Shen, Lan; Lu, Shun

    2015-05-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has become a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we have profiled seven small-molecule inhibitors, including 2 that are approved drugs, against a panel of clinically relevant mutations in ALK tyrosine kinase (TK) domain, aiming at a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism and biological implication underlying inhibitor response to ALK TK mutation. We find that (i) the gatekeeper mutation L1196M causes crizotinib resistance by simultaneously increasing and decreasing the binding affinities of, respectively, ATP and inhibitor to ALK, whereas the secondary mutation C1156Y, which is located far away from the ATP-binding site of ALK TK domain, causes the resistance by inducing marked allosteric effect on the site, (ii) the 2nd and 3rd generation kinase inhibitors exhibit relatively high sensitivity towards ALK mutants as compared to 1st generation inhibitors, (iii) the pan-kinase inhibitor staurosporine is insensitive for most mutations due to its high structural compatibility, and (iv) ATP affinity to ALK is generally reduced upon most clinically relevant mutations. Furthermore, we also identify six novel mutation-inhibitor pairs that are potentially associated with drug resistance. In addition, the G1202R and C1156Y mutations are expected to generally cause resistance for many existing inhibitors, since they can address significant effect on the geometric shape and physicochemical property of ALK active pocket.

  6. Role of p38alpha/beta MAP Kinase in Cell Susceptibility to Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Schelle, Ilona; Bruening, Janina; Buetepage, Mareike; Genth, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL), which is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and in gas gangrene, enters its target cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Inside the cell, TcsL mono-O-glucosylates and thereby inactivates Rac/Cdc42 and Ras subtype GTPases, resulting in actin reorganization and an activation of p38 MAP kinase. While a role of p38 MAP kinase in TcsL-induced cell death is well established, data on a role of p38 MAP kinase in TcsL-induced actin reorganization are not available. In this study, TcsL-induced Rac/Cdc42 glucosylation and actin reorganization are differentially analyzed in p38alpha−/− MSCV empty vector MEFs and the corresponding cell line with reconstituted p38alpha expression (p38alpha−/− MSCV p38alpha MEFs). Genetic deletion of p38alpha results in reduced susceptibility of cells to TcsL-induced Rac/Cdc42 glucosylation and actin reorganization. Furthermore, SB203580, a pyridinyl imidazole inhibitor of p38alpha/beta MAP kinase, also protects cells from TcsL-induced effects in both p38−/− MSCV empty vector MEFs and in p38alpha−/− MSCV p38alpha MEFs, suggesting that inhibition of p38beta contributes to the protective effect of SB203580. In contrast, the effects of the related C. difficile Toxin B are responsive neither to SB203580 treatment nor to p38alpha deletion. In conclusion, the protective effects of SB203580 and of p38alpha deletion are likely not based on inhibition of the toxins’ glucosyltransferase activity rather than on inhibited endocytic uptake of specifically TcsL into target cells. PMID:28025502

  7. Enhanced expression of Giα proteins contributes to the hyperproliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats via MAP kinase- and PI3 kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Bou Daou, Grace; Li, Yuan; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) exhibit hyperproliferation, enhanced MAP kinase (MAPK) activity, and overexpression of Giα proteins. This study was undertaken to examine whether the overexpression of Giα proteins contributes to the hyperproliferation of VSMC of SHR through MAPK signaling. The hyperproliferation of VSMC from SHR in the absence and presence of angiotensin II was restored towards those in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats levels by pertussis toxin (PT) treatment. In addition, siRNA knockdown of Giα proteins also resulted in the attenuation of hyperproliferation towards control levels. The overexpression of Giα proteins was also inhibited by MAPK and PI3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitors. In addition, the hyperproliferation and enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt in VSMC from SHR were attenuated towards WKY levels by the inhibitors of MAPK, PI3K, c-Src, and antioxidants, whereas PT was unable to attenuate the enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. Furthermore, 8Br-cAMP and forskolin also attenuated the hyperproliferation of VSMC from SHR. These results suggest that the hyperproliferation of VSMC from SHR may be attributed to the enhanced expression of Giα proteins and increased activation of MAPK and PI3 kinase. However, Giα-mediated hyperproliferation may not be mediated through MAPK- and PI3 kinase-dependent pathways and may involve decreased levels of intracellular cAMP.

  8. The Atypical MAP Kinase SWIP-13/ERK8 Regulates Dopamine Transporters through a Rho-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Hardaway, J Andrew; Refai, Osama; Marks, Christian R; Snider, Sam L; Sturgeon, Sarah M; Spencer, William C; Colbran, Roger J; Miller, David M; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-09-20

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates multiple behaviors across phylogeny, with disrupted DA signaling in humans associated with addiction, attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The DA transporter (DAT) imposes spatial and temporal limits on DA action, and provides for presynaptic DA recycling to replenish neurotransmitter pools. Molecular mechanisms that regulate DAT expression, trafficking, and function, particularly in vivo, remain poorly understood, though recent studies have implicated rho-linked pathways in psychostimulant action. To identify genes that dictate the ability of DAT to sustain normal levels of DA clearance, we pursued a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans based on the phenotype swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), a paralytic behavior observed in hermaphrodite worms with loss-of-function dat-1 mutations. Here, we report the identity of swip-13, which encodes a highly conserved ortholog of the human atypical MAP kinase ERK8. We present evidence that SWIP-13 acts presynaptically to insure adequate levels of surface DAT expression and DA clearance. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a conserved pathway involving SWIP-13/ERK8 activation of Rho GTPases that dictates DAT surface expression and function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Signaling by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is tightly regulated by the DA transporter (DAT), insuring efficient DA clearance after release. Molecular networks that regulate DAT are poorly understood, particularly in vivo Using a forward genetic screen in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we implicate the atypical mitogen activated protein kinase, SWIP-13, in DAT regulation. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that SWIP-13, as well as its human counterpart ERK8, regulate DAT surface availability via the activation of Rho proteins. Our findings implicate a novel pathway that regulates DA synaptic availability and that may

  9. Localization of the human stress responsive MAP kinase-like CSAIDs binding protein (CSBP) gene to chromosome 6p21.3/21.2

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.C.; Young, P.R.; DiLella, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) play a pivotal role in the initiation of inflammatory responses. Soluble protein antagonists of IL-1 and TNF, such as IL-1ra, sTNFR-Fc fusion, and monoclonal antibodies to TNF have proven to be effective at blocking acute and chronic responses in a number of animal models of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, septic shock, and inflammatory bowel disease. Consequently, there has been considerable interest in discovering compounds that could inhibit the production of these cytokines and might therefore become treatments. Recently, a structurally related series of pyridinyl imidazoles was found to block IL-1 and TNF production from LPS-stimulated human monocytes and to ameliorate inflammatory diseases significantly in vivo, leading to their being named CSAIDs (cytokine suppressive anti-inflammatory drugs). The protein target of these compounds, termed CSBP (CSAID binding protein), was discovered to be a new member of the MAP kinase family of serine-threonine protein kinases whose kinase activity is activated by LPS in human monocytes. Independently, the same kinase, or its rodent homologues, was found to respond also to chemical, thermal, and osmotic stress and IL-1 treatment. Inhibition of this kinase correlated with reduction in inflammatory cytokine production from LPS-activated monocytes. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Laminar shear stress upregulates endothelial Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 via a Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase/Akt/p300 cascade.

    PubMed

    Takai, Jun; Santu, Alexandra; Zheng, Haifeng; Koh, Sang Don; Ohta, Masanori; Filimban, Linda M; Lemaître, Vincent; Teraoka, Ryutaro; Jo, Hanjoong; Miura, Hiroto

    2013-08-15

    In endothelial cells (ECs), Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 play a crucial role in the regulation of arterial tone via producing NO and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factors. Since a rise in intracellular Ca²⁺ levels and activation of p300 histone acetyltransferase are early EC responses to laminar shear stress (LS) for the transcriptional activation of genes, we examined the role of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK), the most upstream element of a Ca²⁺/calmodulin-kinase cascade, and p300 in LS-dependent regulation of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 in ECs. Exposure to LS (15 dyn/cm²) for 24 h markedly increased KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 mRNA expression in cultured human coronary artery ECs (3.2 ± 0.4 and 45 ± 10 fold increase, respectively; P < 0.05 vs. static condition; n = 8-30), whereas oscillatory shear (OS; ± 5 dyn/cm² × 1 Hz) moderately increased KCa3.1 but did not affect KCa2.3. Expression of KCa2.1 and KCa2.2 was suppressed under both LS and OS conditions, whereas KCa1.1 was slightly elevated in LS and unchanged in OS. Inhibition of CaMKK attenuated LS-induced increases in the expression and channel activity of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1, and in phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473) and p300 (Ser1834). Inhibition of Akt abolished the upregulation of these channels by diminishing p300 phosphorylation. Consistently, disruption of the interaction of p300 with transcription factors eliminated the induction of these channels. Thus a CaMKK/Akt/p300 cascade plays an important role in LS-dependent induction of KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 expression, thereby regulating EC function and adaptation to hemodynamic changes.

  11. Methyl (E)-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acryloyl)tryptophanate can suppress MCP-1 expression by inhibiting p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB in LPS-stimulated differentiated THP-1 cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The p38 MAP kinase and NF-kB play significant roles in regulating the production of proinflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic factor-1 (MCP-1). Therefore, potent inhibitors to suppress p38 kinase and NF-kB activities have been explored as anti-inflammatory agents. In this study, a nov...

  12. Insulin increase in MAP kinase phosphorylation is shifted to early time-points by overexpressing APS, while Akt phosphorylation is not influenced.

    PubMed

    Onnockx, Sheela; Xie, Jingwei; Degraef, Chantal; Erneux, Christophe; Pirson, Isabelle

    2009-09-10

    Upon insulin stimulation, the adaptor protein APS is recruited to the insulin receptor and tyrosine phosphorylated. APS initiates the insulin-induced TC10 cascade which participates to GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism that governs APS and its SH2 and PH domains action on the insulin transduction cascade is not yet fully understood. Here, we show that APS co-immunoprecipitates with the class I PI 3-kinase regulatory subunit p85, through its SH2 domain but that APS does not modulate neither PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels nor Akt phosphorylation provoked by insulin. We have confirmed a previously described positive effect of APS overexpression on insulin-induced MAPK phosphorylation upregulation. Consequently, we analyzed the role of SH2 and PH domains of APS in the APS increased MAPK phosphorylation observed upon insulin stimulation and correlated this with the membrane localization of the protein. The effect observed on MAPK phosphorylation requires the intact PH binding domain of APS as well as its SH2 domain.

  13. Inhibition of MAP kinase promotes the recruitment of corepressor SMRT by tamoxifen-bound estrogen receptor alpha and potentiates tamoxifen action in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wei; Chen, Linfeng; Li, Juan; Yao, Zhi

    2010-05-28

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}), a ligand controlled transcription factor, plays an important role in breast cancer growth and endocrine therapy. Tamoxifen (TAM) antagonizes ER{alpha} activity and has been applied in breast cancer treatment. TAM-bound ER{alpha} associates with nuclear receptor-corepressors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been elucidated to result in cross-talk between growth factor and ER{alpha} mediated signaling. We show that activated MAPK represses interaction of TAM-bound ER{alpha} with silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) and inhibits the recruitment of SMRT by ER{alpha} to certain estrogen target genes. Blockade of MAPK signaling cascade with MEK inhibitor U0126 promotes the interaction and subsequently inhibits ER{alpha} activity via enhanced recruitment of SMRT, leading to reduced expression of ER{alpha} target genes. The growth rate of MCF-7 cells was decelerated when treated with both TAM and U0126. Moreover, the growth of MCF-7 cells stably expressing SMRT showed a robust repression in the presence of TAM and U0126. These results suggest that activated MAPK signaling cascade attenuates antagonist-induced recruitment of SMRT to ER{alpha}, suggesting corepressor mediates inhibition of ER{alpha} transactivation and breast cancer cell growth by antagonist. Taken together, our finding indicates combination of antagonist and MAPK inhibitor could be a helpful approach for breast cancer therapy.

  14. DLK-1/p38 MAP Kinase Signaling Controls Cilium Length by Regulating RAB-5 Mediated Endocytosis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Aniek; Rademakers, Suzanne; Jansen, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles present on almost all vertebrate cells. Cilium length is constant, but varies between cell types, indicating that cilium length is regulated. How this is achieved is unclear, but protein transport in cilia (intraflagellar transport, IFT) plays an important role. Several studies indicate that cilium length and function can be modulated by environmental cues. As a model, we study a C. elegans mutant that carries a dominant active G protein α subunit (gpa-3QL), resulting in altered IFT and short cilia. In a screen for suppressors of the gpa-3QL short cilium phenotype, we identified uev-3, which encodes an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme variant that acts in a MAP kinase pathway. Mutation of two other components of this pathway, dual leucine zipper-bearing MAPKKK DLK-1 and p38 MAPK PMK-3, also suppress the gpa-3QL short cilium phenotype. However, this suppression seems not to be caused by changes in IFT. The DLK-1/p38 pathway regulates several processes, including microtubule stability and endocytosis. We found that reducing endocytosis by mutating rabx-5 or rme-6, RAB-5 GEFs, or the clathrin heavy chain, suppresses gpa-3QL. In addition, gpa-3QL animals showed reduced levels of two GFP-tagged proteins involved in endocytosis, RAB-5 and DPY-23, whereas pmk-3 mutant animals showed accumulation of GFP-tagged RAB-5. Together our results reveal a new role for the DLK-1/p38 MAPK pathway in control of cilium length by regulating RAB-5 mediated endocytosis. PMID:26657059

  15. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.