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Sample records for map kinase dependent

  1. VEGF activates protein kinase C-dependent, but Ras-independent Raf-MEK-MAP kinase pathway for DNA synthesis in primary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Ueno, H; Shibuya, M

    1999-04-01

    KDR/FIk-1 tyrosine kinase, one of the two VEGF receptors induces mitogenesis and differentiation of vascular endothelial cells. We have previously reported that a major target molecule of KDR/Flk-1 kinase is PLC-gamma, and that VEGF induces activation of MAP kinase, mainly mediated by protein kinase C (PKC) in the NIH3T3 cells overexpressing KDR/FIk-1 (Takahashi and Shibuya, 1997). However, the signal transduction initiated from VEGF in endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. In primary sinusoidal endothelial cells which showed strictly VEGF-dependent growth, we found that VEGF stimulated the activation of Raf-1-MEK-MAP kinase cascade. To our surprise, an important regulator, Ras was not efficiently activated to a significant level in response to VEGF. Consistent with this, dominant-negative Ras did not block the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinase. On the other hand, PKC-specific inhibitors severely reduced VEGF-dependent phosphorylation of MEK, activation of MAP kinase and subsequent DNA synthesis. A potent PI3 kinase inhibitor, Wortmannin, could not inhibit either of them. These results suggest that in primary endothelial cells, VEGF-induced activation of Raf-MEK-MAP kinase and DNA synthesis are mainly mediated by PKC-dependent pathway, much more than by Ras-dependent or PI3 kinase-dependent pathway.

  2. Stimulation of MAP-2 kinase activity in T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 or anti-Ti monoclonal antibody is partially dependent on protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Nel, A E; Hanekom, C; Rheeder, A; Williams, K; Pollack, S; Katz, R; Landreth, G E

    1990-04-01

    Signaling via the alpha-beta T cell Ag receptor (Ti)-CD3 complex is a complicated event that implicates several protein kinases, most notably protein kinase C (PKC). We have recently identified a serine kinase in T lymphocytes with the following characteristics: molecular mass 43 kDa, in vitro substrate affinity for microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2) with a preference for Mn2+ during the catalytic reaction, and elution from DEAE resin over a salt range 100 to 200 mM NaCl. This kinase is activated in a rapidly reversible fashion during ligation of CD3/Ti by a process which involves prior phosphorylation; in vitro exposure of activated 43-kDa MAP-2 kinase (MAP-K) to an immobilized phosphatase abrogated its kinase activity. We now show that a MAP-2K response could also be obtained during treatment with mAb to Ti and the specific PKC agonist, PMA. Although the kinetics of the former response was rapidly reversible, PMA elicited a more prolonged response. The dose responsiveness for PMA was similar to the requirements for PKC activation in intact lymphocytes. Moreover, as with PKC, we found that the CD3-induced MAP-2K response could be further enhanced by using a second layer cross-linking antibody. The specificity of CD3/Ti in the Jurkat cell response is demonstrated by the fact that OKT-11(CD2) and anti-CD4 mAb did not stimulate a MAP-2K response. It was also not possible to elicit a response in a Jurkat cell mutant that lacks surface expression of CD3 and Ti. The specificity of PKC in these events was further explored with the cell permeant diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and the nonagonist phorbol ester, 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate: whereas the former was an effective inducer of the MAP-2K response, the latter failed to yield any stimulation. Prior exposure of Jurkat cells to 100 mM PMA for 24 h eliminated greater than 60% of the MAP-2K response during anti-CD3 treatment. This response could also be inhibited in dose-dependent fashion by prior

  3. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation in bergmann glia cells: involvement of p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Rossana C; Barrera, Iliana; Castelán, Francisco; Soto-Cid, Abraham; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2008-07-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) are present in neurons and glial cells and are involved in gene expression regulation. Mitogen-activated proteins kinases (MAPK) are critical for all the membrane to nuclei signaling pathways described so far. In cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation is partially dependent on p42/44 MAPK activity. Another member of this kinase family, p38 MAPK is activated by non-mitogenic stimuli through its Thr180/Tyr182 phosphorylation and phosphorylates cytoplasmic and nuclear protein targets involved in translational and transcriptional events. Taking into consideration that the role of p38MAPK in glial cells is not well understood, we demonstrate here that glutamate increases p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a time and dose dependent manner in cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells (BGC). Moreover, p38 MAPK is involved in the glutamate-induced transcriptional activation in these cells. Ionotropic as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors participate in p38 MAPK activation. The present findings demonstrate the involvement of p38 MAPK in glutamate-dependent gene expression regulation in glial cells.

  4. Aberrant Activation of p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Innate Immune Responses Is Toxic to Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Hilary K; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Thekkiniath, Jose; Dowen, Robert H; Conery, Annie L; Pukkila-Worley, Read

    2016-03-01

    Inappropriate activation of innate immune responses in intestinal epithelial cells underlies the pathophysiology of inflammatory disorders of the intestine. Here we examine the physiological effects of immune hyperactivation in the intestine of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We previously identified an immunostimulatory xenobiotic that protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by inducing immune effector expression via the conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway, but was toxic to nematodes developing in the absence of pathogen. To investigate a possible connection between the toxicity and immunostimulatory properties of this xenobiotic, we conducted a forward genetic screen for C. elegans mutants that are resistant to the deleterious effects of the compound, and identified five toxicity suppressors. These strains contained hypomorphic mutations in each of the known components of the p38 MAP kinase cassette (tir-1, nsy-1, sek-1, and pmk-1), demonstrating that hyperstimulation of the p38 MAPK pathway is toxic to animals. To explore mechanisms of immune pathway regulation in C. elegans, we conducted another genetic screen for dominant activators of the p38 MAPK pathway, and identified a single allele that had a gain-of-function (gf) mutation in nsy-1, the MAP kinase kinase kinase that acts upstream of p38 MAPK pmk-1. The nsy-1(gf) allele caused hyperinduction of p38 MAPK PMK-1-dependent immune effectors, had greater levels of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and was more resistant to killing by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to wild-type controls. In addition, the nsy-1(gf) mutation was toxic to developing animals. Together, these data suggest that the activity of the MAPKKK NSY-1 is tightly regulated as part of a physiological mechanism to control p38 MAPK-mediated innate immune hyperactivation, and ensure cellular homeostasis in C. elegans. PMID:26818074

  5. Pectin activation of MAP kinase and gene expression is WAK2 dependent.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Johansen, Susan; Shishido, Akira; Todorova, Tanya; Martinez, Rhysly; Defeo, Elita; Obregon, Pablo

    2009-12-01

    The angiosperm extracellular matrix, or cell wall, is composed of a complex array of cellulose, hemicellulose, pectins and proteins, the modification and regulated synthesis of which are essential for cell growth and division. The wall associated kinases (WAKs) are receptor-like proteins that have an extracellular domain that bind pectins, the more flexible portion of the extracellular matrix, and are required for cell expansion as they have a role in regulating cellular solute concentrations. We show here that both recombinant WAK1 and WAK2 bind pectin in vitro. In protoplasts pectins activate, in a WAK2-dependent fashion, the transcription of vacuolar invertase, and a wak2 mutant alters the normal pectin regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. Microarray analysis shows that WAK2 is required for the pectin activation of numerous genes in protoplasts, many of which are involved in cell wall biogenesis. Thus, WAK2 plays a major role in signaling a diverse array of cellular events in response to pectin in the extracellular matrix.

  6. Gene for the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA-dependent protein kinase maps to the scid locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R D; Hogg, J; Ozaki, J H; Gell, D; Jackson, S P; Riblet, R

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) has been proposed recently as a candidate gene for the mouse severe combined immune deficiency (scid) locus. We have used a partial cDNA clone for human DNA-PKcs to map the mouse homologue using a large interspecific backcross panel. We found that the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs does not recombine with scid, consistent with the hypothesis that scid is a mutation in the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479885

  7. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Spinal Inflammation Impairs Respiratory Motor Plasticity by a Spinal p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Adrianne G; Smith, Stephanie M C; Peterson, Timothy J; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-04-29

    Inflammation is characteristic of most clinical disorders that challenge the neural control of breathing. Since inflammation modulates neuroplasticity, we studied the impact of inflammation caused by prolonged intermittent hypoxia on an important form of respiratory plasticity, acute intermittent hypoxia (three, 5 min hypoxic episodes, 5 min normoxic intervals) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Because chronic intermittent hypoxia elicits neuroinflammation and pLTF is undermined by lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that one night of intermittent hypoxia (IH-1) elicits spinal inflammation, thereby impairing pLTF by a p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. pLTF and spinal inflammation were assessed in anesthetized rats pretreated with IH-1 (2 min hypoxia, 2 min normoxia; 8 h) or sham normoxia and allowed 16 h for recovery. IH-1 (1) transiently increased IL-6 (1.5 ± 0.2-fold; p = 0.02) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (2.4 ± 0.4-fold; p = 0.01) mRNA in cervical spinal homogenates, (2) elicited a sustained increase in IL-1β mRNA (2.4 ± 0.2-fold; p < 0.001) in isolated cervical spinal microglia, and (3) abolished pLTF (-1 ± 5% vs 56 ± 10% in controls; p < 0.001). pLTF was restored after IH-1 by systemic NSAID administration (ketoprofen; 55 ± 9%; p < 0.001) or spinal p38 MAP kinase inhibition (58 ± 2%; p < 0.001). IH-1 increased phosphorylated (activated) p38 MAP kinase immunofluorescence in identified phrenic motoneurons and adjacent microglia. In conclusion, IH-1 elicits spinal inflammation and impairs pLTF by a spinal p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. By targeting inflammation, we may develop strategies to manipulate respiratory motor plasticity for therapeutic advantage when the respiratory control system is compromised (e.g., sleep apnea, apnea of prematurity, spinal injury, or motor neuron disease).

  8. Map kinases in fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xu, J R

    2000-12-01

    MAP kinases in eukaryotic cells are well known for transducing a variety of extracellular signals to regulate cell growth and differentiation. Recently, MAP kinases homologous to the yeast Fus3/Kss1 MAP kinases have been identified in several fungal pathogens and found to be important for appressorium formation, invasive hyphal growth, and fungal pathogenesis. This MAP kinase pathway also controls diverse growth or differentiation processes, including conidiation, conidial germination, and female fertility. MAP kinases homologous to yeast Slt2 and Hog1 have also been characterized in Candida albicans and Magnaporthe grisea. Mutants disrupted of the Slt2 homologues have weak cell walls, altered hyphal growth, and reduced virulence. The Hog1 homologues are dispensable for growth but are essential for regulating responses to hyperosmotic stress in C. albicans and M. grisea. Overall, recent studies have indicated that MAP kinase pathways may play important roles in regulating growth, differentiation, survival, and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. PMID:11273677

  9. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  10. Genetic activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Li, Tan; Abel, Glen M; Palmiter, Richard D; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of adult neurogenesis impairs the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it is not known whether increasing adult neurogenesis affects the persistence of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis are not fully defined. We recently reported that the conditional and targeted knock-out of ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions of the mouse brain attenuates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and disrupts several forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. Here, we developed a gain-of-function knock-in mouse model to specifically activate endogenous ERK5 in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain. We report that the selective and targeted activation of ERK5 increases adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus by enhancing cell survival, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic complexity. Conditional ERK5 activation also improves the performance of challenging forms of spatial learning and memory and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We conclude that enhancing signal transduction of a single signaling pathway within adult neural stem/progenitor cells is sufficient to increase adult neurogenesis and improve the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, activation of ERK5 may provide a novel therapeutic target to improve long-term memory.

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  12. AM fungal exudates activate MAP kinases in plant cells in dependence from cytosolic Ca(2+) increase.

    PubMed

    Francia, Doriana; Chiltz, Annick; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Pugin, Alain; Bonfante, Paola; Cardinale, Francesca

    2011-09-01

    The molecular dialogue occurring prior to direct contact between the fungal and plant partners of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses begins with the release of fungal elicitors, so far only partially identified chemically, which can activate specific signaling pathways in the host plant. We show here that the activation of MAPK is also induced by exudates of germinating spores of Gigaspora margarita in cultured cells of the non-leguminous species tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), as well as in those of the model legume Lotus japonicus. MAPK activity peaked about 15 min after the exposure of the host cells to the fungal exudates (FE). FE were also responsible for a rapid and transient increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and tobacco cells, and pre-treatment with a Ca(2+)-channel blocker (La(3+)) showed that in these cells, MAPK activation was dependent on the cytosolic Ca(2+) increase. A partial dependence of MAPK activity on the common Sym pathway could be demonstrated for a cell line of L. japonicus defective for LjSym4 and hence unable to establish an AM symbiosis. Our results show that MAPK activation is triggered by an FE-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) transient, and that a Sym genetic determinant acts to modulate the intensity and duration of this activity.

  13. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  14. Regulation of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase by MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Graves, L M; Guy, H I; Kozlowski, P; Huang, M; Lazarowski, E; Pope, R M; Collins, M A; Dahlstrand, E N; Earp, H S; Evans, D R

    2000-01-20

    The de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides is required for mammalian cells to proliferate. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is catalysed by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS II), part of the multifunctional enzyme CAD. Here we describe the regulation of CAD by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. When phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro or activated by epidermal growth factor in vivo, CAD lost its feedback inhibition (which is dependent on uridine triphosphate) and became more sensitive to activation (which depends upon phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate). Both these allosteric regulatory changes favour biosynthesis of pyrimidines for growth. They were accompanied by increased epidermal growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of CAD in vivo and were prevented by inhibition of MAP kinase. Mutation of a consensus MAP kinase phosphorylation site abolished the changes in CAD allosteric regulation that were stimulated by growth factors. Finally, consistent with an effect of MAP kinase signalling on CPS II activity, epidermal growth factor increased cellular uridine triphosphate and this increase was reversed by inhibition of MAP kinase. Hence these studies may indicate a direct link between activation of the MAP kinase cascade and de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:10659854

  15. Microglial Signaling in Chronic Pain with a Special Focus on Caspase 6, p38 MAP Kinase, and Sex Dependence.

    PubMed

    Berta, T; Qadri, Y J; Chen, G; Ji, R R

    2016-09-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells in the spinal cord and brain. Mounting evidence suggests that activation of microglia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic pain, including chronic orofacial pain. In particular, microglia contribute to the transition from acute pain to chronic pain, as inhibition of microglial signaling reduces pathologic pain after inflammation, nerve injury, and cancer but not baseline pain. As compared with inflammation, nerve injury induces much more robust morphologic activation of microglia, termed microgliosis, as shown by increased expression of microglial markers, such as CD11b and IBA1. However, microglial signaling inhibitors effectively reduce inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain, arguing against the importance of morphologic activation of microglia in chronic pain sensitization. Importantly, microglia enhance pain states via secretion of proinflammatory and pronociceptive mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins 1β and 18, and brain-derived growth factor. Mechanistically, these mediators have been shown to enhance excitatory synaptic transmission and suppress inhibitory synaptic transmission in the pain circuits. While early studies suggested a predominant role of microglia in the induction of chronic pain, further studies have supported a role of microglia in the maintenance of chronic pain. Intriguingly, recent studies show male-dominant microglial signaling in some neuropathic pain and inflammatory pain states, although both sexes show identical morphologic activation of microglia after nerve injury. In this critical review, we provide evidence to show that caspase 6-a secreted protease that is expressed in primary afferent axonal terminals surrounding microglia-is a robust activator of microglia and induces profound release of tumor necrosis factor α from microglia via activation of p38 MAP kinase. The authors also show that microglial caspase 6/p38 signaling is male dominant in some

  16. 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol induces HuR-dependent MAP kinase phosphatase-1 expression via mGluR5-mediated Ca(2+)/PKCα signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunmi; Woo, Joo Hong; Lee, Jee Hoon; Joe, Eun-Hye; Jou, Ilo

    2016-08-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 plays a pivotal role in controlling MAP kinase (MAPK)-dependent (patho) physiological processes. Although MKP-1 gene expression is tightly regulated at multiple levels, the underlying mechanistic details remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that MKP-1 expression is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol [22(R)-HC] through a novel mechanism. 22(R)-HC induces Hu antigen R (HuR) phosphorylation, cytoplasmic translocation and binding to MKP-1 mRNA, resulting in stabilization of MKP-1 mRNA. The resulting increase in MKP-1 leads to suppression of JNK-mediated inflammatory responses in brain astrocytes. We further demonstrate that 22(R)-HC-induced phosphorylation of nuclear HuR is mediated by PKCα, which is activated in the cytosol by increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels mediated by the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (PLC/IP3R) pathway and translocates from cytoplasm to nucleus. In addition, pharmacological interventions reveal that metabotropic glutamate receptor5 (mGluR5) is responsible for the increases in intracellular Ca(2+) that underlie these actions of 22(R)-HC. Collectively, our findings identify a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of 22(R)-HC, which acts through PKCα-mediated cytoplasmic shuttling of HuR to post-transcriptionally regulate MKP-1 expression. These findings provide an experimental basis for the development of a RNA-targeted therapeutic agent to control MAPK-dependent inflammatory responses.

  17. Retinotopic map plasticity in adult cat visual cortex is accompanied by changes in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, G; Eysel, U T; Vandenbussche, E; Vandesande, F; Arckens, L

    2003-01-01

    In adult cats, the induction of homonymous binocular central retinal lesions causes a dramatic reorganization of the topographic map in the sensory-deprived region of the primary visual cortex. To investigate the possible involvement of the alpha-subunit of the calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase type II (alphaCaMKII) in this form of brain plasticity, we performed in situ hybridization and Western blotting experiments to analyze mRNA, protein and autophosphorylation levels of this multifunctional kinase. No differences in the mRNA or protein levels were observed between the central, sensory-deprived and the peripheral, non-deprived regions of area 17 of retinal lesion animals or between corresponding cortical regions of normal control animals. Western blotting with an alphaCaMKII threonine-286 phosphorylation-state specific antiserum consistently showed a small, albeit not significant, increase of alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation in the central versus the peripheral region of cortical area 17, and this both in normal subjects as well as in retinal lesion animals with a 3-day post-lesion survival time. In contrast, a post-lesion survival time of 14 days resulted in a alphaCaMKII autophosphorylation level that was four times higher in visually-deprived area 17 than in the non-deprived cortical region. This increased phosphorylation state is not a direct consequence of the decrease in visual activity in these neurons, because we would have expected to see a similar change at shorter or longer post-lesion survival times or in the visually deprived visual cortex of animals in which the left optic tract and the corpus callosum were surgically cut. No such changes were observed, leading to the conclusion that the phosphorylation changes observed at 14 days are related to a delayed reorganization of the retinotopic map of the striate cortex. PMID:12849747

  18. IL-12 and IL-18 induce MAP kinase-dependent adhesion of T cells to extracellular matrix components.

    PubMed

    Ariel, Amiram; Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem; Dinarello, Charles A; Lider, Ofer; Hershkoviz, Rami

    2002-07-01

    Cytokines and chemokines play an essential role in recruiting leukocytes from the circulation to the peripheral sites of inflammation by modulating cellular interactions with endothelial cell ligands and extracellular matrix (ECM). Herein, we examined regulation of T cell adhesion to ECM ligands by two major proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18. IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and hyaluronic acid at low (pM) concentrations that were mediated by specific adhesion molecules expressed on the T cell surface, namely, beta(1) integrins and CD44, respectively. The induction of adhesion by IL-12 and IL-18 was inhibited by extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (PD098059 and SB203580, respectively). In contrast, IL-12- and IL-18-induced interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) secretion from T cells was inhibited by SB203580, but not by PD098059. It is interesting that low concentrations of IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to FN in a synergistic manner. Thus, in addition to the regulation of late inflammatory functions such as INF-gamma production, IL-12 and IL-18, alone or in combination, regulate early inflammatory events such as T cell adhesion to inflamed sites. PMID:12101280

  19. Axodendritic contacts onto calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II-expressing neurons in the barn owl auditory space map.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Contreras, Adrian; Liu, Xiao-Bo; DeBello, William M

    2005-06-01

    In the owl midbrain, a map of auditory space is synthesized in the inferior colliculus (IC) and conveyed to the optic tectum (OT). Ascending auditory information courses through these structures via topographic axonal projections. Little is known about the molecular composition of projection neurons or their postsynaptic targets. To visualize axodendritic contacts between identified cell types, we used double-label immunohistochemistry, in vivo retrograde tracing, in vitro anterograde tracing, high-resolution confocal microscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction and fly-through visualization. We discovered a major class of IC neurons that strongly expressed calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II, alpha subunit (CaMKII). The distribution of these cells within the IC was mostly restricted to the external nucleus of the IC (ICX), in which the auditory space map is assembled. A large proportion of ICX-OT projection neurons were CaMKII positive. In addition to being the principal outputs, CaMKII cells were in direct contact with axonal boutons emanating from the main source of input to ICX, the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICCls). Numerous sites of putative synaptic contact were found on the somata, proximal dendrites, and distal dendrites. Double-label immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the existence of synapses between ICCls axons and the dendrites of CaMKII cells. Collectively, our data indicate that CaMKII ICX neurons are a cellular locus for the computation of auditory space-specific responses. Because the ICCls-ICX projection is physically altered during experience-dependent plasticity, these results lay the groundwork for probing microanatomical rearrangements that may underlie plasticity and learning. PMID:15944389

  20. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Enslen, H; Tokumitsu, H; Stork, P J; Davis, R J; Soderling, T R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane depolarization of NG108 cells gives rapid (< 5 min) activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaM-KIV), as well as activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). To investigate whether the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38) might be mediated by the CaM kinase cascade, we have transfected PC12 cells, which lack CaM-KIV, with constitutively active mutants of CaM kinase kinase and/or CaM-KIV (CaM-KKc and CaM-KIVc, respectively). In the absence of depolarization, CaM-KKc transfection had no effect on Elk-dependent transcription of a luciferase reporter gene, whereas CaM-KIVc alone or in combination with CaM-KKc gave 7- to 10-fold and 60- to 80-fold stimulations, respectively, which were blocked by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase cotransfection. When epitope-tagged constructs of MAP kinases were co-transfected with CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc, the immunoprecipitated MAP kinases were activated 2-fold (ERK-2) and 7- to 10-fold (JNK-1 and p38). The JNK and p38 pathways were further investigated using specific c-Jun or ATF2-dependent transcriptional assays. We found that c-Jun/ATF2-dependent transcriptions were enhanced 7- to 10-fold by CaM-KIVc and 20- to 30-fold by CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc. In the case of the Jun-dependent transcription, this effect was not due to direct phosphorylation of c-Jun by activated CaM-KIV, since transcription was blocked by a dominant-negative JNK and by two MAP kinase phosphatases. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (Thr196) in CaM-KIV, which mediates its activation by CaM-KIV kinase, prevented activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF2 by the CaM kinase cascade. These results establish a new Ca2+-dependent mechanism for regulating MAP kinase pathways and resultant transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855261

  1. p38 MAP kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the Gp78 E3 ubiquitin ligase controls ER-mitochondria association and mitochondria motility.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Gao, Guang; Shankar, Jay; Joshi, Bharat; Foster, Leonard J; Nabi, Ivan R

    2015-11-01

    Gp78 is an ERAD-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase that induces degradation of the mitofusin mitochondrial fusion proteins and mitochondrial fission. Gp78 is localized throughout the ER; however, the anti-Gp78 3F3A monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizes Gp78 selectively in mitochondria-associated ER domains. Epitope mapping localized the epitope of 3F3A and a commercial anti-Gp78 mAb to an 8-amino acid motif (533-541) in mouse Gp78 isoform 2 that forms part of a highly conserved 41-amino acid region containing 14-3-3- and WW-binding domains and a p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK) consensus site on Ser-538 (S538). 3F3A binds selectively to nonphosphorylated S538 Gp78. Using 3F3A as a reporter, we induced Gp78 S538 phosphorylation by serum starvation and showed it to be mediated by p38 MAPK. Mass spectroscopy analysis of Gp78 phosphopeptides confirmed S538 as a major p38 MAPK phosphorylation site on Gp78. Gp78 S538 phosphorylation limited its ability to induce mitochondrial fission and degrade MFN1 and MFN2 but did not affect in vitro Gp78 ubiquitin E3 ligase activity. Phosphomimetic Gp78 S538D mutation prevented Gp78 promotion of ER-mitochondria interaction, and SB203580 inhibition of p38 MAPK increased ER-mitochondria association. p38 MAPK phosphorylation of Gp78 S538 therefore regulates Gp78-dependent ER-mitochondria association and mitochondria motility.

  2. MAP kinase activity increases during mitosis in early sea urchin embryos.

    PubMed

    Philipova, R; Whitaker, M

    1998-09-01

    A MBP kinase activity increases at mitosis during the first two embryonic cell cycles of the sea urchin embryo. The activity profile of the MBP kinase is the same both in whole cell extracts and after immunoprecipitation with an anti-MAP kinase antibody (2199). An in-gel assay of MBP activity also shows the same activity profile. The activity is associated with the 44 kDa protein that cross-reacts with anti-MAP kinase antibodies. The 44 kDa protein shows cross-reactivity to anti-phosphotyrosine and MAP kinase-directed anti-phosphotyrosine/phosphothreonine antibodies at the times that MBP kinase activity is high. The 2199 antibody co-precipitates some histone H1 kinase activity, but the MBP kinase activity cannot be accounted for by histone H1 kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MBP. The MAP kinase 2199 antibody was used to purify the MBP kinase activity. Peptide sequencing after partial digestion shows the protein to be homologous to MAP kinases from other species. These data demonstrate that MAP kinase activation during nuclear division is not confined to meiosis, but also occurs during mitotic cell cycles. MAP kinase activity in immunoprecipitates also increases immediately after fertilization, which in the sea urchin egg occurs at interphase of the cell cycle. Treating unfertilized eggs with the calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates the increase in MAP kinase activity, demonstrating that a calcium signal can activate MAP kinase and suggesting that the activation of MAP kinase at fertilization is due to the fertilization-induced increase in cytoplasmic free calcium concentration. This signalling pathway must differ from the pathway responsible for calcium-induced inactivation of MAP kinase activity that is found in eggs that are fertilized in meiotic metaphase. PMID:9701549

  3. TGF-β1 inhibition of IFN-γ-induced signaling and Th1 gene expression in CD4+ T cells is Smad3 independent but MAP kinase dependent

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il-Kyoo; Letterio, John J.; Gorham, James D.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to classic Smad signaling pathways, the pleiotropic immunoregulatory cytokine TGF-β1 can activate MAP kinases, but a role for TGF-β1-MAP kinase pathways in T cells has not been defined heretofore. We have shown previously that TGF-β1 inhibits Th1 development by inhibiting IFN-γ’s induction of T-bet and other Th1 differentiation genes, and that TGF-β1 inhibits receptor-proximal IFN-γ-Jak-Stat signaling responses. We now show that these effects of TGF-β1 are independent of the canonical TGF-β1 signaling module Smad3, but involve a specific MAP kinase pathway. In primary T cells, TGF-β1 activated the MEK/ERK and p38 MAP kinase pathways, but not the JNK pathway. Inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of TGF-β1 on IFN-γ responses in T cells, whereas inhibition of the p38 pathway had no effect. Thus, TGF-β1’s inhibition of IFN-γ signaling in T cells is mediated through a highly specific Smad3-independent, MEK/ERK-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:17403540

  4. c-Jun controls the efficiency of MAP kinase signaling by transcriptional repression of MAP kinase phosphatases

    SciTech Connect

    Sprowles, Amy; Wu Yimi; Kung, H.-J.; Wisdom, Ron . E-mail: ronald.wisdom@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

    2005-08-15

    The mammalian JNK signaling pathway regulates the transcriptional response of cells to environmental stress, including UV irradiation. This signaling pathway is composed of a classical MAP kinase cascade; activation results in phosphorylation of the transcription factor substrates c-Jun and ATF2, and leads to changes in gene expression. The defining components of this pathway are conserved in the fission yeast S. pombe, where the genetic studies have shown that the ability of the JNK homolog Spc1 to be activated in response to UV irradiation is dependent on the presence of the transcription factor substrate Atf1. We have used genetic analysis to define the role of c-Jun in activation of the mammalian JNK signaling pathway. Our results show that optimal activation of JNK requires the presence of its transcription factor substrate c-Jun. Mutational analysis shows that the ability of c-Jun to support efficient activation of JNK requires the ability of Jun to bind DNA, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism. Consistent with this, we show that c-Jun represses the expression of several MAP kinase phosphatases. In the absence of c-Jun, the increased expression of MAP kinase phosphatases leads to impaired activation of the ERK, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases after pathway activation. The results show that one function of c-Jun is to regulate the efficiency of signaling by the ERK, p38, and JNK MAP kinases, a function that is likely to affect cellular responses to many different stimuli.

  5. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  6. MAP kinase pathways: The first twenty years

    PubMed Central

    Avruch, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The MAP kinases, discovered approximately twenty years ago, together with their immediate upstream regulators, are among the most highly studied signal transduction molecules. This body of work has shaped many aspects of our present views of signal transduction by protein kinases. The effort expended in this area reflects the extensive participation of these regulatory modules in the control of cell fate decisions, i.e., proliferation, differentiation and death, across all eukaryotic phylla and in all tissues of metazoans. The discovery of these kinases is reviewed, followed by a discussion of some of the features of this signaling module that account for its broad impact on cell function and its enormous interest to many investigators. PMID:17229475

  7. Selective regulation of MAP kinase signaling by an endomembrane phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase.

    PubMed

    Cappell, Steven D; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2011-04-29

    Multiple MAP kinase pathways share components yet initiate distinct biological processes. Signaling fidelity can be maintained by scaffold proteins and restriction of signaling complexes to discreet subcellular locations. For example, the yeast MAP kinase scaffold Ste5 binds to phospholipids produced at the plasma membrane and promotes selective MAP kinase activation. Here we show that Pik1, a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase that localizes primarily to the Golgi, also regulates MAP kinase specificity but does so independently of Ste5. Pik1 is required for full activation of the MAP kinases Fus3 and Hog1 and represses activation of Kss1. Further, we show by genetic epistasis analysis that Pik1 likely regulates Ste11 and Ste50, components shared by all three MAP kinase pathways, through their interaction with the scaffold protein Opy2. These findings reveal a new regulator of signaling specificity functioning at endomembranes rather than at the plasma membrane. PMID:21388955

  8. Measuring MAP kinase activity in immune complex assays.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, Vera A

    2006-11-01

    I present an overview of published methods for measuring mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase activity on endogenous associated substrates, exogenously added substrates as well as determination of activation loop phosphorylation as a read-out of kinase activity in vivo. Detailed procedures for these assays are given for two MAP kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 and compared with other published protocols, including the protocols for Hog1 and Mpk1 MAPKs. Measuring kinase activity in immune complex assays can serve as an approach for identification of potential substrates of protein kinases as well as for detecting other kinase-associated proteins. PMID:16890454

  9. p38 MAP kinase-mediated NMDA receptor-dependent suppression of hippocampal hypersynchronicity in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ittner, Arne A; Gladbach, Amadeus; Bertz, Josefine; Suh, Lisa S; Ittner, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Hypersynchronicity of neuronal brain circuits is a feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mouse models of AD expressing mutated forms of the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a central protein involved in AD pathology, show cortical hypersynchronicity. We studied hippocampal circuitry in APP23 transgenic mice using telemetric electroencephalography (EEG), at the age of onset of memory deficits. APP23 mice display spontaneous hypersynchronicity in the hippocampus including epileptiform spike trains. Furthermore, spectral contributions of hippocampal theta and gamma oscillations are compromised in APP23 mice, compared to non-transgenic controls. Using cross-frequency coupling analysis, we show that hippocampal gamma amplitude modulation by theta phase is markedly impaired in APP23 mice. Hippocampal hypersynchronicity and waveforms are differentially modulated by injection of riluzole and the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibitor MK801, suggesting specific involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels and NMDA receptors in hypersynchronicity thresholds in APP23 mice. Furthermore, APP23 mice show marked activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in hippocampus, and injection of MK801 but not riluzole reduces activation of p38 in the hippocampus. A p38 inhibitor induces hypersynchronicity in APP23 mice to a similar extent as MK801, thus supporting suppression of hypersynchronicity involves NMDA receptors-mediated p38 activity. In summary, we characterize components of hippocampal hypersynchronicity, waveform patterns and cross-frequency coupling in the APP23 mouse model by pharmacological modulation, furthering the understanding of epileptiform brain activity in AD.

  10. Bimodal lipid substrate dependence of phosphatidylinositol kinase.

    PubMed

    Ganong, B R

    1990-07-24

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase activity was solubilized from rat liver microsomes and partially purified by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and Reactive Green 19-Superose. Examination of the ATP dependence using a mixed micellar assay gave a Km of 120 microM. The dependence of reaction rate on PI was more complicated. PI kinase bound a large amount of Triton X-100, and as expected for a micelle-associated enzyme utilizing a micelle-associated lipid substrate, the reaction rate was dependent on the micellar mole fraction, PI/(PI + Triton X-100), with a Km of 0.02 (unitless). Activity showed an additional dependence on bulk PI concentration at high micelle dilution. These results demonstrated two kinetically distinguishable steps leading to formation of a productive PI/enzyme(/ATP) complex. The rate of the first step, which probably represents exchange of PI from the bulk micellar pool into enzyme-containing micelles, depends on bulk PI concentration. The rate of the second step, association of PI with enzyme within a single micelle, depends on the micellar mole fraction of PI. Depression of the apparent Vmax at low ionic strength suggested that electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged PI/Triton X-100 mixed micelles inhibits PI exchange, consistent with a model in which intermicellar PI exchange depends on micellar collisions.

  11. MAP4K Family Kinases in Immunity and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Huai-Chia; Wang, Xiaohong; Tan, Tse-Hua

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinase kinase kinase kinases (MAP4Ks) belong to the mammalian Ste20-like family of serine/threonine kinases. MAP4Ks including MAP4K1/HPK1, MAP4K2/GCK, MAP4K3/GLK, MAP4K4/HGK, MAP4K5/KHS, and MAP4K6/MINK have been reported to induce JNK activation through activating the MAP3K-MAP2K cascade. The physiological roles of MAP4Ks in immunity and inflammation are largely unknown until recent studies using biochemical approaches and knockout mice. Surprisingly, JNK is not the major target of MAP4Ks in immune cells; MAP4Ks regulate immune responses through novel targets. HPK1 inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling and B-cell receptor signaling via inducing phosphorylation/ubiquitination of SLP-76 and BLNK, respectively. GLK activates TCR signaling through phosphorylating/activating PKCθ. T-cell-mediated immune responses and Th17-mediated experimental autoimmune diseases are enhanced in HPK1 knockout mice but ameliorated in GLK knockout mice. Consistently, HPK1 levels are decreased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and T cells from patients with psoriatic arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), respectively. Moreover, GLK levels are increased in T cells from patients with SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, or adult-onset Still's disease; the percentages of GLK-overexpression T cells are correlated with the disease activity. In addition, HGK phosphorylates and induces TRAF2 protein degradation, leading to negative regulation of IL-6 production in resting T cells. Loss of HGK in T cells results in spontaneous systemic inflammation and type 2 diabetes in mice. HGK is also involved in cancer cell migration. To date, the phenotypes of knockout mice for GCK, KHS, and MINK have not been reported; the roles of these three MAP4Ks in immune cell signaling are discussed in this review. Taken together, MAP4K family kinases play diverse roles in immune cell signaling, immune responses, and inflammation. PMID:26791862

  12. Mangiferin, a Natural Xanthone, Protects Murine Liver in Pb(II) Induced Hepatic Damage and Cell Death via MAP Kinase, NF-κB and Mitochondria Dependent Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most well-known naturally occurring environmental heavy metals, lead (Pb) has been reported to cause liver injury and cellular apoptosis by disturbing the prooxidant-antioxidant balance via oxidative stress. Several studies, on the other hand, reported that mangiferin, a naturally occurring xanthone, has been used for a broad range of therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we, therefore, investigated the molecular mechanisms of the protective action of mangiferin against lead-induced hepatic pathophysiology. Lead [Pb(II)] in the form of Pb(NO3)2 (at a dose of 5 mg/kg body weight, 6 days, orally) induced oxidative stress, hepatic dysfunction and cell death in murine liver. Post treatment of mangiferin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight (6 days, orally), on the other hand, diminished the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced the levels of serum marker enzymes [alanine aminotranferase (ALT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)]. Mangiferin also reduced Pb(II) induced alterations in antioxidant machineries, restored the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as mutual regulation of Bcl-2/Bax. Furthermore, mangiferin inhibited Pb(II)-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (phospho-ERK 1/2, phosphor-JNK phospho- p38), nuclear translocation of NF-κB and apoptotic cell death as was evidenced by DNA fragmentation, FACS analysis and histological assessment. In vitro studies using hepatocytes as the working model also showed the protective effect of mangiferin in Pb(II) induced cytotoxicity. All these beneficial effects of mangiferin contributes to the considerable reduction of apoptotic hepatic cell death induced by Pb(II). Overall results demonstrate that mangiferin exhibit both antioxidative and antiapoptotic properties and protects the organ in Pb(II) induced hepatic dysfunction. PMID:23451106

  13. Molecular basis of MAP kinase regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and ERK5) have evolved to transduce environmental and developmental signals (growth factors, stress) into adaptive and programmed responses (differentiation, inflammation, apoptosis). Almost 20 years ago, it was discovered that MAPKs contain a docking site in the C-terminal lobe that binds a conserved 13-16 amino acid sequence known as the D- or KIM-motif (kinase interaction motif). Recent crystal structures of MAPK:KIM-peptide complexes are leading to a precise understanding of how KIM sequences contribute to MAPK selectivity. In addition, new crystal and especially NMR studies are revealing how residues outside the canonical KIM motif interact with specific MAPKs and contribute further to MAPK selectivity and signaling pathway fidelity. In this review, we focus on these recent studies, with an emphasis on the use of NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry and small angle X-ray scattering to investigate these processes. PMID:24115095

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinases in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Boxem, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Cell division is an inherent part of organismal development, and defects in this process can lead to developmental abnormalities as well as cancerous growth. In past decades, much of the basic cell-cycle machinery has been identified, and a major challenge in coming years will be to understand the complex interplay between cell division and multicellular development. Inevitably, this requires the use of more complex multicellular model systems. The small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an excellent model system to study the regulation of cell division in a multicellular organism, and is poised to make important contributions to this field. The past decade has already seen a surge in cell-cycle research in C. elegans, yielding information on the function of many basic cell-cycle regulators, and making inroads into the developmental control of cell division. This review focuses on the in vivo roles of cyclin-dependent kinases in C. elegans, and highlights novel findings implicating CDKs in coupling development to cell-cycle progression. PMID:16759361

  15. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase during cellular activation results in IFN-γ-dependent augmentation of IL-12 production by human monocytes/macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, J B; Clarke, I A; Dalgleish, A G

    2001-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a key immunomodulatory cytokine produced by antigen-presenting cells that promotes cellular immunity and enables the generation of protective immunity against intracellular pathogens and tumours. Therefore, modulation of IL-12 activity is a primary immunotherapeutic goal. However, little is known about its regulation. Signalling via p38 MAPK has been implicated in the control of inflammatory responses and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. We have used the highly selective p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) to examine the effect of this pathway on the production of IL-12. Surprisingly, we found that SB203580 strongly up-regulated LPS induced IL-12p40 at the protein (intracellular and secreted) and mRNA levels in PBMC cultures. The effect on IL-12 was apparent using both T cell-independent and T cell-dependent stimuli but not in unstimulated cultures, indicating that activation signals are required. Furthermore, the production of IFN-γ by T cells is crucial as production was not increased in LPS-stimulated, purified adherent monocytes/macrophages without the addition of exogenous IFN-γ. These results provide evidence that p38 MAPK has an unexpected suppressive effect on IL-12p40 gene transcription, and suggests interplay between p38 MAPK- and IFN-γ -mediated signals in the regulation of IL-12 production by monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, the importance of IL-12 as a key immunoregulatory cytokine suggests that the clinical application of pyrinidyl imidazole inhibitors, such as SB203580, may need to be reassessed. PMID:11472427

  16. Redundancy in the World of MAP Kinases: All for One

    PubMed Central

    Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Frémin, Christophe; Meloche, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinases ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector components of the prototypical ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This signaling pathway regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and is essential for embryonic development and cellular homeostasis. ERK1 and ERK2 homologs share similar biochemical properties but whether they exert specific physiological functions or act redundantly has been a matter of controversy. However, recent studies now provide compelling evidence in support of functionally redundant roles of ERK1 and ERK2 in embryonic development and physiology. In this review, we present a critical assessment of the evidence for the functional specificity or redundancy of MAP kinase isoforms. We focus on the ERK1/ERK2 pathway but also discuss the case of JNK and p38 isoforms. PMID:27446918

  17. Pyp1 and Pyp2 PTPases dephosphorylate an osmosensing MAP kinase controlling cell size at division in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Millar, J B; Buck, V; Wilkinson, M G

    1995-09-01

    Simultaneous inactivation of pyp1 and pyp2 PTPases in fission yeast leads to aberrant cell morphology and growth arrest. Spontaneous recessive mutations that bypass the requirement for pyp1 and pyp2 and reside in two complementation groups were isolated, sty1 and sty2. sty1- and sty2- mutant cells are substantially delayed in the timing of mitotic initiation. We have isolated the sty1 gene, which encodes a MAP kinase that is closely related to a subfamily of MAP kinases regulated by osmotic stress including Saccharomyces cervisiae HOG1 and human CSBP1. We find that sty2 is allelic to the wis1 MAP kinase kinase and that delta sty1 and delta wis1 cells are unable to grow in high osmolarity medium. Osmotic stress induces both tyrosine phosphorylation of Sty1 and a reduction in cell size at division. Pyp2 associates with and tyrosine dephosphorylates Sty1 in vitro. We find that wis1-dependent induction of pyp2 mRNA is responsible for tyrosine dephosphorylation of Sty1 in vivo on prolonged exposure to osmotic stress. We conclude that Pyp1 and Pyp2 are tyrosine-specific MAP kinase phosphatases that inactivate an osmoregulated MAP kinase, Sty1, which acts downstream of the Wis1 MAP kinase kinase to control cell size at division in fission yeast. PMID:7657164

  18. How MAP kinase modules function as robust, yet adaptable, circuits

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tianhai; Harding, Angus

    2014-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that the diversity of cell types and developmental patterns evident within the animal kingdom is generated by a handful of conserved, core modules. Core biological modules must be robust, able to maintain functionality despite perturbations, and yet sufficiently adaptable for random mutations to generate phenotypic variation during evolution. Understanding how robust, adaptable modules have influenced the evolution of eukaryotes will inform both evolutionary and synthetic biology. One such system is the MAP kinase module, which consists of a 3-tiered kinase circuit configuration that has been evolutionarily conserved from yeast to man. MAP kinase signal transduction pathways are used across eukaryotic phyla to drive biological functions that are crucial for life. Here we ask the fundamental question, why do MAPK modules follow a conserved 3-tiered topology rather than some other number? Using computational simulations, we identify a fundamental 2-tiered circuit topology that can be readily reconfigured by feedback loops and scaffolds to generate diverse signal outputs. When this 2-kinase circuit is connected to proximal input kinases, a 3-tiered modular configuration is created that is both robust and adaptable, providing a biological circuit that can regulate multiple phenotypes and maintain functionality in an uncertain world. We propose that the 3-tiered signal transduction module has been conserved through positive selection, because it facilitated the generation of phenotypic variation during eukaryotic evolution. PMID:25483189

  19. Acetylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is mediated by GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Juhyung; Yun, Nuri; Kim, Chiho; Song, Min-Young; Park, Kang-Sik; Oh, Young J.

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is present as an acetylated form. • CDK5 is acetylated by GCN5. • CDK5’s acetylation site is mapped at Lys33. • Its acetylation may affect CDK5’s kinase activity. - Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a member of atypical serine/threonine cyclin-dependent kinase family, plays a crucial role in pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Its kinase activity and substrate specificity are regulated by several independent pathways including binding with its activator, phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. In the present study, we report that acetylation of CDK5 comprises an additional posttranslational modification within the cells. Among many candidates, we confirmed that its acetylation is enhanced by GCN5, a member of the GCN5-related N-acetyl-transferase family of histone acetyltransferase. Co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescent localization study indicated that GCN5 physically interacts with CDK5 and they are co-localized at the specific nuclear foci. Furthermore, liquid chromatography in conjunction with a mass spectrometry indicated that CDK5 is acetylated at Lys33 residue of ATP binding domain. Considering this lysine site is conserved among a wide range of species and other related cyclin-dependent kinases, therefore, we speculate that acetylation may alter the kinase activity of CDK5 via affecting efficacy of ATP coordination.

  20. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Jessica R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Markus, Benedikt M; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7-kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.

  1. MAP kinases with distinct inhibitory functions impart signaling specificity during yeast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Madhani, H D; Styles, C A; Fink, G R

    1997-11-28

    Filamentous invasive growth of S. cerevisiae requires multiple elements of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade that are also components of the mating pheromone response pathway. Here we show that, despite sharing several constituents, the two pathways use different MAP kinases. The Fus3 MAPK regulates mating, whereas the Kss1 MAPK regulates filamentation and invasion. Remarkably, in addition to their kinase-dependent activation functions, Kss1 and Fus3 each have a distinct kinase-independent inhibitory function. Kss1 inhibits the filamentation pathway by interacting with its target transcription factor Ste12. Fus3 has a different inhibitory activity that prevents the inappropriate activation of invasion by the pheromone response pathway. In the absence of Fus3, there is erroneous crosstalk in which mating pheromone now activates filamentation-specific gene expression using the Kss1 MAPK. PMID:9393860

  2. Calcium-Dependent Signaling and Kinases in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Billker, Oliver; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David

    2009-01-01

    Summary Calcium controls many critical events in the complex life cycles of apicomplexan parasites including protein secretion, motility, and development. Calcium levels are normally tightly regulated and rapid release of calcium into the cytosol activates a family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are normally characteristic of plants. CDPKs present in apicomplexans have acquired a number of unique domain structures likely reflecting their diverse functions. Calcium regulation in parasites is closely linked to signaling by cyclic nucleotides and their associated kinases. This review summarizes the pivotal roles that calcium-and cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases play in unique aspects of parasite biology. PMID:19527888

  3. Identification of additional MAP kinases activated upon PAMP treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Yukino; Ding, Pingtao; Zhang, Yuelin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades play important roles in plant immunity. Upon pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) treatment, MPK3, MPK6 and MPK4 are quickly activated by upstream MKKs through phosphorylation. Western blot analysis using α-phospho-p44/42-ERK antibody suggests that additional MPKs with similar size as MPK4 are also activated upon PAMP perception. To identify these MAP kinases, 7 candidate MPKs with similar sizes as MPK4 were selected for further analysis. Transgenic plants expressing these MPKs with a ZZ-3xFLAG double tag of 17 kD were generated and analyzed by western blot. MPK1, MPK11 and MPK13 were found to be phosphorylated upon treatment with flg22. Our study revealed additional MAPKs being activated during PAMP-triggered immunity. PMID:25482788

  4. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates gene expression through transcription factor release in the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Botanga, Christopher J; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Palma, Kristoffer; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina; Sandbech-Clausen, Signe; Lichota, Jacek; Brodersen, Peter; Grasser, Klaus D; Mattsson, Ole; Glazebrook, Jane; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2008-08-20

    Plant and animal perception of microbes through pathogen surveillance proteins leads to MAP kinase signalling and the expression of defence genes. However, little is known about how plant MAP kinases regulate specific gene expression. We report that, in the absence of pathogens, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) exists in nuclear complexes with the WRKY33 transcription factor. This complex depends on the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Challenge with Pseudomonas syringae or flagellin leads to the activation of MPK4 and phosphorylation of MKS1. Subsequently, complexes with MKS1 and WRKY33 are released from MPK4, and WRKY33 targets the promoter of PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT3 (PAD3) encoding an enzyme required for the synthesis of antimicrobial camalexin. Hence, wrky33 mutants are impaired in the accumulation of PAD3 mRNA and camalexin production upon infection. That WRKY33 is an effector of MPK4 is further supported by the suppression of PAD3 expression in mpk4-wrky33 double mutant backgrounds. Our data establish direct links between MPK4 and innate immunity and provide an example of how a plant MAP kinase can regulate gene expression by releasing transcription factors in the nucleus upon activation.

  5. β-Arrestin drives MAP kinase signalling from clathrin-coated structures after GPCR dissociation.

    PubMed

    Eichel, K; Jullié, D; von Zastrow, M

    2016-03-01

    β-Arrestins critically regulate G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, not only 'arresting' the G protein signal but also modulating endocytosis and initiating a discrete G-protein-independent signal through MAP kinase. Despite enormous recent progress towards understanding biophysical aspects of arrestin function, arrestin cell biology remains relatively poorly understood. Two key tenets underlie the prevailing current view: β-arrestin accumulates in clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) exclusively in physical complex with its activating GPCR, and MAP kinase activation requires endocytosis of formed GPCR-β-arrestin complexes. We show here, using β1-adrenergic receptors, that β-arrestin-2 (arrestin 3) accumulates robustly in CCSs after dissociating from its activating GPCR and transduces the MAP kinase signal from CCSs. Moreover, inhibiting subsequent endocytosis of CCSs enhances the clathrin- and β-arrestin-dependent MAP kinase signal. These results demonstrate β-arrestin 'activation at a distance', after dissociating from its activating GPCR, and signalling from CCSs. We propose a β-arrestin signalling cycle that is catalytically activated by the GPCR and energetically coupled to the endocytic machinery.

  6. β-arrestin drives MAP kinase signaling from clathrin-coated structures after GPCR dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Eichel, K.; Jullié, D.

    2016-01-01

    β-arrestins critically regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, not only 'arresting' the G protein signal but also modulating endocytosis and initiating a discrete G protein-independent signal via MAP kinase1–3. Despite enormous recent progress toward understanding biophysical aspects of arrestin function4,5, its cell biology remains relatively poorly understood. Two key tenets underlie the present dogma: (1) β-arrestin accumulates in clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) exclusively in physical complex with its activating GPCR, and (2) MAP kinase activation requires endocytosis of formed GPCR - β-arrestin complexes6–9. We show here, using β1-adrenergic receptors, that β-arrestin-2 (Arrestin 3) accumulates robustly in CCSs after dissociating from its activating GPCR and transduces the MAP kinase signal from CCSs. Moreover, inhibiting subsequent endocytosis of CCSs enhances the clathrin and β-arrestin -dependent MAP kinase signal. These results demonstrate β-arrestin 'activation at a distance', after dissociating from its activating GPCR, and signaling from CCSs. We propose a β-arrestin signaling cycle that is catalytically activated by the GPCR and energetically coupled to the endocytic machinery. PMID:26829388

  7. β-Arrestin drives MAP kinase signalling from clathrin-coated structures after GPCR dissociation.

    PubMed

    Eichel, K; Jullié, D; von Zastrow, M

    2016-03-01

    β-Arrestins critically regulate G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, not only 'arresting' the G protein signal but also modulating endocytosis and initiating a discrete G-protein-independent signal through MAP kinase. Despite enormous recent progress towards understanding biophysical aspects of arrestin function, arrestin cell biology remains relatively poorly understood. Two key tenets underlie the prevailing current view: β-arrestin accumulates in clathrin-coated structures (CCSs) exclusively in physical complex with its activating GPCR, and MAP kinase activation requires endocytosis of formed GPCR-β-arrestin complexes. We show here, using β1-adrenergic receptors, that β-arrestin-2 (arrestin 3) accumulates robustly in CCSs after dissociating from its activating GPCR and transduces the MAP kinase signal from CCSs. Moreover, inhibiting subsequent endocytosis of CCSs enhances the clathrin- and β-arrestin-dependent MAP kinase signal. These results demonstrate β-arrestin 'activation at a distance', after dissociating from its activating GPCR, and signalling from CCSs. We propose a β-arrestin signalling cycle that is catalytically activated by the GPCR and energetically coupled to the endocytic machinery. PMID:26829388

  8. Activation Domain-dependent Degradation of Somatic Wee1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Laura; Simanski, Scott; Squire, Christopher; Smith, Anthony; Cartzendafner, Jeff; Cavett, Valerie; Caldwell Busby, Jennifer; Sato, Trey; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is dependent upon coordinate regulation of kinase and proteolytic pathways. Inhibitors of cell cycle transitions are degraded to allow progression into the subsequent cell cycle phase. For example, the tyrosine kinase and Cdk1 inhibitor Wee1 is degraded during G2 and mitosis to allow mitotic progression. Previous studies suggested that the N terminus of Wee1 directs Wee1 destruction. Using a chemical mutagenesis strategy, we report that multiple regions of Wee1 control its destruction. Most notably, we find that the activation domain of the Wee1 kinase is also required for its degradation. Mutations in this domain inhibit Wee1 degradation in somatic cell extracts and in cells without affecting the overall Wee1 structure or kinase activity. More broadly, these findings suggest that kinase activation domains may be previously unappreciated sites of recognition by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. PMID:20038582

  9. RKIP regulates MAP kinase signaling in cells with defective B-Raf activity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingchun; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Menon, Jyotsana; Menard, Ray; Kern, Florian; Nakazawa, Yoko; Bevilacqua, Elena; Imamoto, Akira; Baccarini, Manuela; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2013-05-01

    MAP kinase (MAPK) signaling results from activation of Raf kinases in response to external or internal stimuli. Here, we demonstrate that Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) regulates the activation of MAPK when B-Raf signaling is defective. We used multiple models including mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary keratinocytes from RKIP- or Raf-deficient mice as well as allografts in mice to investigate the mechanism. Loss of B-Raf protein or activity significantly reduces MAPK activation in these cells. We show that RKIP depletion can rescue the compromised ERK activation and promote proliferation, and this rescue occurs through a Raf-1 dependent mechanism. These results provide formal evidence that RKIP is a bona fide regulator of Raf-1. We propose a new model in which RKIP plays a key role in regulating the ability of cells to signal through Raf-1 to ERK in B-Raf compromised cells.

  10. Regulation of hippocampus-dependent memory by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Ted; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for the consolidation of new declarative long-term memories. Genetic and behavioral experimentation have revealed that several protein kinases are critical for the formation of hippocampus-dependent long-term memories. Cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a serine–threonine kinase that has been strongly implicated in the expression of specific forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. We review evidence that PKA is required for hippocampus-dependent memory in mammals, and we highlight some of the proteins that have been implicated as targets of PKA. Future directions and open questions regarding the role of PKA in memory storage are also described. PMID:18394470

  11. A novel Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Tzen, M; Benarous, R; Dupouy-Camet, J; Roisin, M P

    2007-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all types of cells in humans. A family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), previously identified as important in the development of plants and protists, was recently shown to play a role in the infectivity of apicomplexans, and in motility and host cell invasion in particular. We report here the isolation of a new calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from the human toxoplasmosis parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The gene consists of 12 exons. The encoded protein, TgCDPK4, consists of the four characteristic domains of members of the CDPK family and is most similar to PfCDPK2 from Plasmodium falciparum. We measured TgCDPK4 activity, induced by calcium influx, using a kinase assay. A calcium chelator (EGTA) inhibited this activity. These findings provide evidence of signal transduction involving members of the CDPK family in T. gondii.

  12. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  13. Activation of NF-κB by nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae is mediated by toll-like receptor 2-TAK1-dependent NIK–IKKα/β–IκBα and MKK3/6–p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Xu, Haidong; Wang, Beinan; Han, Jiahuai; Kai, Hirofumi; Gu, Xin-Xing; Murphy, Timothy F.; Lim, David J.; Li, Jian-Dong

    2001-01-01

    Nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an important human pathogen in both children and adults. In children, it causes otitis media, the most common childhood infection and the leading cause of conductive hearing loss in the United States. In adults, it causes lower respiratory tract infections in the setting of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NTHi-induced infections remain undefined, but they may involve activation of NF-κB, a transcriptional activator of multiple host defense genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Here, we show that NTHi strongly activates NF-κB in human epithelial cells via two distinct signaling pathways, NF-κB translocation-dependent and -independent pathways. The NF-κB translocation-dependent pathway involves activation of NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK)–IKKα/β complex leading to IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, whereas the NF-κB translocation-independent pathway involves activation of MKK3/6–p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. Bifurcation of NTHi-induced NIK–IKKα/β-IκBα and MKK3/6–p38 MAP kinase pathways may occur at transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 (TAK1). Furthermore, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is required for NTHi-induced NF-κB activation. In addition, several key inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α are up-regulated by NTHi. Finally, P6, a 16-kDa lipoprotein highly conserved in the outer membrane of all NTHi and H. influenzae type b strains, appears to also activate NF-κB via similar signaling pathways. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NTHi activates NF-κB via TLR2–TAK1-dependent NIK–IKKα/β-IκBα and MKK3/6–p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways. These studies may bring new insights into molecular pathogenesis of NTHi-induced infections and open up new therapeutic targets for

  14. Kinin B1 and B2 receptor expression in osteoblasts and fibroblasts is enhanced by interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Effects dependent on activation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Brechter, Anna Bernhold; Persson, Emma; Lundgren, Inger; Lerner, Ulf H

    2008-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory mediators formed by the kallikrein-kinin system can stimulate bone resorption and synergistically potentiate bone resorption induced by IL-1 and TNF-alpha. We have shown that the effect is associated with synergistically enhanced RANKL expression and enhanced prostaglandin biosynthesis, due to increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression. In the present study, the effects of osteotropic cytokines and different kinins on the expression of receptor subtypes for bradykinin (BK), des-Arg10-Lys-BK (DALBK), IL-1beta and TNF-alpha have been investigated. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha enhanced kinin B1 and B2 receptor binding in the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 and the mRNA expression of B1 and B2 receptors in MG-63 cells, human gingival fibroblasts and intact mouse calvarial bones. Kinins did not affect mRNA expression of IL-1 or TNF receptors. EMSA showed that IL-1beta and TNF-alpha activated NF-kappaB and AP-1 in MG-63 cells. IL-1beta stimulated NF-kappaB via a non-canonical pathway (p52/p65) and TNF-alpha via the canonical pathway (p50/p65). Activation of AP-1 involved c-Jun in both IL-1beta and TNF-alpha stimulated cells, but c-Fos only in TNF-alpha stimulated cells. Phospho-ELISA and Western blots showed that IL-1beta activated JNK and p38, but not ERK 1/2 MAP kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors showed that NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were important for IL-1beta induced stimulation of B1 receptors, and NF-kappaB and p38 for B2 receptors. p38 and JNK were important for TNF-alpha induced stimulation of B1 receptors, whereas NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were involved in TNF-alpha induced expression of B2 receptors. These data show that IL-1beta and TNF-alpha upregulate B1 and B2 receptor expression by mechanisms involving activation of both NF-kappaB and MAP kinase pathways, but that signal transduction pathways are different for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. The enhanced kinin receptor expression induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha might be one

  15. Salicylic acid activates a 48-kD MAP kinase in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Klessig, D F

    1997-05-01

    The involvement of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway leading to pathogenesis-related gene induction has previously been demonstrated using kinase and phosphatase inhibitors. Here, we show that in tobacco suspension cells, SA induced a rapid and transient activation of a 48-kD kinase that uses myelin basic protein as a substrate. This kinase is called the p48 SIP kinase (for SA-Induced Protein kinase). Biologically active analogs of SA, which induce pathogenesis-related genes and enhanced resistance, also activated this kinase, whereas inactive analogs did not. Phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue(s) in the SIP kinase was associated with its activation. The SIP kinase was purified to homogeneity from SA-treated tobacco suspension culture cells. The purified SIP kinase is strongly phosphorylated on a tyrosine residue(s), and treatment with either protein tyrosine or serine/threonine phosphatases abolished its activity. Using primers corresponding to the sequences of internal tryptic peptides, we cloned the SIP kinase gene. Analysis of the SIP kinase sequence indicates that it belongs to the MAP kinase family and that it is distinct from the other plant MAP kinases previously implicated in stress responses, suggesting that different members of the MAP kinase family are activated by different stresses.

  16. Solution structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Olah, G.A.; Walsh, D.A.; Mitchell, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Protein phosphorylation is well established as one of the most important mechanisms of signal transduction and cellular regulation. Two of the key enzymes that catalyze these phosphorylation reactions are the cAMP- (PKA) and cGMP- (PKG) dependent protein kinases. PKA has served as the prototypic model of this class of enzymes that now comprises in excess of 300 phylogenetically related proteins. A large number of these protein kinases are critical for the regulation of cell function and a full analysis of their similarities and differences is essential to understand their diverse physiological roles. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase has the subunit structure R2C2, in which C and R refer to the catalytic and regulatory subunits, respectively. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is highly homologous to PKA but is distinguished from it by having the regulatory and catalytic domains on a contiguous polypeptide. The studies described here use small-angle scattering and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to study domain movements and conformational changes in these enzymes in different functional states in order to elucidate the molecular bases for the regulation of their activities.

  17. Tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol-receptor complex in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Castoria, G; de Falco, A; Bontempo, P; Nola, E; Auricchio, F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism by which estradiol acts on cell multiplication is still unclear. Under conditions of estradiol-dependent growth, estradiol treatment of human mammary cancer MCF-7 cells triggers rapid and transient activation of the mitogen-activated (MAP) kinases, erk-1 and erk-2, increases the active form of p21ras, tyrosine phosphorylation of Shc and p190 protein and induces association of p190 to p21ras-GAP. Both Shc and p190 are substrates of activated src and once phosphorylated, they interact with other proteins and upregulate p21ras. Estradiol activates the tyrosine kinase/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway in MCF-7 cells with kinetics which are similar to those of peptide mitogens. It is only after introduction of the human wild-type 67 kDa estradiol receptor cDNA that Cos cells become estradiol-responsive in terms of erk-2 activity. This finding, together with the inhibition by the pure anti-estrogen ICI 182 780 of the stimulatory effect of estradiol on each step of the pathway in MCF-7 cells proves that the classic estradiol receptor is responsible for the transduction pathway activation. Transfection experiments of Cos cells with the estradiol receptor cDNA and in vitro experiments with c-src show that the estradiol receptor activates c-src and this activation requires occupancy of the receptor by hormone. Our experiments suggest that c-src is an initial and integral part of the signaling events mediated by the estradiol receptor. Images PMID:8635462

  18. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-02-27

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation.

  19. The MAP kinase pathway coordinates crossover designation with disassembly of synaptonemal complex proteins during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajan, Saravanapriah; Mohideen, Firaz; Tzur, Yonatan B; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Crawley, Oliver; Montoya, Alex; Faull, Peter; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Cutillas, Pedro R; Jambhekar, Ashwini; Blower, Michael D; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Harper, J Wade; Colaiacovo, Monica P

    2016-01-01

    Asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex (SC) is crucial for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. However, the signaling mechanisms that directly regulate this process are poorly understood. Here we show that the mammalian Rho GEF homolog, ECT-2, functions through the conserved RAS/ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway in the C. elegans germline to regulate the disassembly of SC proteins. We find that SYP-2, a SC central region component, is a potential target for MPK-1-mediated phosphorylation and that constitutively phosphorylated SYP-2 impairs the disassembly of SC proteins from chromosomal domains referred to as the long arms of the bivalents. Inactivation of MAP kinase at late pachytene is critical for timely disassembly of the SC proteins from the long arms, and is dependent on the crossover (CO) promoting factors ZHP-3/RNF212/Zip3 and COSA-1/CNTD1. We propose that the conserved MAP kinase pathway coordinates CO designation with the disassembly of SC proteins to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12039.001 PMID:26920220

  20. Cell cycle dependent regulation of deoxycytidine kinase, deoxyguanosine kinase, and cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase I activity in MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Fyrberg, A; Mirzaee, S; Lotfi, K

    2006-01-01

    Activation of nucleoside analogues is dependent on kinases and 5'-nucleotidases and the balance between the activity of these enzymes. The purpose of this study was to analyze deoxycytidine kinase, deoxyguanosine kinase, and 4 different 5'-nucleotidases during cell cycle progression in MOLT-4 cells. The activity of both kinases was cell cycle dependent and increased during proliferation while the activity of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase I decreased. We could show that the kinase activity was higher than the total nucleotidase activity, which was unchanged or decreased during cell cycle progression. These data may be important in designing modern combination therapy with nucleoside analogues.

  1. Signaling Network Map of Endothelial TEK Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sandhya, Varot K; Singh, Priyata; Parthasarathy, Deepak; Kumar, Awinav; Advani, Jayshree; Gattu, Rudrappa; Ranjit, Dhanya V; Vaidyanathan, Rama; Mathur, Premendu Prakash; Prasad, T S Keshava; Mac Gabhann, F; Pandey, Akhilesh; Raju, Rajesh; Gowda, Harsha

    2014-01-01

    TEK tyrosine kinase is primarily expressed on endothelial cells and is most commonly referred to as TIE2. TIE2 is a receptor tyrosine kinase modulated by its ligands, angiopoietins, to regulate the development and remodeling of vascular system. It is also one of the critical pathways associated with tumor angiogenesis and familial venous malformations. Apart from the vascular system, TIE2 signaling is also associated with postnatal hematopoiesis. Despite the involvement of TIE2-angiopoietin system in several diseases, the downstream molecular events of TIE2-angiopoietin signaling are not reported in any pathway repository. Therefore, carrying out a detailed review of published literature, we have documented molecular signaling events mediated by TIE2 in response to angiopoietins and developed a network map of TIE2 signaling. The pathway information is freely available to the scientific community through NetPath, a manually curated resource of signaling pathways. We hope that this pathway resource will provide an in-depth view of TIE2-angiopoietin signaling and will lead to identification of potential therapeutic targets for TIE2-angiopoietin associated disorders.

  2. MAP KINASE ERK 1/2 INHIBITORS INDUCE DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ROSEN, M.B. and E. S. HUNTER. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. MAP kinase Erk1/2 inhibitors induce dysmorphology in mouse whole embryo culture.

    MAP Kinase signal transduction is associated with a variety ...

  3. Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is required for immunity mediated by pattern recognition receptor kinases.

    PubMed

    Mbengue, Malick; Bourdais, Gildas; Gervasi, Fabio; Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Spallek, Thomas; Bartels, Sebastian; Boller, Thomas; Ueda, Takashi; Kuhn, Hannah; Robatzek, Silke

    2016-09-27

    Sensing of potential pathogenic bacteria is of critical importance for immunity. In plants, this involves plasma membrane-resident pattern recognition receptors, one of which is the FLAGELLIN SENSING 2 (FLS2) receptor kinase. Ligand-activated FLS2 receptors are internalized into endosomes. However, the extent to which these spatiotemporal dynamics are generally present among pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and their regulation remain elusive. Using live-cell imaging, we show that at least three other receptor kinases associated with plant immunity, PEP RECEPTOR 1/2 (PEPR1/2) and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), internalize in a ligand-specific manner. In all cases, endocytosis requires the coreceptor BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1), and thus depends on receptor activation status. We also show the internalization of liganded FLS2, suggesting the transport of signaling competent receptors. Trafficking of activated PRRs requires clathrin and converges onto the same endosomal vesicles that are also shared with the hormone receptor BRASSINOSTERIOD INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1). Importantly, clathrin-dependent endocytosis participates in plant defense against bacterial infection involving FLS2-mediated stomatal closure and callose deposition, but is uncoupled from activation of the flagellin-induced oxidative burst and MAP kinase signaling. In conclusion, immunity mediated by pattern recognition receptors depends on clathrin, a critical component for the endocytosis of signaling competent receptors into a common endosomal pathway. PMID:27651493

  4. Differential regulation of the MAP, SAP and RK/p38 kinases by Pyst1, a novel cytosolic dual-specificity phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Groom, L A; Sneddon, A A; Alessi, D R; Dowd, S; Keyse, S M

    1996-01-01

    The Pyst1 and Pyst2 mRNAs encode closely related proteins, which are novel members of a family of dual-specificity MAP kinase phosphatases typified by CL100/MKP-1. Pyst1 is expressed constitutively in human skin fibroblasts and, in contrast to other members of this family of enzymes, its mRNA is not inducible by either stress or mitogens. Furthermore, unlike the nuclear CL100 protein, Pyst1 is localized in the cytoplasm of transfected Cos-1 cells. Like CL100/ MKP-1, Pyst1 dephosphorylates and inactivates MAP kinase in vitro and in vivo. In addition, Pyst1 is able to form a physical complex with endogenous MAP kinase in Cos-1 cells. However, unlike CL100, Pyst1 displays very low activity towards the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) or RK/p38 in vitro, indicating that these kinases are not physiological substrates for Pyst1. This specificity is underlined by the inability of Pyst1 to block either the stress-mediated activation of the JNK-1 SAP kinase or RK/p38 in vivo, or to inhibit nuclear signalling events mediated by the SAP kinases in response to UV radiation. Our results provide the first evidence that the members of the MAP kinase family of enzymes are differentially regulated by dual-specificity phosphatases and also indicate that the MAP kinases may be regulated by different members of this family of enzymes depending on their subcellular location. Images PMID:8670865

  5. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  6. The myxoma virus thymidine kinase gene: sequence and transcriptional mapping.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R J; Bults, H G

    1992-02-01

    The myxoma virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene is encoded on a 1.6 kb SacI-SalI restriction fragment located between 57.7 and 59.3 kb on the 163 kb genomic map. The nucleotide sequence of this fragment as well as 228 bp from the adjacent SalI-AA2 fragment was determined and found to encode four major open reading frames (ORFs). Three of these ORFs are similar in nucleotide sequence to ORFs L5R and J1R, and the TK gene of vaccinia virus (VV). The fourth ORF, MF8a, shows similarity to the ORFs found in the same position relative to the TK genes of Shope fibroma virus, Kenya sheep-1 virus and swine-pox virus. A search of the complete VV nucleotide sequence for regions of similarity to MF8a identified the host specificity gene C7L. Northern blot analysis of early viral RNA identified transcripts of approximately 700 nucleotides for both the TK gene and ORF MF8a. The 5' ends of the TK gene and ORF MF8a early mRNAs were mapped by primer extension to initiation sites 13 nucleotides downstream of sequences with similarity to the VV early promoter consensus. The sizes of the TK and MF8a mRNAs are consistent with transcription termination and polyadenylation occurring downstream of the sequence TTTTTNT, which is identical to the consensus sequence for the VV transcription termination signal.

  7. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase Genes in Corn Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takezawa, D.; Patil, S.; Bhatia, A.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Two cDNAs encoding Ca-2(+) - Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs), Corn Root Protein Kinase 1 and 2 (CRPK 1, CRPK 2) were isolated from the root tip library of corn (Zea mays L., cv. Merit) and their nucleotide sequences were determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of both the clones have features characteristic of plant CDPKS, including all 11 conserved serine/threonine kinase subdomains, a junction domain and a calmodulin-like domain with four Ca-2(+), -binding sites. Northern analysis revealed that CRPKI mRNA is preferentially expressed in roots, especially in the root tip; whereas, the expression of CRPK2 mRNA was very low in all the tissues tested. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that CRPKI mRNA is highly expressed in the root apex, as compared to other parts of the root. Partially purified CDPK from the root tip phosphorylates syntide-2, a common peptide substrate for plant CDPKs, and the phosphorylation was stimulated 7-fold by the addition of Ca-2(+). Our results show that two CDPK isoforms are expressed in corn roots and they may be involved in the Ca-2(+)-dependent signal transduction process.

  8. Comparative analysis of the activation of MAP/ERK kinases in the CNS of animals with different learning abilities.

    PubMed

    Grinkevich, L N; Lisachev, P D; Baranova, K A; Kharchenko, O A

    2007-09-01

    Western blot analysis was used to study the activation of MAP/ERK protein kinases responsible for controlling gene expression via phosphorylation of transcription factors CREB and ELK-1 in native common snails and animals with impaired abilities to form long-term types of conditioned aversive reflexes. Different periods of the formation of this reflex were found to be characterized by different levels of activation of MAP-ERK kinases. The extents of activation of MAP-ERK kinase cascade were different in ganglia (parietal-visceral, cerebral, and pedal) with different roles in the formation of this reflex. The dynamics of activation showed a wavelike nature, with peaks at 10 min and 4 h. Administration of the neurotoxin 5,7-DHT, which induces dysfunction of serotonin terminals and decreases the ability to acquire this type of learning, led to significant decreases in activation of the MAP-ERK kinase cascade at the early stages of learning, which is evidence for an important role for the serotoninergic system in inducing this cascade. Activation of the MAP/ERK kinase cascade 4 h after training was seen both in native and DHT-treated animals, which is probably evidence for activation of non-specific adaptive processes in response to the sensitizing unconditioned stimulus. Thus, the MAP/ERK kinase intracellular regulatory cascade, which plays an important role in the survival of neurons, the regeneration of neuron processes, and synaptic sprouting, also plays an important role in forming the serotonin-dependent food-aversive reflex in the common snail.

  9. Regulation of cyclin D-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4) by cdk4-activating kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, J Y; Matsuoka, M; Strom, D K; Sherr, C J

    1994-01-01

    The accumulation of assembled holoenzymes composed of regulatory D-type cyclins and their catalytic partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4), is rate limiting for progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle in mammalian fibroblasts. Both the synthesis and assembly of D-type cyclins and cdk4 depend upon serum stimulation, but even when both subunits are ectopically overproduced, they do not assemble into complexes in serum-deprived cells. When coexpressed from baculoviral vectors in intact Sf9 insect cells, cdk4 assembles with D-type cyclins to form active protein kinases. In contrast, recombinant D-type cyclin and cdk4 subunits produced in insect cells or in bacteria do not assemble as efficiently into functional holoenzymes when combined in vitro but can be activated in the presence of lysates obtained from proliferating mammalian cells. Assembly of cyclin D-cdk4 complexes in coinfected Sf9 cells facilitates phosphorylation of cdk4 on threonine 172 by a cdk-activating kinase (CAK). Assembly can proceed in the absence of this modification, but cdk4 mutants which cannot be phosphorylated by CAK remain catalytically inactive. Therefore, formation of the cyclin D-cdk4 complex and phosphorylation of the bound catalytic subunit are independently regulated, and in addition to the requirement for CAK activity, serum stimulation is required to promote assembly of the complexes in mammalian cells. Images PMID:8139570

  10. ERK5 MAP Kinase Regulates Neurogenin1 during Cortical Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cundiff, Paige; Liu, Lidong; Wang, Yupeng; Zou, Junhui; Pan, Yung-Wei; Abel, Glen; Duan, Xin; Ming, Guo-li; Englund, Chris; Hevner, Robert; Xia, Zhengui

    2009-01-01

    The commitment of multi-potent cortical progenitors to a neuronal fate depends on the transient induction of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors including Neurogenin 1 (Neurog1). Previous studies have focused on mechanisms that control the expression of these proteins while little is known about whether their pro-neural activities can be regulated by kinase signaling pathways. Using primary cultures and ex vivo slice cultures, here we report that both the transcriptional and pro-neural activities of Neurog1 are regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 5 signaling in cortical progenitors. Activation of ERK5 potentiated, while blocking ERK5 inhibited Neurog1-induced neurogenesis. Furthermore, endogenous ERK5 activity was required for Neurog1-initiated transcription. Interestingly, ERK5 activation was sufficient to induce Neurog1 phosphorylation and ERK5 directly phosphorylated Neurog1 in vitro. We identified S179/S208 as putative ERK5 phosphorylation sites in Neurog1. Mutations of S179/S208 to alanines inhibited the transcriptional and pro-neural activities of Neurog1. Our data identify ERK5 phosphorylation of Neurog1 as a novel mechanism regulating neuronal fate commitment of cortical progenitors. PMID:19365559

  11. A phyloproteomic characterization of in vitro autophosphorylation in calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Adrian D; Rodriguez, Miguel; Han, Byung Woo; Uno, Yuichi; Phillips, George N; Hrabak, Estelle M; Cushman, John C; Harper, Jeff F; Harmon, Alice C; Sussman, Michael R

    2006-06-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are a novel class of signaling molecules that have been broadly implicated in relaying specific calcium-mediated responses to biotic and abiotic stress as well as developmental cues in both plants and protists. Calcium-dependent autophosphorylation has been observed in almost all CDPKs examined, but a physiological role for autophosphorylation has not been demonstrated. To date, only a handful of autophosphorylation sites have been mapped to specific residues within CDPK amino acid sequences. In an attempt to gain further insight into this phenomenon, we have mapped autophosphorylation sites and compared these phosphorylation patterns among multiple CDPK isoforms. From eight CDPKs and two CDPK-related kinases from Arabidopsis thaliana and Plasmodium falciparum, 31 new autophosphorylation sites were characterized, which in addition to the previously described sites, allowed the identification of five conserved loci. Of the 35 total sites analyzed approximately one-half were observed in the N-terminal variable domain. Homology models were generated for the protein kinase and calmodulin-like domains, each containing two of the five conserved sites, to allow intelligent speculation regarding subsequent lines of investigation.

  12. Differential regulation of Jun N-terminal kinase and p38MAP kinase by Galpha12.

    PubMed

    Dermott, Jonathan M; Ha, Ji Hee; Lee, Chang Ho; Dhanasekaran, N

    2004-01-01

    Based on the findings that the overexpression of the wild-type Galpha(12) (Galpha(12)WT) result in the oncogenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells in a serum-dependent manner, a model system has been established in which the mitogenic and subsequent cell transformation pathways activated by Galpha(12) can be turned on or off by the addition or removal of serum. Using this model system, our previous studies have shown that the stimulation of Galpha(12)WT or the expression of an activated mutant of Galpha(12) (Galpha(12)QL) leads to increased cell proliferation and subsequent oncogenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells, as well as persistent activation of Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). In the present studies, we show that the stimulation of Galpha(12)WT or the expression of Galpha(12)QL results in a potent inhibition of p38MAPK, and that the mechanism by which Galpha(12) inhibits p38MAPK activity involves the dual specificity kinases upstream of p38MAPK. The results indicate that Galpha(12) attenuates the activation of MKK3 and MKK4, which are known to stimulate only p38MAPK or p38MAPK and JNK, respectively. The results also suggest that Galpha(12) activates JNKs specifically through the stimulation of the JNK-specific upstream kinase MKK7. These findings demonstrate for the first time that Galpha(12) differentially regulates JNK and p38MAPK by specifically activating MKK7, while inhibiting MKK3 and MKK4 in NIH3T3 cells. Since the stimulation of p38MAPK is often associated with apoptotic responses, our findings suggest that Galpha(12) stimulates cell proliferation and neoplastic transformation of NIH3T3 cells by attenuating p38MAPK-associated apoptotic responses, while activating the mitogenic responses through the stimulation of ERK- and JNK-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:14712227

  13. Induction of p27Kip1 degradation and anchorage independence by Ras through the MAP kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kawada, M; Yamagoe, S; Murakami, Y; Suzuki, K; Mizuno, S; Uehara, Y

    1997-08-01

    While most untransformed cells require substrate attachment for growth (anchorage dependence), the oncogenic transformed cells lack this requirement (anchorage independence) and are often tumorigenic. However, the mechanism of loss of anchorage dependence is not fully understood. When rat normal fibroblasts were cultured in suspension without substrate attachment, the cell cycle arrested in G1 phase and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 protein and its mRNA accumulated. Conditional expression of oncogenic Ras induced the G1-S transition of the cell cycle and significantly shortened the half-life of p27Kip1 protein without altering its mRNA level. Inhibition of the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase by cyclic AMP-elevating agents and a MEK inhibitor prevented the oncogenic Ras-induced degradation of p27Kip1. These results suggest that the loss of substrate attachment induces the cell cycle arrest through the up-regulation of p27Kip1 mRNA, but the oncogenic Ras confers anchorage independence by accelerating p27Kip1 degradation through the activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway. Furthermore, we have found that p27Kip1 is phosphorylated by MAP kinase in vitro and the phosphorylated p27Kip1 cannot bind to and inhibit cdk2.

  14. Regulation of cAMP-dependent Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Diskar, Mandy; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Kaupisch, Alexandra; Kaufholz, Melanie; Brockmeyer, Stefanie; Sohmen, Daniel; Berrera, Marco; Zaccolo, Manuela; Boshart, Michael; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Prinz, Anke

    2010-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinases are reversibly complexed with any of the four isoforms of regulatory (R) subunits, which contain either a substrate or a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitory domain. The human protein kinase X (PrKX) is an exemption as it is inhibited only by pseudosubstrate inhibitors, i.e. RIα or RIβ but not by substrate inhibitors RIIα or RIIβ. Detailed examination of the capacity of five PrKX-like kinases ranging from human to protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei) to form holoenzymes with human R subunits in living cells shows that this preference for pseudosubstrate inhibitors is evolutionarily conserved. To elucidate the molecular basis of this inhibitory pattern, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance in combination with site-directed mutagenesis. We observed that the conserved αH-αI loop residue Arg-283 in PrKX is crucial for its RI over RII preference, as a R283L mutant was able to form a holoenzyme complex with wild type RII subunits. Changing the corresponding αH-αI loop residue in PKA Cα (L277R), significantly destabilized holoenzyme complexes in vitro, as cAMP-mediated holoenzyme activation was facilitated by a factor of 2–4, and lead to a decreased affinity of the mutant C subunit for R subunits, significantly affecting RII containing holoenzymes. PMID:20819953

  15. Identification of human cyclin-dependent kinase 8, a putative protein kinase partner for cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Tassan, J P; Jaquenoud, M; Léopold, P; Schultz, S J; Nigg, E A

    1995-09-12

    Metazoan cyclin C was originally isolated by virtue of its ability to rescue Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in G1 cyclin function. This suggested that cyclin C might play a role in cell cycle control, but progress toward understanding the function of this cyclin has been hampered by the lack of information on a potential kinase partner. Here we report the identification of a human protein kinase, K35 [cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8)], that is likely to be a physiological partner of cyclin C. A specific interaction between K35 and cyclin C could be demonstrated after translation of CDKs and cyclins in vitro. Furthermore, cyclin C could be detected in K35 immunoprecipitates prepared from HeLa cells, indicating that the two proteins form a complex also in vivo. The K35-cyclin C complex is structurally related to SRB10-SRB11, a CDK-cyclin pair recently shown to be part of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme of S. cerevisiae. Hence, we propose that human K35(CDK8)-cyclin C might be functionally associated with the mammalian transcription apparatus, perhaps involved in relaying growth-regulatory signals.

  16. Anti-immunoglobulin M activates nuclear calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in human B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that the nuclear protein, Ets-1, is phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner after ligation of immunoglobulin (Ig) M on B lymphocytes. As this phosphorylation was independent of protein kinase C activity, we tested whether a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) might phosphorylate the Ets-1 protein after elevation of intracellular free calcium concentrations. The dephosphorylated form of Ets-1 has been shown to bind to chromatin, suggesting that the operative kinase should be detectable in the nucleus. We prepared nuclear extracts from two human B cell lines in which increased intracellular free calcium levels correlated with increased phosphorylation of the Ets-1 protein. Activity of the CaM kinases was determined using a synthetic peptide substrate both in the absence and presence of an inhibitor specific for the CaM kinase family, KN-62. Stimulation of cells with anti-IgM led to increased activity of a nuclear kinase that could phosphorylate the peptide, and this activity was reduced by 10 microM KN-62. Kinase activity was reduced in lysates preadsorbed using an antibody specific for CaM kinase II. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide maps of the Ets-1 protein from cells incubated with ionomycin or anti-IgM contained two unique phosphopeptides that were absent in untreated cells. Incubation of isolated Ets-1 protein with purified CaM kinase II produced phosphorylation of peptides that migrated identically to those found in cells incubated with either anti-IgM or ionomycin. These data suggest a model of signal transduction by the antigen receptor on B lymphocytes in which increased intracellular free calcium can rapidly activate nuclear CaM kinase II, potentially resulting in phosphorylation and regulation of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:7500040

  17. TGF-β activates Erk MAP kinase signalling through direct phosphorylation of ShcA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Matt K; Pardoux, Cécile; Hall, Marie C; Lee, Pierre S; Warburton, David; Qing, Jing; Smith, Susan M; Derynck, Rik

    2007-01-01

    Erk1/Erk2 MAP kinases are key regulators of cell behaviour and their activation is generally associated with tyrosine kinase signalling. However, TGF-β stimulation also activates Erk MAP kinases through an undefined mechanism, albeit to a much lower level than receptor tyrosine kinase stimulation. We report that upon TGF-β stimulation, the activated TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) recruits and directly phosphorylates ShcA proteins on tyrosine and serine. This dual phosphorylation results from an intrinsic TβRI tyrosine kinase activity that complements its well-defined serine-threonine kinase function. TGF-β-induced ShcA phosphorylation induces ShcA association with Grb2 and Sos, thereby initiating the well-characterised pathway linking receptor tyrosine kinases with Erk MAP kinases. We also found that TβRI is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to TGF-β. Thus, TβRI, like the TGF-β type II receptor, is a dual-specificity kinase. Recruitment of tyrosine kinase signalling pathways may account for aspects of TGF-β biology that are independent of Smad signalling. PMID:17673906

  18. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  19. Computational insights for the discovery of non-ATP competitive inhibitors of MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Schnieders, Michael J; Kaoud, Tamer S; Yan, Chunli; Dalby, Kevin N; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-01-01

    Due to their role in cellular signaling mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases represent targets of pharmaceutical interest. However, the majority of known MAP kinase inhibitors compete with cellular ATP and target an ATP binding pocket that is highly conserved in the 500 plus representatives of the human protein kinase family. Here we review progress toward the development of non-ATP competitive MAP kinase inhibitors for the extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), the c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3) and the p38 MAPKs (α, β, γ, and δ). Special emphasis is placed on the role of computational methods in the drug discovery process for MAP kinases. Topics include recent advances in X-ray crystallography theory that improve the MAP kinase structures essential to structurebased drug discovery, the use of molecular dynamics to understand the conformational heterogeneity of the activation loop and inhibitors discovered by virtual screening. The impact of an advanced polarizable force field such as AMOEBA used in conjunction with sophisticated kinetic and thermodynamic simulation methods is also discussed.

  20. Computational Insights for the Discovery of Non-ATP Competitive Inhibitors of MAP Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schnieders, Michael J.; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Yan, Chunli; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ren, Pengyu

    2014-01-01

    Due to their role in cellular signaling mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases represent targets of pharmaceutical interest. However, the majority of known MAP kinase inhibitors compete with cellular ATP and target an ATP binding pocket that is highly conserved in the 500 plus representatives of the human protein kinase family. Here we review progress toward the development of non-ATP competitive MAP kinase inhibitors for the extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), the c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK1/2/3) and the p38 MAPKs (α, β, γ, and δ). Special emphasis is placed on the role of computational methods in the drug discovery process for MAP kinases. Topics include recent advances in X-ray crystallography theory that improve the MAP kinase structures essential to structure-based drug discovery, the use of molecular dynamics to understand the conformational heterogeneity of the activation loop and inhibitors discovered by virtual screening. The impact of an advanced polarizable force field such as AMOEBA used in conjunction with sophisticated kinetic and thermodynamic simulation methods is also discussed. PMID:22316156

  1. The MAP kinase substrate MKS1 is a regulator of plant defense responses.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Erik; Jenkins, Thomas; Brodersen, Peter; Thorgrimsen, Stephan; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Zhu, Shijiang; Qiu, Jin-Long; Micheelsen, Pernille; Rocher, Anne; Petersen, Morten; Newman, Mari-Anne; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Hirt, Heribert; Somssich, Imre; Mattsson, Ole; Mundy, John

    2005-07-20

    Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) functions as a regulator of pathogen defense responses, because it is required for both repression of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent resistance and for activation of jasmonate (JA)-dependent defense gene expression. To understand MPK4 signaling mechanisms, we used yeast two-hybrid screening to identify the MPK4 substrate MKS1. Analyses of transgenic plants and genome-wide transcript profiling indicated that MKS1 is required for full SA-dependent resistance in mpk4 mutants, and that overexpression of MKS1 in wild-type plants is sufficient to activate SA-dependent resistance, but does not interfere with induction of a defense gene by JA. Further yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that MKS1 interacts with the WRKY transcription factors WRKY25 and WRKY33. WRKY25 and WRKY33 were shown to be in vitro substrates of MPK4, and a wrky33 knockout mutant was found to exhibit increased expression of the SA-related defense gene PR1. MKS1 may therefore contribute to MPK4-regulated defense activation by coupling the kinase to specific WRKY transcription factors.

  2. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors: a review on pharmacophore mapping and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Damre, Mangesh V; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are the serine/threonine protein kinases, which play a vital role in cellular responses to external stress signals. p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory effects in the preclinical disease models, primarily through inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators. A number of structurally diverse p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have been developed as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Most of the inhibitors have failed in the clinical trials either due to poor pharmacokinetic profile or selectivity issue, which makes p38 MAP kinase a promising target for molecular modelling studies. Several quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and pharmacophore models have been developed to identify the structural requirements essential for p38 MAP kinase inhibitory activity. In this review, we provide an overview of the presently known p38 MAP kinase inhibitors and how QSAR analyses among series of compounds have led to the development of molecular models and pharmacophores, allowing the design of novel inhibitors.

  3. Negative regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 targets by protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Hawasli, Ammar H.; Greene, Robert W.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Bibb, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed protein serine/threonine kinase essential for brain development and implicated in synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission, drug addiction, and neurodegenerative disorders. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the activity of Cdk5 in vivo. In order to determine whether protein kinase C (PKC) regulates Cdk5 activity in the central nervous system, the phosphorylation levels of two Cdk5 substrates were evaluated under conditions of altered PKC activity in vivo. Treatment of acute striatal slices with a PKC-activating phorbol ester caused a time- and dose-dependent decrease in the levels of phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1, and phospho-Thr75 dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr 32,000 (DARPP-32). This effect was reversed by the PKC inhibitor, Ro-32-0432. Moreover, phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1, and phospho-Thr75 DARPP-32 levels were elevated in brain tissue from mice lacking the gene for PKC-α. PKC did not phosphorylate Cdk5 or its cofactor, p25, in vitro. Striatal levels of the Cdk5 cofactor, p35, did not change in response to phorbol ester treatment. Furthermore, Cdk5 immunoprecipitated from striatal slices treated with phorbol ester had unaltered activity toward a control substrate in vitro. These results suggest that PKC exerts its effects on the phosphorylation state of Cdk5 substrates through an indirect mechanism that may involve the regulatory binding partners of Cdk5 other than its neuronal cofactors. PMID:18190909

  4. Negative regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 targets by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Hawasli, Ammar H; Greene, Robert W; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Bibb, James A

    2008-03-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed protein serine/threonine kinase essential for brain development and implicated in synaptic plasticity, dopaminergic neurotransmission, drug addiction, and neurodegenerative disorders. Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate the activity of Cdk5 in vivo. In order to determine whether protein kinase C (PKC) regulates Cdk5 activity in the central nervous system, the phosphorylation levels of two Cdk5 substrates were evaluated under conditions of altered PKC activity in vivo. Treatment of acute striatal slices with a PKC-activating phorbol ester caused a time- and dose-dependent decrease in the levels of phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1, and phospho-Thr75 dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr 32,000 (DARPP-32). This effect was reversed by the PKC inhibitor, Ro-32-0432. Moreover, phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1, and phospho-Thr75 DARPP-32 levels were elevated in brain tissue from mice lacking the gene for PKC-alpha. PKC did not phosphorylate Cdk5 or its cofactor, p25, in vitro. Striatal levels of the Cdk5 cofactor, p35, did not change in response to phorbol ester treatment. Furthermore, Cdk5 immunoprecipitated from striatal slices treated with phorbol ester had unaltered activity toward a control substrate in vitro. These results suggest that PKC exerts its effects on the phosphorylation state of Cdk5 substrates through an indirect mechanism that may involve the regulatory binding partners of Cdk5 other than its neuronal cofactors.

  5. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  6. The Potential for Signal Integration and Processing in Interacting Map Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, John H.; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2009-01-01

    The cellular response to environmental stimuli requires biochemical information processing through which sensory inputs and cellular status are integrated and translated into appropriate responses by way of interacting networks of enzymes. One such network, the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) kinase cascade is a highly conserved signal transduction module that propagates signals from cell surface receptors to various cytosolic and nuclear targets by way of a phosphorylation cascade. We have investigated the potential for signal processing within a network of interacting feed-forward kinase cascades typified by the MAP kinase cascade. A genetic algorithm was used to search for sets of kinetic parameters demonstrating representative key input-output patterns of interest. We discuss two of the networks identified in our study, one implementing the exclusive-or function (XOR) and another implementing what we refer to as an in-band detector (IBD) or two-sided threshold. These examples confirm the potential for logic and amplitude-dependent signal processing in interacting MAP kinase cascades demonstrating limited cross-talk. Specifically, the XOR function allows the network to respond to either one, but not both signals simultaneously, while the IBD permits the network to respond exclusively to signals within a given range of strength, and to suppress signals below as well as above this range. The solution to the XOR problem is interesting in that it requires only two interacting pathways, crosstalk at only one layer, and no feedback or explicit inhibition. These types of responses are not only biologically relevant but constitute signal processing modules that can be combined to create other logical functions and that, in contrast to amplification, cannot be achieved with a single cascade or with two non-interacting cascades. Our computational results revealed surprising similarities between experimental data describing the JNK/MKK4/MKK7 pathway and the solution for

  7. Time-dependent landslide probability mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Russell H.; Bernknopf, Richard L.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Case studies where time of failure is known for rainfall-triggered debris flows can be used to estimate the parameters of a hazard model in which the probability of failure is a function of time. As an example, a time-dependent function for the conditional probability of a soil slip is estimated from independent variables representing hillside morphology, approximations of material properties, and the duration and rate of rainfall. If probabilities are calculated in a GIS (geomorphic information system ) environment, the spatial distribution of the result for any given hour can be displayed on a map. Although the probability levels in this example are uncalibrated, the method offers a potential for evaluating different physical models and different earth-science variables by comparing the map distribution of predicted probabilities with inventory maps for different areas and different storms. If linked with spatial and temporal socio-economic variables, this method could be used for short-term risk assessment.

  8. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  9. Phosphorylation of connexin 32, a hepatocyte gap-junction protein, by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Sáez, J C; Nairn, A C; Czernik, A J; Spray, D C; Hertzberg, E L; Greengard, P; Bennett, M V

    1990-09-11

    Phosphorylation of connexin 32, the major liver gap-junction protein, was studied in purified liver gap junctions and in hepatocytes. In isolated gap junctions, connexin 32 was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), by protein kinase C (PKC) and by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ca2+/CaM-PK II). Connexin 26 was not phosphorylated by these three protein kinases. Phosphopeptide mapping of connexin 32 demonstrated that cAMP-PK and PKC primarily phosphorylated a seryl residue in a peptide termed peptide 1. PKC also phosphorylated seryl residues in additional peptides. CA2+/CaM-PK II phosphorylated serine and to a lesser extent, threonine, at sites different from those phosphorylated by the other two protein kinases. A synthetic peptide PSRKGSGFGHRL-amine (residues 228-239 based on the deduced amino acid sequence of rat connexin 32) was phosphorylated by cAMP-PK and by PKC, with kinetic properties being similar to those for other physiological substrates phosphorylated by these enzymes. Ca2+/CaM-PK II did not phosphorylate the peptide. Phosphopeptide mapping and amino acid sequencing of the phosphorylated synthetic peptide indicated that Ser233 of connexin 32 was present in peptide 1 and was phosphorylated by cAMP-PK or by PKC. In hepatocytes labeled with [32P]orthophosphoric acid, treatment with forskolin or 20-deoxy-20-oxophorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBt) resulted in increased 32P-incorporation into connexin 32. Phosphopeptide mapping and phosphoamino acid analysis showed that a seryl residue in peptide 1 was most prominently phosphorylated under basal conditions. Treatment with forskolin or PDBt stimulated the phosphorylation of peptide 1. PDBt treatment also increased the phosphorylation of seryl residues in several other peptides. PDBt did not affect the cAMP-PK activity in hepatocytes. It has previously been shown that phorbol ester reduces dye coupling in several cell types, however in rat hepatocytes, dye coupling was not reduced

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 protects podocytes from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Saurus, Pauliina; Kuusela, Sara; Dumont, Vincent; Lehtonen, Eero; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku; Saleem, Moin A.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Loss of podocytes is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and predicts its progression. We found that treatment of podocytes with sera from normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes patients with high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity, known to predict progression of DN, downregulated CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2). LPS-treatment of mice also reduced CDK2 expression. LPS-induced downregulation of CDK2 was prevented in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using immunomodulatory agent GIT27. We also observed that CDK2 is downregulated in the glomeruli of obese Zucker rats before the onset of proteinuria. Knockdown of CDK2, or inhibiting its activity with roscovitine in podocytes increased apoptosis. CDK2 knockdown also reduced expression of PDK1, an activator of the cell survival kinase Akt, and reduced Akt phosphorylation. This suggests that CDK2 regulates the activity of the cell survival pathway via PDK1. Furthermore, PDK1 knockdown reduced the expression of CDK2 suggesting a regulatory loop between CDK2 and PDK1. Collectively, our data show that CDK2 protects podocytes from apoptosis and that reduced expression of CDK2 associates with the development of DN. Preventing downregulation of CDK2 by blocking the TLR pathway with GIT27 may provide a means to prevent podocyte apoptosis and progression of DN. PMID:26876672

  11. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Regulation of Diurnal Transcription in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed global transcriptome changes during synchronized cell division in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle consists of a long G1 phase, followed by an S/M phase with multiple rapid, alternating rounds of DNA replication and segregation. We found that the S/M period is associated with strong induction of ∼2300 genes, many with conserved roles in DNA replication or cell division. Other genes, including many involved in photosynthesis, are reciprocally downregulated in S/M, suggesting a gene expression split correlating with the temporal separation between G1 and S/M. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle is synchronized by light-dark cycles, so in principle, these transcriptional changes could be directly responsive to light or to metabolic cues. Alternatively, cell-cycle-periodic transcription may be directly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases. To distinguish between these possibilities, we analyzed transcriptional profiles of mutants in the kinases CDKA and CDKB, as well as other mutants with distinct cell cycle blocks. Initial cell-cycle-periodic expression changes are largely CDK independent, but later regulation (induction and repression) is under differential control by CDKA and CDKB. Deviation from the wild-type transcriptional program in diverse cell cycle mutants will be an informative phenotype for further characterization of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. PMID:26475866

  12. Structure and functions of plant calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Klimecka, Maria; Muszyńska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    Calcium ions as second messengers play an essential role in many important cellular processes. In plants, transient changes in calcium content in the cytosol (calcium signatures) have been observed during growth, development and under stress conditions. Such diverse functions require many different calcium sensors. One of the largest and most differentiated group of calcium sensors are protein kinases, among them calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) which were identified only in plants and protists. CDPKs have a regulatory domain which is able to bind calcium ions. For regulation of CDPKs activities not only calcium ions but also specific phospholipids and autophosphorylation are responsible. CDPKs have many different substrates, which reflects the diversity of their functions. Potential protein substrates of CDPK are involved in carbon and nitrogen metabolism, phospholipid synthesis, defense responses, ion and water transport, cytoskeleton organization, transcription and hormone responses. Presently, participation of CDPKs in stress signal transduction pathways (e.g., cold, drought, high salinity, wounding) is intensively studied in many laboratories. An intriguing, but still not fully clarified problem is the cross-talk via CDPKs among different signaling pathways that enables signal integration at different levels and ensure appropriate downstream responses.

  13. MARK/PAR1 kinase is a regulator of microtubule-dependent transport in axons.

    PubMed

    Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Thies, Edda; Trinczek, Bernhard; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckard

    2004-10-11

    Microtubule-dependent transport of vesicles and organelles appears saltatory because particles switch between periods of rest, random Brownian motion, and active transport. The transport can be regulated through motor proteins, cargo adaptors, or microtubule tracks. We report here a mechanism whereby microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) represent obstacles to motors which can be regulated by microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK)/Par-1, a family of kinases that is known for its involvement in establishing cell polarity and in phosphorylating tau protein during Alzheimer neurodegeneration. Expression of MARK causes the phosphorylation of MAPs at their KXGS motifs, thereby detaching MAPs from the microtubules and thus facilitating the transport of particles. This occurs without impairing the intrinsic activity of motors because the velocity during active movement remains unchanged. In primary retinal ganglion cells, transfection with tau leads to the inhibition of axonal transport of mitochondria, APP vesicles, and other cell components which leads to starvation of axons and vulnerability against stress. This transport inhibition can be rescued by phosphorylating tau with MARK.

  14. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  15. Cardioprotective Stimuli Mediate Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase and Phosphoinositide Dependent Kinase 1 Nuclear Accumulation in Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marta; Avitabile, Daniele; Fischer, Kimberlee; Emmanuel, Gregory; Gude, Natalie; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Mishra, Shikha; Schaefer, Eric M.; Brown, Joan Heller; Sussman, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) / phosphoinositide dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) signaling pathway exerts cardioprotective effects in the myocardium through activation of key proteins including Akt. Activated Akt accumulates in nuclei of cardiomyocytes suggesting that biologically relevant targets are located in that subcellular compartment. Nuclear Akt activity could be potentiated in both intensity and duration by the presence of a nuclear-associated PI3K / PDK1 signaling cascade as has been described in other non-myocyte cell types. PI3K / PDK1 distribution was determined in vitro and in vivo by immunostaining and nuclear extraction of cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes or transgenic mouse hearts. Results show that PI3K and PDK1 are present at a basal level in cardiomyocytes nuclei and that cardioprotective stimulation with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increases their nuclear localization. In comparison, overexpression of nuclear-targeted Akt does not mediate increased translocation of either PI3K or PDK1 indicating that accumulation of Akt does not drive PI3K or PDK1 into the nuclear compartment. Furthermore, PI3K and phospho-Akt473 show parallel temporal accumulation in the nucleus following (MI) infarction challenge. These findings demonstrate the presence of a dynamically regulated nuclear-associated signaling cascade involving PI3K and PDK that presumably influences nuclear Akt activation. PMID:19269295

  16. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase-dependent

  17. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials. PMID:26900281

  18. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  19. Endothelial NOS-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)- terminal kinase by oxidized low-density lipoprotein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, Y. M.; Levonen, A. L.; Moellering, D.; Ramachandran, A.; Patel, R. P.; Jo, H.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to activate a number of signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. Among these are the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), also known as stress-activated protein kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAP kinase) determine cell survival in response to environmental stress. Interestingly, JNK signaling involves redox-sensitive mechanisms and is activated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species derived from both NADPH oxidases, nitric oxide synthases (NOS), peroxides, and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The role of endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the activation of JNK in response to oxLDL has not been examined. Herein, we show that on exposure of endothelial cells to oxLDL, both ERK and JNK are activated through independent signal transduction pathways. A key role of eNOS activation through a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-dependent mechanism leading to phosphorylation of eNOS is demonstrated for oxLDL-dependent activation of JNK. Moreover, we show that activation of ERK by oxLDL is critical in protection against the cytotoxicity of oxLDL.

  20. Mapping Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems in California

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Jeanette; Merrifield, Matt

    2010-01-01

    Background Most groundwater conservation and management efforts focus on protecting groundwater for drinking water and for other human uses with little understanding or focus on the ecosystems that depend on groundwater. However, groundwater plays an integral role in sustaining certain types of aquatic, terrestrial and coastal ecosystems, and their associated landscapes. Our aim was to illuminate the connection between groundwater and surface ecosystems by identifying and mapping the distribution of groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs) in California. Methodology/Principal Findings To locate where groundwater flow sustains ecosystems we identified and mapped groundwater dependent ecosystems using a GIS. We developed an index of groundwater dependency by analyzing geospatial data for three ecosystem types that depend on groundwater: (1) springs and seeps; (2) wetlands and associated vegetation alliances; and (3) stream discharge from groundwater sources (baseflow index). Each variable was summarized at the scale of a small watershed (Hydrologic Unit Code-12; mean size = 9,570 ha; n = 4,621), and then stratified and summarized to 10 regions of relative homogeneity in terms of hydrologic, ecologic and climatic conditions. We found that groundwater dependent ecosystems are widely, although unevenly, distributed across California. Although different types of GDEs are clustered more densely in certain areas of the state, watersheds with multiple types of GDEs are found in both humid (e.g. coastal) and more arid regions. Springs are most densely concentrated in the North Coast and North Lahontan, whereas groundwater dependent wetlands and associated vegetation alliances are concentrated in the North and South Lahontan and Sacramento River hydrologic regions. The percentage of land area where stream discharge is most dependent on groundwater is found in the North Coast, Sacramento River and Tulare Lake regions. GDE clusters are located at the highest percentage

  1. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  2. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor therapy for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Prithviraj; Simmons, Gary L; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate cell cycle progression. Certain CDKs (e.g., CDK7, CDK9) also control cellular transcription. Consequently, CDKs represent attractive targets for anti-cancer drug development, as their aberrant expression is common in diverse malignancies, and CDK inhibition can trigger apoptosis. CDK inhibition may be particularly successful in hematologic malignancies, which are more sensitive to inhibition of cell cycling and apoptosis induction. AREAS COVERED A number of CDK inhibitors, ranging from pan-CDK inhibitors such as flavopiridol (alvocidib) to highly selective inhibitors of specific CDKs (e.g., CDK4/6), such as PD0332991, that are currently in various phases of development, are profiled in this review. Flavopiridol induces cell cycle arrest, and globally represses transcription via CDK9 inhibition. The latter may represent its major mechanism of action via down-regulation of multiple short-lived proteins. In early phase trials, flavopiridol has shown encouraging efficacy across a wide spectrum of hematologic malignancies. Early results with dinaciclib and PD0332991 also appear promising. EXPERT OPINION In general, the anti-tumor efficacy of CDK inhibitor monotherapy is modest, and rational combinations are being explored, including those involving other targeted agents. While selective CDK4/6 inhibition might be effective against certain malignancies, broad spectrum CDK inhibition will likely be required for most cancers. PMID:23647051

  4. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Anticancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary E; Corsino, Patrick E; Narayan, Satya; Law, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) have been considered promising drug targets for a number of years, but most CDK inhibitors have failed rigorous clinical testing. Recent studies demonstrating clear anticancer efficacy and reduced toxicity of CDK4/6 inhibitors such as palbociclib and multi-CDK inhibitors such as dinaciclib have rejuvenated the field. Favorable results with palbociclib and its recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval demonstrate that CDK inhibitors with narrow selectivity profiles can have clinical utility for therapy based on individual tumor genetics. A brief overview of results obtained with ATP-competitive inhibitors such as palbociclib and dinaciclib is presented, followed by a compilation of new avenues that have been pursued toward the development of novel, non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors. These creative ways to develop CDK inhibitors are presented along with crystal structures of these agents complexed with CDK2 to highlight differences in their binding sites and mechanisms of action. The recent successes of CDK inhibitors in the clinic, combined with the potential for structure-based routes to the development of non-ATP-competitive CDK inhibitors, and evidence that CDK inhibitors may have use in suppressing chromosomal instability and in synthetic lethal drug combinations inspire optimism that CDK inhibitors will become important weapons in the fight against cancer.

  5. Endothelial protein kinase MAP4K4 promotes vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Skoura, Athanasia; Matevossian, Anouch; Danai, Laura V.; Zheng, Wei; Cortes, Christian; Bhattacharya, Samit K.; Aouadi, Myriam; Hagan, Nana; Yawe, Joseph C.; Vangala, Pranitha; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Cooper, Marcus P.; Fitzgibbons, Timothy P.; Buckbinder, Leonard; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Signalling pathways that control endothelial cell (EC) permeability, leukocyte adhesion and inflammation are pivotal for atherosclerosis initiation and progression. Here we demonstrate that the Sterile-20-like mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4), which has been implicated in inflammation, is abundantly expressed in ECs and in atherosclerotic plaques from mice and humans. On the basis of endothelial-specific MAP4K4 gene silencing and gene ablation experiments in Apoe−/− mice, we show that MAP4K4 in ECs markedly promotes Western diet-induced aortic macrophage accumulation and atherosclerotic plaque development. Treatment of Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice with a selective small-molecule MAP4K4 inhibitor also markedly reduces atherosclerotic lesion area. MAP4K4 silencing in cultured ECs attenuates cell surface adhesion molecule expression while reducing nuclear localization and activity of NFκB, which is critical for promoting EC activation and atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results reveal that MAP4K4 is a key signalling node that promotes immune cell recruitment in atherosclerosis. PMID:26688060

  6. Phosphorylation and inhibition of. gamma. -glutamyl transferase activity by cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Kolesnichenko, L.S.; Chernov, N.N.

    1986-10-20

    It was shown that preparations of bovine kidney ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase of differing degrees of purity are phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. This is accompanied by a decrease in both the transferase and hydrolase activities of the enzyme. Consequently, ..gamma..-glutamyl transferase may serve as the substrate and target of the regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  7. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases from Arabidopsis Show Substrate Specificity Differences in an Analysis of 103 Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Amy; Chang, Ing-Feng; Chang, Chia-Lun; Garg, Shilpi; Miguel, Rodriguez Milla; Barron, Yoshimi D.; Li, Ying; Romanowsky, Shawn; Cushman, John C.; Gribskov, Michael; Harmon, Alice C.; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of substrates represents a critical challenge for understanding any protein kinase-based signal transduction pathway. In Arabidopsis, there are more than 1000 different protein kinases, 34 of which belong to a family of Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs). While CPKs are implicated in regulating diverse aspects of plant biology, from ion transport to transcription, relatively little is known about isoform-specific differences in substrate specificity, or the number of phosphorylation targets. Here, in vitro kinase assays were used to compare phosphorylation targets of four CPKs from Arabidopsis (CPK1, 10, 16, and 34). Significant differences in substrate specificity for each kinase were revealed by assays using 103 different substrates. For example CPK16 phosphorylated Serine 109 in a peptide from the stress-regulated protein, Di19-2 with KM ∼70 μM, but this site was not phosphorylated significantly by CPKs 1, 10, or 34. In contrast, CPKs 1, 10, and 34 phosphorylated 93 other peptide substrates not recognized by CPK16. Examples of substrate specificity differences among all four CPKs were verified by kinetic analyses. To test the correlation between in vivo phosphorylation events and in vitro kinase activities, assays were performed with 274 synthetic peptides that contained phosphorylation sites previously mapped in proteins isolated from plants (in vivo-mapped sites). Of these, 74 (27%) were found to be phosphorylated by at least one of the four CPKs tested. This 27% success rate validates a robust strategy for linking the activities of specific kinases, such as CPKs, to the thousands of in planta phosphorylation sites that are being uncovered by emerging technologies. PMID:22645532

  8. Breast tumor kinase (protein tyrosine kinase 6) regulates heregulin-induced activation of ERK5 and p38 MAP kinases in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Julie Hanson; Daniel, Andrea R; Lofgren, Kristopher; Kleer, Celina G; Lange, Carol A

    2007-05-01

    Total tyrosine kinase activity is often elevated in both cytosolic and membrane fractions of malignant breast tissue and correlates with a decrease in disease-free survival. Breast tumor kinase (Brk; protein tyrosine kinase 6) is a soluble tyrosine kinase that was cloned from a metastatic breast tumor and found to be overexpressed in a majority of breast tumors. Herein, we show that Brk is overexpressed in 86% of invasive ductal breast tumors and coexpressed with ErbB family members in breast cancer cell lines. Additionally, the ErbB ligand, heregulin, activates Brk kinase activity. Knockdown of Brk by stable expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in T47D breast cancer cells decreases proliferation and blocks epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and heregulin-induced activation of Rac GTPase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 5, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not Akt, ERK1/2, or c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Furthermore, EGF- and heregulin-induced cyclin D1 expression is dependent on p38 signaling and inhibited by Brk shRNA knockdown. The myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcription factor target of p38 MAPK and ERK5 signaling is also sensitive to altered Brk expression. Finally, heregulin-induced migration of T47D cells requires p38 MAPK activity and is blocked by Brk knockdown. These results place Brk in a novel signaling pathway downstream of ErbB receptors and upstream of Rac, p38 MAPK, and ERK5 and establish the ErbB-Brk-Rac-p38 MAPK pathway as a critical mediator of breast cancer cell migration.

  9. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  10. Registered Report: COT drives resistance to RAF inhibition through MAP kinase pathway reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vidhu; Young, Lisa; Cavadas, Miguel; Owen, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “COT drives resistance to RAF inhibition through MAPK pathway reactivation” by Johannessen and colleagues, published in Nature in 2010 (Johannessen et al., 2010). The key experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 3B, 3D-E, 3I, and 4E-F. In Figures 3B, D-E, RPMI-7951 and OUMS023 cells were reported to exhibit robust ERK/MEK activity concomitant with reduced growth sensitivity in the presence of the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720. MAP3K8 (COT/TPL2) directly regulated MEK/ERK phosphorylation, as the treatment of RPMI-7951 cells with a MAP3K8 kinase inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent suppression of MEK/ERK activity (Figure 3I). In contrast, MAP3K8-deficient A375 cells remained sensitive to BRAF inhibition, exhibiting reduced growth and MEK/ERK activity during inhibitor treatment. To determine if RAF and MEK inhibitors together can overcome single-agent resistance, MAP3K8-expressing A375 cells treated with PLX4720 along with MEK inhibitors significantly inhibited both cell viability and ERK activation compared to treatment with PLX4720 alone, as reported in Figures 4E-F. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11414.001 PMID:26999821

  11. CD28 signal transduction pathways. A comparison of B7-1 and B7-2 regulation of the map kinases: ERK2 and Jun kinases.

    PubMed

    Nunes, J A; Battifora, M; Woodgett, J R; Truneh, A; Olive, D; Cantrell, D A

    1996-01-01

    The present study compares the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase responses in T cells activated with the CD28 ligands B7-1 (CD80) and B7-2/B70 (CD86). Ligands B7-1 and B7-2 do not activate the Raf-1/ERK2 cascade, but share the ability to activate related Jun kinases. These natural ligands for CD28 had no stimulatory effect alone on Jun kinase activation, but the data show that B7-1 and B7-2 could both co-operate with intracellular Ca2+ increase and protein kinase C (PKC) activation to stimulate Jun kinases. The present study shows that the interaction of CD28 with its ligands B7-1 and B7-2 can induce identical signal transduction through the MAP kinase cascades.

  12. Structural Bioinformatics-Based Prediction of Exceptional Selectivity of p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor PH-797804

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li; Shieh, Huey S.; Selness, Shaun R.; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Walker, John K.; Devadas, Balekudru; Hope, Heidi R.; Compton, Robert P.; Schindler, John F.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Benson, Alan G.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Broadus, Richard M.; Walden, Zara; Monahan, Joseph B.; Pfizer

    2009-07-24

    PH-797804 is a diarylpyridinone inhibitor of p38{alpha} mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase derived from a racemic mixture as the more potent atropisomer (aS), first proposed by molecular modeling and subsequently confirmed by experiments. On the basis of structural comparison with a different biaryl pyrazole template and supported by dozens of high-resolution crystal structures of p38{alpha} inhibitor complexes, PH-797804 is predicted to possess a high level of specificity across the broad human kinase genome. We used a structural bioinformatics approach to identify two selectivity elements encoded by the TXXXG sequence motif on the p38{alpha} kinase hinge: (i) Thr106 that serves as the gatekeeper to the buried hydrophobic pocket occupied by 2,4-difluorophenyl of PH-797804 and (ii) the bidentate hydrogen bonds formed by the pyridinone moiety with the kinase hinge requiring an induced 180{sup o} rotation of the Met109-Gly110 peptide bond. The peptide flip occurs in p38{alpha} kinase due to the critical glycine residue marked by its conformational flexibility. Kinome-wide sequence mining revealed rare presentation of the selectivity motif. Corroboratively, PH-797804 exhibited exceptionally high specificity against MAP kinases and the related kinases. No cross-reactivity was observed in large panels of kinase screens (selectivity ratio of >500-fold). In cellular assays, PH-797804 demonstrated superior potency and selectivity consistent with the biochemical measurements. PH-797804 has met safety criteria in human phase I studies and is under clinical development for several inflammatory conditions. Understanding the rationale for selectivity at the molecular level helps elucidate the biological function and design of specific p38{alpha} kinase inhibitors.

  13. Solution structure analysis of the conformational changes that occur upon the binding of the protein kinase inhibitor peptide to the catalytic subunit of the cAMP dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.D.; Walsh, D.A.; Olah, G.A.; Sosnick, T.R.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering experiments have been used to examine both the secondary structure content and overall conformation, respectively, of the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and to characterize the structural change that occurs upon binding of the protein kinase inhibitor peptide, PKI(5-22)amide. While the secondary structure of the enzyme is unaltered by the binding of PKI(5-22)amide, a large overall conformational change occurs resulting in a compaction of the enzyme that is characterized by a 2{angstrom} decrease in radius of gyration, Rg, and an 11{angstrom} decrease in the maximum linear dimension, d{sub max}. We have modeled the conformational change as a simple rotation of the upper and lower lobes of the kinase by 39{degrees} about a molecular hinge defined by Glyl25, resulting in a closure of the cleft between the two lobes of the kinase. These data are evaluated with respect to recent x-ray crystallographic studies of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, CDK2 protein kinase, and the MAP kinase ERK2. In addition, the implications that these findings have for the remainder of the protein kinase family are discussed.

  14. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of selective and potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    N'gompaza-Diarra, Joannah; Bettayeb, Karima; Gresh, Nohad; Meijer, Laurent; Oumata, Nassima

    2012-10-01

    A new series of 2,6,9-trisubstituted purines, structurally related to the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Roscovitine, has been synthesized. These compounds mainly differ by the substituent on the C-2 position which encompasses a diol group. These compounds were screened for kinase inhibitory activities and antiproliferative effects. They were shown to be potent inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases but also, for some of them of casein kinase 1 (CK1) and dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). The inhibition of kinases was accompanied by an antiproliferative effect against several tumor cell-lines. The most potent derivatives inhibited SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) tumor cell line with an IC(50) < 0.5 μM which means approximately a 30 fold increase compared to Roscovitine. A valine ester was also prepared from the most potent inhibitor to serve as a prodrug. PMID:22982525

  16. The yeast carboxyl-terminal repeat domain kinase CTDK-I is a divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, D E; Lee, J M; Hardin, S E; Greenleaf, A L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTDK-I is a protein kinase complex that specifically and efficiently hyperphosphorylates the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and is composed of three subunits of 58, 38, and 32 kDa. The kinase is essential in vivo for normal phosphorylation of the CTD and for normal growth and differentiation. We have now cloned the genes for the two smaller kinase subunits, CTK2 and CTK3, and found that they form a unique, divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex with the previously characterized largest subunit protein CTK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog. The CTK2 gene encodes a cyclin-related protein with limited homology to cyclin C, while CTK3 shows no similarity to other known proteins. Copurification of the three gene products with each other and CTDK-I activity by means of conventional chromatography and antibody affinity columns has verified their participation in the complex in vitro. In addition, null mutations of each of the genes and all combinations thereof conferred very similar growth-impaired, cold-sensitive phenotypes, consistent with their involvement in the same function in vivo. These characterizations and the availability of all of the genes encoding CTDK-I and reagents derivable from them will facilitate investigations into CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7565723

  17. Sphingosine Kinase 1 is a Critical Component of the Copper-Dependent FGF1 Export Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Raffaella; Mandinova, Anna; Venkataraman, Krishnan; Hla, Timoty; Vadas, Mathew; Pitson, Stuart; Duarte, Maria; Graziani, Irene; Kolev, Vihren; Kacer, Doreen; Kirov, Aleksandr; Maciag, Thomas; Prudovsky, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 catalyzes the formation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a lipid mediator involved in the regulation of angiogenesis. Sphingosine kinase 1 is constitutively released from cells, even though it lacks a classical signal peptide sequence. Because copper-dependent non-classical stress-induced release of FGF1 also regulates angiogenesis, we questioned whether sphingosine kinase 1 is involved in the FGF1 release pathway. We report that (i) the coexpression of sphingosine kinase 1 with FGF1 inhibited the release of sphingosine kinase 1 at 37°C; (ii) sphingosine kinase 1 was released at 42°C in complex with FGF1; (iii) sphingosine kinase 1 null cells failed to release FGF1 at stress; (iv) sphingosine kinase 1 is a high affinity copper-binding protein which formed a complex with FGF1 in a cell-free system, and (v) sphingosine kinase 1 over expression rescued the release of FGF1 from inhibition by the copper chelator, tetrathiomolybdate. We propose that sphingosine kinase 1 is a component of the copper-dependent FGF1 release pathway. PMID:17643421

  18. MAP kinase pathways in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustin, M. C.; Albertyn, J.; Alexander, M.; Davenport, K.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    A cascade of three protein kinases known as a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is commonly found as part of the signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Almost two decades of genetic and biochemical experimentation plus the recently completed DNA sequence of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome have revealed just five functionally distinct MAPK cascades in this yeast. Sexual conjugation, cell growth, and adaptation to stress, for example, all require MAPK-mediated cellular responses. A primary function of these cascades appears to be the regulation of gene expression in response to extracellular signals or as part of specific developmental processes. In addition, the MAPK cascades often appear to regulate the cell cycle and vice versa. Despite the success of the gene hunter era in revealing these pathways, there are still many significant gaps in our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms for activation of these cascades and how the cascades regulate cell function. For example, comparison of different yeast signaling pathways reveals a surprising variety of different types of upstream signaling proteins that function to activate a MAPK cascade, yet how the upstream proteins actually activate the cascade remains unclear. We also know that the yeast MAPK pathways regulate each other and interact with other signaling pathways to produce a coordinated pattern of gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms of this cross talk are poorly understood. This review is therefore an attempt to present the current knowledge of MAPK pathways in yeast and some directions for future research in this area.

  19. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site. PMID:17062013

  20. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  2. Feedback phosphorylation of an RGS protein by MAP kinase in yeast.

    PubMed

    Garrison, T R; Zhang, Y; Pausch, M; Apanovitch, D; Aebersold, R; Dohlman, H G

    1999-12-17

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS proteins) are well known to accelerate G protein GTPase activity in vitro and to promote G protein desensitization in vivo. Less is known about how RGS proteins are themselves regulated. To address this question we purified the RGS in yeast, Sst2, and used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify post-translational modifications. This analysis revealed that Sst2 is phosphorylated at Ser-539 and that phosphorylation occurs in response to pheromone stimulation. Ser-539 lies within a consensus mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation site, Pro-X-Ser-Pro. Phosphorylation is blocked by mutations in the MAP kinase genes (FUS3, KSS1), as well as by mutations in components needed for MAP kinase activation (STE11, STE7, STE4, STE18). Phosphorylation is also blocked by replacing Ser-539 with Ala, Asp, or Glu (but not Thr). These point mutations do not alter pheromone sensitivity, as determined by growth arrest and reporter transcription assays. However, phosphorylation appears to slow the rate of Sst2 degradation. These findings indicate that the G protein-regulated MAP kinase in yeast can act as a feedback regulator of Sst2, itself a regulator of G protein signaling. PMID:10593933

  3. Resveratrol amplifies BMP-4-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis via p38 MAP kinase in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2015-09-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol that possesses health‑related properties, and is predominantly found in grapes and berries. Bone morphogenetic protein‑4 (BMP‑4) stimulates osteocalcin synthesis via p38 mitogen‑activated protein (MAP) kinase in osteoblast‑like MC3T3‑E1 cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on BMP‑4‑induced osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis in MC3T3‑E1 cells. Resveratrol alone had no effect on OPG expression levels, but significantly enhanced BMP‑4‑induced OPG release. In addition, resveratrol markedly amplified the mRNA expression levels of BMP‑4‑induced OPG. SB203580 is an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, which was shown to suppress BMP‑4‑stimulated OPG release. BMP‑4‑induced phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase was also enhanced by resveratrol. Furthermore, SB203580 significantly reduced the resveratrol‑induced amplification of BMP‑4‑stimulated OPG release. These results suggested that resveratrol was able to upregulate BMP‑4‑stimulated OPG synthesis via the amplification of p38 MAP kinase activity in osteoblasts.

  4. Smooth-muscle mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase: purification and characterization, and the phosphorylation of caldesmon.

    PubMed Central

    Childs, T J; Mak, A S

    1993-01-01

    A single 42 kDa isoform of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is expressed in both embryonic and adult chicken gizzard. The gizzard MAP kinase, which cross-reacts with anti-p44mpk antibody, has been purified from adult chicken gizzard and partially characterized. The purification protocol employs phenyl-Sepharose, polylysine-agarose, hydroxyapatite, Mono-Q and phenyl-Superose column chromatography. The purified enzyme phosphorylates myelin basic protein and gizzard high-molecular-mass (h-)caldesmon. Sea-star p44mpk and gizzard MAP kinase phosphorylate h-caldesmon at identical sites at the C-terminal domain, as revealed by tryptic-peptide mapping of the phosphorylated protein. Phosphorylation of h-caldesmon by gizzard MAP kinase abolishes its interaction with polymerized tubulin. The specific activity of the purified gizzard kinase toward myelin basic protein is similar to that of brain tau kinase, but is only a fraction of that of activated sea-star p44mpk. This suggests that, although a large amount of MAP kinase is present in the gizzard, only a small percentage of the enzyme is activated normally. Autophosphorylation of the gizzard kinase, at least in part on tyrosine residues, activates its kinase activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:8280072

  5. mTOR regulates skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo through kinase-dependent and kinase-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yejing; Wu, Ai-Luen; Warnes, Christine; Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Chongben; Kawasome, Hideki; Terada, Naohiro; Boppart, Marni D; Schoenherr, Christopher J; Chen, Jie

    2009-12-01

    Rapamycin-sensitive signaling is required for skeletal muscle differentiation and remodeling. In cultured myoblasts, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to regulate differentiation at different stages through distinct mechanisms, including one that is independent of mTOR kinase activity. However, the kinase-independent function of mTOR remains controversial, and no in vivo studies have examined those mTOR myogenic mechanisms previously identified in vitro. In this study, we find that rapamycin impairs injury-induced muscle regeneration. To validate the role of mTOR with genetic evidence and to probe the mechanism of mTOR function, we have generated and characterized transgenic mice expressing two mutants of mTOR under the control of human skeletal actin (HSA) promoter: rapamycin-resistant (RR) and RR/kinase-inactive (RR/KI). Our results show that muscle regeneration in rapamycin-administered mice is restored by RR-mTOR expression. In the RR/KI-mTOR mice, nascent myofiber formation during the early phase of regeneration proceeds in the presence of rapamycin, but growth of the regenerating myofibers is blocked by rapamycin. Igf2 mRNA levels increase drastically during early regeneration, which is sensitive to rapamycin in wild-type muscles but partially resistant to rapamycin in both RR- and RR/KI-mTOR muscles, consistent with mTOR regulation of Igf2 expression in a kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, systemic ablation of S6K1, a target of mTOR kinase, results in impaired muscle growth but normal nascent myofiber formation during regeneration. Therefore, mTOR regulates muscle regeneration through kinase-independent and kinase-dependent mechanisms at the stages of nascent myofiber formation and myofiber growth, respectively.

  6. Substituted N-aryl-6-pyrimidinones: A new class of potent, selective, and orally active p38 MAP kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Devadas, Balekudru; Selness, Shaun R.; Xing, Li; Madsen, Heather M.; Marrufo, Laura D.; Shieh, Huey; Messing, Dean M.; Yang, Jerry Z.; Morgan, Heidi M.; Anderson, Gary D.; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Zhang, Jian; Devraj, Rajesh V.; Monahan, Joseph B.

    2012-02-28

    A novel series of highly potent and selective p38 MAP kinase inhibitors was developed originating from a substituted N-aryl-6-pyrimidinone scaffold. SAR studies coupled with in vivo evaluations in rat arthritis model culminated in the identification of 10 with excellent oral efficacy. Compound 10 exhibited a significantly enhanced dissolution rate compared to 1, translating to a high oral bioavailability (>90%) in rat. In animal studies 10 inhibited LPS-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in a dose-dependent manner and demonstrated robust efficacy comparable to dexamethasone in a rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model.

  7. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. {yields} The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. {yields} Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. {yields} PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  8. Kinase-dependent Regulation of Monoamine Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of neurotransmission by the monoamines dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for normal nervous system function. Precise temporal and spatial control of this signaling in mediated in large part by the actions of monoamine transporters (DAT, NET, and SERT, respectively). These transporters act to recapture their respective neurotransmitters after release, and disruption of clearance and reuptake has significant effects on physiology and behavior and has been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To ensure adequate and dynamic control of these transporters, multiple modes of control have evolved to regulate their activity and trafficking. Central to many of these modes of control are the actions of protein kinases, whose actions can be direct or indirectly mediated by kinase-modulated protein interactions. Here, we summarize the current state of our understanding of how protein kinases regulate monoamine transporters through changes in activity, trafficking, phosphorylation state, and interacting partners. We highlight genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence for kinase-linked control of DAT, NET, and SERT and, where applicable, provide evidence for endogenous activators of these pathways. We hope our discussion can lead to a more nuanced and integrated understanding of how neurotransmitter transporters are controlled and may contribute to disorders that feature perturbed monoamine signaling, with an ultimate goal of developing better therapeutic strategies. PMID:27591044

  9. Cross-interactions of two p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitors and two cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists with the CCK1 receptor and p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Morel, Caroline; Ibarz, Géraldine; Oiry, Catherine; Carnazzi, Eric; Bergé, Gilbert; Gagne, Didier; Galleyrand, Jean-Claude; Martinez, Jean

    2005-06-01

    Although SB202190 and SB203580 are described as specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, several reports have indicated that other enzymes are also sensitive to SB203580. Using a pharmacological approach, we report for the first time that compounds SB202190 and SB203580 were able to directly and selectively interact with a G-protein-coupled receptor, namely the cholecystokinin receptor subtype CCK1, but not with the CCK2 receptor. We demonstrated that these compounds were non-competitive antagonists of the CCK1 receptor at concentrations typically used to inhibit protein kinases. By chimeric construction of the CCK2 receptor, we determined the involvement of two CCK1 receptor intracellular loops in the binding of SB202190 and SB203580. We also showed that two CCK antagonists, L364,718 and L365,260, were able to regulate p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity. Using a reporter gene strategy and immunoblotting experiments, we demonstrated that both CCK antagonists inhibited selectively the enzymatic activity of p38 MAP kinase. Kinase assays suggested that this inhibition resulted from a direct interaction with both CCK antagonists. Molecular modeling simulations suggested that this interaction occurs in the ATP binding pocket of p38 MAP kinase. These results suggest that SB202190 and SB203580 bind to the CCK1 receptor and, as such, these compounds should be used with caution in models that express this receptor. We also found that L364,718 and L365,260, two CCK receptor antagonists, directly interacted with p38 MAP kinase and inhibited its activity. These findings suggest that the CCK1 receptor shares structural analogies with the p38 MAP kinase ATP binding site. They open the way to potential design of either a new family of MAP kinase inhibitors from CCK1 receptor ligand structures or new CCK1 receptor ligands based on p38 MAP kinase inhibitor structures.

  10. The NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase mimics TCR signalling pathways, inducing NFAT and AP-1 by RAS-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Turner, Suzanne D; Yeung, Debra; Hadfield, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J; Alexander, Denis R

    2007-04-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) expression is associated with the lymphoid malignancy anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and results from a t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. We show that NPM-ALK induces Ras activation and phosphorylation of the ERK MAP Kinase consistent with activation of the Ras-MAP Kinase pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of Ras is necessary for inducing transcription via NFAT/AP-1 composite transcriptional binding sites. This activity is dependent on NPM-ALK forming complexes with proteins that bind to autophosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 156, 567 and 664, associated with binding to IRS-1, Shc and PLCgamma, respectively. Specifically, NPM-ALK activates transcription from the TRE promoter element, an AP-1 binding region, an activity dependent on both Ras and Shc activity. Our results show that NPM-ALK mimics activated T-cell receptor signalling by inducing pathways associated with the activation of NFAT/AP-1 transcription factors that bind to promoter elements found in a broad array of cytokine genes.

  11. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  12. Kainate receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells is attenuated by mitogen-activated protein and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Sarah F; Beart, Philip M

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that neuronal apoptosis is the result of an abortive attempt to re-enter the cell cycle, and more recently the cyclin-dependent (CDKs) and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, two superfamilies of kinases that influence and control cell cycle progression, have been implicated in neuronal apoptosis. Here, to examine whether CDK/MAPK related pathways are involved in excitotoxicity, we studied the actions of various kinase inhibitors on apoptosis induced by the ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptor agonist, kainate (KA), in primary cultures of murine cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). KA-mediated neurotoxicity was concentration-dependent, as determined by a cell viability assay monitoring the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and largely apoptotic in nature, as shown by morphological examination and labelling of DNA fragmentation in situ using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling (TUNEL). KA-mediated neurotoxicity and apoptosis was completely attenuated by the mixed CDK and MAP kinase inhibitor, olomoucine, in a concentration-dependent manner (50 – 600 μM), and partially by roscovitine (1 – 100 μM), a more selective CDK inihibitor. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB203580 (1 – 100 μM), partially attenuated KA receptor-mediated apoptosis, as did the MAP kinase kinase inhibitors PD98509 (1 – 100 μM) and U0126 (1 – 100 μM). These findings provide new evidence for a complex network of interacting pathways involving CDK/MAPK that control apoptosis downstream of KA receptor activation in excitotoxic neuronal cell death. PMID:11934814

  13. How can yeast cells decide between three activated MAP kinase pathways? A model approach.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Ludger; Ruoff, Peter

    2009-04-21

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the regulation of three MAP kinase pathways responding to pheromones (Fus3 pathway), carbon/nitrogen starvation (Kss1 pathway), and high osmolarity/osmotic stress (Hog1 pathway) is the subject of intensive research. We were interested in the question how yeast cells would respond when more than one of the MAP kinase pathways are activated simultaneously. Here, we give a brief overview over the regulatory mechanisms of the yeast MAP kinase pathways and investigate a kinetic model based on presently known molecular interactions and feedbacks within and between the three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. When two pathways are activated simultaneously with the osmotic stress response as one of them, the model predicts that the osmotic stress response (Hog1 pathway) is turned on first. The same is true when all three pathways are activated at the same time. When testing simultaneous stimulations by low nitrogen and pheromones through the Kss1 and Fus3 pathways, respectively, the low nitrogen response dominates over the pheromone response. Due to its autocatalytic activation mechanism, the pheromone response (Fus3 pathway) shows typical sigmoid response kinetics and excitability. In the presence of a small but sufficient amount of activated Fus3, a stimulation by pheromones will lead to a rapid self-amplification of the pheromone response. This 'excitability' appears to be a feature of the pheromone pathway that has specific biological significance. PMID:19322936

  14. BAFF activation of the ERK5 MAP kinase pathway regulates B cell survival.

    PubMed

    Jacque, Emilie; Schweighoffer, Edina; Tybulewicz, Victor L J; Ley, Steven C

    2015-06-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) stimulation of the BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) is essential for the homeostatic survival of mature B cells. Earlier in vitro experiments with inhibitors that block MEK 1 and 2 suggested that activation of ERK 1 and 2 MAP kinases is required for BAFF-R to promote B cell survival. However, these inhibitors are now known to also inhibit MEK5, which activates the related MAP kinase ERK5. In the present study, we demonstrated that BAFF-induced B cell survival was actually independent of ERK1/2 activation but required ERK5 activation. Consistent with this, we showed that conditional deletion of ERK5 in B cells led to a pronounced global reduction in mature B2 B cell numbers, which correlated with impaired survival of ERK5-deficient B cells after BAFF stimulation. ERK5 was required for optimal BAFF up-regulation of Mcl1 and Bcl2a1, which are prosurvival members of the Bcl-2 family. However, ERK5 deficiency did not alter BAFF activation of the PI3-kinase-Akt or NF-κB signaling pathways, which are also important for BAFF to promote mature B cell survival. Our study reveals a critical role for the MEK5-ERK5 MAP kinase signaling pathway in BAFF-induced mature B cell survival and homeostatic maintenance of B2 cell numbers.

  15. Rac regulates collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Yasunari; Doi, Tomoaki; Akamatsu, Shigeru; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Kondo, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Ogura, Shinji

    2013-10-01

    We previously reported that the collagen-induced phosphorylation of heat shock protein (HSP) 27 via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase is sufficient to induce the secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB and the release of soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) from human platelets. It has been shown that Rac, which belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases, is involved in the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac in the collagen-stimulated release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L in human platelets. Human blood was donated from healthy volunteers and platelet-rich plasma was obtained from the blood samples. The samples were then treated with 1.0 µg/ml collagen for 0, 1, 3, or 5 min and Rac1 activity was determined using the Rac1 Activation Assay kit. We found that collagen stimulated the activation of Rac in human platelets in a time-dependent manner. However, pre-treatment with NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor interaction, reduced the collagen-induced platelet aggregation. NSC23766 markedly attenuated not only the collagen-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation, but also the phosphorylation of HSP27 at three serine residues (Ser-15, Ser-78 and Ser-82). In addition, the collagen‑induced release of PDGF-AB and sCD40L was significantly suppressed by NSC23766 in a dose-dependent manner. These results strongly suggest that Rac regulates the collagen-induced HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase in human platelets, resulting in the stimulation of PDGF-AB secretion and the release of sCD40L.

  16. Inhibition of protein kinase C by calphostin C is light-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, R.F.; Miller, F.D.; Merriman, R.L.; Howbert, J.J.; Heath, W.F.; Kobayashi, E.; Takahashi, I.; Tamaoki, T.; Nakano, H. )

    1991-04-15

    Calphostin C, a secondary metabolite of the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides, inhibits protein kinase C by competing at the binding site for diacylglycerol and phorbol esters. Calphostin C is a polycyclic hydrocarbon with strong absorbance in the visible and ultraviolet ranges. In characterizing the activity of this compound, we unexpectedly found that the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)phorbol dibutyrate binding was dependent on exposure to light. Ordinary fluorescent light was sufficient for full activation. The inhibition of protein kinase C activity in cell-free systems and intact cells also required light. Light-dependent cytotoxicity was seen at concentrations about 5-fold higher than those inhibiting protein kinase C.

  17. Multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase is necessary for nuclear envelope breakdown

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The role of multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) in nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) was investigated in sea urchin eggs. The eggs contain a 56-kD polypeptide which appears to be a homologue of neuronal CaM kinase. For example, it undergoes Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent autophosphorylation that converts it to a Ca2(+)-independent species, a hallmark of multifunctional CaM kinase. It is homologous to the alpha subunit of rat brain CaM kinase. Autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation by the sea urchin egg kinase are inhibited in vitro by CaMK(273-302), a synthetic peptide corresponding to the autoinhibitory domain of the neuronal CaM kinase. This peptide inhibited NEB when microinjected into sea urchin eggs. Only one mAb to the neuronal enzyme immunoprecipitated the 56-kD polypeptide. Only this antibody blocked or significantly delayed NEB when microinjected into sea urchin eggs. These results suggest that sea urchin eggs contain multifunctional CaM kinase, and that this enzyme is involved in the control of NEB during mitotic division. PMID:2229172

  18. Pharmacological profiling of kinase dependency in cell lines across triple-negative breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Lauren S.; Beatty, Alexander; Devarajan, Karthik; Peri, Suraj; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC), negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Her2 amplification, are resistant to standard targeted therapies and exhibit a poor prognosis. Furthermore, they are highly heterogeneous with respect to genomic alterations, and common therapeutic targets are lacking though substantial evidence implicates dysregulated kinase signaling. Recently, six subtypes of TNBC were identified based on gene expression and were proposed to predict sensitivity to a variety of therapeutic agents including kinase inhibitors. To test this hypothesis, we screened a large collection of well-characterized, small-molecule kinase inhibitors for growth inhibition in a panel of TNBC cell lines representing all six subtypes. Sensitivity to kinase inhibition correlated poorly with TNBC subtype. Instead, unsupervised clustering segregated TNBC cell lines according to clinically relevant features including dependence on epidermal growth factor signaling and mutation of the PTEN tumor suppressor. We further report the discovery of kinase inhibitors with selective toxicity to these groups. Overall, however, TNBC cell lines exhibited diverse sensitivity to kinase inhibition consistent with the lack of common driver mutations in this disease. While our findings support specific kinase dependencies in subsets of TNBC, they are not associated with gene expression-based subtypes. Instead we find that mutation status can be an effective predictor of sensitivity to inhibition of particular kinase pathways for subsets of TNBC. PMID:25344583

  19. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  20. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Aoto, Phillip C; Martin, Bryan T; Wright, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  1. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Martin, Bryan T.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  2. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Suppression by WEE1 Kinase Protects the Genome through Control of Replication Initiation and Nucleotide Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Patzke, Sebastian; Holmberg, Christian; Mejlvang, Jakob; Groth, Anja; Nielsen, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes or inhibition of WEE1 kinase deregulates cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and leads to replication stress; however, the underlying mechanism is not understood. We now show that elevation of CDK activity by inhibition of WEE1 kinase rapidly increases initiation of replication. This leads to nucleotide shortage and reduces replication fork speed, which is followed by SLX4/MUS81-mediated DNA double-strand breakage. Fork speed is normalized and DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is suppressed when CDT1, a key factor for replication initiation, is depleted. Furthermore, addition of nucleosides counteracts the effects of unscheduled CDK activity on fork speed and DNA DSB formation. Finally, we show that WEE1 regulates the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced S-phase checkpoint, consistent with its role in control of replication initiation. In conclusion, these results suggest that deregulated CDK activity, such as that occurring following inhibition of WEE1 kinase or activation of oncogenes, induces replication stress and loss of genomic integrity through increased firing of replication origins and subsequent nucleotide shortage. PMID:22907750

  3. Synergistic effect of vasoactive intestinal peptides on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in osteoblasts: amplification of p44/p42 MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Mizutani, Jun; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Minamitani, Chiho; Kato, Kenji; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2010-05-01

    We previously showed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in these cells. VIP, which by itself slightly stimulated IL-6 synthesis, synergistically enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. The synergistic effect of VIP on the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis was concentration-dependent in the range between 1 and 70 nM. We previously reported that VIP stimulated cAMP production in MC3T3-E1 cells. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, or 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8bromo-cAMP), a plasma membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, markedly enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis as well as VIP. VIP markedly up-regulated the TNF-alpha-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation. The Akt phosphorylation stimulated by TNF-alpha was only slightly affected by VIP. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, significantly suppressed the enhancement of TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis by VIP. The synergistic effect of a combination of VIP and TNF-alpha on the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase was diminished by H-89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These results strongly suggest that VIP synergistically enhances TNF-alpha-stimulated IL-6 synthesis via up-regulating p44/p42 MAP kinase through the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP system in osteoblasts.

  4. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells overexpressing alpha and beta isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-effects of protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, T; Yoshimura, Y; Nomura, T; Fujii, M; Sugiura, H

    1998-06-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) is one of the most abundant protein kinases in the brain and has a broad substrate specificity [M.K. Bennett, N.E. Erondu, M.B. Kennedy, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase that is highly concentrated in brain, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12735-12744 [1]; J.R. Goldenring, B. Gonzalez, J.S. McGuire, Jr., R.J. DeLorenzo, Purification and characterization of a calmodulin-dependent kinase from rat brain cytosol able to phosphorylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, J. Biol. Chem. 258 (1983) 12632-12640 [4]; M.B. Kennedy, P. Greengard, Two calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, which are highly concentrated in brain, phosphorylate protein I at distinct sites, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 78 (1981) 1293-1297 [10]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Evidence for three distinct forms of calmodulin-dependent protein kinases from rat brain, FEBS Lett. 116 (1980) 141-144 [20]; T. Yamauchi, H. Fujisawa, Purification and characterization of the brain calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (kinase II), which is involved in the activation of tryptophan 5-monooxygenase, Eur. J. Biochem. 132 (1983) 15-21 [21

  5. HAM-5 Functions As a MAP Kinase Scaffold during Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise

    2014-01-01

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every ∼8 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a recently identified scaffold for the MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway in Sordaria macrospora. How the MAK-2 oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK-2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM-5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM-5-GFP co-localized with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM-5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK-2 activity influences HAM-5 function/localization. However, MAK-2-GFP showed cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM-5 was shown to physically interact with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members for oscillation and chemotropic interactions during germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM-5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK-2 cascade to upstream factors and proteins involved in this intriguing process of

  6. Interdomain allosteric regulation of Polo kinase by Aurora B and Map205 is required for cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Kachaner, David; Pinson, Xavier; El Kadhi, Khaled Ben; Normandin, Karine; Talje, Lama; Lavoie, Hugo; Lépine, Guillaume; Carréno, Sébastien; Kwok, Benjamin H; Hickson, Gilles R; Archambault, Vincent

    2014-10-27

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo and its human orthologue Polo-like kinase 1 fulfill essential roles during cell division. Members of the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family contain an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions. How Plks are regulated in cytokinesis is poorly understood. Here we show that phosphorylation of Polo by Aurora B is required for cytokinesis. This phosphorylation in the activation loop of the KD promotes the dissociation of Polo from the PBD-bound microtubule-associated protein Map205, which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of Polo kinase activity. This mechanism allows the release of active Polo from microtubules of the central spindle and its recruitment to the site of cytokinesis. Failure in Polo phosphorylation results in both early and late cytokinesis defects. Importantly, the antagonistic regulation of Polo by Aurora B and Map205 in cytokinesis reveals that interdomain allosteric mechanisms can play important roles in controlling the cellular functions of Plks.

  7. Apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells induced by organotin compounds found in drinking water: involvement of MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Mundy, William R; Freudenrich, Theresa M

    2006-01-01

    Mono- and dialkyl organotin compounds are used primarily as heat stabilizers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics. Recently, monomethyltin (MMT), dimethyltin (DMT), monobutyltin (MBT), and dibutyltin (DBT) have been detected in water from homes and businesses served by PVC pipes. While trialkyl organotins such as trimethyltin (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) are well known neurotoxicants, the toxicity of the mono- and dialkyl organotins is not well described. The present study compared the cytotoxicity of organotins found in drinking water with the known neurotoxicant TMT in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, and examined the role of MAP kinase signaling in organotin-induced cell death. Twenty-four hour exposure to TMT resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability with an EC(50) of 3 microM. Exposure to MMT, DMT, and MBT at concentrations up to 10 microM had no effect. DBT, however, was very potent, and decreased cell viability with an EC(50) of 0.3 microM. Staining of organotin-treated cerebellar granule cells with the nuclear dye Syto-13 revealed that TMT and DBT, but not MMT, DMT, or MBT, produced condensation and fragmentation of chromatin characteristic of apoptosis. TMT- and DBT-induced apoptosis was confirmed using TUNEL staining and measurement of PARP cleavage. Activation of MAP kinase pathways was examined after 6 h of exposure to the organotins which induced apoptosis. Both TMT and DBT activated ERK1/2, but only TMT activated the JNK/c-Jun and p38 pathways. Pharmacologic blockade of JNK/c-Jun and p38 activation significantly decreased apoptosis produced by TMT, but not by DBT. These results show that DBT is a potent neurotoxicant in vitro, but unlike TMT, does not induce cell death via activation of MAP kinase signaling.

  8. Specificity of MAP kinase signaling in yeast differentiation involves transient versus sustained MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, W; Flatauer, L J; Bardwell, A J; Bardwell, L

    2001-09-01

    Signals transmitted by common components often elicit distinct (yet appropriate) outcomes. In yeast, two developmental options-mating and invasive growth-are both regulated by the same MAP kinase cascade. Specificity has been thought to result from specialized roles for the two MAP kinases, Kss1 and Fus3, and because Fus3 prevents Kss1 from gaining access to the mating pathway. Kss1 has been thought to participate in mating only when Fus3 is absent. Instead, we show that Kss1 is rapidly phosphorylated and potently activated by mating pheromone in wild-type cells, and that this is required for normal pheromone-induced gene expression. Signal identity is apparently maintained because active Fus3 limits the extent of Kss1 activation, thereby preventing inappropriate signal crossover. PMID:11583629

  9. hKSR-2 inhibits MEKK3-activated MAP kinase and NF-kappaB pathways in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Channavajhala, Padma L; Rao, Vikram R; Spaulding, Vikki; Lin, Lih-Ling; Zhang, Y George

    2005-09-01

    Kinase suppressor of ras (KSR) and MEKK3 (MAP kinase kinase kinase) are integral members of the MAP kinase pathway. We have recently identified a new isoform of the KSR family named human kinase suppressor of ras-2 (hKSR-2), and demonstrated that hKSR-2 negatively regulates Cot, a MAP3K family member which is important in inflammation and oncogenesis [P.L. Channavajhala, L. Wu, J.W. Cuozzo, J.P. Hall, W. Liu, L.L. Lin, Y. Zhang, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 47089-47097]. In this report, we provide evidence that hKSR-2 also regulates the activity of MEKK3 (another MAP3K family member) in HEK-293T cells. We demonstrate that hKSR-2 is a negative regulator of MEKK3-mediated activation of MAP kinase (specifically ERK and JNK) and NF-kappaB pathways, and concurrently inhibits MEKK3-mediated interleukin-8 production. We find that while hKSR-2 blocks MEKK3 activation, it has little to no effect on other members of the MAP3K family, including MEKK4, TAK1, and Ras-Raf, suggesting that its effects are selective. PMID:16039990

  10. PCTAIRE Kinase 3/Cyclin-dependent Kinase 18 Is Activated through Association with Cyclin A and/or Phosphorylation by Protein Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shinya; Kominato, Kyohei; Koide-Yoshida, Shizuyo; Miyamoto, Kenji; Isshiki, Kinuka; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yuasa, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinase 3 (PCTK3)/cyclin-dependent kinase 18 (CDK18) is an uncharacterized member of the CDK family because its activator(s) remains unidentified. Here we describe the mechanisms of catalytic activation of PCTK3 by cyclin A2 and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Using a pulldown experiment with HEK293T cells, cyclin A2 and cyclin E1 were identified as proteins that interacted with PCTK3. An in vitro kinase assay using retinoblastoma protein as the substrate showed that PCTK3 was specifically activated by cyclin A2 but not by cyclin E1, although its activity was lower than that of CDK2. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry analysis showed that PCTK3 colocalized with cyclin A2 in the cytoplasm and regulated cyclin A2 stability. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that PCTK3 contained four putative PKA phosphorylation sites. In vitro and in vivo kinase assays showed that PCTK3 was phosphorylated by PKA at Ser12, Ser66, and Ser109 and that PCTK3 activity significantly increased via phosphorylation at Ser12 by PKA even in the absence of cyclin A2. In the presence of cyclin A2, PCTK3 activity was comparable to CDK2 activity. We also found that PCTK3 knockdown in HEK293T cells induced polymerized actin accumulation in peripheral areas and cofilin phosphorylation. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for the mechanisms of catalytic activation of PCTK3 by cyclin A2 and PKA and a physiological function of PCTK3. PMID:24831015

  11. KINATEST-ID: a pipeline to develop phosphorylation-dependent terbium sensitizing kinase assays.

    PubMed

    Lipchik, Andrew M; Perez, Minervo; Bolton, Scott; Dumrongprechachan, Vasin; Ouellette, Steven B; Cui, Wei; Parker, Laurie L

    2015-02-25

    Nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases (NRTKs) are essential for cellular homeostasis and thus are a major focus of current drug discovery efforts. Peptide substrates that can enhance lanthanide ion luminescence upon tyrosine phosphorylation enable rapid, sensitive screening of kinase activity, however design of suitable substrates that can distinguish between tyrosine kinase families is a huge challenge. Despite their different substrate preferences, many NRTKs are structurally similar even between families. Furthermore, the development of lanthanide-based kinase assays is hampered by incomplete understanding of how to integrate sequence selectivity with metal ion binding, necessitating laborious iterative substrate optimization. We used curated proteomic data from endogenous kinase substrates and known Tb(3+)-binding sequences to build a generalizable in silico pipeline with tools to generate, screen, align, and select potential phosphorylation-dependent Tb(3+)-sensitizing substrates that are most likely to be kinase specific. We demonstrated the approach by developing several substrates that are selective within kinase families and amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS) applications. Overall, this strategy represents a pipeline for developing efficient and specific assays for virtually any tyrosine kinase that use HTS-compatible lanthanide-based detection. The tools provided in the pipeline also have the potential to be adapted to identify peptides for other purposes, including other enzyme assays or protein-binding ligands.

  12. Sequestration of Polo kinase to microtubules by phosphopriming-independent binding to Map205 is relieved by phosphorylation at a CDK site in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Vincent; D’Avino, Pier Paolo; Deery, Michael J.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Glover, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The conserved Polo kinase controls multiple events in mitosis and cytokinesis. Although Polo-like kinases are regulated by phosphorylation and proteolysis, control of subcellular localization plays a major role in coordinating their mitotic functions. This is achieved largely by the Polo-Box Domain, which binds prephosphorylated targets. However, it remains unclear whether and how Polo might interact with partner proteins when priming mitotic kinases are inactive. Here we show that Polo associates with microtubules in interphase and cytokinesis, through a strong interaction with the microtubule-associated protein Map205. Surprisingly, this interaction does not require priming phosphorylation of Map205, and the Polo-Box Domain of Polo is required but not sufficient for this interaction. Moreover, phosphorylation of Map205 at a CDK site relieves this interaction. Map205 can stabilize Polo and inhibit its cellular activity in vivo. In syncytial embryos, the centrosome defects observed in polo hypomorphs are enhanced by overexpression of Map205 and suppressed by its deletion. We propose that Map205-dependent targeting of Polo to microtubules provides a stable reservoir of Polo that can be rapidly mobilized by the activity of Cdk1 at mitotic entry. PMID:18832073

  13. Mouse Sphingosine Kinase 1a Is Negatively Regulated through Conventional PKC-Dependent Phosphorylation at S373 Residue

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yong-Seok; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Ha, Sang Hoon; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase is a lipid kinase that converts sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate, an important signaling molecule with intracellular and extracellular functions. Although diverse extracellular stimuli influence cellular sphingosine kinase activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mouse sphingosine kinase (mSK) isoforms 1 and 2. mSK1a was robustly phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimuli such as phorbol ester, whereas mSK2 exhibited a high basal level of phosphorylation in quiescent cells regardless of agonist stimulation. Interestingly, phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation of mSK1a correlated with suppression of its activity. Chemical inhibition of conventional PKCs (cPKCs) abolished mSK1a phosphorylation, while overexpression of PKCα, a cPKC isoform, potentiated the phosphorylation, in response to phorbol ester. Furthermore, an in vitro kinase assay showed that PKCα directly phosphorylated mSK1a. In addition, phosphopeptide mapping analysis determined that the S373 residue of mSK1a was the only site phosphorylated by cPKC. Interestingly, alanine substitution of S373 made mSK1a refractory to the inhibitory effect of phorbol esters, whereas glutamate substitution of the same residue resulted in a significant reduction in mSK1a activity, suggesting the significant role of this phosphorylation event. Taken together, we propose that mSK1a is negatively regulated through cPKC-dependent phosphorylation at S373 residue. PMID:26642194

  14. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs-deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.

  15. Exploitation of latent allostery enables the evolution of new modes of MAP kinase regulation.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Scott M; Flores, Jonathan; Lim, Wendell A

    2013-08-15

    Allosteric interactions provide precise spatiotemporal control over signaling proteins, but how allosteric activators and their targets coevolve is poorly understood. Here, we trace the evolution of two allosteric activator motifs within the yeast scaffold protein Ste5 that specifically target the mating MAP kinase Fus3. One activator (Ste5-VWA) provides pathway insulation and dates to the divergence of Fus3 from its paralog, Kss1; a second activator (Ste5-FBD) that tunes mating behavior is, in contrast, not conserved in most lineages. Surprisingly, both Ste5 activator motifs could regulate MAP kinases that diverged from Fus3 prior to the emergence of Ste5, suggesting that Ste5 activators arose by exploiting latent regulatory features already present in the MAPK ancestor. The magnitude of this latent allosteric potential drifts widely among pre-Ste5 MAP kinases, providing a pool of hidden phenotypic diversity that, when revealed by new activators, could lead to functional divergence and to the evolution of distinct signaling behaviors. PMID:23953117

  16. Exploitation of latent protein allostery enables the evolution of novel and divergent MAP kinase regulation

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Scott M.; Flores, Jonathan; Lim, Wendell A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Allosteric interactions provide precise spatiotemporal control over signaling proteins, but how allosteric activators and their targets co-evolve is poorly understood. Here, we trace the evolution of two allosteric activator motifs within the yeast scaffold protein Ste5 that specifically target the mating MAP kinase Fus3. One activator (Ste5-VWA) provides pathway insulation and dates to the divergence of Fus3 from its paralog, Kss1; a second activator (Ste5-FBD) that tunes mating behavior is, in contrast, not conserved in most lineages. Surprisingly, both Ste5 activator motifs could regulate MAP kinases that diverged from Fus3 prior to the emergence of Ste5, suggesting that Ste5 activators arose by exploiting latent regulatory features already present in the MAPK ancestor. The magnitude of this latent allosteric potential drifts widely among pre-Ste5 MAP kinases, providing a pool of hidden phenotypic diversity that, when revealed by new activators, could lead to functional divergence and the evolution of distinct signaling behaviors. PMID:23953117

  17. Identification of p38α MAP kinase inhibitors by pharmacophore based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Das, Nihar R; Thanki, Kaushik; Damre, Mangesh V; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Sharma, Shyam S; Jain, Sanyog; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2014-04-01

    The p38α mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase plays a vital role in treating many inflammatory diseases. In the present study, a combined ligand and structure based pharmacophore model was developed to identify potential DFG-in selective p38 MAP kinase inhibitors. Conformations of co-crystallised inhibitors were used in the development and validation of ligand and structure based pharmacophore modeling approached. The validated pharmacophore was utilized in database screening to identify potential hits. After Lipinski's rule of five filter and molecular docking analysis, nineteen hits were purchased and selected for in vitro analysis. The virtual hits exhibited promising activity against tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) with 23-98% inhibition at 10μM concentration. Out of these seven compounds has shown potent inhibitory activity against p38 MAP kinase with IC50 values ranging from 12.97 to 223.5nM. In addition, the toxicity study against HepG2 cells was also carried out to confirm the safety profile of identified virtual hits.

  18. STK33 kinase inhibitor BRD-8899 has no effect on KRAS-dependent cancer cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tuoping; Masson, Kristina; Jaffe, Jacob D.; Silkworth, Whitney; Ross, Nathan T.; Scherer, Christina A.; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan; Carr, Steven A.; Stern, Andrew M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Golub, Todd R.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 30% of human cancers harbor oncogenic gain-of-function mutations in KRAS. Despite interest in KRAS as a therapeutic target, direct blockade of KRAS function with small molecules has yet to be demonstrated. Based on experiments that lower mRNA levels of protein kinases, KRAS-dependent cancer cells were proposed to have a unique requirement for the serine/threonine kinase STK33. Thus, it was suggested that small-molecule inhibitors of STK33 might have therapeutic benefit in these cancers. Here, we describe the development of selective, low nanomolar inhibitors of STK33’s kinase activity. The most potent and selective of these, BRD8899, failed to kill KRAS-dependent cells. While several explanations for this result exist, our data are most consistent with the view that inhibition of STK33’s kinase activity does not represent a promising anti-KRAS therapeutic strategy. PMID:22323609

  19. Immunohistochemical Localization of Cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase in Mammalian Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Suzanne M.; Walter, Ulrich; Miller, Penelope E.; Greengard, Paul; de Camilli, Pietro

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase in rat brain has been studied by an immunological approach involving radioimmunoassay and fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Data obtained by radioimmunoassay indicate that cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase is 20- to 40-fold more concentrated in cerebellum than in other brain regions. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrate that the high concentration of immunoreactivity of the protein kinase in cerebellum is attributable to Purkinje cells. Immunoreactivity in these cells is homogeneously distributed throughout the cell (perikarya, dendrites, and axons) with the exception of the nucleus. No other neurons either in the cerebellum or in other brain regions were stained by antiserum to the protein kinase. Immunoreactivity, however, was found throughout the brain on smooth muscle cells of blood vessels.

  20. Chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in tobacco: differential regulation by calmodulin isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Xia, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1998-01-01

    cDNA clones of chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) from tobacco (TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2) were isolated and characterized. The polypeptides encoded by TCCaMK-1 and TCCaMK-2 have 15 different amino acid substitutions, yet they both contain a total of 517 amino acids. Northern analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner during anther development. Messenger RNA was detected when tobacco bud sizes were between 0.5 cm and 1.0 cm. The appearance of mRNA coincided with meiosis and became undetectable at later stages of anther development. The reverse polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification assay using isoform-specific primers showed that both of the CCaMK mRNAs were expressed in anther with similar expression patterns. The CCaMK protein expressed in Escherichia coli showed Ca2+-dependent autophosphorylation and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Calmodulin isoforms (PCM1 and PCM6) had differential effects on the regulation of autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation of tobacco CCaMK, but not lily CCaMK. The evolutionary tree of plant serine/threonine protein kinases revealed that calmodulin-dependent kinases form one subgroup that is distinctly different from Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) and other serine/threonine kinases in plants.

  1. T cell antigen receptor engagement stimulates c-raf phosphorylation and induces c-raf-associated kinase activity via a protein kinase C-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J N; Klausner, R D; Rapp, U R; Samelson, L E

    1990-10-25

    The c-raf kinase has been shown to be activated following stimulation of several tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors. We examined changes in c-raf following engagement of the T cell receptor for antigen (TCR), a stimulus which activates both a non-receptor tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). We found that activation of the T-cell receptor on the T cell hybridoma 2B4 causes a rapid and stoichiometric hyperphosphorylation of c-raf and an increase in c-raf-associated kinase activity. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that the phosphorylation was entirely on serine residues. High-resolution phosphopeptide mapping showed the appearance of a single major new phosphopeptide with TCR stimulation. That phosphopeptide was shown to comigrate with the major new phosphopeptide induced in response to phorbol ester. When cells were depleted of PKC by pretreatment with high concentrations of phorbol ester, TCR stimulation was no longer capable of inducing c-raf-associated kinase activity. To determine whether activation of the tyrosine kinase alone would activate c-raf, we examined the 2B4 variant cell line FL.8. In response to Thy-1 stimulation, these cells activate the tyrosine kinase but not protein kinase C due to a deficiency in TCR eta chain expression. We found that in contrast to Thy-1 stimulation of 2B4 cells, stimulation of FL.8 cells does not lead to the induction of c-raf-associated kinase activity, although phorbol ester activates the kinase to an equivalent degree in both cells. We conclude that T cell receptor activation of c-raf occurs via phosphorylation by the serine/threonine kinase PKC. Activation of c-raf through PKC represents a mechanism distinct from that reported for tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors.

  2. Characterization of a calcium- and lipid-dependent protein kinase associated with the plasma membrane of oat

    SciTech Connect

    Schaller, G.E.; Sussman, M.R. ); Harmon, A.C. )

    1992-02-18

    A protein kinase that is activated by calcium and lipid has been partially purified from the plasma membrane of oat roots. This protein kinase cross-reacts with four monoclonal antibodies directed against a soluble calcium-dependent protein kinase from soybean described previously indicating that the oat enzyme is a member of this calcium-dependent protein kinase family. Immunoblots demonstrate that the membrane-derived protein kinase is slightly larger than that observed in the cytosolic fraction of oat. Limited digestion of the membrane-derived kinase with trypsin generates a smaller water-soluble kinase that is still activated by calcium but is no longer activated by lipid. When posthomogenization proteolysis is minimized, the bulk of the immunoreactive kinase material is localized in the membrane. These results suggest that a calcium-dependent protein kinase observed in the supernatant fraction of oat extracts may originate in situ from a calcium- and lipid-dependent protein kinase which is associated with the oat plasma membrane. They further indicate that, in contrast to animal cells, the predominant calcium- and lipid-dependent protein kinase associated with the plasma membrane of plant cells has biochemical properties and amino acid sequence unlike protein kinase C.

  3. DNA-dependent protein kinase and checkpoint kinase 2 synergistically activate a latent population of p53 upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Jack, Melissa T; Woo, Richard A; Motoyama, Noboru; Takai, Hitoyuki; Lee, Patrick W K

    2004-04-01

    The role of the checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) as an upstream activator of p53 following DNA damage has been controversial. We have recently shown that Chk2 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) are both involved in DNA damage-induced apoptosis but not G(1) arrest in mouse embryo fibroblasts. Here we demonstrate that Chk2 is required to activate p53 in vitro as measured by its ability to bind its consensus DNA target sequence following DNA damage and is in fact the previously unidentified factor working synergistically with DNA-PK to activate p53. The gene mutated in ataxia telangiectasia is not involved in this p53 activation. Using wortmannin, serine 15 mutants of p53, DNA-PK null cells and Chk2 null cells, we demonstrate that DNA-PK and Chk2 act independently and sequentially on p53. Furthermore, the p53 target of these two kinases represents a latent (preexisting) population of p53. Taken together, the results from these studies are consistent with a model in which DNA damage causes an immediate and sequential modification of latent p53 by DNA-PK and Chk2, which under appropriate conditions can lead to apoptosis. PMID:14752107

  4. Arabidopsis MAP kinase phosphatase 1 and its target MAP kinases 3 and 6 antagonistically determine UV-B stress tolerance, independent of the UVR8 photoreceptor pathway.

    PubMed

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Bartels, Sebastian; Albert, Andreas; Ulm, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Plants perceive UV-B radiation as an informational signal by a pathway involving UVR8 as UV-B photoreceptor, activating photomorphogenic and acclimation responses. In contrast, the response to UV-B as an environmental stress involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades. Whereas the perception pathway is plant specific, the UV-B stress pathway is more broadly conserved. Knowledge of the UV-B stress-activated MAPK signalling pathway in plants is limited, and its potential interplay with the UVR8-mediated pathway has not been defined. Here, we show that loss of MAP kinase phosphatase 1 in the mutant mkp1 results in hypersensitivity to acute UV-B stress, but without impairing UV-B acclimation. The MKP1-interacting proteins MPK3 and MPK6 are activated by UV-B stress and are hyperactivated in mkp1. Moreover, mutants mpk3 and mpk6 exhibit elevated UV-B tolerance and partially suppress the UV-B hypersensitivity of mkp1. We show further that the MKP1-regulated stress-response MAPK pathway is independent of the UVR8 photoreceptor, but that MKP1 also contributes to survival under simulated sunlight. We conclude that, whereas UVR8-mediated acclimation in plants promotes UV-B-induced defence measures, MKP1-regulated stress signalling results when UV-B protection and repair are insufficient and damage occurs. The combined activity of these two mechanisms is crucial to UV-B tolerance in plants.

  5. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  6. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  7. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase Kinase α Is Expressed by Monocytic Cells and Regulates the Activation Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guest, Christopher B.; Deszo, Eric L.; Hartman, Matthew E.; York, Jason M.; Kelley, Keith W.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase α (CaMKKα) is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). This protein was identified as CaMKKα by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKα in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKα inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin) and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKα, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKα to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFα and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKα inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFα production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKα in the differentiation of monocytic cells. PMID:18270593

  8. ERK1/2 map kinase metabolic pathway is responsible for phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF4E during in vitro maturation of pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ellederová, Zdenka; Cais, Ondrej; Susor, Andrej; Uhlírová, Katka; Kovárová, Hana; Jelínková, Lucie; Tomek, Wolfgang; Kubelka, Michal

    2008-02-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) plays an important role in mRNA translation by binding the 5'-cap structure of the mRNA and facilitating the recruitment to the mRNA of other translation factors and the 40S ribosomal subunit. eIF4E undergoes regulated phosphorylation on Ser-209 and this phosphorylation is believed to be important for its binding to mRNA and to other initiation factors. The findings showing that the translation initiation factor eIF4E becomes gradually phosphorylated during in vitro maturation (IVM) of pig oocytes with a maximum in metaphase II (M II) stage oocytes have been documented by us recently (Ellederova et al., 2006). The aim of this work was to study in details the metabolic pathways involved in this process. Using inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, Butyrolactone I (BL I) and protein phosphatases, okadaic acid (OA) we show that ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway is involved in this phosphorylation. We also demonstrate that activation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase and eIF4E is associated with the activating phosphorylation of Mnk1 kinase, one of the two main kinases phosphorylating eIF4E in somatic cells.

  9. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase activity in nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum, L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.3 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified 80,000-fold by salt fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography, after which it has a high specific activity of about 100 picomoles per minute per microgram in the presence of Ca2+ and reaches half-maximal activation at about 3 x 10(-7) molar free Ca2+, without calmodulin. It is a monomer with a molecular weight near 90,000. It can efficiently use histone III-S, ribosomal S6 protein, and casein as artificial substrates, but it phosphorylates phosvitin only weakly. Its Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity is half-maximally inhibited by 0.1 millimolar chlorpromazine, by 35 nanomolar K-252a and by 7 nanomolar staurosporine. It is insensitive to sphingosine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, and to basic polypeptides that block other Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. It is not stimulated by exogenous phospholipids or fatty acids. In intact isolated pea nuclei it preferentially phosphorylates several chromatin-associated proteins, with the most phosphorylated protein band being near the same molecular weight (43,000) as a nuclear protein substrate whose phosphorylation has been reported to be stimulated by phytochrome in a calcium-dependent fashion.

  10. Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein-dependent protein synthesis is regulated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Coleen M; Nozaki, Naohito; Shigeri, Yasushi; Soderling, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB) regulates protein synthesis in hippocampal dendrites. CPEB binds the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of cytoplasmic mRNAs and, when phosphorylated, initiates mRNA polyadenylation and translation. We report that, of the protein kinases activated in the hippocampus during synaptic plasticity, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) robustly phosphorylated the regulatory site (threonine 171) in CPEB in vitro. In postsynaptic density fractions or hippocampal neurons, CPEB phosphorylation increased when CaMKII was activated. These increases in CPEB phosphorylation were attenuated by a specific peptide inhibitor of CaMKII and by the general CaM-kinase inhibitor KN-93. Inhibitors of protein phosphatase 1 increased basal CPEB phosphorylation in neurons; this was also attenuated by a CaM-kinase inhibitor. To determine whether CaM-kinase activity regulates CPEB-dependent mRNA translation, hippocampal neurons were transfected with luciferase fused to a 3' UTR containing CPE-binding elements. Depolarization of neurons stimulated synthesis of luciferase; this was abrogated by inhibitors of protein synthesis, mRNA polyadenylation, and CaMKII. These results demonstrate that CPEB phosphorylation and translation are regulated by CaMKII activity and provide a possible mechanism for how dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus may be stimulated during synaptic plasticity.

  11. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa

    DOE PAGES

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-11-20

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) thatmore » can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal

  12. Hydrogen peroxide activates focal adhesion kinase and c-Src by a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-dependent mechanism and promotes cell migration in Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Dunagan, Mitzi; Sheth, Parimal; Seth, Ankur; Rao, R K

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies showed that c-Src and phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase mediate the oxidative stress-induced disruption of tight junctions in Caco-2 cell monolayers. The present study evaluated the roles of PI3 kinase and Src kinase in the oxidative stress-induced activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and acceleration of cell migration. Oxidative stress, induced by xanthine and xanthine oxidase system, rapidly increased phosphorylation of FAK on Y397, Y925, and Y577 in the detergent-insoluble and soluble fractions and increased its tyrosine kinase activity. The PI3 kinase inhibitors, wortmannin and LY294002, and the Src kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5[chlorophyll]-7-[t-butyl]pyrazolo[3-4-d]pyrimidine, attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Oxidative stress induced phosphorylation of c-Src on Y418 by a PI3 kinase-dependent mechanism, whereas oxidative stress-induced activation of PI3 kinase was independent of Src kinase activity. Hydrogen peroxide accelerated Caco-2 cell migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Promotion of cell migration by hydrogen peroxide was attenuated by LY294002 and PP2. Reduced expression of FAK by siRNA attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced acceleration of cell migration. The expression of constitutively active c-Src(Y527F) enhanced cell migration, whereas the expression of dominant negative c-Src(K296R/Y528F) attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced stimulation of cell migration. Oxidative stress-induced activation of c-Src and FAK was associated with a rapid increase in the tyrosine phosphorylation and the levels of paxillin and p130(CAS) in actin-rich, detergent-insoluble fractions. This study shows that oxidative stress activates FAK and accelerates cell migration in an intestinal epithelium by a PI3 kinase- and Src kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:20378826

  13. Mapping dynamic protein interactions in MAP kinase signaling using live-cell fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and imaging.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Brian D; Schwartz, Joel W; Li, Rong

    2007-12-18

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS), and photon counting histograms (PCH) are fluctuation methods that emerged recently as potentially useful tools for obtaining parameters of molecular dynamics, interactions, and oligomerization in vivo. Here, we report the successful implementation of FCS, FCCS, and PCH in live yeast cells using fluorescent protein-tagged proteins expressed from their native chromosomal loci, examining cytosolic dynamics and interactions among components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, a widely occurring signaling motif, in response to mating pheromone. FCS analysis detailed the diffusion characteristics and mobile concentrations of MAPK proteins. FCCS analysis using EGFP and mCherry-tagged protein pairs observed the interactions of Ste7 (MAPK kinase) with the MAPKs, Fus3 or Kss1, and of the scaffold protein, Ste5, with Ste7 and Ste11 (MAPK kinase kinase) in the cytosol, providing in vivo constants of their binding equilibrium. The interaction of Ste5 with Fus3 in the cytosol was below the limit of detection, suggesting a weak interaction, if it exists, with K(d) >400-500 nM. Using PCH, we show that cytosolic Ste5 were mostly monomers. Artificial dimerization of Ste5, as confirmed by PCH, using a dimerizing tag, stimulated the interaction between Ste5 and Fus3. Native Ste5 was found to bind Fus3 preferentially at the cortex in pheromone-treated cells, as detected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These results provide a quantitative spatial map of MAPK complexes in vivo and directly support the model that membrane association and regulation of the Ste5 scaffold are critical steps in MAPK activation. PMID:18077328

  14. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is a cGMP-dependent kinase anchoring protein (GKAP) specific for the cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ isoform.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Eleonora; Burgers, Pepijn P; Plank, Michael; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-03-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important in providing compartmentalization and specificity in cellular signal transduction. Many studies have hallmarked the well designed compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) through its anchoring proteins. Much less data are available on the compartmentalization of its closest homolog, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), via its own PKG anchoring proteins (GKAPs). For the enrichment, screening, and discovery of (novel) PKA anchoring proteins, a plethora of methodologies is available, including our previously described chemical proteomics approach based on immobilized cAMP or cGMP. Although this method was demonstrated to be effective, each immobilized cyclic nucleotide did not discriminate in the enrichment for either PKA or PKG and their secondary interactors. Hence, with PKG signaling components being less abundant in most tissues, it turned out to be challenging to enrich and identify GKAPs. Here we extend this cAMP-based chemical proteomics approach using competitive concentrations of free cyclic nucleotides to isolate each kinase and its secondary interactors. Using this approach, we identified Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) as a putative novel GKAP. Through sequence alignment with known GKAPs and secondary structure prediction analysis, we defined a small sequence domain mediating the interaction with PKG Iβ but not PKG Iα. In vitro binding studies and site-directed mutagenesis further confirmed the specificity and affinity of HAP1 binding to the PKG Iβ N terminus. These data fully support that HAP1 is a GKAP, anchoring specifically to the cGMP-dependent protein kinase isoform Iβ, and provide further evidence that also PKG spatiotemporal signaling is largely controlled by anchoring proteins.

  15. PI3 Kinase signals BCR dependent mature B cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Sasaki, Yoshiteru; Calado, Dinis Pedro; Zhang, Baochun; Paik, Ji Hye; DePinho, Ronald A.; Kutok, Jeffrey L.; Kearney, John F.; Otipoby, Kevin L.; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Previous work has shown that mature B cells depend upon survival signals delivered to the cells by their antigen receptor (BCR). To identify the molecular nature of this survival signal, we have developed a genetic approach in which ablation of the BCR is combined with the activation of specific, BCR dependent signaling cascades in mature B cells in vivo. Using this system, we provide evidence that the survival of BCR deficient mature B cells can be rescued by a single signaling pathway downstream of the BCR, namely PI3K signaling, with the FOXO1 transcription factor playing a central role. PMID:19879843

  16. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  17. Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-02-01

    In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

  18. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-2 is a distinct protein kinase enriched in a novel cytoskeletal fraction associated with adipocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Murata, Haruhiko; Mueckler, Mike

    2003-06-13

    By recombining subcellular components of 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a test tube, early insulin signaling events dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) were successfully reconstituted, up to and including the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 by the serine/threonine kinase, Akt (Murata, H., Hresko, R.C., and Mueckler, M. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21607-21614). Utilizing the advantages provided by a cell-free methodology, we characterized phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 2 (PDK2), the putative kinase responsible for phosphorylating Akt on Ser-473. Immunodepleting cytosolic PDK1 from an in vitro reaction containing plasma membrane and cytosol markedly inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt at the PDK1 site (Thr-308) but had no effect on phosphorylation at the PDK2 site (Ser-473). In contrast, PDK2 activity was found to be highly enriched in a novel cytoskeletal subcellular fraction associated with plasma membranes. Akt isoforms 1-3 and a kinase-dead Akt1 (K179A) mutant were phosphorylated in a phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent manner at Ser-473 in an in vitro reaction containing this novel adipocyte subcellular fraction. Our data indicate that this PDK2 activity is the result of a kinase distinct from PDK1 and is not due to autophosphorylation or transphosphorylation of Akt. PMID:12682057

  19. Mapping the Putative G Protein-coupled Receptor (GPCR) Docking Site on GPCR Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Beautrait, Alexandre; Michalski, Kevin R.; Lopez, Thomas S.; Mannix, Katelynn M.; McDonald, Devin J.; Cutter, Amber R.; Medina, Christopher B.; Hebert, Aaron M.; Francis, Charnelle J.; Bouvier, Michel; Tesmer, John J. G.; Sterne-Marr, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate agonist-occupied receptors initiating the processes of desensitization and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Interaction of GRKs with activated receptors serves to stimulate their kinase activity. The extreme N-terminal helix (αN), the kinase small lobe, and the active site tether (AST) of the AGC kinase domain have previously been implicated in mediating the allosteric activation. Expanded mutagenesis of the αN and AST allowed us to further assess the role of these two regions in kinase activation and receptor phosphorylation in vitro and in intact cells. We also developed a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay to monitor the recruitment of GRK2 to activated α2A-adrenergic receptors (α2AARs) in living cells. The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer signal exhibited a biphasic response to norepinephrine concentration, suggesting that GRK2 is recruited to Gβγ and α2AAR with EC50 values of 15 nm and 8 μm, respectively. We show that mutations in αN (L4A, V7E, L8E, V11A, S12A, Y13A, and M17A) and AST (G475I, V477D, and I485A) regions impair or potentiate receptor phosphorylation and/or recruitment. We suggest that a surface of GRK2, including Leu4, Val7, Leu8, Val11, and Ser12, directly interacts with receptors, whereas residues such as Asp10, Tyr13, Ala16, Met17, Gly475, Val477, and Ile485 are more important for kinase domain closure and activation. Taken together with data on GRK1 and GRK6, our data suggest that all three GRK subfamilies make conserved interactions with G protein-coupled receptors, but there may be unique interactions that influence selectivity. PMID:25049229

  20. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  1. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of DNA-dependent protein kinase-defective rodent mutant irs-20.

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, A; Beamish, H J; Gell, D; Amatucci, A G; Muhlmann-Diaz, M C; Singleton, B K; Smith, G C; Blunt, T; Schalkwyk, L C; Bedford, J S; Jackson, S P; Jeggo, P A; Taccioli, G E

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is a member of a sub-family of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinases termed PIK-related kinases. A distinguishing feature of this sub-family is the presence of a conserved C-terminal region downstream of a PI 3-kinase domain. Mutants defective in DNA-PKcs are sensitive to ionising radiation and are unable to carry out V(D)J recombination. Irs-20 is a DNA-PKcs-defective cell line with milder gamma-ray sensitivity than two previously characterised mutants, V-3 and mouse scid cells. Here we show that the DNA-PKcs protein from irs-20 cells can bind to DNA but is unable to function as a protein kinase. To verify the defect in irs-20 cells and provide insight into the function and expression of DNA-PKcs in double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination we introduced YACs encoding human and mouse DNA-PKcs into defective mutants and achieved complementation of the defective phenotypes. Furthermore, in irs-20 we identified a mutation in DNA-PKcs that causes substitution of a lysine for a glutamic acid in the fourth residue from the C-terminus. This represents a strong candidate for the inactivating mutation and provides supportive evidence that the extreme C-terminal motif is important for protein kinase activity. PMID:9518490

  2. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  3. Gene expression related to synaptogenesis, neuritogenesis, and MAP kinase in behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Ujike, Hiroshi; Takaki, Manabu; Kodama, Masafumi; Kuroda, Shigetoshi

    2002-06-01

    The most important characteristic of behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, such as amphetamine and cocaine, is the very long-lasting hypersensitivity to the drug after cessation of exposure. Rearrangement and structural modification of neural networks in CNS must be involved in behavioral sensitization. Previous microscopic studies have shown that the length of dendrites and density of dendritic spines increased in the nucleus accumbens and frontal cortex after repeated exposure to amphetamine and cocaine, but the molecular mechanisms responsible are not well understood. We investigated a set of genes related to synaptogenesis, neuritogenesis, and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase after exposure to methamphetamine. Synaptophysin mRNA, but not VAMP2 (synaptobrevin 2) mRNA, which are considered as synaptogenesis markers, increased in the accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, and several cortices, including the medial frontal cortex, after a single dose of 4 mg/kg methamphetamine. Stathmin mRNA, but not neuritin or narp mRNA, which are markers for neuritic sprouting, increased in the striatum, hippocampus, and cortices after a single dose of methamphetamine. The mRNA of arc, an activity-regulated protein associated with cytoskeleton, but not of alpha-tubulin, as markers for neuritic elongation, showed robust increases in the striatum, hippocampus, and cortices after a single dose of methamphetamine. The mRNAs of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), MKP-3, and rheb, a ras homologue abundant in brain, were investigated to assess the MAP kinase cascades. MKP-1 and MKP-3 mRNAs, but not rheb mRNA, increased in the striatum, thalamus, and cortices, and in the striatum, hippocampus, and cortices, respectively, after a single methamphetamine. Synaptophysin and stathmin mRNAs did not increase again after chronic methamphetamine administration, whereas the increases in arc, MKP-1, and MKP-3 mRNAs persisted in the brain regions after chronic methamphetamine administration

  4. Mutational Analysis of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Protein Kinase Together with Kinome-Wide Binding and Stability Studies Suggests Context-Dependent Recognition of Kinases by the Chaperone Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Pasculescu, Adrian; Dai, Anna Yue; Williton, Kelly; Taylor, Lorne; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Woodgett, James R.; Pawson, Tony; Colwill, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and cell division cycle 37 (CDC37) chaperones are key regulators of protein kinase folding and maturation. Recent evidence suggests that thermodynamic properties of kinases, rather than primary sequences, are recognized by the chaperones. In concordance, we observed a striking difference in HSP90 binding between wild-type (WT) and kinase-dead (KD) glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) forms. Using model cell lines stably expressing these two GSK3β forms, we observed no interaction between WT GSK3β and HSP90, in stark contrast to KD GSK3β forming a stable complex with HSP90 at a 1:1 ratio. In a survey of 91 ectopically expressed kinases in DLD-1 cells, we compared two parameters to measure HSP90 dependency: static binding and kinase stability following HSP90 inhibition. We observed no correlation between HSP90 binding and reduced stability of a kinase after pharmacological inhibition of HSP90. We expanded our stability study to >50 endogenous kinases across four cell lines and demonstrated that HSP90 dependency is context dependent. These observations suggest that HSP90 binds to its kinase client in a particular conformation that we hypothesize to be associated with the nucleotide-processing cycle. Lastly, we performed proteomics profiling of kinases and phosphopeptides in DLD-1 cells to globally define the impact of HSP90 inhibition on the kinome. PMID:26755559

  5. Phosphorylation of the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, in vitro, and in transfected COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jurutka, P W; Hsieh, J C; Haussler, M R

    1993-03-31

    We report that the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor is an efficient substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase, in vitro. This phosphorylation reaction is rapid and neither dependent upon nor significantly affected by the presence of the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ligand. Preliminary mapping experiments utilizing C-terminal truncation mutants reveal that the primary site(s) of phosphorylation, in vitro, is localized between amino acids 133 and 201. Cotransfection of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor into monkey kidney (COS-7) cells not only results in a dramatic kinase-dependent increase in receptor phosphorylation but also elicits an attenuation in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent transcriptional activation of a reporter gene. These observations suggest a potential role for cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the modulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor-mediated gene regulation. PMID:8385450

  6. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Roth, Jack A.; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Pataer, Apar

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expresson of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinaseT172 [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  7. PRKX, a Novel cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Member, Plays an Important Role in Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sizhou; Li, Qian; Alberts, Ian; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The human protein kinase X gene (PRKX) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are both c-AMP-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases within the protein kinase AGC subgroup. Of all the protein kinases in this group, PRKX is the least studied. PRKX has been isolated from patients with chondrodysplasia punctate and is involved in numerous processes, including sexual differentiation and fertilization, normal kidney development and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), blood maturation, neural development, and angiogenesis in vitro. Although the role of PRKX in development and disease has been reported recently, the underlying mechanism of PRKX activity is largely unknown. In addition, based on the expression pattern of PRKX and the extensive role of PKA in disease and development, PRKX might have additional crucial functions that have not been addressed in the literature. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and developmental functions of PRKX that have been reported by recent studies. In particular, we elucidate the structural and functional differences between PRKX and PKA, as well as the possible roles of PRKX in development and related diseases. Finally, we propose future studies that could lead to important discoveries of more PRKX functions and the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:26252946

  8. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  9. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells.

  10. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells. PMID:26406906

  11. Resveratrol suppresses prostaglandin F(2α)-induced osteoprotegerin synthesis in osteoblasts: inhibition of the MAP kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Gen; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kondo, Akira; Mizutani, Jun; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2014-01-15

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol abundantly found in grape skins and red wine, possesses various beneficial properties for human health. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the effects of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) on osteoprotegerin (OPG) synthesis and of resveratrol on the OPG synthesis in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. PGF2α stimulated both the release of the OPG protein and the expression of OPG mRNA. Treatment with PD98059, SB203580 and SP600125, specific inhibitors of MEK1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) all suppressed the OPG release induced by PGF2α. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the PGF2α-stimulated OPG release and the mRNA levels of OPG. Similarly, treatment with SRT1720, an activator of SIRT1, also suppressed the PGF2α-stimulated OPG release. Resveratrol and SRT1720 both attenuated the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase, MEK1/2, Raf-1, p38 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK induced by PGF2α. These findings strongly suggest that resveratrol suppresses PGF2α-stimulated OPG synthesis by inhibiting the MAP kinase pathways in osteoblasts, and that the effect is mediated via SIRT1 activation.

  12. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  13. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiaoyong; Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Ma, Yaxian; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yin, Weiyao; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Xu, Wenming; Ming Xu, Wen; Xu, Liangzhi; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-07

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued.

  14. Irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating the MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yong Qiao, Xiao; Nie, Ying; Xian Ma, Ya; Chen, Yan; Cheng, Ran; Yao Yinrg, Wei; Hu, Ying; Ming Xu, Wen; Zhi Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is able to improve skeletal health. However, the mechanisms are poorly known. Irisin, a novel exercise-induced myokine, secreted by skeletal muscle in response to exercise, have been shown to mediate beneficial effects of exercise in many disorders. In the current study, we demonstrated that irisin promotes osteoblast proliferation, and increases the expression of osteoblastic transcription regulators, such as Runt-related transcription factor-2, osterix/sp7; and osteoblast differentiation markers, including alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 alpha-1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in vitro. Irisin also increase ALP activity and calcium deposition in cultured osteoblast. These osteogenic effects were mediated by activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB023580 or pERK by U0126 abolished the proliferation and up-regulatory effects of irisin on Runx2 expression and ALP activity. Together our observation suggest that irisin directly targets osteoblast, promoting osteoblast proliferation and differentiation via activating P38/ERK MAP kinase signaling cascades in vitro. Whether irisin can be utilized as the therapeutic agents for osteopenia and osteoporosis is worth to be further pursued. PMID:26738434

  15. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Jiang, Zhongliang; Ahmad, Nisar; Rosati, Rita; Liu, Yusen; Beuret, Laurent; Monks, Robert; Charron, Jean; Birnbaum, Morris J; Samavati, Lobelia

    2013-11-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), also known as dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP-1), plays a crucial role in the deactivation of MAPKs. Several drugs with immune-suppressive properties modulate MKP-1 expression as part of their mechanism of action. We investigated the effect of mTOR inhibition through rapamycin and a dual mTOR inhibitor (AZD2014) on MKP-1 expression. Low dose rapamycin led to a rapid activation of both AKT and ERK pathways with a subsequent increase in MKP-1 expression. Rapamycin treatment led to phosphorylation of CREB, transcription factor 1 (ATF1), and ATF2, three transcription factors that bind to the cyclic AMP-responsive elements on the Mkp-1 promoter. Inhibition of either the MEK/ERK or the AKT pathway attenuated rapamycin-mediated MKP-1 induction. AZD2014 did not activate AKT but activated the ERK pathway, leading to a moderate MKP-1 induction. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) derived from wild-type (WT) mice or mice deficient in AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms or BMDM from targeted deficiency in MEK1 and MEK2, we show that rapamycin treatment led to an increased MKP1 expression in BMDM from WT but failed to do so in BMDMs lacking the AKT1 isoform or MEK1 and MEK2. Importantly, rapamycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-mediated p38 activation and decreased nitric oxide and IL-6 production. Our work provides a conceptual framework for the observed immune modulatory effect of mTOR inhibition.

  16. Method of empirical dependences in estimation and prediction of activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Moshkova, Albina N.; Erlykina, Elena I.; Khvatova, Elena M.

    2016-04-01

    Creatine kinase is a key enzyme of energy metabolism in the brain. There are known cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes. Mitochondrial creatine kinase exists as a mixture of two oligomeric forms - dimer and octamer. The aim of investigation was to study catalytic properties of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase and using of the method of empirical dependences for the possible prediction of the activity of these enzymes in cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was revealed to be accompanied with the changes of the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes and oligomeric state of mitochondrial isoform. There were made the models of multiple regression that permit to study the activity of creatine kinase system in cerebral ischemia using a calculating method. Therefore, the mathematical method of empirical dependences can be applied for estimation and prediction of the functional state of the brain by the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia.

  17. The p38 MAP kinase pathway modulates the hypoxia response and glutamate receptor trafficking in aging neurons.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Chan; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are sensitive to low oxygen (hypoxia) and employ a conserved pathway to combat its effects. Here, we show that p38 MAP Kinase (MAPK) modulates this hypoxia response pathway in C. elegans. Mutants lacking p38 MAPK components pmk-1 or sek-1 resemble mutants lacking the hypoxia response component and prolyl hydroxylase egl-9, with impaired subcellular localization of Mint orthologue LIN-10, internalization of glutamate receptor GLR-1, and depression of GLR-1-mediated behaviors. Loss of p38 MAPK impairs EGL-9 protein localization in neurons and activates the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF-1, suggesting that p38 MAPK inhibits the hypoxia response pathway through EGL-9. As animals age, p38 MAPK levels decrease, resulting in GLR-1 internalization; this age-dependent downregulation can be prevented through either p38 MAPK overexpression or removal of CDK-5, an antagonizing kinase. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK inhibits the hypoxia response pathway and determines how aging neurons respond to hypoxia through a novel mechanism. PMID:26731517

  18. Cell-permeable p38 MAP kinase promotes migration of adult neural stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamanoue, Makoto; Morioka, Kazuhito; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohsawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Tsuburaya, Kayo; Akasaka, Yoshikiyo; Mikami, Tetsuo; Ogata, Toru; Takamatsu, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) can migrate toward sites of injury, but the migration activity of NPCs is insufficient to regenerate damaged brain tissue. In this study, we showed that p38 MAP kinase (p38) is expressed in doublecortin-positive adult NPCs. Experiments using the p38 inhibitor SB203580 revealed that endogenous p38 participates in NPC migration. To enhance NPC migration, we generated a cell-permeable wild-type p38 protein (PTD-p38WT) in which the HIV protein transduction domain (PTD) was fused to the N-terminus of p38. Treatment with PTD-p38WT significantly promoted the random migration of adult NPCs without affecting cell survival or differentiation; this effect depended on the cell permeability and kinase activity of the fusion protein. These findings indicate that PTD-p38WT is a novel and useful tool for unraveling the roles of p38, and that this protein provides a reasonable approach for regenerating the injured brain by enhancing NPC migration. PMID:27067799

  19. The SLT2 (MPK1) MAP kinase homolog is involved in polarized cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Bud emergence, spindle pole body duplication and DNA replication are all dependent on the activation of the CDC28 protein kinase at the Start point in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Bud emergence requires polarization of the cytoskeleton and secretory vesicles to a specific site on the cell surface. Cdc28p activated by G1-cyclins triggers polarization of actin to the site of bud emergence and favors apical bud growth (Lew, D. J., and S. I. Reed. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:1305- 1320). We isolated slt2-1 as a mutation that enhances the division defect of cdc28 mutants with defects at Start. Slt2p(Mpk1p) is a member of the MAP kinase family (Lee, K. S., K. Irie, Y. Gotoh, Y. Watanabe, H. Araki, E. Nishida, K. Matsumoto, and D. E. Levin. 1993. Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:3067-3075). We show that slt2 mutants exhibit phenotypes similar to those shown by mutants of the yeast actin cytoskeleton, including delocalization of chitin deposition and of actin cortical spots and the accumulation of secretory pathway membranes and vesicles. Furthermore, slt2::HIS3 act1-1 and slt2::HIS3 myo2-66 double mutants are inviable. We suggest that Slt2p functions downstream or in parallel with Cdc28p in promoting bud formation and apical growth. PMID:8276900

  20. Identification of interacting proteins for calcium-dependent protein kinase 8 by a novel screening system based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Mayu; Han, Yulong; Kito, Nobuki; Che, Fang-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases are key regulators of cell function that constitute one of the largest and most functionally diverse gene families. We developed a novel assay system, based on the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technique in Escherichia coli, for detecting transient interactions such as those between kinases and their substrates. This system detected the interaction between OsMEK1 and its direct target OsMAP1. By contrast, BiFC fluorescence was not observed when OsMAP2 or OsMAP3, which are not substrates of OsMEK1, were used as prey proteins. We also screened for interacting proteins of calcium-dependent protein kinase 8 (OsCPK8), a regulator of plant immune responses, and identified three proteins as interacting molecules of OsCPK8. The interaction between OsCPK8 and two of these proteins (ARF-GEF and peptidyl prolyl isomerase) was confirmed in rice cells by means of BiFC technology. These results indicate that our new assay system has the potential to screen for protein kinase target molecules.

  1. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  2. Phosphopeptide binding by Sld3 links Dbf4-dependent kinase to MCM replicative helicase activation.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Tom D; Yeeles, Joseph Tp; Diffley, John Fx

    2016-05-01

    The initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires the assembly of active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicases at replication origins by a set of conserved and essential firing factors. This process is controlled during the cell cycle by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and in response to DNA damage by the checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk1. Here we show that Sld3, previously shown to be an essential CDK and Rad53 substrate, is recruited to the inactive MCM double hexamer in a DDK-dependent manner. Sld3 binds specifically to DDK-phosphorylated peptides from two MCM subunits (Mcm4, 6) and then recruits Cdc45. MCM mutants that cannot bind Sld3 or Sld3 mutants that cannot bind phospho-MCM or Cdc45 do not support replication. Moreover, phosphomimicking mutants in Mcm4 and Mcm6 bind Sld3 without DDK and facilitate DDK-independent replication. Thus, Sld3 is an essential "reader" of DDK phosphorylation, integrating signals from three distinct protein kinase pathways to coordinate DNA replication during S phase. PMID:26912723

  3. Selective cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors discriminating between cell cycle and transcriptional kinases: future reality or utopia?

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Krystof, Vladimír

    2009-08-01

    Progression of the cell cycle is controlled by activating and inhibiting cellular factors. The delicate balance between these positive- and negative-acting regulators warrants proper cell cycle progression in normal cells and facilitates cellular response to a variety of stress stimuli. The increased activity of the positive regulators of the cell cycle in cancer cells is frequently accompanied by the loss or inactivation of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The supplementation of the cellular CDK inhibitors by the pharmacological counterparts is a very promising therapeutic option. The generated pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs belong to different classes of compounds and display various CDK inhibitory features. In this article the action and specificity of CDK inhibitor roscovitine, belonging to the group of purine analogues, is reviewed and the rationale for dissecting the inhibitory action on cell cycle and transcriptional CDKs is discussed.

  4. Flunitrazepam rapidly reduces GABAA receptor subunit protein expression via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Price, Sally A; Bristow, David R

    1998-01-01

    Acute flunitrazepam (1 μM) exposure for 1 h reduced GABAA receptor α1 (22±4%, mean±s.e.mean) and β2/3 (21±4%) subunit protein levels in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. This rapid decrease in subunit proteins was completely prevented by bisindolymaleimide 1 (1 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, but not by N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-89, 4.8 μM), an inhibitor of protein kinases A and G. These results suggest the existence of a benzodiazepine-induced mechanism to rapidly alter GABAA receptor protein expression, that appears to be dependent on protein kinase C activity. PMID:9723942

  5. Designing selective inhibitors for calcium-dependent protein kinases in apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    Hui, Raymond; El Bakkouri, Majida; Sibley, L David

    2015-07-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause some of the most severe human diseases, including malaria (caused by Plasmodium), toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Treatments are limited by the lack of effective drugs and development of resistance to available agents. By exploiting novel features of protein kinases in these parasites, it may be possible to develop new treatments. We summarize here recent advances in identifying small molecule inhibitors against a novel family of plant-like, calcium-dependent kinases that are uniquely expanded in apicomplexan parasites. Analysis of the 3D structure, activation mechanism, and sensitivity to small molecules had identified several attractive chemical scaffolds that are potent and selective inhibitors of these parasite kinases. Further optimization of these leads may yield promising new drugs for treatment of these parasitic infections. PMID:26002073

  6. Virtual screening filters for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase inhibitors: a fragment based library generation approach.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayan, Preethi; Sastry, G Narahari

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we introduce the development and application of a three-step scoring and filtering procedure for the design of type II p38 MAP kinase leads using allosteric fragments extracted from virtual screening hits. The design of the virtual screening filters is based on a thorough evaluation of docking methods, DFG-loop conformation, binding interactions and chemotype specificity of the 138 p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from Protein Data Bank bound to DFG-in and DFG-out conformations using Glide, GOLD and CDOCKER. A 40 ns molecular dynamics simulation with the apo, type I with DFG-in and type II with DFG-out forms was carried out to delineate the effects of structural variations on inhibitor binding. The designed docking-score and sub-structure filters were first tested on a dataset of 249 potent p38 MAP kinase inhibitors from seven diverse series and 18,842 kinase inhibitors from PDB, to gauge their capacity to discriminate between kinase and non-kinase inhibitors and likewise to selectively filter-in target-specific inhibitors. The designed filters were then applied in the virtual screening of a database of ten million (10⁷) compounds resulting in the identification of 100 hits. Based on their binding modes, 98 allosteric fragments were extracted from the hits and a fragment library was generated. New type II p38 MAP kinase leads were designed by tailoring the existing type I ATP site binders with allosteric fragments using a common urea linker. Target specific virtual screening filters can thus be easily developed for other kinases based on this strategy to retrieve target selective compounds. PMID:22306417

  7. Cholesterol ester hydrolase in pig liver is activated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.S.; Dubin, E.; Margolis, S.

    1986-05-01

    To examine whether hepatic neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) is regulated by phosphorylation, the authors have assayed CEH activity from pig liver cytosol by measuring /sup 14/C-oleate release from labeled cholesteryl oleate at pH 7.4. When pig liver cytosol was incubated with 2 mM Mg and 0.5 mM ATP, CEH activity was increased (141 +/- 8% of control, mean +/- SEM). Addition of 25..mu..M cyclic AMP (cAMP) further activated CEH activity (164 +/- 4% of control) as compared to incubation with Mg and ATP (p < 0.02). In the presence of 5 mM EDTA or in the absence of either Mg or ATP, no activation of CEH was observed. The activation was completely abolished by further incubation of activated cytosol with E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Activation of CEH activity was partially prevented by the addition of protein kinase inhibitor (p < 0.02) and this effect was completely reversed in the presence of exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase (p < 0.05). To examine further the role of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, CEH activity was purified 240-fold by 35% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ precipitation and Sepharose 4B chromatography. Incubation of partially purified CEH fractions with Mg, ATP and cAMP did not increase CEH activity. Addition of exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activated CEH activity of partially purified fractions. The authors observations indicate that pig liver CEH is activated by phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  8. New isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z L; Ikebe, M

    1994-01-01

    Four novel isoforms of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) were found in rat aorta smooth muscle. Two of them were related to gamma-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (gamma-a). Differences in the primary structure of these isoforms were located in the variable region. One of them (gamma-b) contained 23 unique amino acid residues, whereas the other (gamma-c) did not contain this sequence. Both isoforms lacked the two segments (Val-316 to Gln-337 and Lys-353 to Leu-362) present in gamma-a. The DNA sequence of these gamma-isoforms except the variable region was exactly the same, suggesting that they are produced by alternative splicing. Another two isoforms were related to the delta-isoform of brain CaM kinase II (delta-a). delta-b contained a unique 11-residue sequence in the variable region whereas delta-c did not. As found for gamma-isoforms, the sequence analysis suggested that the three delta-isoforms are also produced by alternative splicing. Analysis of RNA by reverse transcription PCR confirmed the existence of specific messages for gamma-b, delta-a and delta-b. The variety of isoforms of CaM kinase II suggest that each isoform may play a specialized role in cell regulation. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8172610

  9. Evolutionary paths of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Søberg, Kristoffer; Jahnsen, Tore; Rognes, Torbjørn; Skålhegg, Bjørn S; Laerdahl, Jon K

    2013-01-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) has served as a prototype for the large family of protein kinases that are crucially important for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. The PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the two genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood and characterized human kinases. Here we have studied the evolution of this gene family in chordates, arthropods, mollusks and other animals employing probabilistic methods and show that Cα and Cβ arose by duplication of an ancestral PKA catalytic subunit in a common ancestor of vertebrates. The two genes have subsequently been duplicated in teleost fishes. The evolution of the PRKACG retroposon in simians was also investigated. Although the degree of sequence conservation in the PKA Cα/Cβ kinase family is exceptionally high, a small set of signature residues defining Cα and Cβ subfamilies were identified. These conserved residues might be important for functions that are unique to the Cα or Cβ clades. This study also provides a good example of a seemingly simple phylogenetic problem which, due to a very high degree of sequence conservation and corresponding weak phylogenetic signals, combined with problematic nonphylogenetic signals, is nontrivial for state-of-the-art probabilistic phylogenetic methods. PMID:23593352

  10. How do kinases contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of the transcription factor NFAT5?

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    NFAT5 plays a critical role in maintaining the renal functions. Its dis-regulation in the kidney leads to or is associated with certain renal diseases or disorders, most notably the urinary concentration defect. Hypertonicity, which the kidney medulla is normally exposed to, activates NFAT5 through phosphorylation of a signaling molecule or NFAT5 itself. Hypotonicity inhibits NFAT5 through a similar mechanism. More than a dozen of protein and lipid kinases have been identified to contribute to tonicity-dependent regulation of NFAT5. Hypertonicity activates NFAT5 by increasing its nuclear localization and transactivating activity in the early phase and protein abundance in the late phase. The known mechanism for inhibition of NFAT5 by hypotonicity is a decrease of nuclear NFAT5. The present article reviews the effect of each kinase on NFAT5 nuclear localization, transactivation and protein abundance, and the relationship among these kinases, if known. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus suppress immune reactions by inhibiting the phosphatase calcineurin-dependent activation of NFAT1. It is hoped that this review would stimulate the interest to seek explanations from the NFAT5 regulatory pathways for certain clinical presentations and to explore novel therapeutic approaches based on the pathways. On the basic science front, this review raises two interesting questions. The first one is how these kinases can specifically signal to NFAT5 in the context of hypertonicity or hypotonicity, because they also regulate other cellular activities and even opposite activities in some cases. The second one is why these many kinases, some of which might have redundant functions, are needed to regulate NFAT5 activity. This review reiterates the concept of signaling through cooperation. Cells need these kinases working in a coordinated way to provide the signaling specificity that is lacking in the individual one. Redundancy in regulation of NFAT5 is a critical strategy for cells to

  11. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinases (CaMKKs) Effects on AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Regulation of Chicken Sperm Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Mong Diep; Combarnous, Yves; Praud, Christophe; Duittoz, Anne; Blesbois, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Sperm require high levels of energy to ensure motility and acrosome reaction (AR) accomplishment. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated to be strongly involved in the control of these properties. We address here the question of the potential role of calcium mobilization on AMPK activation and function in chicken sperm through the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs) mediated pathway. The presence of CaMKKs and their substrates CaMKI and CaMKIV was evaluated by western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Sperm were incubated in presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, or of CaMKKs inhibitor (STO-609). Phosphorylations of AMPK, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, as well as sperm functions were evaluated. We demonstrate the presence of both CaMKKs (α and β), CaMKI and CaMKIV in chicken sperm. CaMKKα and CaMKI were localized in the acrosome, the midpiece, and at much lower fluorescence in the flagellum, whereas CaMKKβ was mostly localized in the flagellum and much less in the midpiece and the acrosome. CaMKIV was only present in the flagellum. The presence of extracellular calcium induced an increase in kinases phosphorylation and sperm activity. STO-609 reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not in its absence. STO-609 did not affect CaMKIV phosphorylation but decreased CaMKI phosphorylation and this inhibition was quicker in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ than in its absence. STO-609 efficiently inhibited sperm motility and AR, both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca2+. Our results show for the first time the presence of CaMKKs (α and β) and one of its substrate, CaMKI in different subcellular compartments in germ cells, as well as the changes in the AMPK regulation pathway, sperm motility and AR related to Ca2+ entry in sperm through the Ca2+/CaM/CaMKKs/CaMKI pathway. The Ca2+/CaMKKs/AMPK pathway is activated only under conditions of extracellular Ca2+ entry in the cells

  12. Multiple docking sites on substrate proteins form a modular system that mediates recognition by ERK MAP kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Dave; Glossip, Danielle; Xing, Heming; Muslin, Anthony J.; Kornfeld, Kerry

    1999-01-01

    MAP kinases phosphorylate specific groups of substrate proteins. Here we show that the amino acid sequence FXFP is an evolutionarily conserved docking site that mediates ERK MAP kinase binding to substrates in multiple protein families. FXFP and the D box, a different docking site, form a modular recognition system, as they can function independently or in combination. FXFP is specific for ERK, whereas the D box mediates binding to ERK and JNK MAP kinase, suggesting that the partially overlapping substrate specificities of ERK and JNK result from recognition of shared and unique docking sites. These findings enabled us to predict new ERK substrates and design peptide inhibitors of ERK that functioned in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9925641

  13. Functional Mapping of Protein Kinase A Reveals Its Importance in Adult Schistosoma mansoni Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    de Saram, Paulu S. R.; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and ‘smart’ anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology

  14. Functional mapping of protein kinase A reveals its importance in adult Schistosoma mansoni motor activity.

    PubMed

    de Saram, Paulu S R; Ressurreição, Margarida; Davies, Angela J; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M; Walker, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A (PKA) is the major transducer of cAMP signalling in eukaryotic cells. Here, using laser scanning confocal microscopy and 'smart' anti-phospho PKA antibodies that exclusively detect activated PKA, we provide a detailed in situ analysis of PKA signalling in intact adult Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of debilitating human intestinal schistosomiasis. In both adult male and female worms, activated PKA was consistently found associated with the tegument, oral and ventral suckers, oesophagus and somatic musculature. In addition, the seminal vesicle and gynaecophoric canal muscles of the male displayed activated PKA whereas in female worms activated PKA localized to the ootype wall, the ovary, and the uterus particularly around eggs during expulsion. Exposure of live worms to the PKA activator forskolin (50 µM) resulted in striking PKA activation in the central and peripheral nervous system including at nerve endings at/near the tegument surface. Such neuronal PKA activation was also observed without forskolin treatment, but only in a single batch of worms. In addition, PKA activation within the central and peripheral nervous systems visibly increased within 15 min of worm-pair separation when compared to that observed in closely coupled worm pairs. Finally, exposure of adult worms to forskolin induced hyperkinesias in a time and dose dependent manner with 100 µM forskolin significantly increasing the frequency of gross worm movements to 5.3 times that of control worms (P≤0.001). Collectively these data are consistent with PKA playing a central part in motor activity and neuronal communication, and possibly interplay between these two systems in S. mansoni. This study, the first to localize a protein kinase when exclusively in an activated state in adult S. mansoni, provides valuable insight into the intricacies of functional protein kinase signalling in the context of whole schistosome physiology.

  15. Screening of a kinase library reveals novel pro-senescence kinases and their common NF-κB-dependent transcriptional program.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Mylène; Kirsh, Olivier; Griveau, Audrey; Vindrieux, David; Martin, Nadine; Defossez, Pierre-Antoine; Bernard, David

    2015-11-01

    Cellular senescence results in proliferation arrest and acquisition of hallmarks such as the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP). Senescence is involved in regulating numerous physio-pathological responses, including embryonic development, cancer, and several aging-related diseases. Only a few kinases, centered on the RAS signaling pathway, have been identified as inducing premature senescence. About possible other senescence-regulating kinases and signaling pathways, practically little is known. By screening a library of activated kinases, we identified 33 kinases whose constitutive expression decreases cell proliferation and induces expression of senescence markers; p16 and SASP components. Focusing on some kinases showing the strongest pro-senescence effects, we observed that they all induce expression of SASP-component genes through activation of an NF-κB-dependent transcriptional program. Furthermore, inhibition of the p53 or Rb pathway failed to prevent the SASP-inducing effect of pro-senescence kinases. Inhibition of the NF-κB, p53, or Rb pathway proved insufficient to prevent kinase-triggered cell cycle arrest. We have thus identified a repertoire of novel pro-senescence kinases and pathways. These results will open new perspectives in the understanding on the role of cellular senescence in various physio-pathological responses. PMID:26583757

  16. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 regulates autophagy through a calcium-dependent pathway involving NAADP.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suaga, Patricia; Luzón-Toro, Berta; Churamani, Dev; Zhang, Ling; Bloor-Young, Duncan; Patel, Sandip; Woodman, Philip G; Churchill, Grant C; Hilfiker, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset Parkinson's disease, but its physiological function has remained largely unknown. Here we report that LRRK2 activates a calcium-dependent protein kinase kinase-β (CaMKK-β)/adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway which is followed by a persistent increase in autophagosome formation. Simultaneously, LRKR2 overexpression increases the levels of the autophagy receptor p62 in a protein synthesis-dependent manner, and decreases the number of acidic lysosomes. The LRRK2-mediated effects result in increased sensitivity of cells to stressors associated with abnormal protein degradation. These effects can be mimicked by the lysosomal Ca(2+)-mobilizing messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and can be reverted by an NAADP receptor antagonist or expression of dominant-negative receptor constructs. Collectively, our data indicate a molecular mechanism for LRRK2 deregulation of autophagy and reveal previously unidentified therapeutic targets. PMID:22012985

  17. Direct Phosphorylation and Activation of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by a Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kabin; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Qin; Yang, Yinong

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a pivotal point of convergence for many signaling pathways in eukaryotes. In the classical MAPK cascade, a signal is transmitted via sequential phosphorylation and activation of MAPK kinase kinase, MAPK kinase (MKK), and MAPK. The activation of MAPK is dependent on dual phosphorylation of a TXY motif by an MKK, which is considered the sole kinase to phosphorylate and activate MAPK. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism of MAPK phosphorylation and activation besides the canonical MAPK cascade. A rice (Oryza sativa) calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), CPK18, was identified as an upstream kinase of MAPK (MPK5) in vitro and in vivo. Curiously, CPK18 was shown to phosphorylate and activate MPK5 without affecting the phosphorylation of its TXY motif. Instead, CPK18 was found to predominantly phosphorylate two Thr residues (Thr-14 and Thr-32) that are widely conserved in MAPKs from land plants. Further analyses reveal that the newly identified CPK18-MPK5 pathway represses defense gene expression and negatively regulates rice blast resistance. Our results suggest that land plants have evolved an MKK-independent phosphorylation pathway that directly connects calcium signaling to the MAPK machinery. PMID:25035404

  18. Receptor tyrosine and MAP kinase are involved in effects of H(2)O(2) on interstitial cells of Cajal in murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Yoo; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Kim, Byung Joo; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is involved in intestinal motility through changes of smooth muscle activity. However, there is no report as to the modulatory effects of H(2)O(2) on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). We investigated the H(2)O(2) effects and signal transductions to determine whether the intestinal motility can be modulated through ICC. We performed whole-cell patch clamp in cultured ICC from murine intestine and molecular analyses. H(2)O(2) hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited pacemaker currents. These effects were inhibited by glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels. The free-radical scavenger catalase inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects. MAFP and AACOCF3 (a cytosolic phospholipase A2 inhibitors) or SC-560 and NS-398 (a selective COX-1 and 2 inhibitor) or AH6809 (an EP2 receptor antagonist) inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects. PD98059 (a mitogen activated/ERK-activating protein kinase inhibitor) inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects, though SB-203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) or a JNK inhibitor did not affect. H(2)O(2)-induced effects could not be inhibited by LY-294002 (an inhibitor of PI3-kinases), calphostin C (a protein kinase C inhibitor) or SQ-22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor). Adenoviral infection analysis revealed H2O2 stimulated tyrosine kinase activity and AG 1478 (an antagonist of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase) inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects. These results suggest H(2)O(2) can modulate ICC pacemaker activity and this occur by the activation of K(ATP) channels through PGE(2) production via receptor tyrosine kinase-dependent MAP kinase activation.

  19. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica; Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent

  20. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  1. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Five Mediates Activation of Lung Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Response to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo S.; Serebreni, Leonid; Fallica, Jonathan; Hamdan, Omar; Wang, Lan; Johnston, Laura; Kolb, Todd; Damarla, Mahendra; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is involved in oxidative metabolism of purines and is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As such, XOR has been implicated in oxidant-mediated injury in multiple cardiopulmonary diseases. XOR enzyme activity is regulated, in part, via a phosphorylation-dependent, post-translational mechanism, although the kinase(s) responsible for such hyperactivation are unknown. Methods and Results Using an in silico approach, we identified a cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) consensus motif adjacent to the XOR flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding domain. CDK5 is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase historically linked to neural development and injury. We tested the hypothesis that CDK5 and its activators are mediators of hypoxia-induced hyperactivation of XOR in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (EC) and the intact murine lung. Using complementary molecular and pharmacologic approaches, we demonstrated that hypoxia significantly increased CDK5 activity in EC. This was coincident with increased expression of the CDK5 activators, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activator 1 (CDK5r1 or p35/p25), and decreased expression of the CDK5 inhibitory peptide, p10. Expression of p35/p25 was necessary for XOR hyperactivation. Further, CDK5 physically associated with XOR and was necessary and sufficient for XOR phosphorylation and hyperactivation both in vitro and in vivo. XOR hyperactivation required the target threonine (T222) within the CDK5-consensus motif. Conclusions and Significance These results indicate that p35/CDK5-mediated phosphorylation of T222 is required for hypoxia-induced XOR hyperactivation in the lung. Recognizing the contribution of XOR to oxidative injury in cardiopulmonary disease, these observations identify p35/CDK5 as novel regulators of XOR and potential modifiers of ROS-mediated injury. PMID:25831123

  2. The effects of cardamonin on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory protein production and MAP kinase and NFκB signalling pathways in monocytes/macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hatziieremia, S; Gray, A I; Ferro, V A; Paul, A; Plevin, R

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: In this study we examined the effect of the natural product cardamonin, upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory gene expression in order to attempt to pinpoint the mechanism of action. Experimental approaches: Cardamonin was isolated from the Greek plant A. absinthium L. Its effects were assessed on LPS-induced nitrite release and iNOS and COX-2 protein expression in two macrophage cell lines. Western blotting was used to investigate its effects on phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinases, ERK, JNK and p38 MAP kinase, and activation of the NFκB pathway, at the level of IκBα degradation and phosphorylation of NFκB. Also its effects on NFκB and GAS/GAF-DNA binding were assessed by EMSA. Key results: Cardamonin concentration-dependently inhibited both NO release and iNOS expression but had no effect on COX-2 expression. It did not affect phosphorylation of the MAP kinases, degradation of IκBα or phosphorylation of NFκB. However, it inhibited NFκB DNA-binding in both LPS-stimulated cells and nuclear extracts of the cells (in vitro). It also inhibited IFNγ-stimulated iNOS induction and GAS/GAF-DNA binding. Conclusions and Implications: These results show that the inhibitory effect of cardamonin on LPS-induced iNOS induction is not mediated via effects on the initial activation of the NFκB or MAP kinase pathways but is due to a direct effect on transcription factor binding to DNA. However, although some selectivity in cardamonin's action is implicated by its inability to affect COX-2 expression, its exact mechanism(s) of action has yet to be identified. PMID:16894344

  3. High humidity suppresses ssi4-mediated cell death and disease resistance upstream of MAP kinase activation, H2O2 production and defense gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fasong; Menke, Frank L H; Yoshioka, Keiko; Moder, Wolfgang; Shirano, Yumiko; Klessig, Daniel F

    2004-09-01

    The Arabidopsis ssi4 mutant, which exhibits spontaneous lesion formation, constitutive expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes and enhanced resistance to virulent bacterial and oomycete pathogens, contains a gain-of-function mutation in a TIR-NBS-LRR type R gene. Epistatic analyses revealed that both PR gene expression and disease resistance are activated via a salicylic acid (SA)- and EDS1-dependent, but NPR1- and NDR1-independent signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrate that in moderate relative humidity (RH; 60%), the ssi4 mutant accumulates H(2)O(2) and SA prior to lesion formation and displays constitutive activation of the MAP kinases AtMPK6 and AtMPK3. It also constitutively expresses a variety of defense-associated genes, including those encoding the WRKY transcription factors AtWRKY29 and AtWRKY6, the MAP kinases AtMPK6 and AtMPK3, the powdery mildew R proteins RPW8.1 and RPW8.2, EDS1 and PR proteins. All of these ssi4-induced responses, as well as the chlorotic, stunted morphology and enhanced disease resistance phenotype, are suppressed by high RH (95%) growth conditions. Thus, a humidity sensitive factor (HSF) appears to function at an early point in the ssi4 signaling pathway. All ssi4 phenotypes, except for MAP kinase activation, also were suppressed by the eds1-1 mutation. Thus, ssi4-induced MAP kinase activation occurs downstream of the HSF but either upstream of EDS1 or on a separate branch of the ssi4 signaling pathway. SA is a critical signaling component in ssi4-mediated defense responses. However, exogenously supplied SA failed to restore lesion formation in high RH-grown ssi4 plants, although it induced defense gene expression. Thus, additional signals also are involved.

  4. Activity-dependent plasticity of hippocampal place maps

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, Philipp; O'Neill, Joseph; Csicsvari, Jozsef

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode a cognitive map of space. These maps are thought to be updated during learning and in response to changes in the environment through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here we examine how changes in activity influence spatial coding in rats using halorhodopsin-mediated, spatially selective optogenetic silencing. Halorhoposin stimulation leads to light-induced suppression in many place cells and interneurons; some place cells increase their firing through disinhibition, whereas some show no effect. We find that place fields of the unaffected subpopulation remain stable. On the other hand, place fields of suppressed place cells were unstable, showing remapping across sessions before and after optogenetic inhibition. Disinhibited place cells had stable maps but sustained an elevated firing rate. These findings suggest that place representation in the hippocampus is constantly governed by activity-dependent processes, and that disinhibition may provide a mechanism for rate remapping. PMID:27282121

  5. Biochemical and genetic defects in the DNA-dependent protein kinase in murine scid lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Danska, J S; Holland, D P; Mariathasan, S; Williams, K M; Guidos, C J

    1996-01-01

    The scid gene product has been identified as the 460-kDa catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs p460), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase family. DNA-PK activity is undetectable in scid cells, but the molecular basis for this defect has not been identified. Here we report that expression of p460 in scid lymphocyte precursors is detectable but is reduced at least 10-fold relative to that in wild-type lymphocytes. In addition, we show that the scid mutation disturbs p460 nuclear association, presumably affecting its role in DNA repair pathways. To examine the molecular basis for our observations, we used a degenerate PCR strategy to clone the C-terminal p460 kinase domain from wild-type and scid thymocytes. Northern (RNA) analysis with these probes revealed normal steady-state p460 mRNA levels in scid cells, suggesting that the reduced abundance of p460 protein is due to a posttranscriptional defect. Sequence comparisons identified a single-base-pair alteration in the scid C-terminal p460 kinase domain, resulting in a premature stop codon. This mutation is predicted to truncate p460 by approximately 8 kDa, but it preserves the conserved motifs required for kinase activity in members of the phosphoinositidyl 3-kinase family. Despite a computed molecular weight alteration of less than 2%, we were able to visualize this difference by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of wild-type and scid p460. These data demonstrate that the scid DNA-PKes mutation is not a null allele and suggest a molecular rationale for the well-described leakiness of the scid phenotype. PMID:8816463

  6. Glutamate signalling via a MEKK1 kinase-dependent pathway induces changes in Arabidopsis root architecture.

    PubMed

    Forde, Brian G; Cutler, Sean R; Zaman, Najia; Krysan, Patrick J

    2013-07-01

    A chemical genetic approach has been used to investigate the mechanism by which external glutamate (l-Glu) is able to trigger major changes in root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana L. An initial screen of 80 agonists and antagonists of mammalian glutamate and GABA receptors, using a specially developed 96-well microphenotyping system, found none that replicated the response of the root to l-Glu or antagonized it. However, a larger screen using >1500 molecules bioactive in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) identified two groups that interfered with the l-Glu response. One of the antagonists, 2-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-2-oxoethyl thiocyanate (CMOT), has been reported to target Ste11, an evolutionarily conserved MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) in yeast. This led to the discovery that root growth in a triple mekk1 mekk2 mekk3 mutant (mekk1/2/3), defective in a set of three tandemly arranged MAP3Ks, was almost insensitive to l-Glu. However, the sensitivity of mekk1/2/3 roots to inhibition by other amino acids reported to act as agonists of glutamate receptor-like (GLR) channels in Arabidopsis roots (Asn, Cys, Gly and Ser) was unaffected. The l-Glu sensitivity of the mekk1/2/3 mutant was restored by transformation with a construct carrying the intact MEKK1 gene. These results demonstrate that MEKK1 plays a key role in transducing the l-Glu signal that elicits large-scale changes in root architecture, and provide genetic evidence for the existence in plants of an l-Glu signalling pathway analogous to that found in animals.

  7. Activity-dependent facilitation of Synaptojanin and synaptic vesicle recycling by the Minibrain kinase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Kan; Bregere, Catherine; Paluch, Jeremy; Lu, Jason F; Dickman, Dion K; Chang, Karen T

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation has emerged as a crucial regulatory mechanism in the nervous system to integrate the dynamic signalling required for proper synaptic development, function and plasticity, particularly during changes in neuronal activity. Here we present evidence that Minibrain (Mnb; also known as Dyrk1A), a serine/threonine kinase implicated in autism spectrum disorder and Down syndrome, is required presynaptically for normal synaptic growth and rapid synaptic vesicle endocytosis at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). We find that Mnb-dependent phosphorylation of Synaptojanin (Synj) is required, in vivo, for complex endocytic protein interactions and to enhance Synj activity. Neuronal stimulation drives Mnb mobilization to endocytic zones and triggers Mnb-dependent phosphorylation of Synj. Our data identify Mnb as a synaptic kinase that promotes efficient synaptic vesicle recycling by dynamically calibrating Synj function at the Drosophila NMJ, and in turn endocytic capacity, to adapt to conditions of high synaptic activity. PMID:24977345

  8. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation.

  9. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  10. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  11. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  12. Three Ways to Die Suddenly: Do They All Require Calcium Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death occurs due to a limited number of pathological events. The heart can beat too fast or too slow to maintain adequate cardiac output or the heart can rupture. Here we survey recent evidence that excessive activation of calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by three core neurohumoral pathways or by oxidant stress can lead to sudden cardiac death due to sinus node dysfunction and bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and cardiac rupture. PMID:25125731

  13. ATPase-promoting dead end inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, M; Prorok, M; Salerno, A; Lawrence, D S

    1993-06-15

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase is a bifunctional enzyme, catalyzing the phosphorylation of the serine and threonine residues in peptides and proteins (kinase activity) as well as the phosphorylation of water (ATPase activity). We have found that several peptides, which serve as inhibitors of the kinase reaction, will either maintain or enhance the ATPase reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Positively charged dipeptides (e.g. Arg-Arg), as well as small guanidino-containing compounds (e.g. guanethidine) block protein kinase activity yet enhance ATPase activity up to 3.5-fold over that exhibited by the enzyme in the absence of these compounds. In contrast, several nonphosphorylatable peptides, whose primary sequences are based on that of a known substrate (i.e. Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly), such as Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly, Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Phe-Leu-Gly, and Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Gly, have little or no effect on the rate of the kinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of ATP. An exception to the latter observation is Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Cys-Leu-Gly, a cysteine-containing peptide that promotes the protein kinase-catalyzed ATPase reaction by 2.2-fold. We have also found that peptides that possess relatively large amino acid side chain moieties immediately following the arginine dyad (i.e. such as Phe, Tyr, Cys, or Asn at Xaa in Leu-Arg-Arg-Xaa-Ala-Leu-Gly) sharply reduce the rate of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that in the presence of peptides containing an -Arg-Arg-Ala- sequence, the enzyme-bound gamma-phosphate of ATP is relatively accessible to water. In contrast, when the latter alanine moiety is replaced by a larger residue, access by water to ATP appears to be hindered. These results indicate that certain structural features associated with the substrate or substrate analog have a profound influence on the manner by which these species interact with the protein kinase. Furthermore, the work described herein demonstrates that it is possible to block the

  14. Transcriptional activation of MMP-13 by periodontal pathogenic LPS requires p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossa, Carlos; Liu, Min; Bronson, Paul; Kirkwood, Keith L

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloprotease-13 (MMP-13) is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased expression is associated with a number of pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontal diseases. MMP-13 gene regulation and the signal transduction pathways activated in response to bacterial LPS are largely unknown. In these studies, the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the regulation of MMP-13 induced by lipopolysaccharide was investigated. Lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans significantly (P < 0.05) increased MMP-13 steady-state mRNA (average of 27% and 46% increase, respectively) in murine periodontal ligament fibroblasts. MMP-13 mRNA induction was significantly reduced by inhibition of p38 MAP kinase. Immunoblot analysis indicated that p38 signaling was required for LPS-induced MMP-13 expression. Lipopolysaccharide induced proximal promoter reporter (-660/+32 mMMP-13) gene activity required p38 signaling. Collectively, these results indicate that lipopolysaccharide-induced murine MMP-13 is regulated by p38 signaling through a transcriptional mechanism.

  15. Ouabain-induced changes in MAP kinase phosphorylation in primary culture of rat cerebellar cells.

    PubMed

    Lopachev, Alexander V; Lopacheva, Olga M; Osipova, Ekaterina A; Vladychenskaya, Elizaveta A; Smolyaninova, Larisa V; Fedorova, Tatiana N; Koroleva, Olga V; Akkuratov, Evgeny E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiotonic steroid (CTS) ouabain is a well-established inhibitor of Na,K-ATPase capable of inducing signalling processes including changes in the activity of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) in various cell types. With increasing evidence of endogenous CTS in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid, it is of particular interest to study ouabain-induced signalling in neurons, especially the activation of MAPK, because they are the key kinases activated in response to extracellular signals and regulating cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigated the effect of ouabain on the level of phosphorylation of three MAPK (ERK1/2, JNK and p38) and on cell survival in the primary culture of rat cerebellar cells. Using Western blotting we described the time course and concentration dependence of phosphorylation for ERK1/2, JNK and p38 in response to ouabain. We discovered that ouabain at a concentration of 1 μM does not cause cell death in cultured neurons while it changes the phosphorylation level of the three MAPK: ERK1/2 is phosphorylated transiently, p38 shows sustained phosphorylation, and JNK is dephosphorylated after a long-term incubation. We showed that ERK1/2 phosphorylation increase does not depend on ouabain-induced calcium increase and p38 activation. Changes in p38 phosphorylation, which is independent from ERK1/2 activation, are calcium dependent. Changes in JNK phosphorylation are calcium dependent and also depend on ERK1/2 and p38 activation. Ten-micromolar ouabain leads to cell death, and we conclude that different effects of 1-μM and 10-μM ouabain depend on different ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation profiles. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Sphingosine kinase 1 dependent protein kinase C-δ activation plays an important role in acute liver failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Li, Wen; Luo, Pan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-δ activation in the pathogenesis of acute liver failure (ALF) in a well-characterized mouse model of D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALF. METHODS: BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to five groups, and ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of D-GaIN (600 mg/kg) and LPS (10 μg/kg). Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels at different time points within one week were determined using a multiparameteric analyzer. Serum levels of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatic morphological changes at 36 h after ALF induction were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Expression of PKC-δ in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: The expression and activation of PKC-δ were up-regulated in liver tissue and PBMCs of mice with D-GalN/LPS-induced ALF. Inhibition of PKC-δ activation with rottlerin significantly increased the survival rates and decreased serum ALT/AST levels at 6, 12 and 24 h compared with the control group (P < 0.001). Rottlerin treatment also significantly decreased serum levels of HMGB1 at 6, 12, and 24 h, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1 β at 12 h compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis in liver tissue were also decreased in the rottlerin treatment group. Furthermore, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) dependent PKC-δ activation played an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine production in ALF. CONCLUSION: SphK1 dependent PKC-δ activation plays an important role in promoting NF-κB activation and inflammatory response in ALF, and inhibition of PKC-δ activation might be

  17. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and -independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Mo Park, Jin; Payne, Aimee S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In this study, we identify MAPKAP (mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein) kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small-molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. In addition, small-molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous but not induced suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering.

  18. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK)-dependent immune cell crosstalk drives pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Andrew J.; Kaneda, Megan M.; Tsujikawa, Takahiro; Nguyen, Abraham V.; Affara, Nesrine I.; Ruffell, Brian; Gorjestani, Sara; Liudahl, Shannon M.; Truitt, Morgan; Olson, Peter; Kim, Grace; Hanahan, Douglas; Tempero, Margaret A.; Sheppard, Brett; Irving, Bryan; Chang, Betty Y.; Varner, Judith A.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has one of the worst five-year survival rates of all solid tumors, and thus new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Here we report that targeting Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase (BTK), a key B cell and macrophage kinase, restores T cell-dependent anti-tumor immune responses, thereby inhibiting PDAC growth and improving responsiveness to standard-of-care chemotherapy (CTX). We report that PDAC tumor growth depends on crosstalk between B cells and FcRγ+ tumor-associated macrophages, resulting in TH2-type macrophage programming via BTK activation in a phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)γ-dependent manner. Treatment of PDAC-bearing mice with the BTK inhibitor PCI32765 (ibrutinib) or by PI3Kγ inhibition reprogrammed macrophages toward a TH1 phenotype that fostered CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity, and suppressed PDAC growth, indicating that BTK signaling mediates PDAC immunosuppression. These data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of BTK in PDAC can reactivate adaptive immune responses, presenting a new therapeutic modality for this devastating tumor type. PMID:26715645

  19. Regulation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chan; Nishi, Akinori; Kansy, Janice W; Fernandez, Joseph; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Gillardon, Frank; Hemmings, Hugh C; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2007-06-01

    Inhibitor-1, the first identified endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1), was previously reported to be a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) at Ser67. Further investigation has revealed the presence of an additional Cdk5 site identified by mass spectrometry and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis as Ser6. Basal levels of phospho-Ser6 inhibitor-1, as detected by a phosphorylation state-specific antibody against the site, existed in specific regions of the brain and varied with age. In the striatum, basal in vivo phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of Ser6 were mediated by Cdk5, PP-2A, and PP-1, respectively. Additionally, calcineurin contributed to dephosphorylation under conditions of high Ca2+. In biochemical assays the function of Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser6 and Ser67 was demonstrated to be an intramolecular impairment of the ability of inhibitor-1 to be dephosphorylated at Thr35; this effect was recapitulated in two systems in vivo. Dephosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Thr35 is equivalent to inactivation of the protein, as inhibitor-1 only serves as an inhibitor of PP-1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA) at Thr35. Thus, inhibitor-1 serves as a critical junction between kinase- and phosphatase-signaling pathways, linking PP-1 to not only PKA and calcineurin but also Cdk5.

  20. Specific factors are required for kinase-dependent endocytosis of insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, J B; Worthylake, R; Wiley, H S; Gill, G N

    1994-01-01

    Mouse B82 cells that support high affinity saturable endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) exhibited only low rates of nonsaturable internalization of insulin receptors (InsR). To investigate the defect in endocytosis of InsR in B82 cells, we examined the role of sequence motifs and tyrosine kinase, the two receptor components shown to be required for efficient saturable endocytosis of InsR in Rat 1 cells. Placement of residues encoded by exon 16 of the InsR onto an EGFR truncated to residue 958 restored EGF-induced internalization of this mutant receptor indicating that the sequence codes in exon 16 are recognized by B82 cells. To determine whether the kinase function could be provided in trans, a B82 cell expressing both receptors was established. EGF-activated EGFR kinase was not able to restore insulin-dependent rapid endocytosis to InsR. However, fusion of untransfected Rat1 cells with InsR-expressing B82 cells enabled rapid endocytosis of InsR, indicating that the internalization defect can be complemented. These results indicate that, although internalization codes can function in the context of other receptors, activation of tyrosine kinase receptors requires an additional specific component. Images PMID:7919536

  1. Crystal structure of a human cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexwith a flavonol inhibitor, Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Heshu; Chang, Debbie J.; Baratte, Blandine; Meijer, Laurent; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2005-01-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in cell cycle control, apoptosis, transcription and neuronal functions. They are important targets for the design of drugs with anti-mitotic and/or anti-neurodegenerative effects. CDK4 and CDK6 form a subfamily among the CDKs in mammalian cells, as defined by sequence similarities. Compared to CDK2 and CDK5, structural information on CDK4 and CDK6 is sparse. We describe here the crystal structure of human CDK6 in complex with a viral cyclin and a flavonol inhibitor, fisetin. Fisetin binds to the active form of CDK6, forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues in the binding pocket that undergo large conformational changes during CDK activation by cyclin binding. The 4-keto group and the 3-hydroxyl group of fisetin are hydrogen bonded with the backbone in the hinge region between the N-terminal and C-terminal kinase domain, as has been observed for many CDK inhibitors. However, CDK2 and HCK kinase in complex with other flavone inhibitors such as quercetin and flavopiridol showed a different binding mode with the inhibitor rotated by about 180. The structural information of the CDK6-fisetin complex is correlated with the binding affinities of different flavone inhibitors for CDK6. This complex structure is the first description of an inhibitor complex with a kinase from the CDK4/6 subfamily and can provide a basis for selecting and designing inhibitor compounds with higher affinity and specificity.

  2. Cyclin E-dependent protein kinase activity regulates niche retention of Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu A.; Kalderon, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Whether stem cells have unique cell cycle machineries and how they integrate with niche interactions remains largely unknown. We identified a hypomorphic cyclin E allele WX that strongly impairs the maintenance of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in the Drosophila ovary but does not reduce follicle cell proliferation or germline stem cell maintenance. CycEWX protein can still bind to the cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit Cdk2, but forms complexes with reduced protein kinase activity measured in vitro. By creating additional CycE variants with different degrees of kinase dysfunction and expressing these and CycEWX at different levels, we found that higher CycE-Cdk2 kinase activity is required for FSC maintenance than to support follicle cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cycEWX FSCs were lost from their niches rather than arresting proliferation. Furthermore, FSC function was substantially restored by expressing either excess DE-cadherin or excess E2F1/DP, the transcription factor normally activated by CycE-Cdk2 phosphorylation of retinoblastoma proteins. These results suggest that FSC maintenance through niche adhesion is regulated by inputs that normally control S phase entry, possibly as a quality control mechanism to ensure adequate stem cell proliferation. We speculate that a positive connection between central regulators of the cell cycle and niche retention may be a common feature of highly proliferative stem cells. PMID:19966222

  3. Histone H3 as a novel substrate for MAP kinase phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Corttrell M; Chandrasekharan, Unni M; Yang, Lin; Shen, Jianzhong; Kinter, Michael; McDermott, Michael S; DiCorleto, Paul E

    2009-02-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) is a nuclear, dual-specificity phosphatase that has been shown to dephosphorylate MAP kinases. We used a "substrate-trap" technique involving a mutation in MKP-1 of the catalytically critical cysteine to a serine residue ("CS" mutant) to capture novel MKP-1 substrates. We transfected the MKP-1 (CS) mutant and control (wild-type, WT) constructs into phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated COS-1 cells. MKP-1-substrate complexes were immunoprecipitated, which yielded four bands of 17, 15, 14, and 10 kDa with the CS MKP-1 mutant but not the WT MKP-1. The bands were identified by mass spectrometry as histones H3, H2B, H2A, and H4, respectively. Histone H3 was phosphorylated, and purified MKP-1 dephosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-Ser-10) in vitro; whereas, histone H3 (phospho-Thr-3) was unaffected. We have previously shown that thrombin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upregulated MKP-1 in human endothelial cells (EC). We now show that both thrombin and VEGF caused dephosphorylation of histone H3 (phospho-Ser-10) and histone H3 (phospho-Thr-3) in EC with kinetics consistent with MKP-1 induction. Furthermore, MKP-1-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF- and thrombin-induced H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation but had no effect on H3 (phospho-Thr-3 or Thr-11) dephosphorylation. In summary, histone H3 is a novel substrate of MKP-1, and VEGF- and thrombin-induced H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation requires MKP-1. We propose that MKP-1-mediated H3 (phospho-Ser-10) dephosphorylation is a key regulatory step in EC activation by VEGF and thrombin. PMID:19020052

  4. Phosphorylation of synaptosomal cytoplasmic proteins: Inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase c) by bay k 8644.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P J; Lovenberg, W

    1988-01-01

    The phosphorylation of specific substrates of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C) was examined in striatal synaptosomal cytoplasm. The phosphoprotein substrata were termed group C phosphoprotems and were divided into two subgroups: group C(1) phosphoproteins (P83, P45A, P21 and P18) were found in both cytoplasm and synaptosomal membranes and, although stimulated by phosphatidylserine, only required exogamous calcium for their labeling; group C(2) phosphoproteins (P120, P96, P21.5, P18.5 and P16) were found predominantly in the cytoplasm and were absolutely dependent upon exogenous calcium and phosphatidylserme for their labeling. Several criteria were used to identify these proteins as specific protein kinase C substrates: (a) their phosphorylation was stimulated to a greater extent by Ca(2+) /phosphatidylserine/diolein than by Ca(2+) alone or Cal(2+) /calmodulin (group C(1)) or was completely dependent upon Ca(2+) /phosphatdylserine/diolein (group C(2)); (b) supermaximal concentrations of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor were without effect; (c) their phosphorylation was stimulated by oleic acid, which selectively activates protein kinase C in the absence of Ca(2+); (d) NaCl, which inhibited cAMP- and Ca(2+)/calmodulindependent phosphorylation, slightly increased phosphorylation of group C(1) and slightly decreased phosphorylation of group C(2) phosphoproteins. Maximal phosphorylation of P96 and other group C phosphoproteins occurred within 60 s and was followed by a slow decay rate while substrata of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase were maximally labeled within 20-30 s and rapidly dephosphorylated. The phosphorylation of all group C phosphoproteins was inhibited by the calcium channel agomst BAY K 8644, however, group C(2) phosphoproteins were considerably more sensitive. The IC(50) for inhibition of P96 labeling was 19 ?M. but for P83 was 190 ?M. Group B phosphoproteins were also slightly inhibited, and the

  5. Choline phosphate potentiates sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced Raf-1 kinase activation dependent of Ras--phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael; Han, Sang Seop

    2002-04-01

    In NIH3T3 cells, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) caused a significant increase of Raf-1 kinase activity as early as 2 min. Interestingly, choline phosphate (ChoP) produced synergistic increase of S1P-stimulated Raf-1 kinase activation in the presence of ATP while showing additive effect in the absence of ATP. However, Raf-1 kinase activation induced by S1P decreased in the presence of ATP when applied alone. The overexpression of N-terminal fragment of Raf-1 (RfI) to inhibit Raf--Ras interaction caused the inhibition of S1P-induced Raf-1 kinase activation. Also, wortmannin, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, exhibited inhibitory effects on S1P-induced activation of Raf-1 kinase. In addition, we demonstrated that the chemical antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine attenuated Raf-1 activation induced by S1P, suggesting that H(2)O(2) may be required for the signalling pathway leading to Raf-1 activation. This H(2)O(2)-induced Raf-1 kinase activation was also blocked by inhibition of Ras--PI3K signalling pathway using alpha-hydroxyfarnesylphosphonic acid and wortmannin. Taken together, these results indicate that S1P-induced Raf-1 kinase activation is mediated by H(2)O(2) stimulation of Ras--PI3K pathway, and is enhanced by ChoP in the presence of ATP.

  6. p38 MAP kinase and MKK-1 co-operate in the generation of GM-CSF from LPS-stimulated human monocytes by an NF-κB-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Meja, Koremu K; Seldon, Paul M; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J; Lindsay, Mark A; Giembycz, Mark A

    2000-01-01

    The extent to which the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and MAP kinase kinase (MKK)-1-signalling pathways regulate the expression of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from LPS-stimulated human monocytes has been investigated and compared to the well studied cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα).Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) evoked a concentration-dependent generation of GM-CSF from human monocytes. Temporally, this effect was preceded by an increase in GM-CSF mRNA transcripts and abolished by actinomycin D and cycloheximide.LPS-induced GM-CSF release and mRNA expression were associated with a rapid and time-dependent activation of p38 MAP kinase, ERK-1 and ERK-2.The respective MKK-1 and p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, PD 098059 and SB 203580, maximally suppressed LPS-induced GM-CSF generation by >90%, indicating that both of these signalling cascades co-operate in the generation of this cytokine.Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that LPS increased nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) : DNA binding. SN50, an inhibitor of NF-κB translocation, abolished LPS-induced NF-κB : DNA binding and the elaboration of TNFα, a cytokine known to be regulated by NF-κB in monocytes. In contrast, SN50 failed to affect the release of GM-CSF from the same monocyte cultures.Collectively, these results suggest that the generation of GM-CSF by LPS-stimulated human monocytes is regulated in a co-operative fashion by p38 MAP kinase- and MKK-1-dependent signalling pathways independently of the activation of NF-κB. PMID:11082122

  7. Pho85p, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, and the Snf1p protein kinase act antagonistically to control glycogen accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D; Farkas, I; Roach, P J

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient levels control multiple cellular processes. Cells lacking the SNF1 gene cannot express glucose-repressible genes and do not accumulate the storage polysaccharide glycogen. The impaired glycogen synthesis is due to maintenance of glycogen synthase in a hyperphosphorylated, inactive state. In a screen for second site suppressors of the glycogen storage defect of snf1 cells, we identified a mutant gene that restored glycogen accumulation and which was allelic with PHO85, which encodes a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family. In cells with disrupted PHO85 genes, we observed hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and impaired glycogen synthase kinase activity. In snf1 cells, glycogen synthase kinase activity was elevated. Partial purification of glycogen synthase kinase activity from yeast extracts resulted in the separation of two fractions by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, both of which phosphorylated and inactivated glycogen synthase. The activity of one of these, GPK2, was inhibited by olomoucine, which potently inhibits cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and contained an approximately 36-kDa species that reacted with antibodies to Pho85p. Analysis of Ser-to-Ala mutations at the three potential Gsy2p phosphorylation sites in pho85 cells implicated Ser-654 and/or Thr-667 in PHO85 control of glycogen synthase. We propose that Pho85p is a physiological glycogen synthase kinase, possibly acting downstream of Snf1p. PMID:8754836

  8. Menin uncouples Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun phosphorylation from MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Adriana; Cuozzo, Concetta; Esposito, Ilaria; Maggiolini, Marcello; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Vivacqua, Adele; Garramone, Maria; Weiss, Carsten; Bohmann, Dirk; Musti, Anna Maria

    2002-09-19

    Menin, a nuclear protein encoded by the tumor suppressor gene MEN1, interacts with the AP-1 transcription factor JunD and inhibits its transcriptional activity. In addition, overexpression of Menin counteracts Ras-induced tumorigenesis. We show that Menin inhibits ERK-dependent phosphorylation and activation of both JunD and the Ets-domain transcription factor Elk-1. We also show that Menin represses the inducible activity of the c-fos promoter. Furthermore, Menin expression inhibits Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated phosphorylation of both JunD and c-Jun. Kinase assays show that Menin overexpression does not interfere with activation of either ERK2 or JNK1, suggesting that Menin acts at a level downstream of MAPK activation. An N-terminal deletion mutant of Menin that cannot inhibit JunD phosphorylation by JNK, can still repress JunD phosphorylation by ERK2, suggesting that Menin interferes with ERK and JNK pathways through two distinct inhibitory mechanisms. Taken together, our data suggest that Menin uncouples ERK and JNK activation from phosphorylation of their nuclear targets Elk-1, JunD and c-Jun, hence inhibiting accumulation of active Fos/Jun heterodimers. This study provides new molecular insights into the tumor suppressor function of Menin and suggests a mechanism by which Menin may interfere with Ras-dependent cell transformation and oncogenesis. PMID:12226747

  9. Ubiquitin plays an atypical role in GPCR-induced p38 MAP kinase activation on endosomes.

    PubMed

    Grimsey, Neil J; Aguilar, Berenice; Smith, Thomas H; Le, Phillip; Soohoo, Amanda L; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A; Nizet, Victor; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-09-28

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin and promotes inflammatory responses through multiple pathways including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The mechanisms that govern PAR1-induced p38 activation remain unclear. Here, we define an atypical ubiquitin-dependent pathway for p38 activation used by PAR1 that regulates endothelial barrier permeability. Activated PAR1 K63-linked ubiquitination is mediated by the NEDD4-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and initiated recruitment of transforming growth factor-β-activated protein kinase-1 binding protein-2 (TAB2). The ubiquitin-binding domain of TAB2 was essential for recruitment to PAR1-containing endosomes. TAB2 associated with TAB1, which induced p38 activation independent of MKK3 and MKK6. The P2Y1 purinergic GPCR also stimulated p38 activation via NEDD4-2-mediated ubiquitination and TAB1-TAB2. TAB1-TAB2-dependent p38 activation was critical for PAR1-promoted endothelial barrier permeability in vitro, and p38 signaling was required for PAR1-induced vascular leakage in vivo. These studies define an atypical ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway used by a subset of GPCRs that regulates endosomal p38 signaling and endothelial barrier disruption.

  10. Ubiquitin plays an atypical role in GPCR-induced p38 MAP kinase activation on endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Aguilar, Berenice; Smith, Thomas H.; Le, Phillip; Soohoo, Amanda L.; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin and promotes inflammatory responses through multiple pathways including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling. The mechanisms that govern PAR1-induced p38 activation remain unclear. Here, we define an atypical ubiquitin-dependent pathway for p38 activation used by PAR1 that regulates endothelial barrier permeability. Activated PAR1 K63-linked ubiquitination is mediated by the NEDD4-2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and initiated recruitment of transforming growth factor-β–activated protein kinase-1 binding protein-2 (TAB2). The ubiquitin-binding domain of TAB2 was essential for recruitment to PAR1-containing endosomes. TAB2 associated with TAB1, which induced p38 activation independent of MKK3 and MKK6. The P2Y1 purinergic GPCR also stimulated p38 activation via NEDD4-2–mediated ubiquitination and TAB1–TAB2. TAB1–TAB2-dependent p38 activation was critical for PAR1-promoted endothelial barrier permeability in vitro, and p38 signaling was required for PAR1-induced vascular leakage in vivo. These studies define an atypical ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway used by a subset of GPCRs that regulates endosomal p38 signaling and endothelial barrier disruption. PMID:26391660

  11. Ras-dependent and -independent pathways target the mitogen-activated protein kinase network in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Büscher, D; Hipskind, R A; Krautwald, S; Reimann, T; Baccarini, M

    1995-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are activated upon a variety of extracellular stimuli in different cells. In macrophages, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulates proliferation, while bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits cell growth and causes differentiation and activation. Both CSF-1 and LPS rapidly activate the MAPK network and induce the phosphorylation of two distinct ternary complex factors (TCFs), TCF/Elk and TCF/SAP. CSF-1, but not LPS, stimulated the formation of p21ras. GTP complexes. Expression of a dominant negative ras mutant reduced, but did not abolish, CSF-1-mediated stimulation of MEK and MAPK. In contrast, activation of the MEK kinase Raf-1 was Ras independent. Treatment with the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 suppressed LPS-mediated, but not CSF-1-mediated, activation of Raf-1, MEK, and MAPK. Similarly, down-regulation or inhibition of protein kinase C blocked MEK and MAPK induction by LPS but not that by CSF-1. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate pretreatment led to the sustained activation of the Raf-1 kinase but not that of MEK and MAPK. Thus, activated Raf-1 alone does not support MEK/MAPK activation in macrophages. Phosphorylation of TCF/Elk but not that of TCF/SAP was blocked by all treatments that interfered with MAPK activation, implying that TCF/SAP was targeted by a MAPK-independent pathway. Therefore, CSF-1 and LPS target the MAPK network by two alternative pathways, both of which induce Raf-1 activation. The mitogenic pathway depends on Ras activity, while the differentiation signal relies on protein kinase C and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activation. PMID:7799956

  12. Nuclear and axonal localization of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type Gr in rat cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, K F; Ohmstede, C A; Fisher, R S; Sahyoun, N

    1991-01-01

    The granule cell-enriched Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase-Gr) is a recently discovered neuron-specific enzyme. The kinase avidly phosphorylates synapsin I and contains a polyglutamate sequence, which suggests an association with chromatin as well. A possible role in synapsin I phosphorylation and in nuclear Ca2+ signaling was supported by immunochemical and ultrastructural examination of CaM kinase-Gr distribution. CaM kinase-Gr immunoreactivity was present in the molecular and granule cell layers of the rat cerebellum. This pattern corresponded to the occurrence of the enzyme in the granule cell axons and nuclei, respectively. Immunoblots confirmed these findings. Thus, CaM kinase-Gr may mediate and coordinate Ca2(+)-signaling within different subcellular compartments. Images PMID:2011593

  13. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms.

  14. Mutual regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase and the mitotic exit network

    PubMed Central

    König, Cornelia; Maekawa, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is a spindle pole body (SPB)–associated, GTPase-driven signaling cascade that controls mitotic exit. The inhibitory Bfa1–Bub2 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) only associates with the daughter SPB (dSPB), raising the question as to how the MEN is regulated on the mother SPB (mSPB). Here, we show mutual regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) and the MEN. In early anaphase Cdk1 becomes recruited to the mSPB depending on the activity of the MEN kinase Cdc15. Conversely, Cdk1 negatively regulates binding of Cdc15 to the mSPB. In addition, Cdk1 phosphorylates the Mob1 protein to inhibit the activity of Dbf2–Mob1 kinase that regulates Cdc14 phosphatase. Our data revise the understanding of the spatial regulation of the MEN. Although MEN activity in the daughter cells is controlled by Bfa1–Bub2, Cdk1 inhibits MEN activity at the mSPB. Consistent with this model, only triple mutants that lack BUB2 and the Cdk1 phosphorylation sites in Mob1 and Cdc15 show mitotic exit defects. PMID:20123997

  15. Vaccination with cyclin-dependent kinase tick antigen confers protection against Ixodes infestation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Moraes, Jorge; Githaka, Naftaly; Martins, Renato; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Logullo, Carlos; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-30

    Among arthropods, ticks lead as vectors of animal diseases and rank second to mosquitoes in transmitting human pathogens. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) participate in cell cycle control in eukaryotes. CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases and these catalytic subunits are activated or inactivated at specific stages of the cell cycle. To determine the potential of using CDKs as anti-tick vaccine antigens, hamsters were immunized with recombinant Ixodes persulcatus CDK10, followed by a homologous tick challenge. Though it was not exactly unexpected, IpCDK10 vaccination significantly impaired tick blood feeding and fecundity, which manifested as low engorgement weights, poor oviposition, and a reduction in 80% of hatching rates. These findings may underpin the development of more efficacious anti-tick vaccines based on the targeting of cell cycle control proteins. PMID:26073111

  16. Vaccination with cyclin-dependent kinase tick antigen confers protection against Ixodes infestation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Moraes, Jorge; Githaka, Naftaly; Martins, Renato; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Logullo, Carlos; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-30

    Among arthropods, ticks lead as vectors of animal diseases and rank second to mosquitoes in transmitting human pathogens. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) participate in cell cycle control in eukaryotes. CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases and these catalytic subunits are activated or inactivated at specific stages of the cell cycle. To determine the potential of using CDKs as anti-tick vaccine antigens, hamsters were immunized with recombinant Ixodes persulcatus CDK10, followed by a homologous tick challenge. Though it was not exactly unexpected, IpCDK10 vaccination significantly impaired tick blood feeding and fecundity, which manifested as low engorgement weights, poor oviposition, and a reduction in 80% of hatching rates. These findings may underpin the development of more efficacious anti-tick vaccines based on the targeting of cell cycle control proteins.

  17. Eimeria tenella contains a pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase and a pyruvate kinase with unusual allosteric regulators.

    PubMed

    Denton, H; Thong, K W; Coombs, G H

    1994-01-01

    Sporozoites and unsporulated oocysts of Eimeria tenella were shown to contain a pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK) but apparently lack an ATP-specific activity. The PPi-PFK resembles those that occur in a number of other protists in being reversible and not subject to metabolic control. In contrast, the ADP-utilising pyruvate kinase, present in two developmental stages of the parasite, exhibited strong positive cooperativity with respect to its substrate, phosphoenolpyruvate, and was shown to be allosterically activated by glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate and AMP. It is suggested that the PPi-PFK represents an adaptation of the parasite towards life in an environment containing only low concentrations of oxygen and that the unusual allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase evolved to compensate for glycolysis not being controlled at the PPi-PFK step.

  18. Protein kinase C -dependent regulation of synaptosomal glutamate uptake under conditions of hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Borisov, Arseniy; Sivko, Roman

    Glutamate is not only the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS, but also a potent neurotoxin. Excessive concentration of ambient glutamate over activates glutamate receptors and causes neurotoxicity. Uptake of glutamate from the extracellular space into nerve cells was mediated by sodium-dependent glutamate transporters located in the plasma membrane. It was shown that the activity of glutamate transporters in rat brain nerve terminals was decreased after hypergravity (centrifugation of rats in special containers at 10 G for 1 hour). This decrease may result from the reduction in the number of glutamate transporters expressed in the plasma membrane of nerve terminals after hypergravity that was regulated by protein kinase C. The possibility of the involvement of protein kinase C in the regulation of the activity of glutamate transporters was assessed under conditions of hypergravity. The effect of protein kinase C inhibitor GF 109 203X on synaptosomal L-[14C]glutamate uptake was analysed. It was shown that the inhibitor decreased L-[14C]glutamate uptake by 15 % in control but did not influence it after hypergravity. In control, the initial velocity of L-[14C]glutamate uptake in the presence of the inhibitor decreased from 2.5 ± 0.2 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.17 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins, whereas after hypergravity this value lowered from 2.05 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.04 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins. Thus, protein kinase C -dependent alteration in the cell surface expression of glutamate transporters may be one of the causes of a decrease in the activity of glutamate transporters after hypergravity.

  19. The role of Dbf4-dependent protein kinase in DNA polymerase ζ-dependent mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Luis N; Ferguson, Rebecca; Santoro, Irma; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Sclafani, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    The yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) (composed of Dbf4 and Cdc7 subunits) is an essential, conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates multiple processes in the cell, including DNA replication, recombination and induced mutagenesis. Only DDK substrates important for replication and recombination have been identified. Consequently, the mechanism by which DDK regulates mutagenesis is unknown. The yeast mcm5-bob1 mutation that bypasses DDK's essential role in DNA replication was used here to examine whether loss of DDK affects spontaneous as well as induced mutagenesis. Using the sensitive lys2ΔA746 frameshift reversion assay, we show DDK is required to generate "complex" spontaneous mutations, which are a hallmark of the Polζ translesion synthesis DNA polymerase. DDK co-immunoprecipitated with the Rev7 regulatory, but not with the Rev3 polymerase subunit of Polζ. Conversely, Rev7 bound mainly to the Cdc7 kinase subunit and not to Dbf4. The Rev7 subunit of Polζ may be regulated by DDK phosphorylation as immunoprecipitates of yeast Cdc7 and also recombinant Xenopus DDK phosphorylated GST-Rev7 in vitro. In addition to promoting Polζ-dependent mutagenesis, DDK was also important for generating Polζ-independent large deletions that revert the lys2ΔA746 allele. The decrease in large deletions observed in the absence of DDK likely results from an increase in the rate of replication fork restart after an encounter with spontaneous DNA damage. Finally, nonepistatic, additive/synergistic UV sensitivity was observed in cdc7Δ pol32Δ and cdc7Δ pol30-K127R,K164R double mutants, suggesting that DDK may regulate Rev7 protein during postreplication "gap filling" rather than during "polymerase switching" by ubiquitinated and sumoylated modified Pol30 (PCNA) and Pol32. PMID:24875188

  20. DNA-dependent protein kinase is a context dependent regulator of Lmx1a and midbrain specification.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Cameron P; Fabb, Stewart A; Pouton, Colin W; Haynes, John M

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecules capable of directing pluripotent cell differentiation towards specific lineages is highly desirable to both reduce cost, and increase efficiency. Within neural progenitors, LIM homeobox transcription factor 1 alpha (Lmx1a) is required for proper development of roof plate and cortical hem structures of the forebrain, as well as the development of floor plate and midbrain dopaminergic neurons. In this study we generated homologous recombinant cell lines expressing either luciferase or β-lactamase under the control of the Lmx1a promoter, and used these cell lines to investigate kinase-mediated regulation of Lmx1a activity during neuronal differentiation. A screen of 143 small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors yielded 16 compounds that positively or negatively modulated Lmx1a activity. Inhibition of EGF, VEGF and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) signaling significantly upregulated Lmx1a activity whereas MEK inhibition strongly downregulated its activity. Quantitative FACS analysis revealed that the DNA-PK inhibitor significantly increased the number of Lmx1a+ progenitors while subsequent qPCR showed an upregulation of Notch effectors, the basic helix-loop-helix genes, Hes5 and Hey1. FACS further revealed that DNA-PK-mediated regulation of Lmx1a+ cells is dependent on the rapamycin-sensitive complex, mTORC1. Interestingly, this DNA-PK inhibitor effect was preserved in a co-culture differentiation protocol. Terminal differentiation assays showed that DNA-PK inhibition shifted development of neurons from forebrain toward midbrain character as assessed by Pitx3/TH immunolabeling and corresponding upregulation of midbrain (En1), but not forebrain (FoxG1) transcripts. These studies show that Lmx1a signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells contributes to a molecular cascade establishing neuronal specification. The data presented here identifies a novel regulatory pathway where signaling from DNA-PK appears to suppress midbrain

  1. Mapping and characterization of antigenic epitopes of arginine kinase of Scylla paramamosain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Cao, Min-Jie; Alcocer, Marcos; Liu, Qing-Mei; Fei, Dan-Xia; Mao, Hai-Yan; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2015-06-01

    Arginine kinase (AK) is a panallergen present in crustaceans, which can induce an immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated immune response in humans. The aim of this work was to map and characterize the antigenic epitopes of Scylla paramamosain AK. Specific-protein-A-enriched IgG raised in rabbits against purified S. paramamosain AK was used to screen a phage display random peptide library. Five AK mimotope clones were identified among 20 random clones after biopanning. Four conformational epitopes D3A4K43M1A5T49T44I7, L31K33V35T32E11E18F14S34D37, V177G172M173D176Q178T174L181K175L187, and R202L170Y203E190P205W204L187T206Y145 were identified with the program LocaPep, and mapped to S. paramamosain AK. The key amino acids of these conformational epitopes were D3, K33, T174, and W204, respectively. On the basis of biopanning, six IgE-specific peptides were mapped with synthetic overlapping peptides using the sera from crab-allergic patients, and four seropositive peptides (amino acids 113-127, 127-141, 141-155, and 204-218) were confirmed as linear epitopes in a degranulation assay in RBL-2H3 cells. Stability experiments showed that the structural integrity of AK is essential for its allergenicity, and the intramolecular disulfide bond at Cys201-Cys271 is essential for its structural stability. PMID:25728640

  2. A systematic investigation of the protein kinases involved in NMDA receptor-dependent LTD: evidence for a role of GSK-3 but not other serine/threonine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Peineau, Stéphane; Nicolas, Céline S; Bortolotto, Zuner A; Bhat, Ratan V; Ryves, W Jonathan; Harwood, Adrian J; Dournaud, Pascal; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Collingridge, Graham L

    2009-01-01

    Background The signalling mechanisms involved in the induction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus are poorly understood. Numerous studies have presented evidence both for and against a variety of second messengers systems being involved in LTD induction. Here we provide the first systematic investigation of the involvement of serine/threonine (ser/thr) protein kinases in NMDAR-LTD, using whole-cell recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons. Results Using a panel of 23 inhibitors individually loaded into the recorded neurons, we can discount the involvement of at least 57 kinases, including PKA, PKC, CaMKII, p38 MAPK and DYRK1A. However, we have been able to confirm a role for the ser/thr protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). Conclusion The present study is the first to investigate the role of 58 ser/thr protein kinases in LTD in the same study. Of these 58 protein kinases, we have found evidence for the involvement of only one, GSK-3, in LTD. PMID:19583853

  3. Protein Kinase A-Dependent and -Independent Signaling Pathways Contribute to Cyclic AMP-Stimulated Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Lisa A.; Summers, Scott A.; Prendergast, Gregory V.; Backer, Jonathan M.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Meinkoth, Judy L.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) on cell proliferation are cell type specific. Although the growth-inhibitory effects of cAMP have been well studied, much less is known regarding how cAMP stimulates proliferation. We report that cAMP stimulates proliferation through both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and PKA-independent signaling pathways and that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for cAMP-stimulated mitogenesis. In cells where cAMP is a mitogen, cAMP-elevating agents stimulate membrane ruffling, Akt phosphorylation, and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70s6k) activity. cAMP effects on ruffle formation and Akt were PKA independent but sensitive to wortmannin. In contrast, cAMP-stimulated p70s6k activity was repressed by PKA inhibitors but not by wortmannin or microinjection of the N-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, indicating that p70s6k and Akt can be regulated independently. Microinjection of highly specific inhibitors of PI3K or Rac1, or treatment with the p70s6k inhibitor rapamycin, impaired cAMP-stimulated DNA synthesis, demonstrating that PKA-dependent and -independent pathways contribute to cAMP-mediated mitogenesis. Direct elevation of PI3K activity through microinjection of an antibody that stimulates PI3K activity or stable expression of membrane-localized p110 was sufficient to confer hormone-independent DNA synthesis when accompanied by elevations in p70s6k activity. These findings indicate that multiple pathways contribute to cAMP-stimulated mitogenesis, only some of which are PKA dependent. Furthermore, they demonstrate that the ability of cAMP to stimulate both p70s6k- and PI3K-dependent pathways is an important facet of cAMP-regulated cell cycle progression. PMID:10454535

  4. Novel redox-dependent regulation of NOX5 by the tyrosine kinase c-Abl.

    PubMed

    El Jamali, Amina; Valente, Anthony J; Lechleiter, James D; Gamez, Maria J; Pearson, Doran W; Nauseef, William M; Clark, Robert A

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the mechanism of H(2)O(2) activation of the Ca(2+)-regulated NADPH oxidase NOX5. H(2)O(2) induced a transient, dose-dependent increase in superoxide production in K562 cells expressing NOX5. Confocal studies demonstrated that the initial calcium influx generated by H(2)O(2) is amplified by a feedback mechanism involving NOX5-dependent superoxide production and H(2)O(2). H(2)O(2) NOX5 activation was inhibited by extracellular Ca(2+) chelators, a pharmacological inhibitor of c-Abl, and overexpression of kinase-dead c-Abl. Transfected kinase-active GFP-c-Abl colocalized with vesicular sites of superoxide production in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In contrast to H(2)O(2), the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin induced NOX5 activity independent of c-Abl. Immunoprecipitation of cell lysates revealed that active GFP-c-Abl formed oligomers with endogenous c-Abl and that phosphorylation of both proteins was increased by H(2)O(2) treatment. Furthermore, H(2)O(2)-induced NOX5 activity correlated with increased localization of c-Abl to the membrane fraction, and NOX5 proteins could be coimmunoprecipitated with GFP-Abl proteins. Our data demonstrate for the first time that NOX5 is activated by c-Abl through a Ca(2+)-mediated, redox-dependent signaling pathway and suggest a functional association between NOX5 NADPH oxidase and c-Abl.

  5. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 associated with p39 promotes Munc18-1 phosphorylation and Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Lena; Johansson, Jenny Ulrika; Gromada, Jesper; Mandic, Slavena Andrea; Fried, Gabriel; Berggren, Per-Olof; Bark, Christina

    2004-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine protein kinase that requires association with a regulatory protein, p35 or p39, to form an active enzyme. Munc18-1 plays an essential role in membrane fusion, and its function is regulated by phosphorylation. We report here that both p35 and p39 were expressed in insulin-secreting beta-cells, where they exhibited individual subcellular distributions and associated with membranous organelles of different densities. Overexpression of Cdk5, p35, or p39 showed that Cdk5 and p39 augmented Ca(2+)-induced insulin exocytosis. Suppression of p39 and Cdk5, but not of p35, by antisense oligonucleotides selectively inhibited insulin exocytosis. Transient transfection of primary beta-cells with Munc18-1 templates mutated in potential Cdk5 or PKC phosphorylation sites, in combination with Cdk5 and the different Cdk5 activators, suggested that Cdk5/p39-promoted Ca(2+)-dependent insulin secretion from primary beta-cells by phosphorylating Munc18-1 at a biochemical step immediately prior to vesicle fusion.

  6. A conserved protein interaction network involving the yeast MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1.

    PubMed

    Kusari, Anasua B; Molina, Douglas M; Sabbagh, Walid; Lau, Chang S; Bardwell, Lee

    2004-01-19

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 bind to multiple regulators and substrates. We show that mutations in a conserved docking site in these MAPKs (the CD/7m region) disrupt binding to an important subset of their binding partners, including the Ste7 MAPK kinase, the Ste5 adaptor/scaffold protein, and the Dig1 and Dig2 transcriptional repressors. Supporting the possibility that Ste5 and Ste7 bind to the same region of the MAPKs, they partially competed for Fus3 binding. In vivo, some of the MAPK mutants displayed reduced Ste7-dependent phosphorylation, and all of them exhibited multiple defects in mating and pheromone response. The Kss1 mutants were also defective in Kss1-imposed repression of Ste12. We conclude that MAPKs contain a structurally and functionally conserved docking site that mediates an overall positively acting network of interactions with cognate docking sites on their regulators and substrates. Key features of this interaction network appear to have been conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:14734536

  7. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  8. Induction of MAP kinase phosphatase 3 through Erk/MAP kinase activation in three oncogenic Ras (H-, K- and N-Ras)-expressing NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Koo, JaeHyung; Wang, Sen; Kang, NaNa; Hur, Sun Jin; Bahk, Young Yil

    2016-01-01

    Ras oncoproteins are small molecular weight GTPases known for their involvement in oncogenesis, which operate in a complex signaling network with multiple effectors. Approximately 25% of human tumors possess mutations in a member of this family. The Raf1/MEK/Erk1/2 pathway is one of the most intensively studied signaling mechanisms. Different levels of regulation account for the inactivation of MAP kinases by MAPK phosphatases in a cell type- and stimuli-dependent manner. In the present study, using three inducible Ras-expressing NIH/3T3 cell lines, we demonstrated that MKP3 upregulation requires the activation of the Erk1/2 pathway, which correlates with the shutdown of this pathway. We also demonstrated, by applying pharmacological inhibitors and effector mutants of Ras, that induction of MKP3 at the protein level is positively regulated by the oncogenic Ras/Raf/MEK/Erk1/2 signaling pathway. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 370-375] PMID:26818088

  9. ERK1 and ERK2 Map Kinases: Specific Roles or Functional Redundancy?

    PubMed Central

    Buscà, Roser; Pouysségur, Jacques; Lenormand, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The MAP kinase signaling cascade Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK has been involved in a large variety of cellular and physiological processes that are crucial for life. Many pathological situations have been associated to this pathway. More than one isoform has been described at each level of the cascade. In this review we devoted our attention to ERK1 and ERK2, which are the effector kinases of the pathway. Whether ERK1 and ERK2 specify functional differences or are in contrast functionally redundant, constitutes an ongoing debate despite the huge amount of studies performed to date. In this review we compiled data on ERK1 vs. ERK2 gene structures, protein sequences, expression levels, structural and molecular mechanisms of activation and substrate recognition. We have also attempted to perform a rigorous analysis of studies regarding the individual roles of ERK1 and ERK2 by the means of morpholinos, siRNA, and shRNA silencing as well as gene disruption or gene replacement in mice. Finally, we comment on a recent study of gene and protein evolution of ERK isoforms as a distinct approach to address the same question. Our review permits the evaluation of the relevance of published studies in the field especially when measurements of global ERK activation are taken into account. Our analysis favors the hypothesis of ERK1 and ERK2 exhibiting functional redundancy and points to the concept of the global ERK quantity, and not isoform specificity, as being the essential determinant to achieve ERK function. PMID:27376062

  10. Dual role for membrane localization in yeast MAP kinase cascade activation and its contribution to signaling fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lamson, Rachel E; Takahashi, Satoe; Winters, Matthew J; Pryciak, Peter M

    2006-03-21

    Distinct MAP kinase pathways in yeast share several signaling components , including the PAK Ste20 and the MAPKKK Ste11, yet signaling is specific. Mating pheromones trigger an initial step in which Ste20 activates Ste11 , and this requires plasma membrane recruitment of the MAP kinase cascade scaffold protein, Ste5 . Here, we demonstrate an additional role for Ste5 membrane localization. Once Ste11 is activated, signaling through the mating pathway remains minimal but is substantially amplified when Ste5 is recruited to the membrane either by the Gbetagamma dimer or by direct membrane targeting, even to internal membranes. Ste11 signaling is also amplified by Ste5 oligomerization and by a hyperactivating mutation in the Ste7 binding region of Ste5. We suggest a model in which membrane recruitment of Ste5 concentrates its binding partners and thereby amplifies signaling through the kinase cascade. We find similar behavior in the osmotically responsive HOG pathway. Remarkably, while both pheromone and hyperosmotic stimuli amplify signaling from constitutively active Ste11, the resulting signaling output remains pathway specific. These findings suggest a common mode of regulation in which pathway stimuli both initiate and amplify MAP kinase cascade signaling. The regulation of rate-limiting steps that lie after a branchpoint from shared components helps ensure signaling specificity.

  11. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  12. Quantitative network mapping of the human kinome interactome reveals new clues for rational kinase inhibitor discovery and individualized cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Quan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-06-15

    The human kinome is gaining importance through its promising cancer therapeutic targets, yet no general model to address the kinase inhibitor resistance has emerged. Here, we constructed a systems biology-based framework to catalogue the human kinome, including 538 kinase genes, in the broader context of the human interactome. Specifically, we constructed three networks: a kinase-substrate interaction network containing 7,346 pairs connecting 379 kinases to 36,576 phosphorylation sites in 1,961 substrates, a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) containing 92,699 pairs, and an atomic resolution PPIN containing 4,278 pairs. We identified the conserved regulatory phosphorylation motifs (e.g., Ser/Thr-Pro) using a sequence logo analysis. We found the typical anticancer target selection strategy that uses network hubs as drug targets, might lead to a high adverse drug reaction risk. Furthermore, we found the distinct network centrality of kinases creates a high anticancer drug resistance risk by feedback or crosstalk mechanisms within cellular networks. This notion is supported by the systematic network and pathway analyses that anticancer drug resistance genes are significantly enriched as hubs and heavily participate in multiple signaling pathways. Collectively, this comprehensive human kinome interactome map sheds light on anticancer drug resistance mechanisms and provides an innovative resource for rational kinase inhibitor design.

  13. Phosphorylation of polynucleotide kinase/ phosphatase by DNA-dependent protein kinase and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated regulates its association with sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Zolner, Angela E.; Abdou, Ismail; Ye, Ruiqiong; Mani, Rajam S.; Fanta, Mesfin; Yu, Yaping; Douglas, Pauline; Tahbaz, Nasser; Fang, Shujuan; Dobbs, Tracey; Wang, Chen; Morrice, Nick; Hendzel, Michael J.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) is a dual specificity 5′-DNA kinase/3′-DNA phosphatase, with roles in base excision repair, DNA single-strand break repair and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ); yet precisely how PNKP functions in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. We demonstrate that PNKP is phosphorylated by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in vitro. The major phosphorylation site for both kinases was serine 114, with serine 126 being a minor site. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced phosphorylation of cellular PNKP on S114 was ATM dependent, whereas phosphorylation of PNKP on S126 required both ATM and DNA-PK. Inactivation of DNA-PK and/or ATM led to reduced PNKP at DNA damage sites in vivo. Cells expressing PNKP with alanine or aspartic acid at serines 114 and 126 were modestly radiosensitive and IR enhanced the association of PNKP with XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV; however, this interaction was not affected by mutation of PNKP phosphorylation sites. Purified PNKP protein with mutation of serines 114 and 126 had decreased DNA kinase and DNA phosphatase activities and reduced affinity for DNA in vitro. Together, our results reveal that IR-induced phosphorylation of PNKP by ATM and DNA-PK regulates PNKP function at DSBs. PMID:21824916

  14. Phosphorylation of polynucleotide kinase/ phosphatase by DNA-dependent protein kinase and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated regulates its association with sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zolner, Angela E; Abdou, Ismail; Ye, Ruiqiong; Mani, Rajam S; Fanta, Mesfin; Yu, Yaping; Douglas, Pauline; Tahbaz, Nasser; Fang, Shujuan; Dobbs, Tracey; Wang, Chen; Morrice, Nick; Hendzel, Michael J; Weinfeld, Michael; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2011-11-01

    Human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) is a dual specificity 5'-DNA kinase/3'-DNA phosphatase, with roles in base excision repair, DNA single-strand break repair and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ); yet precisely how PNKP functions in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. We demonstrate that PNKP is phosphorylated by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in vitro. The major phosphorylation site for both kinases was serine 114, with serine 126 being a minor site. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced phosphorylation of cellular PNKP on S114 was ATM dependent, whereas phosphorylation of PNKP on S126 required both ATM and DNA-PK. Inactivation of DNA-PK and/or ATM led to reduced PNKP at DNA damage sites in vivo. Cells expressing PNKP with alanine or aspartic acid at serines 114 and 126 were modestly radiosensitive and IR enhanced the association of PNKP with XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV; however, this interaction was not affected by mutation of PNKP phosphorylation sites. Purified PNKP protein with mutation of serines 114 and 126 had decreased DNA kinase and DNA phosphatase activities and reduced affinity for DNA in vitro. Together, our results reveal that IR-induced phosphorylation of PNKP by ATM and DNA-PK regulates PNKP function at DSBs.

  15. Extracellular alpha-synuclein induces calpain-dependent overactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Grzegorz A; Gąssowska, Magdalena; Wilkaniec, Anna; Cieślik, Magdalena; Adamczyk, Agata

    2013-09-17

    Extracellular alpha-synuclein (ASN) could be involved in the pathomechanism of Parkinson's disease (PD) via disturbances of calcium homeostasis, activation of nitric oxide synthase and oxidative/nitrosative stress. In this study we analyzed the role of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in the molecular mechanism(s) of ASN toxicity. We found that exposure of PC12 cells to ASN increases Cdk5 activity via calpain-dependent p25 formation and by enhancement of Cdk5 phosphorylation at Tyr15. Cdk5 and calpain inhibitors prevented ASN-evoked cell death. Our findings, indicating the participation of Cdk5 in ASN toxicity, provide new insight into how extracellular ASN may trigger dopaminergic cell dysfunction in PD.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr protein kinase B mediates an oxygen-dependent replication switch

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, Corrie; Liao, Reiling; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Rustad, Tige; Ollodart, Anja R.; Wright, Aaron T.; Sherman, David R.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-07

    In the majority of cases, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections are clinically latent, characterized by little or no bacterial replication and drug tolerance. Low oxygen tension is a major host factor inducing bacteriostasis, but the molecular mechanisms driving oxygen-dependent replication are poorly understood. Mtb encodes eleven serine/threonine protein kinases, a family of signaling molecules known to regulate similar replicative adaptations in other bacteria. Here, we tested the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in the Mtb response to altered oxygen status, using an in vitro model of latency (hypoxia) and reactivation (reaeration). Broad kinase inhibition compromised survival of Mtb in hypoxia. Activity-based protein profiling and genetic mutation identified PknB as the kinase critical for surviving hypoxia. Mtb replication was highly sensitive to changes in PknB levels in aerated culture, and even more so in hypoxia. A mutant overexpressing PknB specifically in hypoxia showed a 10-fold loss in viability in low oxygen conditions. In contrast, chemically reducing PknB activity during hypoxia specifically compromised resumption of growth during reaeration. These data support a model in which PknB activity is reduced to achieve bacteriostasis, and elevated when replication resumes. Together, these data show that phosphosignaling controls replicative transitions associated with latency and reactivation, that PknB is a major regulator of these transitions, and that PknB could provide a highly vulnerable therapeutic target at every step of the Mtb life cycle - active disease, latency, and reactivation.

  17. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: A multifunctional enzyme and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-05-01

    The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family, and is primarily involved in transcriptional regulation in lymphocytes, neurons and male germ cells. CAMKIV operates the signaling cascade and regulates activity of several transcription activators by phosphorylation, which in turn plays pivotal roles in immune response, inflammation and memory consolidation. In this review, we tried to focus on different aspects of CAMKIV to understand the significance of this protein in the biological system. This enzyme is associated with varieties of disorders such as cerebral hypoxia, azoospermia, endometrial and ovarian cancer, systemic lupus, etc., and hence it is considered as a potential therapeutic target. Structure of CAMKIV is comprised of five distinct domains in which kinase domain is responsible for enzyme activity. CAMKIV is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as regulation of gene expression, T-cell maturation, regulation of survival phase of dendritic cells, bone growth and metabolism, memory consolidation, sperm motility, regulation of microtubule dynamics, cell-cycle progression and apoptosis. In this review, we performed an extensive analysis on structure, function and regulation of CAMKIV and associated diseases. PMID:26773169

  18. Casein kinase 1α–dependent feedback loop controls autophagy in RAS-driven cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Jit Kong; Zhang, Fuquan; Chua, Pei Jou; Bay, Boon Huat; Thorburn, Andrew; Virshup, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations in the RAS oncogene are common in cancer but are difficult to therapeutically target. RAS activation promotes autophagy, a highly regulated catabolic process that metabolically buffers cells in response to diverse stresses. Here we report that casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase, is a key negative regulator of oncogenic RAS–induced autophagy. Depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of CK1α enhanced autophagic flux in oncogenic RAS–driven human fibroblasts and multiple cancer cell lines. FOXO3A, a master longevity mediator that transcriptionally regulates diverse autophagy genes, was a critical target of CK1α, as depletion of CK1α reduced levels of phosphorylated FOXO3A and increased expression of FOXO3A-responsive genes. Oncogenic RAS increased CK1α protein abundance via activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. In turn, elevated levels of CK1α increased phosphorylation of nuclear FOXO3A, thereby inhibiting transactivation of genes critical for RAS-induced autophagy. In both RAS-driven cancer cells and murine xenograft models, pharmacologic CK1α inactivation synergized with lysosomotropic agents to inhibit growth and promote tumor cell death. Together, our results identify a kinase feedback loop that influences RAS-dependent autophagy and suggest that targeting CK1α-regulated autophagy offers a potential therapeutic opportunity to treat oncogenic RAS–driven cancers. PMID:25798617

  19. Development of highly potent and selective diaminothiazole inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrunn, Ernst; Betzi, Stephane; Alam, Riazul; Martin, Mathew P.; Becker, Andreas; Han, Huijong; Francis, Rawle; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Jakkaraj, Sudhakar; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Sebti, Said M.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Gebhard, Anthony W.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Tash, Joseph S.; Georg, Gunda I.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases that act as key regulatory elements in cell cycle progression. We describe the development of highly potent diaminothiazole inhibitors of CDK2 (IC50 = 0.0009 – 0.0015 µM) from a single hit compound with weak inhibitory activity (IC50 = 15 µM), discovered by high-throughput screening. Structure-based design was performed using 35 co-crystal structures of CDK2 liganded with distinct analogues of the parent compound. The profiling of compound 51 against a panel of 339 kinases revealed high selectivity for CDKs, with preference for CDK2 and CDK5 over CDK9, CDK1, CDK4 and CDK6. Compound 51 inhibited the proliferation of 13 out of 15 cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 0.27 and 6.9 µM, which correlated with the complete suppression of retinoblastoma phosphorylation and the onset of apoptosis. Combined, the results demonstrate the potential of this new inhibitors series for further development into CDK-specific chemical probes or therapeutics. PMID:23600925

  20. Gain-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans lin-1 ETS gene identify a C-terminal regulatory domain phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, D; Beitel, G J; Clark, S G; Horvitz, H R; Kornfeld, K

    1998-01-01

    Genetic analysis of lin-1 loss-of-function mutations suggests that lin-1 controls multiple cell-fate decisions during Caenorhabditis elegans development and is negatively regulated by a conserved receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-ERK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction pathway. LIN-1 protein contains an ETS domain and presumably regulates transcription. We identified and characterized six gain-of-function mutations that define a new class of lin-1 allele. These lin-1 alleles appeared to be constitutively active and unresponsive to negative regulation. Each allele has a single-base change that affects the predicted C terminus of LIN-1, suggesting this region is required for negative regulation. The C terminus of LIN-1 was a high-affinity substrate for Erk2 in vitro, suggesting that LIN-1 is directly regulated by ERK MAP kinase. Because mpk-1 ERK MAP kinase controls at least one cell-fate decision that does not require lin-1, our results suggest that MPK-1 contributes to the specificity of this receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by phosphorylating different proteins in different developmental contexts. These lin-1 mutations all affect a four-amino-acid motif, FQFP, that is conserved in vertebrate and Drosophila ETS proteins that are also phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase. This sequence may be a substrate recognition motif for the ERK subfamily of MAP kinases. PMID:9691039

  1. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion. PMID:15726816

  2. Implication of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the neuroprotective properties of lithium.

    PubMed

    Jordà, E G; Verdaguer, E; Canudas, A M; Jiménez, A; Garcia de Arriba, S; Allgaier, C; Pallàs, M; Camins, A

    2005-01-01

    Although numerous studies have demonstrated a neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic role of lithium in neuronal cell cultures, the precise mechanism by which this occurs, remains to be elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the lithium-mediated neuroprotection against colchicine-induced apoptosis in cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Previously, it has been demonstrated that colchicine mediates apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons through cytoskeletal alteration and activation of an intrinsic pro-apoptotic pathway. Recently we also demonstrated a potential role of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) in this pathway. Here we report that colchicine induces dephosphorylation in Ser-9 and phosphorylation in Tyr-216, and thus activation, of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta in cerebellar granule neurons, and that this modification is inhibited by the presence of 5 mM lithium. However, the selective glycogen synthase kinase-3beta inhibitors SB-415286 and SB-216763 were unable to prevent colchicine-induced apoptosis in these cells, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic activity of lithium is not mediated by glycogen synthase kinase-3beta under these conditions. On the other hand, 5 mM lithium prevented the colchicine-induced increase in cdk5 expression and breakdown of cdk5/p35 to cdk5/p25. In addition, we show that up-regulation of cdk5/p25 is unrelated to inhibition of the activity of myocyte enhancer factor 2, a pro-survival transcription factor. These data suggest a previously undescribed neuroprotective mechanism of lithium associated with the modulation of cdk5/p35 or cdk5/p25 expression.

  3. Kinetic and calcium-binding properties of three calcium-dependent protein kinase isoenzymes from soybean.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Yoo, B C; Harmon, A C

    1998-05-12

    Calmodulin-like domain protein kinases (CDPKs) are a family of calcium- but not calmodulin-dependent protein kinases found in a wide variety of plants and in protists. CDPKs are encoded by large multigene families, and to assess whether family members play distinct or redundant roles in vivo, we characterized soybean CDPK isoforms alpha, beta, and gamma, which share 60-80% identity in amino acid sequence. RNA blot analysis showed that the three CDPKs were expressed in most plant tissues examined and in suspension-cultured soybean cells. Recombinant CDPKalpha, -beta, and -gamma phosphorylated peptide substrates containing the four-residue motif R/K-X-X-S/T, but CDPKalpha was the most selective for residues outside of the motif. The CDPKs were inhibited by the general protein kinase inhibitors K252a and staurosporine and by calphostin C, which is an inhibitor of protein kinase C. The calcium-binding properties of each CDPK were distinct. The Kd's for Ca2+ determined by flow dialysis in the absence of substrates were 51, 1.4, and 1.6 micro M for CDPKalpha, -beta, and -gamma, respectively. In the presence of the peptide substrate syntide-2 the Kd of CDPKalpha decreased to 0.6 microM. Also, the sensitivity of this isoenzyme's activity to calcium varied with protein substrate. The concentrations of Ca2+ required for half-maximal activity (K0.5) for each CDPK with syntide-2 as substrate were 0.06, 0.4, and 1 micro M, respectively. These results show that members of the CDPK family differ in biochemical properties and support the hypothesis that each isoform may have a distinct role in calcium signal transduction.

  4. IκB kinase-induced interaction of TPL-2 kinase with 14-3-3 is essential for Toll-like receptor activation of ERK-1 and -2 MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Ben-Addi, Abduelhakem; Mambole-Dema, Agnes; Brender, Christine; Martin, Stephen R; Janzen, Julia; Kjaer, Sven; Smerdon, Stephen J; Ley, Steven C

    2014-06-10

    The MEK-1/2 kinase TPL-2 is critical for Toll-like receptor activation of the ERK-1/2 MAP kinase pathway during inflammatory responses, but it can transform cells following C-terminal truncation. IκB kinase (IKK) complex phosphorylation of the TPL-2 C terminus regulates full-length TPL-2 activation of ERK-1/2 by a mechanism that has remained obscure. Here, we show that TPL-2 Ser-400 phosphorylation by IKK and TPL-2 Ser-443 autophosphorylation cooperated to trigger TPL-2 association with 14-3-3. Recruitment of 14-3-3 to the phosphorylated C terminus stimulated TPL-2 MEK-1 kinase activity, which was essential for TPL-2 activation of ERK-1/2. The binding of 14-3-3 to TPL-2 was also indispensible for lipopolysaccharide-induced production of tumor necrosis factor by macrophages, which is regulated by TPL-2 independently of ERK-1/2 activation. Our data identify a key step in the activation of TPL-2 signaling and provide a mechanistic insight into how C-terminal deletion triggers the oncogenic potential of TPL-2 by rendering its kinase activity independent of 14-3-3 binding.

  5. Biochemical similarities between soluble and membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinases of barley

    SciTech Connect

    Klimczak, L.J.; Hind, G. )

    1990-04-01

    The soluble and membrane-bound forms of the calcium-dependent protein kinase from barley leaves (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Borsoy) have been partially purified and compared. Both forms showed an active polypeptide of 37 kilodaltons on activity gels with incorporated histone as substrate. They eluted from chromatofocusing columns at an identical isoelectric point of pH 4.25 {plus minus} 0.2, and also comigrated on several other chromatographic affinity media including Matrex Gel Blue A, histone-agarose, phenyl-Sepharose, and heparin-agarose. Both activities comigrated with chicken ovalbumin during gel filtration through Sephacryl S-200, indicating a native molecular mass of 45 kilodaltons. The activities share a number of enzymatic properties including salt and pH dependence, free calcium stimulation profile, substrate specificity, and Km values. The soluble activity was shown to bind to artificial lipid vesicles. These data suggest strongly that the soluble and membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinases from barley are very closely related or even identical.

  6. TRAF2 multitasking in TNF receptor-induced signaling to NF-κB, MAP kinases and cell death.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alice; Verstrepen, Lynn; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-09-15

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that exerts its functions through the activation of two distinct receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Both receptors can activate canonical NF-κB and JNK MAP kinase signaling, while TNFR2 can also activate non-canonical NF-κB signaling, leading to numerous changes in gene expression that drive inflammation, cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, TNFR1 also activates signaling pathways leading to cell death by either apoptosis or necroptosis, depending on the cellular context. A key player in TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signaling is the RING finger protein TRAF2, which is recruited to both receptors upon their stimulation. TRAF2 exerts multiple receptor-specific functions but also mediates cross-talk between TNFR1 and TNFR2, dictating the outcome of TNF stimulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the positive and negative regulatory role of TRAF2 in different TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling pathways. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanism of action, distinguishing between TRAF2 scaffold and E3 ubiquitin ligase functions, and the regulation of TRAF2 by specific post-translational modifications. Finally, we elaborate on some possible strategies to modulate TRAF2 function in the context of therapeutic targeting in autoimmunity and cancer.

  7. Regulating Global Sumoylation by a MAP Kinase Hog1 and Its Potential Role in Osmo-Tolerance in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Panahi, Mahmoud; Zhu, Ming; Wang, Yuqi

    2014-01-01

    Sumoylation, a post-translational protein modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), has been implicated in many stress responses. Here we analyzed the potential role of sumoylation in osmo-response in yeast. We find that osmotic stress induces rapid accumulation of sumoylated species in normal yeast cells. Interestingly, disruption of MAP kinase Hog1 leads to a much higher level of accumulation of sumoylated conjugates that are independent of new protein synthesis. We also find that the accumulation of sumoylated species is dependent on a SUMO ligase Siz1. Notably, overexpression of SIZ1 in HOG1-disruption mutants (hog1Δ) but not in wild type cells leads to a markedly increased and prolonged accumulation of sumoylated species. Examination of osmo-tolerance of yeast mutants that display either an increase or a decrease in the global sumoylation level revealed an inverse relationship between accumulation of sumoylated conjugates and osmo-tolerance. Further investigation has shown that many of the sumoylated species induced by hyperosmotic stress are actually poly-sumoylated. Together, these findings indicate that abnormal accumulation of poly-sumoylated conjugates is harmful for osmo-tolerance in yeast, and suggest that Hog1 promotes adaptation to hyperosmotic stress partially via regulation of global sumoylation level. PMID:24498309

  8. TRAF2 multitasking in TNF receptor-induced signaling to NF-κB, MAP kinases and cell death.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Alice; Verstrepen, Lynn; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-09-15

    Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine that exerts its functions through the activation of two distinct receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2. Both receptors can activate canonical NF-κB and JNK MAP kinase signaling, while TNFR2 can also activate non-canonical NF-κB signaling, leading to numerous changes in gene expression that drive inflammation, cell proliferation and cell survival. On the other hand, TNFR1 also activates signaling pathways leading to cell death by either apoptosis or necroptosis, depending on the cellular context. A key player in TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signaling is the RING finger protein TRAF2, which is recruited to both receptors upon their stimulation. TRAF2 exerts multiple receptor-specific functions but also mediates cross-talk between TNFR1 and TNFR2, dictating the outcome of TNF stimulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the positive and negative regulatory role of TRAF2 in different TNFR1 and TNFR2 signaling pathways. We discuss the underlying molecular mechanism of action, distinguishing between TRAF2 scaffold and E3 ubiquitin ligase functions, and the regulation of TRAF2 by specific post-translational modifications. Finally, we elaborate on some possible strategies to modulate TRAF2 function in the context of therapeutic targeting in autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26993379

  9. The α,α-Difluorinated Phosphonate L-pSer-Analogue: An Accessible Chemical Tool for Studying Kinase-Dependent Signal Transduction in Vitro, and In Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Kaushik; Eggen, MariJean; Maeng, Jun-Ho; Shen, Quanrong; Berkowitz, David B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY This overview focuses on the (α,α-difluoromethylene)phosphonate mimic of phosphoserine (pCF2Ser) and its application to the study of kinase-mediated signal transduction – pathways of great interest to drug development. The most versatile modes of access to these chemical biological tools are discussed, organized by method of PCF2-C bond. The pCF2-Ser mimic may be site-specifically incorporated into peptides (SPPS) and proteins (expressed protein ligation). This isopolar, dianionic pSer mimic results in a “constitutive phosphorylation” phenotype, and is seen to support native protein-protein interactions that depend upon serine phosphorylation. Signal transduction pathways studied with this chemical biological approach include the regulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein activity, and of melatonin production. Given these successes, the future is bright for the use of such “teflon phospho-amino acid mimics” to map kinase-based signaling pathways. PMID:19778720

  10. Deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD negatively regulates the ubiquitin-dependent kinase Tak1 and prevents abnormal T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Reiley, William W.; Jin, Wei; Lee, Andrew Joon; Wright, Ato; Wu, Xuefeng; Tewalt, Eric F.; Leonard, Timothy O.; Norbury, Christopher C.; Fitzpatrick, Leo; Zhang, Minying; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2007-01-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD has recently been implicated in the regulation of signal transduction, but its physiological function and mechanism of action are still elusive. In this study, we show that CYLD plays a pivotal role in regulating T cell activation and homeostasis. T cells derived from Cyld knockout mice display a hyperresponsive phenotype and mediate the spontaneous development of intestinal inflammation. Interestingly, CYLD targets a ubiquitin-dependent kinase, transforming growth factor–β-activated kinase 1 (Tak1), and inhibits its ubiquitination and autoactivation. Cyld-deficient T cells exhibit constitutively active Tak1 and its downstream kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and IκB kinase β. These results emphasize a critical role for CYLD in preventing spontaneous activation of the Tak1 axis of T cell signaling and, thereby, maintaining normal T cell function. PMID:17548520

  11. Late Phase of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Pathway Is Regulated by Hog1 MAP Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Bicknell, Alicia A.; Tourtellotte, Joel; Niwa, Maho

    2010-01-01

    When unfolded proteins accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causing ER stress, the unfolded protein response (UPR) responds rapidly to induce a transcriptional program that functions to alleviate the stress. However, under extreme conditions, when UPR activation is not sufficient to alleviate ER stress, the stress may persist long term. Very little is known about how the cell responds to persistent ER stress that is not resolved by the immediate activation of the UPR. We show that Hog1 MAP kinase becomes phosphorylated during the late stage of ER stress and helps the ER regain homeostasis. Although Hog1 is well known to function in osmotic stress and cell wall integrity pathways, we show that the activation mechanism for Hog1 during ER stress is distinct from both of these pathways. During late stage ER stress, upon phosphorylation, Hog1 translocates into the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Subsequently, Hog1 returns to the cytoplasm, where its phosphorylation levels remain high. From its cytoplasmic location, Hog1 contributes to the activation of autophagy by enhancing the stability of Atg8, a critical autophagy protein. Thus, Hog1 coordinates a multifaceted response to persistent ER stress. PMID:20382742

  12. A C. elegans p38 MAP kinase pathway mutant protects from dopamine, methamphetamine, and MDMA toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Matthew A.; McIntire, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amine systems are damaged by amphetamine abuse and in Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms mediating this damage are of high importance because of the public health impact of these problems. Here we have taken advantage of the C. elegans nematode model system to investigate genetic modifiers of biogenic amine toxicity. In a forward genetic screen, we identified a mutant resistant to the toxic effects of dopamine. This mutant was also resistant to toxic doses of methamphetamine (MA) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). In addition, this mutation conferred resistance to 6-hydroxydopamine damage to dopaminergic neurons in a Parkinson's disease model. Resistance was due to a mutation in the nsy-1 gene, orthologous to the mammalian ASK-1 MAPKKK. NSY-1 is in the highly conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway, which plays a crucial role in C. elegans innate immunity, suggesting that this pathway may play a role in biogenic amine toxicity system damage due to amphetamines and in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease in higher organisms. PMID:21565252

  13. Structure-function of the multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, Andy; Schulman, Howard

    2002-06-15

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of Ca2+-linked signalling that phosphorylates a wide range of substrates to co-ordinate and regulate Ca2+-mediated alterations in cellular function. The transmission of information by the kinase from extracellular stimuli and the intracellular Ca2+ rise is not passive. Rather, its multimeric structure and autoregulation enable this enzyme to participate actively in the sensitivity, timing and location of its action. CaMKII can: (i) be activated in a Ca2+-spike frequency-dependent manner; (ii) become independent of its initial Ca2+/CaM activators; and (iii) undergo a 'molecular switch-like' behaviour, which is crucial for certain forms of learning and memory. CaMKII is derived from a family of four homologous but distinct genes, with over 30 alternatively spliced isoforms described at present. These isoforms possess diverse developmental and anatomical expression patterns, as well as subcellular localization. Six independent catalytic/autoregulatory domains are connected by a narrow stalk-like appendage to each hexameric ring within the dodecameric structure. Ca2+/CaM binding activates the enzyme by disinhibiting the autoregulatory domain; this process initiates an intra-holoenzyme autophosphorylation reaction that induces complex changes in the enzyme's sensitivity to Ca2+/CaM, including the generation of Ca2+/CaM-independent (autonomous) activity and marked increase in affinity for CaM. The role of CaMKII in Ca2+ signal transduction is shaped by its autoregulation, isoenzymic type and subcellular localization. The molecular determinants and mechanisms producing these processes are discussed as they relate to the structure-function of this multifunctional protein kinase. PMID:11931644

  14. Myosin light chain kinase-dependent microvascular hyperpermeability in thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiaobing; Xu, Wenjuan; Ustinova, Elena; Wu, Mack; Childs, Ed; Hunter, Felicia; Yuan, Sarah

    2003-10-01

    Although the critical role of systemic inflammatory edema in the development of multiple organ failure in patients with massive burns has been fully recognized, the precise mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of blood fluid and proteins in tissues remote from the burn wound are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that circulating factors released during thermal injury cause microvascular leakage by triggering endothelial cell contraction and barrier dysfunction. A third-degree scald burn was induced in rats on the dorsal skin covering 25% total body surface area. The microcirculation and transvascular flux of albumin were observed in the rat mesentery using intravital fluorescence microscopy. The direct effect of circulating factors on microvascular barrier function was assessed by measuring the apparent permeability coefficient of albumin in isolated rat mesenteric venules during perfusion of plasma freshly withdrawn from burned rats. The in vivo study showed that the transvenular flux of albumin was significantly increased over a 6-h period with a maximal response seen at 3 h postburn. Importantly, perfusion of noninjured venules with burn plasma induced a time-dependent increase in albumin permeability. Pharmacological inhibition of protein kinase C, Src tyrosine kinases, or mast cell activation did not significantly affect the hyperpermeability response; however, blockage of myosin light chain phosphorylation with the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 greatly attenuated the burn-induced increase in venular permeability in a dose-related pattern. The results support a role for endogenous circulating factors in microvascular leakage during burns. Myosin light chain phosphorylation-dependent endothelial contractile response may serve as an end-point effector leading to microvascular barrier dysfunction. PMID:14501951

  15. Distribution of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent hexose kinases in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Delvalle, J A; Asensio, C

    1978-08-01

    A systematic study of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent hexose kinases among microorganisms has been undertaken. Sixteen hexose kinases of five major types were partially purified from 12 microorganisms and characterized with respect to specificity for sugar and nucleotide substrates and Michaelis constants for the sugar substrates. Glucokinase activities that phosphorylate glucose and glucosamine are inhibited by N-acetyl-glucosamine and xylose, were found to be present in the non-sulphur photosynthetic bacteria Rhodospirillum rubrum, the blue-green algae Anacystis montana, and the protists Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (green algae), Hypochytrium catenoides (Hypochytridiomycete) and Saprolegnia Iitoralis (Oomycete). The myxobacteria Stigmatella aurantiaca contains a glucokinase activity with a different specificity pattern. Anacystis and Chlorella, besides their glucokinase activities, contain highly specific fructokinases, although that from Anacystis can also phosphorylate fructosamine; fructokinase from Anacystis has a molecular weight of 20 000, and exhibits a sigmoidal saturation curve for ATP when the Mg2+/ATP ratio is 2; this curve is transformed to a Michaelian one when under the same conditions an excess of Mg2+ (5 mM) is added. Saprolegnia however, besides the glucokinase, contains a mannofructokinase activity that phosphorylates mannose (Km 0.06 mM) and fructose (1 mM). On the other hand, hexokinase, a low specificity enzyme, was detected in the protist Allomyces arbuscula (Chytridiomycete) and in fungi Mucor hiemalis and Phycomyces blakesleeanus (Zygomycetes), and Schizophyllum commune (Basidiomycete). Schizophyllum contains a glucomannokinase activity together with hexokinase activity. The pattern of distribution of ATP-dependent hexose kinases among microorganisms seems to parallel that reported for biosynthetic pathways for lysine. The correlation with other biochemical parameters is also considered.

  16. The MADD-3 LAMMER Kinase Interacts with a p38 MAP Kinase Pathway to Regulate the Display of the EVA-1 Guidance Receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Serena A; Rajendran, Luckshika; Bagg, Rachel; Barbier, Louis; van Pel, Derek M; Moshiri, Houtan; Roy, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    The proper display of transmembrane receptors on the leading edge of migrating cells and cell extensions is essential for their response to guidance cues. We previously discovered that MADD-4, which is an ADAMTSL secreted by motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, interacts with an UNC-40/EVA-1 co-receptor complex on muscles to attract plasma membrane extensions called muscle arms. In nematodes, the muscle arm termini harbor the post-synaptic elements of the neuromuscular junction. Through a forward genetic screen for mutants with disrupted muscle arm extension, we discovered that a LAMMER kinase, which we call MADD-3, is required for the proper display of the EVA-1 receptor on the muscle's plasma membrane. Without MADD-3, EVA-1 levels decrease concomitantly with a reduction of the late-endosomal marker RAB-7. Through a genetic suppressor screen, we found that the levels of EVA-1 and RAB-7 can be restored in madd-3 mutants by eliminating the function of a p38 MAP kinase pathway. We also found that EVA-1 and RAB-7 will accumulate in madd-3 mutants upon disrupting CUP-5, which is a mucolipin ortholog required for proper lysosome function. Together, our data suggests that the MADD-3 LAMMER kinase antagonizes the p38-mediated endosomal trafficking of EVA-1 to the lysosome. In this way, MADD-3 ensures that sufficient levels of EVA-1 are present to guide muscle arm extension towards the source of the MADD-4 guidance cue. PMID:27123983

  17. The MADD-3 LAMMER Kinase Interacts with a p38 MAP Kinase Pathway to Regulate the Display of the EVA-1 Guidance Receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Serena A.; Rajendran, Luckshika; Bagg, Rachel; van Pel, Derek M.; Moshiri, Houtan; Roy, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The proper display of transmembrane receptors on the leading edge of migrating cells and cell extensions is essential for their response to guidance cues. We previously discovered that MADD-4, which is an ADAMTSL secreted by motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, interacts with an UNC-40/EVA-1 co-receptor complex on muscles to attract plasma membrane extensions called muscle arms. In nematodes, the muscle arm termini harbor the post-synaptic elements of the neuromuscular junction. Through a forward genetic screen for mutants with disrupted muscle arm extension, we discovered that a LAMMER kinase, which we call MADD-3, is required for the proper display of the EVA-1 receptor on the muscle’s plasma membrane. Without MADD-3, EVA-1 levels decrease concomitantly with a reduction of the late-endosomal marker RAB-7. Through a genetic suppressor screen, we found that the levels of EVA-1 and RAB-7 can be restored in madd-3 mutants by eliminating the function of a p38 MAP kinase pathway. We also found that EVA-1 and RAB-7 will accumulate in madd-3 mutants upon disrupting CUP-5, which is a mucolipin ortholog required for proper lysosome function. Together, our data suggests that the MADD-3 LAMMER kinase antagonizes the p38-mediated endosomal trafficking of EVA-1 to the lysosome. In this way, MADD-3 ensures that sufficient levels of EVA-1 are present to guide muscle arm extension towards the source of the MADD-4 guidance cue. PMID:27123983

  18. The MADD-3 LAMMER Kinase Interacts with a p38 MAP Kinase Pathway to Regulate the Display of the EVA-1 Guidance Receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Serena A; Rajendran, Luckshika; Bagg, Rachel; Barbier, Louis; van Pel, Derek M; Moshiri, Houtan; Roy, Peter J

    2016-04-01

    The proper display of transmembrane receptors on the leading edge of migrating cells and cell extensions is essential for their response to guidance cues. We previously discovered that MADD-4, which is an ADAMTSL secreted by motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, interacts with an UNC-40/EVA-1 co-receptor complex on muscles to attract plasma membrane extensions called muscle arms. In nematodes, the muscle arm termini harbor the post-synaptic elements of the neuromuscular junction. Through a forward genetic screen for mutants with disrupted muscle arm extension, we discovered that a LAMMER kinase, which we call MADD-3, is required for the proper display of the EVA-1 receptor on the muscle's plasma membrane. Without MADD-3, EVA-1 levels decrease concomitantly with a reduction of the late-endosomal marker RAB-7. Through a genetic suppressor screen, we found that the levels of EVA-1 and RAB-7 can be restored in madd-3 mutants by eliminating the function of a p38 MAP kinase pathway. We also found that EVA-1 and RAB-7 will accumulate in madd-3 mutants upon disrupting CUP-5, which is a mucolipin ortholog required for proper lysosome function. Together, our data suggests that the MADD-3 LAMMER kinase antagonizes the p38-mediated endosomal trafficking of EVA-1 to the lysosome. In this way, MADD-3 ensures that sufficient levels of EVA-1 are present to guide muscle arm extension towards the source of the MADD-4 guidance cue.

  19. Withdrawal of Essential Amino Acids Increases Autophagy by a Pathway Involving Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase Kinase-β (CaMKK-β)*

    PubMed Central

    Ghislat, Ghita; Patron, Maria; Rizzuto, Rosario; Knecht, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is the main lysosomal catabolic process that becomes activated under stress conditions, such as amino acid starvation and cytosolic Ca2+ upload. However, the molecular details on how both conditions control autophagy are still not fully understood. Here we link essential amino acid starvation and Ca2+ in a signaling pathway to activate autophagy. We show that withdrawal of essential amino acids leads to an increase in cytosolic Ca2+, arising from both extracellular medium and intracellular stores, which induces the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β (CaMKK-β). Furthermore, we show that autophagy induced by amino acid starvation requires AMPK, as this induction is attenuated in its absence. Subsequently, AMPK activates UNC-51-like kinase (ULK1), a mammalian autophagy-initiating kinase, through phosphorylation at Ser-555 in a process that requires CaMKK-β. Finally, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex C1 (mTORC1), a negative regulator of autophagy downstream of AMPK, is inhibited by amino acid starvation in a Ca2+-sensitive manner, and CaMKK-β appears to be important for mTORC1 inactivation, especially in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. All these results highlight that amino acid starvation regulates autophagy in part through an increase in cellular Ca2+ that activates a CaMKK-β-AMPK pathway and inhibits mTORC1, which results in ULK1 stimulation. PMID:23027865

  20. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from the green alga, Dunaliella salina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roux, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase was partially purified and characterized from the green alga Dunaliella salina. The enzyme was activated at free Ca2+ concentrations above 10(-7) molar. and half-maximal activation was at about 3 x 10(-7) molar. The optimum pH for its Ca(2+)-dependent activity was 7.5. The addition of various phospholipids and diolein had no effects on enzyme activity and did not alter the sensitivity of the enzyme toward Ca2+. The enzyme was inhibited by calmodulin antagonists, N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalene sulfonamide and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide in a dose-dependent manner while the protein kinase C inhibitor, sphingosine, had little effect on enzyme activity up to 800 micromolar. Immunoassay showed some calmodulin was present in the kinase preparations. However, it is unlikely the kinase was calmodulin regulated, since it still showed stimulation by Ca2+ in gel assays after being electrophoretically separated from calmodulin by two different methods. This gel method of detection of the enzyme indicated that a protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 40,000 showed protein kinase activity at each one of the several steps in the purification procedure. Gel assay analysis also showed that after native gel isoelectric focusing the partially purified kinase preparations had two bands with calcium-dependent activity, at isoelectric points 6.7 and 7.1. By molecular weight, by isoelectric point, and by a comparative immunoassay, the Dunaliella kinase appears to differ from at least some of the calcium-dependent, but calmodulin and phospholipid independent kinases described from higher plants.

  1. Novel small molecule inhibitors of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Richard I; Wu, James M; Polokoff, Mark A; Kochanny, Monica J; Dinter, Harald; Zhu, Daguang; Biroc, Sandra L; Alicke, Bruno; Bryant, Judi; Yuan, Shendong; Buckman, Brad O; Lentz, Dao; Ferrer, Mike; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Finster, Silke; Chang, Zheng; Arnaiz, Damian O

    2005-05-20

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1)/Akt signaling pathway plays a key role in cancer cell growth, survival, and tumor angiogenesis and represents a promising target for anticancer drugs. Here, we describe three potent PDK1 inhibitors, BX-795, BX-912, and BX-320 (IC(50) = 11-30 nm) and their initial biological characterization. The inhibitors blocked PDK1/Akt signaling in tumor cells and inhibited the anchorage-dependent growth of a variety of tumor cell lines in culture or induced apoptosis. A number of cancer cell lines with elevated Akt activity were >30-fold more sensitive to growth inhibition by PDK1 inhibitors in soft agar than on tissue culture plastic, consistent with the cell survival function of the PDK1/Akt signaling pathway, which is particularly important for unattached cells. BX-320 inhibited the growth of LOX melanoma tumors in the lungs of nude mice after injection of tumor cells into the tail vein. The effect of BX-320 on cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo indicates that PDK1 inhibitors may have clinical utility as anticancer agents. PMID:15772071

  2. Protein-Protein Interaction for the De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arumugasamy, Karthiga; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The homology of the inhibitor binding site regions on the surface of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) makes actual CDK inhibitors unable to bind specifically to their molecular targets. Most of them are ATP competitive inhibitors with low specificity that also affect the phosphorylation mechanisms of other nontarget kinases giving rise to harmful side effects. So, the search of specific and potent inhibitors able to bind to the desired CDK target is still a pending issue. Structure based drug design minimized the erroneous binding and increased the affinity of the inhibitor interaction. In the case of CDKs their activation and regulation mechanisms mainly depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The design of drugs targeting these PPIs makes feasible and promising towards the discovery of new and specific CDK inhibitors. Development of peptide inhibitors for a target protein is an emerging approach in computer aided drug designing. This chapter describes in detail methodology for use of the VitAL-Viterbi algorithm for de novo peptide design of CDK2 inhibitors.

  3. The Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor Dacapo Promotes Genomic Stability during Premeiotic S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine

    2009-01-01

    The proper execution of premeiotic S phase is essential to both the maintenance of genomic integrity and accurate chromosome segregation during the meiotic divisions. However, the regulation of premeiotic S phase remains poorly defined in metazoa. Here, we identify the p21Cip1/p27Kip1/p57Kip2-like cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) Dacapo (Dap) as a key regulator of premeiotic S phase and genomic stability during Drosophila oogenesis. In dap−/− females, ovarian cysts enter the meiotic cycle with high levels of Cyclin E/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)2 activity and accumulate DNA damage during the premeiotic S phase. High Cyclin E/Cdk2 activity inhibits the accumulation of the replication-licensing factor Doubleparked/Cdt1 (Dup/Cdt1). Accordingly, we find that dap−/− ovarian cysts have low levels of Dup/Cdt1. Moreover, mutations in dup/cdt1 dominantly enhance the dap−/− DNA damage phenotype. Importantly, the DNA damage observed in dap−/− ovarian cysts is independent of the DNA double-strands breaks that initiate meiotic recombination. Together, our data suggest that the CKI Dap promotes the licensing of DNA replication origins for the premeiotic S phase by restricting Cdk activity in the early meiotic cycle. Finally, we report that dap−/− ovarian cysts frequently undergo an extramitotic division before meiotic entry, indicating that Dap influences the timing of the mitotic/meiotic transition. PMID:19211840

  4. Regulators of cyclin-dependent kinases are crucial for maintaining genome integrity in S phase

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Groth, Petra; Clancy, Trevor; Lees, Michael; Jørgensen, Mette; Helleday, Thomas; Syljuåsen, Randi G.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is of critical importance to cells. To identify key regulators of genomic integrity, we screened a human cell line with a kinome small interfering RNA library. WEE1, a major regulator of mitotic entry, and CHK1 were among the genes identified. Both kinases are important negative regulators of CDK1 and -2. Strikingly, WEE1 depletion rapidly induced DNA damage in S phase in newly replicated DNA, which was accompanied by a marked increase in single-stranded DNA. This DNA damage is dependent on CDK1 and -2 as well as the replication proteins MCM2 and CDT1 but not CDC25A. Conversely, DNA damage after CHK1 inhibition is highly dependent on CDC25A. Furthermore, the inferior proliferation of CHK1-depleted cells is improved substantially by codepletion of CDC25A. We conclude that the mitotic kinase WEE1 and CHK1 jointly maintain balanced cellular control of Cdk activity during normal DNA replication, which is crucial to prevent the generation of harmful DNA lesions during replication. PMID:20194642

  5. The calcium-dependent protein kinase CPK7 acts on root hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Guowei; Boudsocq, Marie; Hem, Sonia; Vialaret, Jérôme; Rossignol, Michel; Maurel, Christophe; Santoni, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    The hydraulic conductivity of plant roots (Lp(r)) is determined in large part by the activity of aquaporins. Mechanisms occurring at the post-translational level, in particular phosphorylation of aquaporins of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2 (PIP2) subfamily, are thought to be of critical importance for regulating root water transport. However, knowledge of protein kinases and phosphatases acting on aquaporin function is still scarce. In the present work, we investigated the Lp(r) of knockout Arabidopsis plants for four Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. cpk7 plants showed a 30% increase in Lp(r) because of a higher aquaporin activity. A quantitative proteomic analysis of wild-type and cpk7 plants revealed that PIP gene expression and PIP protein quantity were not correlated and that CPK7 has no effect on PIP2 phosphorylation. In contrast, CPK7 exerts a negative control on the cellular abundance of PIP1s, which likely accounts for the higher Lp(r) of cpk7. In addition, this study revealed that the cellular amount of a few additional proteins including membrane transporters is controlled by CPK7. The overall work provides evidence for CPK7-dependent stability of specific membrane proteins. PMID:25366820

  6. Endothelial cell substrate stiffness influences neutrophil transmigration via myosin light chain kinase-dependent cell contraction.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2011-08-11

    A vast amount of work has been dedicated to the effects of shear flow and cytokines on leukocyte transmigration. However, no studies have explored the effects of substrate stiffness on transmigration. Here, we investigated important aspects of endothelial cell contraction-mediated neutrophil transmigration using an in vitro model of the vascular endothelium. We modeled blood vessels of varying mechanical properties using fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide gels of varying physiologic stiffness, plated with human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers, which were activated with tumor necrosis factor-α. Interestingly, neutrophil transmigration increased with increasing substrate stiffness below the endothelium. HUVEC intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression, stiffness, cytoskeletal arrangement, morphology, and cell-substrate adhesion could not account for the dependence of transmigration on HUVEC substrate stiffness. We also explored the role of cell contraction and observed that large holes formed in endothelium on stiff substrates several minutes after neutrophil transmigration reached a maximum. Further, suppression of contraction through inhibition of myosin light chain kinase normalized the effects of substrate stiffness by reducing transmigration and eliminating hole formation in HUVECs on stiff substrates. These results provide strong evidence that neutrophil transmigration is regulated by myosin light chain kinase-mediated endothelial cell contraction and that this event depends on subendothelial cell matrix stiffness. PMID:21652678

  7. A Forward Genetic Screen Reveals that Calcium-dependent Protein Kinase 3 Regulates Egress in Toxoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Ehret, Emma; Butz, Heidi; Garbuz, Tamila; Oswald, Benji P.; Settles, Matt; Boothroyd, John; Arrizabalaga, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Egress from the host cell is a crucial and highly regulated step in the biology of the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Active egress depends on calcium fluxes and appears to be a crucial step in escaping the attack from the immune system and, potentially, in enabling the parasites to shuttle into appropriate cells for entry into the brain of the host. Previous genetic screens have yielded mutants defective in both ionophore-induced egress and ionophore-induced death. Using whole genome sequencing of one mutant and subsequent analysis of all mutants from these screens, we find that, remarkably, four independent mutants harbor a mis-sense mutation in the same gene, TgCDPK3, encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase. All four mutations are predicted to alter key regions of TgCDPK3 and this is confirmed by biochemical studies of recombinant forms of each. By complementation we confirm a crucial role for TgCDPK3 in the rapid induction of parasite egress and we establish that TgCDPK3 is critical for formation of latent stages in the brains of mice. Genetic knockout of TgCDPK3 confirms a crucial role for this kinase in parasite egress and a non-essential role for it in the lytic cycle. PMID:23209419

  8. Alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation is required for memory consolidation-specific transcription.

    PubMed

    von Hertzen, Laura S J; Giese, K Peter

    2005-08-22

    Autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II switches the kinase into an autonomous activity mode. This molecular switch is important for hippocampal long-term memory formation, which requires de novo gene transcription and protein synthesis. Here, we have studied whether auto-phosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is required for gene transcription induced in the hippocampus by contextual fear conditioning. We have shown that upregulation of a nonassociative transcript, the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase-1 messenger RNA, is normal in alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II autophosphorylation-deficient mutant mice, whereas upregulation of an associative transcript, the nerve growth factor-inducible gene B messenger RNA, is impaired. Thus, we suggest that autophosphorylation of the alpha-isoform of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II is a biochemical switch that regulates association-specific consolidation processes. PMID:16056150

  9. A single amino acid substitution makes ERK2 susceptible to pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors of p38 MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, T.; Coll, J. T.; Xie, X.; Ford, P. J.; Germann, U. A.; Porter, M. D.; Pazhanisamy, S.; Fleming, M. A.; Galullo, V.; Su, M. S.; Wilson, K. P.

    1998-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are serine/threonine kinases that mediate intracellular signal transduction pathways. Pyridinyl imidazole compounds block pro-inflammatory cytokine production and are specific p38 kinase inhibitors. ERK2 is related to p38 in sequence and structure, but is not inhibited by pyridinyl imidazole inhibitors. Crystal structures of two pyridinyl imidazoles complexed with p38 revealed these compounds bind in the ATP site. Mutagenesis data suggested a single residue difference at threonine 106 between p38 and other MAP kinases is sufficient to confer selectivity of pyridinyl imidazoles. We have changed the equivalent residue in human ERK2, Q105, into threonine and alanine, and substituted four additional ATP binding site residues. The single residue change Q105A in ERK2 enhances the binding of SB202190 at least 25,000-fold compared to wild-type ERK2. We report enzymatic analyses of wild-type ERK2 and the mutant proteins, and the crystal structure of a pyridinyl imidazole, SB203580, bound to an ERK2 pentamutant, I103L, Q105T, D106H, E109G. T110A. These ATP binding site substitutions induce low nanomolar sensitivity to pyridinyl imidazoles. Furthermore, we identified 5-iodotubercidin as a potent ERK2 inhibitor, which may help reveal the role of ERK2 in cell proliferation. PMID:9827991

  10. A fungal cell wall integrity-associated MAP kinase cascade in Coniothyrium minitans is required for conidiation and mycoparasitism.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanyun; Gong, Xiaoyan; Hamid, Mahammad Imran; Fu, Yanping; Jiatao, Xie; Cheng, Jiasen; Li, Guoqing; Jiang, Daohong

    2012-05-01

    Coniothyrium minitans is an important biocontrol agent against Sclerotinia diseases. Previously, a conidiation-deficient mutant ZS-1T1000 was screened out from a T-DNA insertional library of C. minitans. CmBCK1, encoding MAP kinase kinase kinase and homologous to BCK1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was disrupted by T-DNA insertion in this mutant. Targeted disruption of CmBCK1 led to the mutants undergoing autolysis and displaying hypersensitivity to the cell wall-degrading enzymes. The △CmBCK1 mutants lost the ability to produce pycnidia and conidia compared to the wild-type strain ZS-1. △CmBCK1 mutants could grow on the surface of sclerotia of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum but not form conidia, which resulted in much lower ability to reduce the viability of sclerotia of S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, CmSlt2, a homolog of Slt2 encoding cell wall integrity-related MAP kinase and up-regulated by BCK1 in S. cerevisiae, was identified and targeted disrupted. The △CmSlt2 mutants had a similar phenotype to the △CmBCK1 mutants. The △CmSlt2 mutants also had autolytic aerial hyphae, hypersensitivity to cell wall-degrading enzymes, lack of conidiation and reduction of sclerotial mycoparasitism. Taken together, our results suggest that CmBCK1 and CmSlt2 are involved in conidiation and the hyperparasitic activities of C. minitans. PMID:22426009

  11. Intestinal cell kinase, a MAP kinase-related kinase, regulates proliferation and G1 cell cycle progression of intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungeun; Vidrich, Alda; Sturgill, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal cell kinase (ICK), originally cloned from the intestine and expressed in the intestinal crypt epithelium, is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that is similar to mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the catalytic domain and requires dual phosphorylation within a MAPK-like TDY motif for full activation. Despite these similarities to MAPKs, the biological functions of ICK remain unknown. In this study, we report that suppression of ICK expression in cultured intestinal epithelial cells by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference significantly impaired cellular proliferation and induced features of gene expression characteristic of colonic or enterocytic differentiation. Downregulation of ICK altered expression of cell cycle regulators (cyclin D1, c-Myc, and p21Cip1/WAF1) of G1-S transition, consistent with the G1 cell cycle delay induced by ICK shRNA. ICK deficiency also led to a significant decrease in the expression and/or activity of p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), concomitant with reduced expression of their upstream regulators, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulatory associated protein of mTOR (Raptor). Furthermore, ICK interacts with the mTOR/Raptor complex in vivo and phosphorylates Raptor in vitro. These results suggest that disrupting ICK function may downregulate protein translation of specific downstream targets of eIF4E and S6K1 such as cyclin D1 and c-Myc through the mTOR/Raptor signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings demonstrate an important role for ICK in proliferation and differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:19696144

  12. N-cadherin mediated distribution of beta-catenin alters MAP kinase and BMP-2 signaling on chondrogenesis-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Modarresi, Rozbeh; Lafond, Toulouse; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Danielson, Keith G; Tuan, Rocky S; Seghatoleslami, M Reza

    2005-05-01

    We have examined the effect of calcium-dependent adhesion, mediated by N-cadherin, on cell signaling during chondrogenesis of multipotential embryonic mouse C3H10T1/2 cells. The activity of chondrogenic genes, type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 were examined in monolayer (non-chondrogenic), and micromass (chondrogenic) cultures of parental C3H10T1/2 cells and altered C3H10T1/2 cell lines that express a dominant negative form of N-cadherin (delta390-T1/2) or overexpress normal N-cadherin (MNCD2-T1/2). Our findings show that missexpression or inhibition of N-cadherin in C3H10T1/2 cells results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II. We have also analyzed activity of the serum response factor (SRF), a nuclear target of MAP kinase signaling implicated in chondrogenesis. In semi-confluent monolayer cultures (minimum cell-cell contact) of C3H10T1/2, MNCD2-T1/2, or delta390-T1/2 cells, there was no significant change in the pattern of MAP kinase or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulation of SRF. However, in micromass cultures, the effect of MAP kinase and BMP-2 on SRF activity was proportional to the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a Wnt stabilized cytoplasmic factor that can associate with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF) to serve as a transcription factor. Our findings suggest that the extent of adherens junction formation mediated by N-cadherin can modulate the potential Wnt-induced nuclear activity of beta-catenin. PMID:15723280

  13. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  14. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12. PMID:25356841

  15. The Transcription Factor Ste12 Mediates the Regulatory Role of the Tmk1 MAP Kinase in Mycoparasitism and Vegetative Hyphal Fusion in the Filamentous Fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Sabine; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12. PMID:25356841

  16. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase. PMID:26867010

  17. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase.

  18. Factor Xa Inhibitor Suppresses the Release of Phosphorylated HSP27 from Collagen-Stimulated Human Platelets: Inhibition of HSP27 Phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kito, Yuko; Enomoto, Yukiko; Iida, Hiroki; Ogura, Shinji; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kozawa, Osamu; Iwama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of factor Xa (FXa) are widely recognized as useful therapeutic tools for stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation or venous thrombosis. Thrombin, which is rapidly generated from pro-thrombin through the activation of factor X to FXa, acts as a potent activator of human platelets. Thus, the reduction of thrombin generation by FXa inhibitor eventually causes a suppressive effect on platelet aggregation. However, little is known whether FXa inhibitors directly affect the function of human platelets. We have previously reported that collagen induces the phosphorylation of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), a low-molecular weight heat shock protein via Rac-dependent activation of p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in human platelets, eventually resulting in the release of HSP27. In the present study, we investigated the direct effect of FXa inhibitor on the collagen-induced human platelet activation. Rivaroxaban as well as edoxaban significantly reduced the collagen-induced phosphorylation of both HSP27 and p44/p42 MAP kinase without affecting the platelet aggregation. Rivaroxaban significantly inhibited the release of phosphorylated HSP27 from collagen-stimulated platelets but not the secretion of platelet derived growth factor-AB. In patients administrated with rivaroxaban, the collagen-induced levels of phosphorylated HSP27 were markedly diminished after 2 days of administration, which failed to affect the platelet aggregation. These results strongly suggest that FXa inhibitor reduces the collagen-stimulated release of phosphorylated HSP27 from human platelets due to the inhibition of HSP27 phosphorylation via p44/p42 MAP kinase. PMID:26867010

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Identification of a regulatory autophosphorylation site adjacent to the inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Schworer, C M; Colbran, R J; Keefer, J R; Soderling, T R

    1988-09-25

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) autophosphorylated under limiting conditions (7 microM [gamma-32P]ATP, 500 microM magnesium acetate, 4 degrees C) was analyzed by CNBr cleavage and peptide mapping to determine the site of autophosphorylation that brings about transition of the kinase to the Ca2+-independent form. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (C3) revealed one major CN-Br 32P-peptide (CB1) that eluted at about 6% propanol. This peptide contained [32P]threonine, but almost no [32P]serine, and migrated as a single band (Mr = 3000-3500) in polyacrylamide gels run in the presence of urea and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The properties of CB1 were compared to the properties of a 26-residue synthetic peptide containing the CaM-binding and inhibitory domains as well as a consensus phosphorylation sequence (-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr-) of rat brain CaM-kinase II (residues 282-307 and 283-308 of the alpha and beta subunits, respectively). CB1 and the synthetic peptide comigrated in urea/sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, co-eluted from reverse phase HPLC (C3 and C18) and from Sephadex G-50, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-binding properties. When the two peptides were subjected to automated Edman sequence analysis, both exhibited a burst of 32P release at cycle 5, which is consistent with the expected amino-terminal sequence of the two peptides, i.e. His-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr(PO4)-. These findings indicate that autophosphorylation of Thr286 (alpha subunit) and Thr287 (beta subunit) is responsible for transition of CaM-kinase II to the Ca2+-independent form. PMID:3417668

  20. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-11-26

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies.

  1. Mycosporine-Like Amino Acids Promote Wound Healing through Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAP Kinases) Signaling Pathway in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Hee; Yang, Dong Joo; Kulkarni, Atul; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) are secondary metabolites found in diverse marine, freshwater, and terrestrial organisms. Evidence suggests that MAAs have several beneficial effects on skin homeostasis such as protection against UV radiation and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, MAAs are also involved in the modulation of skin fibroblasts proliferation. However, the regulatory function of MAAs on wound repair in human skin is not yet clearly elucidated. To investigate the roles of MAAs on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes, three MAAs, Shinorine (SH), Mycosporine-glycine (M-Gly), and Porphyra (P334) were purified from Chlamydomonas hedlyei and Porphyra yezoensis. We found that SH, M-Gly, and P334 have significant effects on the wound healing process in human keratinocytes and these effects were mediated by activation of focal adhesion kinases (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). These results suggest that MAAs accelerate wound repair by activating the FAK-MAPK signaling pathways. This study also indicates that MAAs can act as a new wound healing agent and further suggests that MAAs might be a novel biomaterial for wound healing therapies. PMID:26703626

  2. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans.

  3. Context Specificity of Stress-activated Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Signaling: The Story as Told by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Andrusiak, Matthew G; Jin, Yishi

    2016-04-01

    Stress-associated p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades trigger specific cellular responses and are involved in multiple disease states. At the root of MAP kinase signaling complexity is the differential use of common components on a context-specific basis. The roundwormCaenorhabditis eleganswas developed as a system to study genes required for development and nervous system function. The powerful genetics ofC. elegansin combination with molecular and cellular dissections has led to a greater understanding of how p38 and JNK signaling affects many biological processes under normal and stress conditions. This review focuses on the studies revealing context specificity of different stress-activated MAPK components inC. elegans. PMID:26907690

  4. The role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling components and the Ste12 transcription factor in germination and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Schamber, Astrid; Leroch, Michaela; Diwo, Janine; Mendgen, Kurt; Hahn, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In all fungi studied so far, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades serve as central signalling complexes that are involved in various aspects of growth, stress response and infection. In this work, putative components of the yeast Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade and the putative downstream transcription factor Ste12 were analysed in the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion mutants of the MAP triple kinase Ste11, the MAP kinase kinase Ste7 and the MAP kinase adaptor protein Ste50 all resulted in phenotypes similar to that of the previously described BMP1 MAP kinase mutant, namely defects in germination, delayed vegetative growth, reduced size of conidia, lack of sclerotia formation and loss of pathogenicity. Mutants lacking Ste12 showed normal germination, but delayed infection as a result of low penetration efficiency. Two differently spliced ste12 transcripts were detected, and both were able to complement the ste12 mutant, except for a defect in sclerotium formation, which was only corrected by the full-sized transcript. Overexpression of the smaller ste12 transcript resulted in delayed germination and strongly reduced infection. Bc-Gas2, a homologue of Magnaporthe grisea Gas2 that is required for appressorial function, was found to be non-essential for growth and infection, but its expression was under the control of both Bmp1 and Ste12. In summary, the role and regulatory connections of the Fus3/Kss1-type MAP kinase cascade in B. cinerea revealed both common and unique properties compared with those of other plant pathogenic fungi, and provide evidence for a regulatory link between the BMP1 MAP kinase cascade and Ste12. PMID:20078780

  5. NSun2 Promotes Cell Growth via Elevating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 Translation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junyue; Yi, Jie; Cai, Xiaoyu; Tang, Hao; Liu, Zhenyun; Zhang, Xiaotian; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Jiang, Bin; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The tRNA methytransferase NSun2 promotes cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Here, we report that NSun2 regulates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) expression in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Knockdown of NSun2 decreased the CDK1 protein level, while overexpression of NSun2 elevated it without altering CDK1 mRNA levels. Further studies revealed that NSun2 methylated CDK1 mRNA in vitro and in cells and that methylation by NSun2 enhanced CDK1 translation. Importantly, NSun2-mediated regulation of CDK1 expression had an impact on the cell division cycle. These results provide new insight into the regulation of CDK1 during the cell division cycle. PMID:26391950

  6. cGMP-dependent protein kinase: linking foraging to energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kaun, Karla R; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2009-01-01

    Successful foraging is necessary for procurement of nutritional resources essential for an animal's survival. Maintenance of foraging and food acquisition is dependent on the ability to balance food intake and energy expenditure. This review examines the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) as a regulator of foraging behaviour, food acquisition, and energy balance. The role of PKG in food-related behaviours is highly conserved among worms, flies, bees, ants, and mammals. A growing body of literature suggests that PKG plays an integral role in the component behaviours and physiologies underlying foraging behaviour. These include energy acquisition, nutrient absorption, nutrient allocation, nutrient storage, and energy use. New evidence suggests that PKG mediates both neural and physiological mechanisms underlying these processes. This review illustrates how investigating the role of PKG in energy homeostasis in a diversity of organisms can offer a broad perspective on the mechanisms mediating energy balance.

  7. Receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase MARIS functions downstream of CrRLK1L-dependent signaling during tip growth

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Franck, Christina Maria; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Growing plant cells need to rigorously coordinate external signals with internal processes. For instance, the maintenance of cell wall (CW) integrity requires the coordination of CW sensing with CW remodeling and biosynthesis to avoid growth arrest or integrity loss. Despite the involvement of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) of the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L) subfamily and the reactive oxygen species-producing NADPH oxidases, it remains largely unknown how this coordination is achieved. ANXUR1 (ANX1) and ANX2, two redundant members of the CrRLK1L subfamily, are required for tip growth of the pollen tube (PT), and their closest homolog, FERONIA, controls root-hair tip growth. Previously, we showed that ANX1 overexpression mildly inhibits PT growth by oversecretion of CW material, whereas pollen tubes of anx1 anx2 double mutants burst spontaneously after germination. Here, we report the identification of suppressor mutants with improved fertility caused by the rescue of anx1 anx2 pollen tube bursting. Mapping of one these mutants revealed an R240C nonsynonymous substitution in the activation loop of a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase (RLCK), which we named MARIS (MRI). We show that MRI is a plasma membrane-localized member of the RLCK-VIII subfamily and is preferentially expressed in both PTs and root hairs. Interestingly, mri-knockout mutants display spontaneous PT and root-hair bursting. Moreover, expression of the MRIR240C mutant, but not its wild-type form, partially rescues the bursting phenotypes of anx1 anx2 PTs and fer root hairs but strongly inhibits wild-type tip growth. Thus, our findings identify a novel positive component of the CrRLK1L-dependent signaling cascade that coordinates CW integrity and tip growth. PMID:26378127

  8. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle

    PubMed Central

    Koltes, James E.; Mishra, Bishnu P.; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S.; Totir, Liviu R.; Fernando, Rohan L.; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle. PMID:19887637

  9. PRO40 is a scaffold protein of the cell wall integrity pathway, linking the MAP kinase module to the upstream activator protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Ines; Steffens, Eva Katharina; Schnaß, Nicole; Fränzel, Benjamin; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A; Kück, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are crucial signaling instruments in eukaryotes. Most ascomycetes possess three MAPK modules that are involved in key developmental processes like sexual propagation or pathogenesis. However, the regulation of these modules by adapters or scaffolds is largely unknown. Here, we studied the function of the cell wall integrity (CWI) MAPK module in the model fungus Sordaria macrospora. Using a forward genetic approach, we found that sterile mutant pro30 has a mutated mik1 gene that encodes the MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) of the proposed CWI pathway. We generated single deletion mutants lacking MAPKKK MIK1, MAPK kinase (MAPKK) MEK1, or MAPK MAK1 and found them all to be sterile, cell fusion-deficient and highly impaired in vegetative growth and cell wall stress response. By searching for MEK1 interaction partners via tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified previously characterized developmental protein PRO40 as a MEK1 interaction partner. Although fungal PRO40 homologs have been implicated in diverse developmental processes, their molecular function is currently unknown. Extensive affinity purification, mass spectrometry, and yeast two-hybrid experiments showed that PRO40 is able to bind MIK1, MEK1, and the upstream activator protein kinase C (PKC1). We further found that the PRO40 N-terminal disordered region and the central region encompassing a WW interaction domain are sufficient to govern interaction with MEK1. Most importantly, time- and stress-dependent phosphorylation studies showed that PRO40 is required for MAK1 activity. The sum of our results implies that PRO40 is a scaffold protein for the CWI pathway, linking the MAPK module to the upstream activator PKC1. Our data provide important insights into the mechanistic role of a protein that has been implicated in sexual and asexual development, cell fusion, symbiosis, and pathogenicity in different fungal systems.

  10. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates apoptosis by stabilizing the BH3-only protein Bim.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; Weston, Ross; Anderton, Holly; Ninnis, Robert; Goel, Pranay; Coley, Andrew; Huang, David C S; Wu, Li; Strasser, Andreas; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2011-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl2 homology domain 3(BH3)-only protein Bim is controlled by stringent post-translational regulation, predominantly through alterations in phosphorylation status. To identify new kinases involved in its regulation, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using a non-spliceable variant of the predominant isoform--Bim(EL)--as the bait and identified the regulatory subunit of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A--PRKAR1A--as an interacting partner. We also show that protein kinase A (PKA) is a Bim(EL) isoform-specific kinase that promotes its stabilization. Inhibition of PKA or mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site within Bim(EL) resulted in its accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation. These results might have implications for human diseases that are characterized by abnormally increased PKA activity, such as the Carney complex and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:21151042

  11. Fluoride Induces a Volume Reduction in CA1 Hippocampal Slices Via MAP Kinase Pathway Through Volume Regulated Anion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaekwang; Han, Young-Eun; Favorov, Oleg; Tommerdahl, Mark; Whitsel, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell volume is an important aspect of cellular homeostasis during neural activity. This volume regulation is thought to be mediated by activation of specific transporters, aquaporin, and volume regulated anion channels (VRAC). In cultured astrocytes, it was reported that swelling-induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation is required to open VRAC, which are thought to be important in regulatory volume decrease and in the response of CNS to trauma and excitotoxicity. It has been also described that sodium fluoride (NaF), a recognized G-protein activator and protein phosphatase inhibitor, leads to a significant MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. However, NaF's effect in volume regulation in the brain is not known yet. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NaF-induced volume change in rat and mouse hippocampal slices using intrinsic optical signal (IOS) recording, in which we measured relative changes in intracellular and extracellular volume as changes in light transmittance through brain slices. We found that NaF (1~5 mM) application induced a reduction in light transmittance (decreased volume) in CA1 hippocampus, which was completely reversed by MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 (10 µM). We also observed that NaF-induced volume reduction was blocked by anion channel blockers, suggesting that NaF-induced volume reduction could be mediated by VRAC. Overall, our results propose a novel molecular mechanism of NaF-induced volume reduction via MAP kinase signaling pathway by activation of VRAC. PMID:27122993

  12. Fluoride Induces a Volume Reduction in CA1 Hippocampal Slices Via MAP Kinase Pathway Through Volume Regulated Anion Channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaekwang; Han, Young-Eun; Favorov, Oleg; Tommerdahl, Mark; Whitsel, Barry; Lee, C Justin

    2016-04-01

    Regulation of cell volume is an important aspect of cellular homeostasis during neural activity. This volume regulation is thought to be mediated by activation of specific transporters, aquaporin, and volume regulated anion channels (VRAC). In cultured astrocytes, it was reported that swelling-induced mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation is required to open VRAC, which are thought to be important in regulatory volume decrease and in the response of CNS to trauma and excitotoxicity. It has been also described that sodium fluoride (NaF), a recognized G-protein activator and protein phosphatase inhibitor, leads to a significant MAP kinase activation in endothelial cells. However, NaF's effect in volume regulation in the brain is not known yet. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NaF-induced volume change in rat and mouse hippocampal slices using intrinsic optical signal (IOS) recording, in which we measured relative changes in intracellular and extracellular volume as changes in light transmittance through brain slices. We found that NaF (1~5 mM) application induced a reduction in light transmittance (decreased volume) in CA1 hippocampus, which was completely reversed by MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 (10 µM). We also observed that NaF-induced volume reduction was blocked by anion channel blockers, suggesting that NaF-induced volume reduction could be mediated by VRAC. Overall, our results propose a novel molecular mechanism of NaF-induced volume reduction via MAP kinase signaling pathway by activation of VRAC. PMID:27122993

  13. Genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis protein kinases MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 indicates roles in cell expansion and embryo development.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongsar, Suraphon; Strohm, Allison K; Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode protein kinases related to cdc7p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that the map3kε1;map3kε2 double-mutant combination causes pollen lethality. In this study, we have used an ethanol-inducible promoter construct to rescue this lethal phenotype and create map3kε1(-/-);map3kε2(-/-) double-mutant plants in order to examine the function of these genes in the sporophyte. These rescued double-mutant plants carry a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-MAP3Kε1 transgene under the control of the alcohol-inducible AlcA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. The double-mutant plants were significantly smaller and had shorter roots than wild-type when grown in the absence of ethanol treatment. Microscopic analysis indicated that cell elongation was reduced in the roots of the double-mutant plants and cell expansion was reduced in rosette leaves. Treatment with ethanol to induce expression of YFP-MAP3Kε1 largely rescued the leaf phenotypes. The double-mutant combination also caused embryos to arrest in the early stages of development. Through the use of YFP reporter constructs we determined that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are expressed during embryo development, and also in root tissue. Our results indicate that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 have roles outside of pollen development and that these genes affect several aspects of sporophyte development.

  14. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala; Glas, Rickard

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  15. The involvement of MAP kinases JNK and p38 in photodynamic injury of crayfish neurons and glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petin, Y. O.; Bibov, M. Y.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2007-05-01

    The role of JNK and p38 MAP kinases in functional inactivation and necrosis of mechanoreceptor neurons as well as necrosis, apoptosis and proliferation of satellite glial cells induced by photodynamic treatment (10 -7 M Photosens, 30 min incubation, 670 nm laser irradiation at 0.4 W/cm2) in the isolated crayfish stretch receptor was studied using specific inhibitors SP600125 and SB202190, respectively. SP600125 enhanced PDT-induced apoptosis of photosensitized glial cells but did not influence PDT-induced changes in neuronal activity, density of glial nuclei around neuron body, and necrosis of receptor neurons and glial cells. SB202190 did not influence neuron activity and survival as well but reduced PDT-induced necrosis but not apoptosis of glial cells. Therefore, both MAP kinases influenced glial cells but not neurons. JNK protected glial cells from PDT-induced apoptosis but did not influence necrosis and proliferation of these cells. In contrast, p38 did not influence apoptosis but contributed into PDT-induced necrosis of glial cells and PDT-induced gliosis. These MAP kinase inhibitors may be used for modulation of photodynamic therapy of brain tumors.

  16. The putative lipid transporter, Arv1, is required for activating pheromone-induced MAP kinase signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Villasmil, Michelle L; Ansbach, Alison; Nickels, Joseph T

    2011-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells respond to extrinsic mating signals by forming polarized projections (shmoos), which are necessary for conjugation. We have examined the role of the putative lipid transporter, Arv1, in yeast mating, particularly the conserved Arv1 homology domain (AHD) within Arv1 and its role in this process. Previously it was shown that arv1 cells harbor defects in sphingolipid and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosyntheses and may harbor sterol trafficking defects. Here we demonstrate that arv1 cells are mating defective and cannot form shmoos. They lack the ability to initiate pheromone-induced G1 cell cycle arrest, due to failure to polarize PI(4,5)P(2) and the Ste5 scaffold, which results in weakened MAP kinase signaling activity. A mutant Ste5, Ste5(Q59L), which binds more tightly to the plasma membrane, suppresses the MAP kinase signaling defects of arv1 cells. Filipin staining shows arv1 cells contain altered levels of various sterol microdomains that persist throughout the mating process. Data suggest that the sterol trafficking defects of arv1 affect PI(4,5)P(2) polarization, which causes a mislocalization of Ste5, resulting in defective MAP kinase signaling and the inability to mate. Importantly, our studies show that the AHD of Arv1 is required for mating, pheromone-induced G1 cell cycle arrest, and for sterol trafficking.

  17. The Putative Lipid Transporter, Arv1, Is Required for Activating Pheromone-Induced MAP Kinase Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Villasmil, Michelle L.; Ansbach, Alison; Nickels, Joseph T.

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells respond to extrinsic mating signals by forming polarized projections (shmoos), which are necessary for conjugation. We have examined the role of the putative lipid transporter, Arv1, in yeast mating, particularly the conserved Arv1 homology domain (AHD) within Arv1 and its role in this process. Previously it was shown that arv1 cells harbor defects in sphingolipid and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosyntheses and may harbor sterol trafficking defects. Here we demonstrate that arv1 cells are mating defective and cannot form shmoos. They lack the ability to initiate pheromone-induced G1 cell cycle arrest, due to failure to polarize PI(4,5)P2 and the Ste5 scaffold, which results in weakened MAP kinase signaling activity. A mutant Ste5, Ste5Q59L, which binds more tightly to the plasma membrane, suppresses the MAP kinase signaling defects of arv1 cells. Filipin staining shows arv1 cells contain altered levels of various sterol microdomains that persist throughout the mating process. Data suggest that the sterol trafficking defects of arv1 affect PI(4,5)P2 polarization, which causes a mislocalization of Ste5, resulting in defective MAP kinase signaling and the inability to mate. Importantly, our studies show that the AHD of Arv1 is required for mating, pheromone-induced G1 cell cycle arrest, and for sterol trafficking. PMID:21098723

  18. Carbon Source-dependent assembly of the Snf1p kinase complex in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Corvey, Carsten; Koetter, Peter; Beckhaus, Tobias; Hack, Jeremy; Hofmann, Sandra; Hampel, Martin; Stein, Torsten; Karas, Michael; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2005-07-01

    The Snf1p/AMP-activated kinases are involved in transcriptional, metabolic, and developmental regulation in response to stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Snf1p (Cat1p) is one of the key regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, and cat1 (snf1) mutants fail to grow with non-fermentable carbon sources. In Candida albicans, Snf1p is an essential protein and cells depend on a functional Snf1 kinase even with glucose as carbon source. We investigated the CaSnf1p complex after tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometric analysis and show that the complex composition changes with the carbon source provided. Three subunits were identified, one of which was named CaSnf4p because of its homology to the ScSnf4 protein and the respective CaSNF4 gene could complement a S. cerevisiae snf4 mutant. The other two proteins revealed similarities to the S. cerevisiae kinase beta subunits ScGal83p, ScSip2p, and ScSip1p. Both genes complemented the scaffold function in a S. cerevisiae gal83,sip1,sip2 triple deletion mutant and were named according to their scaffold function as CaKIS1p and CaKIS2p. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization peptide mass fingerprint analysis indicated that CaKis2p is N-terminal myristoylated and the incorporation of CaKis2p in the Snf1p complex was reduced when compared with cells grown with glucose as a carbon source. To verify the different complex assemblies, a stable isotope labeling technique (iTraqtrade mark) was employed, confirming a 3-fold decrease of CaKis2p with ethanol. Yeast two-hybrid analysis confirmed the interaction partners, and these results showed an activator domain for the CaKis2 protein that has not been reported for S. cerevisiae scaffold subunits.

  19. Molecular characterization and analysis of a novel calcium-dependent protein kinase from Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Han, H Y; Zhu, S H; Jiang, L L; Li, Y; Dong, H; Zhao, Q P; Kong, C L; Huang, B

    2013-05-01

    The calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are unique enzymes found only in plants, green algae, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites. In this study, a novel CDPK gene of Eimeria tenella, designed EtCDPK3, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) based on the expressed sequence tag (EST). The entire cDNA of EtCDPK3 contained 1637 nucleotides encoding 433 amino acids and the deduced EtCDPK3 protein had canonical characteristic domains identified in other CDPKs, including a well-conserved amino-terminal kinase domain and a carboxy-terminal calmodulin-like structure with 4 EF-hand motifs for calcium binding. The expression profiles of the EtCDPK3 gene in different development stages were investigated by real-time quantitative PCR. Messenger RNA levels from the EtCDPK3 gene were higher in sporozoites than in other stages (unsporulated oocysts, sporulated oocysts and merozoites). Western blot analysis showed that rabbit antiserum against recombinant EtCDPK3 could recognize a native 49 kDa protein band of parasite. Indirect immunofluorescent antibody labelling revealed dispersed localization of EtCDPK3 during the first schizogony and intense specific staining. EtCDPK3 was located at the apical end of the sporozoites after early infection of DF-1 cells and the protein was highly expressed. Inhibition of EtCDPK3 function using specific antibodies reduced the ability of E. tenella to invade host cells. These results suggested that EtCDPK3 may be involved in invasion and survival of the parasite intracellular stages of E. tenella. Because this kinase family is absent from hosts, it represents a valid target that could be exploited for chemotherapy against Eimeria spp. PMID:23369433

  20. Unscheduled Akt-Triggered Activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 as a Key Effector Mechanism of Apoptin's Anticancer Toxicity▿

    PubMed Central

    Maddika, Subbareddy; Panigrahi, Soumya; Wiechec, Emilia; Wesselborg, Sebastian; Fischer, Ute; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Los, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Apoptin, a protein from the chicken anemia virus, has attracted attention because it specifically kills tumor cells while leaving normal cells unharmed. The reason for this tumor selectivity is unclear and depends on subcellular localization, as apoptin resides in the cytoplasm of normal cells but in the nuclei of transformed cells. It was shown that nuclear localization and tumor-specific killing crucially require apoptin's phosphorylation by an as yet unknown kinase. Here we elucidate the pathway of apoptin-induced apoptosis and show that it essentially depends on abnormal phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)/Akt activation, resulting in the activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2. Inhibitors as well as dominant-negative mutants of PI3-kinase and Akt not only inhibited CDK2 activation but also protected cells from apoptin-induced cell death. Akt activated CDK2 by direct phosphorylation as well as by the phosphorylation-induced degradation of the inhibitor p27Kip1. Importantly, we also identified CDK2 as the principal kinase that phosphorylates apoptin and is crucially required for apoptin-induced cell death. Immortalized CDK2-deficient fibroblasts and CDK2 knockdown cells were markedly protected against apoptin. Thus, our results not only decipher the pathway of apoptin-induced cell death but also provide mechanistic insights for the selective killing of tumor cells. PMID:19103742

  1. Kinase-Dependent and -Independent Roles of EphA2 in the Regulation of Prostate Cancer Invasion and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Maria Letizia; Parri, Matteo; Angelucci, Adriano; Onnis, Barbara; Bianchini, Francesca; Giannoni, Elisa; Raugei, Giovanni; Calorini, Lido; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna; Bologna, Mauro; Chiarugi, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Ligand-activated Eph tyrosine kinases regulate cellular repulsion, morphology, adhesion, and motility. EphA2 kinase is frequently up-regulated in several different types of cancers, including prostate, breast, colon, and lung carcinomas, as well as in melanoma. The existing data do not clarify whether EphA2 receptor phosphorylation or its simple overexpression, which likely leads to Eph kinase-independent responses, plays a role in the progression of malignant prostate cancer. In this study, we address the role of EphA2 tyrosine phosphorylation in prostate carcinoma cell adhesion, motility, invasion, and formation of metastases. Tumor cells expressing kinase-deficient EphA2 mutants, as well as an EphA2 variant lacking the cytoplasmic domain, are defective in ephrinA1-mediated cell rounding, retraction fiber formation, de-adhesion from the extracellular matrix, RhoA and Rac1 GTPase regulation, three-dimensional matrix invasion, and in vivo metastasis, suggesting a key role for EphA2 kinase activity. Nevertheless, EphA2 regulation of cell motility and invasion, as well as the formation of bone and visceral tumor colonies, reveals a component of both EphA2 kinase-dependent and -independent features. These results uncover a differential requirement for EphA2 kinase activity in the regulation of prostate carcinoma metastasis outcome, suggesting that although the kinase activity of EphA2 is required for the regulation of cell adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangement, some distinct kinase-dependent and -independent pathways likely cooperate to drive cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis outcome. PMID:19264906

  2. Myosin light chain kinase controls voltage-dependent calcium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, A; Schakman, O; Yerna, X; Dessy, C; Morel, N

    2014-07-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent kinase myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is the activator of smooth muscle contraction. In addition, it has been reported to be involved in Ca(2+) channel regulation in cultured cells, and we previously showed that the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 decreases arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced Ca(2+) influx in rat aorta. This study was designed to investigate whether MLCK is involved in Ca(2+) regulation in resistance artery smooth muscle cell, which plays a major role in the control of blood pressure. As ML compounds were shown to have off-target effects, MLCK was downregulated by transfection with a small interfering RNA targeting MLCK (MLCK-siRNA) in rat small resistance mesenteric artery (RMA) and in the rat embryonic aortic cell line A7r5. Noradrenaline-induced contraction and Ca(2+) signal were significantly depressed in MLCK-siRNA compared to scramble-siRNA-transfected RMA. Contraction and Ca(2+) signal induced by high KCl and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were also significantly decreased in MLCK-siRNA-transfected RMA, suggesting that MLCK depletion modifies voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. KCl- and AVP-induced Ca(2+) signals and voltage-activated Ca(2+) current were decreased in MLCK-depleted A7r5 cells. Eventually, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that in A7r5, MLCK controlled mRNA expression of CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.1 (T-type) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Our results suggest that MLCK controls the transcription of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:24162233

  3. Pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructo-1-kinase complements fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase but not phosphofructokinase deficiency in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kemp, R G; Tripathi, R L

    1993-09-01

    The gene from Propionibacterium freudenreichii for PPi-dependent phosphofructo-1-kinase, an enzyme that is found in some bacteria, in a number of anaerobic protists, and in plants, complements the absence of fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase in Escherichia coli but does not complement the deficiency of the ATP-dependent phosphofructokinase.

  4. SPLICE VARIANT SPECIFIC UPREGULATIONOF CA+2/CALMODULIN DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE 1G BY PYRETHROID INSECTICIDES IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroid insecticides induce neurotoxicity in mammals by interfering with ion channel function in excitable neuronal membranes. Previous work demonstrated dose-dependent increases in expression of Ca+2/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (Camk1g) mRNA following acute deltameth...

  5. Role played by Disabled-2 in albumin induced MAP Kinase signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Diwakar, Ramaswamy Pearson, Alexander L.; Colville-Nash, Paul; Baines, Deborah L.; Dockrell, Mark E.C.

    2008-02-15

    Albumin has been shown to activate the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in proximal tubular cells (PTECs) of the kidney. Megalin, the putative receptor for albumin has potential signalling properties. However, the mechanisms by which megalin signals are unclear. The adaptor phosphoprotein Disabled-2 (Dab2) is known to interact with the cytoplasmic tail of megalin and may be involved in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling. In this study, we investigated the role of Dab2 in albumin-mediated MAPK signalling and further studied the role of Dab2 in albumin-induced TGF{beta}-1 secretion, a MAPK dependent event. We used RNA interference to knockdown Dab2 protein abundance in HKC-8 cells a model of human PTECs. Albumin activated ERK1,2 and Elk-1 in a MEK-1 dependent manner and resulted in secretion of TGF{beta}-1. In the absence of albumin, knockdown of Dab2 resulted in a trend towards increase in pERK1,2 consistent with its putative role as an inhibitor of cell proliferation. However albumin-induced ERK1,2 activation was completely abolished by Dab2 knockdown. Dab2 knockdown did not however result in inhibition of albumin-induced TGF{beta}-1 secretion. These results suggest that Dab2 is a ligand dependent bi-directional regulator of ERK1,2 activity by demonstrating that in addition to its more traditional role as an inhibitor of ERK1,2 it may also activate ERK1,2.

  6. Protein Kinase A Opposes the Phosphorylation-dependent Recruitment of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β to A-kinase Anchoring Protein 220.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Tunquist, Brian J; Langeberg, Lorene K; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    The proximity of an enzyme to its substrate can influence rate and magnitude of catalysis. A-kinase anchoring protein 220 (AKAP220) is a multivalent anchoring protein that can sequester a variety of signal transduction enzymes. These include protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Using a combination of molecular and cellular approaches we show that GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr-1132 on AKAP220 initiates recruitment of this kinase into the enzyme scaffold. We also find that AKAP220 anchors GSK3β and its substrate β-catenin in membrane ruffles. Interestingly, GSK3β can be released from the multienzyme complex in response to PKA phosphorylation on serine 9, which suppresses GSK3β activity. The signaling scaffold may enhance this regulatory mechanism, as AKAP220 has the capacity to anchor two PKA holoenzymes. Site 1 on AKAP220 (residues 610-623) preferentially interacts with RII, whereas site 2 (residues 1633-1646) exhibits a dual specificity for RI and RII. In vitro affinity measurements revealed that site 2 on AKAP220 binds RII with ∼10-fold higher affinity than site 1. Occupancy of both R subunit binding sites on AKAP220 could provide a mechanism to amplify local cAMP responses and enable cross-talk between PKA and GSK3β.

  7. Activated platelets rescue apoptotic cells via paracrine activation of EGFR and DNA-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Au, A E-L; Sashindranath, M; Borg, R J; Kleifeld, O; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Medcalf, R L; Samson, A L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation is a frontline response to injury, not only essential for clot formation but also important for tissue repair. Indeed, the reparative influence of platelets has long been exploited therapeutically where application of platelet concentrates expedites wound recovery. Despite this, the mechanisms of platelet-triggered cytoprotection are poorly understood. Here, we show that activated platelets accumulate in the brain to exceptionally high levels following injury and release factors that potently protect neurons from apoptosis. Kinomic microarray and subsequent kinase inhibitor studies showed that platelet-based neuroprotection relies upon paracrine activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). This same anti-apoptotic cascade stimulated by activated platelets also provided chemo-resistance to several cancer cell types. Surprisingly, deep proteomic profiling of the platelet releasate failed to identify any known EGFR ligand, indicating that activated platelets release an atypical activator of the EGFR. This study is the first to formally associate platelet activation to EGFR/DNA-PK – an endogenous cytoprotective cascade. PMID:25210793

  8. RNAi Screen Reveals an Abl Kinase-Dependent Host Cell Pathway Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Pielage, Julia F.; Powell, Kimberly R.; Kalman, Daniel; Engel, Joanne N.

    2008-01-01

    Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of ∼80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa–induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:18369477

  9. The history and future of targeting cyclin-dependent kinases in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Uzma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Turner, Nicholas C.; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer represents a pathological manifestation of uncontrolled cell division; therefore, it has long been anticipated that our understanding of the basic principles of cell cycle control would result in effective cancer therapies. In particular, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that promote transition through the cell cycle were expected to be key therapeutic targets because many tumorigenic events ultimately drive proliferation by impinging on CDK4 or CDK6 complexes in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, perturbations in chromosomal stability and aspects of S phase and G2/M control mediated by CDK2 and CDK1 are pivotal tumorigenic events. Translating this knowledge into successful clinical development of CDK inhibitors has historically been challenging, and numerous CDK inhibitors have demonstrated disappointing results in clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of CDKs, the rationale for therapeutically targeting discrete kinase complexes and historical clinical results of CDK inhibitors. We also discuss how CDK inhibitors with high selectivity (particularly for both CDK4 and CDK6), in combination with patient stratification, have resulted in more substantial clinical activity. PMID:25633797

  10. A MYRISTOYL/PHOSPHOSERINE SWITCH CONTROLS cAMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE ASSOCIATION TO MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Gaffarogullari, Ece C.; Masterson, Larry R.; Metcalfe, Emily E.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Balatri, Erica; Musa, Musa M.; Mullen, Daniel; Distefano, Mark D.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) mediates a myriad of cellular signaling events and its activity is tightly regulated both in space and time. Among these regulatory mechanisms is N-myristoylation, whose biological role has been elusive. Using a combination of thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic methods, we analyzed the effects of N-myristoylation and phosphorylation at Ser10 on the interactions of PKA with model membranes. We found that in the absence of lipids, the myristoyl group is tucked into the hydrophobic binding pocket of the enzyme (myr-in state). Upon association with lipid bilayers, the myristoyl group is extruded and inserts into the hydrocarbon region of the lipid bilayer (myr-out state). NMR data indicate that the enzyme undergoes conformational equilibrium between myr-in and myr-out states, which can be shifted either by interaction with membranes and/or phosphorylation at Ser10. Our results provide evidence that the membrane binding motif of myristoylated PKA-C steers the enzyme towards lipids independent of its regulatory subunit or an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP), providing an additional mechanism to localize the enzyme near membrane-bound substrates. PMID:21740913

  11. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Alan K.; Baldor, Linda C.; Hogan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement. PMID:16176981

  12. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  13. Memantine increases brain production of kynurenic acid via protein kinase A-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kloc, Renata; Luchowska, Elzbieta; Wielosz, Marian; Owe-Larsson, Bjorn; Urbanska, Ewa M

    2008-04-18

    We describe a novel aspect of action of memantine ex vivo, in the brain cortical slices and in vitro, in mixed glial cultures. The drug potently increased the production of kynurenic acid, an endogenous tryptophan metabolite blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and nicotinic alpha7 receptors. In cortical slices memantine, an open-channel NMDA blocker (100-150 microM), but not the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, LY235959 increased the production of kynurenic acid. Neither SCH23390, D1 receptor antagonist (50 microM) nor raclopride, D2 receptor antagonist (10 microM) changed the memantine-induced effects. Propranolol (100 microM) has partially reduced its action. Selective cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 (1 microM), but not selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, NPC15437 (30 microM) totally reversed the action of memantine. In mixed glial cultures, 2-24 h incubation with memantine (2-50 microM) enhanced the production of kynurenic acid. Memantine (up to 0.5 mM) has not affected the activity of kynurenic acid biosynthetic enzymes. The obtained data suggest that memantine enhances the production of kynurenic acid in PKA-mediated way. This effect may partially contribute to the therapeutic actions of memantine and be of a potential clinical importance.

  14. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  15. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development.

  16. Comprehensive Behavioral Analysis of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Keizo; Tanda, Koichi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kasahara, Jiro; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Adachi, Minami; Umeda, Masahiro; Araki, Tsutomu; Fukunaga, Kohji; Kondo, Hisatake; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO) mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency. PMID:20209163

  17. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  18. Unexpected Reduction of Skin Tumorigenesis on Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6 in Mouse Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G1 phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  19. Applying conformational selection theory to improve crossdocking efficiency in 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1.

    PubMed

    Kotasthane, Anuja; Mulakala, Chandrika; Viswanadhan, Vellarkad N

    2014-03-01

    The emerging picture of biomolecular recognition is that of conformational selection followed by induced-fit. Conformational selection theory states that binding partners exist in various conformations in solution, with binding involving a "selection" between complementary conformers. In this study, we devise a docking protocol that mimics conformational selection in protein-ligand binding and demonstrate that it significantly enhances crossdocking accuracy over Glide's flexible docking protocol, which is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry. Our protocol uses a pregenerated conformational ensemble to simulate ligand flexibility. The ensemble was generated by thorough conformational sampling coupled with conformer minimization. The generated conformers were then rigidly docked in the active site of the protein along with a postdocking minimization step that allows limited induced fit effects to be modeled for the ligand. We illustrate the improved performance of our protocol through crossdocking of 31 ligands to cocomplexed proteins of the kinase 3-phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase-1 extracted from the crystal structures 1H1W (ATP bound), 1OKY (staurosporine bound) and 3QD0 (bound to a potent inhibitor). Consistent with conformational selection theory, the performance of our protocol was the best for crossdocking to the cognate protein bound to the natural ligand, ATP.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 governs learning and synaptic plasticity via control of NMDAR degradation.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Benavides, David R; Nguyen, Chan; Kansy, Janice W; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Chambon, Pierre; Greengard, Paul; Powell, Craig M; Cooper, Donald C; Bibb, James A

    2007-07-01

    Learning is accompanied by modulation of postsynaptic signal transduction pathways in neurons. Although the neuronal protein kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in cognitive disorders, its role in learning has been obscured by the perinatal lethality of constitutive knockout mice. Here we report that conditional knockout of Cdk5 in the adult mouse brain improved performance in spatial learning tasks and enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. Enhanced synaptic plasticity in Cdk5 knockout mice was attributed to reduced NR2B degradation, which caused elevations in total, surface and synaptic NR2B subunit levels and current through NR2B-containing NMDARs. Cdk5 facilitated the degradation of NR2B by directly interacting with both it and its protease, calpain. These findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism by which Cdk5 facilitates calpain-mediated proteolysis of NR2B and may control synaptic plasticity and learning.

  1. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  2. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  3. Mapping the Dynamics Landscape of Conformational Transitions in Enzyme: The Adenylate Kinase Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Conformational transition describes the essential dynamics and mechanism of enzymes in pursuing their various functions. The fundamental and practical challenge to researchers is to quantitatively describe the roles of large-scale dynamic transitions for regulating the catalytic processes. In this study, we tackled this challenge by exploring the pathways and free energy landscape of conformational changes in adenylate kinase (AdK), a key ubiquitous enzyme for cellular energy homeostasis. Using explicit long-timescale (up to microseconds) molecular dynamics and bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, we determined at the atomistic level the intermediate conformational states and mapped the transition pathways of AdK in the presence and absence of ligands. There is clearly chronological operation of the functional domains of AdK. Specifically in the ligand-free AdK, there is no significant energy barrier in the free energy landscape separating the open and closed states. Instead there are multiple intermediate conformational states, which facilitate the rapid transitions of AdK. In the ligand-bound AdK, the closed conformation is energetically most favored with a large energy barrier to open it up, and the conformational population prefers to shift to the closed form coupled with transitions. The results suggest a perspective for a hybrid of conformational selection and induced fit operations of ligand binding to AdK. These observations, depicted in the most comprehensive and quantitative way to date, to our knowledge, emphasize the underlying intrinsic dynamics of AdK and reveal the sophisticated conformational transitions of AdK in fulfilling its enzymatic functions. The developed methodology can also apply to other proteins and biomolecular systems. PMID:26244746

  4. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  5. Two Degradation Pathways of the p35 Cdk5 (Cyclin-dependent Kinase) Activation Subunit, Dependent and Independent of Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Takasugi, Toshiyuki; Minegishi, Seiji; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Kawahara, Hiroyuki; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2016-02-26

    Cdk5 is a versatile protein kinase that is involved in various neuronal activities, such as the migration of newborn neurons, neurite outgrowth, synaptic regulation, and neurodegenerative diseases. Cdk5 requires the p35 regulatory subunit for activation. Because Cdk5 is more abundantly expressed in neurons compared with p35, the p35 protein levels determine the kinase activity of Cdk5. p35 is a protein with a short half-life that is degraded by proteasomes. Although ubiquitination of p35 has been previously reported, the degradation mechanism of p35 is not yet known. Here, we intended to identify the ubiquitination site(s) in p35. Because p35 is myristoylated at the N-terminal glycine, the possible ubiquitination sites are the lysine residues in p35. We mutated all 23 Lys residues to Arg (p35 23R), but p35 23R was still rapidly degraded by proteasomes at a rate similar to wild-type p35. The degradation of p35 23R in primary neurons and the Cdk5 activation ability of p35 23R suggested the occurrence of ubiquitin-independent degradation of p35 in physiological conditions. We found that p35 has the amino acid sequence similar to the ubiquitin-independent degron in the NKX3.1 homeodomain transcription factor. An Ala mutation at Pro-247 in the degron-like sequence made p35 stable. These results suggest that p35 can be degraded by two degradation pathways: ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent. The rapid degradation of p35 by two different methods would be a mechanism to suppress the production of p25, which overactivates Cdk5 to induce neuronal cell death.

  6. The mRNA decay factor PAT1 functions in a pathway including MAP kinase 4 and immune receptor SUMM2

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Milena Edna; Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Palma, Kristoffer; Lolle, Signe; Regué, Àngels Mateu; Bethke, Gerit; Glazebrook, Jane; Zhang, Weiping; Sieburth, Leslie; Larsen, Martin R; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Multi-layered defense responses are activated in plants upon recognition of invading pathogens. Transmembrane receptors recognize conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and activate MAP kinase cascades, which regulate changes in gene expression to produce appropriate immune responses. For example, Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) regulates the expression of a subset of defense genes via at least one WRKY transcription factor. We report here that MPK4 is found in complexes in vivo with PAT1, a component of the mRNA decapping machinery. PAT1 is also phosphorylated by MPK4 and, upon flagellin PAMP treatment, PAT1 accumulates and localizes to cytoplasmic processing (P) bodies which are sites for mRNA decay. Pat1 mutants exhibit dwarfism and de-repressed immunity dependent on the immune receptor SUMM2. Since mRNA decapping is a critical step in mRNA turnover, linking MPK4 to mRNA decay via PAT1 provides another mechanism by which MPK4 may rapidly instigate immune responses. PMID:25603932

  7. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, James; Ryan, Colm J.; Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Pemberton, Helen N.; Chong, Irene Y.; Costa-Cabral, Sara; Frankum, Jessica; Gulati, Aditi; Holme, Harriet; Miller, Rowan; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Rafiq, Rumana; Wei, Wenbin; Williamson, Chris T.; Quigley, David A.; Tym, Joe; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Fenton, Timothy; Natrajan, Rachael; Strauss, Sandra J.; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors. PMID:26947069

  8. Dependence of cisplatin-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo on cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Yu, Fang; Kaldis, Philipp; Aleem, Eiman; Nowak, Grazyna; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutics, but its usefulness is limited by its toxicity to normal tissues, including cells of the kidney proximal tubule. The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism of cisplatin cytotoxicity. It was shown in vivo that cisplatin administration induces upregulation of the gene for the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in kidney cells. This protein is a positive effector on the fate of cisplatin-exposed renal tubule cells in vivo and in vitro; adenoviral transduction of p21 completely protected proximal tubule cells from cisplatin toxicity. Herein is reported that cdk2 inhibitory drugs protect kidney cells in vivo and in vitro, that transduction of kidney cells in vitro with dominant-negative cdk2 also protected, and that cdk2 knockout cells were resistant to cisplatin. The cdk2 knockout cells regained cisplatin sensitivity after transduction with wild-type cdk2. It is concluded that cisplatin cytotoxicity depends on cdk2 activation and that the mechanism of p21 protection is by direct inhibition of cdk2. This demonstrated the involvement of a protein that previously was associated with cell-cycle progression with pathways of apoptosis. It also was demonstrated that this pathway of cisplatin-induced cell death can be interceded in vivo to prevent nephrotoxicity.

  9. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  10. Phosphorylation of Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor peptide by protein kinase C and Ca sup 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, S.; Czernik, A.J.; Greengard, P. )

    1988-08-01

    The amino acid sequence of the Alzheimer disease amyloid precursor (ADAP) has been deduced from the corresponding cDNA, and hydropathy analysis of the sequence suggest a receptor-like structure with a single transmembrane domain. The putative cytoplasmic domain of ADAP contains potential sites for serine and threonine phosphorylation. In the present study, synthetic peptides derived from this domain were used as model substrates for various purified protein kinases. Protein kinase C rapidly catalyzed the phosphorylation of a peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 645-661 of ADAP. Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II phosphorylated ADAP peptide (645-661) on Thr-654 and Ser-655. Using rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes prelabeled with {sup 32}P{sub i}, a {sup 32}P-labeled phosphoprotein of {approx}135 kDa was immunoprecipitated by using antisera prepared against ADAP peptide(597-624), consistent with the possibility that the holoform of ADAP in rat brain is a phosphoprotein. Based on analogy with the effect of phosphorylation by protein kinase C of juxtamembrane residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin 2 receptor, phosphorylation of ADAP may target it for internalization.

  11. PTH stimulated growth and decreased Col-X deposition are phosphotidylinositol-3,4,5 triphosphate kinase and mitogen activating protein kinase dependent in avian sterna.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Erik Kern; Coon, David J; Kern, Matthew F; Svoboda, Kathy K H

    2010-02-01

    Type X collagen (Col-X) deposition is a marker of terminal differentiation during chondrogenesis, in addition to appositional growth and apoptosis. The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTH/PTHrP) receptor, or PPR, is a G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR), which activates several downstream pathways, moderating chondrocyte differentiation, including suppression of Col-X deposition. An Avian sterna model was used to analyze the PPR GPCR downstream kinase role in growth rate and extracellular matrix (ECM) including Col-II, IX, and X. Phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI3K), mitogen activating protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA) were inhibited with specific established inhibitors LY294002, PD98059, and H89, respectively to test the hypothesis that they could reverse/inhibit the PTH/PTHrP pathway. Excised E14 chick sterna were PTH treated with or without an inhibitor and compared to controls. Sternal length was measured every 24 hr. Cultured sterna were immuno-stained using specific antibodies for Col-II, IX, or X and examined via confocal microscopy. Increased growth in PTH-treated sterna was MAPK, PI3K, and PKA dose dependent, suggesting growth was regulated through multiple pathways. Col-X deposition was rescued in PTH-treated sterna in the presence of PI3K or MAPK inhibitors, but not with the PKA inhibitor. All three inhibitors moderately disrupted Col-II and Col-IX deposition. These results suggest that PTH can activate multiple pathways during chondrocyte differentiation.

  12. [The contribution of protein kinase C and Rho-kinase to the control of the receptor-dependent artery contraction decreases with age independently of sympathetic innervation].

    PubMed

    Mochalov, S V; Kalenchuk, V U; Gaĭnullina, D K; Vorotnikov, A V; Tarasova, O S

    2008-01-01

    The age-related dynamics of the activity of signalling pathways coupled to alpha1-adrenergic receptors and their dependence on the sympathetic innervation of arterial smooth muscle have been studied. The effects of the protein kinase C inhibitor (GF109203X, 10(-6) M) and the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632, 10(-5) M) on the isometric contraction of the rat saphenous artery, induced by the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine, were examined. It was shown that the sensitivity to methoxamine of arteries from 2-week-old rats that are partially innervated was reduced as compared to adults, but the effects of both inhibitors were more prominent. The denervation induced by the excision of sympathetic ganglia increased the arterial sensitivity to methoxamine but was not accompanied by changes in sensitivity to the inhibitors. Therefore, the postnatal development of the arterial smooth muscle is characterized by a decrease in the contribution of protein kinase C and Rho-kinase to the regulation of contraction; however, these changes do not correlate with changes in the sensitivity of arteries to methoxamine and development of sympathetic innervation. PMID:19137699

  13. The potent antiplasmodial calmodulin-antagonist trifluoperazine inhibits plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Cavagnino, Andrea; Rossi, Franca; Rizzi, Menico

    2011-12-01

    Due to their critical involvement in the execution of the malaria parasite developmental pattern both in the mosquito vector and in the human host, Plasmodium calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are considered promising candidates for the development of new tools to block malaria transmission. We report here that the phenothiazine trifluoperazine non-competitively inhibits Plasmodium falciparum CDPK4 in the micromolar range while other calmodulin antagonists only marginally affect the enzyme activity, and we propose the inhibition mechanism. Our results demonstrate that selective enzyme inhibition is achievable by targeting its calmodulin-like domain. This observation could be exploited for the discovery of innovative phenothiazine-based CDPK inhibitors of potential medical interest.

  14. A phytotoxin Solanapyrone-A downregulates calcium-dependent protein kinase activity in potato.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A; Hatsugai, N; Shah, M M

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that alternaric acid, a host-specific toxin produced by the plant pathogenic fungus Alternaria solani, in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), stimulated in vitro phosphorylation of His-tagged calcium-dependent protein kinase 2 from potato cultivar Rishiri (RiCDPK2). Herein, we report that Solanapyrone-A (SpA), a non-host-specific toxin produced by A. solani, inhibited the phosphorylation of RiCDPK2 in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). However, SpA stimulated RiCDPK2 phosphorylation in the absence of these cations. Based on the current findings, we suggest that RiCDPK2 may mediate SpA-induced signaling independent of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), leading to a compatible interaction between potato and A. solani. PMID:23765960

  15. Concentration-dependent control of pyruvate kinase M mutually exclusive splicing by hnRNP proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; David, Charles J.; Manley, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the mammalian pyruvate kinase M (PKM) gene provides an important example of mutually exclusive splicing. We showed previously that the hnRNP proteins A1, A2 and PTB play a critical role in this process. Here we provide evidence that concentration-dependent interactions involving a network of these proteins are sufficient to determine the outcome of PKM splicing. At high concentrations, such as found in most cancer cells, hnRNP A1 binding to two sites in the upstream regulated exon (exon 9) orchestrates cooperative interactions leading to exon 9 exclusion. At lower concentrations, binding shifts to downstream intronic sites such that exon 9 is included and exon 10 largely excluded, with any mRNA including both exons degraded by nonsense-mediated decay. Together our results provide a mechanism by which a small number of general factors control alternative splicing of a widely expressed transcript. PMID:22307054

  16. The effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor treatment on experimental herpes simplex encephalitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Jing-Xia; Lu, Zu-Neng

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis(HSE) is the most common and serious viral encephalitis in humans. There is a lack of effective medication to date for HSE. A better understanding of the mediators of tissue damage is essential for finding new targets for therapeutic intervention. In this project, we explored the effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor olomoucine treatment on experimental HSE mice. The following results were obtained: (1) olomoucine increased survival in HSE mice; (2) olomoucine inhibited microglial activation and reduced HSV-1-induced cytokines release; (3) olomoucine prevented neural cells apoptosis and attenuated brain tissue pathological changes following HSV-1 infection; (4) olomoucine reduced brain edema and improved neurological function in HSE. Overall, olomoucine can induce a blunted inflammatory response, maintain the blood vessel wall intact, improve neurological function and increase survival in HSE mice.

  17. Deficient signaling in mice devoid of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y L; Reis, L F; Pavlovic, J; Aguzzi, A; Schäfer, R; Kumar, A; Williams, B R; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1995-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) has been implicated in interferon (IFN) induction, antiviral response and tumor suppression. We have generated mice devoid of functional PKR (Pkr%). Although the mice are physically normal and the induction of type I IFN genes by poly(I).poly(C) (pIC) and virus is unimpaired, the antiviral response induced by IFN-gamma and pIC was diminished. However, in embryo fibroblasts from Pkr knockout mice, the induction of type I IFN as well as the activation of NF-kappa B by pIC, were strongly impaired but restored by priming with IFN. Thus, PKR is not directly essential for responses to pIC, and a pIC-responsive system independent of PKR is induced by IFN. No evidence of the tumor suppressor activity of PKR was demonstrated. Images PMID:8557029

  18. A Dopamine- and Protein Kinase A-Dependent Mechanism for Network Adaptation in Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero, C. F.; Pignatelli, A.; Partida, G. J.; Ishida, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrates can detect light intensity changes in vastly different photic environments, in part, because post-receptoral neurons undergo “network adaptation”. Previous data implicated dopaminergic, cAMP-dependent inhibition of retinal ganglion cells in this process, yet left unclear how this occurs, and whether this occurs in darkness versus light. To test for light- and dopamine-dependent changes in ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ, we immunostained dark- and light-adapted retinas with anti-cAMP antisera, in the presence and absence of various dopamine receptor ligands. To test for direct effects of dopamine receptor ligands and membrane-permeable protein kinase ligands on ganglion cell excitability, we recorded spikes from isolated ganglion cells in perforated-patch whole-cell mode, before and during application of these agents by microperfusion. Our immunostainings show that light, endogenous dopamine, and exogenous dopamine elevate ganglion cell cAMP levels in situ by activating D1-type dopamine receptors. Our spike recordings show that D1-type agonists and 8-bromo cAMP reduce spike frequency and curtail sustained spike firing, and that these effects entail protein kinase A activation. These effects resemble those of background light on ganglion cell responses to light flashes. Network adaptation could thus be produced, to some extent, by dopaminergic modulation of ganglion cell spike generation, a mechanism distinct from modulation of transmitter release onto ganglion cells or of transmitter-gated currents in ganglion cells. Combining these observations, with results obtained in studies of photoreceptor, bipolar, and horizontal cells, indicates that all three layers of neurons in the retina are equipped with mechanisms for adaptation to ambient light. PMID:11606650

  19. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Serelaxin, the recombinant form of human relaxin-II, increases cGMP levels and has shown beneficial effects on kidney function in acute heart failure patients. Antifibrotic properties of serelaxin are supposed to be mediated via relaxin family peptide receptor 1 and subsequently enhanced nitric oxide/cGMP to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This study examines the involvement of cGKI in the antifibrotic signaling of serelaxin. Methods and Results: Kidney fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in wildtype (WT) and cGKI knock-out (KO) mice. After 7 days, renal antifibrotic effects of serelaxin were assessed. Serelaxin treatment for 7 days significantly increased cGMP in the kidney of WT and cGKI-KO. In WT, renal fibrosis was reduced through decreased accumulation of collagen1A1, total collagen, and fibronectin. The profibrotic connective tissue growth factor as well as myofibroblast differentiation were reduced and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 were positively modulated after treatment. Moreover, Smad2 as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) phosphorylation were decreased, whereas phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5a phosphorylation was increased. However, these effects were not observed in cGKI-KO. Conclusion: Antifibrotic renal effects of serelaxin are mediated via cGMP/cGKI to inhibit Smad2- and ERK1-dependent TGF-β signaling and increased PDE5a phosphorylation. PMID:27462268

  20. Hormone-induced intercellular signal transfer dissociates cyclic AMP- dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We used co-cultures of porcine ovarian granulosa cells and mouse adrenocortical tumor cells (Y-1) to examine the kinetics of contact- dependent intercellular signal transfer and to assess the molecular mechanisms employed by this process. Exposure to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) caused cAMP-dependent protein kinase dissociation in granulosa cells and, with time, in Y-1 cells if, and only if, they contacted a responding granulosa cell. Y-1 cells close to a granulosa cell but not touching it failed to respond similarly. In reciprocal experiments, co-cultures were stimulated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Y-1 cells dissociated protein kinase as did granulosa cells in contact with Y-1 cells; however, granulosa cells that were not in contact with Y-1 cells failed to respond to the hormone. Fluorogenic steroids were secreted by Y-1 cells cultured alone and stimulated with ACTH, but were not secreted by cultures exposed to FSH. Neither hormone caused fluorogenic steroid production by granulosa cells. On the other hand these steroids were secreted in co-cultures stimulated with ACTH and to a lesser degree in co-cultures exposed to FSH. Autoradiography revealed that I125-FSH bound only to granulosa cells, never to Y-1 cells, even if they were in contact with an ovarian cell. The possibility of cell fusion was tested by experiments in which Y-1 cell membranes were labeled with cationized ferritin. These cells were then placed in co-culture with ovarian granulosa cells that had previously been allowed to ingest latex spheres. At regions of gap junctions between Y-1 and granulosa cells ferritin remained attached to the adrenal cell membrane and was never observed to migrate to the granulosa cell membrane. From these data, we conclude that hormone specific stimulation of one cell type leads to protein kinase dissociation in heterotypic partners only if they contact a hormone responsive cell. This signal transfer is bidirectional, exhibits temporal kinetics and

  1. Altered Dendritic Cell Phenotype in Response to Leishmania amazonensis Amastigote Infection Is Mediated by MAP Kinase, ERK

    PubMed Central

    Boggiatto, Paola Mercedes; Jie, Fei; Ghosh, Mousumi; Gibson-Corley, Katherine Nicole; Ramer-Tait, Amanda Ellen; Jones, Douglas Elliot; Petersen, Christine Anne

    2009-01-01

    Initiation of productive immune responses against Leishmania depends on the successful transition of dendritic cells (DC) from an immature to a mature phenotype. This process is characterized by high CD40 surface expression as well as interleukin-12 production, which are frequently seen in response to L. major infection. In vivo footpad infection of C3HeB/FeJ mice for 7 days with L. amazonensis promoted an immature CD11c+ DC phenotype characterized by both significantly low CD40 surface expression and significantly decreased interleukin-12p40 production compared with L. major infection of these same mice. In vitro infection of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells with L. amazonensis amastigotes resulted in rapid and significant phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, observed within minutes of exposure to the parasite. Infection with L. amazonensis promastigotes led to increased 1/2 phosphorylation after 4 hours of infection compared with L. major infection, which correlated with promastigote transformation into amastigotes. Treatment of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells with a mitogen activated protein kinase kinase-specific inhibitor, PD98059, led to regained surface CD40 expression and interleukin-12p40 production following L. amazonensis amastigote infection compared with non-treated, infected DC. Treatment of L. amazonensis-infected mice with the highly-specific mitogen activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, CI-1040, enhanced surface CD40 expression on CD11c+ DC obtained from the draining lymph node. L. amazonensis amastigotes, through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, inhibit the ability of DC to undergo proper maturation both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19349356

  2. Fungal Communication Requires the MAK-2 Pathway Elements STE-20 and RAS-2, the NRC-1 Adapter STE-50 and the MAP Kinase Scaffold HAM-5

    PubMed Central

    Dettmann, Anne; Heilig, Yvonne; Valerius, Oliver; Ludwig, Sarah; Seiler, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for the survival of unicellular organisms as well as for the development and function of multicellular tissues. Cell-to-cell signaling is also required to develop the interconnected mycelial network characteristic of filamentous fungi and is a prerequisite for symbiotic and pathogenic host colonization achieved by molds. Somatic cell–cell communication and subsequent cell fusion is governed by the MAK-2 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa, yet the composition and mode of regulation of the MAK-2 pathway are currently unclear. In order to identify additional components involved in MAK-2 signaling we performed affinity purification experiments coupled to mass spectrometry with strains expressing functional GFP-fusion proteins of the MAPK cascade. This approach identified STE-50 as a regulatory subunit of the Ste11p homolog NRC-1 and HAM-5 as cell-communication-specific scaffold protein of the MAPK cascade. Moreover, we defined a network of proteins consisting of two Ste20-related kinases, the small GTPase RAS-2 and the adenylate cyclase capping protein CAP-1 that function upstream of the MAK-2 pathway and whose signals converge on the NRC-1/STE-50 MAP3K complex and the HAM-5 scaffold. Finally, our data suggest an involvement of the striatin interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, the casein kinase 2 heterodimer, the phospholipid flippase modulators YPK-1 and NRC-2 and motor protein-dependent vesicle trafficking in the regulation of MAK-2 pathway activity and function. Taken together, these data will have significant implications for our mechanistic understanding of MAPK signaling and for homotypic cell–cell communication in fungi and higher eukaryotes. PMID:25411845

  3. MAP Kinase Phosphatase 1 (MKP-1/DUSP1) is Neuroprotective in Huntington’s Disease Via Additive Effects of JNK and p38 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David M.; Moser, Roger; Régulier, Etienne; Breuillaud, Lionel; Dixon, Meredith; Beesen, Ayshe Ana; Elliston, Linda; Silva Santos, Mariana de Fatima; Kim, Jinho; Jones, Lesley; Goldstein, Darlene R.; Ferrante, Robert J.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that sodium butyrate is neuroprotective in Huntington’s disease (HD) mice and that this therapeutic effect is associated with increased expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase/dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (MKP-1/DUSP1). Here we show that enhancing MKP-1 expression is sufficient to achieve neuroprotection in lentiviral models of HD. Wild-type MKP-1 overexpression inhibited apoptosis in primary striatal neurons exposed to an N-terminal fragment of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin (Htt171-82Q), blocking caspase-3 activation and significantly reducing neuronal cell death. This neuroprotective effect of MKP-1 was demonstrated to be dependent on its enzymatic activity, being ablated by mutation of its phosphatase domain and being attributed to inhibition of specific MAP kinases (MAPKs). Overexpression of MKP-1 prevented the polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin-induced activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) and p38 MAPKs, whereas extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation was not altered by either polyglutamine-expanded Htt or MKP-1. Moreover, mutants of MKP-1 that selectively prevented p38 or JNK binding confirmed the important dual contributions of p38 and JNK regulation to MKP-1-mediated neuroprotection. These results demonstrate additive effects of p38 and JNK MAPK inhibition by MKP-1 without consequence to ERK activation in this striatal neuron-based paradigm. MKP-1 also provided neuroprotection in vivo in a lentiviral model of HD neuropathology in rat striatum. Taken together, these data extend previous evidence that JNK- and p38-mediated pathways contribute to HD pathogenesis and, importantly, show that therapies simultaneously inhibiting both JNK and p38 signalling pathways may lead to improved neuroprotective outcomes. PMID:23392662

  4. Comparing landslide inventories: The map depends on the method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wills, C.J.; McCrink, T.P.

    2002-01-01

    Landslide inventory maps are generally prepared by interpreting the geomorphic expression of landsliding on aerial photos, topographic maps, or on the ground. Distinctive landslide geomorphology allows the recognition and mapping of landslides, although there are always landslides that have very subtle expression and are not identified. The difficulties of mapping landslides based on their geomorphic expression are amplified in heavily forested terrain. The ground surface is obscured by tree cover on aerial photographs, and landslide-related features are often hidden. This limitation affects not only aerial photo interpretation, but also interpretation of topographic maps, which are based on aerial photographs. We compared five maps showing landslides in the Laurel Quadrangle in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. These include a geologic map, a map prepared for the county based on interpretation of aerial photographs, a map prepared by us based on aerial photographs and compilation of previous work, a map of features interpreted from the U.S. Geological Survey 7.5-minute topographic map, and a detailed field-based landslide map. Comparison of these maps shows that the geologic map identifies few landslides, but most landslides on the geologic map are also shown on the other maps. The two maps based mainly on aerial photo interpretation tend to show the larger slides, but there is only about 60 percent correspondence of landslide areas between the two. Comparing the reconnaissance techniques with the much more detailed field mapping shows that the reconnaisance maps emphasize the large slides of bedrock and identify a lower percentage of shallow debris slides and debris flows.

  5. Translational control of myelin basic protein expression by ERK2 MAP kinase regulates timely remyelination in the adult brain.

    PubMed

    Michel, Kelly; Zhao, Tianna; Karl, Molly; Lewis, Katherine; Fyffe-Maricich, Sharyl L

    2015-05-20

    Successful myelin repair in the adult CNS requires the robust and timely production of myelin proteins to generate new myelin sheaths. The underlying regulatory mechanisms and complex molecular basis of myelin regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we investigate the role of ERK MAP kinase signaling in this process. Conditional deletion of Erk2 from cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage resulted in delayed remyelination following demyelinating injury to the adult mouse corpus callosum. The delayed repair occurred as a result of a specific deficit in the translation of the major myelin protein, MBP. In the absence of ERK2, activation of the ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) and its downstream target, ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP), was impaired at a critical time when premyelinating oligodendrocytes were transitioning to mature cells capable of generating new myelin sheaths. Thus, we have described an important link between the ERK MAP kinase signaling cascade and the translational machinery specifically in remyelinating oligodendrocytes in vivo. These results suggest an important role for ERK2 in the translational control of MBP, a myelin protein that appears critical for ensuring the timely generation of new myelin sheaths following demyelinating injury in the adult CNS.

  6. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkers, Wilfried; Leeder, Abigail C.; Ansong, Charles; Wang, Yuexi; Yang, Feng; Starr, Trevor L.; Camp, II, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Glass, N. Louise; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-11-20

    Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT) tips every 4 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a protein of unknown biochemical function. How this oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G) that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM5-GFP co-localized with NRC1, MEK2 and MAK2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK2 activity influences HAM5 function/localization. However, MAK2-GFP showed only cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta, as observed in wild type germlings. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM5 was shown to physically interact with MAK2, MEK2 and NRC1, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members during oscillation and chemotropic interactions during both germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK2 to upstream factors and other proteins involved in this intriguing process of fungal

  7. Cellular Notch responsiveness is defined by phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent signals

    PubMed Central

    Mckenzie, Grahame; Ward, George; Stallwood, Yvette; Briend, Emmanuel; Papadia, Sofia; Lennard, Andrew; Turner, Martin; Champion, Brian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2006-01-01

    Background Notch plays a wide-ranging role in controlling cell fate, differentiation and development. The PI3K-Akt pathway is a similarly conserved signalling pathway which regulates processes such as differentiation, proliferation and survival. Mice with disrupted Notch and PI3K signalling show phenotypic similarities during haematopoietic cell development, suggesting functional interaction between these pathways. Results We show that cellular responsiveness to Notch signals depends on the activity of the PI3K-Akt pathway in cells as diverse as CHO cells, primary T-cells and hippocampal neurons. Induction of the endogenous PI3K-Akt pathway in CHO cells (by the insulin pathway), in T-cells (via TCR activation) or in neurons (via TrKB activation) potentiates Notch-dependent responses. We propose that the PI3K-Akt pathway exerts its influence on Notch primarily via inhibition of GSK3-beta, a kinase known to phosphorylate and regulate Notch signals. Conclusion The PI3K-Akt pathway acts as a "gain control" for Notch signal responses. Since physiological levels of intracellular Notch are often low, coincidence with PI3K-activation may be crucial for induction of Notch-dependent responses. PMID:16507111

  8. Anchorage-dependent cell growth: tyrosine kinases and phosphatases meet redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Chiarugi, Paola; Giannoni, Elisa

    2005-01-01

    Recent data have provided new insight concerning the regulation of nontransformed cell proliferation in response to both soluble growth factors and adhesive cues. Nontransformed cells are anchorage-dependent for the execution of the complete mitotic program and cannot avoid the concomitant signals starting from mitogenic molecules, as growth factors, and adhesive agents belonging to the extracellular matrix. Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and phosphotyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) together with soluble small molecules have been included among intracellular signal transducers of growth factor and extracellular matrix receptors. Reactive oxygen species retain a key role during both growth factor and integrin receptor signaling, and these second messengers are recognized to be a synergistic point of confluence for anchorage-dependent growth signaling. Redox-regulated proteins include PTPs and PTKs, although with opposite regulation of enzymatic activity. Transient oxidation of PTPs leads to their inactivation, through the formation of an intramolecular S-S bridge. Conversely, oxidation of PTKs leads to their activation, either by direct SH modification or, indirectly, by concomitant inhibition of PTPs that leads to sustained activation of PTKs. This review will focus on the redox regulation of PTPs and PTKs during anchorage-dependent cell growth and its implications for tumor biology.

  9. Second messenger-dependent protein kinases and protein synthesis regulate endogenous secretin receptor responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ghadessy, Roxana S; Kelly, Eamonn

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of second messenger-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and C (PKC) in the regulation of endogenous secretin receptor responsiveness in NG108-15 mouse neuroblastoma×rat glioma hybrid cells. In whole cell cyclic AMP accumulation studies, activation of PKC either by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or by purinoceptor stimulation using uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) decreased secretin receptor responsiveness. PKC activation also inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation but did not affect cyclic AMP responses mediated by the prostanoid-IP receptor agonist iloprost, or the A2 adenosine receptor agonist 5′-(N-ethylcarboxamido) adenosine (NECA). In additivity experiments, saturating concentrations of secretin and iloprost were found to be additive in terms of cyclic AMP accumulation, whereas saturating concentrations of NECA and iloprost together were not. This suggests compartmentalization of Gs-coupling components in NG108-15 cells and possible heterologous regulation of secretin receptor responsiveness at the level of adenylyl cyclase activation. Cells exposed to the PKA inhibitor H-89, exhibited a time-dependent increase in secretin receptor responsiveness compared to control cells. This effect was selective since cyclic AMP responses to forskolin, iloprost and NECA were not affected by H-89 treatment. Furthermore, treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide produced a time-dependent increase in secretin receptor responsiveness. Together these results indicate that endogenous secretin receptor responsiveness is regulated by PKC, PKA and protein neosynthesis in NG108-15 cells. PMID:11959806

  10. Accurate calculation of mutational effects on the thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to p38α MAP kinase: a combined computational and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shun; Travis, Sue M; Elcock, Adrian H

    2013-07-01

    A major current challenge for drug design efforts focused on protein kinases is the development of drug resistance caused by spontaneous mutations in the kinase catalytic domain. The ubiquity of this problem means that it would be advantageous to develop fast, effective computational methods that could be used to determine the effects of potential resistance-causing mutations before they arise in a clinical setting. With this long-term goal in mind, we have conducted a combined experimental and computational study of the thermodynamic effects of active-site mutations on a well-characterized and high-affinity interaction between a protein kinase and a small-molecule inhibitor. Specifically, we developed a fluorescence-based assay to measure the binding free energy of the small-molecule inhibitor, SB203580, to the p38α MAP kinase and used it measure the inhibitor's affinity for five different kinase mutants involving two residues (Val38 and Ala51) that contact the inhibitor in the crystal structure of the inhibitor-kinase complex. We then conducted long, explicit-solvent thermodynamic integration (TI) simulations in an attempt to reproduce the experimental relative binding affinities of the inhibitor for the five mutants; in total, a combined simulation time of 18.5 μs was obtained. Two widely used force fields - OPLS-AA/L and Amber ff99SB-ILDN - were tested in the TI simulations. Both force fields produced excellent agreement with experiment for three of the five mutants; simulations performed with the OPLS-AA/L force field, however, produced qualitatively incorrect results for the constructs that contained an A51V mutation. Interestingly, the discrepancies with the OPLS-AA/L force field could be rectified by the imposition of position restraints on the atoms of the protein backbone and the inhibitor without destroying the agreement for other mutations; the ability to reproduce experiment depended, however, upon the strength of the restraints' force constant

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  12. Autophosphorylation and Subcellular Localization Dynamics of a Salt- and Water Deficit-Induced Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase from Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Chehab, E. Wassim; Patharkar, O. Rahul; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Taybi, Tahar; Cushman, John C.

    2004-01-01

    A salinity and dehydration stress-responsive calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) was isolated from the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum; McCPK1). McCPK1 undergoes myristoylation, but not palmitoylation in vitro. Removal of the N-terminal myristate acceptor site partially reduced McCPK1 plasma membrane (PM) localization as determined by transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions in microprojectile-bombarded cells. Removal of the N-terminal domain (amino acids 1–70) completely abolished PM localization, suggesting that myristoylation and possibly the N-terminal domain contribute to membrane association of the kinase. The recombinant, Escherichia coli-expressed, full-length McCPK1 protein was catalytically active in a calcium-dependent manner (K0.5 = 0.15 μm). Autophosphorylation of recombinant McCPK1 was observed in vitro on at least two different Ser residues, with the location of two sites being mapped to Ser-62 and Ser-420. An Ala substitution at the Ser-62 or Ser-420 autophosphorylation site resulted in a slight increase in kinase activity relative to wild-type McCPK1 against a histone H1 substrate. In contrast, Ala substitutions at both sites resulted in a dramatic decrease in kinase activity relative to wild-type McCPK1 using histone H1 as substrate. McCPK1 undergoes a reversible change in subcellular localization from the PM to the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, and actin microfilaments of the cytoskeleton in response to reductions in humidity, as determined by transient expression of McCPK1-green fluorescent protein fusions in microprojectile-bombarded cells and confirmed by subcellular fractionation and western-blot analysis of 6× His-tagged McCPK1. PMID:15247393

  13. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P.C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs–deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality. PMID:25925375

  14. Overlapping functions of the MAP4K family kinases Hppy and Msn in Hippo signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangxi; Cho, Yong Suk; Yue, Tao; Ip, Y Tony; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) tumor suppressor pathway is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that controls tissue growth and organ size in species ranging from Drosophila to human, and its malfunction has been implicated in many types of human cancer. In this study, we conducted a kinome screen and identified Happyhour (Hppy)/MAP4K3 as a novel player in the Hpo pathway. Our biochemical study showed that Hppy binds and phosphorylates Wts. Our genetic experiments suggest that Hppy acts in parallel and partial redundantly with Misshapen (Msn)/MAP4K4 to regulate Yki nuclear localization and Hpo target gene expression in Drosophila wing imaginal discs. Furthermore, we showed that cytoskeleton stress restricts Yki nuclear localization through Hppy and Msn when Hpo activity is compromised, thus providing an explanation for the Wts-dependent but Hpo-independent regulation of Yki in certain contexts. Our study has unraveled an additional layer of complexity in the Hpo signaling pathway and laid down a foundation for exploring how different upstream regulators feed into the core Hpo pathway. PMID:27462435

  15. Classification of Aurora-A Kinase Inhibitors Using Self-Organizing Map (SOM) and Support Vector Machine (SVM).

    PubMed

    Wang, Liyu; Wang, Zhi; Yan, Aixia; Yuan, Qipeng

    2011-01-17

    Two classification models of 148 Aurora-A kinase inhibitors were developed to separate active and weakly potent active inhibitors of Aurora-A kinase. Each molecule was represented by 12 selected molecular descriptors calculated by the ADRIANA.Code. Then the classification models were built using a Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map (SOM) and a Support Vector Machine (SVM) method, respectively, which could be used for virtual screening an existing database to find possible new lead compounds with higher activity. The prediction accuracy of the models for the training and test sets are 96.6 % and 90.0 % for SOM, 93.2 % and 93.3 % for SVM.

  16. The nondigestible disaccharide epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption via rho-associated kinase- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanisms in rat small intestines.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuya; Nishimukai, Megumi; Takechi, Maki; Taguchi, Hidenori; Hamada, Shigeki; Yokota, Atsushi; Ito, Susumu; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2010-02-10

    We previously showed that epilactose, a nondigestible disaccharide, increased calcium (Ca) absorption in the small intestines of rats. Here, we explored the mechanism(s) underlying the epilactose-mediated promotion of Ca absorption in a ligated intestinal segment of anesthetized rats. The addition of epilactose to the luminal solution increased Ca absorption and chromium (Cr)-EDTA permeability, a paracellular indicator, with a strong correlation (R = 0.93) between these changes. Epilactose induced the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains (MLCs), which is known to activate the paracellular route, without any change in the association of tight junction proteins with the actin cytoskeleton. The epilactose-mediated promotion of the Ca absorption was suppressed by specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). These results indicate that epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption in the small intestine of rats through the induction of MLC phosphorylation via MLCK- and ROCK-dependent mechanisms.

  17. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  18. Identification of a nonsense mutation in the carboxyl-terminal region of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit in the scid mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Blunt, T; Gell, D; Fox, M; Taccioli, G E; Lehmann, A R; Jackson, S P; Jeggo, P A

    1996-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) consists of a heterodimeric protein (Ku) and a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). The Ku protein has double-stranded DNA end-binding activity that serves to recruit the complex to DNA ends. Despite having serine/threonine protein kinase activity, DNA-PKcs falls into the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase superfamily. DNA-PK functions in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination, and recent evidence has shown that mouse scid cells are defective in DNA-PKcs. In this study we have cloned the cDNA for the carboxyl-terminal region of DNA-PKcs in rodent cells and identified the existence of two differently spliced products in human cells. We show that DNA-PKcs maps to the same chromosomal region as the mouse scid gene. scid cells contain approximately wild-type levels of DNA-PKcs transcripts, whereas the V-3 cell line, which is also defective in DNA-PKcs, contains very reduced transcript levels. Sequence comparison of the carboxyl-terminal region of scid and wild-type mouse cells enabled us to identify a nonsense mutation within a highly conserved region of the gene in mouse scid cells. This represents a strong candidate for the inactivating mutation in DNA-PKcs in the scid mouse. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8816792

  19. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Yasunori Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  20. Regulation of flagellar biogenesis by a calcium dependent protein kinase in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yinwen; Pan, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a bi-flagellated green alga, is a model organism for studies of flagella or cilia related activities including cilia-based signaling, flagellar motility and flagellar biogenesis. Calcium has been shown to be a key regulator of these cellular processes whereas the signaling pathways linking calcium to these cellular functions are less understood. Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are present in plants but not in animals, are also present in ciliated microorganisms which led us to examine their possible functions and mechanisms in flagellar related activities. By in silico analysis of Chlamydomonas genome we have identified 14 CDPKs and studied one of the flagellar localized CDPKs--CrCDPK3. CrCDPK3 was a protein of 485 amino acids and predicted to have a protein kinase domain at the N-terminus and four EF-hand motifs at the C-terminus. In flagella, CrCDPK3 was exclusively localized in the membrane matrix fraction and formed an unknown 20 S protein complex. Knockdown of CrCDPK3 expression by using artificial microRNA did not affect flagellar motility as well as flagellar adhesion and mating. Though flagellar shortening induced by treatment with sucrose or sodium pyrophosphate was not affected in RNAi strains, CrCDPK3 increased in the flagella, and pre-formed protein complex was disrupted. During flagellar regeneration, CrCDPK3 also increased in the flagella. When extracellular calcium was lowered to certain range by the addition of EGTA after deflagellation, flagellar regeneration was severely affected in RNAi cells compared with wild type cells. In addition, during flagellar elongation induced by LiCl, RNAi cells exhibited early onset of bulbed flagella. This work expands new functions of CDPKs in flagellar activities by showing involvement of CrCDPK3 in flagellar biogenesis in Chlamydomonas.

  1. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, M. Emmy M.; van der Ploeg, Ida; Koster, Jan; Bate-Eya, Laurel Tabe; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.; Molenaar, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide) gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization. PMID:26716839

  2. PPARδ Activation Acts Cooperatively with 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinase-1 to Enhance Mammary Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Claire B.; Yin, Yuzhi; Yuan, Hongyan; Zeng, Xiao; King, Sruthi; Li, Xin; Kopelovich, Levy; Albanese, Chris; Glazer, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorδ (PPARδ) is a transcription factor that is associated with metabolic gene regulation and inflammation. It has been implicated in tumor promotion and in the regulation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). PDK1 is a key regulator of the AGC protein kinase family, which includes the proto-oncogene AKT/PKB implicated in several malignancies, including breast cancer. To assess the role of PDK1 in mammary tumorigenesis and its interaction with PPARδ, transgenic mice were generated in which PDK1 was expressed in mammary epithelium under the control of the MMTV enhancer/promoter region. Transgene expression increased pT308AKT and pS9GSK3β, but did not alter phosphorylation of mTOR, 4EBP1, ribosomal protein S6 and PKCα. The transgenic mammary gland also expressed higher levels of PPARδ and a gene expression profile resembling wild-type mice maintained on a diet containing the PPARδ agonist, GW501516. Both wild-type and transgenic mice treated with GW501516 exhibited accelerated rates of tumor formation that were more pronounced in transgenic animals. GW501516 treatment was accompanied by a distinct metabolic gene expression and metabolomic signature that was not present in untreated animals. GW501516-treated transgenic mice expressed higher levels of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolites than treated wild-type mice, suggesting the involvement of PDK1 in enhancing PPARδ-driven energy metabolism. These results reveal that PPARδ activation elicits a distinct metabolic and metabolomic profile in tumors that is in part related to PDK1 and AKT signaling. PMID:21297860

  3. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  4. Lack of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Inhibits c-myc Tumorigenic Activities in Epithelial Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Macias, Everardo; Rounbehler, Robert; Sicinski, Piotr; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Johnson, David G.; Conti, Claudio J.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2004-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and that has also been found to be deregulated in several forms of human and experimental tumors. We have shown that forced expression of c-myc in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) resulted in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors in the skin and oral cavity. Although a number of genes involved in cancer development are regulated by c-myc, the actual mechanisms leading to Myc-induced neoplasia are not known. Among the genes regulated by Myc is the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) gene. Interestingly, previous studies from our laboratory showed that the overexpression of CDK4 led to keratinocyte hyperproliferation, although no spontaneous tumor development was observed. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that CDK4 may be one of the critical downstream genes involved in Myc carcinogenesis. Our results showed that CDK4 inhibition in K5-Myc transgenic mice resulted in the complete inhibition of tumor development, suggesting that CDK4 is a critical mediator of tumor formation induced by deregulated Myc. Furthermore, a lack of CDK4 expression resulted in marked decreases in epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation compared to the results obtained for K5-Myc littermates. Biochemical analysis of the K5-Myc epidermis showed that CDK4 mediates the proliferative activities of Myc by sequestering p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and thereby indirectly activating CDK2 kinase activity. These results show that CDK4 mediates the proliferative and oncogenic activities of Myc in vivo through a mechanism that involves the sequestration of specific CDK inhibitors. PMID:15314163

  5. Regulation of hippocampal and behavioral excitability by cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Koovakkattu, Della; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Anderson, Anne E; Powell, Craig M; Sinton, Christopher M; Bibb, James A; Cooper, Donald C

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in learning, synaptic plasticity, neurotransmission, and numerous neurological disorders. We previously showed that conditional loss of Cdk5 in adult mice enhanced hippocampal learning and plasticity via modulation of calpain-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) degradation. In the present study, we characterize the enhanced synaptic plasticity and examine the effects of long-term Cdk5 loss on hippocampal excitability in adult mice. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) from the Schaffer collateral CA1 subregion of the hippocampus (SC/CA1) reveal that loss of Cdk5 altered theta burst topography and enhanced post-tetanic potentiation. Since Cdk5 governs NMDAR NR2B subunit levels, we investigated the effects of long-term Cdk5 knockout on hippocampal neuronal excitability by measuring NMDAR-mediated fEPSP magnitudes and population-spike thresholds. Long-term loss of Cdk5 led to increased Mg(2+)-sensitive potentials and a lower threshold for epileptiform activity and seizures. Biochemical analyses were performed to better understand the role of Cdk5 in seizures. Induced-seizures in wild-type animals led to elevated amounts of p25, the Cdk5-activating cofactor. Long-term, but not acute, loss of Cdk5 led to decreased p25 levels, suggesting that Cdk5/p25 may be activated as a homeostatic mechanism to attenuate epileptiform activity. These findings indicate that Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity, controls neuronal and behavioral stimulus-induced excitability and may be a novel pharmacological target for cognitive and anticonvulsant therapies. PMID:19529798

  6. A calcium-dependent protein kinase is systemically induced upon wounding in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Chico, José Manuel; Raíces, Marcela; Téllez-Iñón, María Teresa; Ulloa, Rita María

    2002-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone (LeCDPK1) from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) encoding a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) was isolated by screening a cDNA library from tomato cell cultures exposed to Cladosporium fulvum elicitor preparations. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA reveals a high degree of similarity with other members of the CDPK family. LeCDPK1 has a putative N-terminal myristoylation sequence and presents a possible palmitoylation site. The in vitro translated protein conserves the biochemical properties of a member of the CDPK family. In addition, CDPK activity was detected in soluble and particulate extracts of tomato leaves. Basal levels of LeCDPK1 mRNA were detected by northern-blot analysis in roots, stems, leaves, and flowers of tomato plants. The expression of LeCDPK1 was rapidly and transiently enhanced in detached tomato leaves treated with pathogen elicitors and H2O2. Moreover, when tomato greenhouse plants were subjected to mechanical wounding, a transient increase of LeCDPK1 steady-state mRNA levels was detected locally at the site of the injury and systemically in distant non-wounded leaves. The increase observed in LeCDPK1 mRNA upon wounding correlates with an increase in the amount and in the activity of a soluble CDPK detected in extracts of tomato leaves, suggesting that this kinase is part of physiological plant defense mechanisms against biotic or abiotic attacks. PMID:11788771

  7. Topical alpha-selective p38 MAP kinase inhibition reduces acute skin inflammation in guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Ma, Jing Ying; Reddy, Mamtha; Esikova, Irina; Kerr, Irene; Movius, Fabiola; Higgins, Linda S; Protter, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Certain skin pathologies, including psoriasis, are thought to be immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Available literature clearly indicates the involvement of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, T cells, and macrophages), their cytokines, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Neutrophils play an important role in the formation of acute inflammatory changes in psoriasis. Acute inflammation or acute flares in psoriasis remain poorly addressed in clinical medicine. In this communication, we first establish a simple and reproducible model for studying neutrophil-mediated acute skin inflammation. Using the hairless guinea pig, due to the similarity of skin architecture to that of human, acute inflammation was induced with an intradermal injection of 50 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in 50 μL solution. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured by MPO-positive neutrophils and shown to increase for 24-hours post-injection. Simultaneously, the level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK was documented for 48-hours post-LPS injection in the skin. Next, we used this model to examine the therapeutic potential of an α-selective p38 MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469. A comparison of topical application of SCIO-469 at 5 mg/mL or 15 mg/mL to vehicle revealed that SCIO-469 dose-dependently reduces acute skin inflammation and that this effect is statistically significant at the higher dose. Further examination of tissues that received this dose also revealed statistically significant reduction of MPO activity, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, interleukin-6, and cyclooxygenase-2. These data suggest that the α-selective p38 MAPK inhibitor, SCIO-469, acts as a topical anti-inflammatory agent via the p38 MAPK pathway to reduce neutrophil induced acute inflammation in the skin. These observations suggest that α-selective p38 MAPK inhibition may be an effective therapeutic strategy to manage acute skin inflammation PMID:22096353

  8. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and chromosomal localization of human CDKN2D/INK4d, an inhibitor of cyclin D-dependent kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, Tsukasa; Shurtleff, S.A.; Downing, J.R.

    1995-10-10

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is dependent on the activity of holoenzymes formed between D-type cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases cdk4 and cdk6. p16{sup INK4a} p15{sup INK4b}, and p18{sup INK4c}, a group of structurally related proteins, function as specific inhibitors of the cyclin D-dependent kinases and are likely to play physiologic roles as specific regulators of these kinases in vivo. A new member of the INK4 gene family, murine INK4d, has recently been identified. Here we report the isolation of human INK4d (gene symbol CDKN2D), which is 86 identical at the amino acid level to the murine clone and {approximately}44% identical to each of the other human INK4 family members. The INK4d gene is ubiquitously expressed as a single 1.4-kb mRNA with the highest levels detected in thymus, spleen, peripheral blood leukocytes, fetal liver, brain, and testes. The abundance of INK4d mRNA oscillates in a cell-cycle-dependent manner with expression lowest at mid G1 and maximal during S phase. Using a P1-phage genomic clone of INK4d for fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, the location of this gene was mapped to chromosome 19p13. No rearrangements or deletions of the INK4d gene were observed in Southern blot analysis of selected cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) containing a variant (1;19)(q23;p13) translocation that lacks rearrangement of either E2A or PBX1, or in ALL cases containing homozygous or hemizygous deletions of the related genes, INK4a and INK4b. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Heterozygous Mutations in MAP3K7, Encoding TGF-β-Activated Kinase 1, Cause Cardiospondylocarpofacial Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Carine; Rogers, Curtis; Le Goff, Wilfried; Pinto, Graziella; Bonnet, Damien; Chrabieh, Maya; Alibeu, Olivier; Nistchke, Patrick; Munnich, Arnold; Picard, Capucine; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiospondylocarpofacial (CSCF) syndrome is characterized by growth retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly with carpal-tarsal fusion and extensive posterior cervical vertebral synostosis, cardiac septal defects with valve dysplasia, and deafness with inner ear malformations. Whole-exome sequencing identified heterozygous MAP3K7 mutations in six distinct CSCF-affected individuals from four families and ranging in age from 5 to 37 years. MAP3K7 encodes transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), which is involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-p38 signaling pathway. MAPK-p38 signaling was markedly altered when expression of non-canonical TGF-β-driven target genes was impaired. These findings support the loss of transcriptional control of the TGF-β-MAPK-p38 pathway in fibroblasts obtained from affected individuals. Surprisingly, although TAK1 is located at the crossroad of inflammation, immunity, and cancer, this study reports MAP3K7 mutations in a developmental disorder affecting mainly cartilage, bone, and heart. PMID:27426734

  10. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-06-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets.

  11. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Scholpa, Natalie E; Briggs, Sherri B; Wagner, John J; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21(-/-) mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid-induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21(-/-) mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21(-/-) mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21(-/-) mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors.

  12. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  13. The cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 directly regulates vacuole inheritance.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yutian; Weisman, Lois S

    2008-09-01

    In budding yeast, vacuole inheritance is tightly coordinated with the cell cycle. The movement of vacuoles and several other organelles is actin-based and is mediated by interaction between the yeast myosin V motor Myo2 and organelle-specific adaptors. Myo2 binds to vacuoles via the adaptor protein Vac17, which binds to the vacuole membrane protein Vac8. Here we show that the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 phosphorylates Vac17 and that phosphorylation of Vac17 parallels cell cycle-dependent movement of the vacuole. Substitution of the Cdk1 sites in Vac17 decreases its interaction with Myo2 and causes a partial defect in vacuole inheritance. This defect is enhanced in the presence of Myo2 with mutated phosphorylation sites. Thus, Cdk1 appears to control the timing of vacuole movement. The presence of multiple predicted Cdk1 sites in other organelle-specific myosin V adaptors suggests that the inheritance of other cytoplasmic organelles may be regulated by a similar mechanism.

  14. Context-dependent transcriptional interpretation of mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoosik; Iagovitina, Antonina; Ishihara, Keisuke; Fitzgerald, Kate M.; Deplancke, Bart; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Terminal regions of the Drosophila embryo are patterned by the localized activation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK), which induces zygotic genes through relief of their repression by transcriptional repressor Capicua. The levels of MAPK activation at the anterior and posterior termini are close to each other, but the expression patterns of MAPK-target genes, such as zerknüllt (zen) and tailless (tll), display strong anterior-posterior (AP) asymmetry. This region-specific response to MAPK activation provides a clear example of context-dependent interpretation of inductive signaling, a common developmental effect that remains poorly understood. In the past, the AP asymmetry of zen expression was attributed to a mechanism that depends on MAPK substrate competition. We present data suggesting that the asymmetric expression of tll is generated by a different mechanism, based on feedforward control and multiple enhancers of the tll gene. A simple mathematical model of this mechanism correctly predicts how the wild-type expression pattern of tll changes in mutants affecting the anterior, dorsoventral, and terminal patterning systems and some of their direct targets. PMID:23822503

  15. RhoG regulates anoikis through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Nao; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori . E-mail: hirokato@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-01

    In normal epithelial cells, cell-matrix interaction is required for cell survival and proliferation, whereas disruption of this interaction causes epithelial cells to undergo apoptosis called anoikis. Here we show that the small GTPase RhoG plays an important role in the regulation of anoikis. HeLa cells are capable of anchorage-independent cell growth and acquire resistance to anoikis. We found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RhoG promoted anoikis in HeLa cells. Previous studies have shown that RhoG activates Rac1 and induces several cellular functions including promotion of cell migration through its effector ELMO and the ELMO-binding protein Dock180 that function as a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. However, RhoG-induced suppression of anoikis was independent of the ELMO- and Dock180-mediated activation of Rac1. On the other hand, the regulation of anoikis by RhoG required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, and constitutively active RhoG bound to the PI3K regulatory subunit p85{alpha} and induced the PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of Akt. Taken together, these results suggest that RhoG protects cells from apoptosis caused by the loss of anchorage through a PI3K-dependent mechanism, independent of its activation of Rac1.

  16. Myristic Acid Enhances Diacylglycerol Kinase δ-Dependent Glucose Uptake in Myotubes.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuko; Sakiyama, Shizuka; Sakai, Hiromichi; Sakane, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    Decreased expression of diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) δ in skeletal muscles attenuates glucose uptake and is closely related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Therefore, up-regulation of DGKδ expression is thought to protect and improve glucose homoeostasis in type 2 diabetes. We recently determined that myristic acid (14:0), but not palmitic (16:0) or stearic (18:0) acid, significantly increased DGKδ2 protein expression in mouse C2C12 myotubes. In the current study, we analyzed whether myristic acid indeed enhances glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. We observed that myristic acid caused ~1.4-fold increase in insulin-independent glucose uptake. However, palmitic and stearic acids failed to enhance glucose uptake. DGKδ-specific siRNA decreased myristic acid-dependent increase of glucose uptake. Moreover, overexpression of DGKδ2 enhanced glucose uptake in C2C12 cells in the absence of myristic acid treatment. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that myristic acid enhances basal glucose uptake in myotubes in a DGKδ2 expression-dependent manner.

  17. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  18. Calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, kinases, and transcriptional corepressors involved in T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun O.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The second messenger calcium plays an essential role in mediating the TCR signaling pathway leading to cytokine production and T cell clonal expansion. The immunosuppressive drugs cyclosproin A (CsA) and FK506 have served both as therapeutic agents and as molecular probes for unraveling the protein phosphatase calcineurin as a rate-limiting enzyme involved in the transmission of calcium signal from the cytosol into the nucleus to reprogram gene expression. The use of mouse knockout models has helped to verify and further elucidate the functions of different isoforms of calcineurin in both helper T cell activation and thymocyte development. In addition to calcineurin, three other classes of calmodulin-binding proteins have also been shown to play important roles in calcium signaling in T cells. Thus, Cabin1 and class II HDACs have been found to constitute a novel calcium-signaling module in conjunction with the transcription factor myocyte enhance factor family and the transcriptional coactivator p300 to suppress and activate cytokine gene transcription in a calcium-dependent manner. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) II and IV were also shown to play negative and positive regulatory functions, respectively, in TCR-mediated cytokine production. The crosstalks among these and other signal transducers in T cells form an extensive non-linear signaling network that dictates the final outcome of the TCR signaling pathway. PMID:19290928

  19. Interferon-Gamma Increases Endothelial Permeability by Causing Activation of p38 MAP Kinase and Actin Cytoskeleton Alteration.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chin Theng; Fong, Lai Yen; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Yong, Yoke Keong; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Ahmad, Zuraini

    2015-07-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is known to potentiate the progression of inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and atherosclerosis. IFN-γ has been found to disrupt the barrier integrity of epithelial and endothelial cell both in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanisms of IFN-γ underlying increased endothelial cell permeability have not been extensively elucidated. We reported that IFN-γ exhibits a biphasic nature in increasing endothelial permeability. The changes observed in the first phase (4-8 h) involve cell retraction and rounding in addition to condensed peripheral F-actin without a significant change in the F-/G-actin ratio. However, cell elongation, stress fiber formation, and an increased F-/G-actin ratio were noticed in the second phase (16-24 h). Consistent with our finding from the permeability assay, IFN-γ induced the formation of intercellular gaps in both phases. A delayed phase of increased permeability was observed at 12 h, which paralleled the onset of cell elongation, stress fiber formation, and increased F-/G-actin ratio. In addition, IFN-γ stimulated p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation over a 24 h period. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase by SB203580 prevented increases in paracellular permeability, actin rearrangement, and increases in the F-/G-actin ratio caused by IFN-γ. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase is activated in response to IFN-γ and causes actin rearrangement and altered cell morphology, which in turn mediates endothelial cell hyperpermeability. The F-/G-actin ratio might be involved in the regulation of actin distribution and cell morphology rather than the increased permeability induced by IFN-γ.

  20. PDK2: the missing piece in the receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway puzzle.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lily Q; Liu, Feng

    2005-08-01

    Activation of members of the protein kinase AGC (cAMP dependent, cGMP dependent, and protein kinase C) family is regulated primarily by phosphorylation at two sites: a conserved threonine residue in the activation loop and a serine/threonine residue in a hydrophobic motif (HM) near the COOH terminus. Although phosphorylation of these kinases in the activation loop has been found to be mediated by phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1), the kinase(s) that catalyzes AGC kinase phosphorylation in the HM remains uncharacterized. So far, at least 10 kinases have been suggested to function as an HM kinase or the so-called "PDK2," including mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase-activated protein kinase-2 (MK2), integrin-linked kinase (ILK), p38 MAP kinase, protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha), PKCbeta, the NIMA-related kinase-6 (NEK6), the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the double-stranded DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNK-PK), and the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product. However, whether any or all of these kinases act as a physiological HM kinase remains to be established. Nonetheless, available data suggest that multiple systems may be used in cells to regulate the activation of the AGC family kinases. It is possible that, unlike activation loop phosphorylation, phosphorylation of the HM site in the different AGC family kinases is mediated by distinct kinases. In addition, phosphorylation of the AGC family kinase at the HM site could be cell type, signaling pathway, and substrate specific. Identification and characterization of the bonafide HM kinase(s) will be essential to verify these hypotheses. PMID:16014356

  1. Age-dependent variations of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities in water buffalo calf serum.

    PubMed

    Avallone, L; Lombardi, P; Florio, S; d'Angelo, A; Bogin, E

    1996-12-01

    The electrophoretic patterns of the serum enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase from water buffalo calves are described. Differences in total activities as well as their relative distribution were seen at ages ranging from 1 to 10 weeks. While total lactate dehydrogenase activity increased by over 100%, total creatine kinase increased by almost 400%. The relative activities of lactate dehydrogenase 1 and 5 decreased with age. Lactate dehydrogenase 2 and 3 increased and lactate dehydrogenase 4 did not change. In relation to creatine kinase, the prevalent isoenzyme was creatine kinase-MM, but it's relative activity gradually decreased in comparison to the other two isoenzymes (creatine kinase-MB and creatine kinase-BB). Creatine kinase-BB was completely absent until the 3rd week of age. The percentage modifications of creatine kinase isoenzymes were correlated to age. The results suggest that isoenzymatic separation and characterization of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in relation to the various tissues can significantly contribute to the diagnosis of diseases which are linked to tissue damage.

  2. The gene for creatine kinase, mitochondrial 2 (sarcomeric; CKMT2), maps to chromosome 5q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, I.; Devaud, C. ); Cherif, D.; Cohen, D.; Beckmann, J.S. )

    1993-10-01

    YAC clones for the creatine kinase, mitochrondial 2 (sarcomeric; CKMT2), gene were isolated. One of these YACs was localized on chromosome 5q13.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. A polymorphic dinucleotide repeat (heterozygosity 0.77) was identified within the seventh intron of the CKMT2 gene. Genotyping of CEPH families allowed positioning of CKMT2 on the multipoint map of chromosome 5 between D5S424 and D5S428, distal to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) (5q12-q14). 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  3. Activity of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Habituation in "Drosophila melanogaster"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiner, Ricarda; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Erber, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) has many cellular functions in vertebrates and insects that affect complex behaviors such as locomotion and foraging. The "foraging" ("for") gene encodes a PKG in "Drosophila melanogaster." Here, we demonstrate a function for the "for" gene in sensory responsiveness and nonassociative learning. Larvae of the…

  4. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  5. Rewiring MAP kinases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to regulate novel targets through ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Benjamin; Khakhar, Arjun; Nadel, Cory M; Gardner, Richard G; Seelig, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has often copied and repurposed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling module. Understanding how connections form during evolution, in disease and across individuals requires knowledge of the basic tenets that govern kinase-substrate interactions. We identify criteria sufficient for establishing regulatory links between a MAPK and a non-native substrate. The yeast MAPK Fus3 and human MAPK ERK2 can be functionally redirected if only two conditions are met: the kinase and substrate contain matching interaction domains and the substrate includes a phospho-motif that can be phosphorylated by the kinase and recruit a downstream effector. We used a panel of interaction domains and phosphorylation-activated degradation motifs to demonstrate modular and scalable retargeting. We applied our approach to reshape the signaling behavior of an existing kinase pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that a MAPK can be largely defined by its interaction domains and compatible phospho-motifs and provide insight into how MAPK-substrate connections form. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15200.001 PMID:27525484

  6. Rewiring MAP kinases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to regulate novel targets through ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Groves, Benjamin; Khakhar, Arjun; Nadel, Cory M; Gardner, Richard G; Seelig, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Evolution has often copied and repurposed the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling module. Understanding how connections form during evolution, in disease and across individuals requires knowledge of the basic tenets that govern kinase-substrate interactions. We identify criteria sufficient for establishing regulatory links between a MAPK and a non-native substrate. The yeast MAPK Fus3 and human MAPK ERK2 can be functionally redirected if only two conditions are met: the kinase and substrate contain matching interaction domains and the substrate includes a phospho-motif that can be phosphorylated by the kinase and recruit a downstream effector. We used a panel of interaction domains and phosphorylation-activated degradation motifs to demonstrate modular and scalable retargeting. We applied our approach to reshape the signaling behavior of an existing kinase pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that a MAPK can be largely defined by its interaction domains and compatible phospho-motifs and provide insight into how MAPK-substrate connections form.

  7. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase and its closely related kinase genes in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Cheng, Junbin; Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zhuoli; Li, Jiazhi; Mou, Shaoliang; Qiu, Ailian; Lai, Yan; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a genome wide comprehensive analysis of genes encoding CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs) was performed in pepper, a total of 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and 8 CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

  8. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase and its closely related kinase genes in Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hanyang; Cheng, Junbin; Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zhuoli; Li, Jiazhi; Mou, Shaoliang; Qiu, Ailian; Lai, Yan; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a genome wide comprehensive analysis of genes encoding CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs) was performed in pepper, a total of 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and 8 CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families. PMID:26442050

  9. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase and its closely related kinase genes in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Cheng, Junbin; Yan, Yan; Xiao, Zhuoli; Li, Jiazhi; Mou, Shaoliang; Qiu, Ailian; Lai, Yan; Guan, Deyi; He, Shuilin

    2015-01-01

    As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a genome wide comprehensive analysis of genes encoding CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs) was performed in pepper, a total of 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and 8 CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families. PMID:26442050

  10. Diacylglycerol kinase theta is translocated and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependently activated by noradrenaline but not angiotensin II in intact small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A J; Draeger, A; Houssa, B; van Blitterswijk , W J; Ohanian, V; Ohanian, J

    2001-01-01

    Diacylglycerol (DG) kinase (DGK) phosphorylates the lipid second messenger DG to phosphatidic acid. We reported previously that noradrenaline (NA), but not angiotensin II (AII), increases membrane-associated DGK activity in rat small arteries [Ohanian and Heagerty (1994) Biochem. J. 300, 51-56]. Here, we have identified this DGK activity as DGKtheta, present in both smooth muscle and endothelial cells of these small vessels. Subcellular fractionation of artery homogenates revealed that DGKtheta was present in nuclear, plasma membrane (and/or Golgi) and cytosolic fractions. Upon NA stimulation, DGKtheta translocated towards the membrane and cytosol (155 and 153% increases relative to the control, respectively) at 30 s, followed by a return to near-basal levels at 5 min; AII was without effect. Translocation to the membrane was to both Triton-soluble and -insoluble fractions. NA, but not AII, transiently increased DGKtheta activity in immunoprecipitates (126% at 60 s). Membrane translocation and DGKtheta activation were regulated differently: NA-induced DGKtheta activation, but not translocation, was dependent on transient activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K). In addition, DGK activity co-immunoprecipitated with protein kinase B, a downstream effector of PI 3-K, and was increased greatly by NA stimulation. The rapid and agonist-specific activation of DGKtheta suggests that this pathway may have a physiological role in vascular smooth-muscle responses. PMID:11115406

  11. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  12. Dose-dependent impairment of inhibitory avoidance retention in rats by immediate post-training infusion of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor into cortical structures.

    PubMed

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Quevedo, J; Rockenbach, I C; Amaral, O B; Vianna, M R; Lenz, G; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    1999-11-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase abundantly expressed in postmitotic neurons of the developed nervous system. MAPK is activated in and required for both the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal slices and the acquisition of fear conditioning training in rats. The present work was performed in order to test the effect of the specific inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MAPKK), PD 098059, on retention of a step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally injected (0.5 microl/side) with PD 098059 (at 0.5, 5, or 50 microM) or vehicle into the entorhinal cortex or into the parietal cortex immediately after IA training using a 0.4 mA footshock. Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. PD 098059 impaired retention when injected into the entorhinal cortex at the dose of 50 microM, but not at the doses of 5 or 0.5 microM. When infused into the parietal cortex, PD 098059 was amnestic at the doses of 5 and 50 microM. The drug had no effect when infused at the highest dose in either structure 6 h after training. Our results suggest that the MAPKK inhibitor impairs IA retention memory in a dose-dependent manner when injected immediately after training into entorhinal cortex or parietal cortex. The effective dose is variable according to the neocortical structure studied.

  13. Gene-Environment Interactions Target Mitogen-activated Protein 3 Kinase 1 (MAP3K1) Signaling in Eyelid Morphogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Jingjing; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Puga, Alvaro; Xia, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions determine the biological outcomes through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Mouse embryonic eyelid closure is a well defined model to study the genetic control of developmental programs. Using this model, we investigated how exposure to dioxin-like environmental pollutants modifies the genetic risk of developmental abnormalities. Our studies reveal that mitogen-activated protein 3 kinase 1 (MAP3K1) signaling is a focal point of gene-environment cross-talk. Dioxin exposure, acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), blocked eyelid closure in genetic mutants in which MAP3K1 signaling was attenuated but did not disturb this developmental program in either wild type or mutant mice with attenuated epidermal growth factor receptor or WNT signaling. Exposure also markedly inhibited c-Jun phosphorylation in Map3k1+/− embryonic eyelid epithelium, suggesting that dioxin-induced AHR pathways can synergize with gene mutations to inhibit MAP3K1 signaling. Our studies uncover a novel mechanism through which the dioxin-AHR axis interacts with the MAP3K1 signaling pathways during fetal development and provide strong empirical evidence that specific gene alterations can increase the risk of developmental abnormalities driven by environmental pollutant exposure. PMID:26109068

  14. Gabapentin activates ROMK1 channels by a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C-H; Tsai, T-S; Liou, H-H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gabapentin is an effective anticonvulsant. The major physiological function of renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK1) channels is to maintain the resting membrane potential (RMP). We investigated the effect of gabapentin on ROMK1 channels and the mechanism involved. Experimental approach: Xenopus oocytes were injected with mRNA coding for wild-type or mutant ROMK1 channels and giant inside-out patch-clamp recordings were performed. Key results: Gabapentin increased the activity of ROMK1 channels, concentration-dependently and enhanced the activity of wild-type and an intracellular pH (pHi)-gating residue mutant (K80M) channels over a range of pHi. Gabapentin also increased activity of channels mutated at phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-binding sites (R188Q, R217A and K218A). However, gabapentin failed to enhance channel activity in the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors and did not activate phosphorylation site mutants (S44A, S219A or S313A), mutants that mimicked the negative charge carried by a phosphate group bound to a serine (S44D, S219D or S313D), or a mutated channel with a positive charge (S219R). These findings show that gabapentin activates ROMK1 channels independently of the pHi and not via a PIP2-dependent pathway. The effects of gabapentin on ROMK1 channels may be due to a PKA-mediated phosphorylation-induced conformational change, but not to charge–charge interactions. Conclusions and implications: ROMK1 channels are the main channels responsible for maintaining the RMP during cellular excitation. Gabapentin increased the activity of ROMK1 channels by a PKA-dependent mechanism, reducing neuronal excitability, and this may play an important role in its antiepileptic effect. PMID:18311184

  15. Activation dependent expression of MMPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells involves protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Saja, K; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Chatterjee, B P; Sudhakaran, P R

    2007-02-01

    Monocyte/Macrophages are integral cellular components of inflammation. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) produced by these cells play a crucial role in every aspect of inflammation. Results of the investigations on activation dependent upregulation of MMPs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in culture using different lectins as an in vitro model system to mimic inflammatory monocytes are presented. Under normal physiological conditions the monocytes produced only very low amount of MMPs in an indomethacin insensitive PG/cAMP independent manner. Zymographic analysis and ELISA showed that treatment of monocyte with lectins like concanavalin A (ConA), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA) caused upregulation of MMPs and the maximum effect was produced by ALA. ALA significantly upregulated MMP-9 in a concentration and time dependent manner. Immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR confirmed ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 production. Inhibition of ALA effect by indomethacin and reversal of the indomethacin effect by Bt(2)cAMP indicated involvement of cAMP dependent signaling pathway. Further support for the prostaglandin mediated effect was obtained by the upregulation of cyclooxygenase by ALA. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the expression of MMP-9 indicating that ALA mediated upregulation of MMP-9 is mediated through PKA pathway. Increase in MMP production and increase in cyclooxygenase activity and inhibition of the effect of ALA on MMP production by indomethacin suggested that the ALA activated monocytes in culture can be used as an in vitro model system to study the intracellular signaling process involved in the mediation of inflammatory response.

  16. Evidence for protein kinase C-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in T cells: potential role of additional diacylglycerol binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Puente, L G; Stone, J C; Ostergaard, H L

    2000-12-15

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) is a critical signal transduction event for CTL activation, but the signaling mechanisms responsible are not fully characterized. Protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to contribute to MAPK activation following TCR stimulation. We have found that dependence on PKC varies with the method used to stimulate the T cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in CTL stimulated with soluble cross-linked anti-CD3 is completely inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM). In contrast, only the later time points in the course of ERK activation are sensitive to BIM when CTL are stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, a condition that stimulates CTL degranulation. Surprisingly, MAPK activation in response to immobilized anti-CD3 is strongly inhibited at all time points by the diacylglycerol (DAG)-binding domain inhibitor calphostin C implicating the contribution of a DAG-dependent but PKC-independent pathway in the activation of ERK in CTL clones. Chronic exposure to phorbol ester down-regulates the expression of DAG-responsive PKC isoforms; however, this treatment of CTL clones does not inhibit anti-CD3-induced activation of MAPK. Phorbol ester-treated cells have reduced expression of several isoforms of PKC but still express the recently described DAG-binding Ras guanylnucleotide-releasing protein. These results indicate that the late phase of MAPK activation in CTL clones in response to immobilized anti-CD3 stimulation requires PKC while the early phase requires a DAG-dependent, BIM-resistant component.

  17. Discriminating of ATP competitive Src kinase inhibitors and decoys using self-organizing map and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aixia; Hu, Xiaoying; Wang, Kai; Sun, Jing

    2013-02-01

    A data set containing 686 Src kinase inhibitors and 1,941 Src kinase non-binding decoys was collected and used to build two classification models to distinguish inhibitors from decoys. The data set was randomly split into a training set (458 inhibitors and 972 decoys) and a test set (228 inhibitors and 969 decoys). Each molecule was represented by five global molecular descriptors and 18 2D property autocorrelation descriptors calculated using the program ADRIANA.Code. Two machine learning methods, a Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) and a support vector machine (SVM), were utilized for the training and classification. For the test set, classification accuracy (ACC) of 99.92% and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.98 were achieved for the SOM model; ACC of 99.33% and MCC of 0.98 were obtained for the SVM model. Some molecular properties, such as molecular weight, number of atoms in a molecule, hydrogen bond properties, polarizabilities, electronegativities, and hydrophobicities, were found to be important for the inhibition of Src kinase.

  18. ERK1/2 MAP kinases promote cell cycle entry by rapid, kinase-independent disruption of retinoblastoma-lamin A complexes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Javier; Calvo, Fernando; González, José M; Casar, Berta; Andrés, Vicente; Crespo, Piero

    2010-11-29

    As orchestrators of essential cellular processes like proliferation, ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals impact on cell cycle regulation. A-type lamins are major constituents of the nuclear matrix that also control the cell cycle machinery by largely unknown mechanisms. In this paper, we disclose a functional liaison between ERK1/2 and lamin A whereby cell cycle progression is regulated. We demonstrate that lamin A serves as a mutually exclusive dock for ERK1/2 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Our results reveal that, immediately after their postactivation entrance in the nucleus, ERK1/2 dislodge Rb from its interaction with lamin A, thereby facilitating its rapid phosphorylation and consequently promoting E2F activation and cell cycle entry. Interestingly, these effects are independent of ERK1/2 kinase activity. We also show that cellular transformation and tumor cell proliferation are dependent on the balance between lamin A and nuclear ERK1/2 levels, which determines Rb accessibility for phosphorylation/inactivation.

  19. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  20. Diacylglycerol kinase epsilon in bovine and rat photoreceptor cells. Light-dependent distribution in photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Natalini, Paola M; Zulian, Sandra E; Ilincheta de Boschero, Mónica G; Giusto, Norma M

    2013-07-01

    The present study shows the selective light-dependent distribution of 1,2-diacylglycerol kinase epsilon (DAGKɛ) in photoreceptor cells from bovine and albino rat retina. Immunofluorescence microscopy in isolated rod outer segments from bleached bovine retinas (BBROS) revealed a higher DAGKɛ signal than that found in rod outer segments from dark-adapted bovine retinas (BDROS). The light-dependent outer segment localization of DAGKɛ was also observed by immunohistochemistry in retinas from albino rats. DAGK activity, measured in terms of phosphatidic acid formation from a) [(3)H]DAG and ATP in the presence of EGTA and R59022, a type I DAGK inhibitor, or b) [γ-(32)P]ATP and 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (SAG), was found to be significantly higher in BBROS than in BDROS. Higher light-dependent DAGK activity (condition b) was also found when ROS were isolated from dark-adapted rat retinas exposed to light. Western blot analysis of isolated ROS proteins from bovine and rat retinas confirmed that illumination increases DAGKɛ content in the outer segments of these two species. Light-dependent DAGKɛ localization in the outer segment was not observed when U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, was present prior to the exposure of rat eyecups (in situ model) to light. Furthermore, no increased PA synthesis from [(3)H]DAG and ATP was observed in the presence of neomycin prior to the exposure of bovine eyecups to light. Interestingly, when BBROS were pre-phosphorylated with ATP in the presence of 1,2-dioctanoyl sn-glycerol (di-C8) or phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) as PKC activation conditions, higher DAGK activity was observed than in dephosphorylated controls. Taken together, our findings suggest that the selective distribution of DAGKɛ in photoreceptor cells is a light-dependent mechanism that promotes increased SAG removal and synthesis of 1-stearoyl, 2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid in the sensorial portion of this cell, thus demonstrating a novel mechanism of light

  1. Identification and Characterization of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Gene Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinü; Jiang, Feng; Shi, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xingjian; Yang, Huipeng; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) play key roles at different checkpoint regulations of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, only few studies of lepidoptera CDK family proteins have been reported so far. In this study, we performed the cDNA sequencing of 10 members of the CDK family in Bombyx mori. Gene structure analysis suggested that CDK12 and CDC2L1 owned two and three isoforms, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CDK genes in different species were highly conserved, implying that they evolved independently even before the split between vertebrates and invertebrates. We found that the expression levels of BmCDKs in 13 tissues of fifth-instar day 3 larvae were different: CDK1, CDK7, and CDK9 had a high level of expression, whereas CDK4 was low-level expressed and was detected only in the testes and fat body cells. Similar expression profiles of BmCDKs during embryo development were obtained. Among the variants of CDK12, CDK12 transcript variant A had the highest expression, and the expression of CDC2L1 transcript variant A was the highest among the variants of CDC2L1. It was shown from the RNAi experiments that the silencing of CDK1, CDK10, CDK12, and CDC2L1 could influence the cells from G0/G1 to S phase transition.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase regulates the length of S phase through TICRR/TRESLIN phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Goins, Duane; Siefert, Joseph C.; Clowdus, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    S-phase cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) stimulate replication initiation and accelerate progression through the replication timing program, but it is unknown which CDK substrates are responsible for these effects. CDK phosphorylation of the replication factor TICRR (TopBP1-interacting checkpoint and replication regulator)/TRESLIN is required for DNA replication. We show here that phosphorylated TICRR is limiting for S-phase progression. Overexpression of a TICRR mutant with phosphomimetic mutations at two key CDK-phosphorylated residues (TICRRTESE) stimulates DNA synthesis and shortens S phase by increasing replication initiation. This effect requires the TICRR region that is necessary for its interaction with MDM two-binding protein. Expression of TICRRTESE does not grossly alter the spatial organization of replication forks in the nucleus but does increase replication clusters and the number of replication forks within each cluster. In contrast to CDK hyperactivation, the acceleration of S-phase progression by TICRRTESE does not induce DNA damage. These results show that CDK can stimulate initiation and compress the replication timing program by phosphorylating a single protein, suggesting a simple mechanism by which S-phase length is controlled. PMID:25737283

  3. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  4. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Grant S.; DeBello, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII) in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults. PMID:25789177

  5. Selected Contribution: Skeletal muscle focal adhesion kinase, paxillin, and serum response factor are loading dependent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, S. E.; Fluck, M.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation examined the effect of mechanical loading state on focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and serum response factor (SRF) in rat skeletal muscle. We found that FAK concentration and tyrosine phosphorylation, paxillin concentration, and SRF concentration are all lower in the lesser load-bearing fast-twitch plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles compared with the greater load-bearing slow-twitch soleus muscle. Of these three muscles, 7 days of mechanical unloading via tail suspension elicited a decrease in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation only in the soleus muscle and decreases in FAK and paxillin concentrations only in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles. Unloading decreased SRF concentration in all three muscles. Mechanical overloading (via bilateral gastrocnemius ablation) for 1 or 8 days increased FAK and paxillin concentrations in the soleus and plantaris muscles. Additionally, whereas FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and SRF concentration were increased by < or =1 day of overloading in the soleus muscle, these increases did not occur until somewhere between 1 and 8 days of overloading in the plantaris muscle. These data indicate that, in the skeletal muscles of rats, the focal adhesion complex proteins FAK and paxillin and the transcription factor SRF are generally modulated in association with the mechanical loading state of the muscle. However, the somewhat different patterns of adaptation of these proteins to altered loading in slow- vs. fast-twitch skeletal muscles indicate that the mechanisms and time course of adaptation may partly depend on the prior loading state of the muscle.

  6. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  7. Subcellular targeting of nine calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms from Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dammann, Christian; Ichida, Audrey; Hong, Bimei; Romanowsky, Shawn M.; Hrabak, Estelle M.; Harmon, Alice C.; Pickard, Barbara G.; Harper, Jeffrey F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are specific to plants and some protists. Their activation by calcium makes them important switches for the transduction of intracellular calcium signals. Here, we identify the subcellular targeting potentials for nine CDPK isoforms from Arabidopsis, as determined by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in transgenic plants. Subcellular locations were determined by fluorescence microscopy in cells near the root tip. Isoforms AtCPK3-GFP and AtCPK4-GFP showed a nuclear and cytosolic distribution similar to that of free GFP. Membrane fractionation experiments confirmed that these isoforms were primarily soluble. A membrane association was observed for AtCPKs 1, 7, 8, 9, 16, 21, and 28, based on imaging and membrane fractionation experiments. This correlates with the presence of potential N-terminal acylation sites, consistent with acylation as an important factor in membrane association. All but one of the membrane-associated isoforms targeted exclusively to the plasma membrane. The exception was AtCPK1-GFP, which targeted to peroxisomes, as determined by covisualization with a peroxisome marker. Peroxisome targeting of AtCPK1-GFP was disrupted by a deletion of two potential N-terminal acylation sites. The observation of a peroxisome-located CDPK suggests a mechanism for calcium regulation of peroxisomal functions involved in oxidative stress and lipid metabolism.

  8. Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors and the road to polyploidy