Science.gov

Sample records for mapping array identifies

  1. System and method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array

    DOEpatents

    Bixler, Jay V; Brandt, Timothy G; Conger, James L; Lawson, Janice K

    2013-05-21

    A method for generating a deselect mapping for a focal plane array according to one embodiment includes gathering a data set for a focal plane array when exposed to light or radiation from a first known target; analyzing the data set for determining which pixels or subpixels of the focal plane array to add to a deselect mapping; adding the pixels or subpixels to the deselect mapping based on the analysis; and storing the deselect mapping. A method for gathering data using a focal plane array according to another embodiment includes deselecting pixels or subpixels based on a deselect mapping; gathering a data set using pixels or subpixels in a focal plane array that are not deselected upon exposure thereof to light or radiation from a target of interest; and outputting the data set.

  2. Using peptide array to identify binding motifs and interaction networks for modular domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Shawn S-C; Wu, Chenggang

    2009-01-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions underlie all essential biological processes and form the basis of cellular signal transduction. The recognition of a short, linear peptide sequence in one protein by a modular domain in another represents a common theme of macromolecular recognition in cells, and the importance of this mode of protein-protein interaction is highlighted by the large number of peptide-binding domains encoded by the human genome. This phenomenon also provides a unique opportunity to identify protein-protein binding events using peptide arrays and complementary biochemical assays. Accordingly, high-density peptide array has emerged as a useful tool by which to map domain-mediated protein-protein interaction networks at the proteome level. Using the Src-homology 2 (SH2) and 3 (SH3) domains as examples, we describe the application of oriented peptide array libraries in uncovering specific motifs recognized by an SH2 domain and the use of high-density peptide arrays in identifying interaction networks mediated by the SH3 domain. Methods reviewed here could also be applied to other modular domains, including catalytic domains, that recognize linear peptide sequences.

  3. Mapping Capacitive Coupling Among Pixels in a Sensor Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh; Cole, David M.; Smith, Roger M.

    2010-01-01

    An improved method of mapping the capacitive contribution to cross-talk among pixels in an imaging array of sensors (typically, an imaging photodetector array) has been devised for use in calibrating and/or characterizing such an array. The method involves a sequence of resets of subarrays of pixels to specified voltages and measurement of the voltage responses of neighboring non-reset pixels.

  4. The Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.; Fuchs, B.

    2012-12-01

    A fifteen station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was installed in northern Colorado in the spring of 2012. While the driving force for the array was to produce 3-dimensional lightning data to support the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment (Barth, this conference), data from the array are being used for several other projects. These include: electrification studies in conjunction with the CSU CHILL radar (Lang et al, this conference); observations of the parent lightning discharges of sprites (Lyons et al, this conference); trying to detect upward discharges triggered by wind turbines, characterizing conditions in which aircraft flying through clouds produce discharges which can be detected by the LMA, and other opportunities, such as observations of lightning in pyrocumulus clouds produced by the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO. All the COLMA stations are solar-powered, and use broadband cellular modems for data communications. This makes the stations completely self-contained and autonomous, allowing a station to be installed anywhere a cellular signal is available. Because most of the stations were installed well away from anthropogenic noise sources, the COLMA is very sensitive. This is evidenced by the numerous plane tracks detected in its the vicinity. The diameter, D, of the COLMA is about 100 km, significantly larger than other LMAs. Because the error in the radial distance r is proportional to (r/D)2, and the error in the altitude z is proportional to (z/D)2, the larger array diameter greatly expands the usable range of the COLMA. The COLMA is able to detect and characterize lighting flashes to a distance of about 350 km from the array center. In addition to a web-based display (lightning.nmt.edu/colma), geo-referenced images are produced and updated at one-minute intervals. These geo-referenced images can be used to overlay the real-time lightning data on Google Earth and other mapping software. These displays were used by the DC3

  5. Inspection design using 2D phased array, TFM and cueMAP software

    SciTech Connect

    McGilp, Ailidh; Dziewierz, Jerzy; Lardner, Tim

    2014-02-18

    A simulation suite, cueMAP, has been developed to facilitate the design of inspection processes and sparse 2D array configurations. At the core of cueMAP is a Total Focusing Method (TFM) imaging algorithm that enables computer assisted design of ultrasonic inspection scenarios, including the design of bespoke array configurations to match the inspection criteria. This in-house developed TFM code allows for interactive evaluation of image quality indicators of ultrasonic imaging performance when utilizing a 2D phased array working in FMC/TFM mode. The cueMAP software uses a series of TFM images to build a map of resolution, contrast and sensitivity of imagingmore » performance of a simulated reflector, swept across the inspection volume. The software takes into account probe properties, wedge or water standoff, and effects of specimen curvature. In the validation process of this new software package, two 2D arrays have been evaluated on 304n stainless steel samples, typical of the primary circuit in nuclear plants. Thick section samples have been inspected using a 1MHz 2D matrix array. Due to the processing efficiency of the software, the data collected from these array configurations has been used to investigate the influence sub-aperture operation on inspection performance.« less

  6. A simultaneous multichannel monophasic action potential electrode array for in vivo epicardial repolarization mapping.

    PubMed

    Sahakian, A V; Peterson, M S; Shkurovich, S; Hamer, M; Votapka, T; Ji, T; Swiryn, S

    2001-03-01

    While the recording of extracellular monophasic action potentials (MAPs) from single epicardial or endocardial sites has been performed for over a century, we are unaware of any previous successful attempt to record MAPs simultaneously from a large number of sites in vivo. We report here the design and validation of an array of MAP electrodes which records both depolarization and repolarization simultaneously at up to 16 epicardial sites in a square array on the heart in vivo. The array consists of 16 sintered Ag-AgCl electrodes mounted in a common housing with individual suspensions allowing each electrode to exert a controlled pressure on the epicardial surface. The electrodes are arranged in a square array, with each quadrant of four having an additional recessed sintered Ag-AgCl reference electrode at its center. A saline-soaked sponge establishes ionic contact between the reference electrodes and the tissue. The array was tested on six anesthetized open-chested pigs. Simultaneous diagnostic-quality MAP recordings were obtained from up to 13 out of 16 ventricular sites. Ventricular MAPs had amplitudes of 10-40 mV with uniform morphologies and stable baselines for up to 30 min. MAP duration at 90% repolarization was measured and shown to vary as expected with cycle length during sustained pacing. The relationship between MAP duration and effective refractory period was also confirmed. The ability of the array to detect local differences in repolarization was tested in two ways. Placement of the array straddling the atrioventricular (AV) junction yielded simultaneous atrial or ventricular recordings at corresponding sites during 1:1 and 2:1 AV conduction. Localized ischemia via constriction of a coronary artery branch resulted in shortening of the repolarization phase at the ischemic, but not the nonischemic, sites. In conclusion, these results indicate that the simultaneous multichannel MAP electrode array is a viable method for in vivo epicardial repolarization

  7. A novel isoform of MAP4 organises the paraxial microtubule array required for muscle cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mogessie, Binyam; Roth, Daniel; Rahil, Zainab; Straube, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical for muscle cell differentiation and undergoes reorganisation into an array of paraxial microtubules, which serves as template for contractile sarcomere formation. In this study, we identify a previously uncharacterised isoform of microtubule-associated protein MAP4, oMAP4, as a microtubule organising factor that is crucial for myogenesis. We show that oMAP4 is expressed upon muscle cell differentiation and is the only MAP4 isoform essential for normal progression of the myogenic differentiation programme. Depletion of oMAP4 impairs cell elongation and cell–cell fusion. Most notably, oMAP4 is required for paraxial microtubule organisation in muscle cells and prevents dynein- and kinesin-driven microtubule–microtubule sliding. Purified oMAP4 aligns dynamic microtubules into antiparallel bundles that withstand motor forces in vitro. We propose a model in which the cooperation of dynein-mediated microtubule transport and oMAP4-mediated zippering of microtubules drives formation of a paraxial microtubule array that provides critical support for the polarisation and elongation of myotubes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05697.001 PMID:25898002

  8. Lightning Mapping With an Array of Fast Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Daohong; Takagi, Nobuyuki

    2018-04-01

    Fast Antenna Lightning Mapping Array (FALMA), a low-frequency lightning mapping system comprising an array of fast antennas, was developed and established in Gifu, Japan, during the summer of 2017. Location results of two hybrid flashes and a cloud-to-ground flash comprising 11 return strokes (RSs) are described in detail in this paper. Results show that concurrent branches of stepped leaders can be readily resolved, and K changes and dart leaders with speeds up to 2.4 × 107 m/s are also well imaged. These results demonstrate that FALMA can reconstruct three-dimensional structures of lightning flashes with great details. Location accuracy of FALMA is estimated by comparing the located striking points of successive RSs in cloud-to-ground flashes. Results show that distances between successive RSs are mainly below 25 m, indicating exceptionally high location accuracy of FALMA.

  9. Genome-Wide Structural Variation Detection by Genome Mapping on Nanochannel Arrays.

    PubMed

    Mak, Angel C Y; Lai, Yvonne Y Y; Lam, Ernest T; Kwok, Tsz-Piu; Leung, Alden K Y; Poon, Annie; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hastie, Alex R; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Andrews, Warren; Zhou, Xiang; Pang, Andy W C; Dai, Heng; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Wu, Jacob J K; Li, Catherine M L; Li, Jing-Woei; Yim, Aldrin K Y; Chan, Saki; Sibert, Justin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Chan, Ting-Fung; Yip, Kevin Y; Xiao, Ming; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive whole-genome structural variation detection is challenging with current approaches. With diploid cells as DNA source and the presence of numerous repetitive elements, short-read DNA sequencing cannot be used to detect structural variation efficiently. In this report, we show that genome mapping with long, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules imaged on nanochannel arrays can be used for whole-genome structural variation detection without sequencing. While whole-genome haplotyping is not achieved, local phasing (across >150-kb regions) is routine, as molecules from the parental chromosomes are examined separately. In one experiment, we generated genome maps from a trio from the 1000 Genomes Project, compared the maps against that derived from the reference human genome, and identified structural variations that are >5 kb in size. We find that these individuals have many more structural variants than those published, including some with the potential of disrupting gene function or regulation. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Mapping lightning in the sky with a mini array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Pedeboy, Stéphane; Soula, Serge; Enno, Sven-Erik; Sugier, Jacqueline; Rycroft, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    Mini arrays are commonly used for infrasonic and seismic studies. Here we report for the first time the detection and mapping of distant lightning discharges in the sky with a mini array. The array has a baseline to wavelength ratio ˜4.2·10-2 to record very low frequency electromagnetic waves from 2 to 18 kHz. It is found that the mini array detects ˜69 lightning pulses per second from cloud-to-ground and in-cloud discharges, even though the parent thunderstorms are ˜900-1100 km away and a rigorous selection criterion based on the quality of the wavefront across the array is used. In particular, lightning pulses that exhibit a clockwise phase progression are found at larger elevation angles in the sky as the result of a birefringent subionospheric wave propagation attributed to ordinary and extraordinary waves. These results imply that long range lightning detection networks might benefit from an exploration of the wave propagation conditions with mini arrays.

  11. Genotype–phenotype correlations in Down syndrome identified by array CGH in 30 cases of partial trisomy and partial monosomy chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Robert; Béna, Frédérique; Gagos, Sarantis; Gehrig, Corinne; Lopez, Gipsy; Schinzel, Albert; Lespinasse, James; Bottani, Armand; Dahoun, Sophie; Taine, Laurence; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Cornillet-Lefèbvre, Pascale; Pelet, Anna; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Toutain, Annick; Colleaux, Laurence; Horst, Jürgen; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki; Descartes, Maria; Franklin, Judy C; Florentin-Arar, Lina; Kitsiou, Sophia; Aït Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Costantine, Maher; Sinet, Pierre-Marie; Delabar, Jean M; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most frequent congenital birth defects, and the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. In most cases, DS results from the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. DS has a complex phenotype, and a major goal of DS research is to identify genotype–phenotype correlations. Cases of partial trisomy 21 and other HSA21 rearrangements associated with DS features could identify genomic regions associated with specific phenotypes. We have developed a BAC array spanning HSA21q and used array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) to enable high-resolution mapping of pathogenic partial aneuploidies and unbalanced translocations involving HSA21. We report the identification and mapping of 30 pathogenic chromosomal aberrations of HSA21 consisting of 19 partial trisomies and 11 partial monosomies for different segments of HSA21. The breakpoints have been mapped to within ∼85 kb. The majority of the breakpoints (26 of 30) for the partial aneuploidies map within a 10-Mb region. Our data argue against a single DS critical region. We identify susceptibility regions for 25 phenotypes for DS and 27 regions for monosomy 21. However, most of these regions are still broad, and more cases are needed to narrow down the phenotypic maps to a reasonable number of candidate genomic elements per phenotype. PMID:19002211

  12. Map reading tools for map libraries.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenberg, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Engineers, navigators and military strategists employ a broad array of mechanical devices to facilitate map use. A larger number of map users such as educators, students, tourists, journalists, historians, politicians, economists and librarians are unaware of the available variety of tools which can be used with maps to increase the speed and efficiency of their application and interpretation. This paper identifies map reading tools such as coordinate readers, protractors, dividers, planimeters, and symbol-templets according to a functional classification. Particularly, arrays of tools are suggested for use in determining position, direction, distance, area and form (perimeter-shape-pattern-relief). -from Author

  13. A low-frequency near-field interferometric-TOA 3-D Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Fanchao; Cummer, Steven A.; Solanki, Rahulkumar; Weinert, Joel; McTague, Lindsay; Katko, Alex; Barrett, John; Zigoneanu, Lucian; Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi

    2014-11-01

    We report on the development of an easily deployable LF near-field interferometric-time of arrival (TOA) 3-D Lightning Mapping Array applied to imaging of entire lightning flashes. An interferometric cross-correlation technique is applied in our system to compute windowed two-sensor time differences with submicrosecond time resolution before TOA is used for source location. Compared to previously reported LF lightning location systems, our system captures many more LF sources. This is due mainly to the improved mapping of continuous lightning processes by using this type of hybrid interferometry/TOA processing method. We show with five station measurements that the array detects and maps different lightning processes, such as stepped and dart leaders, during both in-cloud and cloud-to-ground flashes. Lightning images mapped by our LF system are remarkably similar to those created by VHF mapping systems, which may suggest some special links between LF and VHF emission during lightning processes.

  14. First results of the Colombia Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jesus; Montanyà, Joan; van der Velde, Oscar; Romero, David; Fabró, Ferran; Taborda, John; Aranguren, Daniel; Torres, Horacio

    2016-04-01

    In April 2015 the 3D Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA) network was installed on Santa Marta area (north of Colombia). The COLMA maps VHF radio emissions of lightning leaders in three dimensions by the time-of-arrival technique (Rison et al., 1999). This array has six sensors with base lines between 5 km to 20 km. The COLMA is the first VHF 3D network operating in the tropics and it has been installed in the frame of ASIM (Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor) ESA's mission in order to investigate the electrical characteristics of tropical thunderstorms favorable for the production of Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes (TGF). In this paper we present COLMA data of several storms. We discuss lightning activity, lightning leader altitudes and thunderstorm charge structures compared to data form our ELMA (Ebro Lightning Mapping Array) at the north-east coast of Spain. The data confirm what we expected, lightning leaders can propagate at higher altitudes compared to mid latitude thunderstorms because the higher vertical development of tropical thunderstorms. A simple inspection of a ten minute period of the 16th of November of 2015 storm shows a tripolar electric charge structure. In that case, the midlevel negative charge region was located between 7 to 9 km. The structure presented a lower positive charge below the midlevel negative and centred at 6.5 km and an upper positive charge region extending from 9 km to slightly more than 15 km. This vertical extension of the upper positive charge where negative leaders evolve is significantly larger compared to the storms at the ELMA area in Spain. COLMA has shown frequent activity of negative leaders reaching altitudes of more than 15 km.

  15. Thin-film sparse boundary array design for passive acoustic mapping during ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Coviello, Christian M; Kozick, Richard J; Hurrell, Andrew; Smith, Penny Probert; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-10-01

    A new 2-D hydrophone array for ultrasound therapy monitoring is presented, along with a novel algorithm for passive acoustic mapping using a sparse weighted aperture. The array is constructed using existing polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrasound sensor technology, and is utilized for its broadband characteristics and its high receive sensitivity. For most 2-D arrays, high-resolution imagery is desired, which requires a large aperture at the cost of a large number of elements. The proposed array's geometry is sparse, with elements only on the boundary of the rectangular aperture. The missing information from the interior is filled in using linear imaging techniques. After receiving acoustic emissions during ultrasound therapy, this algorithm applies an apodization to the sparse aperture to limit side lobes and then reconstructs acoustic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Experiments show verification of the theoretical point spread function, and cavitation maps in agar phantoms correspond closely to predicted areas, showing the validity of the array and methodology.

  16. Camp Blanding Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee,Richard; Christian, Hugh; Bailey, Jeffrey; Hall, John; Uman, Martin; Jordan, Doug; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Edens, Harald

    2011-01-01

    A seven station, short base-line Lightning Mapping Array was installed at the Camp Blanding International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during April 2011. This network will support science investigations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) and lightning initiation using rocket triggered lightning at the ICLRT. The network operations and data processing will be carried out through a close collaboration between several organizations, including the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Florida, and New Mexico Tech. The deployment was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The network does not have real-time data dissemination. Description, status and plans will be discussed.

  17. Discovery and mapping of single feature polymorphisms in wheat using Affymetrix arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Amy N; Bradbury, Peter J; Ma, Hongxiang; Hu, Shengwa; Bowden, Robert L; Buckler, Edward S; Bai, Guihua

    2009-01-01

    Background Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a staple food crop worldwide. The wheat genome has not yet been sequenced due to its huge genome size (~17,000 Mb) and high levels of repetitive sequences; the whole genome sequence may not be expected in the near future. Available linkage maps have low marker density due to limitation in available markers; therefore new technologies that detect genome-wide polymorphisms are still needed to discover a large number of new markers for construction of high-resolution maps. A high-resolution map is a critical tool for gene isolation, molecular breeding and genomic research. Single feature polymorphism (SFP) is a new microarray-based type of marker that is detected by hybridization of DNA or cRNA to oligonucleotide probes. This study was conducted to explore the feasibility of using the Affymetrix GeneChip to discover and map SFPs in the large hexaploid wheat genome. Results Six wheat varieties of diverse origins (Ning 7840, Clark, Jagger, Encruzilhada, Chinese Spring, and Opata 85) were analyzed for significant probe by variety interactions and 396 probe sets with SFPs were identified. A subset of 164 unigenes was sequenced and 54% showed polymorphism within probes. Microarray analysis of 71 recombinant inbred lines from the cross Ning 7840/Clark identified 955 SFPs and 877 of them were mapped together with 269 simple sequence repeat markers. The SFPs were randomly distributed within a chromosome but were unevenly distributed among different genomes. The B genome had the most SFPs, and the D genome had the least. Map positions of a selected set of SFPs were validated by mapping single nucleotide polymorphism using SNaPshot and comparing with expressed sequence tags mapping data. Conclusion The Affymetrix array is a cost-effective platform for SFP discovery and SFP mapping in wheat. The new high-density map constructed in this study will be a useful tool for genetic and genomic research in wheat. PMID:19480702

  18. High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array mapping in Brassica oleracea: identification of QTL associated with carotenoid variation in broccoli florets.

    PubMed

    Brown, Allan F; Yousef, Gad G; Chebrolu, Kranthi K; Byrd, Robert W; Everhart, Koyt W; Thomas, Aswathy; Reid, Robert W; Parkin, Isobel A P; Sharpe, Andrew G; Oliver, Rebekah; Guzman, Ivette; Jackson, Eric W

    2014-09-01

    A high-resolution genetic linkage map of B. oleracea was developed from a B. napus SNP array. The work will facilitate genetic and evolutionary studies in Brassicaceae. A broccoli population, VI-158 × BNC, consisting of 150 F2:3 families was used to create a saturated Brassica oleracea (diploid: CC) linkage map using a recently developed rapeseed (Brassica napus) (tetraploid: AACC) Illumina Infinium single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. The map consisted of 547 non-redundant SNP markers spanning 948.1 cM across nine chromosomes with an average interval size of 1.7 cM. As the SNPs are anchored to the genomic reference sequence of the rapid cycling B. oleracea TO1000, we were able to estimate that the map provides 96 % coverage of the diploid genome. Carotenoid analysis of 2 years data identified 3 QTLs on two chromosomes that are associated with up to half of the phenotypic variation associated with the accumulation of total or individual compounds. By searching the genome sequences of the two related diploid species (B. oleracea and B. rapa), we further identified putative carotenoid candidate genes in the region of these QTLs. This is the first description of the use of a B. napus SNP array to rapidly construct high-density genetic linkage maps of one of the constituent diploid species. The unambiguous nature of these markers with regard to genomic sequences provides evidence to the nature of genes underlying the QTL, and demonstrates the value and impact this resource will have on Brassica research.

  19. Large-region acoustic source mapping using a movable array and sparse covariance fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shengkui; Tuna, Cagdas; Nguyen, Thi Ngoc Tho; Jones, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    Large-region acoustic source mapping is important for city-scale noise monitoring. Approaches using a single-position measurement scheme to scan large regions using small arrays cannot provide clean acoustic source maps, while deploying large arrays spanning the entire region of interest is prohibitively expensive. A multiple-position measurement scheme is applied to scan large regions at multiple spatial positions using a movable array of small size. Based on the multiple-position measurement scheme, a sparse-constrained multiple-position vectorized covariance matrix fitting approach is presented. In the proposed approach, the overall sample covariance matrix of the incoherent virtual array is first estimated using the multiple-position array data and then vectorized using the Khatri-Rao (KR) product. A linear model is then constructed for fitting the vectorized covariance matrix and a sparse-constrained reconstruction algorithm is proposed for recovering source powers from the model. The user parameter settings are discussed. The proposed approach is tested on a 30 m × 40 m region and a 60 m × 40 m region using simulated and measured data. Much cleaner acoustic source maps and lower sound pressure level errors are obtained compared to the beamforming approaches and the previous sparse approach [Zhao, Tuna, Nguyen, and Jones, Proc. IEEE Intl. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing (ICASSP) (2016)].

  20. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.

    2014-05-31

    This study maps the phased array-generated acoustic sound fields through three types of CASS microstructure in four specimens to quantitatively assess the beam formation effectiveness in these materials.

  1. Identifying allelic loss and homozygous deletions in pancreatic cancer without matched normals using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Eric S; Hucl, Tomas; Gallmeier, Eike; West, Kristen M; Arking, Dan E; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Hruban, Ralph H; Kern, Scott E

    2006-08-15

    Recent advances in oligonucleotide arrays and whole-genome complexity reduction data analysis now permit the evaluation of tens of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms simultaneously for a genome-wide analysis of allelic status. Using these arrays, we created high-resolution allelotype maps of 26 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The areas of heterozygosity implicitly served to reveal regions of allelic loss. The array-derived maps were verified by a panel of 317 microsatellite markers used in a subset of seven samples, showing a 97.1% concordance between heterozygous calls. Three matched tumor/normal pairs were used to estimate the false-negative and potential false-positive rates for identifying loss of heterozygosity: 3.6 regions (average minimal region of loss, 720,228 bp) and 2.3 regions (average heterozygous gap distance, 4,434,994 bp) per genome, respectively. Genomic fractional allelic loss calculations showed that cumulative levels of allelic loss ranged widely from 17.1% to 79.9% of the haploid genome length. Regional increases in "NoCall" frequencies combined with copy number loss estimates were used to identify 41 homozygous deletions (19 first reports), implicating an additional 13 regions disrupted in pancreatic cancer. Unexpectedly, 23 of these occurred in just two lines (BxPc3 and MiaPaCa2), suggesting the existence of at least two subclasses of chromosomal instability (CIN) patterns, distinguished here by allelic loss and copy number changes (original CIN) and those also highly enriched in the genomic "holes" of homozygous deletions (holey CIN). This study provides previously unavailable high-resolution allelotype and deletion breakpoint maps in widely shared pancreatic cancer cell lines and effectively eliminates the need for matched normal tissue to define informative loci.

  2. Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Santhi K; Tragante, Vinicius; Guo, Wei; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B; Smith, Erin N; Johnson, Toby; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E; Franceschini, Nora; Gaunt, Tom R; Gho, Johannes M I H; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E; Mateo Leach, Irene; McDonough, Caitrin W; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Mellander, Olle; Molony, Cliona M; Nolte, Ilja M; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Price, Tom S; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Most, Peter J; Van Iperen, Erik P A; Van Setten, Jessica; Van Setten, Jessic A; Vonk, Judith M; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L; Berenson, Gerald S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burkley, Ben; Burt, Amber; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Wei; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Curtis, Sean P; Dreisbach, Albert; Duggan, David; Ehret, Georg B; Fabsitz, Richard R; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Ervin; Furlong, Clement E; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hofker, Marten H; Hovingh, G Kees; Kirkland, Susan A; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kutlar, Abdullah; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Langaee, Taimour Y; Li, Yun R; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Kiang; Maiwald, Steffi; Malik, Rainer; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W; Pepine, Carl J; Pettinger, Mary; Polak, Joseph F; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Ranchalis, Jane; Redline, Susan; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Scharnag, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Stolk, Ronald P; Taylor, Herman A; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Verschuren, W Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J Hunter; Boehm, Bernhard O; Caulfield, Mark J; Chasman, Daniel I; Davidson, Karina W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Gums, John G; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hillege, Hans L; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Mitchell, Braxton D; Murray, Sarah S; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Reiner, Alex P; Schadt, Eric E; Silverstein, Roy L; Snieder, Harold; Stanton, Alice V; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Samani, Nilesh J; Johnson, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; de Bakker, Paul I W; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J; Asselbergs, Folkert W

    2013-04-15

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ∼2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Towards on-chip time-resolved thermal mapping with micro-/nanosensor arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, thin-film thermocouple (TFTC) array emerged as a versatile candidate in micro-/nanoscale local temperature sensing for its high resolution, passive working mode, and easy fabrication. However, some key issues need to be taken into consideration before real instrumentation and industrial applications of TFTC array. In this work, we will demonstrate that TFTC array can be highly scalable from micrometers to nanometers and that there are potential applications of TFTC array in integrated circuits, including time-resolvable two-dimensional thermal mapping and tracing the heat source of a device. Some potential problems and relevant solutions from a view of industrial applications will be discussed in terms of material selection, multiplexer reading, pattern designing, and cold-junction compensation. We show that the TFTC array is a powerful tool for research fields such as chip thermal management, lab-on-a-chip, and other novel electrical, optical, or thermal devices. PMID:22931306

  4. The first genetic map of pigeon pea based on diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi Ying; Saxena, Rachit K; Kulwal, Pawan L; Ash, Gavin J; Dubey, Anuja; Harper, John D I; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Gothalwal, Ragini; Kilian, Andrzej; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2011-04-01

    With an objective to develop a genetic map in pigeon pea (Cajanus spp.), a total of 554 diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers showed polymorphism in a pigeon pea F(2) mapping population of 72 progenies derived from an interspecific cross of ICP 28 (Cajanus cajan) and ICPW 94 (Cajanus scarabaeoides). Approximately 13% of markers did not conform to expected segregation ratio. The total number of DArT marker loci segregating in Mendelian manner was 405 with 73.1% (P > 0.001) of DArT markers having unique segregation patterns. Two groups of genetic maps were generated using DArT markers. While the maternal genetic linkage map had 122 unique DArT maternal marker loci, the paternal genetic linkage map has a total of 172 unique DArT paternal marker loci. The length of these two maps covered 270.0 cM and 451.6 cM, respectively. These are the first genetic linkage maps developed for pigeon pea, and this is the first report of genetic mapping in any grain legume using diversity arrays technology.

  5. Genome-Wide Mapping of Copy Number Variation in Humans: Comparative Analysis of High Resolution Array Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Haraksingh, Rajini R.; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Urban, Alexander E.; Snyder, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Accurate and efficient genome-wide detection of copy number variants (CNVs) is essential for understanding human genomic variation, genome-wide CNV association type studies, cytogenetics research and diagnostics, and independent validation of CNVs identified from sequencing based technologies. Numerous, array-based platforms for CNV detection exist utilizing array Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH), Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) genotyping or both. We have quantitatively assessed the abilities of twelve leading genome-wide CNV detection platforms to accurately detect Gold Standard sets of CNVs in the genome of HapMap CEU sample NA12878, and found significant differences in performance. The technologies analyzed were the NimbleGen 4.2 M, 2.1 M and 3×720 K Whole Genome and CNV focused arrays, the Agilent 1×1 M CGH and High Resolution and 2×400 K CNV and SNP+CGH arrays, the Illumina Human Omni1Quad array and the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. The Gold Standards used were a 1000 Genomes Project sequencing-based set of 3997 validated CNVs and an ultra high-resolution aCGH-based set of 756 validated CNVs. We found that sensitivity, total number, size range and breakpoint resolution of CNV calls were highest for CNV focused arrays. Our results are important for cost effective CNV detection and validation for both basic and clinical applications. PMID:22140474

  6. A Larger Chocolate Chip—Development of a 15K Theobroma cacao L. SNP Array to Create High-Density Linkage Maps

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Donald; Stack, Conrad; Mustiga, Guiliana M.; Rodezno, Dayana C.; Suarez, Carmen; Amores, Freddy; Feltus, Frank A.; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Cornejo, Omar E.; Motamayor, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is an important cash crop in tropical regions around the world and has a rich agronomic history in South America. As a key component in the cosmetic and confectionary industries, millions of people worldwide use products made from cacao, ranging from shampoo to chocolate. An Illumina Infinity II array was created using 13,530 SNPs identified within a small diversity panel of cacao. Of these SNPs, 12,643 derive from variation within annotated cacao genes. The genotypes of 3,072 trees were obtained, including two mapping populations from Ecuador. High-density linkage maps for these two populations were generated and compared to the cacao genome assembly. Phenotypic data from these populations were combined with the linkage maps to identify the QTLs for yield and disease resistance. PMID:29259608

  7. A Larger Chocolate Chip-Development of a 15K Theobroma cacao L. SNP Array to Create High-Density Linkage Maps.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Donald; Stack, Conrad; Mustiga, Guiliana M; Rodezno, Dayana C; Suarez, Carmen; Amores, Freddy; Feltus, Frank A; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Cornejo, Omar E; Motamayor, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Cacao ( Theobroma cacao L.) is an important cash crop in tropical regions around the world and has a rich agronomic history in South America. As a key component in the cosmetic and confectionary industries, millions of people worldwide use products made from cacao, ranging from shampoo to chocolate. An Illumina Infinity II array was created using 13,530 SNPs identified within a small diversity panel of cacao. Of these SNPs, 12,643 derive from variation within annotated cacao genes. The genotypes of 3,072 trees were obtained, including two mapping populations from Ecuador. High-density linkage maps for these two populations were generated and compared to the cacao genome assembly. Phenotypic data from these populations were combined with the linkage maps to identify the QTLs for yield and disease resistance.

  8. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations.

  9. Deconvolution Methods and Systems for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Mapping coherent/incoherent acoustic sources as determined from a phased microphone array. A linear configuration of equations and unknowns are formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more cross-beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. An equation derived from the linear configuration of equations and unknowns can then be iteratively determined. The equation can be attained by the solution requirement of a constraint equivalent to the physical assumption that the coherent sources have only in phase coherence. The size of the problem may then be reduced using zoning methods. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with a phased microphone array (microphones arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations) in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  10. A Large Maize (Zea mays L.) SNP Genotyping Array: Development and Germplasm Genotyping, and Genetic Mapping to Compare with the B73 Reference Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ganal, Martin W.; Durstewitz, Gregor; Polley, Andreas; Bérard, Aurélie; Buckler, Edward S.; Charcosset, Alain; Clarke, Joseph D.; Graner, Eva-Maria; Hansen, Mark; Joets, Johann; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; McMullen, Michael D.; Montalent, Pierre; Rose, Mark; Schön, Chris-Carolin; Sun, Qi; Walter, Hildrun; Martin, Olivier C.; Falque, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    SNP genotyping arrays have been useful for many applications that require a large number of molecular markers such as high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection. We report the establishment of a large maize SNP array and its use for diversity analysis and high density linkage mapping. The markers, taken from more than 800,000 SNPs, were selected to be preferentially located in genes and evenly distributed across the genome. The array was tested with a set of maize germplasm including North American and European inbred lines, parent/F1 combinations, and distantly related teosinte material. A total of 49,585 markers, including 33,417 within 17,520 different genes and 16,168 outside genes, were of good quality for genotyping, with an average failure rate of 4% and rates up to 8% in specific germplasm. To demonstrate this array's use in genetic mapping and for the independent validation of the B73 sequence assembly, two intermated maize recombinant inbred line populations – IBM (B73×Mo17) and LHRF (F2×F252) – were genotyped to establish two high density linkage maps with 20,913 and 14,524 markers respectively. 172 mapped markers were absent in the current B73 assembly and their placement can be used for future improvements of the B73 reference sequence. Colinearity of the genetic and physical maps was mostly conserved with some exceptions that suggest errors in the B73 assembly. Five major regions containing non-colinearities were identified on chromosomes 2, 3, 6, 7 and 9, and are supported by both independent genetic maps. Four additional non-colinear regions were found on the LHRF map only; they may be due to a lower density of IBM markers in those regions or to true structural rearrangements between lines. Given the array's high quality, it will be a valuable resource for maize genetics and many aspects of maize breeding. PMID:22174790

  11. A High-Density Consensus Map of Common Wheat Integrating Four Mapping Populations Scanned by the 90K SNP Array

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Weie; He, Zhonghu; Gao, Fengmei; Liu, Jindong; Jin, Hui; Zhai, Shengnan; Qu, Yanying; Xia, Xianchun

    2017-01-01

    A high-density consensus map is a powerful tool for gene mapping, cloning and molecular marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding. The objective of this study was to construct a high-density, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based consensus map of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by integrating genetic maps from four recombinant inbred line populations. The populations were each genotyped using the wheat 90K Infinium iSelect SNP assay. A total of 29,692 SNP markers were mapped on 21 linkage groups corresponding to 21 hexaploid wheat chromosomes, covering 2,906.86 cM, with an overall marker density of 10.21 markers/cM. Compared with the previous maps based on the wheat 90K SNP chip detected 22,736 (76.6%) of the SNPs with consistent chromosomal locations, whereas 1,974 (6.7%) showed different chromosomal locations, and 4,982 (16.8%) were newly mapped. Alignment of the present consensus map and the wheat expressed sequence tags (ESTs) Chromosome Bin Map enabled assignment of 1,221 SNP markers to specific chromosome bins and 819 ESTs were integrated into the consensus map. The marker orders of the consensus map were validated based on physical positions on the wheat genome with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.69 (4D) to 0.97 (1A, 4B, 5B, and 6A), and were also confirmed by comparison with genetic position on the previously 40K SNP consensus map with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.84 (6D) to 0.99 (6A). Chromosomal rearrangements reported previously were confirmed in the present consensus map and new putative rearrangements were identified. In addition, an integrated consensus map was developed through the combination of five published maps with ours, containing 52,607 molecular markers. The consensus map described here provided a high-density SNP marker map and a reliable order of SNPs, representing a step forward in mapping and validation of chromosomal locations of SNPs on the wheat 90K array. Moreover, it can be

  12. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, S.; Cole, D. M.; Hancock, B. R.; Smith, R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic coupling effects such as Inter-Pixel Capacitance (IPC) affect the quantitative interpretation of image data from CMOS, hybrid visible and infrared imagers alike. Existing methods of characterizing IPC do not provide a map of the spatial variation of IPC over all pixels. We demonstrate a deterministic method that provides a direct quantitative map of the crosstalk across an imager. The approach requires only the ability to reset single pixels to an arbitrary voltage, different from the rest of the imager. No illumination source is required. Mapping IPC independently for each pixel is also made practical by the greater S/N ratio achievable for an electrical stimulus than for an optical stimulus, which is subject to both Poisson statistics and diffusion effects of photo-generated charge. The data we present illustrates a more complex picture of IPC in Teledyne HgCdTe and HyViSi focal plane arrays than is presently understood, including the presence of a newly discovered, long range IPC in the HyViSi FPA that extends tens of pixels in distance, likely stemming from extended field effects in the fully depleted substrate. The sensitivity of the measurement approach has been shown to be good enough to distinguish spatial structure in IPC of the order of 0.1%.

  13. Evaluation of SNP Data from the Malus Infinium Array Identifies Challenges for Genetic Analysis of Complex Genomes of Polyploid Origin

    PubMed Central

    Troggio, Michela; Šurbanovski, Nada; Bianco, Luca; Moretto, Marco; Giongo, Lara; Banchi, Elisa; Viola, Roberto; Fernández, Felicdad Fernández; Costa, Fabrizio; Velasco, Riccardo; Cestaro, Alessandro; Sargent, Daniel James

    2013-01-01

    High throughput arrays for the simultaneous genotyping of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have made the rapid genetic characterisation of plant genomes and the development of saturated linkage maps a realistic prospect for many plant species of agronomic importance. However, the correct calling of SNP genotypes in divergent polyploid genomes using array technology can be problematic due to paralogy, and to divergence in probe sequences causing changes in probe binding efficiencies. An Illumina Infinium II whole-genome genotyping array was recently developed for the cultivated apple and used to develop a molecular linkage map for an apple rootstock progeny (M432), but a large proportion of segregating SNPs were not mapped in the progeny, due to unexpected genotype clustering patterns. To investigate the causes of this unexpected clustering we performed BLAST analysis of all probe sequences against the ‘Golden Delicious’ genome sequence and discovered evidence for paralogous annealing sites and probe sequence divergence for a high proportion of probes contained on the array. Following visual re-evaluation of the genotyping data generated for 8,788 SNPs for the M432 progeny using the array, we manually re-scored genotypes at 818 loci and mapped a further 797 markers to the M432 linkage map. The newly mapped markers included the majority of those that could not be mapped previously, as well as loci that were previously scored as monomorphic, but which segregated due to divergence leading to heterozygosity in probe annealing sites. An evaluation of the 8,788 probes in a diverse collection of Malus germplasm showed that more than half the probes returned genotype clustering patterns that were difficult or impossible to interpret reliably, highlighting implications for the use of the array in genome-wide association studies. PMID:23826289

  14. Evaluation of SNP Data from the Malus Infinium Array Identifies Challenges for Genetic Analysis of Complex Genomes of Polyploid Origin.

    PubMed

    Troggio, Michela; Surbanovski, Nada; Bianco, Luca; Moretto, Marco; Giongo, Lara; Banchi, Elisa; Viola, Roberto; Fernández, Felicdad Fernández; Costa, Fabrizio; Velasco, Riccardo; Cestaro, Alessandro; Sargent, Daniel James

    2013-01-01

    High throughput arrays for the simultaneous genotyping of thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have made the rapid genetic characterisation of plant genomes and the development of saturated linkage maps a realistic prospect for many plant species of agronomic importance. However, the correct calling of SNP genotypes in divergent polyploid genomes using array technology can be problematic due to paralogy, and to divergence in probe sequences causing changes in probe binding efficiencies. An Illumina Infinium II whole-genome genotyping array was recently developed for the cultivated apple and used to develop a molecular linkage map for an apple rootstock progeny (M432), but a large proportion of segregating SNPs were not mapped in the progeny, due to unexpected genotype clustering patterns. To investigate the causes of this unexpected clustering we performed BLAST analysis of all probe sequences against the 'Golden Delicious' genome sequence and discovered evidence for paralogous annealing sites and probe sequence divergence for a high proportion of probes contained on the array. Following visual re-evaluation of the genotyping data generated for 8,788 SNPs for the M432 progeny using the array, we manually re-scored genotypes at 818 loci and mapped a further 797 markers to the M432 linkage map. The newly mapped markers included the majority of those that could not be mapped previously, as well as loci that were previously scored as monomorphic, but which segregated due to divergence leading to heterozygosity in probe annealing sites. An evaluation of the 8,788 probes in a diverse collection of Malus germplasm showed that more than half the probes returned genotype clustering patterns that were difficult or impossible to interpret reliably, highlighting implications for the use of the array in genome-wide association studies.

  15. GWAS and admixture mapping identify different asthma-associated loci in Latinos: The GALA II Study

    PubMed Central

    Galanter, Joshua M; Gignoux, Christopher R; Torgerson, Dara G; Roth, Lindsey A; Eng, Celeste; Oh, Sam S; Nguyen, Elizabeth A; Drake, Katherine A; Huntsman, Scott; Hu, Donglei; Sen, Saunak; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Avila, Pedro C.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; LeNoir, Michael A.; Meade, Kelley; Serebrisky, Denise; Borrell, Luisa N; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William; Estrada, Andres Moreno; Mendoza, Karla Sandoval; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Klitz, William; Romieu, Isabelle; London, Stephanie J.; Gilliland, Frank; Martinez, Fernando; Bustamante, Carlos; Williams, L Keoki; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodríguez-Santana, José R.; Burchard, and Esteban G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental causes. Genome-wide association studies of asthma have mostly involved European populations and replication of positive associations has been inconsistent. Objective To identify asthma-associated genes in a large Latino population with genome-wide association analysis and admixture mapping. Methods Latino children with asthma (n = 1,893) and healthy controls (n = 1,881) were recruited from five sites in the United States: Puerto Rico, New York, Chicago, Houston, and the San Francisco Bay Area. Subjects were genotyped on an Affymetrix World Array IV chip. We performed genome-wide association and admixture mapping to identify asthma-associated loci. Results We identified a significant association between ancestry and asthma at 6p21 (lowest p-value: rs2523924, p < 5 × 10−6). This association replicates in a meta-analysis of the EVE Asthma Consortium (p = 0.01). Fine mapping of the region in this study and the EVE Asthma Consortium suggests an association between PSORS1C1 and asthma. We confirmed the strong allelic association between the 17q21 asthma in Latinos (IKZF3, lowest p-value: rs90792, OR: 0.67, 95% CI 0.61 – 0.75, p = 6 × 10−13) and replicated associations in several genes that had previously been associated with asthma in genome-wide association studies. Conclusions Admixture mapping and genome-wide association are complementary techniques that provide evidence for multiple asthma-associated loci in Latinos. Admixture mapping identifies a novel locus on 6p21 that replicates in a meta-analysis of several Latino populations, while genome-wide association confirms the previously identified locus on 17q21. PMID:24406073

  16. Deconvolution methods and systems for the mapping of acoustic sources from phased microphone arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor); Humphreys, Jr., William M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for mapping acoustic sources determined from a phased microphone array. A plurality of microphones are arranged in an optimized grid pattern including a plurality of grid locations thereof. A linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can be formed by accounting for a reciprocal influence of one or more beamforming characteristics thereof at varying grid locations among the plurality of grid locations. A full-rank equation derived from the linear configuration of N equations and N unknowns can then be iteratively determined. A full-rank can be attained by the solution requirement of the positivity constraint equivalent to the physical assumption of statically independent noise sources at each N location. An optimized noise source distribution is then generated over an identified aeroacoustic source region associated with the phased microphone array in order to compile an output presentation thereof, thereby removing the beamforming characteristics from the resulting output presentation.

  17. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  18. Spatiotemporal norepinephrine mapping using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Wydallis, John B; Feeny, Rachel M; Wilson, William; Kern, Tucker; Chen, Tom; Tobet, Stuart; Reynolds, Melissa M; Henry, Charles S

    2015-10-21

    A high-density amperometric electrode array containing 8192 individually addressable platinum working electrodes with an integrated potentiostat fabricated using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) processes is reported. The array was designed to enable electrochemical imaging of chemical gradients with high spatiotemporal resolution. Electrodes are arranged over a 2 mm × 2 mm surface area into 64 subarrays consisting of 128 individual Pt working electrodes as well as Pt pseudo-reference and auxiliary electrodes. Amperometric measurements of norepinephrine in tissue culture media were used to demonstrate the ability of the array to measure concentration gradients in complex media. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidics were incorporated to control the chemical concentrations in time and space, and the electrochemical response at each electrode was monitored to generate electrochemical heat maps, demonstrating the array's imaging capabilities. A temporal resolution of 10 ms can be achieved by simultaneously monitoring a single subarray of 128 electrodes. The entire 2 mm × 2 mm area can be electrochemically imaged in 64 seconds by cycling through all subarrays at a rate of 1 Hz per subarray. Monitoring diffusional transport of norepinephrine is used to demonstrate the spatiotemporal resolution capabilities of the system.

  19. Development and Application of a Low Frequency Near-Field Interferometric-TOA 3D Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, F.; Cummer, S. A.; Weinert, J. L.; McTague, L. E.; Solanki, R.; Barrett, J.

    2014-12-01

    Lightning processes radiated extremely wideband electromagnetic signals. Lightning images mapped by VHF interferometry and VHF time of arrival lightning mapping arrays enable us to understand the lightning in-cloud detail development during the extent of flash that can not always be captured by cameras because of the shield of cloud. Lightning processes radiate electromagnetically over an extremely wide bandwidth, offering the possibility of multispectral lightning radio imaging. Low frequency signals are often used for lightning detection, but usually only for ground point location or thunderstorm tracking. Some recent results have demonstrated lightning LF 3D mapping of discrete lightning pulses, but imaging of continuous LF emissions have not been shown. In this work, we report a GPS-synchronized LF near field interferometric-TOA 3D lightning mapping array applied to image the development of lightning flashes on second time scale. Cross-correlation, as used in broadband interferometry, is applied in our system to find windowed arrival time differences with sub-microsecond time resolution. However, because the sources are in the near field of the array, time of arrival processing is used to find the source locations with a typical precision of 100 meters. We show that this system images the complete lightning flash structure with thousands of LF sources for extensive flashes. Importantly, this system is able to map both continuous emissions like dart leaders, and bursty or discrete emissions. Lightning stepped leader and dart leader propagation speeds are estimated to 0.56-2.5x105 m/s and 0.8-2.0x106 m/s respectively, which are consistent with previous reports. In many aspects our LF images are remarkably similar to VHF lightning mapping array images, despite the 1000 times difference in frequency, which may suggest some special links between the LF and VHF emission during lightning processes.

  20. Development of a dense SNP-based linkage map of an apple rootstock progeny using the Malus Infinium whole genome genotyping array.

    PubMed

    Antanaviciute, Laima; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad; Jansen, Johannes; Banchi, Elisa; Evans, Katherine M; Viola, Roberto; Velasco, Riccardo; Dunwell, Jim M; Troggio, Michela; Sargent, Daniel J

    2012-05-25

    A whole-genome genotyping array has previously been developed for Malus using SNP data from 28 Malus genotypes. This array offers the prospect of high throughput genotyping and linkage map development for any given Malus progeny. To test the applicability of the array for mapping in diverse Malus genotypes, we applied the array to the construction of a SNP-based linkage map of an apple rootstock progeny. Of the 7,867 Malus SNP markers on the array, 1,823 (23.2%) were heterozygous in one of the two parents of the progeny, 1,007 (12.8%) were heterozygous in both parental genotypes, whilst just 2.8% of the 921 Pyrus SNPs were heterozygous. A linkage map spanning 1,282.2 cM was produced comprising 2,272 SNP markers, 306 SSR markers and the S-locus. The length of the M432 linkage map was increased by 52.7 cM with the addition of the SNP markers, whilst marker density increased from 3.8 cM/marker to 0.5 cM/marker. Just three regions in excess of 10 cM remain where no markers were mapped. We compared the positions of the mapped SNP markers on the M432 map with their predicted positions on the 'Golden Delicious' genome sequence. A total of 311 markers (13.7% of all mapped markers) mapped to positions that conflicted with their predicted positions on the 'Golden Delicious' pseudo-chromosomes, indicating the presence of paralogous genomic regions or mis-assignments of genome sequence contigs during the assembly and anchoring of the genome sequence. We incorporated data for the 2,272 SNP markers onto the map of the M432 progeny and have presented the most complete and saturated map of the full 17 linkage groups of M. pumila to date. The data were generated rapidly in a high-throughput semi-automated pipeline, permitting significant savings in time and cost over linkage map construction using microsatellites. The application of the array will permit linkage maps to be developed for QTL analyses in a cost-effective manner, and the identification of SNPs that have been

  1. Development of a dense SNP-based linkage map of an apple rootstock progeny using the Malus Infinium whole genome genotyping array

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A whole-genome genotyping array has previously been developed for Malus using SNP data from 28 Malus genotypes. This array offers the prospect of high throughput genotyping and linkage map development for any given Malus progeny. To test the applicability of the array for mapping in diverse Malus genotypes, we applied the array to the construction of a SNP-based linkage map of an apple rootstock progeny. Results Of the 7,867 Malus SNP markers on the array, 1,823 (23.2%) were heterozygous in one of the two parents of the progeny, 1,007 (12.8%) were heterozygous in both parental genotypes, whilst just 2.8% of the 921 Pyrus SNPs were heterozygous. A linkage map spanning 1,282.2 cM was produced comprising 2,272 SNP markers, 306 SSR markers and the S-locus. The length of the M432 linkage map was increased by 52.7 cM with the addition of the SNP markers, whilst marker density increased from 3.8 cM/marker to 0.5 cM/marker. Just three regions in excess of 10 cM remain where no markers were mapped. We compared the positions of the mapped SNP markers on the M432 map with their predicted positions on the ‘Golden Delicious’ genome sequence. A total of 311 markers (13.7% of all mapped markers) mapped to positions that conflicted with their predicted positions on the ‘Golden Delicious’ pseudo-chromosomes, indicating the presence of paralogous genomic regions or mis-assignments of genome sequence contigs during the assembly and anchoring of the genome sequence. Conclusions We incorporated data for the 2,272 SNP markers onto the map of the M432 progeny and have presented the most complete and saturated map of the full 17 linkage groups of M. pumila to date. The data were generated rapidly in a high-throughput semi-automated pipeline, permitting significant savings in time and cost over linkage map construction using microsatellites. The application of the array will permit linkage maps to be developed for QTL analyses in a cost-effective manner, and

  2. Development and evaluation of high-density Axiom® CicerSNP Array for high-resolution genetic mapping and breeding applications in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Roorkiwal, Manish; Jain, Ankit; Kale, Sandip M; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Thudi, Mahendar; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2018-04-01

    To accelerate genomics research and molecular breeding applications in chickpea, a high-throughput SNP genotyping platform 'Axiom ® CicerSNP Array' has been designed, developed and validated. Screening of whole-genome resequencing data from 429 chickpea lines identified 4.9 million SNPs, from which a subset of 70 463 high-quality nonredundant SNPs was selected using different stringent filter criteria. This was further narrowed down to 61 174 SNPs based on p-convert score ≥0.3, of which 50 590 SNPs could be tiled on array. Among these tiled SNPs, a total of 11 245 SNPs (22.23%) were from the coding regions of 3673 different genes. The developed Axiom ® CicerSNP Array was used for genotyping two recombinant inbred line populations, namely ICCRIL03 (ICC 4958 × ICC 1882) and ICCRIL04 (ICC 283 × ICC 8261). Genotyping data reflected high success and polymorphic rate, with 15 140 (29.93%; ICCRIL03) and 20 018 (39.57%; ICCRIL04) polymorphic SNPs. High-density genetic maps comprising 13 679 SNPs spanning 1033.67 cM and 7769 SNPs spanning 1076.35 cM were developed for ICCRIL03 and ICCRIL04 populations, respectively. QTL analysis using multilocation, multiseason phenotyping data on these RILs identified 70 (ICCRIL03) and 120 (ICCRIL04) main-effect QTLs on genetic map. Higher precision and potential of this array is expected to advance chickpea genetics and breeding applications. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers in apple for genetic linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Henk J; van de Weg, W Eric; Carling, Jason; Khan, Sabaz Ali; McKay, Steven J; van Kaauwen, Martijn P W; Wittenberg, Alexander H J; Koehorst-van Putten, Herma J J; Noordijk, Yolanda; Gao, Zhongshan; Rees, D Jasper G; Van Dyk, Maria M; Jaccoud, Damian; Considine, Michael J; Kilian, Andrzej

    2012-03-01

    Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) provides a high-throughput whole-genome genotyping platform for the detection and scoring of hundreds of polymorphic loci without any need for prior sequence information. The work presented here details the development and performance of a DArT genotyping array for apple. This is the first paper on DArT in horticultural trees. Genetic mapping of DArT markers in two mapping populations and their integration with other marker types showed that DArT is a powerful high-throughput method for obtaining accurate and reproducible marker data, despite the low cost per data point. This method appears to be suitable for aligning the genetic maps of different segregating populations. The standard complexity reduction method, based on the methylation-sensitive PstI restriction enzyme, resulted in a high frequency of markers, although there was 52-54% redundancy due to the repeated sampling of highly similar sequences. Sequencing of the marker clones showed that they are significantly enriched for low-copy, genic regions. The genome coverage using the standard method was 55-76%. For improved genome coverage, an alternative complexity reduction method was examined, which resulted in less redundancy and additional segregating markers. The DArT markers proved to be of high quality and were very suitable for genetic mapping at low cost for the apple, providing moderate genome coverage. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11032-011-9579-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  4. CdS nanorods/organic hybrid LED array and the piezo-phototronic effect of the device for pressure mapping.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rongrong; Wang, Chunfeng; Dong, Lin; Shen, Changyu; Zhao, Kun; Pan, Caofeng

    2016-04-21

    As widely applied in light-emitting diodes and optical devices, CdS has attracted the attention of many researchers due to its nonlinear properties and piezo-electronic effect. Here, we demonstrate a LED array composed of PSS and CdS nanorods and research the piezo-photonic effect of the array device. The emission intensity of the device depends on the electron-hole recombination at the interface of the p-n junction which can be adjusted using the piezo-phototronic effect and can be used to map the pressure applied on the surface of the device with spatial resolution as high as 1.5 μm. A flexible LED device array has been prepared using a CdS nanorod array on a Au/Cr/kapton substrate. This device may be used in the field of strain mapping using its high pressure spatial-resolution and flexibility.

  5. Phased Array Ultrasound System for Planar Flow Mapping in Liquid Metals.

    PubMed

    Mader, Kevin; Nauber, Richard; Galindo, Vladimir; Beyer, Hannes; Buttner, Lars; Eckert, Sven; Czarske, Jurgen

    2017-09-01

    Controllable magnetic fields can be used to optimize flows in technical and industrial processes involving liquid metals in order to improve quality and yield. However, experimental studies in magnetohydrodynamics often involve complex, turbulent flows and require planar, two-component (2c) velocity measurements through only one acoustical access. We present the phased array ultrasound Doppler velocimeter as a modular research platform for flow mapping in liquid metals. It combines the pulse wave Doppler method with the phased array technique to adaptively focus the ultrasound beam. This makes it possible to resolve smaller flow structures in planar measurements compared with fixed-beam sensors and enables 2c flow mapping with only one acoustical access via the cross beam technique. From simultaneously measured 2-D velocity fields, quantities for turbulence characterization can be derived. The capabilities of this measurement system are demonstrated through measurements in the alloy gallium-indium-tin at room temperature. The 2-D, 2c velocity measurements of a flow in a cubic vessel driven by a rotating magnetic field (RMF) with a spatial resolution of up to 2.2 mm are presented. The measurement results are in good agreement with a semianalytical simulation. As a highlight, two-point correlation functions of the velocity field for different magnitudes of the RMF are presented.

  6. Development of a 63K SNP Array for Cotton and High-Density Mapping of Intraspecific and Interspecific Populations of Gossypium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M.; Lemm, Jana; Plieske, Joerg; Ashrafi, Hamid; Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Fang, David D.; Frelichowski, James; Giband, Marc; Hague, Steve; Hinze, Lori L.; Kochan, Kelli J.; Riggs, Penny K.; Scheffler, Jodi A.; Udall, Joshua A.; Ulloa, Mauricio; Wang, Shirley S.; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Bag, Sumit K.; Bhardwaj, Archana; Burke, John J.; Byers, Robert L.; Claverie, Michel; Gore, Michael A.; Harker, David B.; Islam, Md S.; Jenkins, Johnie N.; Jones, Don C.; Lacape, Jean-Marc; Llewellyn, Danny J.; Percy, Richard G.; Pepper, Alan E.; Poland, Jesse A.; Mohan Rai, Krishan; Sawant, Samir V.; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Spriggs, Andrew; Taylor, Jen M.; Wang, Fei; Yourstone, Scott M.; Zheng, Xiuting; Lawley, Cindy T.; Ganal, Martin W.; Van Deynze, Allen; Wilson, Iain W.; Stelly, David M.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput genotyping arrays provide a standardized resource for plant breeding communities that are useful for a breadth of applications including high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), genomic selection (GS), complex trait dissection, and studying patterns of genomic diversity among cultivars and wild accessions. We have developed the CottonSNP63K, an Illumina Infinium array containing assays for 45,104 putative intraspecific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for use within the cultivated cotton species Gossypium hirsutum L. and 17,954 putative interspecific SNP markers for use with crosses of other cotton species with G. hirsutum. The SNPs on the array were developed from 13 different discovery sets that represent a diverse range of G. hirsutum germplasm and five other species: G. barbadense L., G. tomentosum Nuttal × Seemann, G. mustelinum Miers × Watt, G. armourianum Kearny, and G. longicalyx J.B. Hutchinson and Lee. The array was validated with 1,156 samples to generate cluster positions to facilitate automated analysis of 38,822 polymorphic markers. Two high-density genetic maps containing a total of 22,829 SNPs were generated for two F2 mapping populations, one intraspecific and one interspecific, and 3,533 SNP markers were co-occurring in both maps. The produced intraspecific genetic map is the first saturated map that associates into 26 linkage groups corresponding to the number of cotton chromosomes for a cross between two G. hirsutum lines. The linkage maps were shown to have high levels of collinearity to the JGI G. raimondii Ulbrich reference genome sequence. The CottonSNP63K array, cluster file and associated marker sequences constitute a major new resource for the global cotton research community. PMID:25908569

  7. Cell force mapping using a double-sided micropillar array based on the moiré fringe method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Anderson, S.; Zheng, X.; Roberts, E.; Qiu, Y.; Liao, R.; Zhang, X.

    2014-07-01

    The mapping of traction forces is crucial to understanding the means by which cells regulate their behavior and physiological function to adapt to and communicate with their local microenvironment. To this end, polymeric micropillar arrays have been used for measuring cell traction force. However, the small scale of the micropillar deflections induced by cell traction forces results in highly inefficient force analyses using conventional optical approaches; in many cases, cell forces may be below the limits of detection achieved using conventional microscopy. To address these limitations, the moiré phenomenon has been leveraged as a visualization tool for cell force mapping due to its inherent magnification effect and capacity for whole-field force measurements. This Letter reports an optomechanical cell force sensor, namely, a double-sided micropillar array (DMPA) made of poly(dimethylsiloxane), on which one side is employed to support cultured living cells while the opposing side serves as a reference pattern for generating moiré patterns. The distance between the two sides, which is a crucial parameter influencing moiré pattern contrast, is predetermined during fabrication using theoretical calculations based on the Talbot effect that aim to optimize contrast. Herein, double-sided micropillar arrays were validated by mapping mouse embryo fibroblast contraction forces and the resulting force maps compared to conventional microscopy image analyses as the reference standard. The DMPA-based approach precludes the requirement for aligning two independent periodic substrates, improves moiré contrast, and enables efficient moiré pattern generation. Furthermore, the double-sided structure readily allows for the integration of moiré-based cell force mapping into microfabricated cell culture environments or lab-on-a-chip devices.

  8. Mapping the fine structure of cortical activity with different micro-ECoG electrode array geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Gkogkidis, C. Alexis; Iljina, Olga; Fiederer, Lukas D. J.; Henle, Christian; Mader, Irina; Kaminsky, Jan; Stieglitz, Thomas; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Ball, Tonio

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Innovations in micro-electrocorticography (µECoG) electrode array manufacturing now allow for intricate designs with smaller contact diameters and/or pitch (i.e. inter-contact distance) down to the sub-mm range. The aims of the present study were: (i) to investigate whether frequency ranges up to 400 Hz can be reproducibly observed in µECoG recordings and (ii) to examine how differences in topographical substructure between these frequency bands and electrode array geometries can be quantified. We also investigated, for the first time, the influence of blood vessels on signal properties and assessed the influence of cortical vasculature on topographic mapping. Approach. The present study employed two µECoG electrode arrays with different contact diameters and inter-contact distances, which were used to characterize neural activity from the somatosensory cortex of minipigs in a broad frequency range up to 400 Hz. The analysed neural data were recorded in acute experiments under anaesthesia during peripheral electrical stimulation. Main results. We observed that µECoG recordings reliably revealed multi-focal cortical somatosensory response patterns, in which response peaks were often less than 1 cm apart and would thus not have been resolvable with conventional ECoG. The response patterns differed by stimulation site and intensity, they were distinct for different frequency bands, and the results of functional mapping proved independent of cortical vascular. Our analysis of different frequency bands exhibited differences in the number of activation peaks in topographical substructures. Notably, signal strength and signal-to-noise ratios differed between the two electrode arrays, possibly due to their different sensitivity for variations in spatial patterns and signal strengths. Significance. Our findings that the geometry of µECoG electrode arrays can strongly influence their recording performance can help to make informed decisions that maybe

  9. Identifying UMLS concepts from ECG Impressions using KnowledgeMap

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.; Spickard, Anderson; Miller, Randolph A; Schildcrout, Jonathan; Darbar, Dawood; Rosenbloom, S. Trent; Peterson, Josh F.

    2005-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) impressions represent a wealth of medical information for potential decision support and drug-effect discovery. Much of this information is inaccessible to automated methods in the free-text portion of the ECG report. We studied the application of the KnowledgeMap concept identifier (KMCI) to map Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts from ECG impressions. ECGs were processed by KMCI and the results scored for accuracy by multiple raters. Reviewers also recorded unidentified concepts through the scoring interface. Overall, KMCI correctly identified 1059 out of 1171 concepts for a recall of 0.90. Precision, indicating the proportion of ECG concepts correctly identified, was 0.94. KMCI was particularly effective at identifying ECG rhythms (330/333), perfusion changes (65/66), and noncardiac medical concepts (11/11). In conclusion, KMCI is an effective method for mapping ECG impressions to UMLS concepts. PMID:16779029

  10. Development and implementation of a highly-multiplexed SNP array for genetic mapping in maritime pine and comparative mapping with loblolly pine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant source of genetic variation among individuals of a species. New genotyping technologies allow examining hundreds to thousands of SNPs in a single reaction for a wide range of applications such as genetic diversity analysis, linkage mapping, fine QTL mapping, association studies, marker-assisted or genome-wide selection. In this paper, we evaluated the potential of highly-multiplexed SNP genotyping for genetic mapping in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), the main conifer used for commercial plantation in southwestern Europe. Results We designed a custom GoldenGate assay for 1,536 SNPs detected through the resequencing of gene fragments (707 in vitro SNPs/Indels) and from Sanger-derived Expressed Sequenced Tags assembled into a unigene set (829 in silico SNPs/Indels). Offspring from three-generation outbred (G2) and inbred (F2) pedigrees were genotyped. The success rate of the assay was 63.6% and 74.8% for in silico and in vitro SNPs, respectively. A genotyping error rate of 0.4% was further estimated from segregating data of SNPs belonging to the same gene. Overall, 394 SNPs were available for mapping. A total of 287 SNPs were integrated with previously mapped markers in the G2 parental maps, while 179 SNPs were localized on the map generated from the analysis of the F2 progeny. Based on 98 markers segregating in both pedigrees, we were able to generate a consensus map comprising 357 SNPs from 292 different loci. Finally, the analysis of sequence homology between mapped markers and their orthologs in a Pinus taeda linkage map, made it possible to align the 12 linkage groups of both species. Conclusions Our results show that the GoldenGate assay can be used successfully for high-throughput SNP genotyping in maritime pine, a conifer species that has a genome seven times the size of the human genome. This SNP-array will be extended thanks to recent sequencing effort using new generation

  11. A unified approach to VLSI layout automation and algorithm mapping on processor arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, N.; Pattabiraman, S.; Srinivasan, Vinoo N.

    1993-01-01

    Development of software tools for designing supercomputing systems is highly complex and cost ineffective. To tackle this a special purpose PAcube silicon compiler which integrates different design levels from cell to processor arrays has been proposed. As a part of this, we present in this paper a novel methodology which unifies the problems of Layout Automation and Algorithm Mapping.

  12. Mapping of transcription factor binding regions in mammalian cells by ChIP: Comparison of array- and sequencing-based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Euskirchen, Ghia M.; Rozowsky, Joel S.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Lee, Wah Heng; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Hartman, Stephen; Emanuelsson, Olof; Stolc, Viktor; Weissman, Sherman; Gerstein, Mark B.; Ruan, Yijun; Snyder, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Recent progress in mapping transcription factor (TF) binding regions can largely be credited to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technologies. We compared strategies for mapping TF binding regions in mammalian cells using two different ChIP schemes: ChIP with DNA microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) and ChIP with DNA sequencing (ChIP-PET). We first investigated parameters central to obtaining robust ChIP-chip data sets by analyzing STAT1 targets in the ENCODE regions of the human genome, and then compared ChIP-chip to ChIP-PET. We devised methods for scoring and comparing results among various tiling arrays and examined parameters such as DNA microarray format, oligonucleotide length, hybridization conditions, and the use of competitor Cot-1 DNA. The best performance was achieved with high-density oligonucleotide arrays, oligonucleotides ≥50 bases (b), the presence of competitor Cot-1 DNA and hybridizations conducted in microfluidics stations. When target identification was evaluated as a function of array number, 80%–86% of targets were identified with three or more arrays. Comparison of ChIP-chip with ChIP-PET revealed strong agreement for the highest ranked targets with less overlap for the low ranked targets. With advantages and disadvantages unique to each approach, we found that ChIP-chip and ChIP-PET are frequently complementary in their relative abilities to detect STAT1 targets for the lower ranked targets; each method detected validated targets that were missed by the other method. The most comprehensive list of STAT1 binding regions is obtained by merging results from ChIP-chip and ChIP-sequencing. Overall, this study provides information for robust identification, scoring, and validation of TF targets using ChIP-based technologies. PMID:17568005

  13. A Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) Determined from Phased Microphone Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2006-01-01

    Current processing of acoustic array data is burdened with considerable uncertainty. This study reports an original methodology that serves to demystify array results, reduce misinterpretation, and accurately quantify position and strength of acoustic sources. Traditional array results represent noise sources that are convolved with array beamform response functions, which depend on array geometry, size (with respect to source position and distributions), and frequency. The Deconvolution Approach for the Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS) method removes beamforming characteristics from output presentations. A unique linear system of equations accounts for reciprocal influence at different locations over the array survey region. It makes no assumption beyond the traditional processing assumption of statistically independent noise sources. The full rank equations are solved with a new robust iterative method. DAMAS is quantitatively validated using archival data from a variety of prior high-lift airframe component noise studies, including flap edge/cove, trailing edge, leading edge, slat, and calibration sources. Presentations are explicit and straightforward, as the noise radiated from a region of interest is determined by simply summing the mean-squared values over that region. DAMAS can fully replace existing array processing and presentations methodology in most applications. It appears to dramatically increase the value of arrays to the field of experimental acoustics.

  14. Exome genotyping arrays to identify rare and low frequency variants associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Permuth, Jennifer B.; Pirie, Ailith; Ann Chen, Y.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Reid, Brett M.; Chen, Zhihua; Monteiro, Alvaro; Dennis, Joe; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bisogna, Maria; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Carney, Michael E.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; D’Aloisio, Aimee A.; Anne Doherty, Jennifer; Earp, Madalene; Edwards, Robert P.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Goodman, Marc T.; Gronwald, Jacek; Hogdall, Estrid; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Kjaer, Suzanne K.; Kraft, Peter; Le, Nhu D.; Levine, Douglas A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubinski, Jan; Matsuo, Keitaro; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Rosemary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Nakanishi, Toru; Ness, Roberta B.; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Anne Rossing, Mary; Sandler, Dale P.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Song, Honglin; Taylor, Jack A.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Webb, Penelope M.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Winham, Stacey; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen L.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Rare and low frequency variants are not well covered in most germline genotyping arrays and are understudied in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. To address this gap, we used genotyping arrays targeting rarer protein-coding variation in 8,165 EOC cases and 11,619 controls from the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Pooled association analyses were conducted at the variant and gene level for 98,543 variants directly genotyped through two exome genotyping projects. Only common variants that represent or are in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with previously-identified signals at established loci reached traditional thresholds for exome-wide significance (P < 5.0 × 10 − 7). One of the most significant signals (Pall histologies = 1.01 × 10 − 13;Pserous = 3.54 × 10 − 14) occurred at 3q25.31 for rs62273959, a missense variant mapping to the LEKR1 gene that is in LD (r2 = 0.90) with a previously identified ‘best hit’ (rs7651446) mapping to an intron of TIPARP. Suggestive associations (5.0 × 10 − 5 > P≥5.0 ×10 − 7) were detected for rare and low-frequency variants at 16 novel loci. Four rare missense variants were identified (ACTBL2 rs73757391 (5q11.2), BTD rs200337373 (3p25.1), KRT13 rs150321809 (17q21.2) and MC2R rs104894658 (18p11.21)), but only MC2R rs104894668 had a large effect size (OR = 9.66). Genes most strongly associated with EOC risk included ACTBL2 (PAML = 3.23 × 10 − 5; PSKAT-o = 9.23 × 10 − 4) and KRT13 (PAML = 1.67 × 10 − 4; PSKAT-o = 1.07 × 10 − 5), reaffirming variant-level analysis. In summary, this large study identified several rare and low-frequency variants and genes that may contribute to EOC susceptibility, albeit with possible small effects. Future studies that integrate epidemiology, sequencing, and functional assays are needed to further unravel the unexplained

  15. Exome genotyping arrays to identify rare and low frequency variants associated with epithelial ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Pirie, Ailith; Ann Chen, Y; Lin, Hui-Yi; Reid, Brett M; Chen, Zhihua; Monteiro, Alvaro; Dennis, Joe; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bandera, Elisa V; Bisogna, Maria; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Carney, Michael E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Cook, Linda S; Cramer, Daniel W; Cunningham, Julie M; Cybulski, Cezary; D'Aloisio, Aimee A; Anne Doherty, Jennifer; Earp, Madalene; Edwards, Robert P; Fridley, Brooke L; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Goodman, Marc T; Gronwald, Jacek; Hogdall, Estrid; Iversen, Edwin S; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Karlan, Beth Y; Kelemen, Linda E; Kjaer, Suzanne K; Kraft, Peter; Le, Nhu D; Levine, Douglas A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lubinski, Jan; Matsuo, Keitaro; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Rosemary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Nakanishi, Toru; Ness, Roberta B; Olson, Sara; Orlow, Irene; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Poole, Elizabeth M; Ramus, Susan J; Anne Rossing, Mary; Sandler, Dale P; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Song, Honglin; Taylor, Jack A; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S; Webb, Penelope M; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wilkens, Lynne R; Winham, Stacey; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Anna H; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen L; Pharoah, Paul D P; Sellers, Thomas A

    2016-08-15

    Rare and low frequency variants are not well covered in most germline genotyping arrays and are understudied in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk. To address this gap, we used genotyping arrays targeting rarer protein-coding variation in 8,165 EOC cases and 11,619 controls from the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Pooled association analyses were conducted at the variant and gene level for 98,543 variants directly genotyped through two exome genotyping projects. Only common variants that represent or are in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) with previously-identified signals at established loci reached traditional thresholds for exome-wide significance (P < 5.0 × 10  -   7 ). One of the most significant signals (P all histologies  =   1.01 × 10  -   13 ;P serous  =   3.54 × 10  -   14 ) occurred at 3q25.31 for rs62273959, a missense variant mapping to the LEKR1 gene that is in LD (r 2  =   0.90) with a previously identified 'best hit' (rs7651446) mapping to an intron of TIPARP. Suggestive associations (5.0 × 10  -   5  >   P≥5.0 ×10  -   7 ) were detected for rare and low-frequency variants at 16 novel loci. Four rare missense variants were identified (ACTBL2 rs73757391 (5q11.2), BTD rs200337373 (3p25.1), KRT13 rs150321809 (17q21.2) and MC2R rs104894658 (18p11.21)), but only MC2R rs104894668 had a large effect size (OR = 9.66). Genes most strongly associated with EOC risk included ACTBL2 (P AML  =   3.23 × 10  -   5 ; P SKAT-o  =   9.23 × 10  -   4 ) and KRT13 (P AML  =   1.67 × 10  -   4 ; P SKAT-o  =   1.07 × 10  -   5 ), reaffirming variant-level analysis. In summary, this large study identified several rare and low-frequency variants and genes that may contribute to EOC susceptibility, albeit with possible small effects. Future studies that integrate epidemiology, sequencing, and functional assays are needed

  16. Identifier mapping performance for integrating transcriptomics and proteomics experimental results

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies integrating transcriptomic data with proteomic data can illuminate the proteome more clearly than either separately. Integromic studies can deepen understanding of the dynamic complex regulatory relationship between the transcriptome and the proteome. Integrating these data dictates a reliable mapping between the identifier nomenclature resultant from the two high-throughput platforms. However, this kind of analysis is well known to be hampered by lack of standardization of identifier nomenclature among proteins, genes, and microarray probe sets. Therefore data integration may also play a role in critiquing the fallible gene identifications that both platforms emit. Results We compared three freely available internet-based identifier mapping resources for mapping UniProt accessions (ACCs) to Affymetrix probesets identifications (IDs): DAVID, EnVision, and NetAffx. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses of 91 endometrial cancer and 7 noncancer samples generated 11,879 distinct ACCs. For each ACC, we compared the retrieval sets of probeset IDs from each mapping resource. We confirmed a high level of discrepancy among the mapping resources. On the same samples, mRNA expression was available. Therefore, to evaluate the quality of each ACC-to-probeset match, we calculated proteome-transcriptome correlations, and compared the resources presuming that better mapping of identifiers should generate a higher proportion of mapped pairs with strong inter-platform correlations. A mixture model for the correlations fitted well and supported regression analysis, providing a window into the performance of the mapping resources. The resources have added and dropped matches over two years, but their overall performance has not changed. Conclusions The methods presented here serve to achieve concrete context-specific insight, to support well-informed decisions in choosing an ID mapping strategy for "omic" data merging. PMID:21619611

  17. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Jones, Ryan M.; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-12-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612, and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning (-40, 40) and (-30, 50) mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi-foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning (-25, 25) mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in vivo experiments demonstrated the system’s ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non

  18. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Jones, Ryan M.; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612 and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning [−40, 40] and [−30, 50] mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi–foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning [−25, 25] mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in-vivo experiments demonstrated the system's ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non

  19. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Jones, Ryan M; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-12-21

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612, and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning (-40, 40) and (-30, 50) mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi-foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning (-25, 25) mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in vivo experiments demonstrated the system's ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non

  20. Rapid genotyping with DNA micro-arrays for high-density linkage mapping and QTL mapping in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench)

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Shiori; Hara, Takashi; Ueno, Mariko; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Satoru; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Ryo; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2014-01-01

    For genetic studies and genomics-assisted breeding, particularly of minor crops, a genotyping system that does not require a priori genomic information is preferable. Here, we demonstrated the potential of a novel array-based genotyping system for the rapid construction of high-density linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. By using the system, we successfully constructed an accurate, high-density linkage map for common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench); the map was composed of 756 loci and included 8,884 markers. The number of linkage groups converged to eight, which is the basic number of chromosomes in common buckwheat. The sizes of the linkage groups of the P1 and P2 maps were 773.8 and 800.4 cM, respectively. The average interval between adjacent loci was 2.13 cM. The linkage map constructed here will be useful for the analysis of other common buckwheat populations. We also performed QTL mapping for main stem length and detected four QTL. It took 37 days to process 178 samples from DNA extraction to genotyping, indicating the system enables genotyping of genome-wide markers for a few hundred buckwheat plants before the plants mature. The novel system will be useful for genomics-assisted breeding in minor crops without a priori genomic information. PMID:25914583

  1. Rapid genotyping with DNA micro-arrays for high-density linkage mapping and QTL mapping in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench).

    PubMed

    Yabe, Shiori; Hara, Takashi; Ueno, Mariko; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Satoru; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Ryo; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2014-12-01

    For genetic studies and genomics-assisted breeding, particularly of minor crops, a genotyping system that does not require a priori genomic information is preferable. Here, we demonstrated the potential of a novel array-based genotyping system for the rapid construction of high-density linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. By using the system, we successfully constructed an accurate, high-density linkage map for common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench); the map was composed of 756 loci and included 8,884 markers. The number of linkage groups converged to eight, which is the basic number of chromosomes in common buckwheat. The sizes of the linkage groups of the P1 and P2 maps were 773.8 and 800.4 cM, respectively. The average interval between adjacent loci was 2.13 cM. The linkage map constructed here will be useful for the analysis of other common buckwheat populations. We also performed QTL mapping for main stem length and detected four QTL. It took 37 days to process 178 samples from DNA extraction to genotyping, indicating the system enables genotyping of genome-wide markers for a few hundred buckwheat plants before the plants mature. The novel system will be useful for genomics-assisted breeding in minor crops without a priori genomic information.

  2. Rapid recognition of volatile organic compounds with colorimetric sensor arrays for lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xianhua; Li, Dan; Du, Wei; Yan, Mengqiu; Wang, You; Huo, Danqun; Hou, Changjun

    2018-06-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath can be used as biomarkers to identify early stages of lung cancer. Herein, we report a disposable colorimetric array that has been constructed from diverse chemo-responsive colorants. Distinguishable difference maps were plotted within 4 min for specifically targeted VOCs. Through the consideration of various chemical interactions with VOCs, the arrays successfully discriminate between 20 different volatile organic compounds in breath that are related to lung cancer. VOCs were identified either with the visualized difference maps or through pattern recognition with an accuracy of at least 90%. No uncertainties or errors were observed in the hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Finally, good reproducibility and stability of the array was achieved against changes in humidity. Generally, this work provides fundamental support for construction of simple and rapid VOC sensors. More importantly, this approach provides a hypothesis-free array method for breath testing via VOC profiling. Therefore, this small, rapid, non-invasive, inexpensive, and visualized sensor array is a powerful and promising tool for early screening of lung cancer. Graphical abstract A disposable colorimetric array has been developed with broadly chemo-responsive dyes to incorporate various chemical interactions, through which the arrays successfully discriminate 20 VOCs that are related to lung cancer via difference maps alone or chemometrics within 4 min. The hydrophobic porous matrix provides good stability against changes in humidity.

  3. The Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SPLMA): Prospects to GOES-R GLM and CHUVA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Rachel I.; Carrey, Larry; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, Jeffrey C.; Goodman, Steven J.; Bruning, Eric C.; Koshak, William; Morales, Carlos A.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Angelis, Carlos F.; hide

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics and prospects of a Lightning Mapping Array to be deployed at the city of S o Paulo (SPLMA). This LMA network will provide CHUVA campaign with total lightning, lightning channel mapping and detailed information on the locations of cloud charge regions for the thunderstorms investigated during one of its IOP. The real-time availability of LMA observations will also contribute to and support improved weather situational awareness and mission execution. For GOES-R program it will form the basis of generating unique and valuable proxy data sets for both GLM and ABI sensors in support of several on-going research investigations

  4. Simulated near-field mapping of ripple pattern supported metal nanoparticles arrays for SERS optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, Mahima; Bhatnagar, Mukul; Ranjan, Mukesh; Mukherjee, Subroto; Nath, Rabinder; Mitra, Anirban

    2017-11-01

    An analytical model has been developed using a modified Yamaguchi model along with the wavelength dependent plasmon line-width correction. The model has been used to calculate the near-field response of random nanoparticles on the plane surface, elongated and spherical silver nanoparticle arrays supported on ion beam produced ripple patterned templates. The calculated near-field mapping for elongated nanoparticles arrays on the ripple patterned surface shows maximum number of hot-spots with a higher near-field enhancement (NFE) as compared to the spherical nanoparticle arrays and randomly distributed nanoparticles on the plane surface. The results from the simulations show a similar trend for the NFE when compared to the far field reflection spectra. The nature of the wavelength dependent NFE is also found to be in agreement with the observed experimental results from surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The calculated and the measured optical response unambiguously reveal the importance of interparticle gap and ordering, where a high intensity Raman signal is obtained for ordered elongated nanoparticles arrays case as against non-ordered and the aligned configuration of spherical nanoparticles on the rippled surface.

  5. Identifying Resistivity Anomalies of Sungai Batu Ancient River using 3D Contour Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusoh, R.; Saad, R.; Saidin, M.; Muhammad, S. B.; Anda, S. T.; Ismail, M. A. M.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Electrical resistivity method was undertaken at archeological site at Sungai Batu in Lembah Bujang, located at Sungai Merbok in northwestern of Malaysia. The survey was implemented near the excavation site. This paper shows the results of 5 ground resistivity survey line was carry out using SAS4000 equipment. The wenner-schlumberger array was applied for measurement. Resistivity data are used to obtain valuable information to identify the remain buried archeology. The ground resistivity data were presented in contour map for various depth by using Surfer 13 software visualized clearly the anomalies evidenced for every single depth section. The results from the survey has found the appearance of sedimentation formation that believe happen long time ago after ancient river was buried by sediment from weathering process due to increasing sea level. Otherwise, another anomaly was found in the middle of the survey area which shows high resistivity value about 1000 – 2000 ohm.m

  6. Two-dimensional mapping of needle visibility with linear and curved array for ultrasound-guided interventional procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanti, Hesty; Suprijanto, Kurniadi, Deddy

    2018-02-01

    Needle visibility in ultrasound-guided technique has been a crucial factor for successful interventional procedure. It has been affected by several factors, i.e. puncture depth, insertion angle, needle size and material, and imaging technology. The influences of those factors made the needle not always well visible. 20 G needles of 15 cm length (Nano Line, facet) were inserted into water bath with variation of insertion angles and depths. Ultrasound measurements are performed with BK-Medical Flex Focus 800 using 12 MHz linear array and 5 MHz curved array in Ultrasound Guided Regional Anesthesia mode. We propose 3 criteria to evaluate needle visibility, i.e. maximum intensity, mean intensity, and the ratio between minimum and maximum intensity. Those criteria were then depicted into representative maps for practical purpose. The best criterion candidate for representing the needle visibility was criterion 1. Generally, the appearance pattern of the needle from this criterion was relatively consistent, i.e. for linear array, it was relatively poor visibility in the middle part of the shaft, while for curved array, it is relatively better visible toward the end of the shaft. With further investigations, for example with the use of tissue-mimicking phantom, the representative maps can be built for future practical purpose, i.e. as a tool for clinicians to ensure better needle placement in clinical application. It will help them to avoid the "dead" area where the needle is not well visible, so it can reduce the risks of vital structures traversing and the number of required insertion, resulting in less patient morbidity. Those simple criteria and representative maps can be utilized to evaluate general visibility patterns of the needle in vast range of needle types and sizes in different insertion media. This information is also important as an early investigation for future research of needle visibility improvement, i.e. the development of beamforming strategies and

  7. Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression

    PubMed Central

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Saunders, Edward J.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Dadaev, Tokhir; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Ross-Adams, Helen; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Halim, Silvia; Russel, Roslin; Dunning, Alison M.; Luccarini, Craig; Dennis, Joe; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Muir, Ken; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I.; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Campa, Daniele; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Dan; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y.; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A.; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Morgan, Angela; Dicks, Ed; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Bojesen, Stig E.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 5p15 and multiple cancer types have been reported. We have previously shown evidence for a strong association between prostate cancer (PrCa) risk and rs2242652 at 5p15, intronic in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene that encodes TERT. To comprehensively evaluate the association between genetic variation across this region and PrCa, we performed a fine-mapping analysis by genotyping 134 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array or Sequenom MassArray iPlex, followed by imputation of 1094 SNPs in 22 301 PrCa cases and 22 320 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis identified four signals in the promoter or intronic regions of TERT that independently associated with PrCa risk. Gene expression analysis of normal prostate tissue showed evidence that SNPs within one of these regions also associated with TERT expression, providing a potential mechanism for predisposition to disease. PMID:23535824

  8. Methylation array data can simultaneously identify individuals and convey protected health information: an unrecognized ethical concern.

    PubMed

    Philibert, Robert A; Terry, Nicolas; Erwin, Cheryl; Philibert, Winter J; Beach, Steven Rh; Brody, Gene H

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide methylation arrays are increasingly used tools in studies of complex medical disorders. Because of their expense and potential utility to the scientific community, current federal policy dictates that data from these arrays, like those from genome-wide genotyping arrays, be deposited in publicly available databases. Unlike the genotyping information, access to the expression data is not restricted. An underlying supposition in the current nonrestricted access to methylation data is the belief that protected health and personal identifying information cannot be simultaneously extracted from these arrays. In this communication, we analyze methylation data from the Illumina HumanMethylation450 array and show that genotype at 1,069 highly informative loci, and both alcohol and smoking consumption information, can be derived from the array data. We conclude that both potentially personally identifying information and substance-use histories can be simultaneously derived from methylation array data. Because access to genetic information about a database subject or one of their relatives is critical to the de-identification process, this risk of de-identification is limited at the current time. We propose that access to genome-wide methylation data be restricted to institutionally approved investigators who accede to data use agreements prohibiting re-identification.

  9. HARMONIC SPACE ANALYSIS OF PULSAR TIMING ARRAY REDSHIFT MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Roebber, Elinore; Holder, Gilbert, E-mail: roebbere@physics.mcgill.ca

    2017-01-20

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for treating the angular information in the pulsar timing array (PTA) response to a gravitational wave (GW) background based on standard cosmic microwave background techniques. We calculate the angular power spectrum of the all-sky gravitational redshift pattern induced at the Earth for both a single bright source of gravitational radiation and a statistically isotropic, unpolarized Gaussian random GW background. The angular power spectrum is the harmonic transform of the Hellings and Downs curve. We use the power spectrum to examine the expected variance in the Hellings and Downs curve in both cases.more » Finally, we discuss the extent to which PTAs are sensitive to the angular power spectrum and find that the power spectrum sensitivity is dominated by the quadrupole anisotropy of the gravitational redshift map.« less

  10. Using Bayesian Inference Framework towards Identifying Gas Species and Concentration from High Temperature Resistive Sensor Array Data

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yixin; Zhou, Kai; Lei, Yu

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas sensors have been highly demanded for combustion process optimization and toxic emissions control, which usually suffer from poor selectivity. In order to solve this selectivity issue and identify unknown reducing gas species (CO, CH 4 , and CH 8 ) and concentrations, a high temperature resistive sensor array data set was built in this study based on 5 reported sensors. As each sensor showed specific responses towards different types of reducing gas with certain concentrations, based on which calibration curves were fitted, providing benchmark sensor array response database, then Bayesian inference framework was utilized to process themore » sensor array data and build a sample selection program to simultaneously identify gas species and concentration, by formulating proper likelihood between input measured sensor array response pattern of an unknown gas and each sampled sensor array response pattern in benchmark database. This algorithm shows good robustness which can accurately identify gas species and predict gas concentration with a small error of less than 10% based on limited amount of experiment data. These features indicate that Bayesian probabilistic approach is a simple and efficient way to process sensor array data, which can significantly reduce the required computational overhead and training data.« less

  11. Blood pressure loci identified with a gene-centric array.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R; Newhouse, Stephen J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G; Whincup, Peter H; Brown, Morris J; Connell, John M; Dobson, Richard J; Howard, Philip J; Mein, Charles A; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N M; Lawlor, Debbie A; Goodall, Alison H; Fowkes, F Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S; Burton, Paul R; Nelson, Christopher P; Tobin, Martin D; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S; Hastie, Claire E; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Wells, George A; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V; Dominiczak, Anna F; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Munroe, Patricia B

    2011-12-09

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10(-7) study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r(2) = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10(-7) at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Acceleration of short and long DNA read mapping without loss of accuracy using suffix array.

    PubMed

    Tárraga, Joaquín; Arnau, Vicente; Martínez, Héctor; Moreno, Raul; Cazorla, Diego; Salavert-Torres, José; Blanquer-Espert, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín; Medina, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    HPG Aligner applies suffix arrays for DNA read mapping. This implementation produces a highly sensitive and extremely fast mapping of DNA reads that scales up almost linearly with read length. The approach presented here is faster (over 20× for long reads) and more sensitive (over 98% in a wide range of read lengths) than the current state-of-the-art mappers. HPG Aligner is not only an optimal alternative for current sequencers but also the only solution available to cope with longer reads and growing throughputs produced by forthcoming sequencing technologies. https://github.com/opencb/hpg-aligner. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Spatio-temporal dimension of lightning flashes based on three-dimensional Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Jesús A.; Pineda, Nicolau; Montanyà, Joan; Velde, Oscar van der; Fabró, Ferran; Romero, David

    2017-11-01

    3D mapping system like the LMA - Lightning Mapping Array - are a leap forward in lightning observation. LMA measurements has lead to an improvement on the analysis of the fine structure of lightning, allowing to characterize the duration and maximum extension of the cloud fraction of a lightning flash. During several years of operation, the first LMA deployed in Europe has been providing a large amount of data which now allows a statistical approach to compute the full duration and horizontal extension of the in-cloud phase of a lightning flash. The "Ebro Lightning Mapping Array" (ELMA) is used in the present study. Summer and winter lighting were analyzed for seasonal periods (Dec-Feb and Jun-Aug). A simple method based on an ellipse fitting technique (EFT) has been used to characterize the spatio-temporal dimensions from a set of about 29,000 lightning flashes including both summer and winter events. Results show an average lightning flash duration of 440 ms (450 ms in winter) and a horizontal maximum length of 15.0 km (18.4 km in winter). The uncertainties for summer lightning lengths were about ± 1.2 km and ± 0.7 km for the mean and median values respectively. In case of winter lightning, the level of uncertainty reaches up to 1 km and 0.7 km of mean and median value. The results of the successful correlation of CG discharges with the EFT method, represent 6.9% and 35.5% of the total LMA flashes detected in summer and winter respectively. Additionally, the median value of lightning lengths calculated through this correlative method was approximately 17 km for both seasons. On the other hand, the highest median ratios of lightning length to CG discharges in both summer and winter were reported for positive CG discharges.

  14. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  15. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roger M (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  16. Identifying equivalent sound sources from aeroacoustic simulations using a numerical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignier, Nicolas J.; O'Reilly, Ciarán J.; Boij, Susann

    2017-04-01

    An application of phased array methods to numerical data is presented, aimed at identifying equivalent flow sound sources from aeroacoustic simulations. Based on phased array data extracted from compressible flow simulations, sound source strengths are computed on a set of points in the source region using phased array techniques assuming monopole propagation. Two phased array techniques are used to compute the source strengths: an approach using a Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse and a beamforming approach using dual linear programming (dual-LP) deconvolution. The first approach gives a model of correlated sources for the acoustic field generated from the flow expressed in a matrix of cross- and auto-power spectral values, whereas the second approach results in a model of uncorrelated sources expressed in a vector of auto-power spectral values. The accuracy of the equivalent source model is estimated by computing the acoustic spectrum at a far-field observer. The approach is tested first on an analytical case with known point sources. It is then applied to the example of the flow around a submerged air inlet. The far-field spectra obtained from the source models for two different flow conditions are in good agreement with the spectra obtained with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings integral, showing the accuracy of the source model from the observer's standpoint. Various configurations for the phased array and for the sources are used. The dual-LP beamforming approach shows better robustness to changes in the number of probes and sources than the pseudo-inverse approach. The good results obtained with this simulation case demonstrate the potential of the phased array approach as a modelling tool for aeroacoustic simulations.

  17. Transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays using CT-based skull-specific aberration corrections: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ryan M.; O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of transcranial passive acoustic mapping with hemispherical sparse arrays (30 cm diameter, 16 to 1372 elements, 2.48 mm receiver diameter) using CT-based aberration corrections was investigated via numerical simulations. A multi-layered ray acoustic transcranial ultrasound propagation model based on CT-derived skull morphology was developed. By incorporating skull-specific aberration corrections into a conventional passive beamforming algorithm (Norton and Won 2000 IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens. 38 1337–43), simulated acoustic source fields representing the emissions from acoustically-stimulated microbubbles were spatially mapped through three digitized human skulls, with the transskull reconstructions closely matching the water-path control images. Image quality was quantified based on main lobe beamwidths, peak sidelobe ratio, and image signal-to-noise ratio. The effects on the resulting image quality of the source’s emission frequency and location within the skull cavity, the array sparsity and element configuration, the receiver element sensitivity, and the specific skull morphology were all investigated. The system’s resolution capabilities were also estimated for various degrees of array sparsity. Passive imaging of acoustic sources through an intact skull was shown possible with sparse hemispherical imaging arrays. This technique may be useful for the monitoring and control of transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) treatments, particularly non-thermal, cavitation-mediated applications such as FUS-induced blood-brain barrier disruption or sonothrombolysis, for which no real-time monitoring technique currently exists. PMID:23807573

  18. On the VHF Source Retrieval Errors Associated with Lightning Mapping Arrays (LMAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation examines in detail the standard retrieval method: that of retrieving the (x, y, z, t) parameters of a lightning VHF point source from multiple ground-based Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) time-of-arrival (TOA) observations. The solution is found by minimizing a chi-squared function via the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The associated forward problem is examined to illustrate the importance of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Monte Carlo simulated retrievals are used to assess the benefits of changing various LMA network properties. A generalized retrieval method is also introduced that, in addition to TOA data, uses LMA electric field amplitude measurements to retrieve a transient VHF dipole moment source.

  19. Jansky Array mapping of Gravitational Bursts as Afterglows in Radio (JAGWAR): The VLA Large Program and Initial Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooley, Kunal; Hallinan, Gregg; Hotokezaka, Kenta; Frail, Dale; Myers, Steven T.; Horesh, Assaf; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shri; Pound Singer, Leo; nissanke, Samaya; Rana, Javed

    2018-01-01

    The era of gravitational waves and multi-messenger astronomy has begun. Telescopes around the globe are now in hot pursuit of electromagnetic counterparts (EM) to aLIGO/VIRGO sources, especially double-neutron star (NS-NS) and neutron star-black hole mergers (NS-BH). The EM counterparts are crucial for 1) providing arcsecond localization and identifying the precise host galaxy and merger redshift, 2) understanding the energetics and physics of the merger, 3) mapping their environments and pre-merger mass ejection processes, and 4) confirming the validity of the GW signals at low signal-to-noise ratios. Radio wavelengths provide one of the best diagnostics of both the dynamical sub-relativistic ejecta and any ultra-relativistic jet launched, as well as the possible interaction of these two components. In this talk I will introduce the Jansky Array mapping of Gravitational Bursts as Afterglows in Radio (JAGWAR) program, running on the VLA, aimed at maximizing the discoveries of the radio afterglows of NS-NS and NS-BH mergers. I will also present the JAGWAR results from the aLIGO/VIRGO observing run O2, which concluded in August 2017.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Sound Field Mapping Through Large-Bore Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS) Piping Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.

    2012-04-16

    A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to further understand the effects of coarse grained microstructures found in CASS materials on phased array ultrasonic wave propagation. Laboratory measurements were made on three CASS specimens with different microstructures; the specimens were polished and etched to reveal measurable grain sizes, shapes and orientations. Three longitudinal, phased array probes were fixed on a specimen's outside diameter with the sound field directed toward one end (face) of the pipe segment over a fixed range of angles. A point receiver was raster scanned over the surface of the specimen face generating a sound fieldmore » image. A slice of CASS material was then removed from the specimen end and the beam mapping exercise repeated. The sound fields acquired were analyzed for spot size, coherency, and beam redirection. Analyses were conducted between the resulting sound fields and the microstructural characteristics of each specimen.« less

  1. Use of Microtremor Array Recordings for Mapping Subsurface Soil Structure, Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walling, M.

    2012-12-01

    Microtremor array recordings are carried out in Singapore, for different geology, to study the influence of each site in modeling the subsurface structure. The Spatial Autocorrelation (SPAC) method is utilized for the computation of the soil profiles. The array configuration of the recording consists of 7 seismometers, recording the vertical component of the ground motion, and the recording at each site is carried out for 30 minutes. The results from the analysis show that the soil structure modeled for the young alluvial of Kallang Formation (KF), in terms of shear wave velocity (Vs), gives a good correlation with borehole information, while for the older geological formation of Jurong Formation (JF) (sedimentary rock sequence) and Old Alluvial (OA) (dense alluvium formation), the correlation is not very clear due to the lack of impedance contrast. The older formation of Bukit Timah Granite (BTG) show contrasting results within the formation, with the northern BTG suggesting a low Vs upper layer of about 20m - 30m while the southern BTG reveals a dense formation. The discrepancy in the variation within BTG is confirmed from borehole data that reveals the northern BTG to have undergone intense weathering while the southern BTG have not undergone noticeable weathering. Few sites with bad recording quality could not resolve the soil structure. Microtremor array recording is good for mapping sites with soft soil formation and weathered rock formation but can be limited in the absence of subsurface velocity contrast and bad quality of microtremor records.; The correlation between the Vs30 estimated from SPAC method and borehole data for the four major geological formations of Singapore. The encircled sites are the sites with recording error.

  2. A Spatiotemporal Indexing Approach for Efficient Processing of Big Array-Based Climate Data with MapReduce

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Hu, Fei; Schnase, John L.; Duffy, Daniel Q.; Lee, Tsengdar; Bowen, Michael K.; Yang, Chaowei

    2016-01-01

    Climate observations and model simulations are producing vast amounts of array-based spatiotemporal data. Efficient processing of these data is essential for assessing global challenges such as climate change, natural disasters, and diseases. This is challenging not only because of the large data volume, but also because of the intrinsic high-dimensional nature of geoscience data. To tackle this challenge, we propose a spatiotemporal indexing approach to efficiently manage and process big climate data with MapReduce in a highly scalable environment. Using this approach, big climate data are directly stored in a Hadoop Distributed File System in its original, native file format. A spatiotemporal index is built to bridge the logical array-based data model and the physical data layout, which enables fast data retrieval when performing spatiotemporal queries. Based on the index, a data-partitioning algorithm is applied to enable MapReduce to achieve high data locality, as well as balancing the workload. The proposed indexing approach is evaluated using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) climate reanalysis dataset. The experimental results show that the index can significantly accelerate querying and processing (10 speedup compared to the baseline test using the same computing cluster), while keeping the index-to-data ratio small (0.0328). The applicability of the indexing approach is demonstrated by a climate anomaly detection deployed on a NASA Hadoop cluster. This approach is also able to support efficient processing of general array-based spatiotemporal data in various geoscience domains without special configuration on a Hadoop cluster.

  3. Characteristics of Lightning Within Electrified Snowfall Events Using Lightning Mapping Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Lang, Timothy J.; Bruning, Eric C.; Calhoun, Kristin M.; Harkema, Sebastian; Curtis, Nathan

    2018-02-01

    This study examined 34 lightning flashes within four separate thundersnow events derived from lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) in northern Alabama, central Oklahoma, and Washington DC. The goals were to characterize the in-cloud component of each lightning flash, as well as the correspondence between the LMA observations and lightning data taken from national lightning networks like the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Individual flashes were examined in detail to highlight several observations within the data set. The study results demonstrated that the structures of these flashes were primarily normal polarity. The mean area encompassed by this set of flashes is 375 km2, with a maximum flash extent of 2,300 km2, a minimum of 3 km2, and a median of 128 km2. An average of 2.29 NLDN flashes were recorded per LMA-derived lightning flash. A maximum of 11 NLDN flashes were recorded in association with a single LMA-derived flash on 10 January 2011. Additionally, seven of the 34 flashes in the study contain zero NLDN-identified flashes. Eleven of the 34 flashes initiated from tall human-made objects (e.g., communication towers). In at least six lightning flashes, the NLDN detected a return stroke from the cloud back to the tower and not the initial upward leader. This study also discusses lightning's interaction with the human-built environment and provides an example of lightning within heavy snowfall observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-16's Geostationary Lightning Mapper.

  4. Characteristics of Lightning within Electrified Snowfall Events using Lightning Mapping Arrays.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Christopher J; Lang, Timothy J; Bruning, Eric C; Calhoun, Kristin M; Harkema, Sebastian; Curtis, Nathan

    2018-02-27

    This study examined 34 lightning flashes within four separate thundersnow events derived from lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) in northern Alabama, central Oklahoma, and Washington DC. The goals were to characterize the in-cloud component of each lightning flash, as well as the correspondence between the LMA observations and lightning data taken from national lightning networks like the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). Individual flashes were examined in detail to highlight several observations within the dataset. The study results demonstrated that the structures of these flashes were primarily normal polarity. The mean area encompassed by this set of flashes is 375 km 2 , with a maximum flash extent of 2300 km 2 , a minimum of 3 km 2 , and a median of 128 km 2 . An average of 2.29 NLDN flashes were recorded per LMA-derived lightning flash. A maximum of 11 NLDN flashes were recorded in association with a single LMA-derived flash on 10 January 2011. Additionally, seven of the 34 flashes in the study contain zero NLDN identified flashes. Eleven of the 34 flashes initiated from tall human-made objects (e.g., communication towers). In at least six lightning flashes, the NLDN detected a return stroke from the cloud back to the tower and not the initial upward leader. This study also discusses lightning's interaction with the human built environment and provides an example of lightning within heavy snowfall observed by GOES-16's Geostationary Lightning Mapper.

  5. Air-cathode microbial fuel cell array: a device for identifying and characterizing electrochemically active microbes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Huijie; Li, Lei; de Figueiredo, Paul; Han, Arum

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have generated excitement in environmental and bioenergy communities due to their potential for coupling wastewater treatment with energy generation and powering diverse devices. The pursuit of strategies such as improving microbial cultivation practices and optimizing MFC devices has increased power generating capacities of MFCs. However, surprisingly few microbial species with electrochemical activity in MFCs have been identified because current devices do not support parallel analyses or high throughput screening. We have recently demonstrated the feasibility of using advanced microfabrication methods to fabricate an MFC microarray. Here, we extend these studies by demonstrating a microfabricated air-cathode MFC array system. The system contains 24 individual air-cathode MFCs integrated onto a single chip. The device enables the direct and parallel comparison of different microbes loaded onto the array. Environmental samples were used to validate the utility of the air-cathode MFC array system and two previously identified isolates, 7Ca (Shewanella sp.) and 3C (Arthrobacter sp.), were shown to display enhanced electrochemical activities of 2.69 mW/m(2) and 1.86 mW/m(2), respectively. Experiments using a large scale conventional air-cathode MFC validated these findings. The parallel air-cathode MFC array system demonstrated here is expected to promote and accelerate the discovery and characterization of electrochemically active microbes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fractal-Based Lightning Channel Length Estimation from Convex-Hull Flash Areas for DC3 Lightning Mapping Array Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruning, Eric C.; Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Carey, Larry D.; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; MacGorman, Donald R.

    2013-01-01

    We will use VHF Lightning Mapping Array data to estimate NOx per flash and per unit channel length, including the vertical distribution of channel length. What s the best way to find channel length from VHF sources? This paper presents the rationale for the fractal method, which is closely related to the box-covering method.

  7. High Resolution Mapping of QTLs for Heat Tolerance in Rice Using a 5K SNP Array.

    PubMed

    Ps, Shanmugavadivel; Sv, Amitha Mithra; Prakash, Chandra; Mk, Ramkumar; Tiwari, Ratan; Mohapatra, Trilochan; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Heat stress is one of the major abiotic threats to rice production, next to drought and salinity stress. Incidence of heat stress at reproductive phase of the crop results in abnormal pollination leading to floret sterility, low seed set and poor grain quality. Identification of QTLs and causal genes for heat stress tolerance at flowering will facilitate breeding for improved heat tolerance in rice. In the present study, we used 272 F 8 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between Nagina22, a well-known heat tolerant Aus cultivar and IR64, a heat sensitive popular Indica rice variety to map the QTLs for heat tolerance. To enable precise phenotyping for heat stress tolerance, we used a controlled phenotyping facility available at ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, Karnal, India. Based on 'days to 50% flowering' data of the RILs, we followed staggered sowing to synchronize flowering to impose heat stress at uniform stage. Using the Illumina infinium 5K SNP array for genotyping the parents and the RILs, and stress susceptibility and stress tolerance indices (SSI and STI) of percent spikelet sterility and yield per plant (g), we identified five QTLs on chromosomes 3, 5, 9 and 12. The identified QTLs explained phenotypic variation in the range of 6.27 to 21. 29%. Of these five QTLs, two high effect QTLs, one novel (qSTIPSS9.1) and one known (qSTIY5.1/qSSIY5.2), were mapped in less than 400 Kbp genomic regions, comprising of 65 and 54 genes, respectively. The present study identified two major QTLs for heat tolerance in rice in narrow physical intervals, which can be employed for crop improvement by marker assisted selection (MAS) after development of suitable scorable markers for breeding of high yielding heat tolerant rice varieties. This is the first report of a major QTL for heat tolerance on chromosome 9 of rice. Further, a known QTL for heat tolerance on chromosome 5 was narrowed down from 23 Mb to 331 Kbp in this study.

  8. Genomic Variation by Whole-Genome SNP Mapping Arrays Predicts Time-to-Event Outcome in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schweighofer, Carmen D.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Majewski, Tadeusz; Barron, Lynn L.; Lerner, Susan; Sargent, Rachel L.; O'Brien, Susan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Wierda, William G.; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Keating, Michael J.; Abruzzo, Lynne V.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic abnormalities, such as deletions in 11q22 or 17p13, are associated with poorer prognosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We hypothesized that unknown regions of copy number variation (CNV) affect clinical outcome and can be detected by array-based single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. We compared SNP genotypes from 168 untreated patients with CLL with genotypes from 73 white HapMap controls. We identified 322 regions of recurrent CNV, 82 of which occurred significantly more often in CLL than in HapMap (CLL-specific CNV), including regions typically aberrant in CLL: deletions in 6q21, 11q22, 13q14, and 17p13 and trisomy 12. In univariate analyses, 35 of total and 11 of CLL-specific CNVs were associated with unfavorable time-to-event outcomes, including gains or losses in chromosomes 2p, 4p, 4q, 6p, 6q, 7q, 11p, 11q, and 17p. In multivariate analyses, six CNVs (ie, CLL-specific variations in 11p15.1-15.4 or 6q27) predicted time-to-treatment or overall survival independently of established markers of prognosis. Moreover, genotypic complexity (ie, the number of independent CNVs per patient) significantly predicted prognosis, with a median time-to-treatment of 64 months versus 23 months in patients with zero to one versus two or more CNVs, respectively (P = 3.3 × 10−8). In summary, a comparison of SNP genotypes from patients with CLL with HapMap controls allowed us to identify known and unknown recurrent CNVs and to determine regions and rates of CNV that predict poorer prognosis in patients with CLL. PMID:23273604

  9. At-TAX: a whole genome tiling array resource for developmental expression analysis and transcript identification in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Laubinger, Sascha; Zeller, Georg; Henz, Stefan R; Sachsenberg, Timo; Widmer, Christian K; Naouar, Naïra; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Rätsch, Gunnar; Weigel, Detlef

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression maps for model organisms, including Arabidopsis thaliana, have typically been created using gene-centric expression arrays. Here, we describe a comprehensive expression atlas, Arabidopsis thaliana Tiling Array Express (At-TAX), which is based on whole-genome tiling arrays. We demonstrate that tiling arrays are accurate tools for gene expression analysis and identified more than 1,000 unannotated transcribed regions. Visualizations of gene expression estimates, transcribed regions, and tiling probe measurements are accessible online at the At-TAX homepage. PMID:18613972

  10. A dual-mode hemispherical sparse array for 3D passive acoustic mapping and skull localization within a clinical MRI guided focused ultrasound device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crake, Calum; Brinker, Spencer T.; Coviello, Christian M.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2018-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that passive acoustic imaging may be used alongside MRI for monitoring of focused ultrasound therapy. However, past implementations have generally made use of either linear arrays originally designed for diagnostic imaging or custom narrowband arrays specific to in-house therapeutic transducer designs, neither of which is fully compatible with clinical MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) devices. Here we have designed an array which is suitable for use within an FDA-approved MR-guided transcranial focused ultrasound device, within the bore of a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner. The array is constructed from 5  ×  0.4 mm piezoceramic disc elements arranged in pseudorandom fashion on a low-profile laser-cut acrylic frame designed to fit between the therapeutic elements of a 230 kHz InSightec ExAblate 4000 transducer. By exploiting thickness and radial resonance modes of the piezo discs the array is capable of both B-mode imaging at 5 MHz for skull localization, as well as passive reception at the second harmonic of the therapy array for detection of cavitation and 3D passive acoustic imaging. In active mode, the array was able to perform B-mode imaging of a human skull, showing the outer skull surface with good qualitative agreement with MR imaging. Extension to 3D showed the array was able to locate the skull within  ±2 mm/2° of reference points derived from MRI, which could potentially allow registration of a patient to the therapy system without the expense of real-time MRI. In passive mode, the array was able to resolve a point source in 3D within a  ±10 mm region about each axis from the focus, detect cavitation (SNR ~ 12 dB) at burst lengths from 10 cycles to continuous wave, and produce 3D acoustic maps in a flow phantom. Finally, the array was used to detect and map cavitation associated with microbubble activity in the brain in nonhuman primates.

  11. Variants for HDL-C, LDL-C and Triglycerides Identified from Admixture Mapping and Fine-Mapping Analysis in African-American Families

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Priya B.; Tang, Hua; Feng, Tao; Tayo, Bamidele; Morrison, Alanna C.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Hanis, Craig L.; Arnett, Donna K.; Hunt, Steven C.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rao, D.C.; Cooper, R.S.; Risch, Neil; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Admixture mapping of lipids was followed-up by family-based association analysis to identify variants for cardiovascular disease in African-Americans. Methods and Results The present study conducted admixture mapping analysis for total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides. The analysis was performed in 1,905 unrelated African-American subjects from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s Family Blood Pressure Program. Regions showing admixture evidence were followed-up with family-based association analysis in 3,556 African-American subjects from the FBPP. The admixture mapping and family-based association analyses were adjusted for age, age2, sex, body-mass-index, and genome-wide mean ancestry to minimize the confounding due to population stratification. Regions that were suggestive of local ancestry association evidence were found on chromosomes 7 (LDL-C), 8 (HDL-C), 14 (triglycerides) and 19 (total cholesterol and triglycerides). In the fine-mapping analysis, 52,939 SNPs were tested and 11 SNPs (8 independent SNPs) showed nominal significant association with HDL-C (2 SNPs), LDL-C (4 SNPs) and triglycerides (5 SNPs). The family data was used in the fine-mapping to identify SNPs that showed novel associations with lipids and regions including genes with known associations for cardiovascular disease. Conclusions This study identified regions on chromosomes 7, 8, 14 and 19 and 11 SNPs from the fine-mapping analysis that were associated with HDL-C, LDL-C and triglycerides for further studies of cardiovascular disease in African-Americans. PMID:25552592

  12. Variants for HDL-C, LDL-C, and triglycerides identified from admixture mapping and fine-mapping analysis in African American families.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Priya B; Tang, Hua; Feng, Tao; Tayo, Bamidele; Morrison, Alanna C; Kardia, Sharon L R; Hanis, Craig L; Arnett, Donna K; Hunt, Steven C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rao, Dabeeru C; Cooper, Richard S; Risch, Neil; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-02-01

    Admixture mapping of lipids was followed-up by family-based association analysis to identify variants for cardiovascular disease in African Americans. The present study conducted admixture mapping analysis for total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. The analysis was performed in 1905 unrelated African American subjects from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP). Regions showing admixture evidence were followed-up with family-based association analysis in 3556 African American subjects from the FBPP. The admixture mapping and family-based association analyses were adjusted for age, age(2), sex, body mass index, and genome-wide mean ancestry to minimize the confounding caused by population stratification. Regions that were suggestive of local ancestry association evidence were found on chromosomes 7 (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol), 8 (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), 14 (triglycerides), and 19 (total cholesterol and triglycerides). In the fine-mapping analysis, 52 939 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested and 11 SNPs (8 independent SNPs) showed nominal significant association with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (2 SNPs), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (4 SNPs), and triglycerides (5 SNPs). The family data were used in the fine-mapping to identify SNPs that showed novel associations with lipids and regions, including genes with known associations for cardiovascular disease. This study identified regions on chromosomes 7, 8, 14, and 19 and 11 SNPs from the fine-mapping analysis that were associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides for further studies of cardiovascular disease in African Americans. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Novel SSR Markers from BAC-End Sequences, DArT Arrays and a Comprehensive Genetic Map with 1,291 Marker Loci for Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Spurthi N.; Varghese, Nicy; Shah, Trushar M.; Penmetsa, R. Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Gudipati, Srivani; Gaur, Pooran M.; Kulwal, Pawan L.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; KaviKishor, Polavarapu B.; Winter, Peter; Kahl, Günter; Town, Christopher D.; Kilian, Andrzej; Cook, Douglas R.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2011-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is the third most important cool season food legume, cultivated in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. The goal of this study was to develop novel molecular markers such as microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences (BESs) and diversity arrays technology (DArT) markers, and to construct a high-density genetic map based on recombinant inbred line (RIL) population ICC 4958 (C. arietinum)×PI 489777 (C. reticulatum). A BAC-library comprising 55,680 clones was constructed and 46,270 BESs were generated. Mining of these BESs provided 6,845 SSRs, and primer pairs were designed for 1,344 SSRs. In parallel, DArT arrays with ca. 15,000 clones were developed, and 5,397 clones were found polymorphic among 94 genotypes tested. Screening of newly developed BES-SSR markers and DArT arrays on the parental genotypes of the RIL mapping population showed polymorphism with 253 BES-SSR markers and 675 DArT markers. Segregation data obtained for these polymorphic markers and 494 markers data compiled from published reports or collaborators were used for constructing the genetic map. As a result, a comprehensive genetic map comprising 1,291 markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) spanning a total of 845.56 cM distance was developed (http://cmap.icrisat.ac.in/cmap/sm/cp/thudi/). The number of markers per linkage group ranged from 68 (LG 8) to 218 (LG 3) with an average inter-marker distance of 0.65 cM. While the developed resource of molecular markers will be useful for genetic diversity, genetic mapping and molecular breeding applications, the comprehensive genetic map with integrated BES-SSR markers will facilitate its anchoring to the physical map (under construction) to accelerate map-based cloning of genes in chickpea and comparative genome evolution studies in legumes. PMID:22102885

  14. Error Analyses of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solokiewicz, R. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Christian, H. J.; Hall, J. M.; Bailey, J. C.; Krider, E. P.; Bateman, M. G.; Boccippio, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and in time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval errors. The simulation applies a VHF source retrieval algorithm that was recently developed at the NASA-MSFC and that is similar, but not identical to, the standard New Mexico Tech retrieval algorithm. The second method uses a purely theoretical technique (i.e., chi-squared Curvature Matrix theory) to estimate retrieval errors. Both methods assume that the LMA system has an overall rms timing error of 50ns, but all other possible errors (e.g., multiple sources per retrieval attempt) are neglected. The detailed spatial distributions of retrieval errors are provided. Given that the two methods are completely independent of one another, it is shown that they provide remarkably similar results, except that the chi-squared theory produces larger altitude error estimates than the (more realistic) Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Identification and mapping of linear antibody epitopes in human serum albumin using high-density Peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lajla Bruntse; Buus, Soren; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    We have recently developed a high-density photolithographic, peptide array technology with a theoretical upper limit of 2 million different peptides per array of 2 cm(2). Here, we have used this to perform complete and exhaustive analyses of linear B cell epitopes of a medium sized protein target using human serum albumin (HSA) as an example. All possible overlapping 15-mers from HSA were synthesized and probed with a commercially available polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA antibody preparation. To allow for identification of even the weakest epitopes and at the same time perform a detailed characterization of key residues involved in antibody binding, the array also included complete single substitution scans (i.e. including each of the 20 common amino acids) at each position of each 15-mer peptide. As specificity controls, all possible 15-mer peptides from bovine serum albumin (BSA) and from rabbit serum albumin (RSA) were included as well. The resulting layout contained more than 200.000 peptide fields and could be synthesized in a single array on a microscope slide. More than 20 linear epitope candidates were identified and characterized at high resolution i.e. identifying which amino acids in which positions were needed, or not needed, for antibody interaction. As expected, moderate cross-reaction with some peptides in BSA was identified whereas no cross-reaction was observed with peptides from RSA. We conclude that high-density peptide microarrays are a very powerful methodology to identify and characterize linear antibody epitopes, and should advance detailed description of individual specificities at the single antibody level as well as serologic analysis at the proteome-wide level.

  16. Development and mapping of DArT markers within the Festuca - Lolium complex

    PubMed Central

    Kopecký, David; Bartoš, Jan; Lukaszewski, Adam J; Baird, James H; Černoch, Vladimír; Kölliker, Roland; Rognli, Odd Arne; Blois, Helene; Caig, Vanessa; Lübberstedt, Thomas; Studer, Bruno; Shaw, Paul; Doležel, Jaroslav; Kilian, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Background Grasses are among the most important and widely cultivated plants on Earth. They provide high quality fodder for livestock, are used for turf and amenity purposes, and play a fundamental role in environment protection. Among cultivated grasses, species within the Festuca-Lolium complex predominate, especially in temperate regions. To facilitate high-throughput genome profiling and genetic mapping within the complex, we have developed a Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) array for five grass species: F. pratensis, F. arundinacea, F. glaucescens, L. perenne and L. multiflorum. Results The DArTFest array contains 7680 probes derived from methyl-filtered genomic representations. In a first marker discovery experiment performed on 40 genotypes from each species (with the exception of F. glaucescens for which only 7 genotypes were used), we identified 3884 polymorphic markers. The number of DArT markers identified in every single genotype varied from 821 to 1852. To test the usefulness of DArTFest array for physical mapping, DArT markers were assigned to each of the seven chromosomes of F. pratensis using single chromosome substitution lines while recombinants of F. pratensis chromosome 3 were used to allocate the markers to seven chromosome bins. Conclusion The resources developed in this project will facilitate the development of genetic maps in Festuca and Lolium, the analysis on genetic diversity, and the monitoring of the genomic constitution of the Festuca × Lolium hybrids. They will also enable marker-assisted selection for multiple traits or for specific genome regions. PMID:19832973

  17. Magnetic field mapping of the UCNTau magneto-gravitational trap: design study

    SciTech Connect

    Libersky, Matthew Murray

    2014-09-04

    The beta decay lifetime of the free neutron is an important input to the Standard Model of particle physics, but values measured using different methods have exhibited substantial disagreement. The UCN r experiment in development at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) plans to explore better methods of measuring the neutron lifetime using ultracold neutrons (UCNs). In this experiment, UCNs are confined in a magneto-gravitational trap formed by a curved, asymmetric Halbach array placed inside a vacuum vessel and surrounded by holding field coils. If any defects present in the Halbach array are sufficient to reduce the local field near themore » surface below that needed to repel the desired energy level UCNs, loss by material interaction can occur at a rate similar to the loss by beta decay. A map of the magnetic field near the surface of the array is necessary to identify any such defects, but the array's curved geometry and placement in a vacuum vessel make conventional field mapping methods difficult. A system consisting of computer vision-based tracking and a rover holding a Hall probe has been designed to map the field near the surface of the array, and construction of an initial prototype has begun at LANL. The design of the system and initial results will be described here.« less

  18. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Pinto, O., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luz Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in December 2011-January 2012, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sa Luz Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sa Jos dos Campos.

  19. The CHARA Array Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Schaefer, Gail; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Gies, Douglas; Farrington, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    We are building a searchable database for the CHARA Array data archive. The Array consists of six telescopes linked together as an interferometer, providing sub-milliarcsecond resolution in the optical and near-infrared. The Array enables a variety of scientific studies, including measuring stellar angular diameters, imaging stellar shapes and surface features, mapping the orbits of close binary companions, and resolving circumstellar environments. This database is one component of an NSF/MSIP funded program to provide open access to the CHARA Array to the broader astronomical community. This archive goes back to 2004 and covers all the beam combiners on the Array. We discuss the current status of and future plans for the public database, and give directions on how to access it.

  20. Fine-mapping of lipid regions in global populations discovers ethnic-specific signals and refines previously identified lipid loci

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Niha; Luis Ambite, Jose; Bush, William S.; Kichaev, Gleb; Lu, Yingchang; Manichaikul, Ani; Sheu, Wayne H-H.; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Buzkova, Petra; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chung, Ren-Hua; Cochran, Barbara; Dumitrescu, Logan; Gottesman, Omri; Haessler, Jeffrey W.; Haiman, Christopher; Heiss, Gerardo; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hwu, Chii-Min; Juang, Jyh-Ming J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Li-An; Lin, Danyu; Lin, Shih-Yi; Mackey, Rachel H.; Martin, Lisa W.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Peters, Ulrike; Predazzi, Irene; Quertermous, Thomas; Reiner, Alex P.; Robinson, Jennifer; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryckman, Kelli K.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Stahl, Eli; Tao, Ran; Tsai, Michael Y.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Buyske, Steven; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Cheng, Iona; Crawford, Dana C.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Rich, Stephen S.; Fornage, Myriam; North, Kari E.; Kooperberg, Charles; Carty, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Genome-wide association studies have identified over 150 loci associated with lipid traits, however, no large-scale studies exist for Hispanics and other minority populations. Additionally, the genetic architecture of lipid-influencing loci remains largely unknown. We performed one of the most racially/ethnically diverse fine-mapping genetic studies of HDL-C, LDL-C, and triglycerides to-date using SNPs on the MetaboChip array on 54,119 individuals: 21,304 African Americans, 19,829 Hispanic Americans, 12,456 Asians, and 530 American Indians. The majority of signals found in these groups generalize to European Americans. While we uncovered signals unique to racial/ethnic populations, we also observed systematically consistent lipid associations across these groups. In African Americans, we identified three novel signals associated with HDL-C (LPL, APOA5, LCAT) and two associated with LDL-C (ABCG8, DHODH). In addition, using this population, we refined the location for 16 out of the 58 known MetaboChip lipid loci. These results can guide tailored screening efforts, reveal population-specific responses to lipid-lowering medications, and aid in the development of new targeted drug therapies. PMID:28426890

  1. Full-Sky Maps of the VHF Radio Sky with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, Michael W.; Hallinan, Gregg

    2018-05-01

    21-cm cosmology is a powerful new probe of the intergalactic medium at redshifts 20 >~ z >~ 6 corresponding to the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization. Current observations of the highly-redshifted 21-cm transition are limited by the dynamic range they can achieve against foreground sources of low-frequency (<200 MHz) of radio emission. We used the Owens Valley Radio Observatory Long Wavelength Array (OVRO-LWA) to generate a series of new modern high-fidelity sky maps that capture emission on angular scales ranging from tens of degrees to ~15 arcmin, and frequencies between 36 and 73 MHz. These sky maps were generated from the application of Tikhonov-regularized m-mode analysis imaging, which is a new interferometric imaging technique that is uniquely suited for low-frequency, wide-field, drift-scanning interferometers.

  2. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Welch, William J.; Dreher, John; Tarter, Jill; Blitz, Leo; Davis, Michael; Fleming, Matt; Bock, Douglas; Bower, Geoffrey; Lugten, John; Girmay-Keleta, G.; D'Addario, Larry R.; Harp, Gerry R.; Ackermann, Rob; Weinreb, Sander; Engargiola, Greg; Thornton, Doug; Wadefalk, Niklas

    2004-10-01

    The Allen Telescope Array, originally called the One Hectare Telescope (1hT) [1] will be a large array radio telescope whose novel characteristics will be a wide field of view (3.5 deg-GHz HPBW), continuous frequency coverage of 0.5 - 11 GHz, four dual-linear polarization output bands of 100 MHz each, four beams in each band, two 100 MHz spectral correlators for two of the bands, and hardware for RFI mitigation built in. Its scientific motivation is for deep SETI searches and, at the same time, a variety of other radio astronomy projects, including transient (e.g. pulsar) studies, HI mapping of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, Zeeman studies of the galactic magnetic field in a number of transitions, mapping of long chain molecules in molecular clouds, mapping of the decrement in the cosmic background radiation toward galaxy clusters, and observation of HI absorption toward quasars at redshifts up to z=2. The array is planned for 350 6.1-meter dishes giving a physical collecting area of about 10,000 square meters. The large number of components reduces the price with economies of scale. The front end receiver is a single cryogenically cooled MIMIC Low Noise Amplifier covering the whole band. The feed is a wide-band log periodic feed of novel design, and the reflector system is an offset Gregorian for minimum sidelobes and spillover. All preliminary and critical design reviews have been completed. Three complete antennas with feeds and receivers are under test, and an array of 33 antennas is under construction at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory for the end of 2004. The present plan is to have a total of about 200 antennas completed by the summer of 2006 and the balance of the array finished before the end of the decade.

  3. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system and method for solids hoppers and the like

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.; Smith, Jr., Nelson S.

    1994-01-01

    A real time ultrasonic surface contour mapping system is provided including a digitally controlled phased-array of transmitter/receiver (T/R) elements located in a fixed position above the surface to be mapped. The surface is divided into a predetermined number of pixels which are separately scanned by an arrangement of T/R elements by applying phase delayed signals thereto that produce ultrasonic tone bursts from each T/R that arrive at a point X in phase and at the same time relative to the leading edge of the tone burst pulse so that the acoustic energies from each T/R combine in a reinforcing manner at point X. The signals produced by the reception of the echo signals reflected from point X back to the T/Rs are also delayed appropriately so that they add in phase at the input of a signal combiner. This combined signal is then processed to determine the range to the point X using density-corrected sound velocity values. An autofocusing signal is developed from the computed average range for a complete scan of the surface pixels. A surface contour map is generated in real time form the range signals on a video monitor.

  4. The OncoArray Consortium: a Network for Understanding the Genetic Architecture of Common Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming; Byun, Jinyoung; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Gayther, Simon A.; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Dunning, Alison M.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Fachal, Laura; Doheny, Kimberly; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Romm, Jane; Pugh, Elizabeth; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Caga-Anan, Charlisse; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kamal, Ahsan; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Van Den Berg, David J.; Nelson, Stefanie; Demetriades, Stephen; Goldgar, David E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Forman, Judith L.; Giles, Graham G.; Conti, David V.; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Waldenberger, Melanie; Brüske, Irene; Hicks, Belynda D.; Ling, Hua; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Manz, Judith; Cunningham, Julie M.; Butterbach, Katja; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraft, Peter; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Lindström, Sara; Adams, Marcia; McKay, James D.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Benlloch, Sara; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brennan, Paul; Riggan, Marjorie; O’Mara, Tracy A.; Shen, Hongbin; Shi, Yongyong; Thompson, Deborah J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Berchuck, Andrew; Laboissiere, Sylvie; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Shelford, Tameka; Edlund, Christopher K.; Taylor, Jack A.; Field, John K.; Park, Sue K.; Offit, Kenneth; Thomassen, Mads; Schmutzler, Rita; Ottini, Laura; Hung, Rayjean J.; Marchini, Jonathan; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Peters, Ulrike; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Seldin, Michael F.; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Seminara, Daniela; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wide backbone, comprising 230,000 SNPs tagging most common genetic variants, together with dense mapping of known susceptibility regions, rare variants from sequencing experiments, pharmacogenetic markers and cancer related traits. Methods The OncoArray can be genotyped using a novel technology developed by Illumina to facilitate efficient genotyping. The consortium developed standard approaches for selecting SNPs for study, for quality control of markers and for ancestry analysis. The array was genotyped at selected sites and with prespecified replicate samples to permit evaluation of genotyping accuracy among centers and by ethnic background. Results The OncoArray consortium genotyped 447,705 samples. A total of 494,763 SNPs passed quality control steps with a sample success rate of 97% of the samples. Participating sites performed ancestry analysis using a common set of markers and a scoring algorithm based on principal components analysis. Conclusions Results from these analyses will enable researchers to identify new susceptibility loci, perform fine mapping of new or known loci associated with either single or multiple cancers, assess the degree of overlap in cancer causation and pleiotropic effects of loci that have been identified for disease-specific risk, and jointly model genetic, environmental and lifestyle related exposures. Impact Ongoing analyses will shed light on etiology and risk assessment for many types of cancer. PMID:27697780

  5. Accelerating parallel transmit array B1 mapping in high field MRI with slice undersampling and interpolation by kriging.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Guillaume; Luong, Michel; Cloos, Martijn A; Amadon, Alexis; Wackernagel, Hans

    2014-08-01

    Transmit arrays have been developed to mitigate the RF field inhomogeneity commonly observed in high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), typically above 3T. To this end, the knowledge of the RF complex-valued B1 transmit-sensitivities of each independent radiating element has become essential. This paper details a method to speed up a currently available B1-calibration method. The principle relies on slice undersampling, slice and channel interleaving and kriging, an interpolation method developed in geostatistics and applicable in many domains. It has been demonstrated that, under certain conditions, kriging gives the best estimator of a field in a region of interest. The resulting accelerated sequence allows mapping a complete set of eight volumetric field maps of the human head in about 1 min. For validation, the accuracy of kriging is first evaluated against a well-known interpolation technique based on Fourier transform as well as to a B1-maps interpolation method presented in the literature. This analysis is carried out on simulated and decimated experimental B1 maps. Finally, the accelerated sequence is compared to the standard sequence on a phantom and a volunteer. The new sequence provides B1 maps three times faster with a loss of accuracy limited potentially to about 5%.

  6. SU-G-201-17: Verification of Dose Distributions From High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Ir-192 Source Using a Multiple-Array-Diode-Detector (MapCheck2)

    SciTech Connect

    Harpool, K; De La Fuente Herman, T; Ahmad, S

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively the accuracy of dose distributions for the Ir-192 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy source calculated by the Brachytherapy-Planning system (BPS) and measured using a multiple-array-diode-detector in a heterogeneous medium. Methods: A two-dimensional diode-array-detector system (MapCheck2) was scanned with a catheter and the CT-images were loaded into the Varian-Brachytherapy-Planning which uses TG-43-formalism for dose calculation. Treatment plans were calculated for different combinations of one dwell-position and varying irradiation times and different-dwell positions and fixed irradiation time with the source placed 12mm from the diode-array plane. The calculated dose distributions were compared to the measured doses with MapCheck2 delivered bymore » an Ir-192-source from a Nucletron-Microselectron-V2-remote-after-loader. The linearity of MapCheck2 was tested for a range of dwell-times (2–600 seconds). The angular effect was tested with 30 seconds irradiation delivered to the central-diode and then moving the source away in increments of 10mm. Results: Large differences were found between calculated and measured dose distributions. These differences are mainly due to absence of heterogeneity in the dose calculation and diode-artifacts in the measurements. The dose differences between measured and calculated due to heterogeneity ranged from 5%–12% depending on the position of the source relative to the diodes in MapCheck2 and different heterogeneities in the beam path. The linearity test of the diode-detector showed 3.98%, 2.61%, and 2.27% over-response at short irradiation times of 2, 5, and 10 seconds, respectively, and within 2% for 20 to 600 seconds (p-value=0.05) which depends strongly on MapCheck2 noise. The angular dependency was more pronounced at acute angles ranging up to 34% at 5.7 degrees. Conclusion: Large deviations between measured and calculated dose distributions for HDR-brachytherapy with Ir-192 may

  7. Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean = 4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean = 79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

  8. An ultra-high density linkage map and QTL mapping for sex and growth-related traits of common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wenzhu; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Jianxin; Dong, Chuanju; Jiang, Likun; Feng, Jingyan; Chen, Baohua; Gong, Yiwen; Chen, Lin; Xu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    High density genetic linkage maps are essential for QTL fine mapping, comparative genomics and high quality genome sequence assembly. In this study, we constructed a high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage map with 28,194 SNP markers on 14,146 distinct loci for common carp based on high-throughput genotyping with the carp 250 K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in a mapping family. The genetic length of the consensus map was 10,595.94 cM with an average locus interval of 0.75 cM and an average marker interval of 0.38 cM. Comparative genomic analysis revealed high level of conserved syntenies between common carp and the closely related model species zebrafish and medaka. The genome scaffolds were anchored to the high-density linkage map, spanning 1,357 Mb of common carp reference genome. QTL mapping and association analysis identified 22 QTLs for growth-related traits and 7 QTLs for sex dimorphism. Candidate genes underlying growth-related traits were identified, including important regulators such as KISS2, IGF1, SMTLB, NPFFR1 and CPE. Candidate genes associated with sex dimorphism were also identified including 3KSR and DMRT2b. The high-density and high-resolution genetic linkage map provides an important tool for QTL fine mapping and positional cloning of economically important traits, and improving common carp genome assembly. PMID:27225429

  9. In vivo and ex vivo sentinel node mapping does not identify the same lymph nodes in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Helene Schou; Bennedsen, Astrid Louise Bjørn; Burgdorf, Stefan Kobbelgaard; Eriksen, Jens Ravn; Eiholm, Susanne; Toxværd, Anders; Riis, Lene Buhl; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2017-07-01

    Identification of lymph nodes and pathological analysis is crucial for the correct staging of colon cancer. Lymph nodes that drain directly from the tumor area are called "sentinel nodes" and are believed to be the first place for metastasis. The purpose of this study was to perform sentinel node mapping in vivo with indocyanine green and ex vivo with methylene blue in order to evaluate if the sentinel lymph nodes can be identified by both techniques. Patients with colon cancer UICC stage I-III were included from two institutions in Denmark from February 2015 to January 2016. In vivo sentinel node mapping with indocyanine green during laparoscopy and ex vivo sentinel node mapping with methylene blue were performed in all patients. Twenty-nine patients were included. The in vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 19 cases, and ex vivo sentinel node mapping was successful in 13 cases. In seven cases, no sentinel nodes were identified. A total of 51 sentinel nodes were identified, only one of these where identified by both techniques (2.0%). In vivo sentinel node mapping identified 32 sentinel nodes, while 20 sentinel nodes were identified by ex vivo sentinel node mapping. Lymph node metastases were found in 10 patients, and only two had metastases in a sentinel node. Placing a deposit in relation to the tumor by indocyanine green in vivo or of methylene blue ex vivo could only identify sentinel lymph nodes in a small group of patients.

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of magnetometer array data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, A. D.; Baumjohann, W.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is developed for mapping magnetic variation fields in three dimensions using data from an array of magnetometers, based on the theory of optimal linear estimation. The technique is applied to data from the Scandinavian Magnetometer Array. Estimates of the spatial power spectra for the internal and external magnetic variations are derived, which in turn provide estimates of the spatial autocorrelation functions of the three magnetic variation components. Statistical errors involved in mapping the external and internal fields are quantified and displayed over the mapping region. Examples of field mapping and of separation into external and internal components are presented. A comparison between the three-dimensional field separation and a two-dimensional separation from a single chain of stations shows that significant differences can arise in the inferred internal component.

  11. Genome-Wide Mapping of Cystitis Due to Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli in Mice Identifies a Unique Bladder Transcriptome That Signifies Pathogen-Specific Antimicrobial Defense against Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee K.; Carey, Alison J.; Cui, Xiangqin; Webb, Richard I.; Ipe, Deepak; Crowley, Michael; Cripps, Allan W.; Benjamin, William H.; Ulett, Kimberly B.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    The most common causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) are Gram-negative pathogens such as Escherichia coli; however, Gram-positive organisms, including Streptococcus agalactiae, or group B streptococcus (GBS), also cause UTI. In GBS infection, UTI progresses to cystitis once the bacteria colonize the bladder, but the host responses triggered in the bladder immediately following infection are largely unknown. Here, we used genome-wide expression profiling to map the bladder transcriptome of GBS UTI in mice infected transurethrally with uropathogenic GBS that was cultured from a 35-year-old women with cystitis. RNA from bladders was applied to Affymetrix Gene-1.0ST microarrays; quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze selected gene responses identified in array data sets. A surprisingly small significant-gene list of 172 genes was identified at 24 h; this compared to 2,507 genes identified in a side-by-side comparison with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). No genes exhibited significantly altered expression at 2 h in GBS-infected mice according to arrays despite high bladder bacterial loads at this early time point. The absence of a marked early host response to GBS juxtaposed with broad-based bladder responses activated by UPEC at 2 h. Bioinformatics analyses, including integrative system-level network mapping, revealed multiple activated biological pathways in the GBS bladder transcriptome that regulate leukocyte activation, inflammation, apoptosis, and cytokine-chemokine biosynthesis. These findings define a novel, minimalistic type of bladder host response triggered by GBS UTI, which comprises collective antimicrobial pathways that differ dramatically from those activated by UPEC. Overall, this study emphasizes the unique nature of bladder immune activation mechanisms triggered by distinct uropathogens. PMID:22733575

  12. An Arrayed Genome-Scale Lentiviral-Enabled Short Hairpin RNA Screen Identifies Lethal and Rescuer Gene Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Bhavneet; Antczak, Christophe; Ramirez, Christina N.; Shum, David; Liu-Sullivan, Nancy; Radu, Constantin; Frattini, Mark G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract RNA interference technology is becoming an integral tool for target discovery and validation.; With perhaps the exception of only few studies published using arrayed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries, most of the reports have been either against pooled siRNA or shRNA, or arrayed siRNA libraries. For this purpose, we have developed a workflow and performed an arrayed genome-scale shRNA lethality screen against the TRC1 library in HeLa cells. The resulting targets would be a valuable resource of candidates toward a better understanding of cellular homeostasis. Using a high-stringency hit nomination method encompassing criteria of at least three active hairpins per gene and filtered for potential off-target effects (OTEs), referred to as the Bhinder–Djaballah analysis method, we identified 1,252 lethal and 6 rescuer gene candidates, knockdown of which resulted in severe cell death or enhanced growth, respectively. Cross referencing individual hairpins with the TRC1 validated clone database, 239 of the 1,252 candidates were deemed independently validated with at least three validated clones. Through our systematic OTE analysis, we have identified 31 microRNAs (miRNAs) in lethal and 2 in rescuer genes; all having a seed heptamer mimic in the corresponding shRNA hairpins and likely cause of the OTE observed in our screen, perhaps unraveling a previously unknown plausible essentiality of these miRNAs in cellular viability. Taken together, we report on a methodology for performing large-scale arrayed shRNA screens, a comprehensive analysis method to nominate high-confidence hits, and a performance assessment of the TRC1 library highlighting the intracellular inefficiencies of shRNA processing in general. PMID:23198867

  13. A Human Proteome Array Approach to Identifying Key Host Proteins Targeted by Toxoplasma Kinase ROP18*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaoshou; Hou, Yongheng; Hao, Taofang; Rho, Hee-Sool; Wan, Jun; Luan, Yizhao; Gao, Xin; Yao, Jianping; Pan, Aihua; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Liao, Wanqin; Zhu, Heng; Zhou, Xingwang

    2017-01-01

    Toxoplasma kinase ROP18 is a key molecule responsible for the virulence of Toxoplasma gondii; however, the mechanisms by which ROP18 exerts parasite virulence via interaction with host proteins remain limited to a small number of identified substrates. To identify a broader array of ROP18 substrates, we successfully purified bioactive mature ROP18 and used it to probe a human proteome array. Sixty eight new putative host targets were identified. Functional annotation analysis suggested that these proteins have a variety of functions, including metabolic process, kinase activity and phosphorylation, cell growth, apoptosis and cell death, and immunity, indicating a pleiotropic role of ROP18 kinase. Among these proteins, four candidates, p53, p38, UBE2N, and Smad1, were further validated. We demonstrated that ROP18 targets p53, p38, UBE2N, and Smad1 for degradation. Importantly, we demonstrated that ROP18 phosphorylates Smad1 Ser-187 to trigger its proteasome-dependent degradation. Further functional characterization of the substrates of ROP18 may enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of Toxoplasma infection and provide new therapeutic targets. Similar strategies could be used to identify novel host targets for other microbial kinases functioning at the pathogen-host interface. PMID:28087594

  14. Maps | Geospatial Data Science | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Maps Maps NREL develops an array of maps to support renewable energy development and generation resource in the United States by county Geothermal Maps of geothermal power plants, resources for enhanced geothermal systems, and hydrothermal sites in the United States Hydrogen Maps of hydrogen production

  15. Toroidal sensor arrays for real-time photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychkov, Anton S.; Cherepetskaya, Elena B.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Makarov, Vladimir A.

    2017-07-01

    This article addresses theoretical and numerical investigation of image formation in photoacoustic (PA) imaging with complex-shaped concave sensor arrays. The spatial resolution and the size of sensitivity region of PA and laser ultrasonic (LU) imaging systems are assessed using sensitivity maps and spatial resolution maps in the image plane. This paper also discusses the relationship between the size of high-sensitivity regions and the spatial resolution of real-time imaging systems utilizing toroidal arrays. It is shown that the use of arrays with toroidal geometry significantly improves the diagnostic capabilities of PA and LU imaging to investigate biological objects, rocks, and composite materials.

  16. Development of a 63K SNP array for Gossypium and high-density mapping of intra- and inter-specific populations of cotton (G. hirsutum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-throughput genotyping arrays provide a standardized resource for crop research communities that are useful for a breadth of applications including high-density genetic mapping, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), genomic selection (GS), candidate marker and quantitative trait loci (QTL) ide...

  17. Fine-mapping of lipid regions in global populations discovers ethnic-specific signals and refines previously identified lipid loci.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Niha; Graff, Mariaelisa; Luis Ambite, Jose; Bush, William S; Kichaev, Gleb; Lu, Yingchang; Manichaikul, Ani; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Absher, Devin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bielinski, Suzette J; Bottinger, Erwin P; Buzkova, Petra; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Chung, Ren-Hua; Cochran, Barbara; Dumitrescu, Logan; Gottesman, Omri; Haessler, Jeffrey W; Haiman, Christopher; Heiss, Gerardo; Hsiung, Chao A; Hung, Yi-Jen; Hwu, Chii-Min; Juang, Jyh-Ming J; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Li-An; Lin, Danyu; Lin, Shih-Yi; Mackey, Rachel H; Martin, Lisa W; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Peters, Ulrike; Predazzi, Irene; Quertermous, Thomas; Reiner, Alex P; Robinson, Jennifer; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryckman, Kelli K; Schreiner, Pamela J; Stahl, Eli; Tao, Ran; Tsai, Michael Y; Waite, Lindsay L; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Buyske, Steven; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Cheng, Iona; Crawford, Dana C; Loos, Ruth J F; Rich, Stephen S; Fornage, Myriam; North, Kari E; Kooperberg, Charles; Carty, Cara L

    2016-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies have identified over 150 loci associated with lipid traits, however, no large-scale studies exist for Hispanics and other minority populations. Additionally, the genetic architecture of lipid-influencing loci remains largely unknown. We performed one of the most racially/ethnically diverse fine-mapping genetic studies of HDL-C, LDL-C, and triglycerides to-date using SNPs on the MetaboChip array on 54,119 individuals: 21,304 African Americans, 19,829 Hispanic Americans, 12,456 Asians, and 530 American Indians. The majority of signals found in these groups generalize to European Americans. While we uncovered signals unique to racial/ethnic populations, we also observed systematically consistent lipid associations across these groups. In African Americans, we identified three novel signals associated with HDL-C (LPL, APOA5, LCAT) and two associated with LDL-C (ABCG8, DHODH). In addition, using this population, we refined the location for 16 out of the 58 known MetaboChip lipid loci. These results can guide tailored screening efforts, reveal population-specific responses to lipid-lowering medications, and aid in the development of new targeted drug therapies. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The OncoArray Consortium: A Network for Understanding the Genetic Architecture of Common Cancers.

    PubMed

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming; Byun, Jinyoung; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Gayther, Simon A; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Sellers, Thomas A; Gruber, Stephen B; Dunning, Alison M; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Fachal, Laura; Doheny, Kimberly; Spurdle, Amanda B; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Romm, Jane; Pugh, Elizabeth; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Hazelett, Dennis J; Bojesen, Stig E; Caga-Anan, Charlisse; Haiman, Christopher A; Kamal, Ahsan; Luccarini, Craig; Tessier, Daniel; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Van Den Berg, David J; Nelson, Stefanie; Demetriades, Stephen; Goldgar, David E; Couch, Fergus J; Forman, Judith L; Giles, Graham G; Conti, David V; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Waldenberger, Melanie; Brüske-Hohlfeld, Irene; Hicks, Belynda D; Ling, Hua; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Soucy, Penny; Manz, Judith; Cunningham, Julie M; Butterbach, Katja; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Kraft, Peter; FitzGerald, Liesel; Lindström, Sara; Adams, Marcia; McKay, James D; Phelan, Catherine M; Benlloch, Sara; Kelemen, Linda E; Brennan, Paul; Riggan, Marjorie; O'Mara, Tracy A; Shen, Hongbing; Shi, Yongyong; Thompson, Deborah J; Goodman, Marc T; Nielsen, Sune F; Berchuck, Andrew; Laboissiere, Sylvie; Schmit, Stephanie L; Shelford, Tameka; Edlund, Christopher K; Taylor, Jack A; Field, John K; Park, Sue K; Offit, Kenneth; Thomassen, Mads; Schmutzler, Rita; Ottini, Laura; Hung, Rayjean J; Marchini, Jonathan; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Peters, Ulrike; Eeles, Rosalind A; Seldin, Michael F; Gillanders, Elizabeth; Seminara, Daniela; Antoniou, Antonis C; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F

    2017-01-01

    Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wide backbone, comprising 230,000 SNPs tagging most common genetic variants, together with dense mapping of known susceptibility regions, rare variants from sequencing experiments, pharmacogenetic markers, and cancer-related traits. The OncoArray can be genotyped using a novel technology developed by Illumina to facilitate efficient genotyping. The consortium developed standard approaches for selecting SNPs for study, for quality control of markers, and for ancestry analysis. The array was genotyped at selected sites and with prespecified replicate samples to permit evaluation of genotyping accuracy among centers and by ethnic background. The OncoArray consortium genotyped 447,705 samples. A total of 494,763 SNPs passed quality control steps with a sample success rate of 97% of the samples. Participating sites performed ancestry analysis using a common set of markers and a scoring algorithm based on principal components analysis. Results from these analyses will enable researchers to identify new susceptibility loci, perform fine-mapping of new or known loci associated with either single or multiple cancers, assess the degree of overlap in cancer causation and pleiotropic effects of loci that have been identified for disease-specific risk, and jointly model genetic, environmental, and lifestyle-related exposures. Ongoing analyses will shed light on etiology and risk assessment for many types of cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 126-35. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Detection and Mapping of the September 2017 Mexico Earthquakes Using DAS Fiber-Optic Infrastructure Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrenbach, M. H.; Cole, S.; Williams, J. J.; Biondi, B. C.; McMurtry, T.; Martin, E. R.; Yuan, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) uses conventional telecom fibers for a wide variety of monitoring purposes. Fiber-optic arrays can be located along pipelines for leak detection; along borders and perimeters to detect and locate intruders, or along railways and roadways to monitor traffic and identify and manage incidents. DAS can also be used to monitor oil and gas reservoirs and to detect earthquakes. Because thousands of such arrays are deployed worldwide and acquiring data continuously, they can be a valuable source of data for earthquake detection and location, and could potentially provide important information to earthquake early-warning systems. In this presentation, we show that DAS arrays in Mexico and the United States detected the M8.1 and M7.2 Mexico earthquakes in September 2017. At Stanford University, we have deployed a 2.4 km fiber-optic DAS array in a figure-eight pattern, with 600 channels spaced 4 meters apart. Data have been recorded continuously since September 2016. Over 800 earthquakes from across California have been detected and catalogued. Distant teleseismic events have also been recorded, including the two Mexican earthquakes. In Mexico, fiber-optic arrays attached to pipelines also detected these two events. Because of the length of these arrays and their proximity to the event locations, we can not only detect the earthquakes but also make location estimates, potentially in near real time. In this presentation, we review the data recorded for these two events recorded at Stanford and in Mexico. We compare the waveforms recorded by the DAS arrays to those recorded by traditional earthquake sensor networks. Using the wide coverage provided by the pipeline arrays, we estimate the event locations. Such fiber-optic DAS networks can potentially play a role in earthquake early-warning systems, allowing actions to be taken to minimize the impact of an earthquake on critical infrastructure components. While many such fiber

  20. Design and Fabrication of an Experimental Microheater Array Powder Sintering Printer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Nicholas; Zhou, Wenchao

    2018-03-01

    Microheater array powder sintering (MAPS) is a novel additive manufacturing process that uses an array of microheaters to selectively sinter powder particles. MAPS shows great promise as a new method of printing flexible electronics by enabling digital curing of conductive inks on a variety of substrates. For MAPS to work effectively, a microscale air gap needs to be maintained between the heater array and the conductive ink. In this article, we present an experimental MAPS printer with air gap control for printing conductive circuits. First, we discuss design aspects necessary to implement MAPS. An analysis is performed to validate that the design can maintain the desired air gap between the microheaters and the sintering layer, which consists of a silver nanoparticle ink. The printer is tested by printing conductive lines on a flexible plastic substrate with silver nanoparticle ink. Results show MAPS performs on par with or better than the existing fabrication methods for printed electronics in terms of both the print quality (conductivity of the printed line) and print speed, which shows MAPS' great promise as a competitive new method for digital production of printed electronics.

  1. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): A Network Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J.; Buechler, D.; Goodman, S. J.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.; Hall, J.

    2005-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is s a 3-D VHF regional lightning detection system that provides on-orbit algorithm validation and instrument performance assessments for the NASA Lightning Imaging Sensor, as well as information on storm kinematics and updraft evolution that offers the potential to improve severe storm warning lead time by up t o 50% and decrease te false alarm r a t e ( for non-tornado producing storms). In support of this latter function, the LMA serves as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. The LMA, which became operational i n November 2001, consists of VHF receivers deployed across northern Alabama and a base station located at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), which is on t h e campus of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The LMA system locates the sources of impulsive VHF radio signals s from lightning by accurately measuring the time that the signals aririve at the different receiving stations. Each station's records the magnitude and time of the peak lightning radiation signal in successive 80 ms intervals within a local unused television channel (channel 5, 76-82 MHz in our case ) . Typically hundreds of sources per flash can be reconstructed, which i n t u r n produces accurate 3-dimensional lightning image maps (nominally <50 m error within 150 la. range). The data are transmitted back t o a base station using 2.4 GHz wireless Ethernet data links and directional parabolic grid antennas. There are four repeaters in the network topology and the links have an effective data throughput rate ranging from 600 kbits s -1 t o 1.5 %its s -1. This presentation provides an overview of t h e North Alabama network, the data processing (both real-time and post processing) and network statistics.

  2. A Lightning Channel Retrieval Algorithm for the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new multi-station VHF time-of-arrival (TOA) antenna network is, at the time of this writing, coming on-line in Northern Alabama. The network, called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), employs GPS timing and detects VHF radiation from discrete segments (effectively point emitters) that comprise the channel of lightning strokes within cloud and ground flashes. The network will support on-going ground validation activities of the low Earth orbiting Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) satellite developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. It will also provide for many interesting and detailed studies of the distribution and evolution of thunderstorms and lightning in the Tennessee Valley, and will offer many interesting comparisons with other meteorological/geophysical wets associated with lightning and thunderstorms. In order to take full advantage of these benefits, it is essential that the LMA channel mapping accuracy (in both space and time) be fully characterized and optimized. In this study, a new revised channel mapping retrieval algorithm is introduced. The algorithm is an extension of earlier work provided in Koshak and Solakiewicz (1996) in the analysis of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) system. As in the 1996 study, direct algebraic solutions are obtained by inverting a simple linear system of equations, thereby making computer searches through a multi-dimensional parameter domain of a Chi-Squared function unnecessary. However, the new algorithm is developed completely in spherical Earth-centered coordinates (longitude, latitude, altitude), rather than in the (x, y, z) cartesian coordinates employed in the 1996 study. Hence, no mathematical transformations from (x, y, z) into spherical coordinates are required (such transformations involve more numerical error propagation, more computer program coding, and slightly more CPU computing time). The new algorithm also has a more realistic

  3. 2D XANES-XEOL mapping: observation of enhanced band gap emission from ZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2014-05-01

    Using 2D XANES-XEOL spectroscopy, it is found that the band gap emission of ZnO nanowire arrays is substantially enhanced i.e. that the intensity ratio between the band gap and defect emissions increases by more than an order of magnitude when the excitation energy is scanned across the O K-edge. Possible mechanisms are discussed.Using 2D XANES-XEOL spectroscopy, it is found that the band gap emission of ZnO nanowire arrays is substantially enhanced i.e. that the intensity ratio between the band gap and defect emissions increases by more than an order of magnitude when the excitation energy is scanned across the O K-edge. Possible mechanisms are discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XEOL spectra with different excitation energies. X-ray attenuation length vs. photon energy. Details of surface defects in ZnO NWs. The second O K-edge and Zn L-edge 2D XANES-XEOL maps. Comparison of the first and second TEY at O K-edge and Zn L-edge scans, respectively. Raman spectra of the ZnO NWs with different IBGE/IDE ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01049c

  4. Clustering of self-organizing map identifies five distinct medulloblastoma subgroups.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changjun; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Pucha

    2016-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is one the most malignant paediatric brain tumours. Molecular subgrouping these medulloblastomas will not only help identify specific cohorts for certain treatment but also improve confidence in prognostic prediction. Currently, there is a consensus of the existences of four distinct subtypes of medulloblastoma. We proposed a novel bioinformatics method, clustering of self-organizing map, to determine the subgroups and their molecular diversity. Microarray expression profiles of 46 medulloblastoma samples were analysed and five clusters with distinct demographics, clinical outcome and transcriptional profiles were identified. The previously reported Wnt subgroup was identified as expected. Three other novel subgroups were proposed for later investigation. Our findings underscore the value of SOM clustering for discovering the medulloblastoma subgroups. When the suggested subdivision has been confirmed in large cohorts, this method should serve as a part of routine classification of clinical samples.

  5. CGI: Java Software for Mapping and Visualizing Data from Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization and Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Joyce Xiuweu-Xu; Wei, Michael Yang; Rao, Pulivarthi H.; Lau, Ching C.; Behl, Sanjiv; Man, Tsz-Kwong

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing application of various genomic technologies in biomedical research, there is a need to integrate these data to correlate candidate genes/regions that are identified by different genomic platforms. Although there are tools that can analyze data from individual platforms, essential software for integration of genomic data is still lacking. Here, we present a novel Java-based program called CGI (Cytogenetics-Genomics Integrator) that matches the BAC clones from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to genes from RNA expression profiling datasets. The matching is computed via a fast, backend MySQL database containing UCSC Genome Browser annotations. This program also provides an easy-to-use graphical user interface for visualizing and summarizing the correlation of DNA copy number changes and RNA expression patterns from a set of experiments. In addition, CGI uses a Java applet to display the copy number values of a specific BAC clone in aCGH experiments side by side with the expression levels of genes that are mapped back to that BAC clone from the microarray experiments. The CGI program is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for biologists. It is cross-platform compatible and the source code is freely available under the General Public License. PMID:19936083

  6. CGI: Java software for mapping and visualizing data from array-based comparative genomic hybridization and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Joyce Xiuweu-Xu; Wei, Michael Yang; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Lau, Ching C; Behl, Sanjiv; Man, Tsz-Kwong

    2007-10-06

    With the increasing application of various genomic technologies in biomedical research, there is a need to integrate these data to correlate candidate genes/regions that are identified by different genomic platforms. Although there are tools that can analyze data from individual platforms, essential software for integration of genomic data is still lacking. Here, we present a novel Java-based program called CGI (Cytogenetics-Genomics Integrator) that matches the BAC clones from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to genes from RNA expression profiling datasets. The matching is computed via a fast, backend MySQL database containing UCSC Genome Browser annotations. This program also provides an easy-to-use graphical user interface for visualizing and summarizing the correlation of DNA copy number changes and RNA expression patterns from a set of experiments. In addition, CGI uses a Java applet to display the copy number values of a specific BAC clone in aCGH experiments side by side with the expression levels of genes that are mapped back to that BAC clone from the microarray experiments. The CGI program is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for biologists. It is cross-platform compatible and the source code is freely available under the General Public License.

  7. Panoramic Electrophysiological Mapping but not Electrogram Morphology Identifies Stable Sources for Human Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Krummen, David E.; Miller, John M.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background The foundation for successful arrhythmia ablation is the mapping of electric propagation to identify underlying mechanisms. In atrial fibrillation (AF), however, mapping is difficult so that ablation has often targeted electrogram features, with mixed results. We hypothesized that wide field-of-view (panoramic) mapping of both atria would identify causal mechanisms for AF and allow interpretation of local electrogram features, including complex fractionated atrial electrograms (CFAE). Methods and Results Contact mapping was performed using biatrial multipolar catheters in 36 AF subjects (29 persistent). Stable AF rotors (spiral waves) or focal sources were seen in 35 of 36 cases and targeted for ablation (focal impulse and rotor modulation) before pulmonary vein isolation. In 31 of 36 subjects (86.1%), AF acutely terminated (n=20; 16 to sinus rhythm) or organized (n=11; 19±8% slowing) with 2.5 minutes focal impulse and rotor modulation (interquartile range, 1.0–3.1) at one source, defined as the primary source. Subjects exhibited 2.1±1.0 concurrent AF sources of which the primary, by phase mapping, precessed in limited areas (persistent 2.5±1.7 versus paroxysmal 1.7±0.5 cm2; P=0.30). Notably, source regions showed mixed electrogram amplitudes and CFAE grades that did not differ from surrounding atrium (P=NS). AF sources were not consistently surrounded by CFAE (P=0.67). Conclusions Stable rotors and focal sources for human AF were revealed by contact panoramic mapping (focal impulse and rotor modulation mapping), but not by electrogram footprints. AF sources precessed within areas of ≈2 cm2, with diverse voltage characteristics poorly correlated with CFAE. Most CFAE sites lie remote from AF sources and are not suitable targets for catheter ablation of AF. PMID:23392583

  8. Use of a Microphone Phased Array to Determine Noise Sources in a Rocket Plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Mosher, R.

    2010-01-01

    A 70-element microphone phased array was used to identify noise sources in the plume of a solid rocket motor. An environment chamber was built and other precautions were taken to protect the sensitive condenser microphones from rain, thunderstorms and other environmental elements during prolonged stay in the outdoor test stand. A camera mounted at the center of the array was used to photograph the plume. In the first phase of the study the array was placed in an anechoic chamber for calibration, and validation of the indigenous Matlab(R) based beamform software. It was found that the "advanced" beamform methods, such as CLEAN-SC was partially successful in identifying speaker sources placed closer than the Rayleigh criteria. To participate in the field test all equipments were shipped to NASA Marshal Space Flight Center, where the elements of the array hardware were rebuilt around the test stand. The sensitive amplifiers and the data acquisition hardware were placed in a safe basement, and 100m long cables were used to connect the microphones, Kulites and the camera. The array chamber and the microphones were found to withstand the environmental elements as well as the shaking from the rocket plume generated noise. The beamform map was superimposed on a photo of the rocket plume to readily identify the source distribution. It was found that the plume made an exceptionally long, >30 diameter, noise source over a large frequency range. The shock pattern created spatial modulation of the noise source. Interestingly, the concrete pad of the horizontal test stand was found to be a good acoustic reflector: the beamform map showed two distinct source distributions- the plume and its reflection on the pad. The array was found to be most effective in the frequency range of 2kHz to 10kHz. As expected, the classical beamform method excessively smeared the noise sources at lower frequencies and produced excessive side-lobes at higher frequencies. The "advanced" beamform

  9. Association-heterogeneity mapping identifies an Asian-specific association of the GTF2I locus with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Ikari, Katsunori; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Nath, Swapan K.; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Considerable sharing of disease alleles among populations is well-characterized in autoimmune disorders (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis), but there are some exceptional loci showing heterogenic association among populations. Here we investigated genetic variants with distinct effects on the development of rheumatoid arthritis in Asian and European populations. Ancestry-related association heterogeneity was examined using Cochran’s homogeneity tests for the disease association data from large Asian (n = 14,465; 9,299 discovery subjects and 5,166 validation subjects; 4 collections) and European (n = 45,790; 11 collections) rheumatoid arthritis case-control cohorts with Immunochip and genome-wide SNP array data. We identified significant heterogeneity between the two ancestries for the common variants in the GTF2I locus (PHeterogeneity = 9.6 × 10−9 at rs73366469) and showed that this heterogeneity was due to an Asian-specific association effect (ORMeta = 1.37 and PMeta = 4.2 × 10−13 in Asians; ORMeta = 1.00 and PMeta = 1.00 in Europeans). Trans-ancestral comparison and bioinfomatics analysis revealed a plausibly causal or disease-variant-tagging SNP (rs117026326; in linkage disequilibrium with rs73366469), whose minor allele is common in Asians but rare in Europeans. In conclusion, we identified largest-ever effect on Asian rheumatoid arthritis across human non-HLA regions at GTF2I by heterogeneity mapping followed by replication studies, and pinpointed a possible causal variant. PMID:27272985

  10. A High-Density Genetic Map Identifies a Novel Major QTL for Boron Efficiency in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Low boron (B) seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs) and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14–46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus. PMID:25375356

  11. Statistical analysis of storm electrical discharges reconstituted from a lightning mapping system, a lightning location system, and an acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallin, Louis-Jonardan; Farges, Thomas; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Defer, Eric; Rison, William; Schulz, Wolfgang; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the European Hydrological Cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment project, a field campaign devoted to the study of electrical activity during storms took place in the south of France in 2012. An acoustic station composed of four microphones and four microbarometers was deployed within the coverage of a Lightning Mapping Array network. On the 26 October 2012, a thunderstorm passed just over the acoustic station. Fifty-six natural thunder events, due to cloud-to-ground and intracloud flashes, were recorded. This paper studies the acoustic reconstruction, in the low frequency range from 1 to 40 Hz, of the recorded flashes and their comparison with detections from electromagnetic networks. Concurrent detections from the European Cooperation for Lightning Detection lightning location system were also used. Some case studies show clearly that acoustic signal from thunder comes from the return stroke but also from the horizontal discharges which occur inside the clouds. The huge amount of observation data leads to a statistical analysis of lightning discharges acoustically recorded. Especially, the distributions of altitudes of reconstructed acoustic detections are explored in detail. The impact of the distance to the source on these distributions is established. The capacity of the acoustic method to describe precisely the lower part of nearby cloud-to-ground discharges, where the Lightning Mapping Array network is not effective, is also highlighted.

  12. Comparison of Computational and Experimental Microphone Array Results for an 18%-Scale Aircraft Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Humphreys, William M.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Fares, Ehab; Casalino, Damiano; Ravetta, Patricio A.

    2015-01-01

    An 18%-scale, semi-span model is used as a platform for examining the efficacy of microphone array processing using synthetic data from numerical simulations. Two hybrid RANS/LES codes coupled with Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solvers are used to calculate 97 microphone signals at the locations of an array employed in the NASA LaRC 14x22 tunnel. Conventional, DAMAS, and CLEAN-SC array processing is applied in an identical fashion to the experimental and computational results for three different configurations involving deploying and retracting the main landing gear and a part span flap. Despite the short time records of the numerical signals, the beamform maps are able to isolate the noise sources, and the appearance of the DAMAS synthetic array maps is generally better than those from the experimental data. The experimental CLEAN-SC maps are similar in quality to those from the simulations indicating that CLEAN-SC may have less sensitivity to background noise. The spectrum obtained from DAMAS processing of synthetic array data is nearly identical to the spectrum of the center microphone of the array, indicating that for this problem array processing of synthetic data does not improve spectral comparisons with experiment. However, the beamform maps do provide an additional means of comparison that can reveal differences that cannot be ascertained from spectra alone.

  13. Holographic beam mapping of the CHIME pathfinder array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Philippe; Newburgh, Laura B.; Amiri, Mandana; Bandura, Kevin; Cliche, Jean-François; Connor, Liam; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gilbert, Adam J.; Good, Deborah; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Johnson, Andre M.; Landecker, Tom L.; Masui, Kiyoshi W.; Mena Parra, Juan; Oppermann, Niels; Pen, Ue-Li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Recnik, Andre; Robishaw, Timothy; Shaw, J. Richard; Siegel, Seth; Sigurdson, Kris; Smith, Kendrick; Storer, Emilie; Tretyakov, Ian; Van Gassen, Kwinten; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Donald

    2016-08-01

    The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Pathfinder radio telescope is currently surveying the northern hemisphere between 400 and 800 MHz. By mapping the large scale structure of neutral hydrogen through its redshifted 21 cm line emission between z 0.8-2.5 CHIME will contribute to our understanding of Dark Energy. Bright astrophysical foregrounds must be separated from the neutral hydrogen signal, a task which requires precise characterization of the polarized telescope beams. Using the DRAO John A. Galt 26 m telescope, we have developed a holography instrument and technique for mapping the CHIME Pathfinder beams. We report the status of the instrument and initial results of this effort.

  14. Modelling spatiotemporal change using multidimensional arrays Meng

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng; Appel, Marius; Pebesma, Edzer

    2017-04-01

    The large variety of remote sensors, model simulations, and in-situ records provide great opportunities to model environmental change. The massive amount of high-dimensional data calls for methods to integrate data from various sources and to analyse spatiotemporal and thematic information jointly. An array is a collection of elements ordered and indexed in arbitrary dimensions, which naturally represent spatiotemporal phenomena that are identified by their geographic locations and recording time. In addition, array regridding (e.g., resampling, down-/up-scaling), dimension reduction, and spatiotemporal statistical algorithms are readily applicable to arrays. However, the role of arrays in big geoscientific data analysis has not been systematically studied: How can arrays discretise continuous spatiotemporal phenomena? How can arrays facilitate the extraction of multidimensional information? How can arrays provide a clean, scalable and reproducible change modelling process that is communicable between mathematicians, computer scientist, Earth system scientist and stakeholders? This study emphasises on detecting spatiotemporal change using satellite image time series. Current change detection methods using satellite image time series commonly analyse data in separate steps: 1) forming a vegetation index, 2) conducting time series analysis on each pixel, and 3) post-processing and mapping time series analysis results, which does not consider spatiotemporal correlations and ignores much of the spectral information. Multidimensional information can be better extracted by jointly considering spatial, spectral, and temporal information. To approach this goal, we use principal component analysis to extract multispectral information and spatial autoregressive models to account for spatial correlation in residual based time series structural change modelling. We also discuss the potential of multivariate non-parametric time series structural change methods, hierarchical

  15. A high-resolution genetic map of yellow monkeyflower identifies chemical defense QTLs and recombination rate variation.

    PubMed

    Holeski, Liza M; Monnahan, Patrick; Koseva, Boryana; McCool, Nick; Lindroth, Richard L; Kelly, John K

    2014-03-13

    Genotyping-by-sequencing methods have vastly improved the resolution and accuracy of genetic linkage maps by increasing both the number of marker loci as well as the number of individuals genotyped at these loci. Using restriction-associated DNA sequencing, we construct a dense linkage map for a panel of recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between divergent ecotypes of Mimulus guttatus. We used this map to estimate recombination rate across the genome and to identify quantitative trait loci for the production of several secondary compounds (PPGs) of the phenylpropanoid pathway implicated in defense against herbivores. Levels of different PPGs are correlated across recombinant inbred lines suggesting joint regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway. However, the three quantitative trait loci identified in this study each act on a distinct PPG. Finally, we map three putative genomic inversions differentiating the two parental populations, including a previously characterized inversion that contributes to life-history differences between the annual/perennial ecotypes. Copyright © 2014 Holeski et al.

  16. Epitope presentation is an important determinant of the utility of antigens identified from protein arrays in the development of autoantibody diagnostic assays.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Mairead A; O'Connell, David J; O'Kane, Sara L; O'Brien, John K; O'Toole, Sharon; Martin, Cara; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John J; Cahill, Dolores J

    2012-08-03

    Autoantibodies represent an attractive biomarker for diagnostic assays principally due to the stability of immunoglobulin in patient serum facilitating measurement with conventional assays. Immune responses to tumorigenesis may facilitate detection of ovarian cancer in the early stages of the disease with identification of a panel of tumour specific autoantibodies. Despite the reporting of many tumour associated autoantibodies using arrays of tumour antigens, this has not led to the advance in diagnostic capability as rapidly as was initially expected. Here we examine the potential diagnostic utility of candidate autoantibody biomarkers identified via screening of serum samples on a high content human protein array from a unique cohort of early stage and late stage ovarian cancer patients. We analyse the performance of autoantibodies to the tumour suppressor protein p53 and the novel autoantigens alpha adducin and endosulfine alpha identified in our array screen. Each antigen has different performance characteristics using conventional ELISA format and Western blot immunoassay. The high attrition rate of promising autoantigens identified by array screening can in part be explained by the presentation of the epitope of the antigen in the subsequent method of validation and this study provides directions on maximising the potential of candidate biomarkers. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Proteomics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Jammed-array wideband sawtooth filter.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhongwei; Wang, Chao; Goda, Keisuke; Malik, Omer; Jalali, Bahram

    2011-11-21

    We present an all-optical passive low-cost spectral filter that exhibits a high-resolution periodic sawtooth spectral pattern without the need for active optoelectronic components. The principle of the filter is the partial masking of a phased array of virtual light sources with multiply jammed diffraction orders. We utilize the filter's periodic linear map between frequency and intensity to demonstrate fast sensitive interrogation of fiber Bragg grating sensor arrays and ultrahigh-frequency electrical sawtooth waveform generation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. Fine mapping of a dominantly inherited powdery mildew resistance major-effect QTL, Pm1.1, in cucumber identifies a 41.1 kb region containing two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuewen; Yu, Ting; Xu, Ruixue; Shi, Yang; Lin, Xiaojian; Xu, Qiang; Qi, Xiaohua; Weng, Yiqun; Chen, Xuehao

    2016-03-01

    A dominantly inherited major-effect QTL for powdery mildew resistance in cucumber was fine mapped. Two tandemly arrayed cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase genes were identified as the most possible candidates. Powdery mildew (PM) is one of the most severe fungal diseases of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and other cucurbit crops, but the molecular genetic mechanisms of powdery mildew resistance in cucurbits are still poorly understood. In this study, through marker-assisted backcrossing with an elite cucumber inbred line, D8 (PM susceptible), we developed a single-segment substitution line, SSSL0.7, carrying 95 kb fragment from PM resistance donor, Jin5-508, that was defined by two microsatellite markers, SSR16472 and SSR16881. A segregating population with 3600 F2 plants was developed from the SSSL0.7 × D8 mating; segregation analysis confirmed a dominantly inherited major-effect QTL, Pm1.1 in cucumber chromosome 1 underlying PM resistance in SSSL0.7. New molecular markers were developed through exploring the next generation resequenced genomes of Jin5-508 and D8. Linkage analysis and QTL mapping in a subset of the F2 plants delimited the Pm1.1 locus into a 41.1 kb region, in which eight genes were predicted. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed that two concatenated genes, Csa1M064780 and Csa1M064790 encoding the same function of a cysteine-rich receptor-like protein kinase, were the most likely candidate genes. GFP fusion protein-aided subcellular localization indicated that both candidate genes were located in the plasma membrane, but Csa1M064780 was also found in the nucleus. This is the first report of dominantly inherited PM resistance in cucumber. Results of this study will provide new insights into understanding the phenotypic and genetic mechanisms of PM resistance in cucumber. This work should also facilitate marker-assisted selection in cucumber breeding for PM resistance.

  19. High-resolution melt analysis to identify and map sequence-tagged site anchor points onto linkage maps: a white lupin (Lupinus albus) map as an exemplar.

    PubMed

    Croxford, Adam E; Rogers, Tom; Caligari, Peter D S; Wilkinson, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    * The provision of sequence-tagged site (STS) anchor points allows meaningful comparisons between mapping studies but can be a time-consuming process for nonmodel species or orphan crops. * Here, the first use of high-resolution melt analysis (HRM) to generate STS markers for use in linkage mapping is described. This strategy is rapid and low-cost, and circumvents the need for labelled primers or amplicon fractionation. * Using white lupin (Lupinus albus, x = 25) as a case study, HRM analysis was applied to identify 91 polymorphic markers from expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived and genomic libraries. Of these, 77 generated STS anchor points in the first fully resolved linkage map of the species. The map also included 230 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) loci, spanned 1916 cM (84.2% coverage) and divided into the expected 25 linkage groups. * Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses performed on the population revealed genomic regions associated with several traits, including the agronomically important time to flowering (tf), alkaloid synthesis and stem height (Ph). Use of HRM-STS markers also allowed us to make direct comparisons between our map and that of the related crop, Lupinus angustifolius, based on the conversion of RFLP, microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers into HRM markers.

  20. Comparative physical mapping between wheat chromosome arm 2BL and rice chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tong Geon; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Dae Yeon; Seo, Yong Weon

    2010-12-01

    Physical maps of chromosomes provide a framework for organizing and integrating diverse genetic information. DNA microarrays are a valuable technique for physical mapping and can also be used to facilitate the discovery of single feature polymorphisms (SFPs). Wheat chromosome arm 2BL was physically mapped using a Wheat Genome Array onto near-isogenic lines (NILs) with the aid of wheat-rice synteny and mapped wheat EST information. Using high variance probe set (HVP) analysis, 314 HVPs constituting genes present on 2BL were identified. The 314 HVPs were grouped into 3 categories: HVPs that match only rice chromosome 4 (298 HVPs), those that match only wheat ESTs mapped on 2BL (1), and those that match both rice chromosome 4 and wheat ESTs mapped on 2BL (15). All HVPs were converted into gene sets, which represented either unique rice gene models or mapped wheat ESTs that matched identified HVPs. Comparative physical maps were constructed for 16 wheat gene sets and 271 rice gene sets. Of the 271 rice gene sets, 257 were mapped to the 18-35 Mb regions on rice chromosome 4. Based on HVP analysis and sequence similarity between the gene models in the rice chromosomes and mapped wheat ESTs, the outermost rice gene model that limits the translocation breakpoint to orthologous regions was identified.

  1. An integrated genetic map based on four mapping populations and quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern watermelon (Citrullus lanatus L.) cultivars share a narrow genetic base due to many years of selection for desirable horticultural qualities. Wild subspecies within C. lanatus are important potential sources of novel alleles for watermelon breeding, but successful trait introgression into elite cultivars has had limited success. The application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in watermelon is yet to be realized, mainly due to the past lack of high quality genetic maps. Recently, a number of useful maps have become available, however these maps have few common markers, and were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making integration and comparative analysis among maps difficult. The objective of this research was to use single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) anchor markers to construct an integrated genetic map for C. lanatus. Results Under the framework of the high density genetic map, an integrated genetic map was constructed by merging data from four independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines, which included three subspecies of watermelon. The 698 simple sequence repeat (SSR), 219 insertion-deletion (InDel), 36 structure variation (SV) and 386 SNP markers from the four maps were used to construct an integrated map. This integrated map contained 1339 markers, spanning 798 cM with an average marker interval of 0.6 cM. Fifty-eight previously reported quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 12 traits in these populations were also integrated into the map. In addition, new QTL identified for brix, fructose, glucose and sucrose were added. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in different genetic backgrounds mapped to similar genomic regions of the integrated map, suggesting that such QTL are responsible for the phenotypic variability observed in a broad array of watermelon germplasm. Conclusions The integrated map described herein enhances the utility of genomic tools over

  2. Identification of Pyrus single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and evaluation for genetic mapping in European pear and interspecific Pyrus hybrids.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Sara; Saeed, Munazza; Knäbel, Mareike; Kim, YoonKyeong; Troggio, Michela; Malnoy, Mickael; Velasco, Riccardo; Fontana, Paolo; Won, KyungHo; Durel, Charles-Eric; Perchepied, Laure; Schaffer, Robert; Wiedow, Claudia; Bus, Vincent; Brewer, Lester; Gardiner, Susan E; Crowhurst, Ross N; Chagné, David

    2013-01-01

    We have used new generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from three European pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivars and subsequently developed a subset of 1096 pear SNPs into high throughput markers by combining them with the set of 7692 apple SNPs on the IRSC apple Infinium® II 8K array. We then evaluated this apple and pear Infinium® II 9K SNP array for large-scale genotyping in pear across several species, using both pear and apple SNPs. The segregating populations employed for array validation included a segregating population of European pear ('Old Home'×'Louise Bon Jersey') and four interspecific breeding families derived from Asian (P. pyrifolia Nakai and P. bretschneideri Rehd.) and European pear pedigrees. In total, we mapped 857 polymorphic pear markers to construct the first SNP-based genetic maps for pear, comprising 78% of the total pear SNPs included in the array. In addition, 1031 SNP markers derived from apple (13% of the total apple SNPs included in the array) were polymorphic and were mapped in one or more of the pear populations. These results are the first to demonstrate SNP transferability across the genera Malus and Pyrus. Our construction of high density SNP-based and gene-based genetic maps in pear represents an important step towards the identification of chromosomal regions associated with a range of horticultural characters, such as pest and disease resistance, orchard yield and fruit quality.

  3. Identification of Pyrus Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and Evaluation for Genetic Mapping in European Pear and Interspecific Pyrus Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Troggio, Michela; Malnoy, Mickael; Velasco, Riccardo; Fontana, Paolo; Won, KyungHo; Durel, Charles-Eric; Perchepied, Laure; Schaffer, Robert; Wiedow, Claudia; Bus, Vincent; Brewer, Lester; Gardiner, Susan E.; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Chagné, David

    2013-01-01

    We have used new generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from three European pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivars and subsequently developed a subset of 1096 pear SNPs into high throughput markers by combining them with the set of 7692 apple SNPs on the IRSC apple Infinium® II 8K array. We then evaluated this apple and pear Infinium® II 9K SNP array for large-scale genotyping in pear across several species, using both pear and apple SNPs. The segregating populations employed for array validation included a segregating population of European pear (‘Old Home’בLouise Bon Jersey’) and four interspecific breeding families derived from Asian (P. pyrifolia Nakai and P. bretschneideri Rehd.) and European pear pedigrees. In total, we mapped 857 polymorphic pear markers to construct the first SNP-based genetic maps for pear, comprising 78% of the total pear SNPs included in the array. In addition, 1031 SNP markers derived from apple (13% of the total apple SNPs included in the array) were polymorphic and were mapped in one or more of the pear populations. These results are the first to demonstrate SNP transferability across the genera Malus and Pyrus. Our construction of high density SNP-based and gene-based genetic maps in pear represents an important step towards the identification of chromosomal regions associated with a range of horticultural characters, such as pest and disease resistance, orchard yield and fruit quality. PMID:24155917

  4. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) for whole-genome profiling of barley

    PubMed Central

    Wenzl, Peter; Carling, Jason; Kudrna, David; Jaccoud, Damian; Huttner, Eric; Kleinhofs, Andris; Kilian, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) can detect and type DNA variation at several hundred genomic loci in parallel without relying on sequence information. Here we show that it can be effectively applied to genetic mapping and diversity analyses of barley, a species with a 5,000-Mbp genome. We tested several complexity reduction methods and selected two that generated the most polymorphic genomic representations. Arrays containing individual fragments from these representations generated DArT fingerprints with a genotype call rate of 98.0% and a scoring reproducibility of at least 99.8%. The fingerprints grouped barley lines according to known genetic relationships. To validate the Mendelian behavior of DArT markers, we constructed a genetic map for a cross between cultivars Steptoe and Morex. Nearly all polymorphic array features could be incorporated into one of seven linkage groups (98.8%). The resulting map comprised ≈385 unique DArT markers and spanned 1,137 centimorgans. A comparison with the restriction fragment length polymorphism-based framework map indicated that the quality of the DArT map was equivalent, if not superior, to that of the framework map. These results highlight the potential of DArT as a generic technique for genome profiling in the context of molecular breeding and genomics. PMID:15192146

  5. Milliarcsecond Astronomy with the CHARA Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Gail; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Gies, Douglas; Jones, Jeremy; Farrington, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    The Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy offers 50 nights per year of open access time at the CHARA Array. The Array consists of six telescopes linked together as an interferometer, providing sub-milliarcsecond resolution in the optical and near-infrared. The Array enables a variety of scientific studies, including measuring stellar angular diameters, imaging stellar shapes and surface features, mapping the orbits of close binary companions, and resolving circumstellar environments. The open access time is part of an NSF/MSIP funded program to open the CHARA Array to the broader astronomical community. As part of the program, we will build a searchable database for the CHARA data archive and run a series of one-day community workshops at different locations across the country to expand the user base for stellar interferometry and encourage new scientific investigations with the CHARA Array.

  6. Lunar UV-visible-IR mapping interferometric spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Hayden; Haskin, L.; Korotev, R.; Arvidson, R.; Mckinnon, W.; Hapke, B.; Larson, S.; Lucey, P.

    1992-01-01

    Ultraviolet-visible-infrared mapping digital array scanned interferometers for lunar compositional surveys was developed. The research has defined a no-moving-parts, low-weight and low-power, high-throughput, and electronically adaptable digital array scanned interferometer that achieves measurement objectives encompassing and improving upon all the requirements defined by the LEXSWIG for lunar mineralogical investigation. In addition, LUMIS provides a new, important, ultraviolet spectral mapping, high-spatial-resolution line scan camera, and multispectral camera capabilities. An instrument configuration optimized for spectral mapping and imaging of the lunar surface and provide spectral results in support of the instrument design are described.

  7. High-Resolution Mapping of Structural Mutations in Prostate Cancer with Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    study of the NCI60 panel of cancer cell lines [39]. More recently, amplifications of NOTCH3 were noted in ovarian tumors by an SNP array analysis...and the functional role of NOTCH3 was suggested by the ability to suppress cell proliferation by inhibiting NOTCH3 [40]. Allele-specific copy...Identified and functionally validated the oncogene MITF. 40 Park JT, Li M, Nakayama K, et al. Notch3 gene amplification in ovarian cancer. Cancer Res

  8. A High-Resolution SNP Array-Based Linkage Map Anchors a New Domestic Cat Draft Genome Assembly and Provides Detailed Patterns of Recombination.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Hillier, LaDeana W; Grahn, Robert A; Zimin, Aleksey V; David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Middleton, Rondo; Hannah, Steven; Hendrickson, Sher; Makunin, Alex; O'Brien, Stephen J; Minx, Pat; Wilson, Richard K; Lyons, Leslie A; Warren, Wesley C; Murphy, William J

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution genetic and physical maps are invaluable tools for building accurate genome assemblies, and interpreting results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Previous genetic and physical maps anchored good quality draft assemblies of the domestic cat genome, enabling the discovery of numerous genes underlying hereditary disease and phenotypes of interest to the biomedical science and breeding communities. However, these maps lacked sufficient marker density to order thousands of shorter scaffolds in earlier assemblies, which instead relied heavily on comparative mapping with related species. A high-resolution map would aid in validating and ordering chromosome scaffolds from existing and new genome assemblies. Here, we describe a high-resolution genetic linkage map of the domestic cat genome based on genotyping 453 domestic cats from several multi-generational pedigrees on the Illumina 63K SNP array. The final maps include 58,055 SNP markers placed relative to 6637 markers with unique positions, distributed across all autosomes and the X chromosome. Our final sex-averaged maps span a total autosomal length of 4464 cM, the longest described linkage map for any mammal, confirming length estimates from a previous microsatellite-based map. The linkage map was used to order and orient the scaffolds from a substantially more contiguous domestic cat genome assembly (Felis catus v8.0), which incorporated ∼20 × coverage of Illumina fragment reads. The new genome assembly shows substantial improvements in contiguity, with a nearly fourfold increase in N50 scaffold size to 18 Mb. We use this map to report probable structural errors in previous maps and assemblies, and to describe features of the recombination landscape, including a massive (∼50 Mb) recombination desert (of virtually zero recombination) on the X chromosome that parallels a similar desert on the porcine X chromosome in both size and physical location. Copyright © 2016 Li et al.

  9. North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA): VHF Source Retrieval Algorithm and Error Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Solakiewicz, R. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Goodman, S. J.; Christian, H. J.; Hall, J.; Bailey, J.; Krider, E. P.; Bateman, M. G.; Boccippio, D.

    2003-01-01

    Two approaches are used to characterize how accurately the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is able to locate lightning VHF sources in space and in time. The first method uses a Monte Carlo computer simulation to estimate source retrieval errors. The simulation applies a VHF source retrieval algorithm that was recently developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and that is similar, but not identical to, the standard New Mexico Tech retrieval algorithm. The second method uses a purely theoretical technique (i.e., chi-squared Curvature Matrix Theory) to estimate retrieval errors. Both methods assume that the LMA system has an overall rms timing error of 50 ns, but all other possible errors (e.g., multiple sources per retrieval attempt) are neglected. The detailed spatial distributions of retrieval errors are provided. Given that the two methods are completely independent of one another, it is shown that they provide remarkably similar results. However, for many source locations, the Curvature Matrix Theory produces larger altitude error estimates than the (more realistic) Monte Carlo simulation.

  10. Genetic Mapping Identifies Novel Highly Protective Antigens for an Apicomplexan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Damer P.; Billington, Karen J.; Copestake, Susan L.; Oakes, Richard D.; Quail, Michael A.; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Shirley, Martin W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp.) was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed ‘immune mapped protein-1’ (IMP-1). Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s) of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate protective

  11. A RAD-Based Genetic Map for Anchoring Scaffold Sequences and Identifying QTLs in Bitter Gourd (Momordica charantia)

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Junjie; Luo, Shaobo; Niu, Yu; Huang, Rukui; Wen, Qingfang; Su, Jianwen; Miao, Nansheng; He, Weiming; Dong, Zhensheng; Cheng, Jiaowen; Hu, Kailin

    2018-01-01

    Genetic mapping is a basic tool necessary for anchoring assembled scaffold sequences and for identifying QTLs controlling important traits. Though bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is both consumed and used as a medicinal, research on its genomics and genetic mapping is severely limited. Here, we report the construction of a restriction site associated DNA (RAD)-based genetic map for bitter gourd using an F2 mapping population comprising 423 individuals derived from two cultivated inbred lines, the gynoecious line ‘K44’ and the monoecious line ‘Dali-11.’ This map comprised 1,009 SNP markers and spanned a total genetic distance of 2,203.95 cM across the 11 linkage groups. It anchored a total of 113 assembled scaffolds that covered about 251.32 Mb (85.48%) of the 294.01 Mb assembled genome. In addition, three horticulturally important traits including sex expression, fruit epidermal structure, and immature fruit color were evaluated using a combination of qualitative and quantitative data. As a result, we identified three QTL/gene loci responsible for these traits in three environments. The QTL/gene gy/fffn/ffn, controlling sex expression involved in gynoecy, first female flower node, and female flower number was detected in the reported region. Particularly, two QTLs/genes, Fwa/Wr and w, were found to be responsible for fruit epidermal structure and white immature fruit color, respectively. This RAD-based genetic map promotes the assembly of the bitter gourd genome and the identified genetic loci will accelerate the cloning of relevant genes in the future. PMID:29706980

  12. Parallel algorithms for mapping pipelined and parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Many computational problems in image processing, signal processing, and scientific computing are naturally structured for either pipelined or parallel computation. When mapping such problems onto a parallel architecture it is often necessary to aggregate an obvious problem decomposition. Even in this context the general mapping problem is known to be computationally intractable, but recent advances have been made in identifying classes of problems and architectures for which optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. Among these, the mapping of pipelined or parallel computations onto linear array, shared memory, and host-satellite systems figures prominently. This paper extends that work first by showing how to improve existing serial mapping algorithms. These improvements have significantly lower time and space complexities: in one case a published O(nm sup 3) time algorithm for mapping m modules onto n processors is reduced to an O(nm log m) time complexity, and its space requirements reduced from O(nm sup 2) to O(m). Run time complexity is further reduced with parallel mapping algorithms based on these improvements, which run on the architecture for which they create the mappings.

  13. Array painting reveals a high frequency of balanced translocations in breast cancer cell lines that break in cancer-relevant genes

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, KD; Blood, KA; Ng, BL; Beavis, JC; Chua, Y; Cooke, SL; Raby, S; Ichimura, K; Collins, VP; Carter, NP; Edwards, PAW

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome translocations in the common epithelial cancers are abundant, yet little is known about them. They have been thought to be almost all unbalanced and therefore dismissed as mostly mediating tumour suppressor loss. We present a comprehensive analysis by array painting of the chromosome translocations of breast cancer cell lines HCC1806, HCC1187 and ZR-75-30. In array painting, chromosomes are isolated by flow cytometry, amplified and hybridized to DNA microarrays. A total of 200 breakpoints were identified and all were mapped to 1Mb resolution on BAC arrays, then 40 selected breakpoints, including all balanced breakpoints, were further mapped on tiling-path BAC arrays or to around 2kb resolution using oligonucleotide arrays. Many more of the translocations were balanced at 1Mb resolution than expected, either reciprocal (eight in total) or balanced for at least one participating chromosome (19 paired breakpoints). Secondly, many of the breakpoints were at genes that are plausible targets of oncogenic translocation, including balanced breaks at CTCF, EP300/p300, and FOXP4. Two gene fusions were demonstrated, TAX1BP1-AHCY and RIF1-PKD1L1. Our results support the idea that chromosome rearrangements may play an important role in common epithelial cancers such as breast cancer. PMID:18084325

  14. A small towed beamforming array to identify vocalizing resident killer whales ( Orcinus orca) concurrent with focal behavioral observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Patrick J.; Tyack, Peter L.

    Investigations of communication systems benefit from concurrent observation of vocal and visible behaviors of individual animals. A device has been developed to identify individual vocalizing resident killer whales ( Orcinus orca) during focal behavioral observations. The device consists of a 2-m, 15-element hydrophone array, which is easily towed behind a small vessel, on-board multi-channel recorders, and real-time signal processing equipment. Acoustic data from the hydrophones are digitized and processed using broadband frequency-domain beamforming to yield frequency-azimuth (FRAZ) and "directo-gram" displays of arriving sounds. Based upon statistical analysis of independent portions of typical killer whale calls, the precision of the angle-of-arrival estimate ranges from ±0° to ±2.5° with a mean precision of ±1.5°. Echolocation clicks also are resolved precisely with a typical -6 dB mainlobe width of ±2.0°. Careful positioning of the array relative to the animals minimizes the effects of depth ambiguities and allows identification of individual sources in many circumstances. Several strategies for identifying vocalizing individuals are discussed and an example of a successful identification is described. Use of the array with resident killer whales did not interfere with vessel maneuverability, animal tracking, or behavioral sampling of focal individuals. This localization technique has promise for advancing the abilities of researchers to conduct unbiased behavioral and acoustic sampling of individual free-ranging cetaceans.

  15. A ddRAD Based Linkage Map of the Cultivated Strawberry, Fragaria xananassa

    PubMed Central

    Davik, Jahn; Sargent, Daniel James; Brurberg, May Bente; Lien, Sigbjørn; Kent, Matthew; Alsheikh, Muath

    2015-01-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) is an allo-octoploid considered difficult to disentangle genetically due to its four relatively similar sub-genomic chromosome sets. This has been alleviated by the recent release of the strawberry IStraw90 whole genome genotyping array. However, array resolution relies on the genotypes used in the array construction and may be of limited general use. SNP detection based on reduced genomic sequencing approaches has the potential of providing better coverage in cases where the studied genotypes are only distantly related from the SNP array’s construction foundation. Here we have used double digest restriction-associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD) to identify SNPs in a 145 seedling F1 hybrid population raised from the cross between the cultivars Sonata (♀) and Babette (♂). A linkage map containing 907 markers which spanned 1,581.5 cM across 31 linkage groups representing the 28 chromosomes of the species. Comparing the physical span of the SNP markers with the F. vesca genome sequence, the linkage groups resolved covered 79% of the estimated 830 Mb of the F. ×ananassa genome. Here, we have developed the first linkage map for F. ×ananassa using ddRAD and show that this technique and other related techniques are useful tools for linkage map development and downstream genetic studies in the octoploid strawberry. PMID:26398886

  16. Isthmus sites identified by Ripple Mapping are usually anatomically stable: A novel method to guide atrial substrate ablation?

    PubMed

    Luther, Vishal; Qureshi, Norman; Lim, Phang Boon; Koa-Wing, Michael; Jamil-Copley, Shahnaz; Ng, Fu Siong; Whinnett, Zachary; Davies, D Wyn; Peters, Nicholas S; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Linton, Nick

    2018-03-01

    Postablation reentrant ATs depend upon conducting isthmuses bordered by scar. Bipolar voltage maps highlight scar as sites of low voltage, but the voltage amplitude of an electrogram depends upon the myocardial activation sequence. Furthermore, a voltage threshold that defines atrial scar is unknown. We used Ripple Mapping (RM) to test whether these isthmuses were anatomically fixed between different activation vectors and atrial rates. We studied post-AF ablation ATs where >1 rhythm was mapped. Multipolar catheters were used with CARTO Confidense for high-density mapping. RM visualized the pattern of activation, and the voltage threshold below which no activation was seen. Isthmuses were characterized at this threshold between maps for each patient. Ten patients were studied (Map 1 was AT1; Map 2: sinus 1/10, LA paced 2/10, AT2 with reverse CS activation 3/10; AT2 CL difference 50 ± 30 ms). Point density was similar between maps (Map 1: 2,589 ± 1,330; Map 2: 2,214 ± 1,384; P  =  0.31). RM activation threshold was 0.16 ± 0.08 mV. Thirty-one isthmuses were identified in Map 1 (median 3 per map; width 27 ± 15 mm; 7 anterior; 6 roof; 8 mitral; 9 septal; 1 posterior). Importantly, 7 of 31 (23%) isthmuses were unexpectedly identified within regions without prior ablation. AT1 was treated following ablation of 11/31 (35%) isthmuses. Of the remaining 20 isthmuses, 14 of 16 isthmuses (88%) were consistent between the two maps (four were inadequately mapped). Wavefront collision caused variation in low voltage distribution in 2 of 16 (12%). The distribution of isthmuses and nonconducting tissue within the ablated left atrium, as defined by RM, appear concordant between rhythms. This could guide a substrate ablative approach. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Complementary standoff chemical imaging to map and identify artist materials in an early Italian Renaissance panel painting.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kathryn A; Conover, Damon M; Glinsman, Lisha Deming; Delaney, John K

    2014-12-08

    Two imaging modalities based on molecular and elemental spectroscopy were used to characterize a painting by Cosimo Tura. Visible-to-near-infrared (400-1680 nm) reflectance imaging spectroscopy (RIS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging spectroscopy were employed to identify pigments and determine their spatial distribution with higher confidence than from either technique alone. For example, Mary's red robe was modeled through the distribution of an insect-derived red lake (RIS map) and lead white (XRF lead map), rather than a layer of red lake on vermilion. The RIS image cube was also used to isolate the preparatory design by mapping the reflectance spectra associated with it. In conjunction with results from an earlier RIS study (1650-2500 nm) to map and identify the binding media, a more thorough understanding was gained of the materials and techniques used in the painting. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Galfenol tactile sensor array and visual mapping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Kathleen; Flatau, Alison

    2006-03-01

    The smart material, Galfenol, is being explored for its uses as a magnetostrictive material. This project seeks to determine if Galfenol can be used as a tactile sensor in a 2-D grid array, magnetic circuit system. When used within a magnetic circuit, Galfenol indicates induced stress and force as a change in flux, due to a change in permeability of the material. The change in flux is detected by Giant MagnetoResistive (GMR) Sensors, which produce a voltage change proportional to the field change. By using Galfenol in an array, this research attempts to create a sensory area. Galfenol is an alloy made of Iron and Gallium. Fe 100-xGa x, where 15 <= x <= 28, creates a material with useful mechanical and transduction attributes (Clark et al. and Kellogg). Galfenol is also distinguished by the crystalline structure of the material. Two types currently exist: single crystal and polycrystalline. Single crystal has higher transduction coefficients than polycrystalline, but is more costly. Polycrystalline Galfenol is currently available as either production or research grade. The designations are related to the sample growth rate with the slower rate being the research grade. The slower growth rate more closely resembles the single crystal Galfenol properties. Galfenol 17.5-18% research grade is used for this experiment, provided by Etrema Products Inc. The magnetic circuit and sensor array is first built at the macro scale so that the design can be verified. After the macro scale is proven, further development will move the system to the nano-level. Recent advances in nanofabrication have enabled Galfenol to be grown as nanowires. Using the nanowires, research will seek to create high resolution tactile sensors with spatial resolutions similar to human finger tips, but with greater force ranges and sensitivity capabilities (Flatau & Stadler). Possible uses of such systems include robotics and prosthetics.

  19. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Deployment, Operation and Initial Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R.; Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Rudlosky, S.; Goodman, S. J.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anseimo, E. M.; Pinto, O.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-10 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network is being deployed in the vicinity of Sao Paulo to create the SP-LMA for total lightning measurements in association with the international CHUVA [Cloud processes of the main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribution to cloud resolving modeling and to the GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement)] field campaign. Besides supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives and the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga intensive operation period (IOP) in November-December 2011, the SP-LMA will support the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), both sensors on the NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R), presently under development and scheduled for a 2015 launch. The proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready for use on "day1" following the launch of GOES-R. A preliminary survey of potential sites in the vicinity of Sao Paulo was conducted in December 2009 and January 2010, followed up by a detailed survey in July 2010, with initial network deployment scheduled for October 2010. However, due to a delay in the Sao Luiz do Paraitinga IOP, the SP-LMA will now be installed in July 2011 and operated for one year. Spacing between stations is on the order of 15-30 km, with the network "diameter" being on the order of 30-40 km, which provides good 3-D lightning mapping 150 km from the network center. Optionally, 1-3 additional stations may be deployed in the vicinity of Sao Jos dos Campos.

  20. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shahi, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D’alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analysed 14,498 multiple sclerosis subjects and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (p-value < 1.0 × 10-4). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 multiple sclerosis subjects and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (p-value < 5.0 × 10-8); three found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants in 103 discrete loci outside of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With high resolution Bayesian fine-mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalogue of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine-mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals. PMID:24076602

  1. The paradigm compiler: Mapping a functional language for the connection machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Jack B.

    1989-01-01

    The Paradigm Compiler implements a new approach to compiling programs written in high level languages for execution on highly parallel computers. The general approach is to identify the principal data structures constructed by the program and to map these structures onto the processing elements of the target machine. The mapping is chosen to maximize performance as determined through compile time global analysis of the source program. The source language is Sisal, a functional language designed for scientific computations, and the target language is Paris, the published low level interface to the Connection Machine. The data structures considered are multidimensional arrays whose dimensions are known at compile time. Computations that build such arrays usually offer opportunities for highly parallel execution; they are data parallel. The Connection Machine is an attractive target for these computations, and the parallel for construct of the Sisal language is a convenient high level notation for data parallel algorithms. The principles and organization of the Paradigm Compiler are discussed.

  2. A reference linkage map for Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are invaluable resources in plant research. They provide a key tool for many genetic applications including: mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL); comparative mapping; identifying unlinked (i.e. independent) DNA markers for fingerprinting, population genetics and phylogenetics; assisting genome sequence assembly; relating physical and recombination distances along the genome and map-based cloning of genes. Eucalypts are the dominant tree species in most Australian ecosystems and of economic importance globally as plantation trees. The genome sequence of E. grandis has recently been released providing unprecedented opportunities for genetic and genomic research in the genus. A robust reference linkage map containing sequence-based molecular markers is needed to capitalise on this resource. Several high density linkage maps have recently been constructed for the main commercial forestry species in the genus (E. grandis, E. urophylla and E. globulus) using sequenced Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. To provide a single reference linkage map for eucalypts a composite map was produced through the integration of data from seven independent mapping experiments (1950 individuals) using a marker-merging method. Results The composite map totalled 1107 cM and contained 4101 markers; comprising 3880 DArT, 213 microsatellite and eight candidate genes. Eighty-one DArT markers were mapped to two or more linkage groups, resulting in the 4101 markers being mapped to 4191 map positions. Approximately 13% of DArT markers mapped to identical map positions, thus the composite map contained 3634 unique loci at an average interval of 0.31 cM. Conclusion The composite map represents the most saturated linkage map yet produced in Eucalyptus. As the majority of DArT markers contained on the map have been sequenced, the map provides a direct link to the E. grandis genome sequence and will serve as an important reference for

  3. A Rapid Method of Genomic Array Analysis of Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs) Identifies a 2.5-Mb Region of Enhanced Scaffold/Matrix Attachment at a Human Neocentromere

    PubMed Central

    Sumer, Huseyin; Craig, Jeffrey M.; Sibson, Mandy; Choo, K.H. Andy

    2003-01-01

    Human neocentromeres are fully functional centromeres that arise at previously noncentromeric regions of the genome. We have tested a rapid procedure of genomic array analysis of chromosome scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs), involving the isolation of S/MAR DNA and hybridization of this DNA to a genomic BAC/PAC array. Using this procedure, we have defined a 2.5-Mb domain of S/MAR-enriched chromatin that fully encompasses a previously mapped centromere protein-A (CENP-A)-associated domain at a human neocentromere. We have independently verified this procedure using a previously established fluorescence in situ hybridization method on salt-treated metaphase chromosomes. In silico sequence analysis of the S/MAR-enriched and surrounding regions has revealed no outstanding sequence-related predisposition. This study defines the S/MAR-enriched domain of a higher eukaryotic centromere and provides a method that has broad application for the mapping of S/MAR attachment sites over large genomic regions or throughout a genome. PMID:12840048

  4. Mapping transcription factor interactome networks using HaloTag protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Junshi; Galli, Mary; Kim, Alice Y; Nito, Kazumasa; Aleman, Fernando; Chang, Katherine N; Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra; Quan, Rosa; Nguyen, Hien; Song, Liang; Alvarez, José M; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Chen, Huaming; Ramachandran, Niroshan; Altmann, Stefan; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A; Hill, David E; Schroeder, Julian I; Chory, Joanne; LaBaer, Joshua; Vidal, Marc; Braun, Pascal; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-19

    Protein microarrays enable investigation of diverse biochemical properties for thousands of proteins in a single experiment, an unparalleled capacity. Using a high-density system called HaloTag nucleic acid programmable protein array (HaloTag-NAPPA), we created high-density protein arrays comprising 12,000 Arabidopsis ORFs. We used these arrays to query protein-protein interactions for a set of 38 transcription factors and transcriptional regulators (TFs) that function in diverse plant hormone regulatory pathways. The resulting transcription factor interactome network, TF-NAPPA, contains thousands of novel interactions. Validation in a benchmarked in vitro pull-down assay revealed that a random subset of TF-NAPPA validated at the same rate of 64% as a positive reference set of literature-curated interactions. Moreover, using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay, we confirmed in planta several interactions of biological interest and determined the interaction localizations for seven pairs. The application of HaloTag-NAPPA technology to plant hormone signaling pathways allowed the identification of many novel transcription factor-protein interactions and led to the development of a proteome-wide plant hormone TF interactome network.

  5. Spherical beamforming for spherical array with impedance surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tontiwattanakul, Khemapat

    2018-01-01

    Spherical microphone array beamforming has been a popular research topic for recent years. Due to their isotropic beam in three dimensional spaces as well as a certain frequency range, the arrays are widely used in many applications such as sound field recording, acoustic beamforming, and noise source localisation. The body of a spherical array is usually considered perfectly rigid. A sound field captured by the sensors on spherical array can be decomposed into a series of spherical harmonics. In noise source localisation, the amplitude density of sound sources is estimated and illustrated by mean of colour maps. In this work, a rigid spherical array covered by fibrous materials is studied via numerical simulation and the performance of the spherical beamforming is discussed.

  6. Argus: A W-band 16-pixel focal plane array for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaraj, Kiruthika; Church, Sarah; Cleary, Kieran; Frayer, David; Gawande, Rohit; Goldsmith, Paul; Gundersen, Joshua; Harris, Andrew; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Readhead, Tony; Reeves, Rodrigo; Samoska, Lorene; Sieth, Matt; Voll, Patricia

    2015-05-01

    We are building Argus, a 16-pixel square-packed focal plane array that will cover the 75-115.3 GHz frequency range on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The primary research area for Argus is the study of star formation within our Galaxy and nearby galaxies. Argus will map key molecules that trace star formation, including carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN). An additional key science area is astrochemistry, which will be addressed by observing complex molecules in the interstellar medium, and the study of formation of solar systems, which will be addressed by identifying dense pre-stellar cores and by observing comets in our solar system. Argus has a highly scalable architecture and will be a technology path finder for larger arrays. The array is modular in construction, which will allow easy replacement of malfunctioning and poorly performing components.

  7. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) map number onto space

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, Caroline B.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans map number onto space. However, the origins of this association, and particularly the degree to which it depends upon cultural experience, are not fully understood. Here we provide the first demonstration of a number-space mapping in a non-human primate. We trained four adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to select the fourth position from the bottom of a five-element vertical array. Monkeys maintained a preference to choose the fourth position through changes in the appearance, location, and spacing of the vertical array. We next asked whether monkeys show a spatially-oriented number mapping by testing their responses to the same five-element stimulus array rotated ninety degrees into a horizontal line. In these horizontal probe trials, monkeys preferentially selected the fourth position from the left, but not the fourth position from the right. Our results indicate that rhesus macaques map number onto space, suggesting that the association between number and space in human cognition is not purely a result of cultural experience and instead has deep evolutionary roots. PMID:24762923

  8. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) map number onto space.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-01

    Humans map number onto space. However, the origins of this association, and particularly the degree to which it depends upon cultural experience, are not fully understood. Here we provide the first demonstration of a number-space mapping in a non-human primate. We trained four adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to select the fourth position from the bottom of a five-element vertical array. Monkeys maintained a preference to choose the fourth position through changes in the appearance, location, and spacing of the vertical array. We next asked whether monkeys show a spatially-oriented number mapping by testing their responses to the same five-element stimulus array rotated ninety degrees into a horizontal line. In these horizontal probe trials, monkeys preferentially selected the fourth position from the left, but not the fourth position from the right. Our results indicate that rhesus macaques map number onto space, suggesting that the association between number and space in human cognition is not purely a result of cultural experience and instead has deep evolutionary roots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Whole-exome SNP array identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Yin, Xianyong; Gao, Jinping; Sheng, Yujun; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Jianzhong; He, Chundi; Qiu, Ying; Wen, Guangdong; Tian, Hongqing; Zheng, Xiaodong; Liu, Shengxiu; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Weiran; Cheng, Yuyan; Liu, Longdan; Chang, Yan; Wang, Zaixing; Li, Zenggang; Li, Longnian; Wu, Jianping; Fang, Ling; Shen, Changbing; Zhou, Fusheng; Liang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Li, Hui; Cui, Yong; Xu, Aie; Yang, Xueqin; Hao, Fei; Xu, Limin; Fan, Xing; Li, Yuzhen; Wu, Rina; Wang, Xiuli; Liu, Xiaoming; Zheng, Min; Song, Shunpeng; Ji, Bihua; Fang, Hong; Yu, Jianbin; Sun, Yongxin; Hui, Yan; Zhang, Furen; Yang, Rongya; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reproducibly associated ∼40 susceptibility loci with psoriasis. However, the missing heritability is evident and the contributions of coding variants have not yet been systematically evaluated. Here, we present a large-scale whole-exome array analysis for psoriasis consisting of 42,760 individuals. We discover 16 SNPs within 15 new genes/loci associated with psoriasis, including C1orf141, ZNF683, TMC6, AIM2, IL1RL1, CASR, SON, ZFYVE16, MTHFR, CCDC129, ZNF143, AP5B1, SYNE2, IFNGR2 and 3q26.2-q27 (P<5.00 × 10−08). In addition, we also replicate four known susceptibility loci TNIP1, NFKBIA, IL12B and LCE3D–LCE3E. These susceptibility variants identified in the current study collectively account for 1.9% of the psoriasis heritability. The variant within AIM2 is predicted to impact protein structure. Our findings increase the number of genetic risk factors for psoriasis and highlight new and plausible biological pathways in psoriasis. PMID:25854761

  10. High-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism array-profiling in myeloproliferative neoplasms identifies novel genomic aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Stegelmann, Frank; Bullinger, Lars; Griesshammer, Martin; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Habdank, Marianne; Kuhn, Susanne; Maile, Carmen; Schauer, Stefanie; Döhner, Hartmut; Döhner, Konstanze

    2010-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays allow for genome-wide profiling of copy-number alterations and copy-neutral runs of homozygosity at high resolution. To identify novel genetic lesions in myeloproliferative neoplasms, a large series of 151 clinically well characterized patients was analyzed in our study. Copy-number alterations were rare in essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera. In contrast, approximately one third of myelofibrosis patients exhibited small genomic losses (less than 5 Mb). In 2 secondary myelofibrosis cases the tumor suppressor gene NF1 in 17q11.2 was affected. Sequencing analyses revealed a mutation in the remaining NF1 allele of one patient. In terms of copy-neutral aberrations, no chromosomes other than 9p were recurrently affected. In conclusion, novel genomic aberrations were identified in our study, in particular in patients with myelofibrosis. Further analyses on single-gene level are necessary to uncover the mechanisms that are involved in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:20015882

  11. New design concept of monopole antenna array for UHF 7T MRI.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suk-Min; Park, Joshua Haekyun; Woo, Myung-Kyun; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2014-05-01

    We have developed and evaluated a monopole antenna array that can increase sensitivity at the center of the brain for 7T MRI applications. We have developed a monopole antenna array that has half the length of a conventional dipole antenna with eight channels for brain imaging with a 7T MRI. The eight-channel monopole antenna array and conventional eight-channel transceiver surface coil array were evaluated and compared in terms of transmit properties, specific absorption ratio (SAR), and sensitivity. The sensitivity maps were generated by dividing the SNR map by the flip angle distribution. A single surface coil provides asymmetric sensitivity resulting in reduced sensitivity at the center of the brain. In contrast, a single monopole antenna provides higher sensitivity at the center of the brain. Moreover, the monopole antenna array provides uniform sensitivity over the entire brain, and the sensitivity gain was 1.5 times higher at the center of the brain compared with the surface coil array. The monopole antenna array is a promising candidate for MRI applications, especially for brain imaging in a 7T MRI because it provides increased sensitivity at the center of the brain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Contig Maps and Genomic Sequencing Identify Candidate Genes in the Usher 1C Locus

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Michael J.; Day, Colleen D.; Smilinich, Nancy J.; Ni, L.; Cooper, Paul R.; Nowak, Norma J.; Davies, Chris; de Jong, Pieter J.; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Evans, Glen A.; Smith, Richard J.H.; Shows, Thomas B.

    1998-01-01

    Usher syndrome 1C (USH1C) is a congenital condition manifesting profound hearing loss, the absence of vestibular function, and eventual retinal degeneration. The USH1C locus has been mapped genetically to a 2- to 3-cM interval in 11p14–15.1 between D11S899 and D11S861. In an effort to identify the USH1C disease gene we have isolated the region between these markers in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using a combination of STS content mapping and Alu–PCR hybridization. The YAC contig is ∼3.5 Mb and has located several other loci within this interval, resulting in the order CEN-LDHA-SAA1-TPH-D11S1310-(D11S1888/KCNC1)-MYOD1-D11S902D11S921-D11S1890-TEL. Subsequent haplotyping and homozygosity analysis refined the location of the disease gene to a 400-kb interval between D11S902 and D11S1890 with all affected individuals being homozygous for the internal marker D11S921. To facilitate gene identification, the critical region has been converted into P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) clones using sequence-tagged sites (STSs) mapped to the YAC contig, Alu–PCR products generated from the YACs, and PAC end probes. A contig of >50 PAC clones has been assembled between D11S1310 and D11S1890, confirming the order of markers used in haplotyping. Three PAC clones representing nearly two-thirds of the USH1C critical region have been sequenced. PowerBLAST analysis identified six clusters of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), two known genes (BIR,SUR1) mapped previously to this region, and a previously characterized but unmapped gene NEFA (DNA binding/EF hand/acidic amino-acid-rich). GRAIL analysis identified 11 CpG islands and 73 exons of excellent quality. These data allowed the construction of a transcription map for the USH1C critical region, consisting of three known genes and six or more novel transcripts. Based on their map location, these loci represent candidate disease loci for USH1C. The NEFA gene was assessed as the USH1C locus by the sequencing of an amplified NEFA

  13. A pattern recognition approach to transistor array parameter variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, Luciano; Silva, Filipi N.; Comin, Cesar H.

    2018-06-01

    The properties of semiconductor devices, including bipolar junction transistors (BJTs), are known to vary substantially in terms of their parameters. In this work, an experimental approach, including pattern recognition concepts and methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), was used to experimentally investigate the variation among BJTs belonging to integrated circuits known as transistor arrays. It was shown that a good deal of the devices variance can be captured using only two PCA axes. It was also verified that, though substantially small variation of parameters is observed for BJT from the same array, larger variation arises between BJTs from distinct arrays, suggesting the consideration of device characteristics in more critical analog designs. As a consequence of its supervised nature, LDA was able to provide a substantial separation of the BJT into clusters, corresponding to each transistor array. In addition, the LDA mapping into two dimensions revealed a clear relationship between the considered measurements. Interestingly, a specific mapping suggested by the PCA, involving the total harmonic distortion variation expressed in terms of the average voltage gain, yielded an even better separation between the transistor array clusters. All in all, this work yielded interesting results from both semiconductor engineering and pattern recognition perspectives.

  14. QTL Mapping and CRISPR/Cas9 Editing to Identify a Drug Resistance Gene in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bang; Powell, Robin H; Behnke, Michael S

    2017-06-22

    Scientific knowledge is intrinsically linked to available technologies and methods. This article will present two methods that allowed for the identification and verification of a drug resistance gene in the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the method of Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping using a Whole Genome Sequence (WGS) -based genetic map and the method of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 -based gene editing. The approach of QTL mapping allows one to test if there is a correlation between a genomic region(s) and a phenotype. Two datasets are required to run a QTL scan, a genetic map based on the progeny of a recombinant cross and a quantifiable phenotype assessed in each of the progeny of that cross. These datasets are then formatted to be compatible with R/qtl software that generates a QTL scan to identify significant loci correlated with the phenotype. Although this can greatly narrow the search window of possible candidates, QTLs span regions containing a number of genes from which the causal gene needs to be identified. Having WGS of the progeny was critical to identify the causal drug resistance mutation at the gene level. Once identified, the candidate mutation can be verified by genetic manipulation of drug sensitive parasites. The most facile and efficient method to genetically modify T. gondii is the CRISPR/Cas9 system. This system comprised of just 2 components both encoded on a single plasmid, a single guide RNA (gRNA) containing a 20 bp sequence complementary to the genomic target and the Cas9 endonuclease that generates a double-strand DNA break (DSB) at the target, repair of which allows for insertion or deletion of sequences around the break site. This article provides detailed protocols to use CRISPR/Cas9 based genome editing tools to verify the gene responsible for sinefungin resistance and to construct transgenic parasites.

  15. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent Results and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Boccippio, D.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; Bateman, M.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.

    2002-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technologies into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather and the warning decision-making process. The LMA project is a collaboration among NASA scientists, National Weather Service (NWS) weather forecast offices (WFOs), emergency managers, and other partners. The time rate-of-change of storm characteristics and life-cycle trending are accomplished in real-time through the second generation Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (LISDAD II) system, initially developed in T997 through a collaboration among NASA/MSFC, MIT/Lincoln Lab and the Melbourne, FL WFO. LISDAD II is now a distributed decision support system with a JAVA-based display application that allows anyone, anywhere to track individual storm histories within the Tennessee Valley region of the southeastern U.S. Since the inauguration of the LMA there has been an abundance of severe weather. During 23-24 November 2001, a major tornado outbreak was monitored by LMA in its first data acquisition effort (36 tornadoes in Alabama). Since that time the LMA has collected a vast amount of data on hailstorms and damaging wind events, non-tornadic supercells, and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. In this paper we provide an overview of LMA observations and discuss future prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather.

  16. Utilizing Hierarchical Clustering to improve Efficiency of Self-Organizing Feature Map to Identify Hydrological Homogeneous Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsadnia, Farhad; Ghahreman, Bijan

    2016-04-01

    Hydrologic homogeneous group identification is considered both fundamental and applied research in hydrology. Clustering methods are among conventional methods to assess the hydrological homogeneous regions. Recently, Self-Organizing feature Map (SOM) method has been applied in some studies. However, the main problem of this method is the interpretation on the output map of this approach. Therefore, SOM is used as input to other clustering algorithms. The aim of this study is to apply a two-level Self-Organizing feature map and Ward hierarchical clustering method to determine the hydrologic homogenous regions in North and Razavi Khorasan provinces. At first by principal component analysis, we reduced SOM input matrix dimension, then the SOM was used to form a two-dimensional features map. To determine homogeneous regions for flood frequency analysis, SOM output nodes were used as input into the Ward method. Generally, the regions identified by the clustering algorithms are not statistically homogeneous. Consequently, they have to be adjusted to improve their homogeneity. After adjustment of the homogeneity regions by L-moment tests, five hydrologic homogeneous regions were identified. Finally, adjusted regions were created by a two-level SOM and then the best regional distribution function and associated parameters were selected by the L-moment approach. The results showed that the combination of self-organizing maps and Ward hierarchical clustering by principal components as input is more effective than the hierarchical method, by principal components or standardized inputs to achieve hydrologic homogeneous regions.

  17. The use of concept mapping to identify community-driven intervention strategies for physical and mental health.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Lisa M; Jacquez, Farrah; McLinden, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    Research that partners with youth and community stakeholders increases contextual relevance and community buy-in and therefore maximizes the chance for intervention success. Concept mapping is a mixed-method participatory research process that accesses the input of the community in a collaborative manner. After a school-wide health needs assessment at a low-income, minority/immigrant K-8 school identified bullying and obesity as the most important health issues, concept mapping was used to identify and prioritize specific strategies to address these two areas. Stakeholders including 160 K-8 students, 33 college students working in the school, 35 parents, 20 academic partners, and 22 teachers/staff brainstormed strategies to reduce and prevent obesity and bullying. A smaller group of stakeholders worked individually to complete an unstructured sorting of these strategies into groups of similar ideas, once for obesity and again for bullying. Multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis was applied to the sorting data to produce a series of maps that illustrated the stakeholders' conceptual thinking about obesity and bullying prevention strategies. The maps for both obesity and bullying organized specific strategies into themes that included education, parental role, teacher/school supervision, youth role, expert/professional role, and school structure/support.

  18. Nanoparticle sorting in silicon waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H. T.; Zhang, Y.; Chin, L. K.; Yap, P. H.; Wang, K.; Ser, W.; Liu, A. Q.

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the optical fractionation of nanoparticles in silicon waveguide arrays. The optical lattice is generated by evanescent coupling in silicon waveguide arrays. The hotspot size is tunable by changing the refractive index of surrounding liquids. In the experiment, 0.2-μm and 0.5-μm particles are separated with a recovery rate of 95.76%. This near-field approach is a promising candidate for manipulating nanoscale biomolecules and is anticipated to benefit the biomedical applications such as exosome purification, DNA optical mapping, cell-cell interaction, etc.

  19. Comparative mapping identifies the fusion point of an ancient mammalian X-autosomal rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, S.A.; Watson, J.M.; Spencer, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    Previous comparisons of gene location in the three major groups of mammals (eutherians, marsupials, and monotremes) have suggested that the long arm of the human X represents the ancestral mammalian X chromosome, whereas the short arm represents an autosomal region(s) recently added to the eutherian X chromosome. To identify the fusion point of this ancient X-autosome rearrangement, we have mapped four genes, three of which map near the centromere of the human Xp, in marsupials and in a monotreme. We found that ARAF1, and GATA1 are located on the X chromosome in marsupials, and ALA2 and GATA1 are also locatedmore » on the X in the platypus. This implies that the proximal short arm of the human X chromosome, including the centromere, was part of the ancestral mammalian X chromosome. The fusion point between the conserved region and the recently added regions therefore maps to human Xp11.23, although gene order on the human X indicates that there has been some rearrangement of this region. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.« less

  20. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  1. Theoretical considerations for mapping activation in human cardiac fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2013-06-01

    Defining mechanisms for cardiac fibrillation is challenging because, in contrast to other arrhythmias, fibrillation exhibits complex non-repeatability in spatiotemporal activation but paradoxically exhibits conserved spatial gradients in rate, dominant frequency, and electrical propagation. Unlike animal models, in which fibrillation can be mapped at high spatial and temporal resolution using optical dyes or arrays of contact electrodes, mapping of cardiac fibrillation in patients is constrained practically to lower resolutions or smaller fields-of-view. In many animal models, atrial fibrillation is maintained by localized electrical rotors and focal sources. However, until recently, few studies had revealed localized sources in human fibrillation, so that the impact of mapping constraints on the ability to identify rotors or focal sources in humans was not described. Here, we determine the minimum spatial and temporal resolutions theoretically required to detect rigidly rotating spiral waves and focal sources, then extend these requirements for spiral waves in computer simulations. Finally, we apply our results to clinical data acquired during human atrial fibrillation using a novel technique termed focal impulse and rotor mapping (FIRM). Our results provide theoretical justification and clinical demonstration that FIRM meets the spatio-temporal resolution requirements to reliably identify rotors and focal sources for human atrial fibrillation.

  2. Using Landsat 5 TM Data to Identify and Map Areas of Mangrove in Tulum, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meachum, Samuel Standish

    Mangroves are recognized worldwide as a major ecosystem that provides significant ecosystem services. They are threatened due to rising pressures from human overpopulation and economic development. The Caribbean Coast of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula contains mangrove habitat that have been negatively impacted by the development of the region's tourist industry. However, little research has been done to map and quantify the extent of mangrove in the region. This study used remote sensing techniques to identify mangrove in the Municipality of Tulum located in Quintana Roo, and to produce an accurate vector based thematic map that inventories these areas. Anatomical differences were analyzed and related to high-resolution field spectral data for each mangrove species. A vector map of mangrove habitat, including areas of inland mangrove, was produced with an overall accuracy of 88%. The 19,262 ha. of mangrove identified by this study represents a 140% increase in area over previous studies.

  3. Fabrication and testing of polyimide-based microelectrode arrays for cortical mapping of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Myllymaa, Sami; Myllymaa, Katja; Korhonen, Hannu; Töyräs, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Djupsund, Kaj; Tanila, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2009-06-15

    Modern microfabrication techniques make it possible to develop microelectrode arrays that may be utilized not only in neurophysiological research but also in the clinic, e.g. in neurosurgery and as elements of neural prostheses. The aim of this study was to test whether a flexible microelectrode array is suitable for recording cortical surface field potentials in rats. Polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by utilizing microfabrication techniques e.g. photolithography and magnetron sputter deposition. The present microelectrode array consists of eight platinum microelectrodes (round-shaped, Ø: 200 microm), transmission lines and connector pads sandwiched between two thin layers of biocompatible polyimide. The microelectrode arrays were electrochemically characterized by impedance spectroscopy in physiological saline solution and successfully tested in vivo by conducting acute and chronic measurements of evoked potentials on the surface of rat cortex. The arrays proved excellent flexibility and mechanical strength during handling and implantation onto the surface of cortex. The excellent electrochemical characteristics and stable in vivo recordings with high spatiotemporal resolution highlight the potential of these arrays. The fabrication protocol described here allows implementation of several other neural interfaces with different layouts, material selections or target areas either for recording or stimulation purposes.

  4. A visual salience map in the primate frontal eye field.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kirk G; Bichot, Narcisse P

    2005-01-01

    Models of attention and saccade target selection propose that within the brain there is a topographic map of visual salience that combines bottom-up and top-down influences to identify locations for further processing. The results of a series of experiments with monkeys performing visual search tasks have identified a population of frontal eye field (FEF) visually responsive neurons that exhibit all of the characteristics of a visual salience map. The activity of these FEF neurons is not sensitive to specific features of visual stimuli; but instead, their activity evolves over time to select the target of the search array. This selective activation reflects both the bottom-up intrinsic conspicuousness of the stimuli and the top-down knowledge and goals of the viewer. The peak response within FEF specifies the target for the overt gaze shift. However, the selective activity in FEF is not in itself a motor command because the magnitude of activation reflects the relative behavioral significance of the different stimuli in the visual scene and occurs even when no saccade is made. Identifying a visual salience map in FEF validates the theoretical concept of a salience map in many models of attention. In addition, it strengthens the emerging view that FEF is not only involved in producing overt gaze shifts, but is also important for directing covert spatial attention.

  5. Interspecies synteny mapping identifies a quantitative trait locus for bone mineral density on human chromosome Xp22.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Claire A; Mroczkowski, H Joel; McGuigan, Fiona E A; Albagha, Omar M E; Manolagas, Stavros; Reid, David M; Ralston, Stuart H; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a complex trait with a strong genetic component and an important predictor of osteoporotic fracture risk. Here we report the use of a cross-species strategy to identify genes that regulate BMD, proceeding from quantitative trait mapping in mice to association mapping of the syntenic region in the human genome. We identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on the mouse X-chromosome for post-maturity change in spine BMD in a cross of SAMP6 and AKR/J mice and conducted association mapping of the syntenic region on human chromosome Xp22. We studied 76 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from the human region in two sets of DNA pools prepared from individuals with lumbar spine-BMD (LS-BMD) values falling into the top and bottom 13th percentiles of a population-based study of 3100 post-menopausal women. This procedure identified a region of significant association for two adjacent SNP (rs234494 and rs234495) within the Xp22 locus (P<0.001). Individual genotyping for rs234494 in the BMD pools confirmed the presence of an association for alleles (P=0.018) and genotypes (P=0.008). Analysis of rs234494 and rs234495 in 1053 women derived from the same population who were not selected for BMD values showed an association with LS-BMD for rs234495 (P=0.01) and for haplotypes defined by both SNP (P=0.002). Our study illustrates that interspecies synteny can be used to identify and refine QTL for complex traits and represents the first example where a human QTL for BMD regulation has been mapped using this approach.

  6. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Choi, S. K.; Coughlin, K. P.; Crowley, K. T.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Duff, S. M.; Dunkley, J.; Dünner, R.; van Engelen, A.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Hasselfield, M.; Hills, F.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Hloẑek, R.; Ho, S. P.; Hubmayr, J.; Huffenberger, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Kosowsky, A. B.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Nati, F.; Newburgh, L.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Page, L. A.; Pappas, C. G.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Sehgal, N.; Sherwin, B. D.; Sievers, J. L.; Simon, S. M.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Thornton, R.; Van Lanen, J.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies—imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution—will enable precision cosmological constraints and also a wide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the Advanced ACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the Advanced ACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  7. Advanced ACTPol Cryogenic Detector Arrays and Readout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, S.W.; Allison, R.; Austermann, J.; Baildon, T.; Battaglia, N.; Beall, J. A.; Becker, D.; De Bernardis, F.; Bond, J. R.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol is a polarization-sensitive upgrade for the 6 m aperture Atacama Cosmology Telescope, adding new frequencies and increasing sensitivity over the previous ACTPol receiver. In 2016, Advanced ACTPol will begin to map approximately half the sky in five frequency bands (28-230 GHz). Its maps of primary and secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies-imaged in intensity and polarization at few arcminute-scale resolution-will enable precision cosmological constraints and also awide array of cross-correlation science that probes the expansion history of the universe and the growth of structure via gravitational collapse. To accomplish these scientific goals, the AdvancedACTPol receiver will be a significant upgrade to the ACTPol receiver, including four new multichroic arrays of cryogenic, feedhorn-coupled AlMn transition edge sensor polarimeters (fabricated on 150 mm diameter wafers); a system of continuously rotating meta-material silicon half-wave plates; and a new multiplexing readout architecture which uses superconducting quantum interference devices and time division to achieve a 64-row multiplexing factor. Here we present the status and scientific goals of the Advanced ACTPol instrument, emphasizing the design and implementation of the AdvancedACTPol cryogenic detector arrays.

  8. A DArT marker genetic map of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) integrated with detailed comparative mapping information; comparison with existing DArT marker genetic maps of Lolium perenne, L. multiflorum and Festuca pratensis.

    PubMed

    King, Julie; Thomas, Ann; James, Caron; King, Ian; Armstead, Ian

    2013-07-03

    Ryegrasses and fescues (genera, Lolium and Festuca) are species of forage and turf grasses which are used widely in agricultural and amenity situations. They are classified within the sub-family Pooideae and so are closely related to Brachypodium distachyon, wheat, barley, rye and oats. Recently, a DArT array has been developed which can be used in generating marker and mapping information for ryegrasses and fescues. This represents a potential common marker set for ryegrass and fescue researchers which can be linked through to comparative genomic information for the grasses. A F2 perennial ryegrass genetic map was developed consisting of 7 linkage groups defined by 1316 markers and deriving a total map length of 683 cM. The marker set included 866 DArT and 315 gene sequence-based markers. Comparison with previous DArT mapping studies in perennial and Italian ryegrass (L. multiflorum) identified 87 and 105 DArT markers in common, respectively, of which 94% and 87% mapped to homoeologous linkage groups. A similar comparison with meadow fescue (F. pratensis) identified only 28 DArT markers in common, of which c. 50% mapped to non-homoelogous linkage groups. In L. perenne, the genetic distance spanned by the DArT markers encompassed the majority of the regions that could be described in terms of comparative genomic relationships with rice, Brachypodium distachyon, and Sorghum bicolor. DArT markers are likely to be a useful common marker resource for ryegrasses and fescues, though the success in aligning different populations through the mapping of common markers will be influenced by degrees of population interrelatedness. The detailed mapping of DArT and gene-based markers in this study potentially allows comparative relationships to be derived in future mapping populations characterised using solely DArT markers.

  9. High-Resolution Maps of Mouse Reference Populations

    PubMed Central

    Simecek, Petr; Forejt, Jiri; Williams, Robert W.; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Takada, Toyoyuki; Lu, Lu; Johnson, Thomas E.; Bennett, Beth; Deschepper, Christian F.; Scott-Boyer, Marie-Pier; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Churchill, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic reference panels are widely used to map complex, quantitative traits in model organisms. We have generated new high-resolution genetic maps of 259 mouse inbred strains from recombinant inbred strain panels (C57BL/6J × DBA/2J, ILS/IbgTejJ × ISS/IbgTejJ, and C57BL/6J × A/J) and chromosome substitution strain panels (C57BL/6J-Chr#, C57BL/6J-Chr#, and C57BL/6J-Chr#). We genotyped all samples using the Affymetrix Mouse Diversity Array with an average intermarker spacing of 4.3 kb. The new genetic maps provide increased precision in the localization of recombination breakpoints compared to the previous maps. Although the strains were presumed to be fully inbred, we found residual heterozygosity in 40% of individual mice from five of the six panels. We also identified de novo deletions and duplications, in homozygous or heterozygous state, ranging in size from 21 kb to 8.4 Mb. Almost two-thirds (46 out of 76) of these deletions overlap exons of protein coding genes and may have phenotypic consequences. Twenty-nine putative gene conversions were identified in the chromosome substitution strains. We find that gene conversions are more likely to occur in regions where the homologous chromosomes are more similar. The raw genotyping data and genetic maps of these strain panels are available at http://churchill-lab.jax.org/website/MDA. PMID:28839117

  10. High-Resolution Maps of Mouse Reference Populations.

    PubMed

    Simecek, Petr; Forejt, Jiri; Williams, Robert W; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Takada, Toyoyuki; Lu, Lu; Johnson, Thomas E; Bennett, Beth; Deschepper, Christian F; Scott-Boyer, Marie-Pier; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Churchill, Gary A

    2017-10-05

    Genetic reference panels are widely used to map complex, quantitative traits in model organisms. We have generated new high-resolution genetic maps of 259 mouse inbred strains from recombinant inbred strain panels (C57BL/6J × DBA/2J, ILS/IbgTejJ × ISS/IbgTejJ, and C57BL/6J × A/J) and chromosome substitution strain panels (C57BL/6J-Chr#, C57BL/6J-Chr#, and C57BL/6J-Chr#). We genotyped all samples using the Affymetrix Mouse Diversity Array with an average intermarker spacing of 4.3 kb. The new genetic maps provide increased precision in the localization of recombination breakpoints compared to the previous maps. Although the strains were presumed to be fully inbred, we found residual heterozygosity in 40% of individual mice from five of the six panels. We also identified de novo deletions and duplications, in homozygous or heterozygous state, ranging in size from 21 kb to 8.4 Mb. Almost two-thirds (46 out of 76) of these deletions overlap exons of protein coding genes and may have phenotypic consequences. Twenty-nine putative gene conversions were identified in the chromosome substitution strains. We find that gene conversions are more likely to occur in regions where the homologous chromosomes are more similar. The raw genotyping data and genetic maps of these strain panels are available at http://churchill-lab.jax.org/website/MDA. Copyright © 2017 Simecek et al.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Dsm Extraction from ZY-3 Three-Line Arrays Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Y.; Xie, W.; Du, Q.; Sang, H.

    2015-08-01

    ZiYuan-3 (ZY-3), launched in January 09, 2012, is China's first civilian high-resolution stereo mapping satellite. ZY-3 is equipped with three-line scanners (nadir, backward and forward) for stereo mapping, the resolutions of the panchromatic (PAN) stereo mapping images are 2.1-m at nadir looking and 3.6-m at tilt angles of ±22° forward and backward looking, respectively. The stereo base-height ratio is 0.85-0.95. Compared with stereo mapping from two views images, three-line arrays images of ZY-3 can be used for DSM generation taking advantage of one more view than conventional photogrammetric methods. It would enrich the information for image matching and enhance the accuracy of DSM generated. The primary result of positioning accuracy of ZY-3 images has been reported, while before the massive mapping applications of utilizing ZY-3 images for DSM generation, the performance evaluation of DSM extraction from three-line arrays imagery of ZY-3 has significant meaning for the routine mapping applications. The goal of this research is to clarify the mapping performance of ZY-3 three-line arrays scanners on china's first civilian high-resolution stereo mapping satellite of ZY-3 through the accuracy evaluation of DSM generation. The comparison of DSM product in different topographic areas generated with three views images with different two views combination images of ZY-3 would be presented. Besides the comparison within different topographic study area, the accuracy deviation of the DSM products with different grid size including 25-m, 10-m and 5-m is delineated in order to clarify the impact of grid size on accuracy evaluation.

  12. Array for detecting microbes

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  13. Degree-of-Freedom Strengthened Cascade Array for DOD-DOA Estimation in MIMO Array Systems.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bobin; Dong, Zhi; Zhang, Weile; Wang, Wei; Wu, Qisheng

    2018-05-14

    In spatial spectrum estimation, difference co-array can provide extra degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) for promoting parameter identifiability and parameter estimation accuracy. For the sake of acquiring as more DOFs as possible with a given number of physical sensors, we herein design a novel sensor array geometry named cascade array. This structure is generated by systematically connecting a uniform linear array (ULA) and a non-uniform linear array, and can provide more DOFs than some exist array structures but less than the upper-bound indicated by minimum redundant array (MRA). We further apply this cascade array into multiple input multiple output (MIMO) array systems, and propose a novel joint direction of departure (DOD) and direction of arrival (DOA) estimation algorithm, which is based on a reduced-dimensional weighted subspace fitting technique. The algorithm is angle auto-paired and computationally efficient. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations prove the advantages and effectiveness of the proposed array structure and the related algorithm.

  14. Development and preliminary evaluation of a 90 K Axiom® SNP array for the allo-octoploid cultivated strawberry Fragaria × ananassa.

    PubMed

    Bassil, Nahla V; Davis, Thomas M; Zhang, Hailong; Ficklin, Stephen; Mittmann, Mike; Webster, Teresa; Mahoney, Lise; Wood, David; Alperin, Elisabeth S; Rosyara, Umesh R; Koehorst-Vanc Putten, Herma; Monfort, Amparo; Sargent, Daniel J; Amaya, Iraida; Denoyes, Beatrice; Bianco, Luca; van Dijk, Thijs; Pirani, Ali; Iezzoni, Amy; Main, Dorrie; Peace, Cameron; Yang, Yilong; Whitaker, Vance; Verma, Sujeet; Bellon, Laurent; Brew, Fiona; Herrera, Raul; van de Weg, Eric

    2015-03-07

    A high-throughput genotyping platform is needed to enable marker-assisted breeding in the allo-octoploid cultivated strawberry Fragaria × ananassa. Short-read sequences from one diploid and 19 octoploid accessions were aligned to the diploid Fragaria vesca 'Hawaii 4' reference genome to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and indels for incorporation into a 90 K Affymetrix® Axiom® array. We report the development and preliminary evaluation of this array. About 36 million sequence variants were identified in a 19 member, octoploid germplasm panel. Strategies and filtering pipelines were developed to identify and incorporate markers of several types: di-allelic SNPs (66.6%), multi-allelic SNPs (1.8%), indels (10.1%), and ploidy-reducing "haploSNPs" (11.7%). The remaining SNPs included those discovered in the diploid progenitor F. iinumae (3.9%), and speculative "codon-based" SNPs (5.9%). In genotyping 306 octoploid accessions, SNPs were assigned to six classes with Affymetrix's "SNPolisher" R package. The highest quality classes, PolyHigh Resolution (PHR), No Minor Homozygote (NMH), and Off-Target Variant (OTV) comprised 25%, 38%, and 1% of array markers, respectively. These markers were suitable for genetic studies as demonstrated in the full-sib family 'Holiday' × 'Korona' with the generation of a genetic linkage map consisting of 6,594 PHR SNPs evenly distributed across 28 chromosomes with an average density of approximately one marker per 0.5 cM, thus exceeding our goal of one marker per cM. The Affymetrix IStraw90 Axiom array is the first high-throughput genotyping platform for cultivated strawberry and is commercially available to the worldwide scientific community. The array's high success rate is likely driven by the presence of naturally occurring variation in ploidy level within the nominally octoploid genome, and by effectiveness of the employed array design and ploidy-reducing strategies. This array enables genetic analyses

  15. Mapping Department of Defense laboratory results to Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC).

    PubMed

    Lau, Lee Min; Banning, Pam D; Monson, Kent; Knight, Elva; Wilson, Pat S; Shakib, Shaun C

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has used a common application, Composite Health Care System (CHCS), throughout all DoD facilities. However, the master files used to encode patient data in CHCS are not identical across DoD facilities. The encoded data is thus not interoperable from one DoD facility to another. To enable data interoperability in the next-generation system, CHCS II, and for the DoD to exchange laboratory results with external organizations such as the Veterans Administration (VA), the disparate master file codes for laboratory results are mapped to Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC) wherever possible. This paper presents some findings from our experience mapping DoD laboratory results to LOINC.

  16. Residential photovoltaic module and array requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nearhoof, S. L.; Oster, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in residential applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to residential photovoltaic array installations. Four installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. It is concluded that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in residential arrays. However, there is no applicable building code category for residential photovoltaic modules and arrays and additional work with standards writing organizations is needed to develop residential module and array requirements.

  17. Genome-wide association mapping identifies multiple loci for a canine SLE-related disease complex.

    PubMed

    Wilbe, Maria; Jokinen, Päivi; Truvé, Katarina; Seppala, Eija H; Karlsson, Elinor K; Biagi, Tara; Hughes, Angela; Bannasch, Danika; Andersson, Göran; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lohi, Hannes; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2010-03-01

    The unique canine breed structure makes dogs an excellent model for studying genetic diseases. Within a dog breed, linkage disequilibrium is extensive, enabling genome-wide association (GWA) with only around 15,000 SNPs and fewer individuals than in human studies. Incidences of specific diseases are elevated in different breeds, indicating that a few genetic risk factors might have accumulated through drift or selective breeding. In this study, a GWA study with 81 affected dogs (cases) and 57 controls from the Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever breed identified five loci associated with a canine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related disease complex that includes both antinuclear antibody (ANA)-positive immune-mediated rheumatic disease (IMRD) and steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA). Fine mapping with twice as many dogs validated these loci. Our results indicate that the homogeneity of strong genetic risk factors within dog breeds allows multigenic disorders to be mapped with fewer than 100 cases and 100 controls, making dogs an excellent model in which to identify pathways involved in human complex diseases.

  18. QTL Mapping and CRISPR/Cas9 Editing to Identify a Drug Resistance Gene in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bang; Powell, Robin H.; Behnke, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific knowledge is intrinsically linked to available technologies and methods. This article will present two methods that allowed for the identification and verification of a drug resistance gene in the Apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii, the method of Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping using a Whole Genome Sequence (WGS) -based genetic map and the method of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 -based gene editing. The approach of QTL mapping allows one to test if there is a correlation between a genomic region(s) and a phenotype. Two datasets are required to run a QTL scan, a genetic map based on the progeny of a recombinant cross and a quantifiable phenotype assessed in each of the progeny of that cross. These datasets are then formatted to be compatible with R/qtl software that generates a QTL scan to identify significant loci correlated with the phenotype. Although this can greatly narrow the search window of possible candidates, QTLs span regions containing a number of genes from which the causal gene needs to be identified. Having WGS of the progeny was critical to identify the causal drug resistance mutation at the gene level. Once identified, the candidate mutation can be verified by genetic manipulation of drug sensitive parasites. The most facile and efficient method to genetically modify T. gondii is the CRISPR/Cas9 system. This system comprised of just 2 components both encoded on a single plasmid, a single guide RNA (gRNA) containing a 20 bp sequence complementary to the genomic target and the Cas9 endonuclease that generates a double-strand DNA break (DSB) at the target, repair of which allows for insertion or deletion of sequences around the break site. This article provides detailed protocols to use CRISPR/Cas9 based genome editing tools to verify the gene responsible for sinefungin resistance and to construct transgenic parasites. PMID:28671645

  19. Performance Analysis for Lateral-Line-Inspired Sensor Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    found to affect numerous aspects of behavior including maneuvering in complex fluid environments, schooling, prey tracking, and environment mapping...190 5-29 Maps of the cost function for a reflected vortex model with an increasing array length but constant sensor spacing . The x at...length but constant sensor spacing . The x in each image denotes the true location of the vortex. The black lines correspond to level sets generated by the

  20. Functional genomics platform for pooled screening and mammalian genetic interaction maps

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Martin; Bassik, Michael C.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic genetic interaction maps in microorganisms are powerful tools for identifying functional relationships between genes and defining the function of uncharacterized genes. We have recently implemented this strategy in mammalian cells as a two-stage approach. First, genes of interest are robustly identified in a pooled genome-wide screen using complex shRNA libraries. Second, phenotypes for all pairwise combinations of hit genes are measured in a double-shRNA screen and used to construct a genetic interaction map. Our protocol allows for rapid pooled screening under various conditions without a requirement for robotics, in contrast to arrayed approaches. Each stage of the protocol can be implemented in ~2 weeks, with additional time for analysis and generation of reagents. We discuss considerations for screen design, and present complete experimental procedures as well as a full computational analysis suite for identification of hits in pooled screens and generation of genetic interaction maps. While the protocols outlined here were developed for our original shRNA-based approach, they can be applied more generally, including to CRISPR-based approaches. PMID:24992097

  1. Mobile and replicated alignment of arrays in data-parallel programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    When a data-parallel language like FORTRAN 90 is compiled for a distributed-memory machine, aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories. The mapping determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: first, an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, and then a distribution that maps the template to the processors. We solve two facets of the problem of finding alignments that reduce residual communication: we determine alignments that vary in loops, and objects that should have replicated alignments. We show that loop-dependent mobile alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance, and we provide algorithms with which a compiler can determine good mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself (via spread operations) or can be used to improve performance. We propose an algorithm based on network flow that determines which objects to replicate so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication. This work on mobile and replicated alignment extends our earlier work on determining static alignment.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Localized Sources Identified by Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation Mapping in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Benharash, Peyman; Buch, Eric; Frank, Paul; Share, Michael; Tung, Roderick; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Mandapati, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Background New approaches to ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) include focal impulse and rotor modulation (FIRM) mapping, and initial results reported with this technique have been favorable. We sought to independently evaluate the approach by analyzing quantitative characteristics of atrial electrograms used to identify rotors and describe acute procedural outcomes of FIRM-guided ablation. Methods and Results All FIRM-guided ablation procedures (n=24; 50% paroxysmal) at University of California, Los Angeles Medical Center were included for analysis. During AF, unipolar atrial electrograms collected from a 64-pole basket catheter were used to construct phase maps and identify putative AF sources. These sites were targeted for ablation, in conjunction with pulmonary vein isolation in most patients (n=19; 79%). All patients had rotors identified (mean, 2.3±0.9 per patient; 72% in left atrium). Prespecified acute procedural end point was achieved in 12 of 24 (50%) patients: AF termination (n=1), organization (n=3), or >10% slowing of AF cycle length (n=8). Basket electrodes were within 1 cm of 54% of left atrial surface area, and a mean of 31 electrodes per patient showed interpretable atrial electrograms. Offline analysis revealed no differences between rotor and distant sites in dominant frequency or Shannon entropy. Electroanatomic mapping showed no rotational activation at FIRM-identified rotor sites in 23 of 24 patients (96%). Conclusions FIRM-identified rotor sites did not exhibit quantitative atrial electrogram characteristics expected from rotors and did not differ quantitatively from surrounding tissue. Catheter ablation at these sites, in conjunction with pulmonary vein isolation, resulted in AF termination or organization in a minority of patients (4/24; 17%). Further validation of this approach is necessary. PMID:25873718

  3. NOY: a neutrino observatory network project based on stand alone air shower detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanet, F.; Lebrun, D.; Chauvin, J.; Lagorio, E.; Stassi, P.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a self powered stand alone particle detector array dedicated to the observation of horizontal tau air showers induced by high energy neutrinos interacting in mountain rock. Air shower particle detection reaches a 100% duty cycle and is practically free of background when compared to Cherenkov light or radio techniques. It is thus better suited for rare neutrino event search. An appropriate mountain to valley topological configuration has been identified and the first array will be deployed on an inclined slope at an elevation of 1500 m facing Southern Alps near the city of Grenoble (France). A full simulation has been performed. A neutrino energy dependent mountain tomography chart is obtained using a neutrino and tau propagation code together with a detailed cartography and elevation map of the region. The array acceptance is then evaluated between 1 PeV and 100 EeV by simulating decaying tau air showers across the valley. The effective detection surface is determined by the shower lateral extension at array location and is hence much larger than the array geometrical area. The array exposure will be 1014 cm2 sr s at 100 PeV. Several independent arrays can be deployed with the aim of constituting a large distributed observatory. Some other sites are already under study. At last, special care is dedicated to the educational and outreach aspects of such a cosmic ray detector.

  4. Making a chocolate chip: development and evaluation of a 6K SNP array for Theobroma cacao

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, Donald; Royaert, Stefan; Stack, Conrad; Mockaitis, Keithanne; May, Greg; Farmer, Andrew; Saski, Christopher; Schnell, Ray; Kuhn, David; Motamayor, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Theobroma cacao, the key ingredient in chocolate production, is one of the world's most important tree fruit crops, with ∼4,000,000 metric tons produced across 50 countries. To move towards gene discovery and marker-assisted breeding in cacao, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification project was undertaken using RNAseq data from 16 diverse cacao cultivars. RNA sequences were aligned to the assembled transcriptome of the cultivar Matina 1-6, and 330,000 SNPs within coding regions were identified. From these SNPs, a subset of 6,000 high-quality SNPs were selected for inclusion on an Illumina Infinium SNP array: the Cacao6kSNP array. Using Cacao6KSNP array data from over 1,000 cacao samples, we demonstrate that our custom array produces a saturated genetic map and can be used to distinguish among even closely related genotypes. Our study enhances and expands the genetic resources available to the cacao research community, and provides the genome-scale set of tools that are critical for advancing breeding with molecular markers in an agricultural species with high genetic diversity. PMID:26070980

  5. An Ultra-High-Density, Transcript-Based, Genetic Map of Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Truco, Maria José; Ashrafi, Hamid; Kozik, Alexander; van Leeuwen, Hans; Bowers, John; Wo, Sebastian Reyes Chin; Stoffel, Kevin; Xu, Huaqin; Hill, Theresa; Van Deynze, Allen; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    We have generated an ultra-high-density genetic map for lettuce, an economically important member of the Compositae, consisting of 12,842 unigenes (13,943 markers) mapped in 3696 genetic bins distributed over nine chromosomal linkage groups. Genomic DNA was hybridized to a custom Affymetrix oligonucleotide array containing 6.4 million features representing 35,628 unigenes of Lactuca spp. Segregation of single-position polymorphisms was analyzed using 213 F7:8 recombinant inbred lines that had been generated by crossing cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola acc. US96UC23, the wild progenitor species of L. sativa. The high level of replication of each allele in the recombinant inbred lines was exploited to identify single-position polymorphisms that were assigned to parental haplotypes. Marker information has been made available using GBrowse to facilitate access to the map. This map has been anchored to the previously published integrated map of lettuce providing candidate genes for multiple phenotypes. The high density of markers achieved in this ultradense map allowed syntenic studies between lettuce and Vitis vinifera as well as other plant species. PMID:23550116

  6. An Ultra-High-Density, Transcript-Based, Genetic Map of Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Truco, Maria José; Ashrafi, Hamid; Kozik, Alexander; van Leeuwen, Hans; Bowers, John; Wo, Sebastian Reyes Chin; Stoffel, Kevin; Xu, Huaqin; Hill, Theresa; Van Deynze, Allen; Michelmore, Richard W

    2013-04-09

    We have generated an ultra-high-density genetic map for lettuce, an economically important member of the Compositae, consisting of 12,842 unigenes (13,943 markers) mapped in 3696 genetic bins distributed over nine chromosomal linkage groups. Genomic DNA was hybridized to a custom Affymetrix oligonucleotide array containing 6.4 million features representing 35,628 unigenes of Lactuca spp. Segregation of single-position polymorphisms was analyzed using 213 F 7:8 recombinant inbred lines that had been generated by crossing cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and L. serriola acc. US96UC23, the wild progenitor species of L. sativa The high level of replication of each allele in the recombinant inbred lines was exploited to identify single-position polymorphisms that were assigned to parental haplotypes. Marker information has been made available using GBrowse to facilitate access to the map. This map has been anchored to the previously published integrated map of lettuce providing candidate genes for multiple phenotypes. The high density of markers achieved in this ultradense map allowed syntenic studies between lettuce and Vitis vinifera as well as other plant species. Copyright © 2013 Truco et al.

  7. An automated mapping satellite system ( Mapsat).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colvocoresses, A.P.

    1982-01-01

    The favorable environment of space permits a satellite to orbit the Earth with very high stability as long as no local perturbing forces are involved. Solid-state linear-array sensors have no moving parts and create no perturbing force on the satellite. Digital data from highly stabilized stereo linear arrays are amenable to simplified processing to produce both planimetric imagery and elevation data. A satellite imaging system, called Mapsat, including this concept has been proposed to produce data from which automated mapping in near real time can be accomplished. Image maps as large as 1:50 000 scale with contours as close as a 20-m interval may be produced from Mapsat data. -from Author

  8. Commercial/industrial photovoltaic module and array requirement study. Low-cost solar array project engineering area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Design requirements for photovoltaic modules and arrays used in commercial and industrial applications were identified. Building codes and referenced standards were reviewed for their applicability to commercial and industrial photovoltaic array installation. Four general installation types were identified - integral (replaces roofing), direct (mounted on top of roofing), stand-off (mounted away from roofing), and rack (for flat or low slope roofs, or ground mounted). Each of the generic mounting types can be used in vertical wall mounting systems. This implies eight mounting types exist in the commercial/industrial sector. Installation costs were developed for these mounting types as a function of panel/module size. Cost drivers were identified. Studies were performed to identify optimum module shapes and sizes and operating voltage cost drivers. The general conclusion is that there are no perceived major obstacles to the use of photovoltaic modules in commercial/industrial arrays.

  9. Uncovering Spatial Variation in Acoustic Environments Using Sound Mapping.

    PubMed

    Job, Jacob R; Myers, Kyle; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Gill, Sharon A

    2016-01-01

    Animals select and use habitats based on environmental features relevant to their ecology and behavior. For animals that use acoustic communication, the sound environment itself may be a critical feature, yet acoustic characteristics are not commonly measured when describing habitats and as a result, how habitats vary acoustically over space and time is poorly known. Such considerations are timely, given worldwide increases in anthropogenic noise combined with rapidly accumulating evidence that noise hampers the ability of animals to detect and interpret natural sounds. Here, we used microphone arrays to record the sound environment in three terrestrial habitats (forest, prairie, and urban) under ambient conditions and during experimental noise introductions. We mapped sound pressure levels (SPLs) over spatial scales relevant to diverse taxa to explore spatial variation in acoustic habitats and to evaluate the number of microphones needed within arrays to capture this variation under both ambient and noisy conditions. Even at small spatial scales and over relatively short time spans, SPLs varied considerably, especially in forest and urban habitats, suggesting that quantifying and mapping acoustic features could improve habitat descriptions. Subset maps based on input from 4, 8, 12 and 16 microphones differed slightly (< 2 dBA/pixel) from those based on full arrays of 24 microphones under ambient conditions across habitats. Map differences were more pronounced with noise introductions, particularly in forests; maps made from only 4-microphones differed more (> 4 dBA/pixel) from full maps than the remaining subset maps, but maps with input from eight microphones resulted in smaller differences. Thus, acoustic environments varied over small spatial scales and variation could be mapped with input from 4-8 microphones. Mapping sound in different environments will improve understanding of acoustic environments and allow us to explore the influence of spatial variation

  10. Digital line graphs from 1:24,000-scale maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Science Information Centers (ESIC) distribute digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data flles are grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line . Graph (DLG), is line map information in digital form. These data files include information on planimetric base categories, such as transportation, hydrography, and boundaries. The second type, called a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for a number of ground positions that are usually at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data, which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as wen as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for all known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  11. Digital line graphs from 1:100,000-scale maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1989-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC) distributes digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data files may be grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line Graph (DLG), is line map information in digital form. These data files include information on planimetric base categories, such as transportation, hydrography, and boundaries. The second form, called a Digital Elevation Model (OEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for ground positions that are usually, but not always, at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data, which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as well as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  12. KinSNP software for homozygosity mapping of disease genes using SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Amir, El-Ad David; Bartal, Ofer; Morad, Efrat; Nagar, Tal; Sheynin, Jony; Parvari, Ruti; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered

    2010-08-01

    Consanguineous families affected with a recessive genetic disease caused by homozygotisation of a mutation offer a unique advantage for positional cloning of rare diseases. Homozygosity mapping of patient genotypes is a powerful technique for the identification of the genomic locus harbouring the causing mutation. This strategy relies on the observation that in these patients a large region spanning the disease locus is also homozygous with high probability. The high marker density in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays is extremely advantageous for homozygosity mapping. We present KinSNP, a user-friendly software tool for homozygosity mapping using SNP arrays. The software searches for stretches of SNPs which are homozygous to the same allele in all ascertained sick individuals. User-specified parameters control the number of allowed genotyping 'errors' within homozygous blocks. Candidate disease regions are then reported in a detailed, coloured Excel file, along with genotypes of family members and healthy controls. An interactive genome browser has been included which shows homozygous blocks, individual genotypes, genes and further annotations along the chromosomes, with zooming and scrolling capabilities. The software has been used to identify the location of a mutated gene causing insensitivity to pain in a large Bedouin family. KinSNP is freely available from.

  13. KinSNP software for homozygosity mapping of disease genes using SNP microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Consanguineous families affected with a recessive genetic disease caused by homozygotisation of a mutation offer a unique advantage for positional cloning of rare diseases. Homozygosity mapping of patient genotypes is a powerful technique for the identification of the genomic locus harbouring the causing mutation. This strategy relies on the observation that in these patients a large region spanning the disease locus is also homozygous with high probability. The high marker density in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays is extremely advantageous for homozygosity mapping. We present KinSNP, a user-friendly software tool for homozygosity mapping using SNP arrays. The software searches for stretches of SNPs which are homozygous to the same allele in all ascertained sick individuals. User-specified parameters control the number of allowed genotyping 'errors' within homozygous blocks. Candidate disease regions are then reported in a detailed, coloured Excel file, along with genotypes of family members and healthy controls. An interactive genome browser has been included which shows homozygous blocks, individual genotypes, genes and further annotations along the chromosomes, with zooming and scrolling capabilities. The software has been used to identify the location of a mutated gene causing insensitivity to pain in a large Bedouin family. KinSNP is freely available from http://bioinfo.bgu.ac.il/bsu/software/kinSNP. PMID:20846928

  14. Identifying regions of interest in medical images using self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Teng, Wei-Guang; Chang, Ping-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Advances in data acquisition, processing and visualization techniques have had a tremendous impact on medical imaging in recent years. However, the interpretation of medical images is still almost always performed by radiologists. Developments in artificial intelligence and image processing have shown the increasingly great potential of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). Nevertheless, it has remained challenging to develop a general approach to process various commonly used types of medical images (e.g., X-ray, MRI, and ultrasound images). To facilitate diagnosis, we recommend the use of image segmentation to discover regions of interest (ROI) using self-organizing maps (SOM). We devise a two-stage SOM approach that can be used to precisely identify the dominant colors of a medical image and then segment it into several small regions. In addition, by appropriately conducting the recursive merging steps to merge smaller regions into larger ones, radiologists can usually identify one or more ROIs within a medical image.

  15. Algorithms for Automatic Alignment of Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Oliker, Leonid; Schreiber, Robert; Sheffler, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories when compiling a data-parallel language for a distributed-memory machine. The mapping determines the amount of communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, followed by a distribution that maps the template to the processors. This paper describes algorithms for solving the various facets of the alignment problem: axis and stride alignment, static and mobile offset alignment, and replication labeling. We show that optimal axis and stride alignment is NP-complete for general program graphs, and give a heuristic method that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. We also show how local graph contractions can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. We show how to model the static offset alignment problem using linear programming, and we show that loop-dependent mobile offset alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance. We describe an algorithm with for determining mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself or can be used to improve performance. We describe an algorithm based on network flow that replicates objects so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication.

  16. Colorado Lightning Mapping Array Collaborations through the GOES-R Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stano, Geoffrey T.; Szoke, Edward; Rydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert; Mazur, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    For the past two years, the GOES-R Proving Ground has solicited proposals for its Visiting Scientist Program. NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has used this opportunity to support the GOES-R Proving Ground by expanding SPoRT's total lightning collaborations. In 2012, this expanded the evaluation of SPoRT's pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper product to the Aviation Weather Center and Storm Prediction Center. This year, SPoRT has collaborated with the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array (COLMA) and potential end users. In particular, SPoRT is collaborating with the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and Colorado State University (CSU) to obtain these data in real-time. From there, SPoRT is supporting the transition of these data to the local forecast offices in Boulder, Colorado and Cheyenne, Wyoming as well as to Proving Ground projects (e.g., the Hazardous Weather Testbed's Spring Program and Aviation Weather Center's Summer Experiment). This presentation will focus on the results of this particular Visiting Scientist Program trip. In particular, the COLMA data are being provided to both forecast offices for initial familiarization. Additionally, several forecast issues have been highlighted as important uses for COLMA data in the operational environment. These include the utility of these data for fire weather situations, situational awareness for both severe weather and lightning safety, and formal evaluations to take place in the spring of 2014.

  17. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients. To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p < 0.05). Next, SEC-MAP was applied to examine 57 diagnostic samples from patients with acute leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation. In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences

  18. Mapping and characterization of the amplicon near APOA2 in 1q23 in human sarcomas by FISH and array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Kresse, Stine H; Berner, Jeanne-Marie; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Gregory, Simon G; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W; Forus, Anne; Myklebost, Ola

    2005-01-01

    Background Amplification of the q21-q23 region on chromosome 1 is frequently found in sarcomas and a variety of other solid tumours. Previous analyses of sarcomas have indicated the presence of at least two separate amplicons within this region, one located in 1q21 and one located near the apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) gene in 1q23. In this study we have mapped and characterized the amplicon in 1q23 in more detail. Results We have used fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) to map and define the borders of the amplicon in 10 sarcomas. A subregion of approximately 800 kb was identified as the core of the amplicon. The amplification patterns of nine possible candidate target genes located to this subregion were determined by Southern blot analysis. The genes activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and dual specificity phosphatase 12 (DUSP12) showed the highest level of amplification, and they were also shown to be over-expressed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In general, the level of expression reflected the level of amplification in the different tumours. DUSP12 was expressed significantly higher than ATF6 in a subset of the tumours. In addition, two genes known to be transcriptionally activated by ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa and -94 kDa (GRP78 and GRP94), were shown to be over-expressed in the tumours that showed over-expression of ATF6. Conclusion ATF6 and DUSP12 seem to be the most likely candidate target genes for the 1q23 amplification in sarcomas. Both genes have possible roles in promoting cell growth, which makes them interesting candidate targets. PMID:16274472

  19. Mapping and characterization of the amplicon near APOA2 in 1q23 in human sarcomas by FISH and array CGH.

    PubMed

    Kresse, Stine H; Berner, Jeanne-Marie; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Gregory, Simon G; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gray, Joe W; Forus, Anne; Myklebost, Ola

    2005-11-07

    Amplification of the q21-q23 region on chromosome 1 is frequently found in sarcomas and a variety of other solid tumours. Previous analyses of sarcomas have indicated the presence of at least two separate amplicons within this region, one located in 1q21 and one located near the apolipoprotein A-II (APOA2) gene in 1q23. In this study we have mapped and characterized the amplicon in 1q23 in more detail. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH) to map and define the borders of the amplicon in 10 sarcomas. A subregion of approximately 800 kb was identified as the core of the amplicon. The amplification patterns of nine possible candidate target genes located to this subregion were determined by Southern blot analysis. The genes activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and dual specificity phosphatase 12 (DUSP12) showed the highest level of amplification, and they were also shown to be over-expressed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In general, the level of expression reflected the level of amplification in the different tumours. DUSP12 was expressed significantly higher than ATF6 in a subset of the tumours. In addition, two genes known to be transcriptionally activated by ATF6, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa and -94 kDa (GRP78 and GRP94), were shown to be over-expressed in the tumours that showed over-expression of ATF6. ATF6 and DUSP12 seem to be the most likely candidate target genes for the 1q23 amplification in sarcomas. Both genes have possible roles in promoting cell growth, which makes them interesting candidate targets.

  20. Construction and Annotation of a High Density SNP Linkage Map of the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Genome.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsin Y; Robledo, Diego; Lowe, Natalie R; Bekaert, Michael; Taggart, John B; Bron, James E; Houston, Ross D

    2016-07-07

    High density linkage maps are useful tools for fine-scale mapping of quantitative trait loci, and characterization of the recombination landscape of a species' genome. Genomic resources for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) include a well-assembled reference genome, and high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Our aim was to create a high density linkage map, and to align it with the reference genome assembly. Over 96,000 SNPs were mapped and ordered on the 29 salmon linkage groups using a pedigreed population comprising 622 fish from 60 nuclear families, all genotyped with the 'ssalar01' high density SNP array. The number of SNPs per group showed a high positive correlation with physical chromosome length (r = 0.95). While the order of markers on the genetic and physical maps was generally consistent, areas of discrepancy were identified. Approximately 6.5% of the previously unmapped reference genome sequence was assigned to chromosomes using the linkage map. Male recombination rate was lower than females across the vast majority of the genome, but with a notable peak in subtelomeric regions. Finally, using RNA-Seq data to annotate the reference genome, the mapped SNPs were categorized according to their predicted function, including annotation of ∼2500 putative nonsynonymous variants. The highest density SNP linkage map for any salmonid species has been created, annotated, and integrated with the Atlantic salmon reference genome assembly. This map highlights the marked heterochiasmy of salmon, and provides a useful resource for salmonid genetics and genomics research. Copyright © 2016 Tsai et al.

  1. Genome-wide mapping of virulence in brown planthopper identifies loci that break down host plant resistance.

    PubMed

    Jing, Shengli; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Yinhua; Liu, Bingfang; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Hangjin; Zhou, Xi; Qin, Rui; Zhu, Lili; He, Guangcun

    2014-01-01

    Insects and plants have coexisted for over 350 million years and their interactions have affected ecosystems and agricultural practices worldwide. Variation in herbivorous insects' virulence to circumvent host resistance has been extensively documented. However, despite decades of investigation, the genetic foundations of virulence are currently unknown. The brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) is the most destructive rice (Oryza sativa) pest in the world. The identification of the resistance gene Bph1 and its introduction in commercial rice varieties prompted the emergence of a new virulent brown planthopper biotype that was able to break the resistance conferred by Bph1. In this study, we aimed to construct a high density linkage map for the brown planthopper and identify the loci responsible for its virulence in order to determine their genetic architecture. Based on genotyping data for hundreds of molecular markers in three mapping populations, we constructed the most comprehensive linkage map available for this species, covering 96.6% of its genome. Fifteen chromosomes were anchored with 124 gene-specific markers. Using genome-wide scanning and interval mapping, the Qhp7 locus that governs preference for Bph1 plants was mapped to a 0.1 cM region of chromosome 7. In addition, two major QTLs that govern the rate of insect growth on resistant rice plants were identified on chromosomes 5 (Qgr5) and 14 (Qgr14). This is the first study to successfully locate virulence in the genome of this important agricultural insect by marker-based genetic mapping. Our results show that the virulence which overcomes the resistance conferred by Bph1 is controlled by a few major genes and that the components of virulence originate from independent genetic characters. The isolation of these loci will enable the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the rice-brown planthopper interaction and facilitate the development of durable approaches for controlling this most

  2. Genome-Wide Mapping of Virulence in Brown Planthopper Identifies Loci That Break Down Host Plant Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Shengli; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Yinhua; Liu, Bingfang; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Hangjin; Zhou, Xi; Qin, Rui; Zhu, Lili; He, Guangcun

    2014-01-01

    Insects and plants have coexisted for over 350 million years and their interactions have affected ecosystems and agricultural practices worldwide. Variation in herbivorous insects' virulence to circumvent host resistance has been extensively documented. However, despite decades of investigation, the genetic foundations of virulence are currently unknown. The brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) is the most destructive rice (Oryza sativa) pest in the world. The identification of the resistance gene Bph1 and its introduction in commercial rice varieties prompted the emergence of a new virulent brown planthopper biotype that was able to break the resistance conferred by Bph1. In this study, we aimed to construct a high density linkage map for the brown planthopper and identify the loci responsible for its virulence in order to determine their genetic architecture. Based on genotyping data for hundreds of molecular markers in three mapping populations, we constructed the most comprehensive linkage map available for this species, covering 96.6% of its genome. Fifteen chromosomes were anchored with 124 gene-specific markers. Using genome-wide scanning and interval mapping, the Qhp7 locus that governs preference for Bph1 plants was mapped to a 0.1 cM region of chromosome 7. In addition, two major QTLs that govern the rate of insect growth on resistant rice plants were identified on chromosomes 5 (Qgr5) and 14 (Qgr14). This is the first study to successfully locate virulence in the genome of this important agricultural insect by marker-based genetic mapping. Our results show that the virulence which overcomes the resistance conferred by Bph1 is controlled by a few major genes and that the components of virulence originate from independent genetic characters. The isolation of these loci will enable the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underpinning the rice-brown planthopper interaction and facilitate the development of durable approaches for controlling this most

  3. Concept mapping-An effective method for identifying diversity and congruity in cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Jablokow, Kathryn; Rosas, Scott R; Wopereis, Iwan G J H; Kirschner, Paul A

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of cognitive style for decision making on the behaviour of participants in different phases of the group concept mapping process (GCM). It is argued that cognitive style should be included directly in the coordination of the GCM process and not simply considered as yet another demographic variable. The cognitive styles were identified using the Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory, which locates each person's style on a continuum ranging from very adaptive to very innovative. Cognitive style could explain diversity in the participants' behaviour in different phases of the GCM process. At the same time, the concept map as a group's common cognitive construct can consolidate individual differences and serves as a tool for managing diversity in groups of participants. Some of the results were that: (a) the more adaptive participants generated ideas that fit to a particular, well-established and consensually agreed paradigm, frame of reference, theory or practice; (b) the more innovative participants produced ideas that were more general in scope and required changing a settled structure (paradigm, frame of reference, theory or practice); and (c) the empirical comparison of the map configurations through Procrustes analysis indicated a strong dissimilarity between cognitive styles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. SoundCompass: A Distributed MEMS Microphone Array-Based Sensor for Sound Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    Tiete, Jelmer; Domínguez, Federico; da Silva, Bruno; Segers, Laurent; Steenhaut, Kris; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA). This article presents the SoundCompass’s hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field. PMID:24463431

  5. Development of an Infrared Lamp Array for the Smap Spacecraft Thermal Balance Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Emis, Nickolas; Forgette, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    NASA launched the SMAP observatory in January 2015 aboard a Delta II into a sun-synchronous orbit around Earth. The science payload of a radar and a radiometer utilizes a shared rotating six-meter antenna to provide a global map of the Earth's soil moisture content and its freeze/thaw state on a global, high-resolution scale in this three-year mission. An observatory-level thermal balance test conducted in May/June 2014 validated the thermal design and demonstrated launch readiness as part of the planned environmental test campaign. An infrared lamp array was designed and used in the thermal balance test to replicate solar heating on the solar array and sunlit side of the spacecraft that would normally be seen in orbit. The design, implementation, and operation of an infrared lamp array used for this nineteen-day system thermal test are described in this paper. Instrumental to the smooth operation of this lamp array was a characterization test performed in the same chamber two months prior to the observatory test to provide insight into its array operation and flux uniformity. This knowledge was used to identify the lamp array power settings that would provide the worst case predicted on-orbit fluxes during eclipse, cold, and hot cases. It also showed the lamp array variation when adjustments in flux were needed. Calorimeters calibrated prior to testing determined a relationship between calorimeter temperature and lamp array flux. This allowed the team to adjust the lamp output for the desired absorbed flux on the solar array. Flux levels were within 10% of the desired value at the center of the solar array with an ability to maintain these levels within 5% during steady state cases. All tests demonstrated the infrared lamp array functionality and furthered lamp array understanding for modeling purposes. This method contributed to a high-fidelity environmental simulation, which was required to replicate the extreme on-orbit thermal environments.

  6. Digital Mapping of Buried Pipelines with a Dual Array System

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2005-03-01

    The project carried out under this agreement, which was informally called the "Dual Array Project" (the term we will use in this report), was part of the research efforts at the Office of Pipeline Safety at U.S. DOT, and was one of seven contracts aw...

  7. An Ultrasonic Wheel-Array Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, B. W.; Brotherhood, C. J.; Freemantle, R. J.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the development and modeling of an ultrasonic array wheel probe scanning system. The system operates at 10 MHz using a 64 element array transducer which is 50 mm in length and located in a fluid filled wheel. The wheel is coupled to the test structure dry, or with a small amount of liquid couplant. When the wheel is rolled over the surface of the test structure a defect map (C-Scan) is generated in real-time. The tyre is made from a soft, durable polymer which has very little acoustic loss. Two application studies are presented; the inspection of sealant layers in an aluminum aircraft wing structure and the detection of embedded defects in a thick section carbon composite sample.

  8. A System and Method for Online High-Resolution Mapping of Gastric Slow-Wave Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Simon H.; O’Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution (HR) mapping employs multielectrode arrays to achieve spatially detailed analyses of propagating bioelectrical events. A major current limitation is that spatial analyses must currently be performed “off-line” (after experiments), compromising timely recording feedback and restricting experimental interventions. These problems motivated development of a system and method for “online” HR mapping. HR gastric recordings were acquired and streamed to a novel software client. Algorithms were devised to filter data, identify slow-wave events, eliminate corrupt channels, and cluster activation events. A graphical user interface animated data and plotted electrograms and maps. Results were compared against off-line methods. The online system analyzed 256-channel serosal recordings with no unexpected system terminations with a mean delay 18 s. Activation time marking sensitivity was 0.92; positive predictive value was 0.93. Abnormal slow-wave patterns including conduction blocks, ectopic pacemaking, and colliding wave fronts were reliably identified. Compared to traditional analysis methods, online mapping had comparable results with equivalent coverage of 90% of electrodes, average RMS errors of less than 1 s, and CC of activation maps of 0.99. Accurate slow-wave mapping was achieved in near real-time, enabling monitoring of recording quality and experimental interventions targeted to dysrhythmic onset. This work also advances the translation of HR mapping toward real-time clinical application. PMID:24860024

  9. A system and method for online high-resolution mapping of gastric slow-wave activity.

    PubMed

    Bull, Simon H; O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Cheng, Leo K

    2014-11-01

    High-resolution (HR) mapping employs multielectrode arrays to achieve spatially detailed analyses of propagating bioelectrical events. A major current limitation is that spatial analyses must currently be performed "off-line" (after experiments), compromising timely recording feedback and restricting experimental interventions. These problems motivated development of a system and method for "online" HR mapping. HR gastric recordings were acquired and streamed to a novel software client. Algorithms were devised to filter data, identify slow-wave events, eliminate corrupt channels, and cluster activation events. A graphical user interface animated data and plotted electrograms and maps. Results were compared against off-line methods. The online system analyzed 256-channel serosal recordings with no unexpected system terminations with a mean delay 18 s. Activation time marking sensitivity was 0.92; positive predictive value was 0.93. Abnormal slow-wave patterns including conduction blocks, ectopic pacemaking, and colliding wave fronts were reliably identified. Compared to traditional analysis methods, online mapping had comparable results with equivalent coverage of 90% of electrodes, average RMS errors of less than 1 s, and CC of activation maps of 0.99. Accurate slow-wave mapping was achieved in near real-time, enabling monitoring of recording quality and experimental interventions targeted to dysrhythmic onset. This work also advances the translation of HR mapping toward real-time clinical application.

  10. Fine mapping of regulatory loci for mammalian gene expression using radiation hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Park, Christopher C; Ahn, Sangtae; Bloom, Joshua S; Lin, Andy; Wang, Richard T; Wu, Tongtong; Sekar, Aswin; Khan, Arshad H; Farr, Christine J; Lusis, Aldons J; Leahy, Richard M; Lange, Kenneth; Smith, Desmond J

    2010-01-01

    We mapped regulatory loci for nearly all protein-coding genes in mammals using comparative genomic hybridization and expression array measurements from a panel of mouse–hamster radiation hybrid cell lines. The large number of breaks in the mouse chromosomes and the dense genotyping of the panel allowed extremely sharp mapping of loci. As the regulatory loci result from extra gene dosage, we call them copy number expression quantitative trait loci, or ceQTLs. The −2log10P support interval for the ceQTLs was <150 kb, containing an average of <2–3 genes. We identified 29,769 trans ceQTLs with −log10P > 4, including 13 hotspots each regulating >100 genes in trans. Further, this work identifies 2,761 trans ceQTLs harboring no known genes, and provides evidence for a mode of gene expression autoregulation specific to the X chromosome. PMID:18362883

  11. Measurement of Phased Array Point Spread Functions for Use with Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Chris; Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Bertolucci, Brandon; Woolwine, Kyle; Liu, Fei; Li, Juan; Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Microphone arrays can be used to localize and estimate the strengths of acoustic sources present in a region of interest. However, the array measurement of a region, or beam map, is not an accurate representation of the acoustic field in that region. The true acoustic field is convolved with the array s sampling response, or point spread function (PSF). Many techniques exist to remove the PSF's effect on the beam map via deconvolution. Currently these methods use a theoretical estimate of the array point spread function and perhaps account for installation offsets via determination of the microphone locations. This methodology fails to account for any reflections or scattering in the measurement setup and still requires both microphone magnitude and phase calibration, as well as a separate shear layer correction in an open-jet facility. The research presented seeks to investigate direct measurement of the array's PSF using a non-intrusive acoustic point source generated by a pulsed laser system. Experimental PSFs of the array are computed for different conditions to evaluate features such as shift-invariance, shear layers and model presence. Results show that experimental measurements trend with theory with regard to source offset. The source shows expected behavior due to shear layer refraction when observed in a flow, and application of a measured PSF to NACA 0012 aeroacoustic trailing-edge noise data shows a promising alternative to a classic shear layer correction method.

  12. Identifying Multi-Level Culturally Appropriate Smoking Cessation Strategies for Aboriginal Health Staff: A Concept Mapping Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Anna P.; Cargo, Margaret; Stewart, Harold; Chong, Alwin; Daniel, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Aboriginal Australians, including Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs), smoke at rates double the non-Aboriginal population. This study utilized concept mapping methodology to identify and prioritize culturally relevant strategies to promote smoking cessation in AHWs. Stakeholder participants included AHWs, other health service employees and tobacco…

  13. Mission-Oriented Sensor Arrays and UAVs - a Case Study on Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, N. M.; Freire, I. L.; Trindade, O.; Simões, E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new concept of UAV mission design in geomatics, applied to the generation of thematic maps for a multitude of civilian and military applications. We discuss the architecture of Mission-Oriented Sensors Arrays (MOSA), proposed in Figueira et Al. (2013), aimed at splitting and decoupling the mission-oriented part of the system (non safety-critical hardware and software) from the aircraft control systems (safety-critical). As a case study, we present an environmental monitoring application for the automatic generation of thematic maps to track gunshot activity in conservation areas. The MOSA modeled for this application integrates information from a thermal camera and an on-the-ground microphone array. The use of microphone arrays technology is of particular interest in this paper. These arrays allow estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) of the incoming sound waves. Information about events of interest is obtained by the fusion of the data provided by the microphone array, captured by the UAV, fused with information from the termal image processing. Preliminary results show the feasibility of the on-the-ground sound processing array and the simulation of the main processing module, to be embedded into an UAV in a future work. The main contributions of this paper are the proposed MOSA system, including concepts, models and architecture.

  14. A combinatorial approach of comprehensive QTL-based comparative genome mapping and transcript profiling identified a seed weight-regulating candidate gene in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Khan, Yusuf; Das, Shouvik; Badoni, Saurabh; Shree, Tanima; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C. L. L.; Singh, Sube; Sharma, Shivali; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Chattopdhyay, Debasis; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    High experimental validation/genotyping success rate (94–96%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (82–96%) of 1536 SNP and 472 SSR markers showing in silico polymorphism between desi ICC 4958 and kabuli ICC 12968 chickpea was obtained in a 190 mapping population (ICC 4958 × ICC 12968) and 92 diverse desi and kabuli genotypes. A high-density 2001 marker-based intra-specific genetic linkage map comprising of eight LGs constructed is comparatively much saturated (mean map-density: 0.94 cM) in contrast to existing intra-specific genetic maps in chickpea. Fifteen robust QTLs (PVE: 8.8–25.8% with LOD: 7.0–13.8) associated with pod and seed number/plant (PN and SN) and 100 seed weight (SW) were identified and mapped on 10 major genomic regions of eight LGs. One of 126.8 kb major genomic region harbouring a strong SW-associated robust QTL (Caq'SW1.1: 169.1–171.3 cM) has been delineated by integrating high-resolution QTL mapping with comprehensive marker-based comparative genome mapping and differential expression profiling. This identified one potential regulatory SNP (G/A) in the cis-acting element of candidate ERF (ethylene responsive factor) TF (transcription factor) gene governing seed weight in chickpea. The functionally relevant molecular tags identified have potential to be utilized for marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:25786576

  15. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-04-05

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  16. Gene-Based Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers for Genetic and Association Mapping in Common Bean

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In common bean, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are an underestimated source of gene-based markers such as insertion-deletions (Indels) or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, due to the nature of these conserved sequences, detection of markers is difficult and portrays low levels of polymorphism. Therefore, development of intron-spanning EST-SNP markers can be a valuable resource for genetic experiments such as genetic mapping and association studies. Results In this study, a total of 313 new gene-based markers were developed at target genes. Intronic variation was deeply explored in order to capture more polymorphism. Introns were putatively identified after comparing the common bean ESTs with the soybean genome, and the primers were designed over intron-flanking regions. The intronic regions were evaluated for parental polymorphisms using the single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique and Sequenom MassARRAY system. A total of 53 new marker loci were placed on an integrated molecular map in the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. The new linkage map was used to build a consensus map, merging the linkage maps of the BAT93 × JALO EEP558 and DOR364 × BAT477 populations. A total of 1,060 markers were mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. As a second application of the generated resource, a diversity panel with 93 genotypes was evaluated with 173 SNP markers using the MassARRAY-platform and KASPar technology. These results were coupled with previous SSR evaluations and drought tolerance assays carried out on the same individuals. This agglomerative dataset was examined, in order to discover marker-trait associations, using general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM). Some significant associations with yield components were identified, and were consistent with previous findings. Conclusions In short, this study illustrates the power of intron

  17. Visualizing the Logistic Map with a Microcontroller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serna, Juan D.; Joshi, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    The logistic map is one of the simplest nonlinear dynamical systems that clearly exhibits the route to chaos. In this paper, we explore the evolution of the logistic map using an open-source microcontroller connected to an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We divide the one-dimensional domain interval [0,1] into ten equal parts, an associate…

  18. A Novel Imaging Technique (X-Map) to Identify Acute Ischemic Lesions Using Noncontrast Dual-Energy Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kyo; Itoh, Toshihide; Naruto, Norihito; Takashima, Shutaro; Tanaka, Kortaro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether X-map, a novel imaging technique, can visualize ischemic lesions within 20 hours after the onset in patients with acute ischemic stroke, using noncontrast dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). Six patients with acute ischemic stroke were included in this study. Noncontrast head DECT scans were acquired with 2 X-ray tubes operated at 80 kV and Sn150 kV between 32 minutes and 20 hours after the onset. Using these DECT scans, the X-map was reconstructed based on 3-material decomposition and compared with a simulated standard (120 kV) computed tomography (CT) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The X-map showed more sensitivity to identify the lesions as an area of lower attenuation value than a simulated standard CT in all 6 patients. The lesions on the X-map correlated well with those on DWI. In 3 of 6 patients, the X-map detected a transient decrease in the attenuation value in the peri-infarct area within 1 day after the onset. The X-map is a powerful tool to supplement a simulated standard CT and characterize acute ischemic lesions. However, the X-map cannot replace a simulated standard CT to diagnose acute cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlated Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and Radar Observations of the Initial Stages of Florida Triggered Lightning Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J.; Uman, M, A.; Jordan, D. M.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Rison, W.; Blakeslee, R.

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the geometrical and electrical characteristics of the initial stages of nine Florida triggered lightning discharges using a Lightning Mapping Array (LMA), a C-band SMART radar, and measured channel-base currents. We determine initial channel and subsequent branch lengths, average initial channel and branch propagation speeds, and channel-base current at the time of each branch initiation. The channel-base current is found to not change significantly when branching occurs, an unexpected result. The initial stage of Florida triggered lightning typically transitions from vertical to horizontal propagation at altitudes of 3-6 km, near the typical 0 C level of 4-5 km and several kilometers below the expected center of the negative cloud-charge region at 7-8 km. The data presented potentially provide information on thunderstorm electrical and hydrometeor structure and discharge propagation physics. LMA source locations were obtained from VHF sources of positive impulsive currents as small as 10 A, in contrast to expectations found in the literature.

  20. The data array, a tool to interface the user to a large data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects of the processing of spacecraft data is considered. Use of the data array in a large address space as an intermediate form in data processing for a large scientific data base is advocated. Techniques for efficient indexing in data arrays are reviewed and the data array method for mapping an arbitrary structure onto linear address space is shown. A compromise between the two forms is given. The impact of the data array on the user interface are considered along with implementation.

  1. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    An advanced, universally-mountable, integrated residential photovoltaic array concept was defined based upon an in-depth formulation and evaluation of three candidate approaches which were synthesized from existing or proposed residential array concepts. The impact of module circuitry and process sequence is considered and technology gaps and performance drivers associated with residential photovoltaic array concepts are identified. The actual learning experience gained from the comparison of the problem areas of the hexagonal shingle design with the rectangular module design led to what is considered an advanced array concept. Building the laboratory mockup provided actual experience and the opportunity to uncover additional technology gaps.

  2. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, universally-mountable, integrated residential photovoltaic array concept was defined based upon an in-depth formulation and evaluation of three candidate approaches which were synthesized from existing or proposed residential array concepts. The impact of module circuitry and process sequence is considered and technology gaps and performance drivers associated with residential photovoltaic array concepts are identified. The actual learning experience gained from the comparison of the problem areas of the hexagonal shingle design with the rectangular module design led to what is considered an advanced array concept. Building the laboratory mockup provided actual experience and the opportunity to uncover additional technology gaps.

  3. The Use of AIS Data for Identifying and Mapping Calcareous Soils in Western Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    The identification of calcareous soils, through unique spectral responses of the vegetation to the chemical nature of calcareous soils, can improve the accuracy of delineating the boundaries of soil mapping units over conventional field techniques. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the use of the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) in the identification and delineation of calcareous soils in the western Sandhills of Nebraska. Based upon statistical differences found in separating the spectral curves below 1.3 microns, calcareous and non-calcareous soils may be identified by differences in species of vegetation. Additional work is needed to identify biogeochemical differences between the two soils.

  4. Superconducting micro-resonator arrays with ideal frequency spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Guo, W.; Wang, Y.; Dai, M.; Wei, L. F.; Dober, B.; McKenney, C. M.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubmayr, J.; Austermann, J. E.; Ullom, J. N.; Gao, J.; Vissers, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    We present a wafer trimming technique for producing superconducting micro-resonator arrays with highly uniform frequency spacing. With the light-emitting diode mapper technique demonstrated previously, we first map the measured resonance frequencies to the physical resonators. Then, we fine-tune each resonator's frequency by lithographically trimming a small length, calculated from the deviation of the measured frequency from its design value, from the interdigitated capacitor. We demonstrate this technique on a 127-resonator array made from titanium-nitride and show that the uniformity of frequency spacing is greatly improved. The array yield in terms of frequency collisions improves from 84% to 97%, while the quality factors and noise properties are unaffected. The wafer trimming technique provides an easy-to-implement tool to improve the yield and multiplexing density of large resonator arrays, which is important for various applications in photon detection and quantum computing.

  5. High-density functional-RNA arrays as a versatile platform for studying RNA-based interactions.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jack O; Butt, Louise E; Henderson, Charlotte A; Devonshire, Martin; Healy, Jess; Conway, Stuart J; Locker, Nicolas; Pickford, Andrew R; Vincent, Helen A; Callaghan, Anastasia J

    2018-05-28

    We are just beginning to unravel the myriad of interactions in which non-coding RNAs participate. The intricate RNA interactome is the foundation of many biological processes, including bacterial virulence and human disease, and represents unexploited resources for the development of potential therapeutic interventions. However, identifying specific associations of a given RNA from the multitude of possible binding partners within the cell requires robust high-throughput systems for their rapid screening. Here, we present the first demonstration of functional-RNA arrays as a novel platform technology designed for the study of such interactions using immobilized, active RNAs. We have generated high-density RNA arrays by an innovative method involving surface-capture of in vitro transcribed RNAs. This approach has significant advantages over existing technologies, particularly in its versatility in regards to binding partner character. Indeed, proof-of-principle application of RNA arrays to both RNA-small molecule and RNA-RNA pairings is demonstrated, highlighting their potential as a platform technology for mapping RNA-based networks and for pharmaceutical screening. Furthermore, the simplicity of the method supports greater user-accessibility over currently available technologies. We anticipate that functional-RNA arrays will find broad utility in the expanding field of RNA characterization.

  6. Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO 2 . This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network TM (NLDN) is also employed. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the LMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting raw NOx profiles are discussed.

  7. Estimates of the Lightning NOx Profile in the Vicinity of the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Peterson, Harold S.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Blazar, Arastoo

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to August 2006 North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) data to estimate the (unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical source profile of lightning nitrogen oxides, NOx = NO + NO2. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (Trademark) (NLDN) is also employed. This is part of a larger effort aimed at building a more realistic lightning NOx emissions inventory for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Overall, special attention is given to several important lightning variables including: the frequency and geographical distribution of lightning in the vicinity of the NALMA network, lightning type (ground or cloud flash), lightning channel length, channel altitude, channel peak current, and the number of strokes per flash. Laboratory spark chamber results from the literature are used to convert 1-meter channel segments (that are located at a particular known altitude; i.e., air density) to NOx concentration. The resulting lightning NOx source profiles are discussed.

  8. Making a chocolate chip: development and evaluation of a 6K SNP array for Theobroma cacao.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Donald; Royaert, Stefan; Stack, Conrad; Mockaitis, Keithanne; May, Greg; Farmer, Andrew; Saski, Christopher; Schnell, Ray; Kuhn, David; Motamayor, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Theobroma cacao, the key ingredient in chocolate production, is one of the world's most important tree fruit crops, with ∼4,000,000 metric tons produced across 50 countries. To move towards gene discovery and marker-assisted breeding in cacao, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) identification project was undertaken using RNAseq data from 16 diverse cacao cultivars. RNA sequences were aligned to the assembled transcriptome of the cultivar Matina 1-6, and 330,000 SNPs within coding regions were identified. From these SNPs, a subset of 6,000 high-quality SNPs were selected for inclusion on an Illumina Infinium SNP array: the Cacao6kSNP array. Using Cacao6KSNP array data from over 1,000 cacao samples, we demonstrate that our custom array produces a saturated genetic map and can be used to distinguish among even closely related genotypes. Our study enhances and expands the genetic resources available to the cacao research community, and provides the genome-scale set of tools that are critical for advancing breeding with molecular markers in an agricultural species with high genetic diversity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  9. Exome Array Analysis Identifies a Common Variant in IL27 Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Margaret M.; Chen, Han; Lao, Taotao; Hardin, Megan; Qiao, Dandi; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Castaldi, Peter J.; Hersh, Craig P.; Morrow, Jarrett; Celli, Bartolome R.; Pinto-Plata, Victor M.; Criner, Gerald J.; Marchetti, Nathaniel; Bueno, Raphael; Agustí, Alvar; Make, Barry J.; Crapo, James D.; Calverley, Peter M.; Donner, Claudio F.; Lomas, David A.; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Vestbo, Jorgen; Paré, Peter D.; Levy, Robert D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Laird, Nan M.; Lin, Xihong; Beaty, Terri H.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility is in part related to genetic variants. Most genetic studies have been focused on genome-wide common variants without a specific focus on coding variants, but common and rare coding variants may also affect COPD susceptibility. Objectives: To identify coding variants associated with COPD. Methods: We tested nonsynonymous, splice, and stop variants derived from the Illumina HumanExome array for association with COPD in five study populations enriched for COPD. We evaluated single variants with a minor allele frequency greater than 0.5% using logistic regression. Results were combined using a fixed effects meta-analysis. We replicated novel single-variant associations in three additional COPD cohorts. Measurements and Main Results: We included 6,004 control subjects and 6,161 COPD cases across five cohorts for analysis. Our top result was rs16969968 (P = 1.7 × 10−14) in CHRNA5, a locus previously associated with COPD susceptibility and nicotine dependence. Additional top results were found in AGER, MMP3, and SERPINA1. A nonsynonymous variant, rs181206, in IL27 (P = 4.7 × 10−6) was just below the level of exome-wide significance but attained exome-wide significance (P = 5.7 × 10−8) when combined with results from other cohorts. Gene expression datasets revealed an association of rs181206 and the surrounding locus with expression of multiple genes; several were differentially expressed in COPD lung tissue, including TUFM. Conclusions: In an exome array analysis of COPD, we identified nonsynonymous variants at previously described loci and a novel exome-wide significant variant in IL27. This variant is at a locus previously described in genome-wide associations with diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and obesity and appears to affect genes potentially related to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:26771213

  10. Computational Prediction and Experimental Verification of New MAP Kinase Docking Sites and Substrates Including Gli Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Whisenant, Thomas C.; Ho, David T.; Benz, Ryan W.; Rogers, Jeffrey S.; Kaake, Robyn M.; Gordon, Elizabeth A.; Huang, Lan; Baldi, Pierre; Bardwell, Lee

    2010-01-01

    In order to fully understand protein kinase networks, new methods are needed to identify regulators and substrates of kinases, especially for weakly expressed proteins. Here we have developed a hybrid computational search algorithm that combines machine learning and expert knowledge to identify kinase docking sites, and used this algorithm to search the human genome for novel MAP kinase substrates and regulators focused on the JNK family of MAP kinases. Predictions were tested by peptide array followed by rigorous biochemical verification with in vitro binding and kinase assays on wild-type and mutant proteins. Using this procedure, we found new ‘D-site’ class docking sites in previously known JNK substrates (hnRNP-K, PPM1J/PP2Czeta), as well as new JNK-interacting proteins (MLL4, NEIL1). Finally, we identified new D-site-dependent MAPK substrates, including the hedgehog-regulated transcription factors Gli1 and Gli3, suggesting that a direct connection between MAP kinase and hedgehog signaling may occur at the level of these key regulators. These results demonstrate that a genome-wide search for MAP kinase docking sites can be used to find new docking sites and substrates. PMID:20865152

  11. Manycore Performance-Portability: Kokkos Multidimensional Array Library

    DOE PAGES

    Edwards, H. Carter; Sunderland, Daniel; Porter, Vicki; ...

    2012-01-01

    Large, complex scientific and engineering application code have a significant investment in computational kernels to implement their mathematical models. Porting these computational kernels to the collection of modern manycore accelerator devices is a major challenge in that these devices have diverse programming models, application programming interfaces (APIs), and performance requirements. The Kokkos Array programming model provides library-based approach to implement computational kernels that are performance-portable to CPU-multicore and GPGPU accelerator devices. This programming model is based upon three fundamental concepts: (1) manycore compute devices each with its own memory space, (2) data parallel kernels and (3) multidimensional arrays. Kernel executionmore » performance is, especially for NVIDIA® devices, extremely dependent on data access patterns. Optimal data access pattern can be different for different manycore devices – potentially leading to different implementations of computational kernels specialized for different devices. The Kokkos Array programming model supports performance-portable kernels by (1) separating data access patterns from computational kernels through a multidimensional array API and (2) introduce device-specific data access mappings when a kernel is compiled. An implementation of Kokkos Array is available through Trilinos [Trilinos website, http://trilinos.sandia.gov/, August 2011].« less

  12. WebArray: an online platform for microarray data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaoqin; McClelland, Michael; Wang, Yipeng

    2005-01-01

    Background Many cutting-edge microarray analysis tools and algorithms, including commonly used limma and affy packages in Bioconductor, need sophisticated knowledge of mathematics, statistics and computer skills for implementation. Commercially available software can provide a user-friendly interface at considerable cost. To facilitate the use of these tools for microarray data analysis on an open platform we developed an online microarray data analysis platform, WebArray, for bench biologists to utilize these tools to explore data from single/dual color microarray experiments. Results The currently implemented functions were based on limma and affy package from Bioconductor, the spacings LOESS histogram (SPLOSH) method, PCA-assisted normalization method and genome mapping method. WebArray incorporates these packages and provides a user-friendly interface for accessing a wide range of key functions of limma and others, such as spot quality weight, background correction, graphical plotting, normalization, linear modeling, empirical bayes statistical analysis, false discovery rate (FDR) estimation, chromosomal mapping for genome comparison. Conclusion WebArray offers a convenient platform for bench biologists to access several cutting-edge microarray data analysis tools. The website is freely available at . It runs on a Linux server with Apache and MySQL. PMID:16371165

  13. Spatial mapping and statistical reproducibility of an array of 256 one-dimensional quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Taie, H.; Smith, L. W.; Lesage, A. A. J.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-08-01

    We utilize a multiplexing architecture to measure the conductance properties of an array of 256 split gates. We investigate the reproducibility of the pinch off and one-dimensional definition voltage as a function of spatial location on two different cooldowns, and after illuminating the device. The reproducibility of both these properties on the two cooldowns is high, the result of the density of the two-dimensional electron gas returning to a similar state after thermal cycling. The spatial variation of the pinch-off voltage reduces after illumination; however, the variation of the one-dimensional definition voltage increases due to an anomalous feature in the center of the array. A technique which quantifies the homogeneity of split-gate properties across the array is developed which captures the experimentally observed trends. In addition, the one-dimensional definition voltage is used to probe the density of the wafer at each split gate in the array on a micron scale using a capacitive model.

  14. A consensus linkage map for molecular markers and Quantitative Trait Loci associated with economically important traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of molecular marker linkage maps have been developed for melon (Cucumis melo L.) over the last two decades. However, these maps were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making comparative analysis among maps difficult. In order to solve this problem, a consensus genetic map in melon was constructed using primarily highly transferable anchor markers that have broad potential use for mapping, synteny, and comparative quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, increasing breeding effectiveness and efficiency via marker-assisted selection (MAS). Results Under the framework of the International Cucurbit Genomics Initiative (ICuGI, http://www.icugi.org), an integrated genetic map has been constructed by merging data from eight independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines. The consensus map spans 1150 cM across the 12 melon linkage groups and is composed of 1592 markers (640 SSRs, 330 SNPs, 252 AFLPs, 239 RFLPs, 89 RAPDs, 15 IMAs, 16 indels and 11 morphological traits) with a mean marker density of 0.72 cM/marker. One hundred and ninety-six of these markers (157 SSRs, 32 SNPs, 6 indels and 1 RAPD) were newly developed, mapped or provided by industry representatives as released markers, including 27 SNPs and 5 indels from genes involved in the organic acid metabolism and transport, and 58 EST-SSRs. Additionally, 85 of 822 SSR markers contributed by Syngenta Seeds were included in the integrated map. In addition, 370 QTL controlling 62 traits from 18 previously reported mapping experiments using genetically diverse parental genotypes were also integrated into the consensus map. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in separate studies mapped to similar genomic positions. For example, independently identified QTL controlling fruit shape were mapped on similar genomic positions, suggesting that such QTL are possibly responsible for the phenotypic variability observed for this trait in

  15. A consensus linkage map for molecular markers and quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    PubMed

    Diaz, Aurora; Fergany, Mohamed; Formisano, Gelsomina; Ziarsolo, Peio; Blanca, José; Fei, Zhanjun; Staub, Jack E; Zalapa, Juan E; Cuevas, Hugo E; Dace, Gayle; Oliver, Marc; Boissot, Nathalie; Dogimont, Catherine; Pitrat, Michel; Hofstede, René; van Koert, Paul; Harel-Beja, Rotem; Tzuri, Galil; Portnoy, Vitaly; Cohen, Shahar; Schaffer, Arthur; Katzir, Nurit; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Haiying; Fukino, Nobuko; Matsumoto, Satoru; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Monforte, Antonio J

    2011-07-28

    A number of molecular marker linkage maps have been developed for melon (Cucumis melo L.) over the last two decades. However, these maps were constructed using different marker sets, thus, making comparative analysis among maps difficult. In order to solve this problem, a consensus genetic map in melon was constructed using primarily highly transferable anchor markers that have broad potential use for mapping, synteny, and comparative quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, increasing breeding effectiveness and efficiency via marker-assisted selection (MAS). Under the framework of the International Cucurbit Genomics Initiative (ICuGI, http://www.icugi.org), an integrated genetic map has been constructed by merging data from eight independent mapping experiments using a genetically diverse array of parental lines. The consensus map spans 1150 cM across the 12 melon linkage groups and is composed of 1592 markers (640 SSRs, 330 SNPs, 252 AFLPs, 239 RFLPs, 89 RAPDs, 15 IMAs, 16 indels and 11 morphological traits) with a mean marker density of 0.72 cM/marker. One hundred and ninety-six of these markers (157 SSRs, 32 SNPs, 6 indels and 1 RAPD) were newly developed, mapped or provided by industry representatives as released markers, including 27 SNPs and 5 indels from genes involved in the organic acid metabolism and transport, and 58 EST-SSRs. Additionally, 85 of 822 SSR markers contributed by Syngenta Seeds were included in the integrated map. In addition, 370 QTL controlling 62 traits from 18 previously reported mapping experiments using genetically diverse parental genotypes were also integrated into the consensus map. Some QTL associated with economically important traits detected in separate studies mapped to similar genomic positions. For example, independently identified QTL controlling fruit shape were mapped on similar genomic positions, suggesting that such QTL are possibly responsible for the phenotypic variability observed for this trait in a broad array of

  16. A 7T Spine Array Based on Electric Dipole Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qi; Nair, Govind; Gudino, Natalia; de Zwart, Jacco A.; van Gelderen, Peter; Murphy-Boesch, Joe; Reich, Daniel S.; Duyn, Jeff H.; Merkle, Hellmut

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this work the feasibility of using an array of electric dipole antennas for RF transmission in spine MRI at high field is explored. Method A 2-channel transmit array based on an electric dipole design was quantitatively optimized for 7T spine imaging and integrated with a receive array combining 8 loop coils. Using B1+ mapping, the transmit efficiency of the dipole array was compared to a design using quadrature loop pairs. The radio-frequency (RF) energy deposition for each array was measured using a home-built dielectric phantom and MR thermometry. The performance of the proposed array was qualitatively demonstrated in human studies. Results The results indicate dramatically improved transmit efficiency for the dipole design as compared to the loop excitation. Up to 76% gain was achieved within the spinal region. Conclusion For imaging of the spine, electric-dipole based transmitters provided an attractive alternative to the traditional loop-based design. Easy integration with existing receive array technology facilitates practical use at high field. PMID:26190585

  17. High-resolution electrical mapping of porcine gastric slow-wave propagation from the mucosal surface.

    PubMed

    Angeli, T R; Du, P; Paskaranandavadivel, N; Sathar, S; Hall, A; Asirvatham, S J; Farrugia, G; Windsor, J A; Cheng, L K; O'Grady, G

    2017-05-01

    Gastric motility is coordinated by bioelectrical slow waves, and gastric dysrhythmias are reported in motility disorders. High-resolution (HR) mapping has advanced the accurate assessment of gastric dysrhythmias, offering promise as a diagnostic technique. However, HR mapping has been restricted to invasive surgical serosal access. This study investigates the feasibility of HR mapping from the gastric mucosal surface. Experiments were conducted in vivo in 14 weaner pigs. Reference serosal recordings were performed with flexible-printed-circuit (FPC) arrays (128-192 electrodes). Mucosal recordings were performed by two methods: (i) FPC array aligned directly opposite the serosal array, and (ii) cardiac mapping catheter modified for gastric mucosal recordings. Slow-wave propagation and morphology characteristics were quantified and compared between simultaneous serosal and mucosal recordings. Slow-wave activity was consistently recorded from the mucosal surface from both electrode arrays. Mucosally recorded slow-wave propagation was consistent with reference serosal activation pattern, frequency (P≥.3), and velocity (P≥.4). However, mucosally recorded slow-wave morphology exhibited reduced amplitude (65-72% reduced, P<.001) and wider downstroke width (18-31% wider, P≤.02), compared to serosal data. Dysrhythmias were successfully mapped and classified from the mucosal surface, accorded with serosal data, and were consistent with known dysrhythmic mechanisms in the porcine model. High-resolution gastric electrical mapping was achieved from the mucosal surface, and demonstrated consistent propagation characteristics with serosal data. However, mucosal signal morphology was attenuated, demonstrating necessity for optimized electrode designs and analytical algorithms. This study demonstrates feasibility of endoscopic HR mapping, providing a foundation for advancement of minimally invasive spatiotemporal gastric mapping as a clinical and scientific tool. © 2016 John

  18. Development of an Ultrasonic Phased Array System for Wellbore Integrity Evaluation and Near-Wellbore Fracture Network Mapping of Injection and Production Wells in Geothermal Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Almansouri, Hani; Foster, Benjamin; Kisner, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents our progress developing an ultrasound phased array system in combination with a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm to inspect the health of and characterize the composition of the near-wellbore region for geothermal reservoirs. The main goal for this system is to provide a near-wellbore in-situ characterization capability that will significantly improve wellbore integrity evaluation and near well-bore fracture network mapping. A more detailed image of the fracture network near the wellbore in particular will enable the selection of optimal locations for stimulation along the wellbore, provide critical data that can be used to improve stimulation design, andmore » provide a means for measuring evolution of the fracture network to support long term management of reservoir operations. Development of such a measurement capability supports current hydrothermal operations as well as the successful demonstration of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The paper will include the design of the phased array system, the performance specifications, and characterization methodology. In addition, we will describe the MBIR forward model derived for the phased array system and the propagation of compressional waves through a pseudo-homogenous medium.« less

  19. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    DOEpatents

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  20. BioNano genome mapping of individual chromosomes supports physical mapping and sequence assembly in complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Staňková, Helena; Hastie, Alex R; Chan, Saki; Vrána, Jan; Tulpová, Zuzana; Kubaláková, Marie; Visendi, Paul; Hayashi, Satomi; Luo, Mingcheng; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Doležel, Jaroslav; Šimková, Hana

    2016-07-01

    The assembly of a reference genome sequence of bread wheat is challenging due to its specific features such as the genome size of 17 Gbp, polyploid nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences. BAC-by-BAC sequencing based on chromosomal physical maps, adopted by the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium as the key strategy, reduces problems caused by the genome complexity and polyploidy, but the repeat content still hampers the sequence assembly. Availability of a high-resolution genomic map to guide sequence scaffolding and validate physical map and sequence assemblies would be highly beneficial to obtaining an accurate and complete genome sequence. Here, we chose the short arm of chromosome 7D (7DS) as a model to demonstrate for the first time that it is possible to couple chromosome flow sorting with genome mapping in nanochannel arrays and create a de novo genome map of a wheat chromosome. We constructed a high-resolution chromosome map composed of 371 contigs with an N50 of 1.3 Mb. Long DNA molecules achieved by our approach facilitated chromosome-scale analysis of repetitive sequences and revealed a ~800-kb array of tandem repeats intractable to current DNA sequencing technologies. Anchoring 7DS sequence assemblies obtained by clone-by-clone sequencing to the 7DS genome map provided a valuable tool to improve the BAC-contig physical map and validate sequence assembly on a chromosome-arm scale. Our results indicate that creating genome maps for the whole wheat genome in a chromosome-by-chromosome manner is feasible and that they will be an affordable tool to support the production of improved pseudomolecules. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Three dimensional stress vector sensor array and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Rudnick, Thomas Jeffery

    2005-07-05

    A sensor array is configured based upon capacitive sensor techniques to measure stresses at various positions in a sheet simultaneously and allow a stress map to be obtained in near real-time. The device consists of single capacitive elements applied in a one or two dimensional array to measure the distribution of stresses across a mat surface in real-time as a function of position for manufacturing and test applications. In-plane and normal stresses in rolling bodies such as tires may thus be monitored.

  2. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  3. Multiplatform serum metabolic phenotyping combined with pathway mapping to identify biochemical differences in smokers.

    PubMed

    Kaluarachchi, Manuja R; Boulangé, Claire L; Garcia-Perez, Isabel; Lindon, John C; Minet, Emmanuel F

    2016-10-01

    Determining perturbed biochemical functions associated with tobacco smoking should be helpful for establishing causal relationships between exposure and adverse events. A multiplatform comparison of serum of smokers (n = 55) and never-smokers (n = 57) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, UPLC-MS and statistical modeling revealed clustering of the classes, distinguished by metabolic biomarkers. The identified metabolites were subjected to metabolic pathway enrichment, modeling adverse biological events using available databases. Perturbation of metabolites involved in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular diseases and cancer were identified and discussed. Combining multiplatform metabolic phenotyping with knowledge-based mapping gives mechanistic insights into disease development, which can be applied to next-generation tobacco and nicotine products for comparative risk assessment.

  4. Hail Size Distribution Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D weather radar visualization software program was developed and implemented as part of an experimental Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor System. 3DRadPlot, a radar plotting program, is one of several software modules that form building blocks of the hail data processing and analysis system (the complete software processing system under development). The spatial and temporal mapping algorithms were originally developed through research at the University of Central Florida, funded by NASA s Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), where the goal was to merge National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) volume reflectivity data with drop size distribution data acquired from a cluster of raindrop disdrometers. In this current work, we adapted these algorithms to process data from a cluster of hail disdrometers positioned around Launch Pads 39A or 39B, along with the corresponding NWS radar data. Radar data from all NWS NEXRAD sites is archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). That data can be readily accessed at . 3DRadPlot plots Level III reflectivity data at four scan elevations (this software is available at Open Channel Software, ). By using spatial and temporal interpolation/extrapolation based on hydrometeor fall dynamics, we can merge the hail disdrometer array data coupled with local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) radial velocity and reflectivity data into a 4-D (3-D space and time) picture of hail size distributions. Hail flux maps can then be generated and used for damage prediction and assessment over specific surfaces corresponding to structures within the disdrometer array volume. Immediately following a hail storm, specific damage areas and degree of damage can be identified for inspection crews.

  5. Microbial genome sequencing using optical mapping and Illumina sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction Optical mapping is a technique in which strands of genomic DNA are digested with one or more restriction enzymes, and a physical map of the genome constructed from the resulting image. In outline, genomic DNA is extracted from a pure culture, linearly arrayed on a specialized glass sli...

  6. A gene-signature progression approach to identifying candidate small-molecule cancer therapeutics with connectivity mapping.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Kim, Chang-Sik; Hamilton, Peter W; Zhang, Shu-Dong

    2016-05-11

    Gene expression connectivity mapping has gained much popularity recently with a number of successful applications in biomedical research testifying its utility and promise. Previously methodological research in connectivity mapping mainly focused on two of the key components in the framework, namely, the reference gene expression profiles and the connectivity mapping algorithms. The other key component in this framework, the query gene signature, has been left to users to construct without much consensus on how this should be done, albeit it has been an issue most relevant to end users. As a key input to the connectivity mapping process, gene signature is crucially important in returning biologically meaningful and relevant results. This paper intends to formulate a standardized procedure for constructing high quality gene signatures from a user's perspective. We describe a two-stage process for making quality gene signatures using gene expression data as initial inputs. First, a differential gene expression analysis comparing two distinct biological states; only the genes that have passed stringent statistical criteria are considered in the second stage of the process, which involves ranking genes based on statistical as well as biological significance. We introduce a "gene signature progression" method as a standard procedure in connectivity mapping. Starting from the highest ranked gene, we progressively determine the minimum length of the gene signature that allows connections to the reference profiles (drugs) being established with a preset target false discovery rate. We use a lung cancer dataset and a breast cancer dataset as two case studies to demonstrate how this standardized procedure works, and we show that highly relevant and interesting biological connections are returned. Of particular note is gefitinib, identified as among the candidate therapeutics in our lung cancer case study. Our gene signature was based on gene expression data from Taiwan

  7. Supercritical fluid chromatography-photodiode array detection-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry as a framework for impurity fate mapping in the development and manufacture of drug substances.

    PubMed

    Pirrone, Gregory F; Mathew, Rose M; Makarov, Alexey A; Bernardoni, Frank; Klapars, Artis; Hartman, Robert; Limanto, John; Regalado, Erik L

    2018-03-30

    Impurity fate and purge studies are critical in order to establish an effective impurity control strategy for approval of the commercial filing application of new medicines. Reversed phase liquid chromatography-diode array-mass spectrometry (RPLC-DAD-MS) has traditionally been the preferred tool for impurity fate mapping. However, separation of some reaction mixtures by LC can be very problematic requiring combination LC-UV for area % analysis and a different LC-MS method for peak identification. In addition, some synthetic intermediates might be chemically susceptible to the aqueous conditions used in RPLC separations. In this study, the use of supercritical fluid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (SFC-PDA-ESIMS) for fate and purge of two specified impurities in the 1-uridine starting material from the synthesis of a bis-piv 2'keto-uridine, an intermediate in the synthesis of uprifosbuvir, a treatment under investigation for chronic hepatitis C infection. Readily available SFC instrumentation with a Chiralpak IC column (4.6 × 150 mm, 3 μm) and ethanol: carbon dioxide based mobile phase eluent enabled the separation of closely related components from complex reaction mixtures where RLPC failed to deliver optimal chromatographic performance. These results illustrate how SFC combined with PDA and ESI-MS detection can become a powerful tool for direct impurity fate mapping across multiple reaction steps. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Where to Go Next? Identifying Target Areas in the North Atlantic for Future Seafloor Mapping Initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woelfl, A. C.; Jencks, J.; Johnston, G.; Varner, J. D.; Devey, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    Human activities are rapidly expanding into the oceans, yet detailed bathymetric maps do not exist for most of the seafloor that would permit governments to formulate sensible usage rules. Changing this situation will require an enormous international mapping effort. To ensure that this effort is directed towards the regions most in need of mapping, we need to know which areas have already been mapped and which areas are potentially most interesting. Despite various mapping efforts in recent years, large parts of the Atlantic still lack detailed bathymetric information. To successfully plan for future mapping efforts to fill these gaps, knowledge of current data coverage is imperative to avoid duplication of effort. While certain datasets are publically available online (e.g. NOAA's NCEI, EMODnet, IHO-DCDB, LDEO's GMRT), many are not. However, with the limited information we do have at hand, the question remains, where should we map next? And what criteria should we take into account? In 2016, a study was taken on as part of the efforts of the International Atlantic Seabed Mapping Working Group (ASMIWG). The ASMIWG, established by the Tri-Partite Galway Statement Implementation Committee, was tasked to develop a cohesive seabed mapping strategy for the Atlantic Ocean. The aim of our study was to develop a reproducible process for identifying and evaluating potential target areas within the North Atlantic that represent suitable sites for future bathymetric surveys. The sites were selected by applying a GIS-based suitability analysis that included specific user group-based parameters of the marine environment. Furthermore, information regarding current data coverage were gathered to take into account in the selection process. The results reveal the suitability of sites within the North Atlantic based on the selected criteria. Three potential target sites should be seen as flexible suggestions for future mapping initiatives rather than a rigid, defined set of areas

  9. A consensus genetic map of sorghum that integrates multiple component maps and high-throughput diversity array technology (DArT) markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This final consensus map has allowed us to map a larger number of markers than possible in any individual map of sorghum, to obtain a more complete coverage of the sorghum genome and to fill a number of gaps on individual maps. In addition to overall general consistency of marker order across indiv...

  10. Micromirror array nanostructures for anticounterfeiting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Robert A.

    2004-06-01

    The optical characteristics of pixellated passive micro mirror arrays are derived and applied in the context of their use as reflective optically variable device (OVD) nanostructures for the protection of documents from counterfeiting. The traditional design variables of foil based diffractive OVDs are shown to be able to be mapped to a corresponding set of design parameters for reflective optical micro mirror array (OMMA) devices. The greatly increased depth characteristics of micro mirror array OVDs provides an opportunity for directly printing the OVD microstructure onto the security document in-line with the normal printing process. The micro mirror array OVD architecture therefore eliminates the need for hot stamping foil as the carrier of the OVD information, thereby reducing costs. The origination of micro mirror array devices via a palette based data format and a combination electron beam lithography and photolithography techniques is discussed via an artwork example and experimental tests. Finally the application of the technology to the design of a generic class of devices which have the interesting property of allowing for both application and customer specific OVD image encoding and data encoding at the end user stage of production is described. Because of the end user nature of the image and data encoding process these devices are particularly well suited to ID document applications and for this reason we refer this new OVD concept as biometric OVD technology.

  11. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  12. Depth map generation using a single image sensor with phase masks.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinbeum; Park, Sangwoo; Jo, Jieun; Paik, Joonki

    2016-06-13

    Conventional stereo matching systems generate a depth map using two or more digital imaging sensors. It is difficult to use the small camera system because of their high costs and bulky sizes. In order to solve this problem, this paper presents a stereo matching system using a single image sensor with phase masks for the phase difference auto-focusing. A novel pattern of phase mask array is proposed to simultaneously acquire two pairs of stereo images. Furthermore, a noise-invariant depth map is generated from the raw format sensor output. The proposed method consists of four steps to compute the depth map: (i) acquisition of stereo images using the proposed mask array, (ii) variational segmentation using merging criteria to simplify the input image, (iii) disparity map generation using the hierarchical block matching for disparity measurement, and (iv) image matting to fill holes to generate the dense depth map. The proposed system can be used in small digital cameras without additional lenses or sensors.

  13. Number Prompts Left-to-Right Spatial Mapping in Toddlerhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrink, Koleen; Perez, Jasmin; Baruch, Erica

    2017-01-01

    Toddlers performed a spatial mapping task in which they were required to learn the location of a hidden object in a vertical array and then transpose this location information 90° to a horizontal array. During the vertical training, they were given (a) no labels, (b) alphabetical labels, or (c) numerical labels for each potential spatial location.…

  14. BICEP2 / Keck Array V: Measurements of B-mode polarization at degree angular scales and 150 GHz by the Keck Array

    DOE PAGES

    Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; ...

    2015-09-29

    Here, the Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background polarimeters, each similar to the Bicep2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 to 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as Bicep2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-ΛCDM expectation of >5σ in the range 30 < ℓ < 150 and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectralmore » difference tests these new data are shown to be consistent with Bicep2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 μK arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg 2 for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 μK –2. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of >6σ.« less

  15. BICEP2/KECK ARRAY V: MEASUREMENTS OF B-MODE POLARIZATION AT DEGREE ANGULAR SCALES AND 150 GHz BY THE KECK ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.

    2015-10-01

    The Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background polarimeters, each similar to the Bicep2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 to 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as Bicep2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-ΛCDM expectation of >5σ in the range 30 < ℓ < 150 and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectral differencemore » tests these new data are shown to be consistent with Bicep2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 μK arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg{sup 2} for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 μK{sup −2}. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of >6σ.« less

  16. Exploiting sequence similarity to validate the sensitivity of SNP arrays in detecting fine-scaled copy number variations.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gerard; Leckie, Christopher; Gorringe, Kylie L; Haviv, Izhak; Campbell, Ian G; Kowalczyk, Adam

    2010-04-15

    High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays are efficient and cost effective platforms for the detection of copy number variation (CNV). To ensure accuracy in probe synthesis and to minimize production costs, short oligonucleotide probe sequences are used. The use of short probe sequences limits the specificity of binding targets in the human genome. The specificity of these short probeset sequences has yet to be fully analysed against a normal reference human genome. Sequence similarity can artificially elevate or suppress copy number measurements, and hence reduce the reliability of affected probe readings. For the purpose of detecting narrow CNVs reliably down to the width of a single probeset, sequence similarity is an important issue that needs to be addressed. We surveyed the Affymetrix Human Mapping SNP arrays for probeset sequence similarity against the reference human genome. Utilizing sequence similarity results, we identified a collection of fine-scaled putative CNVs between gender from autosomal probesets whose sequence matches various loci on the sex chromosomes. To detect these variations, we utilized our statistical approach, Detecting REcurrent Copy number change using rank-order Statistics (DRECS), and showed that its performance was superior and more stable than the t-test in detecting CNVs. Through the application of DRECS on the HapMap population datasets with multi-matching probesets filtered, we identified biologically relevant SNPs in aberrant regions across populations with known association to physical traits, such as height, covered by the span of a single probe. This provided empirical confirmation of the existence of naturally occurring narrow CNVs as well as the sensitivity of the Affymetrix SNP array technology in detecting them. The MATLAB implementation of DRECS is available at http://ww2.cs.mu.oz.au/ approximately gwong/DRECS/index.html.

  17. Gender Fair Efficacy of Concept Mapping Tests in Identifying Students' Difficulties in High School Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Shilna, V.

    2014-01-01

    In view of the perceived difficulty of organic chemistry unit for high schools students, this study examined the usefulness of concept mapping as a testing device to assess students' difficulty in the select areas. Since many tests used for identifying students misconceptions and difficulties in school subjects are observed to favour one or the…

  18. arrayCGHbase: an analysis platform for comparative genomic hybridization microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Menten, Björn; Pattyn, Filip; De Preter, Katleen; Robbrecht, Piet; Michels, Evi; Buysse, Karen; Mortier, Geert; De Paepe, Anne; van Vooren, Steven; Vermeesch, Joris; Moreau, Yves; De Moor, Bart; Vermeulen, Stefan; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2005-01-01

    Background The availability of the human genome sequence as well as the large number of physically accessible oligonucleotides, cDNA, and BAC clones across the entire genome has triggered and accelerated the use of several platforms for analysis of DNA copy number changes, amongst others microarray comparative genomic hybridization (arrayCGH). One of the challenges inherent to this new technology is the management and analysis of large numbers of data points generated in each individual experiment. Results We have developed arrayCGHbase, a comprehensive analysis platform for arrayCGH experiments consisting of a MIAME (Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment) supportive database using MySQL underlying a data mining web tool, to store, analyze, interpret, compare, and visualize arrayCGH results in a uniform and user-friendly format. Following its flexible design, arrayCGHbase is compatible with all existing and forthcoming arrayCGH platforms. Data can be exported in a multitude of formats, including BED files to map copy number information on the genome using the Ensembl or UCSC genome browser. Conclusion ArrayCGHbase is a web based and platform independent arrayCGH data analysis tool, that allows users to access the analysis suite through the internet or a local intranet after installation on a private server. ArrayCGHbase is available at . PMID:15910681

  19. Fine-mapping of prostate cancer susceptibility loci in a large meta-analysis identifies candidate causal variants.

    PubMed

    Dadaev, Tokhir; Saunders, Edward J; Newcombe, Paul J; Anokian, Ezequiel; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Brook, Mark N; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Mijuskovic, Martina; Wakerell, Sarah; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Berndt, Sonja I; Benlloch, Sara; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Goh, Chee; Sheng, Xin; Zhang, Zhuo; Muir, Kenneth; Govindasami, Koveela; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stevens, Victoria L; Gapstur, Susan M; Carter, Brian D; Tangen, Catherine M; Goodman, Phyllis; Thompson, Ian M; Batra, Jyotsna; Chambers, Suzanne; Moya, Leire; Clements, Judith; Horvath, Lisa; Tilley, Wayne; Risbridger, Gail; Gronberg, Henrik; Aly, Markus; Nordström, Tobias; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Schleutker, Johanna; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Sipeky, Csilla; Auvinen, Anssi; Albanes, Demetrius; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wolk, Alicja; Hakansson, Niclas; West, Catharine; Dunning, Alison M; Burnet, Neil; Mucci, Lorelei; Giovannucci, Edward; Andriole, Gerald; Cussenot, Olivier; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine; Koutros, Stella; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Maehle, Lovise; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Martin, Richard M; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim J; Hamilton, Robert J; Fleshner, Neil E; Finelli, Antonio; Ingles, Sue Ann; Stern, Mariana C; Rosenstein, Barry; Kerns, Sarah; Ostrer, Harry; Lu, Yong-Jie; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Feng, Ninghan; Mao, Xueying; Guo, Xin; Wang, Guomin; Sun, Zan; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; MacInnis, Robert J; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Kibel, Adam S; Drake, Bettina F; Vega, Ana; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Fachal, Laura; Szulkin, Robert; Eklund, Martin; Kogevinas, Manolis; Llorca, Javier; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Penney, Kathryn L; Stampfer, Meir; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas A; Lin, Hui-Yi; Stanford, Janet L; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Lubinski, Jan; Ostrander, Elaine A; Geybels, Milan S; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Weisher, Maren; Bisbjerg, Rasmus; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Brenner, Hermann; Cuk, Katarina; Holleczek, Bernd; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Schnoeller, Thomas; Kim, Jeri; Logothetis, Christopher J; John, Esther M; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Cardoso, Marta; Neuhausen, Susan L; Steele, Linda; Ding, Yuan Chun; De Ruyck, Kim; De Meerleer, Gert; Ost, Piet; Razack, Azad; Lim, Jasmine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lin, Daniel W; Newcomb, Lisa F; Lessel, Davor; Gamulin, Marija; Kulis, Tomislav; Kaneva, Radka; Usmani, Nawaid; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Parliament, Matthew; Singhal, Sandeep; Claessens, Frank; Joniau, Steven; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Larkin, Samantha; Townsend, Paul A; Aukim-Hastie, Claire; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Castelao, Jose Esteban; Martinez, Maria Elena; Roobol, Monique J; Jenster, Guido; van Schaik, Ron H N; Menegaux, Florence; Truong, Thérèse; Koudou, Yves Akoli; Xu, Jianfeng; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Lindstrom, Sara; Turman, Constance; Ma, Jing; Hunter, David J; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Kraft, Peter; Freedman, Matthew; Wiklund, Fredrik; Chanock, Stephen; Henderson, Brian E; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Eeles, Rosalind A; Conti, David V; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2018-06-11

    Prostate cancer is a polygenic disease with a large heritable component. A number of common, low-penetrance prostate cancer risk loci have been identified through GWAS. Here we apply the Bayesian multivariate variable selection algorithm JAM to fine-map 84 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, using summary data from a large European ancestry meta-analysis. We observe evidence for multiple independent signals at 12 regions and 99 risk signals overall. Only 15 original GWAS tag SNPs remain among the catalogue of candidate variants identified; the remainder are replaced by more likely candidates. Biological annotation of our credible set of variants indicates significant enrichment within promoter and enhancer elements, and transcription factor-binding sites, including AR, ERG and FOXA1. In 40 regions at least one variant is colocalised with an eQTL in prostate cancer tissue. The refined set of candidate variants substantially increase the proportion of familial relative risk explained by these known susceptibility regions, which highlights the importance of fine-mapping studies and has implications for clinical risk profiling.

  20. Demonstration Of Fast, Single-Shot Photocathode QE Mapping Method Using Mla Pattern Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewski, E. E.; Conde, M.; Doran, D. S.

    Quantum efficiency (QE) is the chief figure of merit in the characterization of photocathodes. Semiconductor photocathodes, especially when used in high rep-rate photoinjectors, are known to show QE degradation over time and must be replaced. The totalQE is the basic diagnosticwhich is used widely and is easy to obtain. However, a QE map indicating variations of QE across the cathode surface has greater utility. It can quickly diagnose problems of QE inhomogeneity. Most QE mapping techniques require hours to complete and are thus disruptive to a user facility schedule. A fast, single-shot method has been proposed using a micro-lens arraymore » (MLA) generated QE map. In this paper we report the implementation of the method at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility. A micro-lens array (MLA) is used to project an array of beamlets onto the photocathode. The resulting photoelectron beam in the form of an array of electron beamlets is imaged at a YAG screen. Four synchronized measurements are made and the results used to produce a QE map of the photocathode.« less

  1. Integration of Lupinus angustifolius L. (narrow-leafed lupin) genome maps and comparative mapping within legumes.

    PubMed

    Wyrwa, Katarzyna; Książkiewicz, Michał; Szczepaniak, Anna; Susek, Karolina; Podkowiński, Jan; Naganowska, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) has recently been considered a reference genome for the Lupinus genus. In the present work, genetic and cytogenetic maps of L. angustifolius were supplemented with 30 new molecular markers representing lupin genome regions, harboring genes involved in nitrogen fixation during the symbiotic interaction of legumes and soil bacteria (Rhizobiaceae). Our studies resulted in the precise localization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) carrying sequence variants for early nodulin 40, nodulin 26, nodulin 45, aspartate aminotransferase P2, asparagine synthetase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase. Together with previously mapped chromosomes, the integrated L. angustifolius map encompasses 73 chromosome markers, including 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and 45S rDNA, and anchors 20 L. angustifolius linkage groups to corresponding chromosomes. Chromosomal identification using BAC fluorescence in situ hybridization identified two BAC clones as narrow-leafed lupin centromere-specific markers, which served as templates for preliminary studies of centromere composition within the genus. Bioinformatic analysis of these two BACs revealed that centromeric/pericentromeric regions of narrow-leafed lupin chromosomes consisted of simple sequence repeats ordered into tandem repeats containing the trinucleotide and pentanucleotide simple sequence repeats AGG and GATAC, structured into long arrays. Moreover, cross-genus microsynteny analysis revealed syntenic patterns of 31 single-locus BAC clones among several legume species. The gene and chromosome level findings provide evidence of ancient duplication events that must have occurred very early in the divergence of papilionoid lineages. This work provides a strong foundation for future comparative mapping among legumes and may facilitate understanding of mechanisms involved in shaping legume chromosomes.

  2. SNPConvert: SNP Array Standardization and Integration in Livestock Species.

    PubMed

    Nicolazzi, Ezequiel Luis; Marras, Gabriele; Stella, Alessandra

    2016-06-09

    One of the main advantages of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array technology is providing genotype calls for a specific number of SNP markers at a relatively low cost. Since its first application in animal genetics, the number of available SNP arrays for each species has been constantly increasing. However, conversely to that observed in whole genome sequence data analysis, SNP array data does not have a common set of file formats or coding conventions for allele calling. Therefore, the standardization and integration of SNP array data from multiple sources have become an obstacle, especially for users with basic or no programming skills. Here, we describe the difficulties related to handling SNP array data, focusing on file formats, SNP allele coding, and mapping. We also present SNPConvert suite, a multi-platform, open-source, and user-friendly set of tools to overcome these issues. This tool, which can be integrated with open-source and open-access tools already available, is a first step towards an integrated system to standardize and integrate any type of raw SNP array data. The tool is available at: https://github. com/nicolazzie/SNPConvert.git.

  3. SNP markers tightly linked to root knot nematode resistance in grapevine (Vitis cinerea) identified by a genotyping-by-sequencing approach followed by Sequenom MassARRAY validation

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Norma B.; Moskwa, Sam; Clingeleffer, Peter R.; Thomas, Mark R.

    2018-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes, including root knot nematode Meloidogyne species, cause extensive damage to agriculture and horticultural crops. As Vitis vinifera cultivars are susceptible to root knot nematode parasitism, rootstocks resistant to these soil pests provide a sustainable approach to maintain grapevine production. Currently, most of the commercially available root knot nematode resistant rootstocks are highly vigorous and take up excess potassium, which reduces wine quality. As a result, there is a pressing need to breed new root knot nematode resistant rootstocks, which have no impact on wine quality. To develop molecular markers that predict root knot nematode resistance for marker assisted breeding, a genetic approach was employed to identify a root knot nematode resistance locus in grapevine. To this end, a Meloidogyne javanica resistant Vitis cinerea accession was crossed to a susceptible Vitis vinifera cultivar Riesling and results from screening the F1 individuals support a model that root knot nematode resistance, is conferred by a single dominant allele, referred as MELOIDOGYNE JAVANICA RESISTANCE1 (MJR1). Further, MJR1 resistance appears to be mediated by a hypersensitive response that occurs in the root apical meristem. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified using genotyping-by-sequencing and results from association and genetic mapping identified the MJR1 locus, which is located on chromosome 18 in the Vitis cinerea accession. Validation of the SNPs linked to the MJR1 locus using a Sequenom MassARRAY platform found that only 50% could be validated. The validated SNPs that flank and co-segregate with the MJR1 locus can be used for marker-assisted selection for Meloidogyne javanica resistance in grapevine. PMID:29462210

  4. SNP markers tightly linked to root knot nematode resistance in grapevine (Vitis cinerea) identified by a genotyping-by-sequencing approach followed by Sequenom MassARRAY validation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Harley M; Smith, Brady P; Morales, Norma B; Moskwa, Sam; Clingeleffer, Peter R; Thomas, Mark R

    2018-01-01

    Plant parasitic nematodes, including root knot nematode Meloidogyne species, cause extensive damage to agriculture and horticultural crops. As Vitis vinifera cultivars are susceptible to root knot nematode parasitism, rootstocks resistant to these soil pests provide a sustainable approach to maintain grapevine production. Currently, most of the commercially available root knot nematode resistant rootstocks are highly vigorous and take up excess potassium, which reduces wine quality. As a result, there is a pressing need to breed new root knot nematode resistant rootstocks, which have no impact on wine quality. To develop molecular markers that predict root knot nematode resistance for marker assisted breeding, a genetic approach was employed to identify a root knot nematode resistance locus in grapevine. To this end, a Meloidogyne javanica resistant Vitis cinerea accession was crossed to a susceptible Vitis vinifera cultivar Riesling and results from screening the F1 individuals support a model that root knot nematode resistance, is conferred by a single dominant allele, referred as MELOIDOGYNE JAVANICA RESISTANCE1 (MJR1). Further, MJR1 resistance appears to be mediated by a hypersensitive response that occurs in the root apical meristem. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified using genotyping-by-sequencing and results from association and genetic mapping identified the MJR1 locus, which is located on chromosome 18 in the Vitis cinerea accession. Validation of the SNPs linked to the MJR1 locus using a Sequenom MassARRAY platform found that only 50% could be validated. The validated SNPs that flank and co-segregate with the MJR1 locus can be used for marker-assisted selection for Meloidogyne javanica resistance in grapevine.

  5. The structure of mode-locking regions of piecewise-linear continuous maps: II. Skew sawtooth maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. J. W.

    2018-05-01

    In two-parameter bifurcation diagrams of piecewise-linear continuous maps on , mode-locking regions typically have points of zero width known as shrinking points. Near any shrinking point, but outside the associated mode-locking region, a significant proportion of parameter space can be usefully partitioned into a two-dimensional array of annular sectors. The purpose of this paper is to show that in these sectors the dynamics is well-approximated by a three-parameter family of skew sawtooth circle maps, where the relationship between the skew sawtooth maps and the N-dimensional map is fixed within each sector. The skew sawtooth maps are continuous, degree-one, and piecewise-linear, with two different slopes. They approximate the stable dynamics of the N-dimensional map with an error that goes to zero with the distance from the shrinking point. The results explain the complicated radial pattern of periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamics that occurs near shrinking points.

  6. Design and Use of Microphone Directional Arrays for Aeroacoustic Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Meadows, Kristine R.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the development of two microphone directional arrays for aeroacoustic testing is presented. These arrays were specifically developed to measure airframe noise in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility. A large aperture directional array using 35 flush-mounted microphones was constructed to obtain high resolution noise localization maps around airframe models. This array possesses a maximum diagonal aperture size of 34 inches. A unique logarithmic spiral layout design was chosen for the targeted frequency range of 2-30 kHz. Complementing the large array is a small aperture directional array, constructed to obtain spectra and directivity information from regions on the model. This array, possessing 33 microphones with a maximum diagonal aperture size of 7.76 inches, is easily moved about the model in elevation and azimuth. Custom microphone shading algorithms have been developed to provide a frequency- and position-invariant sensing area from 10-40 kHz with an overall targeted frequency range for the array of 5-60 kHz. Both arrays are employed in acoustic measurements of a 6 percent of full scale airframe model consisting of a main element NACA 632-215 wing section with a 30 percent chord half-span flap. Representative data obtained from these measurements is presented, along with details of the array calibration and data post-processing procedures.

  7. Scanning genomic areas under selection sweep and association mapping as tools to identify horticultural important genes in watermelon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) contains 88% water, sugars, and several important health-related compounds, including lycopene, citrulline, arginine, and glutathione. The current genetic diversity study uses microsatellites with known map positions to identify genomic regions that under...

  8. The pitfalls of platform comparison: DNA copy number array technologies assessed

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The accurate and high resolution mapping of DNA copy number aberrations has become an important tool by which to gain insight into the mechanisms of tumourigenesis. There are various commercially available platforms for such studies, but there remains no general consensus as to the optimal platform. There have been several previous platform comparison studies, but they have either described older technologies, used less-complex samples, or have not addressed the issue of the inherent biases in such comparisons. Here we describe a systematic comparison of data from four leading microarray technologies (the Affymetrix Genome-wide SNP 5.0 array, Agilent High-Density CGH Human 244A array, Illumina HumanCNV370-Duo DNA Analysis BeadChip, and the Nimblegen 385 K oligonucleotide array). We compare samples derived from primary breast tumours and their corresponding matched normals, well-established cancer cell lines, and HapMap individuals. By careful consideration and avoidance of potential sources of bias, we aim to provide a fair assessment of platform performance. Results By performing a theoretical assessment of the reproducibility, noise, and sensitivity of each platform, notable differences were revealed. Nimblegen exhibited between-replicate array variances an order of magnitude greater than the other three platforms, with Agilent slightly outperforming the others, and a comparison of self-self hybridizations revealed similar patterns. An assessment of the single probe power revealed that Agilent exhibits the highest sensitivity. Additionally, we performed an in-depth visual assessment of the ability of each platform to detect aberrations of varying sizes. As expected, all platforms were able to identify large aberrations in a robust manner. However, some focal amplifications and deletions were only detected in a subset of the platforms. Conclusion Although there are substantial differences in the design, density, and number of replicate probes, the

  9. A 7T spine array based on electric dipole transmitters.

    PubMed

    Duan, Qi; Nair, Govind; Gudino, Natalia; de Zwart, Jacco A; van Gelderen, Peter; Murphy-Boesch, Joe; Reich, Daniel S; Duyn, Jeff H; Merkle, Hellmut

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of using an array of electric dipole antennas for RF transmission in spine MRI at high fields. A two-channel transmit array based on an electric dipole design was quantitatively optimized for 7T spine imaging and integrated with a receive array combining eight loop coils. Using B1+ mapping, the transmit efficiency of the dipole array was compared with a design using quadrature loop pairs. The radiofrequency energy deposition for each array was measured using a home-built dielectric phantom and MR thermometry. The performance of the proposed array was qualitatively demonstrated in human studies. The results indicate dramatically improved transmit efficiency for the dipole design compared with the loop excitation. A gain of up to 76% was achieved within the spinal region. For imaging of the spine, electric dipole-based transmitters provide an attractive alternative to the traditional loop-based design. Easy integration with existing receive array technology facilitates practical use at high fields. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Characterization of switching field distributions in Ising-like magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Fraleigh, Robert D.; Kempinger, Susan; Lammert, Paul E.

    The switching field distribution within arrays of single-domain ferromagnetic islands incorporates both island-island interactions and quenched disorder in island geometry. Separating these two contributions is important for disentangling the effects of disorder and interactions in themagnetization dynamics of island arrays. Using submicron, spatially resolved Kerr imaging in an external magnetic field for islands with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, we map out the evolution of island arrays during hysteresis loops. Resolving and tracking individual islands across four different lattice types and a range of interisland spacings, we can extract the individual switching fields of every island and thereby quantitatively determine the contributionsmore » of interactions and quenched disorder in the arrays. The width of the switching field distribution is found to be well fitted by a simple model comprising the sum of an array-independent contribution (interpreted as disorder induced) and a term proportional to the maximum field the entire rest of the array could exert on a single island, i.e., in a fully polarized state. This supports the claim that disorder in these arrays is primarily a single-island property and provides a methodology by which to quantify such disorder.« less

  11. Characterization of switching field distributions in Ising-like magnetic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraleigh, Robert D.; Kempinger, Susan; Lammert, Paul E.; Zhang, Sheng; Crespi, Vincent H.; Schiffer, Peter; Samarth, Nitin

    2017-04-01

    The switching field distribution within arrays of single-domain ferromagnetic islands incorporates both island-island interactions and quenched disorder in island geometry. Separating these two contributions is important for disentangling the effects of disorder and interactions in the magnetization dynamics of island arrays. Using submicron, spatially resolved Kerr imaging in an external magnetic field for islands with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, we map out the evolution of island arrays during hysteresis loops. Resolving and tracking individual islands across four different lattice types and a range of interisland spacings, we can extract the individual switching fields of every island and thereby quantitatively determine the contributions of interactions and quenched disorder in the arrays. The width of the switching field distribution is found to be well fitted by a simple model comprising the sum of an array-independent contribution (interpreted as disorder induced) and a term proportional to the maximum field the entire rest of the array could exert on a single island, i.e., in a fully polarized state. This supports the claim that disorder in these arrays is primarily a single-island property and provides a methodology by which to quantify such disorder.

  12. Modeling change from large-scale high-dimensional spatio-temporal array data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng; Pebesma, Edzer

    2014-05-01

    The massive data that come from Earth observation satellite and other sensors provide significant information for modeling global change. At the same time, the high dimensionality of the data has brought challenges in data acquisition, management, effective querying and processing. In addition, the output of earth system modeling tends to be data intensive and needs methodologies for storing, validation, analyzing and visualization, e.g. as maps. An important proportion of earth system observations and simulated data can be represented as multi-dimensional array data, which has received increasingly attention in big data management and spatial-temporal analysis. Study cases will be developed in natural science such as climate change, hydrological modeling, sediment dynamics, from which the addressing of big data problems is necessary. Multi-dimensional array-based database management and analytics system such as Rasdaman, SciDB, and R will be applied to these cases. From these studies will hope to learn the strengths and weaknesses of these systems, how they might work together or how semantics of array operations differ, through addressing the problems associated with big data. Research questions include: • How can we reduce dimensions spatially and temporally, or thematically? • How can we extend existing GIS functions to work on multidimensional arrays? • How can we combine data sets of different dimensionality or different resolutions? • Can map algebra be extended to an intelligible array algebra? • What are effective semantics for array programming of dynamic data driven applications? • In which sense are space and time special, as dimensions, compared to other properties? • How can we make the analysis of multi-spectral, multi-temporal and multi-sensor earth observation data easy?

  13. Combining mouse mammary gland gene expression and comparative mapping for the identification of candidate genes for QTL of milk production traits in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Micha; Israeli, Galit; Seroussi, Eyal; Weller, Joel I; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Shani, Moshe; Medrano, Juan F

    2007-01-01

    Background Many studies have found segregating quantitative trait loci (QTL) for milk production traits in different dairy cattle populations. However, even for relatively large effects with a saturated marker map the confidence interval for QTL location by linkage analysis spans tens of map units, or hundreds of genes. Combining mapping and arraying has been suggested as an approach to identify candidate genes. Thus, gene expression analysis in the mammary gland of genes positioned in the confidence interval of the QTL can bridge the gap between fine mapping and quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) determination. Results We hybridized Affymetrix microarray (MG-U74v2), containing 12,488 murine probes, with RNA derived from mammary gland of virgin, pregnant, lactating and involuting C57BL/6J mice in a total of nine biological replicates. We combined microarray data from two additional studies that used the same design in mice with a total of 75 biological replicates. The same filtering and normalization was applied to each microarray data using GeneSpring software. Analysis of variance identified 249 differentially expressed probe sets common to the three experiments along the four developmental stages of puberty, pregnancy, lactation and involution. 212 genes were assigned to their bovine map positions through comparative mapping, and thus form a list of candidate genes for previously identified QTLs for milk production traits. A total of 82 of the genes showed mammary gland-specific expression with at least 3-fold expression over the median representing all tissues tested in GeneAtlas. Conclusion This work presents a web tool for candidate genes for QTL (cgQTL) that allows navigation between the map of bovine milk production QTL, potential candidate genes and their level of expression in mammary gland arrays and in GeneAtlas. Three out of four confirmed genes that affect QTL in livestock (ABCG2, DGAT1, GDF8, IGF2) were over expressed in the target organ. Thus, cg

  14. Characterization of polyploid wheat genomic diversity using a high-density 90 000 single nucleotide polymorphism array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shichen; Wong, Debbie; Forrest, Kerrie; Allen, Alexandra; Chao, Shiaoman; Huang, Bevan E; Maccaferri, Marco; Salvi, Silvio; Milner, Sara G; Cattivelli, Luigi; Mastrangelo, Anna M; Whan, Alex; Stephen, Stuart; Barker, Gary; Wieseke, Ralf; Plieske, Joerg; International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium; Lillemo, Morten; Mather, Diane; Appels, Rudi; Dolferus, Rudy; Brown-Guedira, Gina; Korol, Abraham; Akhunova, Alina R; Feuillet, Catherine; Salse, Jerome; Morgante, Michele; Pozniak, Curtis; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Morell, Matthew; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Ganal, Martin; Tuberosa, Roberto; Lawley, Cindy; Mikoulitch, Ivan; Cavanagh, Colin; Edwards, Keith J; Hayden, Matthew; Akhunov, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays are a powerful tool for studying genomic patterns of diversity, inferring ancestral relationships between individuals in populations and studying marker–trait associations in mapping experiments. We developed a genotyping array including about 90 000 gene-associated SNPs and used it to characterize genetic variation in allohexaploid and allotetraploid wheat populations. The array includes a significant fraction of common genome-wide distributed SNPs that are represented in populations of diverse geographical origin. We used density-based spatial clustering algorithms to enable high-throughput genotype calling in complex data sets obtained for polyploid wheat. We show that these model-free clustering algorithms provide accurate genotype calling in the presence of multiple clusters including clusters with low signal intensity resulting from significant sequence divergence at the target SNP site or gene deletions. Assays that detect low-intensity clusters can provide insight into the distribution of presence–absence variation (PAV) in wheat populations. A total of 46 977 SNPs from the wheat 90K array were genetically mapped using a combination of eight mapping populations. The developed array and cluster identification algorithms provide an opportunity to infer detailed haplotype structure in polyploid wheat and will serve as an invaluable resource for diversity studies and investigating the genetic basis of trait variation in wheat. PMID:24646323

  15. A Comparison of Lightning Flashes as Observed by the Lightning Imaging Sensor and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, M. G.; Mach, D. M.; McCaul, M. G.; Bailey, J. C.; Christian, H. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) aboard the TRMM satellite has been collecting optical lightning data since November 1997. A Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) that senses VHF impulses from lightning was installed in North Alabama in the Fall of 2001. A dataset has been compiled to compare data from both instruments for all times when the LIS was passing over the domain of our LMA. We have algorithms for both instruments to group pixels or point sources into lightning flashes. This study presents the comparison statistics of the flash data output (flash duration, size, and amplitude) from both algorithms. We will present the results of this comparison study and show "point-level" data to explain the differences. AS we head closer to realizing a Global Lightning Mapper (GLM) on GOES-R, better understanding and ground truth of each of these instruments and their respective flash algorithms is needed.

  16. Observations of basin ground motions from a dense seismic array in San Jose, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.; Carver, D.; Cranswick, E.; Bice, T.; Sell, R.; Hanson, S.

    2001-01-01

    We installed a dense array of 41 digital seismographs in San Jose, California, to evaluate in detail the effects of a deep sedimentary basin and shallow sedimentary deposits on earthquake ground motions. This urban array is located near the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley and spans the Evergreen sedimentary basin identified by gravity data. Average station spacing is 1 km, with three stations initially spaced 110 m apart. Despite the high-noise urban environment, the stations of the array successfully triggered on and recorded small local earthquakes (M 2.5-2.8 at 10-25 km distance) and larger regional events such as the M 5.0 Bolinas earthquake (90 km distance), M 4.6-5.6 earthquakes near Mammoth Lakes (270 km distance), M 4.9-5.6 events in western Nevada (420 km distance) and the M 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake (590 km distance). Maps of spectral ratios across the array show that the highest amplitudes in all frequency bands studied (0.125-8 Hz) are generally observed at stations farther from the eastern edge of the Santa Clara Valley. Larger spectral amplitudes are often observed above the western edge of the Evergreen Basin. Snapshots of the recorded wavefield crossing the array for regional events to the east reveal that large, low-frequency (0.125-0.5 Hz) arrivals after the S-wave travel from south to north across the array. A moving-window, cross-correlation analysis finds that these later arrivals are surface waves traveling from the south. The timing and propagation direction of these arrivals indicates that they were likely produced by scattering of incident S waves at the border of the Santa Clara Valley to the south of the array. It is remarkable that the largest low-frequency phases at many of the valley sites for regional events to the east are basin surface waves coming from a direction about 70 degrees different from that of the epicenters. Basin surface waves emanating from the eastern edge of the valley are also identified by the cross

  17. Triangulations of sprites relative to parent lighting near the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G.; Cummer, S. A.; Li, J.; Lyons, W. A.; Stanley, M. A.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Thomas, R. J.; Weiss, S. A.; Beasley, W. H.; Bruning, E. C.; MacGorman, D. R.; Palivec, K.; Samaras, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal and spatial development of sprite-producing lightning flashes is examined with coordinated observations over an asymmetric mesoscale convective system on June 29, 2011 near the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OK-LMA). About 30 sprites were mutually observed from Bennett, Colorado and Hawley, Texas, allowing us to triangulate sprite formation in comparison with spatial/temporal development of the parent lightning. Complementary measurements of broadband (<1 Hz to ~300 kHz) radio frequency lightning signals are available from several magnetic sensors across the United States. Our analyses indicate that although sprite locations can be significantly offset horizontally (up to 70 km) from the parent ground stroke, they are usually laterally within 30 km of the in-cloud lightning activity during the 100 ms time interval prior to the sprite production. This is true for short-delayed sprites produced within 20 ms after a causative stroke, and long-delayed sprites appearing up to more than 200 ms after the stroke. Multiple sprites appearing as dancing/jumping events can be produced during one single flash either in a single lightning channel, through series of current surges superposed on a long and intense continuing current, or in multiple lightning channels through distinct ground strokes of the flash. The burst of continuous very-low-frequency/low-frequency lightning sferics commonly observed in association with sprites is linked to the horizontal progression of multiple negative leaders through positive charged regions of the cloud, which are typically centered at altitudes ~1-2 km (or more) above the freezing level.

  18. Development and deployment of a high-density linkage map identified quantitative trait loci for plant height in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Ren, Xiaoping; Wu, Bei; Li, Xinping; Chen, Weigang; Zhou, Xiaojing; Chen, Yuning; Pandey, Manish K; Jiao, Yongqing; Luo, Huaiyong; Lei, Yong; Varshney, Rajeev K; Liao, Boshou; Jiang, Huifang

    2016-12-20

    Plant height is one of the most important architecture traits in crop plants. In peanut, the genetic basis of plant height remains ambiguous. In this context, we genotyped a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population with 140 individuals developed from a cross between two peanut varieties varying in plant height, Zhonghua 10 and ICG 12625. Genotyping data was generated for 1,175 SSR and 42 transposon polymorphic markers and a high-density genetic linkage map was constructed with 1,219 mapped loci covering total map length of 2,038.75 cM i.e., accounted for nearly 80% of the peanut genome. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis using genotyping and phenotyping data for three environments identified 8 negative-effect QTLs and 10 positive-effect QTLs for plant height. Among these QTLs, 8 QTLs had a large contribution to plant height that explained ≥10% phenotypic variation. Two major-effect consensus QTLs namely cqPHA4a and cqPHA4b were identified with stable performance across three environments. Further, the allelic recombination of detected QTLs proved the existence of the phenomenon of transgressive segregation for plant height in the RIL population. Therefore, this study not only successfully reported a high-density genetic linkage map of peanut and identified genomic region controlling plant height but also opens opportunities for further gene discovery and molecular breeding for plant height in peanut.

  19. A map of copy number variations in Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Lou, Haiyi; Li, Shilin; Yang, Yajun; Kang, Longli; Zhang, Xin; Jin, Wenfei; Wu, Bailin; Jin, Li; Xu, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the human genome contains extensive copy number variations (CNVs). Investigating the medical and evolutionary impacts of CNVs requires the knowledge of locations, sizes and frequency distribution of them within and between populations. However, CNV study of Chinese minorities, which harbor the majority of genetic diversity of Chinese populations, has been underrepresented considering the same efforts in other populations. Here we constructed, to our knowledge, a first CNV map in seven Chinese populations representing the major linguistic groups in China with 1,440 CNV regions identified using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Array. Considerable differences in distributions of CNV regions between populations and substantial population structures were observed. We showed that ∼35% of CNV regions identified in minority ethnic groups are not shared by Han Chinese population, indicating that the contribution of the minorities to genetic architecture of Chinese population could not be ignored. We further identified highly differentiated CNV regions between populations. For example, a common deletion in Dong and Zhuang (44.4% and 50%), which overlaps two keratin-associated protein genes contributing to the structure of hair fibers, was not observed in Han Chinese. Interestingly, the most differentiated CNV deletion between HapMap CEU and YRI containing CCL3L1 gene reported in previous studies was also the highest differentiated regions between Tibetan and other populations. Besides, by jointly analyzing CNVs and SNPs, we found a CNV region containing gene CTDSPL were in almost perfect linkage disequilibrium between flanking SNPs in Tibetan while not in other populations except HapMap CHD. Furthermore, we found the SNP taggability of CNVs in Chinese populations was much lower than that in European populations. Our results suggest the necessity of a full characterization of CNVs in Chinese populations, and the CNV map we constructed serves as a useful resource in

  20. A Map of Copy Number Variations in Chinese Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yajun; Kang, Longli; Zhang, Xin; Jin, Wenfei; Wu, Bailin; Jin, Li; Xu, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the human genome contains extensive copy number variations (CNVs). Investigating the medical and evolutionary impacts of CNVs requires the knowledge of locations, sizes and frequency distribution of them within and between populations. However, CNV study of Chinese minorities, which harbor the majority of genetic diversity of Chinese populations, has been underrepresented considering the same efforts in other populations. Here we constructed, to our knowledge, a first CNV map in seven Chinese populations representing the major linguistic groups in China with 1,440 CNV regions identified using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 Array. Considerable differences in distributions of CNV regions between populations and substantial population structures were observed. We showed that ∼35% of CNV regions identified in minority ethnic groups are not shared by Han Chinese population, indicating that the contribution of the minorities to genetic architecture of Chinese population could not be ignored. We further identified highly differentiated CNV regions between populations. For example, a common deletion in Dong and Zhuang (44.4% and 50%), which overlaps two keratin-associated protein genes contributing to the structure of hair fibers, was not observed in Han Chinese. Interestingly, the most differentiated CNV deletion between HapMap CEU and YRI containing CCL3L1 gene reported in previous studies was also the highest differentiated regions between Tibetan and other populations. Besides, by jointly analyzing CNVs and SNPs, we found a CNV region containing gene CTDSPL were in almost perfect linkage disequilibrium between flanking SNPs in Tibetan while not in other populations except HapMap CHD. Furthermore, we found the SNP taggability of CNVs in Chinese populations was much lower than that in European populations. Our results suggest the necessity of a full characterization of CNVs in Chinese populations, and the CNV map we constructed serves as a useful resource in

  1. Novel Sources of Stripe Rust Resistance Identified by Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Ethiopian Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weizhen; Maccaferri, Marco; Rynearson, Sheri; Letta, Tesfaye; Zegeye, Habtemariam; Tuberosa, Roberto; Chen, Xianming; Pumphrey, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a global concern for wheat production, and has been increasingly destructive in Ethiopia, as well as in the United States and in many other countries. As Ethiopia has a long history of stripe rust epidemics, its native wheat germplasm harbors potentially valuable resistance loci. Moreover, the Ethiopian germplasm has been historically underutilized in breeding of modern wheat worldwide and thus the resistance alleles from the Ethiopian germplasm represent potentially novel sources. The objective of this study was to identify loci conferring resistance to predominant Pst races in Ethiopia and the United States. Using a high-density 90 K wheat single nucleotide polymorphism array, a genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) was conducted on 182 durum wheat landrace accessions and contemporary varieties originating from Ethiopia. Landraces were detected to be more resistant at the seedling stage while cultivars were more resistant at the adult-plant stages. GWAS identified 68 loci associated with seedling resistance to one or more races. Six loci on chromosome arms 1AS, 1BS, 3AS, 4BL, and 5BL were associated with resistance against at least two races at the seedling stage, and five loci were previously undocumented. GWAS analysis of field resistance reactions identified 12 loci associated with resistance on chromosomes 1A, 1B, 2BS, 3BL, 4AL, 4B and 5AL, which were detected in at least two of six field screening nurseries at the adult-plant stage. Comparison with previously mapped resistance loci indicates that six of the 12 resistance loci are newly documented. This study reports effective sources of resistance to contemporary races in Ethiopia and the United States and reveals that Ethiopian durum wheat landraces are abundant in novel Pst resistance loci that may be transferred into adapted cultivars to provide resistance against Pst. PMID:28553306

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of solitary and optically injected two-element laser arrays with four different waveguide structures: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianqiang; Susanto, H; Cemlyn, B R; Henning, I D; Adams, M J

    2018-02-19

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of solitary and optically injected two-element laser arrays with a range of waveguide structures. The analysis is performed with a detailed direct numerical simulation, where high-resolution dynamic maps are generated to identify regions of dynamic instability in the parameter space of interest. Our combined one- and two-parameter bifurcation analysis uncovers globally diverse dynamical regimes (steady-state, oscillation, and chaos) in the solitary laser arrays, which are greatly influenced by static design waveguiding structures, the amplitude-phase coupling factor of the electric field, i.e. the linewidth-enhancement factor, as well as the control parameter, e.g. the pump rate. When external optical injection is introduced to one element of the arrays, we show that the whole system can be either injection-locked simultaneously or display rich, different dynamics outside the locking region. The effect of optical injection is to significantly modify the nature and the regions of nonlinear dynamics from those found in the solitary case. We also show similarities and differences (asymmetry) between the oscillation amplitude of the two elements of the array in specific well-defined regions, which hold for all the waveguiding structures considered. Our findings pave the way to a better understanding of dynamic instability in large arrays of lasers.

  3. Psychosocial experiences associated with confirmed and self-identified dyslexia: a participant-driven concept map of adult perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nalavany, Blace Arthur; Carawan, Lena Williams; Rennick, Robyn A

    2011-01-01

    Concept mapping (a mixed qualitative-quantitative methodology) was used to describe and understand the psychosocial experiences of adults with confirmed and self-identified dyslexia. Using innovative processes of art and photography, Phase 1 of the study included 15 adults who participated in focus groups and in-depth interviews and were asked to elucidate their experiences with dyslexia. On index cards, 75 statements and experiences with dyslexia were recorded. The second phase of the study included 39 participants who sorted these statements into self-defined categories and rated each statement to reflect their personal experiences to produce a visual representation, or concept map, of their experience. The final concept map generated nine distinct cluster themes: Organization Skills for Success; Finding Success; A Good Support System Makes the Difference; On Being Overwhelmed; Emotional Downside; Why Can't They See It?; Pain, Hurt, and Embarrassment From Past to Present; Fear of Disclosure; and Moving Forward. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Flexible, foldable, actively multiplexed, high-density electrode array for mapping brain activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Viventi, Jonathan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Vigeland, Leif; Frechette, Eric S; Blanco, Justin A; Kim, Yun-Soung; Avrin, Andrew E; Tiruvadi, Vineet R; Hwang, Suk-Won; Vanleer, Ann C; Wulsin, Drausin F; Davis, Kathryn; Gelber, Casey E; Palmer, Larry; Van der Spiegel, Jan; Wu, Jian; Xiao, Jianliang; Huang, Yonggang; Contreras, Diego; Rogers, John A; Litt, Brian

    2011-11-13

    Arrays of electrodes for recording and stimulating the brain are used throughout clinical medicine and basic neuroscience research, yet are unable to sample large areas of the brain while maintaining high spatial resolution because of the need to individually wire each passive sensor at the electrode-tissue interface. To overcome this constraint, we developed new devices that integrate ultrathin and flexible silicon nanomembrane transistors into the electrode array, enabling new dense arrays of thousands of amplified and multiplexed sensors that are connected using fewer wires. We used this system to record spatial properties of cat brain activity in vivo, including sleep spindles, single-trial visual evoked responses and electrographic seizures. We found that seizures may manifest as recurrent spiral waves that propagate in the neocortex. The developments reported here herald a new generation of diagnostic and therapeutic brain-machine interface devices.

  5. Mitochondrial Protein Interaction Mapping Identifies Regulators of Respiratory Chain Function.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brendan J; Wilkerson, Emily M; Veling, Mike T; Minogue, Catie E; Xia, Chuanwu; Beebe, Emily T; Wrobel, Russell L; Cho, Holly; Kremer, Laura S; Alston, Charlotte L; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Dolan, Brendan K; Ulbrich, Arne; Stefely, Jonathan A; Bohl, Sarah L; Werner, Kelly M; Jochem, Adam; Westphall, Michael S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are essential for numerous cellular processes, yet hundreds of their proteins lack robust functional annotation. To reveal functions for these proteins (termed MXPs), we assessed condition-specific protein-protein interactions for 50 select MXPs using affinity enrichment mass spectrometry. Our data connect MXPs to diverse mitochondrial processes, including multiple aspects of respiratory chain function. Building upon these observations, we validated C17orf89 as a complex I (CI) assembly factor. Disruption of C17orf89 markedly reduced CI activity, and its depletion is found in an unresolved case of CI deficiency. We likewise discovered that LYRM5 interacts with and deflavinates the electron-transferring flavoprotein that shuttles electrons to coenzyme Q (CoQ). Finally, we identified a dynamic human CoQ biosynthetic complex involving multiple MXPs whose topology we map using purified components. Collectively, our data lend mechanistic insight into respiratory chain-related activities and prioritize hundreds of additional interactions for further exploration of mitochondrial protein function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Using the ENTLN lightning catalog to identify thunder signals in the USArray Transportable Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytell, J. E.; Reyes, J. C.; Vernon, F.; Sloop, C.; Heckman, S.

    2013-12-01

    Severe weather events can pose a challenge for seismic analysts who regularly see non-seismic signals recorded at the stations. Sometimes, the noise from thunder can be confused with signals from seismic events such as quarry blasts or earthquakes depending on where and when the noise is observed. Automatic analysis of data is also severely affected by big amplitude arrivals that we could safely ignore. A comprehensive lightning catalog for the continental US in conjunction with a travel time model for thunder arrivals can help analysts identify some of these unknown sources. Researchers from Earthscope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) have partnered with the Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN) in an effort to create such a catalog. Predicted thunder arrivals from some powerful meteorological systems affecting the main TA footprint will undergo extensive evaluation. We will examine the veracity of the predicted arrivals at different distances and azimuths and the time accuracy of the model. A combination of barometric pressure and seismic signals will be use to verify these arrivals.

  7. Identifying the impact of G-quadruplexes on Affymetrix 3' arrays using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Memon, Farhat N; Owen, Anne M; Sanchez-Graillet, Olivia; Upton, Graham J G; Harrison, Andrew P

    2010-01-15

    A tetramer quadruplex structure is formed by four parallel strands of DNA/ RNA containing runs of guanine. These quadruplexes are able to form because guanine can Hoogsteen hydrogen bond to other guanines, and a tetrad of guanines can form a stable arrangement. Recently we have discovered that probes on Affymetrix GeneChips that contain runs of guanine do not measure gene expression reliably. We associate this finding with the likelihood that quadruplexes are forming on the surface of GeneChips. In order to cope with the rapidly expanding size of GeneChip array datasets in the public domain, we are exploring the use of cloud computing to replicate our experiments on 3' arrays to look at the effect of the location of G-spots (runs of guanines). Cloud computing is a recently introduced high-performance solution that takes advantage of the computational infrastructure of large organisations such as Amazon and Google. We expect that cloud computing will become widely adopted because it enables bioinformaticians to avoid capital expenditure on expensive computing resources and to only pay a cloud computing provider for what is used. Moreover, as well as financial efficiency, cloud computing is an ecologically-friendly technology, it enables efficient data-sharing and we expect it to be faster for development purposes. Here we propose the advantageous use of cloud computing to perform a large data-mining analysis of public domain 3' arrays.

  8. Comparative map and trait viewer (CMTV): an integrated bioinformatic tool to construct consensus maps and compare QTL and functional genomics data across genomes and experiments.

    PubMed

    Sawkins, M C; Farmer, A D; Hoisington, D; Sullivan, J; Tolopko, A; Jiang, Z; Ribaut, J-M

    2004-10-01

    In the past few decades, a wealth of genomic data has been produced in a wide variety of species using a diverse array of functional and molecular marker approaches. In order to unlock the full potential of the information contained in these independent experiments, researchers need efficient and intuitive means to identify common genomic regions and genes involved in the expression of target phenotypic traits across diverse conditions. To address this need, we have developed a Comparative Map and Trait Viewer (CMTV) tool that can be used to construct dynamic aggregations of a variety of types of genomic datasets. By algorithmically determining correspondences between sets of objects on multiple genomic maps, the CMTV can display syntenic regions across taxa, combine maps from separate experiments into a consensus map, or project data from different maps into a common coordinate framework using dynamic coordinate translations between source and target maps. We present a case study that illustrates the utility of the tool for managing large and varied datasets by integrating data collected by CIMMYT in maize drought tolerance research with data from public sources. This example will focus on one of the visualization features for Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) data, using likelihood ratio (LR) files produced by generic QTL analysis software and displaying the data in a unique visual manner across different combinations of traits, environments and crosses. Once a genomic region of interest has been identified, the CMTV can search and display additional QTLs meeting a particular threshold for that region, or other functional data such as sets of differentially expressed genes located in the region; it thus provides an easily used means for organizing and manipulating data sets that have been dynamically integrated under the focus of the researcher's specific hypothesis.

  9. Surface analysis and mechanical behaviour mapping of vertically aligned CNT forest array through nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoulos, Elias P.; Charitidis, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based architectures have increased the scientific interest owning to their exceptional performance rendering them promising candidates for advanced industrial applications in the nanotechnology field. Despite individual CNTs being considered as one of the most known strong materials, much less is known about other CNT forms, such as CNT arrays, in terms of their mechanical performance (integrity). In this work, thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method is employed to produce vertically aligned multiwall (VA-MW) CNT carpets. Their structural properties were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, while their hydrophobic behavior was investigated via contact angle measurements. The resistance to indentation deformation of VA-MWCNT carpets was investigated through nanoindentation technique. The synthesized VA-MWCNTs carpets consisted of well-aligned MWCNTs. Static contact angle measurements were performed with water and glycerol, revealing a rather super-hydrophobic behavior. The structural analysis, hydrophobic behavior and indentation response of VA-MWCNTs carpets synthesized via CVD method are clearly demonstrated. Additionally, cycle indentation load-depth curve was applied and hysteresis loops were observed in the indenter loading-unloading cycle due to the local stress distribution. Hardness (as resistance to applied load) and modulus mapping, at 200 nm of displacement for a grid of 70 μm2 is presented. Through trajection, the resistance is clearly divided in 2 regions, namely the MWCNT probing and the in-between area MWCNT - MWCNT interface.

  10. Spatio-temporal mapping of variation potentials in leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ using multi-electrode array

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan; Jia, Yong-Peng; Leng, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    Damaging thermal stimuli trigger long-lasting variation potentials (VPs) in higher plants. Owing to limitations in conventional plant electrophysiological recording techniques, recorded signals are composed of signals originating from all of the cells that are connected to an electrode. This limitation does not enable detailed spatio-temporal distributions of transmission and electrical activities in plants to be visualised. Multi-electrode array (MEA) enables the recording and imaging of dynamic spatio-temporal electrical activities in higher plants. Here, we used an 8 × 8 MEA with a polar distance of 450 μm to measure electrical activities from numerous cells simultaneously. The mapping of the data that were recorded from the MEA revealed the transfer mode of the thermally induced VPs in the leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ. These results suggest that MEA can enable recordings with high spatio-temporal resolution that facilitate the determination of the bioelectrical response mode of higher plants under stress. PMID:24961469

  11. Spatio-temporal mapping of variation potentials in leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ using multi-electrode array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan; Jia, Yong-Peng; Leng, John Q

    2014-06-25

    Damaging thermal stimuli trigger long-lasting variation potentials (VPs) in higher plants. Owing to limitations in conventional plant electrophysiological recording techniques, recorded signals are composed of signals originating from all of the cells that are connected to an electrode. This limitation does not enable detailed spatio-temporal distributions of transmission and electrical activities in plants to be visualised. Multi-electrode array (MEA) enables the recording and imaging of dynamic spatio-temporal electrical activities in higher plants. Here, we used an 8 × 8 MEA with a polar distance of 450 μm to measure electrical activities from numerous cells simultaneously. The mapping of the data that were recorded from the MEA revealed the transfer mode of the thermally induced VPs in the leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ. These results suggest that MEA can enable recordings with high spatio-temporal resolution that facilitate the determination of the bioelectrical response mode of higher plants under stress.

  12. Identifying environmental risk factors and mapping the risk of human West Nile virus in South Dakota.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, A.; Davis, J. K.; Wimberly, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    Human West Nile virus (WNV) first arrived in the USA in 1999 and has since then spread across the country. Today, the highest incidence rates are found in the state of South Dakota. The disease occurrence depends on the complex interaction between the mosquito vector, the bird host and the dead-end human host. Understanding the spatial domain of this interaction and being able to identify disease transmission hotspots is crucial for effective disease prevention and mosquito control. In this study we use geospatial environmental information to understand what drives the spatial distribution of cases of human West Nile virus in South Dakota and to map relative infection risk across the state. To map the risk of human West Nile virus in South Dakota, we used geocoded human case data from the years 2004-2016. Satellite data from the Landsat ETM+ and MODIS for the years 2003 to 2016 were used to characterize environmental patterns. From these datasets we calculated indices, such as the normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) and the normalized differenced water index (NDWI). In addition, datasets such as the National Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS), National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD), National Wetland inventory (NWI), National Elevation Dataset (NED) and Soil Survey Geographic Database (SSURGO) were utilized. Environmental variables were summarized for a buffer zone around the case and control points. We used a boosted regression tree model to identify the most important variables describing the risk of WNV infection. We generated a risk map by applying this model across the entire state. We found that the highest relative risk is present in the James River valley in northeastern South Dakota. Factors that were identified as influencing the transmission risk include inter-annual variability of vegetation cover, water availability and temperature. Land covers such as grasslands, low developed areas and wetlands were also found to be good predictors for human

  13. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Network Assessment and Analyses for Intercomparison Studies and GOES-R Proxy Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.; Carey, L. D.; Goodman, S. J.; Rudlosky, S. D.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anselmo, E. M.; Neves, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    A 12 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network was deployed during October 2011in the vicinity of São Paulo, Brazil (SP-LMA) to contribute total lightning measurements to an international field campaign [CHUVA - Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)]. The SP-LMA was operational from November 2011 through March 2012. Sensor spacing was on the order of 15-30 km, with a network diameter on the order of 40-50km. The SP-LMA provides good 3-D lightning mapping out to150 km from the network center, with 2-D coverage considerably farther. In addition to supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives, the SP-LMA is supporting the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), on NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R: scheduled for a 2015 launch). These proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready to use on "day1" following the GOES-R launch. The SP-LMA data also will be intercompared with lightning observations from other deployed lightning networks to advance our understanding of the capabilities/contributions of each of these networks toward GLM proxy and validation activities. This paper addresses the network assessment and analyses for intercomparison studies and GOES-R proxy activities

  14. Use of sentinel node mapping for cancer of the colon: 'to map or not to map".

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kristen A; Lechner, Jonathan; Shen, Perry; Waters, Gregory S; Geisinger, Kim R; Levine, Edward A

    2006-07-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping has become a cornerstone of oncologic surgery because it is a proven method for identifying nodal disease in melanoma and breast cancer. In addition, it can ameliorate the surgical morbidity secondary to lymphadenectomy. However, experience with SLN mapping for carcinoma of the colon and other visceral malignancies is limited. This study represents an update to our initial pilot experience with SLN mapping for carcinoma of the colon. Consenting patients over the age of 18 diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the colon were included in this study. At the time of operation, 1 to 2 mL of isosulfan blue was injected with a 25-gauge needle into the subserosa at 4 sites around the edge of the palpable tumor. The SLN was identified visually and excised followed by a standard lymphadenectomy and surgical resection. SLNs were evaluated by standard hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) evaluation as well as immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques for carcinoembryonic antigen and cytokeratin if the H&E was negative. Sixty-nine patients underwent SLN mapping. A SLN was identified in 93 per cent (64 of 69) of patients. Nodal metastases were identified in 38 per cent (26 of 69) of patients overall. In 5 patients, the only positive node identified was the SLN, 2 of which were positive by IHC criteria alone. Therefore, 3 per cent (2 of 69) of patients were upstaged by SLN mapping. This technique was 100 per cent specific while being 46 per cent sensitive. Fourteen patients had false-negative SLNs. Metastasis to regional lymph nodes remains the key prognostic factor for colon cancer. SLN mapping is feasible for colon cancer and can identify a subset of patients who could benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. Although SLN mapping did not alter the surgical management of colon cancer, it does make possible a more focused and cost-effective pathologic evaluation of nodal disease. We do not suggest routine utilization of SLN mapping for colon cancer, but we believe that

  15. A Novel Feature-Map Based ICA Model for Identifying the Individual, Intra/Inter-Group Brain Networks across Multiple fMRI Datasets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nizhuan; Chang, Chunqi; Zeng, Weiming; Shi, Yuhu; Yan, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has been widely used in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analysis to evaluate functional connectivity of the brain; however, there are still some limitations on ICA simultaneously handling neuroimaging datasets with diverse acquisition parameters, e.g., different repetition time, different scanner, etc. Therefore, it is difficult for the traditional ICA framework to effectively handle ever-increasingly big neuroimaging datasets. In this research, a novel feature-map based ICA framework (FMICA) was proposed to address the aforementioned deficiencies, which aimed at exploring brain functional networks (BFNs) at different scales, e.g., the first level (individual subject level), second level (intragroup level of subjects within a certain dataset) and third level (intergroup level of subjects across different datasets), based only on the feature maps extracted from the fMRI datasets. The FMICA was presented as a hierarchical framework, which effectively made ICA and constrained ICA as a whole to identify the BFNs from the feature maps. The simulated and real experimental results demonstrated that FMICA had the excellent ability to identify the intergroup BFNs and to characterize subject-specific and group-specific difference of BFNs from the independent component feature maps, which sharply reduced the size of fMRI datasets. Compared with traditional ICAs, FMICA as a more generalized framework could efficiently and simultaneously identify the variant BFNs at the subject-specific, intragroup, intragroup-specific and intergroup levels, implying that FMICA was able to handle big neuroimaging datasets in neuroscience research.

  16. Generalization and fine mapping of European ancestry-based central adiposity variants in African ancestry populations

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Sachiko; Yao, Jie; Guo, Xiuqing; Fernandez-Rhodes, Lindsay; Lim, Unhee; Boston, Jonathan; Buzková, Petra; Carlson, Christopher S.; Cheng, Iona; Cochran, Barbara; Cooper, Richard; Ehret, Georg; Fornage, Myriam; Gong, Jian; Gross, Myron; Gu, C. Charles; Haessler, Jeff; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Houston, Denise; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Jackson, Rebecca; Kuller, Lew; Leppert, Mark; Lewis, Cora E.; Li, Rongling; Le Marchand, Loic; Matise, Tara C.; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung H.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pankow, James S.; Pankratz, Nathan; Pooler, Loreall; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Bien, Stephanie A.; Wassel, Christina L.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Allison, Matthew; Rotter, Jerome I.; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Wilkens, Lynne; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kooperberg, Charles; Peters, Ulrike; Buyske, Steven; Graff, Mariaelisa; North, Kari E.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Central adiposity measures such as waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) are associated with cardiometabolic disorders independently of BMI and are gaining clinically utility. Several studies report genetic variants associated with central adiposity, but most utilize only European ancestry populations. Understanding whether the genetic associations discovered among mainly European descendants are shared with African ancestry populations will help elucidate the biological underpinnings of abdominal fat deposition. Subjects/Methods To identify the underlying functional genetic determinants of body fat distribution, we conducted an array-wide association meta-analysis among persons of African ancestry across seven studies/consortia participating in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) consortium. We used the Metabochip array, designed for fine mapping cardiovascular associated loci, to explore novel array-wide associations with WC and WHR among 15 945 African descendants using all and sex-stratified groups. We further interrogated 17 known WHR regions for African ancestry-specific variants. Results Of the 17 WHR loci, eight SNPs located in four loci were replicated in the sex-combined or sex-stratified meta-analyses. Two of these eight independently associated with WHR after conditioning on the known variant in European descendants (rs12096179 in TBX15-WARS2 and rs2059092 in ADAMTS9). In the fine mapping assessment, the putative functional region was reduced across all four loci but to varying degrees (average 40% drop in number of putative SNPs and 20% drop in genomic region). Similar to previous studies, the significant SNPs in the female stratified analysis were stronger than the significant SNPs from the sex-combined analysis. No novel associations were detected in the array-wide analyses. Conclusions Of 17 previously identified loci, four loci replicated in the African ancestry populations of

  17. CRISPRDetect: A flexible algorithm to define CRISPR arrays.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ambarish; Staals, Raymond H J; Morales, Sergio E; Fineran, Peter C; Brown, Chris M

    2016-05-17

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNAs provide the specificity for noncoding RNA-guided adaptive immune defence systems in prokaryotes. CRISPR arrays consist of repeat sequences separated by specific spacer sequences. CRISPR arrays have previously been identified in a large proportion of prokaryotic genomes. However, currently available detection algorithms do not utilise recently discovered features regarding CRISPR loci. We have developed a new approach to automatically detect, predict and interactively refine CRISPR arrays. It is available as a web program and command line from bioanalysis.otago.ac.nz/CRISPRDetect. CRISPRDetect discovers putative arrays, extends the array by detecting additional variant repeats, corrects the direction of arrays, refines the repeat/spacer boundaries, and annotates different types of sequence variations (e.g. insertion/deletion) in near identical repeats. Due to these features, CRISPRDetect has significant advantages when compared to existing identification tools. As well as further support for small medium and large repeats, CRISPRDetect identified a class of arrays with 'extra-large' repeats in bacteria (repeats 44-50 nt). The CRISPRDetect output is integrated with other analysis tools. Notably, the predicted spacers can be directly utilised by CRISPRTarget to predict targets. CRISPRDetect enables more accurate detection of arrays and spacers and its gff output is suitable for inclusion in genome annotation pipelines and visualisation. It has been used to analyse all complete bacterial and archaeal reference genomes.

  18. Tomato breeding in the genomics era: insights from a SNP array.

    PubMed

    Víquez-Zamora, Marcela; Vosman, Ben; van de Geest, Henri; Bovy, Arnaud; Visser, Richard G F; Finkers, Richard; van Heusden, Adriaan W

    2013-05-27

    The major bottle neck in genetic and linkage studies in tomato has been the lack of a sufficient number of molecular markers. This has radically changed with the application of next generation sequencing and high throughput genotyping. A set of 6000 SNPs was identified and 5528 of them were used to evaluate tomato germplasm at the level of species, varieties and segregating populations. From the 5528 SNPs, 1980 originated from 454-sequencing, 3495 from Illumina Solexa sequencing and 53 were additional known markers. Genotyping different tomato samples allowed the evaluation of the level of heterozygosity and introgressions among commercial varieties. Cherry tomatoes were especially different from round/beefs in chromosomes 4, 5 and 12. We were able to identify a set of 750 unique markers distinguishing S. lycopersicum 'Moneymaker' from all its distantly related wild relatives. Clustering and neighbour joining analysis among varieties and species showed expected grouping patterns, with S. pimpinellifolium as the most closely related to commercial tomatoes earlier results. Our results show that a SNP search in only a few breeding lines already provides generally applicable markers in tomato and its wild relatives. It also shows that the Illumina bead array generated data are highly reproducible. Our SNPs can roughly be divided in two categories: SNPs of which both forms are present in the wild relatives and in domesticated tomatoes (originating from common ancestors) and SNPs unique for the domesticated tomato (originating from after the domestication event). The SNPs can be used for genotyping, identification of varieties, comparison of genetic and physical linkage maps and to confirm (phylogenetic) relations. In the SNPs used for the array there is hardly any overlap with the SolCAP array and it is strongly recommended to combine both SNP sets and to select a core collection of robust SNPs completely covering the entire tomato genome.

  19. Population structure and genome-wide association analysis for frost tolerance in oat using continuous SNP array signal intensity ratios.

    PubMed

    Tumino, Giorgio; Voorrips, Roeland E; Rizza, Fulvia; Badeck, Franz W; Morcia, Caterina; Ghizzoni, Roberta; Germeier, Christoph U; Paulo, Maria-João; Terzi, Valeria; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2016-09-01

    Infinium SNP data analysed as continuous intensity ratios enabled associating genotypic and phenotypic data from heterogeneous oat samples, showing that association mapping for frost tolerance is a feasible option. Oat is sensitive to freezing temperatures, which restricts the cultivation of fall-sown or winter oats to regions with milder winters. Fall-sown oats have a longer growth cycle, mature earlier, and have a higher productivity than spring-sown oats, therefore improving frost tolerance is an important goal in oat breeding. Our aim was to test the effectiveness of a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) for mapping QTLs related to frost tolerance, using an approach that tolerates continuously distributed signals from SNPs in bulked samples from heterogeneous accessions. A collection of 138 European oat accessions, including landraces, old and modern varieties from 27 countries was genotyped using the Infinium 6K SNP array. The SNP data were analyzed as continuous intensity ratios, rather than converting them into discrete values by genotype calling. PCA and Ward's clustering of genetic similarities revealed the presence of two main groups of accessions, which roughly corresponded to Continental Europe and Mediterranean/Atlantic Europe, although a total of eight subgroups can be distinguished. The accessions were phenotyped for frost tolerance under controlled conditions by measuring fluorescence quantum yield of photosystem II after a freezing stress. GWAS were performed by a linear mixed model approach, comparing different corrections for population structure. All models detected three robust QTLs, two of which co-mapped with QTLs identified earlier in bi-parental mapping populations. The approach used in the present work shows that SNP array data of heterogeneous hexaploid oat samples can be successfully used to determine genetic similarities and to map associations to quantitative phenotypic traits.

  20. Evaluation of realistic layouts for next generation on-scalp MEG: spatial information density maps.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Bushra; Pfeiffer, Christoph; Schneiderman, Justin F

    2017-08-01

    While commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are the functional neuroimaging state-of-the-art in terms of spatio-temporal resolution, MEG sensors have not changed significantly since the 1990s. Interest in newer sensors that operate at less extreme temperatures, e.g., high critical temperature (high-T c ) SQUIDs, optically-pumped magnetometers, etc., is growing because they enable significant reductions in head-to-sensor standoff (on-scalp MEG). Various metrics quantify the advantages of on-scalp MEG, but a single straightforward one is lacking. Previous works have furthermore been limited to arbitrary and/or unrealistic sensor layouts. We introduce spatial information density (SID) maps for quantitative and qualitative evaluations of sensor arrays. SID-maps present the spatial distribution of information a sensor array extracts from a source space while accounting for relevant source and sensor parameters. We use it in a systematic comparison of three practical on-scalp MEG sensor array layouts (based on high-T c SQUIDs) and the standard Elekta Neuromag TRIUX magnetometer array. Results strengthen the case for on-scalp and specifically high-T c SQUID-based MEG while providing a path for the practical design of future MEG systems. SID-maps are furthermore general to arbitrary magnetic sensor technologies and source spaces and can thus be used for design and evaluation of sensor arrays for magnetocardiography, magnetic particle imaging, etc.

  1. Construction of integrated linkage map of a recombinant inbred line population of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Vipin, Cina Ann; Luckett, David J.; Harper, John D.I.; Ash, Gavin J.; Kilian, Andrzej; Ellwood, Simon R.; Phan, Huyen T.T.; Raman, Harsh

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) marker panel and its utilisation in the development of an integrated genetic linkage map of white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) using an F8 recombinant inbred line population derived from Kiev Mutant/P27174. One hundred and thirty-six DArT markers were merged into the first genetic linkage map composed of 220 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and 105 genic markers. The integrated map consists of 38 linkage groups of 441 markers and spans a total length of 2,169 cM, with an average interval size of 4.6 cM. The DArT markers exhibited good genome coverage and were associated with previously identified genic and AFLP markers linked with quantitative trait loci for anthracnose resistance, flowering time and alkaloid content. The improved genetic linkage map of white lupin will aid in the identification of markers for traits of interest and future syntenic studies. PMID:24273424

  2. Solar thematic maps for space weather operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rigler, E. Joshua; Hill, Steven M.; Reinard, Alysha A.; Steenburgh, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Thematic maps are arrays of labels, or "themes", associated with discrete locations in space and time. Borrowing heavily from the terrestrial remote sensing discipline, a numerical technique based on Bayes' theorem captures operational expertise in the form of trained theme statistics, then uses this to automatically assign labels to solar image pixels. Ultimately, regular thematic maps of the solar corona will be generated from high-cadence, high-resolution SUVI images, the solar ultraviolet imager slated to fly on NOAA's next-generation GOES-R series of satellites starting ~2016. These thematic maps will not only provide quicker, more consistent synoptic views of the sun for space weather forecasters, but digital thematic pixel masks (e.g., coronal hole, active region, flare, etc.), necessary for a new generation of operational solar data products, will be generated. This paper presents the mathematical underpinnings of our thematic mapper, as well as some practical algorithmic considerations. Then, using images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Advanced Imaging Array (AIA) as test data, it presents results from validation experiments designed to ascertain the robustness of the technique with respect to differing expert opinions and changing solar conditions.

  3. Mapping underwater sound noise and assessing its sources by using a self-organizing maps method.

    PubMed

    Rako, Nikolina; Vilibić, Ivica; Mihanović, Hrvoje

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to provide an objective mapping of the underwater noise and its sources over an Adriatic coastal marine habitat by applying the self-organizing maps (SOM) method. Systematic sampling of sea ambient noise (SAN) was carried out at ten predefined acoustic stations between 2007 and 2009. Analyses of noise levels were performed for 1/3 octave band standard centered frequencies in terms of instantaneous sound pressure levels averaged over 300 s to calculate the equivalent continuous sound pressure levels. Data on vessels' presence, type, and distance from the monitoring stations were also collected at each acoustic station during the acoustic sampling. Altogether 69 noise surveys were introduced to the SOM predefined 2 × 2 array. The overall results of the analysis distinguished two dominant underwater soundscapes, associating them mainly to the seasonal changes in the nautical tourism and fishing activities within the study area and to the wind and wave action. The analysis identified recreational vessels as the dominant anthropogenic source of underwater noise, particularly during the tourist season. The method demonstrated to be an efficient tool in predicting the SAN levels based on the vessel distribution, indicating also the possibility of its wider implication for marine conservation.

  4. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  5. Ordered mapping of 3 alphoid DNA subsets on human chromosome 22

    SciTech Connect

    Antonacci, R.; Baldini, A.; Archidiacono, N.

    1994-09-01

    Alpha satellite DNA consists of tandemly repeated monomers of 171 bp clustered in the centromeric region of primate chromosomes. Sequence divergence between subsets located in different human chromosomes is usually high enough to ensure chromosome-specific hybridization. Alphoid probes specific for almost every human chromosome have been reported. A single chromosome can carry different subsets of alphoid DNA and some alphoid subsets can be shared by different chromosomes. We report the physical order of three alphoid DNA subsets on human chromosome 22 determined by a combination of low and high resolution cytological mapping methods. Results visually demonstrate the presence of threemore » distinct alphoid DNA domains at the centromeric region of chromosome 22. We have measured the interphase distances between the three probes in three-color FISH experiments. Statistical analysis of the results indicated the order of the subsets. Two color experiments on prometaphase chromosomes established the order of the three domains relative to the arms of chromosome 22 and confirmed the results obtained using interphase mapping. This demonstrates the applicability of interphase mapping for alpha satellite DNA orderering. However, in our experiments, interphase mapping did not provide any information about the relationship between extremities of the repeat arrays. This information was gained from extended chromatin hybridization. The extremities of two of the repeat arrays were seen to be almost overlapping whereas the third repeat array was clearly separated from the other two. Our data show the value of extended chromatin hybridization as a complement of other cytological techniques for high resolution mapping of repetitive DNA sequences.« less

  6. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh–Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed. PMID:20000921

  7. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  8. Digital Mapping of Buried Pipelines with a Dual Array System

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-06-06

    The objective of this research is to develop a non-invasive system for detecting, mapping, and inspecting ferrous and plastic pipelines in place using technology that combines and interprets measurements from ground penetrating radar and electromagne...

  9. Use of diversity arrays technology markers for integration into a cotton reference map and anchoring to a recombinant inbred line map

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A DArT marker platform is developed for the cotton genome to evaluate the use of DArT markers compared to AFLPs in mapping, and transferability across the mapping populations. We used a reference genetic map of tetraploid Gossypium that already contained ~5000 loci which coalesced into 26 chromosom...

  10. Physical mapping of QTL for tuber yield, starch content and starch yield in tetraploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by means of genome wide genotyping by sequencing and the 8.3 K SolCAP SNP array.

    PubMed

    Schönhals, Elske Maria; Ding, Jia; Ritter, Enrique; Paulo, Maria João; Cara, Nicolás; Tacke, Ekhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhard; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2017-08-22

    Tuber yield and starch content of the cultivated potato are complex traits of decisive importance for breeding improved varieties. Natural variation of tuber yield and starch content depends on the environment and on multiple, mostly unknown genetic factors. Dissection and molecular identification of the genes and their natural allelic variants controlling these complex traits will lead to the development of diagnostic DNA-based markers, by which precision and efficiency of selection can be increased (precision breeding). Three case-control populations were assembled from tetraploid potato cultivars based on maximizing the differences between high and low tuber yield (TY), starch content (TSC) and starch yield (TSY, arithmetic product of TY and TSC). The case-control populations were genotyped by restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) and the 8.3 k SolCAP SNP genotyping array. The allele frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were compared between cases and controls. RADseq identified, depending on data filtering criteria, between 6664 and 450 genes with one or more differential SNPs for one, two or all three traits. Differential SNPs in 275 genes were detected using the SolCAP array. A genome wide association study using the SolCAP array on an independent, unselected population identified SNPs associated with tuber starch content in 117 genes. Physical mapping of the genes containing differential or associated SNPs, and comparisons between the two genome wide genotyping methods and two different populations identified genome segments on all twelve potato chromosomes harboring one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for TY, TSC and TSY. Several hundred genes control tuber yield and starch content in potato. They are unequally distributed on all potato chromosomes, forming clusters between 0.5-4 Mbp width. The largest fraction of these genes had unknown function, followed by genes with putative signalling and regulatory functions. The

  11. Application of diffusion maps to identify human factors of self-reported anomalies in aviation.

    PubMed

    Andrzejczak, Chris; Karwowski, Waldemar; Mikusinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    A study investigating what factors are present leading to pilots submitting voluntary anomaly reports regarding their flight performance was conducted. Diffusion Maps (DM) were selected as the method of choice for performing dimensionality reduction on text records for this study. Diffusion Maps have seen successful use in other domains such as image classification and pattern recognition. High-dimensionality data in the form of narrative text reports from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) were clustered and categorized by way of dimensionality reduction. Supervised analyses were performed to create a baseline document clustering system. Dimensionality reduction techniques identified concepts or keywords within records, and allowed the creation of a framework for an unsupervised document classification system. Results from the unsupervised clustering algorithm performed similarly to the supervised methods outlined in the study. The dimensionality reduction was performed on 100 of the most commonly occurring words within 126,000 text records describing commercial aviation incidents. This study demonstrates that unsupervised machine clustering and organization of incident reports is possible based on unbiased inputs. Findings from this study reinforced traditional views on what factors contribute to civil aviation anomalies, however, new associations between previously unrelated factors and conditions were also found.

  12. Plasmon Mapping in Au@Ag Nanocube Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures largely determine their optoelectronic properties. Such plasmon modes can be manipulated by changing the morphology of the nanoparticles or by bringing plasmonic nanoparticle building blocks close to each other within organized assemblies. We report the EELS mapping of such plasmon modes in pure Ag nanocubes, Au@Ag core–shell nanocubes, and arrays of Au@Ag nanocubes. We show that these arrays enable the creation of interesting plasmonic structures starting from elementary building blocks. Special attention will be dedicated to the plasmon modes in a triangular array formed by three nanocubes. Because of hybridization, a combination of such nanotriangles is shown to provide an antenna effect, resulting in strong electrical field enhancement at the narrow gap between the nanotriangles. PMID:25067991

  13. Development and Validation of a High-Density SNP Genotyping Array for African Oil Palm.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Qi Bin; Teh, Chee Keng; Ong, Ai Ling; Heng, Huey Ying; Lee, Heng Leng; Mohamed, Mohaimi; Low, Joel Zi-Bin; Apparow, Sukganah; Chew, Fook Tim; Mayes, Sean; Kulaveerasingam, Harikrishna; Tammi, Martti; Appleton, David Ross

    2016-08-01

    High-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays are powerful tools that can measure the level of genetic polymorphism within a population. To develop a whole-genome SNP array for oil palms, SNP discovery was performed using deep resequencing of eight libraries derived from 132 Elaeis guineensis and Elaeis oleifera palms belonging to 59 origins, resulting in the discovery of >3 million putative SNPs. After SNP filtering, the Illumina OP200K custom array was built with 170 860 successful probes. Phenetic clustering analysis revealed that the array could distinguish between palms of different origins in a way consistent with pedigree records. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium declined more slowly for the commercial populations (ranging from 120 kb at r(2) = 0.43 to 146 kb at r(2) = 0.50) when compared with the semi-wild populations (19.5 kb at r(2) = 0.22). Genetic fixation mapping comparing the semi-wild and commercial population identified 321 selective sweeps. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) detected a significant peak on chromosome 2 associated with the polygenic component of the shell thickness trait (based on the trait shell-to-fruit; S/F %) in tenera palms. Testing of a genomic selection model on the same trait resulted in good prediction accuracy (r = 0.65) with 42% of the S/F % variation explained. The first high-density SNP genotyping array for oil palm has been developed and shown to be robust for use in genetic studies and with potential for developing early trait prediction to shorten the oil palm breeding cycle. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recording and assessment of evoked potentials with electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Miljković, N; Malešević, N; Kojić, V; Bijelić, G; Keller, T; Popović, D B

    2015-09-01

    In order to optimize procedure for the assessment of evoked potentials and to provide visualization of the flow of action potentials along the motor systems, we introduced array electrodes for stimulation and recording and developed software for the analysis of the recordings. The system uses a stimulator connected to an electrode array for the generation of evoked potentials, an electrode array connected to the amplifier, A/D converter and computer for the recording of evoked potentials, and a dedicated software application. The method has been tested for the assessment of the H-reflex on the triceps surae muscle in six healthy humans. The electrode array with 16 pads was positioned over the posterior aspect of the thigh, while the recording electrode array with 16 pads was positioned over the triceps surae muscle. The stimulator activated all the pads of the stimulation electrode array asynchronously, while the signals were recorded continuously at all the recording sites. The results are topography maps (spatial distribution of evoked potentials) and matrices (spatial visualization of nerve excitability). The software allows the automatic selection of the lowest stimulation intensity to achieve maximal H-reflex amplitude and selection of the recording/stimulation pads according to predefined criteria. The analysis of results shows that the method provides rich information compared with the conventional recording of the H-reflex with regard the spatial distribution.

  15. Earthquake Hazard Class Mapping by Parcel in Las Vegas Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancha, A.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Louie, J. N.; Hellmer, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    Clark County, Nevada completed the very first effort in the United States to map earthquake hazard class systematically through an entire urban area. The map is used in development and disaster response planning, in addition to its direct use for building code implementation and enforcement. The County contracted with the Nevada System of Higher Education to classify about 500 square miles including urban Las Vegas Valley, and exurban areas considered for future development. The Parcel Map includes over 10,000 surface-wave array measurements accomplished over three years using Optim's SeisOpt° ReMi measurement and processing techniques adapted for large scale data. These array measurements classify individual parcels on the NEHRP hazard scale. Parallel "blind" tests were conducted at 93 randomly selected sites. The rms difference between the Vs30 values yielded by the blind data and analyses and the Parcel Map analyses is 4.92%. Only six of the blind-test sites showed a difference with a magnitude greater than 10%. We describe a "C+" Class for sites with Class B average velocities but soft surface soil. The measured Parcel Map shows a clearly definable C+ to C boundary on the west side of the Valley. The C to D boundary is much more complex. Using the parcel map in computing shaking in the Valley for scenario earthquakes is crucial for obtaining realistic predictions of ground motions.

  16. Application of MEMS Microphone Array Technology to Airframe Noise Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Shams, Qamar A.; Graves, Sharon S.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    Current generation microphone directional array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity data on a variety of aircraft components, resulting in significant gains in test productivity. However, with this gain in productivity has come the desire to install larger and more complex arrays in a variety of ground test facilities, creating new challenges for the designers of array systems. To overcome these challenges, a research study was initiated to identify and develop hardware and fabrication technologies which could be used to construct an array system exhibiting acceptable measurement performance but at much lower cost and with much simpler installation requirements. This paper describes an effort to fabricate a 128-sensor array using commercially available Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones. The MEMS array was used to acquire noise data for an isolated 26%-scale high-fidelity Boeing 777 landing gear in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Stability Tunnel across a range of Mach numbers. The overall performance of the array was excellent, and major noise sources were successfully identified from the measurements.

  17. Mapping the Racial Inequality in Place: Using Youth Perceptions to Identify Unequal Exposure to Neighborhood Environmental Hazards.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Samantha; Zuberi, Anita

    2016-08-25

    Black youth are more likely than white youth to grow up in poor, segregated neighborhoods. This racial inequality in the neighborhood environments of black youth increases their contact with hazardous neighborhood environmental features including violence and toxic exposures that contribute to racial inequality in youth health and well-being. While the concept of neighborhood effects has been studied at length by social scientists, this work has not been as frequently situated within an environmental justice (EJ) paradigm. The present study used youth perceptions gained from in-depth interviews with youth from one Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania neighborhood to identify neighborhood environmental health hazards. We then mapped these youth-identified features to examine how they are spatially and racially distributed across the city. Our results suggest that the intersection of race and poverty, neighborhood disorder, housing abandonment, and crime were salient issues for youth. The maps show support for the youths' assertions that the environments of black and white individuals across the city of Pittsburgh differ in noteworthy ways. This multi-lens, mixed-method analysis was designed to challenge some of the assumptions we make about addressing environmental inequality using youths' own opinions on the issue to drive our inquiry.

  18. Optimization of a large-area detector-block based on SiPM and pixelated LYSO crystal arrays.

    PubMed

    Calva-Coraza, E; Alva-Sánchez, H; Murrieta-Rodríguez, T; Martínez-Dávalos, A; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M

    2017-10-01

    We present the performance evaluation of a large-area detector module based on the ArrayC-60035-64P, an 8×8 array of tileable, 7.2mm pitch, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) by SensL, covering a total area of 57.4mm×57.4mm. We characterized the ArrayC-60035-64P, operating at room temperature, using LYSO pixelated crystal arrays of different pitch sizes (1.075, 1.430, 1.683, 2.080 and 2.280mm) to determine the resolvable crystal size. After an optimization process, a 7mm thick coupling light guide was used for all crystal pitches. To identify the interaction position a 16-channel (8 columns, 8 rows) symmetric charge division (SCD) readout board together with a center-of-gravity algorithm was used. Based on this, we assembled the detector modules using a 40×40 LYSO, 1.43mm pitch array, covering the total detector area. Calibration was performed using a 137 Cs source resulting in excellent crystal maps with minor geometric distortion, a mean 4.1 peak-to-valley ratio and 9.6% mean energy resolution for 662keV photons in the central region. The resolvability index was calculated in the x and y directions with values under 0.42 in all cases. We show that these large area SiPM arrays, combined with a 16-channel SCD readout board, can offer high spatial resolution, without processing a big number of signals, attaining excellent energy resolution and detector uniformity. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mini Array for TLE Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Liu, Z.; Koh, K.; Mezentsev, A.; Pedeboy, S.; Soula, S.; Sugier, J.; Enno, S. E.; Rycroft, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) can generate electromagnetic radiation at frequencies 100 kHz (Qin et al., 2012, Fullekrug et al., 2013) and <1 kHz (Pasko et al., GRL, 1998, Cummer et al., GRL, 1998)as a result of the splitting and exponential growth of streamer discharges (Pasko, JGR, 2010, McHarg, JGR, 2010). The electromagnetic radiation results from the coherent superposition of the very weak signalsfrom thousands of small scale streamer discharges at 40 km height for frequencies 100 kHz and at 80 km height for frequencies <1 kHz. It seems therefore plausible that TLEs can also generate electromagnetic waves at intermediate heights, e.g. 60 km with frequencies between 1-100 kHz, e.g., 10 kHz. However, this frequency range is dominated by the powerful electromagnetic radiation from return strokes and it is hence commonly thought that this radiation can not easily be detectedwith single radio receivers. This study proposes to search for electromagnetic radiation from TLEsabove thunderclouds by use of a mini array that has the ability to determine the elevation angle toward the radiation source. Mini arrays with small apertures are used for infrasonic and seismic studies to determine source mechanisms and properties of the medium through which the waves propagate. For the detection of electromagneticradiation, the array processing is adapted for the fast propagationat the speed of light. Here we report for the first time the detection and mapping of distant lightning strokes in the sky with a mini array located near Bath in the UK. The array has a baseline to wavelength ratio 4.2 10^{-2} to record electromagnetic waves from 2-18 kHz. It is found that the mini array detects 69 lightning strokes per second from cloud-to-ground and in-cloud discharges, even though the parent thunderstorms are 900-1,100 km away and a rigorous selection criterion based on the spatial coherency of the electromagnetic source field across the array is used. About 14% of the lightning

  20. Observing the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA): Fast-Scan Single-Dish Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Iwai, K.; Phillips, N. M.; Hills, R. E.; Hirota, A.; Yagoubov, P.; Siringo, G.; Shimojo, M.; Bastian, T. S.; Hales, A. S.; Sawada, T.; Asayama, S.; Sugimoto, M.; Marson, R. G.; Kawasaki, W.; Muller, E.; Nakazato, T.; Sugimoto, K.; Brajša, R.; Skokić, I.; Bárta, M.; Kim, S.; Remijan, A. J.; de Gregorio, I.; Corder, S. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Loukitcheva, M.; Chen, B.; De Pontieu, B.; Fleishmann, G. D.; Gary, D. E.; Kobelski, A.; Wedemeyer, S.; Yan, Y.

    2017-07-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope has commenced science observations of the Sun starting in late 2016. Since the Sun is much larger than the field of view of individual ALMA dishes, the ALMA interferometer is unable to measure the background level of solar emission when observing the solar disk. The absolute temperature scale is a critical measurement for much of ALMA solar science, including the understanding of energy transfer through the solar atmosphere, the properties of prominences, and the study of shock heating in the chromosphere. In order to provide an absolute temperature scale, ALMA solar observing will take advantage of the remarkable fast-scanning capabilities of the ALMA 12 m dishes to make single-dish maps of the full Sun. This article reports on the results of an extensive commissioning effort to optimize the mapping procedure, and it describes the nature of the resulting data. Amplitude calibration is discussed in detail: a path that uses the two loads in the ALMA calibration system as well as sky measurements is described and applied to commissioning data. Inspection of a large number of single-dish datasets shows significant variation in the resulting temperatures, and based on the temperature distributions, we derive quiet-Sun values at disk center of 7300 K at λ = 3 mm and 5900 K at λ = 1.3 mm. These values have statistical uncertainties of about 100 K, but systematic uncertainties in the temperature scale that may be significantly larger. Example images are presented from two periods with very different levels of solar activity. At a resolution of about 25'', the 1.3 mm wavelength images show temperatures on the disk that vary over about a 2000 K range. Active regions and plages are among the hotter features, while a large sunspot umbra shows up as a depression, and filament channels are relatively cool. Prominences above the solar limb are a common feature of the single-dish images.

  1. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOEpatents

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  2. Characterization of Kilopixel TES detector arrays for PIPER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Rahul; Ade, Peter; Benford, Dominic; Bennett, Charles; Chuss, David; Costen, Nicholas; Coughlin, Kevin; Dotson, Jessie; Eimer, Joseph; Fixsen, Dale; Gandilo, Natalie; Halpern, Mark; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary; Irwin, Kent; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimball, Mark; Kogut, Al; Lazear, Justin; Lowe, Luke; Manos, George; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Timothy; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, Samuel Harvey; Pawlyk, Samuel; Rodriguez, Samelys; Sharp, Elmer; Shirron, Peter; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Sullivan, Dan; Switzer, Eric; Taraschi, Peter; Tucker, Carole; Walts, Alexander; Wollack, Edward

    2018-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER) is a balloon-borne instrument optimized to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at large angular scales. It will map 85% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 200, 270, 350, and 600 GHz to characterize dust foregrounds and constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r. The sky is imaged on to 32x40 pixel arrays of time-domain multiplexed Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers operating at a bath temperature of 100 mK to achieve background-limited sensitivity. Each kilopixel array is indium-bump-bonded to a 2D superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) time-domain multiplexer (MUX) chip and read out by warm electronics. Each pixel measures total incident power over a frequency band defined by bandpass filters in front of the array, while polarization sensitivity is provided by the upstream Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) and analyzer grids. We present measurements of the detector parameters from the laboratory characterization of the first kilopixel science array for PIPER including transition temperature, saturation power, thermal conductivity, time constant, and noise performance. We also describe the testing of the 2D MUX chips, optimization of the integrated readout parameters, and the overall pixel yield of the array. The first PIPER science flight is planned for June 2018 from Palestine, Texas.

  3. Identifying multi-level culturally appropriate smoking cessation strategies for Aboriginal health staff: a concept mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Anna P; Cargo, Margaret; Stewart, Harold; Chong, Alwin; Daniel, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Aboriginal Australians, including Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs), smoke at rates double the non-Aboriginal population. This study utilized concept mapping methodology to identify and prioritize culturally relevant strategies to promote smoking cessation in AHWs. Stakeholder participants included AHWs, other health service employees and tobacco control personnel. Smoking cessation strategies (n = 74) were brainstormed using 34 interviews, 3 focus groups and a stakeholder workshop. Stakeholders sorted strategies into meaningful groups and rated them on perceived importance and feasibility. A concept map was developed using multi-dimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses. Ten unique clusters of smoking cessation strategies were depicted that targeted individuals, family and peers, community, workplace and public policy. Smoking cessation resources and services were represented in addition to broader strategies addressing social and environmental stressors that perpetuate smoking and make quitting difficult. The perceived importance and feasibility of clusters were rated differently by participants working in health services that were government-coordinated compared with community-controlled. For health service workers within vulnerable populations, these findings clearly implicate a need for contextualized strategies that mitigate social and environmental stressors in addition to conventional strategies for tobacco control. The concept map is being applied in knowledge translation to guide development of smoking cessation programs for AHWs.

  4. Advanced Geophysical Classification with the Marine Towed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhurst, D.; Harbaugh, G.; Keiswetter, D.; Bell, T. W.; Massey, G.; Wright, D.

    2017-12-01

    The Marine Towed Array, or MTA, is an underwater dual-mode sensor array that has been successfully deployed at multiple marine venues in support of Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) demonstrations beginning in 2004. It provided both marine electromagnetic and marine magnetic sensors for detection and mapping of underwater UXO. The EMI sensor array was based on older technology, which in several ESTCP demonstrations has not been able to support advanced geophysical classification (AGC). Under ESTCP funding, the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory is in the process of upgrading the MTA with modern, advanced electromagnetic (EMI) electronics and replacing the sensor array with a modern, multistatic array design. A half-scale version of the proposed array has been built and tested on land. Six tri-axial receiver cubes were placed inside two- and three- transmit coil configurations in equivalent positions to design locations for the MTA wing. The responses of a variety of munitions items and test spheres were measured over a range of target-to-array geometries and in both static and simulated dynamic data collection modes. The multi-transmit coil configuration was shown to provide enhanced single-pass classification performance over the original single coil design, particularly as a function of target location relative to the centerline. The ability to go beyond anomaly detection and additionally classify detected anomalies from survey data would dramatically improve the state of the art for underwater UXO remediation by reducing costs and improving the efficiency of these efforts. The results of our efforts to return the MTA to service and validating the new EMI array's design for UXO detection and classification in the underwater environment will be the focus of this presentation.

  5. Electrocorticographic Frequency Alteration Mapping of Speech Cortex during an Awake Craniotomy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Breshears, J.; Sharma, M.; Anderson, N.R.; Rashid, S.; Leuthardt, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Traditional electrocortical stimulation (ECS) mapping is limited by the lengthy serial investigation (one location at a time) and the risk of afterdischarges in localizing eloquent cortex. Electrocorticographic frequency alteration mapping (EFAM) allows the parallel investigation of many cortical sites in much less time and with no risk of afterdischarges because of its passive nature. We examined its use with ECS in the context of language mapping during an awake craniotomy for a tumor resection. Clinical Presentation The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed Caucasian male who presented with headache and mild aphasia. Imaging demonstrated a 3-cm cystic mass in the posterior temporal-parietal lobe. The patient underwent an awake craniotomy for the mapping of his speech cortex and resection of the mass. Intervention Using a 32-contact electrode array, electrocorticographic signals were recorded from the exposed cortex as the patient participated in a 3-min screening task involving active (patient naming visually presented words) and rest (patient silent) conditions. A spectral comparison of the 2 conditions revealed specific cortical locations associated with activation during speech. The patient was then widely mapped using ECS. Three of 4 sites identified by ECS were also identified passively and in parallel by EFAM, 2 with statistical significance and the third by qualitative inspection. Conclusion EFAM was technically achieved in an awake craniotomy patient and had good concordance with ECS mapping. Because it poses no risk of afterdischarges and offers substantial time savings, EFAM holds promise for future development as an adjunct intraoperative mapping tool. Additionally, the cortical signals obtained by this modality can be utilized for localization in the presence of a tumor adjacent to the eloquent regions. PMID:19940544

  6. Development and Evaluation of a 9K SNP Array for Peach by Internationally Coordinated SNP Detection and Validation in Breeding Germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Scalabrin, Simone; Gilmore, Barbara; Lawley, Cynthia T.; Gasic, Ksenija; Micheletti, Diego; Rosyara, Umesh R.; Cattonaro, Federica; Vendramin, Elisa; Main, Dorrie; Aramini, Valeria; Blas, Andrea L.; Mockler, Todd C.; Bryant, Douglas W.; Wilhelm, Larry; Troggio, Michela; Sosinski, Bryon; Aranzana, Maria José; Arús, Pere; Iezzoni, Amy; Morgante, Michele; Peace, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Although a large number of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers covering the entire genome are needed to enable molecular breeding efforts such as genome wide association studies, fine mapping, genomic selection and marker-assisted selection in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] and related Prunus species, only a limited number of genetic markers, including simple sequence repeats (SSRs), have been available to date. To address this need, an international consortium (The International Peach SNP Consortium; IPSC) has pursued a coordinated effort to perform genome-scale SNP discovery in peach using next generation sequencing platforms to develop and characterize a high-throughput Illumina Infinium® SNP genotyping array platform. We performed whole genome re-sequencing of 56 peach breeding accessions using the Illumina and Roche/454 sequencing technologies. Polymorphism detection algorithms identified a total of 1,022,354 SNPs. Validation with the Illumina GoldenGate® assay was performed on a subset of the predicted SNPs, verifying ∼75% of genic (exonic and intronic) SNPs, whereas only about a third of intergenic SNPs were verified. Conservative filtering was applied to arrive at a set of 8,144 SNPs that were included on the IPSC peach SNP array v1, distributed over all eight peach chromosomes with an average spacing of 26.7 kb between SNPs. Use of this platform to screen a total of 709 accessions of peach in two separate evaluation panels identified a total of 6,869 (84.3%) polymorphic SNPs. The almost 7,000 SNPs verified as polymorphic through extensive empirical evaluation represent an excellent source of markers for future studies in genetic relatedness, genetic mapping, and dissecting the genetic architecture of complex agricultural traits. The IPSC peach SNP array v1 is commercially available and we expect that it will be used worldwide for genetic studies in peach and related stone fruit and nut species. PMID:22536421

  7. A Near-Infrared and Thermal Imager for Mapping Titan's Surface Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, S.; Hewagma, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the solar insolation reaches the surface of Titan through atmospheric spectral windows. We will discuss a filter based imaging system for a future Titan orbiter that will exploit these windows mapping surface features, cloud regions, polar storms. In the near-infrared (NIR), two filters (1.28 micrometer and 1.6 micrometer), strategically positioned between CH1 absorption bands, and InSb linear array pixels will explore the solar reflected radiation. We propose to map the mid, infrared (MIR) region with two filters: 9.76 micrometer and 5.88-to-6.06 micrometers with MCT linear arrays. The first will map MIR thermal emission variations due to surface albedo differences in the atmospheric window between gas phase CH3D and C2H4 opacity sources. The latter spans the crossover spectral region where observed radiation transitions from being dominated by thermal emission to solar reflected light component. The passively cooled linear arrays will be incorporated into the focal plane of a light-weight thin film stretched membrane 10 cm telescope. A rad-hard ASIC together with an FPGA will be used for detector pixel readout and detector linear array selection depending on if the field-of-view (FOV) is looking at the day- or night-side of Titan. The instantaneous FOV corresponds to 3.1, 15.6, and 31.2 mrad for the 1, 5, and 10 micrometer channels, respectively. For a 1500 km orbit, a 5 micrometer channel pixel represents a spatial resolution of 91 m, with a FOV that spans 23 kilometers, and Titan is mapped in a push-broom manner as determined by the orbital path. The system mass and power requirements are estimated to be 6 kg and 5 W, respectively. The package is proposed for a polar orbiter with a lifetime matching two Saturn seasons.

  8. Using hazard maps to identify and eliminate workplace hazards: a union-led health and safety training program.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joe; Collins, Michele; Devlin, John; Renner, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The Institute for Sustainable Work and Environment and the Utility Workers Union of America worked with a professional evaluator to design, implement, and evaluate the results of a union-led system of safety-based hazard identification program that trained workers to use hazard maps to identify workplace hazards and target them for elimination. The evaluation documented program implementation and impact using data collected from both qualitative interviews and an on-line survey from worker trainers, plant managers, and health and safety staff. Managers and workers reported that not only were many dangerous hazards eliminated as a result of hazard mapping, some of which were long-standing, difficult-to-resolve issues, but the evaluation also documented improved communication between union members and management that both workers and managers agreed resulted in better, more sustainable hazard elimination.

  9. Challenging aspects of contemporary cochlear implant electrode array design.

    PubMed

    Mistrík, Pavel; Jolly, Claude; Sieber, Daniel; Hochmair, Ingeborg

    2017-12-01

    A design comparison of current perimodiolar and lateral wall electrode arrays of the cochlear implant (CI) is provided. The focus is on functional features such as acoustic frequency coverage and tonotopic mapping, battery consumption and dynamic range. A traumacity of their insertion is also evaluated. Review of up-to-date literature. Perimodiolar electrode arrays are positioned in the basal turn of the cochlea near the modiolus. They are designed to initiate the action potential in the proximity to the neural soma located in spiral ganglion. On the other hand, lateral wall electrode arrays can be inserted deeper inside the cochlea, as they are located along the lateral wall and such insertion trajectory is less traumatic. This class of arrays targets primarily surviving neural peripheral processes. Due to their larger insertion depth, lateral wall arrays can deliver lower acoustic frequencies in manner better corresponding to cochlear tonotopicity. In fact, spiral ganglion sections containing auditory nerve fibres tuned to low acoustic frequencies are located deeper than 1 and half turn inside the cochlea. For this reason, a significant frequency mismatch might be occurring for apical electrodes in perimodiolar arrays, detrimental to speech perception. Tonal languages such as Mandarin might be therefore better treated with lateral wall arrays. On the other hand, closer proximity to target tissue results in lower psychophysical threshold levels for perimodiolar arrays. However, the maximal comfort level is also lower, paradoxically resulting in narrower dynamic range than that of lateral wall arrays. Battery consumption is comparable for both types of arrays. Lateral wall arrays are less likely to cause trauma to cochlear structures. As the current trend in cochlear implantation is the maximal protection of residual acoustic hearing, the lateral wall arrays seem more suitable for hearing preservation CI surgeries. Future development could focus on combining the

  10. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.

  11. PAPER: The Precision Array To Probe The Epoch Of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backer, Donald C.; Parsons, A.; Bradley, R.; Parashare, C.; Gugliucci, N.; Mastrantonio, E.; Herne, D.; Lynch, M.; Wright, M.; Werhimer, D.; Carilli, C.; Datta, A.; Aguirre, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Precision Array to Probe the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) is an experiment that is being designed to detect the faint HI signal from the epoch of reionization. Our instrumentation goals include: the design and building of dipole elements that are optimized for operation from 120-190 MHz with a clean beam response; amplifiers and receivers with good impedance match and overall flat gain response over a large bandpass; and an FPGA correlator capable of producing full Stokes products for the array. The array is being built and evaluated in stages at the Green Bank Observatory in West Virginia with deployment of the full instrument in Western Australia. We present results from an eight-station deployment in Green Bank and four-station deployment in Western Australia, including phase and amplitude calibration, RFI mitigation and removal, full sky maps, and wide-field snapshot imaging. We have discovered new ways to improve our system's stability and sensitivity from these early experiments, and are applying these concepts to a 16-element array in Green Bank in early 2008 and a 32-element array in Western Australia later in 2008.

  12. Automated installation methods for photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, R.; Daniels, A.; Greenaway, R.; Oster, J., Jr.; Racki, D.; Stoeltzing, R.

    1982-11-01

    Since installation expenses constitute a substantial portion of the cost of a large photovoltaic power system, methods for reduction of these costs were investigated. The installation of the photovoltaic arrays includes all areas, starting with site preparation (i.e., trenching, wiring, drainage, foundation installation, lightning protection, grounding and installation of the panel) and concluding with the termination of the bus at the power conditioner building. To identify the optimum combination of standard installation procedures and automated/mechanized techniques, the installation process was investigated including the equipment and hardware available, the photovoltaic array structure systems and interfaces, and the array field and site characteristics. Preliminary designs of hardware for both the standard installation method, the automated/mechanized method, and a mix of standard installation procedures and mechanized procedures were identified to determine which process effectively reduced installation costs. In addition, costs associated with each type of installation method and with the design, development and fabrication of new installation hardware were generated.

  13. The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array: Recent Severe Storm Observations and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Blakeslee, R.; Christian, H.; Koshak, W.; Bailey, J.; Hall, J.; McCaul, E.; Buechler, D.; Darden, C.; Burks, J.

    2004-01-01

    The North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array became operational in November 2001 as a principal component of a severe weather test bed to infuse new science and technology into the short-term forecasting of severe and hazardous weather, principally within nearby National Weather Service forecast offices. Since the installation of the LMA, it has measured the total lightning activity of a large number of severe weather events, including three supercell tornado outbreaks, two supercell hailstorm events, and numerous microburst-producing storms and ordinary non-severe thunderstorms. The key components of evolving storm morphology examined are the time rate-of-change (temporal trending) of storm convective and precipitation characteristics that can be diagnosed in real-time using NEXRAD WSR-88D Doppler radar (echo growth and decay, precipitation structures and velocity features, outflow boundaries), LMA (total lightning flash rate and its trend) and National Lightning Detection Network (cloud-to- ground lightning, its polarity and trends). For example, in a transitional season supercell tornado outbreak, peak total flash rates for typical supercells in Tennessee reached 70-100/min, and increases in the total flash rate occurred during storm intensification as much as 20-25 min prior to at least some of the tornadoes. The most intense total flash rate measured during this outbreak (over 800 flashes/min) occurred in a storm in Alabama. In the case of a severe summertime pulse thunderstorm in North Alabama, the peak total flash rate reached 300/min, with a strong increase in total lightning evident some 9 min before damaging winds were observed at the surface. In this paper we provide a sampling of LMA observations and products during severe weather events to illustrate the capability of the system, and discuss the prospects for improving the short-term forecasting of convective weather using total lightning data.

  14. Novel Abscisic Acid Antagonists Identified with Chemical Array Screening.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takuya; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Yoshida, Kazuko; Umezawa, Taishi; Shimizu, Takeshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) signaling is involved in multiple processes in plants, such as water stress control and seed dormancy. Major regulators of ABA signaling are the PYR/PYL/RCAR family receptor proteins, group A protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs), and subclass III of SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2). Novel ABA agonists and antagonists to modulate the functions of these proteins would not only contribute to clarification of the signaling mechanisms but might also be used to improve crop yields. To obtain small molecules that interact with Arabidopsis ABA receptor PYR1, we screened 24 275 compounds from a chemical library at the RIKEN Natural Products Depository by using a chemical array platform. Subsequent SnRK2 and PP2C assays narrowed down the candidates to two molecules. One antagonized ABA in a competitive manner and inhibited the formation of the PYR1-ABA-PP2C ternary complex. These compounds might have potential as bioprobes to analyze ABA signaling. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Admixture Mapping of African-American Women in the AMBER Consortium Identifies New Loci for Breast Cancer and Estrogen-Receptor Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Bensen, Jeannette T; Yao, Song; Haddad, Stephen; Haiman, Christopher A; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Deming, Sandra L; Olshan, Andrew F; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R; Lunetta, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Recent genetic admixture coupled with striking differences in incidence of estrogen receptor (ER) breast cancer subtypes, as well as severity, between women of African and European ancestry, provides an excellent rationale for performing admixture mapping in African American women with breast cancer risk. We performed the largest breast cancer admixture mapping study with in African American women to identify novel genomic regions associated with the disease. We conducted a genome-wide admixture scan using 2,624 autosomal ancestry informative markers (AIMs) in 3,629 breast cancer cases (including 1,968 ER-positive, 1093 ER-negative, and 601 triple-negative) and 4,658 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) Consortium, a collaborative study of four large geographically different epidemiological studies of breast cancer in African American women. We used an independent case-control study to test for SNP association in regions with genome-wide significant admixture signals. We found two novel genome-wide significant regions of excess African ancestry, 4p16.1 and 17q25.1, associated with ER-positive breast cancer. Two regions known to harbor breast cancer variants, 10q26 and 11q13, were also identified with excess of African ancestry. Fine-mapping of the identified genome-wide significant regions suggests the presence of significant genetic associations with ER-positive breast cancer in 4p16.1 and 11q13. In summary, we identified three novel genomic regions associated with breast cancer risk by ER status, suggesting that additional previously unidentified variants may contribute to the racial differences in breast cancer risk in the African American population.

  16. A multimode electromechanical parametric resonator array

    PubMed Central

    Mahboob, I.; Mounaix, M.; Nishiguchi, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical resonators have emerged as a versatile platform in which detectors with unprecedented sensitivities and quantum mechanics in a macroscopic context can be developed. These schemes invariably utilise a single resonator but increasingly the concept of an array of electromechanical resonators is promising a wealth of new possibilities. In spite of this, experimental realisations of such arrays have remained scarce due to the formidable challenges involved in their fabrication. In a variation to this approach, we identify 75 harmonic vibration modes in a single electromechanical resonator of which 7 can also be parametrically excited. The parametrically resonating modes exhibit vibrations with only 2 oscillation phases which are used to build a binary information array. We exploit this array to execute a mechanical byte memory, a shift-register and a controlled-NOT gate thus vividly illustrating the availability and functionality of an electromechanical resonator array by simply utilising higher order vibration modes. PMID:24658349

  17. Interferometric Mapping of Perseus Outflows with MASSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Ian; Dunham, Michael; Myers, Philip C.; MASSES Team

    2017-01-01

    The MASSES (Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA) survey, a Submillimeter Array (SMA) large-scale program, is mapping molecular lines and continuum emission about the 75 known Class 0/I sources in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. In this talk, I present some of the key results of this project, with a focus on the CO(2-1) maps of the molecular outflows. In particular, I investigate how protostars inherit their rotation axes from large-scale magnetic fields and filamentary structure.

  18. Effects of Adaptive Antenna Arrays on Broadband Signals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    dimensional array geometry. The signal impinging on the antenna array elements is assumed to have originated from a point source in the far field , or...tg9 (4) The assumptions used to identify the far field region of an array also lead to an approximation for ti(6) . It is ti (0 ) x i sin(e) (5) c...implementing the open form transfer function and coefficients of Eqs (16) 53 .. ... ... .. . . .. . . .. ... .. . ..... . .... . . .. through (21). For a

  19. REPORT ON AN ORBITAL MAPPING SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colvocoresses, Alden P.; ,

    1984-01-01

    During June 1984, the International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing accepted a committee report that defines an Orbital Mapping System (OMS) to follow Landsat and other Earth-sensing systems. The OMS involves the same orbital parameters of Landsats 1, 2, and 3, three wave bands (two in the visible and one in the near infrared) and continuous stereoscopic capability. The sensors involve solid-state linear arrays and data acquisition (including stereo) designed for one-dimensional data processing. It has a resolution capability of 10-m pixels and is capable of producing 1:50,000-scale image maps with 20-m contours. In addition to mapping, the system is designed to monitor the works of man as well as nature and in a cost-effective manner.

  20. Implementation of digital equality comparator circuit on memristive memory crossbar array using material implication logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Adib; Mahdzair, Fazren; Luqman, Anas; Osman, Nazmie; Junid, Syed Abdul Mutalib Al

    2018-03-01

    One of the most significant constraints of Von Neumann architecture is the limited bandwidth between memory and processor. The cost to move data back and forth between memory and processor is considerably higher than the computation in the processor itself. This architecture significantly impacts the Big Data and data-intensive application such as DNA analysis comparison which spend most of the processing time to move data. Recently, the in-memory processing concept was proposed, which is based on the capability to perform the logic operation on the physical memory structure using a crossbar topology and non-volatile resistive-switching memristor technology. This paper proposes a scheme to map digital equality comparator circuit on memristive memory crossbar array. The 2-bit, 4-bit, 8-bit, 16-bit, 32-bit, and 64-bit of equality comparator circuit are mapped on memristive memory crossbar array by using material implication logic in a sequential and parallel method. The simulation results show that, for the 64-bit word size, the parallel mapping exhibits 2.8× better performance in total execution time than sequential mapping but has a trade-off in terms of energy consumption and area utilization. Meanwhile, the total crossbar area can be reduced by 1.2× for sequential mapping and 1.5× for parallel mapping both by using the overlapping technique.

  1. Diversity analysis of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) germplasm using the CottonSNP63K Array.

    PubMed

    Hinze, Lori L; Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Wilson, Iain W; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Llewellyn, Danny J; Taylor, Jen M; Spriggs, Andrew; Fang, David D; Ulloa, Mauricio; Burke, John J; Giband, Marc; Lacape, Jean-Marc; Van Deynze, Allen; Udall, Joshua A; Scheffler, Jodi A; Hague, Steve; Wendel, Jonathan F; Pepper, Alan E; Frelichowski, James; Lawley, Cindy T; Jones, Don C; Percy, Richard G; Stelly, David M

    2017-02-03

    Cotton germplasm resources contain beneficial alleles that can be exploited to develop germplasm adapted to emerging environmental and climate conditions. Accessions and lines have traditionally been characterized based on phenotypes, but phenotypic profiles are limited by the cost, time, and space required to make visual observations and measurements. With advances in molecular genetic methods, genotypic profiles are increasingly able to identify differences among accessions due to the larger number of genetic markers that can be measured. A combination of both methods would greatly enhance our ability to characterize germplasm resources. Recent efforts have culminated in the identification of sufficient SNP markers to establish high-throughput genotyping systems, such as the CottonSNP63K array, which enables a researcher to efficiently analyze large numbers of SNP markers and obtain highly repeatable results. In the current investigation, we have utilized the SNP array for analyzing genetic diversity primarily among cotton cultivars, making comparisons to SSR-based phylogenetic analyses, and identifying loci associated with seed nutritional traits. The SNP markers distinctly separated G. hirsutum from other Gossypium species and distinguished the wild from cultivated types of G. hirsutum. The markers also efficiently discerned differences among cultivars, which was the primary goal when designing the CottonSNP63K array. Population structure within the genus compared favorably with previous results obtained using SSR markers, and an association study identified loci linked to factors that affect cottonseed protein content. Our results provide a large genome-wide variation data set for primarily cultivated cotton. Thousands of SNPs in representative cotton genotypes provide an opportunity to finely discriminate among cultivated cotton from around the world. The SNPs will be relevant as dense markers of genome variation for association mapping approaches aimed at

  2. Detecting Spatial Patterns in Biological Array Experiments

    PubMed Central

    ROOT, DAVID E.; KELLEY, BRIAN P.; STOCKWELL, BRENT R.

    2005-01-01

    Chemical genetic screening and DNA and protein microarrays are among a number of increasingly important and widely used biological research tools that involve large numbers of parallel experiments arranged in a spatial array. It is often difficult to ensure that uniform experimental conditions are present throughout the entire array, and as a result, one often observes systematic spatially correlated errors, especially when array experiments are performed using robots. Here, the authors apply techniques based on the discrete Fourier transform to identify and quantify spatially correlated errors superimposed on a spatially random background. They demonstrate that these techniques are effective in identifying common spatially systematic errors in high-throughput 384-well microplate assay data. In addition, the authors employ a statistical test to allow for automatic detection of such errors. Software tools for using this approach are provided. PMID:14567791

  3. Friction Stir Weld Inspection Through Conductivity Imaging Using Shaped Field MWM(Registered Trademark) - Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil; Grundy, David; Zilberstein, Vladimir; Kinchen, David G.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Friction Stir Welds (FSW) of Al 2195-T8 and Al 2219-T8, provided by Lockheed Martin Michoud Operations, were inspected for lack-of-penetration (LOP) defects using a custom designed MWM-Array, a multi-element eddy-current sensor. MWM (registered trademark) electrical conductivity mapping demonstrated high sensitivity to LOP as small as 0.75 mm (0.03 in.), as confirmed by metallographic data that characterized the extent of LOP defects. High sensitivity and high spatial resolution was achieved via a 37-element custom designed MWM-Array allowing LOP detection using the normalized longitudinal component of the MWM measured conductivity. This permitted both LOP detection and correlation of MWM conductivity features with the LOP defect size, as changes in conductivity were apparently associated with metallurgical features within the near-surface layer of the LOP defect zone. MWM conductivity mapping reveals information similar to macro-etching as the MWM-Array is sensitive to small changes in conductivity due to changes in microstructure associated with material thermal processing, in this case welding. The electrical conductivity measured on the root side of FSWs varies across the weld due to microstructural differences introduced by the FSW process, as well as those caused by planar flaws. Weld metal, i.e., dynamically recrystallized zone (DXZ), thermomechanically affected zone (TMZ), heat-affected zone (HAZ), and parent metal (PM) are all evident in the conductivity maps. While prior efforts had met with limited success for NDE (Nondestructive Evaluation) of dissimilar alloy, Al2219 to Al2195 FSW, the new custom designed multi-element MWM-Array achieved detection of all LOP defects even in dissimilar metal welds.

  4. Accurate motor mapping in awake common marmosets using micro-electrocorticographical stimulation and stochastic threshold estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Akito; Takemi, Mitsuaki; Tia, Banty; Castagnola, Elisa; Ansaldo, Alberto; Sato, Kenta; Awiszus, Friedemann; Seki, Kazuhiko; Ricci, Davide; Fadiga, Luciano; Iriki, Atsushi; Ushiba, Junichi

    2018-06-01

    Objective. Motor map has been widely used as an indicator of motor skills and learning, cortical injury, plasticity, and functional recovery. Cortical stimulation mapping using epidural electrodes is recently adopted for animal studies. However, several technical limitations still remain. Test-retest reliability of epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) mapping has not been examined in detail. Many previous studies defined evoked movements and motor thresholds by visual inspection, and thus, lacked quantitative measurements. A reliable and quantitative motor map is important to elucidate the mechanisms of motor cortical reorganization. The objective of the current study was to perform reliable ECS mapping of motor representations based on the motor thresholds, which were stochastically estimated by motor evoked potentials and chronically implanted micro-electrocorticographical (µECoG) electrode arrays, in common marmosets. Approach. ECS was applied using the implanted µECoG electrode arrays in three adult common marmosets under awake conditions. Motor evoked potentials were recorded through electromyographical electrodes implanted in upper limb muscles. The motor threshold was calculated through a modified maximum likelihood threshold-hunting algorithm fitted with the recorded data from marmosets. Further, a computer simulation confirmed reliability of the algorithm. Main results. Computer simulation suggested that the modified maximum likelihood threshold-hunting algorithm enabled to estimate motor threshold with acceptable precision. In vivo ECS mapping showed high test-retest reliability with respect to the excitability and location of the cortical forelimb motor representations. Significance. Using implanted µECoG electrode arrays and a modified motor threshold-hunting algorithm, we were able to achieve reliable motor mapping in common marmosets with the ECS system.

  5. Accurate motor mapping in awake common marmosets using micro-electrocorticographical stimulation and stochastic threshold estimation.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Akito; Takemi, Mitsuaki; Tia, Banty; Castagnola, Elisa; Ansaldo, Alberto; Sato, Kenta; Awiszus, Friedemann; Seki, Kazuhiko; Ricci, Davide; Fadiga, Luciano; Iriki, Atsushi; Ushiba, Junichi

    2018-06-01

    Motor map has been widely used as an indicator of motor skills and learning, cortical injury, plasticity, and functional recovery. Cortical stimulation mapping using epidural electrodes is recently adopted for animal studies. However, several technical limitations still remain. Test-retest reliability of epidural cortical stimulation (ECS) mapping has not been examined in detail. Many previous studies defined evoked movements and motor thresholds by visual inspection, and thus, lacked quantitative measurements. A reliable and quantitative motor map is important to elucidate the mechanisms of motor cortical reorganization. The objective of the current study was to perform reliable ECS mapping of motor representations based on the motor thresholds, which were stochastically estimated by motor evoked potentials and chronically implanted micro-electrocorticographical (µECoG) electrode arrays, in common marmosets. ECS was applied using the implanted µECoG electrode arrays in three adult common marmosets under awake conditions. Motor evoked potentials were recorded through electromyographical electrodes implanted in upper limb muscles. The motor threshold was calculated through a modified maximum likelihood threshold-hunting algorithm fitted with the recorded data from marmosets. Further, a computer simulation confirmed reliability of the algorithm. Computer simulation suggested that the modified maximum likelihood threshold-hunting algorithm enabled to estimate motor threshold with acceptable precision. In vivo ECS mapping showed high test-retest reliability with respect to the excitability and location of the cortical forelimb motor representations. Using implanted µECoG electrode arrays and a modified motor threshold-hunting algorithm, we were able to achieve reliable motor mapping in common marmosets with the ECS system.

  6. Double coding and mapping using Abbreviated Injury Scale 1998 and 2005: identifying issues for trauma data.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Cameron S; Niggemeyer, Louise E; Charman, Debra

    2010-09-01

    The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS05) potentially represents a significant change in injury spectrum classification, due to a substantial increase in the codeset size and alterations to the agreed severity of many injuries compared to the previous version (AIS98). Whilst many trauma registries around the world are moving to adopt AIS05 or its 2008 update (AIS08), its effect on patient classification in existing registries, and the optimum method of comparing existing data collections with new AIS05 collections are unknown. The present study aimed to assess the potential impact of adopting the AIS05 codeset in an established trauma system, and to identify issues associated with this change. A current subset of consecutive major trauma patients admitted to two large hospitals in the Australian state of Victoria were double-coded in AIS98 and AIS05. Assigned codesets were also mapped to the other AIS version using code lists supplied in the AIS05 manual, giving up to four AIS codes per injury sustained. Resulting codesets were assessed for agreement in codes used, injury severity and calculated severity scores. 602 injuries sustained by 109 patients were compared. Adopting AIS05 would lead to a decrease in the number of designated major trauma patients in Victoria, estimated at 22% (95% confidence interval, 15-31%). Differences in AIS level between versions were significantly more likely to occur amongst head and chest injuries. Data mapped to a different codeset performed better in paired comparisons than raw AIS98 and AIS05 codesets, with data mapping of AIS05 codes back to AIS98 giving significantly higher levels of agreement in AIS level, ISS and NISS than other potential comparisons, and resulting in significantly fewer conversion problems than attempting to map AIS98 codes to AIS05. This study provides new insights into AIS codeset change impact. Adoption of AIS05 or AIS08 in established registries will decrease major trauma patient numbers

  7. A novel intra-operative, high-resolution atrial mapping approach.

    PubMed

    Yaksh, Ameeta; van der Does, Lisette J M E; Kik, Charles; Knops, Paul; Oei, Frans B S; van de Woestijne, Pieter C; Bekkers, Jos A; Bogers, Ad J J C; Allessie, Maurits A; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2015-12-01

    A new technique is demonstrated for extensive high-resolution intra-operative atrial mapping that will facilitate the localization of atrial fibrillation (AF) sources and identification of the substrate perpetuating AF. Prior to the start of extra-corporal circulation, a 8 × 24-electrode array (2-mm inter-electrode distance) is placed subsequently on all the right and left epicardial atrial sites, including Bachmann's bundle, for recording of unipolar electrograms during sinus rhythm and (induced) AF. AF is induced by high-frequency pacing at the right atrial free wall. A pacemaker wire stitched to the right atrium serves as a reference signal. The indifferent pole is connected to a steal wire fixed to subcutaneous tissue. Electrograms are recorded by a computerized mapping system and, after amplification (gain 1000), filtering (bandwidth 0.5-400 Hz), sampling (1 kHz) and analogue to digital conversion (16 bits), automatically stored on hard disk. During the mapping procedure, real-time visualization secures electrogram quality. Analysis will be performed offline. This technique was performed in 168 patients of 18 years and older, with coronary and/or structural heart disease, with or without AF, electively scheduled for cardiac surgery and a ventricular ejection fraction above 40 %. The mean duration of the entire mapping procedure including preparation time was 9 ± 2 min. Complications related to the mapping procedure during or after cardiac surgery were not observed. We introduce the first epicardial atrial mapping approach with a high resolution of ≥1728 recording sites which can be performed in a procedure time of only 9±2 mins. This mapping technique can potentially identify areas responsible for initiation and persistence of AF and hopefully can individualize both diagnosis and therapy of AF.

  8. Striped tertiary storage arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.

    1993-01-01

    Data stripping is a technique for increasing the throughput and reducing the response time of large access to a storage system. In striped magnetic or optical disk arrays, a single file is striped or interleaved across several disks; in a striped tape system, files are interleaved across tape cartridges. Because a striped file can be accessed by several disk drives or tape recorders in parallel, the sustained bandwidth to the file is greater than in non-striped systems, where access to the file are restricted to a single device. It is argued that applying striping to tertiary storage systems will provide needed performance and reliability benefits. The performance benefits of striping for applications using large tertiary storage systems is discussed. It will introduce commonly available tape drives and libraries, and discuss their performance limitations, especially focusing on the long latency of tape accesses. This section will also describe an event-driven tertiary storage array simulator that is being used to understand the best ways of configuring these storage arrays. The reliability problems of magnetic tape devices are discussed, and plans for modeling the overall reliability of striped tertiary storage arrays to identify the amount of error correction required are described. Finally, work being done by other members of the Sequoia group to address latency of accesses, optimizing tertiary storage arrays that perform mostly writes, and compression is discussed.

  9. Identifying Key Flavors in Strawberries Driving Liking via Internal and External Preference Mapping.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Penelope; Cicerale, Sara; Pang, Edwin; Keast, Russell

    2018-04-01

    Australian consumers desire the development of a more flavorsome Australian strawberry cultivar. To aid in the development of well-liked strawberries, the attributes driving liking need to be identified. The objective of this research is to apply Preference Mapping (PM) techniques to the descriptive profile of commercial and newly bred strawberry cultivars, together with consumer preference data to determine the flavors contributing to liking. A trained sensory panel (n = 12) used Quantitative Descriptive Analysis (QDA®) methodology to evaluate two appearance, seven aroma, five texture, 10 flavor and 10 aftertaste attributes of three commercial strawberry cultivars and six elite breeding lines grown in Victoria, Australia. Strawberry consumers (n = 150) assessed their liking of the same strawberry cultivars. QDA® significantly discriminated strawberries on 28 of the 34 sensory attributes. There were significant differences in hedonic ratings of strawberries (F(8,714) = 11.5, P = 0.0001), with Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) identifying three consumer clusters each displaying differing patterns of preference. Internal and external PM techniques were applied to the data to identify the attributes driving consumer acceptability. Sweet, berry, caramel, fruity and floral attributes were identified as most contributing to liking. Sour, citrus, green, astringent, firm and gritty attributes were conversely associated with a reduction in consumer liking. Elite Lines 2 and 6 have been identified as having the broadest appeal, satisfying between 60% and 70% of consumers in the population assessed, thus the introduction of these cultivars should satisfy the largest group of consumers in the Australian market. The results of this research could be applied to breeding programs, to ensure newly bred cultivars express characteristics that were identified as well-liked amongst consumers. In addition, this research provides evidence for marketing strawberries by

  10. Sprite-producing Convective Storms within the Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, W. A.; Cummer, S. A.; Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Lang, T. J.; Rutledge, S. A.; Lu, G.; Stanley, M. A.; Ashcraft, T.; Nelson, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The multi-year, multi-institution effort entitled Physical Origins of Coupling to the Upper Atmosphere from Lightning (PhOCAL), has among its goals to qualitatively understand the meteorology and lightning flash characteristics that produce the unusual and/or very energetic lightning responsible for phenomena such as sprites, halos, elves, blue jets and gigantic jets, collectively known as Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). A key task is to obtain simultaneous video, ideally with a high-speed imager (HSI), of both a TLE and its parent lightning discharge, within the domain of a 3-D Lightning Mapping Array (LMA). While conceptually simple, this task is logistically quite complicated. In 2012, a new 15-station Colorado LMA (COLMA) became operational, covering northeastern Colorado, with the Yucca Ridge Field Station (YRFS) near its western edge. The National Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), which since 2007 has been documenting sprite-class +CGs (those with impulse change moment changes >100 C km), indicates that a strong gradient of energetic +CGs exists west-to-east through the COLMA, with the most likely region for sprite-producing storms being in the COLMA eastern fringes (western Kansas and Nebraska). Yet, on 8 and 25 June, 2012, intense convective systems formed in the COLMA along and just east of the Front Range, producing severe weather and intense lightning. On the 8th, four sprite parent +CGs were captured at 3000 fps from YRFS with the sprites confirmed by dual (conventional speed) cameras in New Mexico. In a second storm on the 25th, viewing conditions prevented +CG video acquisition, but sprites were logged over the COLMA and detailed reconstructions of the discharges are being made. The parent discharges often began as upward negative leaders propagating into a mid-level positive charge layer at 8-10 km. They often originated within or near the convective core before expanding outward into a stratiform region and involving several hundred square

  11. A novel VLSI processor architecture for supercomputing arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, N.; Pattabiraman, S.; Devanathan, R.; Ahmed, Ashaf; Venkataraman, S.; Ganesh, N.

    1993-01-01

    Design of the processor element for general purpose massively parallel supercomputing arrays is highly complex and cost ineffective. To overcome this, the architecture and organization of the functional units of the processor element should be such as to suit the diverse computational structures and simplify mapping of complex communication structures of different classes of algorithms. This demands that the computation and communication structures of different class of algorithms be unified. While unifying the different communication structures is a difficult process, analysis of a wide class of algorithms reveals that their computation structures can be expressed in terms of basic IP,IP,OP,CM,R,SM, and MAA operations. The execution of these operations is unified on the PAcube macro-cell array. Based on this PAcube macro-cell array, we present a novel processor element called the GIPOP processor, which has dedicated functional units to perform the above operations. The architecture and organization of these functional units are such to satisfy the two important criteria mentioned above. The structure of the macro-cell and the unification process has led to a very regular and simpler design of the GIPOP processor. The production cost of the GIPOP processor is drastically reduced as it is designed on high performance mask programmable PAcube arrays.

  12. Mapping Meaningful Places on Washington's Olympic Peninsula: Toward a Deeper Understanding of Landscape Values.

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Lee Karol; Biedenweg, Kelly; McLain, Rebecca

    2017-10-01

    Landscape values mapping has been widely employed as a form of public participation GIS (PPGIS) in natural resource planning and decision-making to capture the complex array of values, uses, and interactions between people and landscapes. A landscape values typology has been commonly employed in the mapping of social and environmental values in a variety of management settings and scales. We explore how people attribute meanings and assign values to special places on the Olympic Peninsula (Washington, USA) using both a landscape values typology and qualitative responses about residents' place-relationships. Using geographically referenced social values data collected in community meetings (n = 169), we identify high-frequency landscape values and examine how well the landscape values are reflected in open-ended descriptions of place-relations. We also explore the various interpretations of 14 landscape values used in the study. In particular, we investigate any overlapping meanings or blurriness among landscape values and reveal potentially emergent landscape values from the qualitative data. The results provide insights on the use of landscape values mapping typologies for practitioners and researchers engaged in the mapping of social values for PPGIS.

  13. Mapping Meaningful Places on Washington's Olympic Peninsula: Toward a Deeper Understanding of Landscape Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerveny, Lee Karol; Biedenweg, Kelly; McLain, Rebecca

    2017-10-01

    Landscape values mapping has been widely employed as a form of public participation GIS (PPGIS) in natural resource planning and decision-making to capture the complex array of values, uses, and interactions between people and landscapes. A landscape values typology has been commonly employed in the mapping of social and environmental values in a variety of management settings and scales. We explore how people attribute meanings and assign values to special places on the Olympic Peninsula (Washington, USA) using both a landscape values typology and qualitative responses about residents' place-relationships. Using geographically referenced social values data collected in community meetings ( n = 169), we identify high-frequency landscape values and examine how well the landscape values are reflected in open-ended descriptions of place-relations. We also explore the various interpretations of 14 landscape values used in the study. In particular, we investigate any overlapping meanings or blurriness among landscape values and reveal potentially emergent landscape values from the qualitative data. The results provide insights on the use of landscape values mapping typologies for practitioners and researchers engaged in the mapping of social values for PPGIS.

  14. Experimental implementation of array-compressed parallel transmission at 7 tesla.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinqiang; Cao, Zhipeng; Grissom, William A

    2016-06-01

    To implement and validate a hardware-based array-compressed parallel transmission (acpTx) system. In array-compressed parallel transmission, a small number of transmit channels drive a larger number of transmit coils, which are connected via an array compression network that implements optimized coil-to-channel combinations. A two channel-to-eight coil array compression network was developed using power splitters, attenuators and phase shifters, and a simulation was performed to investigate the effects of coil coupling on power dissipation in a simplified network. An eight coil transmit array was constructed using induced current elimination decoupling, and the coil and network were validated in benchtop measurements, B1+ mapping scans, and an accelerated spiral excitation experiment. The developed attenuators came within 0.08 dB of the desired attenuations, and reflection coefficients were -22 dB or better. The simulation demonstrated that up to 3× more power was dissipated in the network when coils were poorly isolated (-9.6 dB), versus well-isolated (-31 dB). Compared to split circularly-polarized coil combinations, the additional degrees of freedom provided by the array compression network led to 54% lower squared excitation error in the spiral experiment. Array-compressed parallel transmission was successfully implemented in a hardware system. Further work is needed to develop remote network tuning and to minimize network power dissipation. Magn Reson Med 75:2545-2552, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Regional Mapping of Plantation Extent Using Multisensor Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbick, N.; Ledoux, L.; Hagen, S.; Salas, W.

    2016-12-01

    Industrial forest plantations are expanding rapidly across the tropics and monitoring extent is critical for understanding environmental and socioeconomic impacts. In this study, new, multisensor imagery were evaluated and integrated to extract the strengths of each sensor for mapping plantation extent at regional scales. Three distinctly different landscapes with multiple plantation types were chosen to consider scalability and transferability. These were Tanintharyi, Myanmar, West Kalimantan, Indonesia, and southern Ghana. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2), and Sentinel-1A images were fused within a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) framework using random forest and high-resolution surveys. Multi-criteria evaluations showed both L-and C-band gamma nought γ° backscatter decibel (dB), Landsat reflectance ρλ, and texture indices were useful for distinguishing oil palm and rubber plantations from other land types. The classification approach identified 750,822 ha or 23% of the Taninathryi, Myanmar, and 216,086 ha or 25% of western West Kalimantan as plantation with very high cross validation accuracy. The mapping approach was scalable and transferred well across the different geographies and plantation types. As archives for Sentinel-1, Landsat-8, and PALSAR-2 continue to grow, mapping plantation extent and dynamics at moderate resolution over large regions should be feasible.

  16. Development of Map Construction Skills in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Pamela L.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examined children's map construction skills when drawing demands were removed from the task and scenes were highly simplified. Study 1 compared the performance of first graders and third graders on their ability to preserve configuration during transformation of pictured arrays from eye-level to aerial views. For children with…

  17. Transitive Relational Mappings in Three- and Four-Year-Olds: The Analogy of Goldilocks and the Three Bears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goswami, Usha

    1995-01-01

    In three experiments, three- and four-year olds were asked to map relative size from one array of objects to another, map relative size to relative proportion, and map relative size to a variety of perceptual dimensions. Children were able to make relational mappings based on size when spatial positions and concrete representations of size of…

  18. LOFAR Lightning Imaging: Mapping Lightning With Nanosecond Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, B. M.; Scholten, O.; Bonardi, A.; Buitink, S.; Corstanje, A.; Ebert, U.; Falcke, H.; Hörandel, J. R.; Leijnse, H.; Mitra, P.; Mulrey, K.; Nelles, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Rossetto, L.; Rutjes, C.; Schellart, P.; Thoudam, S.; Trinh, T. N. G.; ter Veen, S.; Winchen, T.

    2018-03-01

    Lightning mapping technology has proven instrumental in understanding lightning. In this work we present a pipeline that can use lightning observed by the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope to construct a 3-D map of the flash. We show that LOFAR has unparalleled precision, on the order of meters, even for lightning flashes that are over 20 km outside the area enclosed by LOFAR antennas (˜3,200 km2), and can potentially locate over 10,000 sources per lightning flash. We also show that LOFAR is the first lightning mapping system that is sensitive to the spatial structure of the electrical current during individual lightning leader steps.

  19. Creation of a Human Secretome: A Novel Composite Library of Human Secreted Proteins: Validation Using Ovarian Cancer Gene Expression Data and a Virtual Secretome Array.

    PubMed

    Vathipadiekal, Vinod; Wang, Victoria; Wei, Wei; Waldron, Levi; Drapkin, Ronny; Gillette, Michael; Skates, Steven; Birrer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    To generate a comprehensive "Secretome" of proteins potentially found in the blood and derive a virtual Affymetrix array. To validate the utility of this database for the discovery of novel serum-based biomarkers using ovarian cancer transcriptomic data. The secretome was constructed by aggregating the data from databases of known secreted proteins, transmembrane or membrane proteins, signal peptides, G-protein coupled receptors, or proteins existing in the extracellular region, and the virtual array was generated by mapping them to Affymetrix probeset identifiers. Whole-genome microarray data from ovarian cancer, normal ovarian surface epithelium, and fallopian tube epithelium were used to identify transcripts upregulated in ovarian cancer. We established the secretome from eight public databases and a virtual array consisting of 16,521 Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 probesets. Using ovarian cancer transcriptomic data, we identified candidate blood-based biomarkers for ovarian cancer and performed bioinformatic validation by demonstrating rediscovery of known biomarkers including CA125 and HE4. Two novel top biomarkers (FGF18 and GPR172A) were validated in serum samples from an independent patient cohort. We present the secretome, comprising the most comprehensive resource available for protein products that are potentially found in the blood. The associated virtual array can be used to translate gene-expression data into cancer biomarker discovery. A list of blood-based biomarkers for ovarian cancer detection is reported and includes CA125 and HE4. FGF18 and GPR172A were identified and validated by ELISA as being differentially expressed in the serum of ovarian cancer patients compared with controls. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Array Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, S. J.

    2012-04-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System for the CTBT differ greatly in size and geometry, with apertures ranging from below 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high frequency phases since signals are often incoherent between sensors. Many such phases, typically from events at regional distances, remain undetected since pipeline algorithms often consider only frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing. High frequency phases that are detected are frequently attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates and are consequently not associated with the correct event hypotheses. This can lead to missed events both due to a lack of contributing phase detections and by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. Continuous spectral estimation can be used for phase detection and parameter estimation on the largest aperture arrays, with phase arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity and the ability to estimate backazimuth and slowness requires that the spatial extent of the array is large enough to resolve time-delays between envelopes with a period of approximately 4 or 5 seconds. The NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK arrays have apertures in excess of 20 km and spectrogram beamforming on these stations provides high quality slowness estimates for regional phases without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with aperture between 10 and 20 km (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 second period signal. The MJAR array in Japan recorded high SNR Pn signals for both the 2006 and 2009 North Korea

  1. SimArray: a user-friendly and user-configurable microarray design tool

    PubMed Central

    Auburn, Richard P; Russell, Roslin R; Fischer, Bettina; Meadows, Lisa A; Sevillano Matilla, Santiago; Russell, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Background Microarrays were first developed to assess gene expression but are now also used to map protein-binding sites and to assess allelic variation between individuals. Regardless of the intended application, efficient production and appropriate array design are key determinants of experimental success. Inefficient production can make larger-scale studies prohibitively expensive, whereas poor array design makes normalisation and data analysis problematic. Results We have developed a user-friendly tool, SimArray, which generates a randomised spot layout, computes a maximum meta-grid area, and estimates the print time, in response to user-specified design decisions. Selected parameters include: the number of probes to be printed; the microtitre plate format; the printing pin configuration, and the achievable spot density. SimArray is compatible with all current robotic spotters that employ 96-, 384- or 1536-well microtitre plates, and can be configured to reflect most production environments. Print time and maximum meta-grid area estimates facilitate evaluation of each array design for its suitability. Randomisation of the spot layout facilitates correction of systematic biases by normalisation. Conclusion SimArray is intended to help both established researchers and those new to the microarray field to develop microarray designs with randomised spot layouts that are compatible with their specific production environment. SimArray is an open-source program and is available from . PMID:16509966

  2. Using a binaural biomimetic array to identify bottom objects ensonified by echolocating dolphins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heiweg, D.A.; Moore, P.W.; Martin, S.W.; Dankiewicz, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a unique dolphin biomimetic sonar produced data that were used to study signal processing methods for object identification. Echoes from four metallic objects proud on the bottom, and a substrate-only condition, were generated by bottlenose dolphins trained to ensonify the targets in very shallow water. Using the two-element ('binaural') receive array, object echo spectra were collected and submitted for identification to four neural network architectures. Identification accuracy was evaluated over two receive array configurations, and five signal processing schemes. The four neural networks included backpropagation, learning vector quantization, genetic learning and probabilistic network architectures. The processing schemes included four methods that capitalized on the binaural data, plus a monaural benchmark process. All the schemes resulted in above-chance identification accuracy when applied to learning vector quantization and backpropagation. Beam-forming or concatenation of spectra from both receive elements outperformed the monaural benchmark, with higher sensitivity and lower bias. Ultimately, best object identification performance was achieved by the learning vector quantization network supplied with beam-formed data. The advantages of multi-element signal processing for object identification are clearly demonstrated in this development of a first-ever dolphin biomimetic sonar. ?? 2006 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  3. First High-Density Linkage Map and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Significantly Associated With Traits of Economic Importance in Yellowtail Kingfish Seriola lalandi.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen H; Rastas, Pasi M A; Premachandra, H K A; Knibb, Wayne

    2018-01-01

    The genetic resources available for the commercially important fish species Yellowtail kingfish (YTK) ( Seriola lalandi) are relative sparse. To overcome this, we aimed (1) to develop a linkage map for this species, and (2) to identify markers/variants associated with economically important traits in kingfish (with an emphasis on body weight). Genetic and genomic analyses were conducted using 13,898 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generated from a new high-throughput genotyping by sequencing platform, Diversity Arrays Technology (DArTseq TM ) in a pedigreed population comprising 752 animals. The linkage analysis enabled to map about 4,000 markers to 24 linkage groups (LGs), with an average density of 3.4 SNPs per cM. The linkage map was integrated into a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and identified six variants/SNPs associated with body weight ( P < 5e -8 ) when a multi-locus mixed model was used. Two out of the six significant markers were mapped to LGs 17 and 23, and collectively they explained 5.8% of the total genetic variance. It is concluded that the newly developed linkage map and the significantly associated markers with body weight provide fundamental information to characterize genetic architecture of growth-related traits in this population of YTK S. lalandi .

  4. Development and validation of the Axiom(®) Apple480K SNP genotyping array.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Luca; Cestaro, Alessandro; Linsmith, Gareth; Muranty, Hélène; Denancé, Caroline; Théron, Anthony; Poncet, Charles; Micheletti, Diego; Kerschbamer, Emanuela; Di Pierro, Erica A; Larger, Simone; Pindo, Massimo; Van de Weg, Eric; Davassi, Alessandro; Laurens, François; Velasco, Riccardo; Durel, Charles-Eric; Troggio, Michela

    2016-04-01

    Cultivated apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) is one of the most important fruit crops in temperate regions, and has great economic and cultural value. The apple genome is highly heterozygous and has undergone a recent duplication which, combined with a rapid linkage disequilibrium decay, makes it difficult to perform genome-wide association (GWA) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism arrays offer highly multiplexed assays at a relatively low cost per data point and can be a valid tool for the identification of the markers associated with traits of interest. Here, we describe the development and validation of a 487K SNP Affymetrix Axiom(®) genotyping array for apple and discuss its potential applications. The array has been built from the high-depth resequencing of 63 different cultivars covering most of the genetic diversity in cultivated apple. The SNPs were chosen by applying a focal points approach to enrich genic regions, but also to reach a uniform coverage of non-genic regions. A total of 1324 apple accessions, including the 92 progenies of two mapping populations, have been genotyped with the Axiom(®) Apple480K to assess the effectiveness of the array. A large majority of SNPs (359 994 or 74%) fell in the stringent class of poly high resolution polymorphisms. We also devised a filtering procedure to identify a subset of 275K very robust markers that can be safely used for germplasm surveys in apple. The Axiom(®) Apple480K has now been commercially released both for public and proprietary use and will likely be a reference tool for GWA studies in apple. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Brute-force mapmaking with compact interferometers: a MITEoR northern sky map from 128 to 175 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Tegmark, M.; Dillon, J. S.; Liu, A.; Neben, A. R.; Tribiano, S. M.; Bradley, R. F.; Buza, V.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Gharibyan, H.; Hickish, J.; Kunz, E.; Losh, J.; Lutomirski, A.; Morgan, E.; Narayanan, S.; Perko, A.; Rosner, D.; Sanchez, N.; Schutz, K.; Valdez, M.; Villasenor, J.; Yang, H.; Zarb Adami, K.; Zelko, I.; Zheng, K.

    2017-03-01

    We present a new method for interferometric imaging that is ideal for the large fields of view and compact arrays common in 21 cm cosmology. We first demonstrate the method with the simulations for two very different low-frequency interferometers, the Murchison Widefield Array and the MIT Epoch of Reionization (MITEoR) experiment. We then apply the method to the MITEoR data set collected in 2013 July to obtain the first northern sky map from 128 to 175 MHz at ∼2° resolution and find an overall spectral index of -2.73 ± 0.11. The success of this imaging method bodes well for upcoming compact redundant low-frequency arrays such as Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array. Both the MITEoR interferometric data and the 150 MHz sky map are available at http://space.mit.edu/home/tegmark/omniscope.html.

  6. Vortex unbinding in 2D classical JJ arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Minnhagen, Petter

    1998-05-15

    Vortices for 2D superfluids are introduced and are described in terms of a 2D Coulomb gas. The 2D classical JJ array is modeled by a 2D XY-model and a mapping between the XY-model and the Coulomb gas is given. The physical properties of a JJ array are then given in terms of the corresponding Coulomb gas properties. First aspects of the Kosterlitz-Thouless vortex unbinding transitions are reviewed. Consequences for the resistance as well as the frequency dependent conductivity are described. Next the vortex unbinding induced by an external current is considered with Consequencies for the non-linear IV-characteristics. Finally some somemore » effects of a perpendicular magnetic field are discussed in terms of an interplay between free vortices and bound vortex pairs.« less

  7. Elucidation of the ‘Honeycrisp’ pedigree through haplotype analysis with a multi-family integrated SNP linkage map and a large apple (Malus×domestica) pedigree-connected SNP data set

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Nicholas P; van de Weg, Eric; Bedford, David S; Peace, Cameron P; Vanderzande, Stijn; Clark, Matthew D; Teh, Soon Li; Cai, Lichun; Luby, James J

    2017-01-01

    The apple (Malus×domestica) cultivar Honeycrisp has become important economically and as a breeding parent. An earlier study with SSR markers indicated the original recorded pedigree of ‘Honeycrisp’ was incorrect and ‘Keepsake’ was identified as one putative parent, the other being unknown. The objective of this study was to verify ‘Keepsake’ as a parent and identify and genetically describe the unknown parent and its grandparents. A multi-family based dense and high-quality integrated SNP map was created using the apple 8 K Illumina Infinium SNP array. This map was used alongside a large pedigree-connected data set from the RosBREED project to build extended SNP haplotypes and to identify pedigree relationships. ‘Keepsake’ was verified as one parent of ‘Honeycrisp’ and ‘Duchess of Oldenburg’ and ‘Golden Delicious’ were identified as grandparents through the unknown parent. Following this finding, siblings of ‘Honeycrisp’ were identified using the SNP data. Breeding records from several of these siblings suggested that the previously unreported parent is a University of Minnesota selection, MN1627. This selection is no longer available, but now is genetically described through imputed SNP haplotypes. We also present the mosaic grandparental composition of ‘Honeycrisp’ for each of its 17 chromosome pairs. This new pedigree and genetic information will be useful in future pedigree-based genetic studies to connect ‘Honeycrisp’ with other cultivars used widely in apple breeding programs. The created SNP linkage map will benefit future research using the data from the Illumina apple 8 and 20 K and Affymetrix 480 K SNP arrays. PMID:28243452

  8. NovoTTF™-100A System (Tumor Treating Fields) transducer array layout planning for glioblastoma: a NovoTAL™ system user study.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Aafia; Benson, Laura; Varshaver, Michael; Farber, Ori; Weinberg, Uri; Kirson, Eilon; Palti, Yoram

    2015-11-11

    Optune™, previously known as the NovoTTF-100A System™, generates Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), an effective anti-mitotic therapy for glioblastoma. The system delivers intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields to the supratentorial brain. Patient therapy is personalized by configuring transducer array layout placement on the scalp to the tumor site using MRI measurements and the NovoTAL System. Transducer array layout mapping optimizes therapy by maximizing electric field intensity to the tumor site. This study evaluated physician performance in conducting transducer array layout mapping using the NovoTAL System compared with mapping performed by the Novocure in-house clinical team. Fourteen physicians (7 neuro-oncologists, 4 medical oncologists, and 3 neurosurgeons) evaluated five blinded cases of recurrent glioblastoma and performed head size and tumor location measurements using a standard Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine reader. Concordance with Novocure measurement and intra- and inter-rater reliability were assessed using relevant correlation coefficients. The study criterion for success was a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) >0.80. CCC for each physician versus Novocure on 20 MRI measurements was 0.96 (standard deviation, SD ± 0.03, range 0.90-1.00), indicating very high agreement between the two groups. Intra- and inter-rater reliability correlation coefficients were similarly high: 0.83 (SD ±0.15, range 0.54-1.00) and 0.80 (SD ±0.18, range 0.48-1.00), respectively. This user study demonstrated an excellent level of concordance between prescribing physicians and Novocure in-house clinical teams in performing transducer array layout planning. Intra-rater reliability was very high, indicating reproducible performance. Physicians prescribing TTFields, when trained on the NovoTAL System, can independently perform transducer array layout mapping required for the initiation and maintenance of patients on TTFields

  9. A new catalog of planetary maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Inge, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A single, concise reference to all existing planetary maps, including lunar ones, is being prepared that will allow map users to identify and locate maps of their areas of interest. This will be the first such comprehensive listing of planetary maps. Although the USGS shows index maps on the collar of each map sheet, periodically publishes index maps of Mars, and provides informal listings of the USGS map database, no tabulation exists that identifies all planetary maps, including those published by DMA and other organizations. The catalog will consist of a booklet containing small-scale image maps with superimposed quadrangle boundaries and map data tabulations.

  10. A High Density SNP Array for the Domestic Horse and Extant Perissodactyla: Utility for Association Mapping, Genetic Diversity, and Phylogeny Studies

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Molly E.; Bannasch, Danika L.; Petersen, Jessica L.; Gurr, Jessica; Bailey, Ernie; Binns, Matthew M.; Distl, Ottmar; Guérin, Gérard; Hasegawa, Telhisa; Hill, Emmeline W.; Leeb, Tosso; Lindgren, Gabriella; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Røed, Knut H.; Ryder, Oliver A.; Swinburne, June E.; Tozaki, Teruaki; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Vaudin, Mark; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    An equine SNP genotyping array was developed and evaluated on a panel of samples representing 14 domestic horse breeds and 18 evolutionarily related species. More than 54,000 polymorphic SNPs provided an average inter-SNP spacing of ∼43 kb. The mean minor allele frequency across domestic horse breeds was 0.23, and the number of polymorphic SNPs within breeds ranged from 43,287 to 52,085. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) in most breeds declined rapidly over the first 50–100 kb and reached background levels within 1–2 Mb. The extent of LD and the level of inbreeding were highest in the Thoroughbred and lowest in the Mongolian and Quarter Horse. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analyses demonstrated the tight grouping of individuals within most breeds, close proximity of related breeds, and less tight grouping in admixed breeds. The close relationship between the Przewalski's Horse and the domestic horse was demonstrated by pair-wise genetic distance and MDS. Genotyping of other Perissodactyla (zebras, asses, tapirs, and rhinoceros) was variably successful, with call rates and the number of polymorphic loci varying across taxa. Parsimony analysis placed the modern horse as sister taxa to Equus przewalski. The utility of the SNP array in genome-wide association was confirmed by mapping the known recessive chestnut coat color locus (MC1R) and defining a conserved haplotype of ∼750 kb across all breeds. These results demonstrate the high quality of this SNP genotyping resource, its usefulness in diverse genome analyses of the horse, and potential use in related species. PMID:22253606

  11. Shallow velocity structure above the Socorro Magma Body from ambient noise tomography using the large-N Sevilleta array, central Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worthington, L. L.; Ranasinghe, N. R.; Schmandt, B.; Jiang, C.; Finlay, T. S.; Bilek, S. L.; Aster, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Socorro Magma Body (SMB) is one of the largest recognized active mid-crustal magma intrusions globally. Inflation of the SMB drives sporadically seismogenic uplift at rates of up to of few millimeters per year. We examine the upper crustal structure of the northern section of the SMB region using ambient noise seismic data collected from the Sevilleta Array and New Mexico Tech (NMT) seismic network to constrain basin structure and identify possible upper crustal heterogeneities caused by heat flow and/or fluid or magma migration to shallower depths. The Sevilleta Array comprised 801 vertical-component Nodal seismic stations with 10-Hz seismometers deployed within the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in the central Rio Grande rift north of Socorro, New Mexico, for a period of 12 days during February 2015. Five short period seismic stations from the NMT network located south of the Sevilleta array are also used to improve the raypath coverage outside the Sevilleta array. Inter-station ambient noise cross-correlations were computed from all available 20-minute time windows and stacked to obtain estimates of the vertical component Green's function. Clear fundamental mode Rayleigh wave energy is observed from 3 to 6 s period. Beamforming indicates prominent noise sources from the southwest, near Baja California, and the southeast, in the Gulf of Mexico. The frequency-time analysis method was implemented to measure fundamental mode Rayleigh wave phase velocities and the resulting inter-station travel times were inverted to obtain 2-D phase velocity maps. One-dimensional sensitivity kernels indicate that the Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps are sensitive to a depth interval of 1 to 8 km, depending on wave period. The maps show (up to 40%) variations in phase velocity within the Sevilleta Array, with the largest variations found for periods of 5-6 seconds. Holocene to upper Pleistocene, alluvial sediments found in the Socorro Basin consistently show lower phase

  12. Using Network Theory to Understand Seismic Noise in Dense Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, N.; Gerstoft, P.

    2015-12-01

    Dense seismic arrays offer an opportunity to study anthropogenic seismic noise sources with unprecedented detail. Man-made sources typically have high frequency, low intensity, and propagate as surface waves. As a result attenuation restricts their measurable footprint to a small subset of sensors. Medium heterogeneities can further introduce wave front perturbations that limit processing based on travel time. We demonstrate a non-parametric technique that can reliably identify very local events within the array as a function of frequency and time without using travel-times. The approach estimates the non-zero support of the array covariance matrix and then uses network analysis tools to identify clusters of sensors that are sensing a common source. We verify the method on simulated data and then apply it to the Long Beach (CA) geophone array. The method exposes a helicopter traversing the array, oil production facilities with different characteristics, and the fact that noise sources near roads tend to be around 10-20 Hz.

  13. Scaling and Graphical Transport-Map Analysis of Ambipolar Schottky-Barrier Thin-Film Transistors Based on a Parallel Array of Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Dae-Young; Pregl, Sebastian; Park, So Jeong; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Mikolajick, Thomas; Weber, Walter M

    2015-07-08

    Si nanowire (Si-NW) based thin-film transistors (TFTs) have been considered as a promising candidate for next-generation flexible and wearable electronics as well as sensor applications with high performance. Here, we have fabricated ambipolar Schottky-barrier (SB) TFTs consisting of a parallel array of Si-NWs and performed an in-depth study related to their electrical performance and operation mechanism through several electrical parameters extracted from the channel length scaling based method. Especially, the newly suggested current-voltage (I-V) contour map clearly elucidates the unique operation mechanism of the ambipolar SB-TFTs, governed by Schottky-junction between NiSi2 and Si-NW. Further, it reveals for the first-time in SB based FETs the important internal electrostatic coupling between the channel and externally applied voltages. This work provides helpful information for the realization of practical circuits with ambipolar SB-TFTs that can be transferred to different substrate technologies and applications.

  14. Fine Mapping of a Clubroot Resistance Gene in Chinese Cabbage Using SNP Markers Identified from Bulked Segregant RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Peng, Gary; Liu, Xunjia; Deora, Abhinandan; Falk, Kevin C.; Gossen, Bruce D.; McDonald, Mary R.; Yu, Fengqun

    2017-01-01

    Clubroot, caused by Plasmodiophora brassicae, is an important disease of canola (Brassica napus) in western Canada and worldwide. In this study, a clubroot resistance gene (Rcr2) was identified and fine mapped in Chinese cabbage cv. “Jazz” using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers identified from bulked segregant RNA sequencing (BSR-Seq) and molecular markers were developed for use in marker assisted selection. In total, 203.9 million raw reads were generated from one pooled resistant (R) and one pooled susceptible (S) sample, and >173,000 polymorphic SNP sites were identified between the R and S samples. One significant peak was observed between 22 and 26 Mb of chromosome A03, which had been predicted by BSR-Seq to contain the causal gene Rcr2. There were 490 polymorphic SNP sites identified in the region. A segregating population consisting of 675 plants was analyzed with 15 SNP sites in the region using the Kompetitive Allele Specific PCR method, and Rcr2 was fine mapped between two SNP markers, SNP_A03_32 and SNP_A03_67 with 0.1 and 0.3 cM from Rcr2, respectively. Five SNP markers co-segregated with Rcr2 in this region. Variants were identified in 14 of 36 genes annotated in the Rcr2 target region. The numbers of poly variants differed among the genes. Four genes encode TIR-NBS-LRR proteins and two of them Bra019410 and Bra019413, had high numbers of polymorphic variants and so are the most likely candidates of Rcr2. PMID:28894454

  15. Robust synchronization in fiber laser arrays.

    PubMed

    Peles, Slaven; Rogers, Jeffrey L; Wiesenfeld, Kurt

    2006-02-01

    Synchronization of coupled fiber lasers has been reported in recent experiments [Bruesselbach, Opt. Lett. 30, 1339 (2005); Minden, Proc. SPIE 5335, 89 (2004)]. While these results may lead to dramatic advances in laser technology, the mechanism by which these lasers synchronize is not understood. We analyze a recently proposed [Rogers, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 41, 767 (2005)] iterated map model of fiber laser arrays to explore this phenomenon. In particular, we look at synchronous solutions of the maps when the gain fields are constant. Determining the stability of these solutions is analytically tractable for a number of different coupling schemes. We find that in the most symmetric physical configurations the most symmetric solution is either unstable or stable over insufficient parameter range to be practical. In contrast, a lower symmetry configuration yields surprisingly robust coherence. This coherence persists beyond the pumping threshold for which the gain fields become time dependent.

  16. Development of an Advanced Hydraulic Fracture Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Norm Warpinski; Steve Wolhart; Larry Griffin

    The project to develop an advanced hydraulic fracture mapping system consisted of both hardware and analysis components in an effort to build, field, and analyze combined data from tiltmeter and microseismic arrays. The hardware sections of the project included: (1) the building of new tiltmeter housings with feedthroughs for use in conjunction with a microseismic array, (2) the development of a means to use separate telemetry systems for the tilt and microseismic arrays, and (3) the selection and fabrication of an accelerometer sensor system to improve signal-to-noise ratios. The analysis sections of the project included a joint inversion for analysismore » and interpretation of combined tiltmeter and microseismic data and improved methods for extracting slippage planes and other reservoir information from the microseisms. In addition, testing was performed at various steps in the process to assess the data quality and problems/issues that arose during various parts of the project. A prototype array was successfully tested and a full array is now being fabricated for industrial use.« less

  17. The Protein Identifier Cross-Referencing (PICR) service: reconciling protein identifiers across multiple source databases.

    PubMed

    Côté, Richard G; Jones, Philip; Martens, Lennart; Kerrien, Samuel; Reisinger, Florian; Lin, Quan; Leinonen, Rasko; Apweiler, Rolf; Hermjakob, Henning

    2007-10-18

    Each major protein database uses its own conventions when assigning protein identifiers. Resolving the various, potentially unstable, identifiers that refer to identical proteins is a major challenge. This is a common problem when attempting to unify datasets that have been annotated with proteins from multiple data sources or querying data providers with one flavour of protein identifiers when the source database uses another. Partial solutions for protein identifier mapping exist but they are limited to specific species or techniques and to a very small number of databases. As a result, we have not found a solution that is generic enough and broad enough in mapping scope to suit our needs. We have created the Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR) service, a web application that provides interactive and programmatic (SOAP and REST) access to a mapping algorithm that uses the UniProt Archive (UniParc) as a data warehouse to offer protein cross-references based on 100% sequence identity to proteins from over 70 distinct source databases loaded into UniParc. Mappings can be limited by source database, taxonomic ID and activity status in the source database. Users can copy/paste or upload files containing protein identifiers or sequences in FASTA format to obtain mappings using the interactive interface. Search results can be viewed in simple or detailed HTML tables or downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV) or Microsoft Excel (XLS) files suitable for use in a local database or a spreadsheet. Alternatively, a SOAP interface is available to integrate PICR functionality in other applications, as is a lightweight REST interface. We offer a publicly available service that can interactively map protein identifiers and protein sequences to the majority of commonly used protein databases. Programmatic access is available through a standards-compliant SOAP interface or a lightweight REST interface. The PICR interface, documentation and code examples are available at

  18. The Protein Identifier Cross-Referencing (PICR) service: reconciling protein identifiers across multiple source databases

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Richard G; Jones, Philip; Martens, Lennart; Kerrien, Samuel; Reisinger, Florian; Lin, Quan; Leinonen, Rasko; Apweiler, Rolf; Hermjakob, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Background Each major protein database uses its own conventions when assigning protein identifiers. Resolving the various, potentially unstable, identifiers that refer to identical proteins is a major challenge. This is a common problem when attempting to unify datasets that have been annotated with proteins from multiple data sources or querying data providers with one flavour of protein identifiers when the source database uses another. Partial solutions for protein identifier mapping exist but they are limited to specific species or techniques and to a very small number of databases. As a result, we have not found a solution that is generic enough and broad enough in mapping scope to suit our needs. Results We have created the Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR) service, a web application that provides interactive and programmatic (SOAP and REST) access to a mapping algorithm that uses the UniProt Archive (UniParc) as a data warehouse to offer protein cross-references based on 100% sequence identity to proteins from over 70 distinct source databases loaded into UniParc. Mappings can be limited by source database, taxonomic ID and activity status in the source database. Users can copy/paste or upload files containing protein identifiers or sequences in FASTA format to obtain mappings using the interactive interface. Search results can be viewed in simple or detailed HTML tables or downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV) or Microsoft Excel (XLS) files suitable for use in a local database or a spreadsheet. Alternatively, a SOAP interface is available to integrate PICR functionality in other applications, as is a lightweight REST interface. Conclusion We offer a publicly available service that can interactively map protein identifiers and protein sequences to the majority of commonly used protein databases. Programmatic access is available through a standards-compliant SOAP interface or a lightweight REST interface. The PICR interface, documentation and

  19. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 μm AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 μm pixel size and 160x120, 52 μm pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  20. Solar observations with the prototype of the Brazilian Decimetric Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Ramesh, R.; Faria, C.; Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Madsen, F. H. R.; Subramanian, K. R.; Sundararajan, M. S.

    The prototype of the Brazilian Decimetric Array BDA consists of 5 element alt-az mounted parabolic mesh type dishes of 4-meter diameter having base lines up to 220 meters in the E--W direction The array was put into regular operation at Cachoeira Paulista Brazil longitude 45 r 00 20 W and latitude 22 r 41 19 S This array operates in the frequency range of 1 2 -- 1 7 GHz Solar observations are carried at sim 1 4 GHz in transit and tracking modes Spatial fine structures superimposed on the one dimensional brightness map of the sun associated with active regions and or with solar activity and their time evolution will be presented In the second phase of the project the frequency range will be increased to 1 2 - 1 7 2 8 and 5 6 GHz Central part of the array will consist of 26 antennas with 4-meter diameter laid out randomically in the square of 256 by 256 meter with minimum and maximum base lines of 8 and 256 meters respectively Details of this array with imaging capabilities in snap shot mode for solar observations and procedure of the phase and amplitude calibrations will be presented The development of instrument will be completed by the beginning of 2008

  1. Experimental demonstration of conformal phased array antenna via transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Lei, Juan; Yang, Juxing; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhiya; Fu, Guang; Hao, Yang

    2018-02-28

    Transformation Optics has been proven a versatile technique for designing novel electromagnetic devices and it has much wider applicability in many subject areas related to general wave equations. Among them, quasi-conformal transformation optics (QCTO) can be applied to minimize anisotropy of transformed media and has opened up the possibility to the design of broadband antennas with arbitrary geometries. In this work, a wide-angle scanning conformal phased array based on all-dielectric QCTO lens is designed and experimentally demonstrated. Excited by the same current distribution as such in a conventional planar array, the conformal system in presence of QCTO lens can preserve the same radiation characteristics of a planar array with wide-angle beam-scanning and low side lobe level (SLL). Laplace's equation subject to Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions is adopted to construct the mapping between the virtual and physical spaces. The isotropic lens with graded refractive index is realized by all-dielectric holey structure after an effective parameter approximation. The measurements of the fabricated system agree well with the simulated results, which demonstrate its excellent wide-angle beam scanning performance. Such demonstration paves the way to a robust but efficient array synthesis, as well as multi-beam and beam forming realization of conformal arrays via transformation optics.

  2. Multiplexed single-mode wavelength-to-time mapping of multimode light

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Harikumar K; Izdebski, Frauke; Gris-Sánchez, Itandehui; Krstajić, Nikola; Walker, Richard; Bridle, Helen L.; Dalgarno, Paul A.; MacPherson, William N.; Henderson, Robert K.; Birks, Tim A.; Thomson, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    When an optical pulse propagates along an optical fibre, different wavelengths travel at different group velocities. As a result, wavelength information is converted into arrival-time information, a process known as wavelength-to-time mapping. This phenomenon is most cleanly observed using a single-mode fibre transmission line, where spatial mode dispersion is not present, but the use of such fibres restricts possible applications. Here we demonstrate that photonic lanterns based on tapered single-mode multicore fibres provide an efficient way to couple multimode light to an array of single-photon avalanche detectors, each of which has its own time-to-digital converter for time-correlated single-photon counting. Exploiting this capability, we demonstrate the multiplexed single-mode wavelength-to-time mapping of multimode light using a multicore fibre photonic lantern with 121 single-mode cores, coupled to 121 detectors on a 32 × 32 detector array. This work paves the way to efficient multimode wavelength-to-time mapping systems with the spectral performance of single-mode systems. PMID:28120822

  3. Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) mosaic for the Kahiltna terrane, Alaska, 2007-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.

    2015-01-01

    The USGS has compiled a continuous, cloud-free 12.5-meter resolution radar mosaic of SAR data of approximately 212,000 square kilometers to examine the suitability of this technology for geologic mapping. This mosaic was created from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data collected from 2007 to 2010 spanning the Kahiltna terrane and the surrounding area. Interpretation of these data may help geologists understand past geologic processes and identify areas with potential for near-surface mineral resources for further ground-based geological and geochemical investigations.

  4. Nonimaging applications for microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Francis; Jerominek, Hubert; Pope, Timothy D.; Zhang, Rose; Ngo, Linh P.; Tremblay, Bruno; Tasker, Nick; Grenier, Carol; Bilodeau, Ghislain; Cayer, Felix; Lehoux, Mario; Alain, Christine; Larouche, Carl; Savard, Simon

    2001-10-01

    In an effort to leverage uncooled microbolometer technology, testing of bolometer performance in various nonimaging applications has been performed. One of these applications makes use of an uncooled microbolometer array as the sensing element for a laser beam analyzer. Results of the characterization of cw CO2 laser beams with this analyzer are given. A comparison with the results obtained with a commercial laser beam analyzer is made. Various advantages specific to microbolometer arrays for this application are identified. A second application makes use of microbolometers for absolute temperature measurements. The experimental method and results are described. The technique's limitations and possible implementations are discussed. Finally, the third application evaluated is related to the rapidly expanding field of biometry. It consists of using a modified microbolometer array for fingerprint sensing. The basic approach allowing the use of microbolometers for such an application is discussed. The results of a proof-of-principle experiment are described. Globally, the described work illustrates the fact that microbolometer array fabrication technology can be exploited for many important applications other than IR imaging.

  5. Fast photoacoustic imaging system based on 320-element linear transducer array.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bangzheng; Xing, Da; Wang, Yi; Zeng, Yaguang; Tan, Yi; Chen, Qun

    2004-04-07

    A fast photoacoustic (PA) imaging system, based on a 320-transducer linear array, was developed and tested on a tissue phantom. To reconstruct a test tomographic image, 64 time-domain PA signals were acquired from a tissue phantom with embedded light-absorption targets. A signal acquisition was accomplished by utilizing 11 phase-controlled sub-arrays, each consisting of four transducers. The results show that the system can rapidly map the optical absorption of a tissue phantom and effectively detect the embedded light-absorbing target. By utilizing the multi-element linear transducer array and phase-controlled imaging algorithm, we thus can acquire PA tomography more efficiently, compared to other existing technology and algorithms. The methodology and equipment thus provide a rapid and reliable approach to PA imaging that may have potential applications in noninvasive imaging and clinic diagnosis.

  6. Effective Padding of Multi-Dimensional Arrays to Avoid Cache Conflict Misses

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Changwan; Bao, Wenlei; Cohen, Albert

    Caches are used to significantly improve performance. Even with high degrees of set-associativity, the number of accessed data elements mapping to the same set in a cache can easily exceed the degree of associativity, causing conflict misses and lowered performance, even if the working set is much smaller than cache capacity. Array padding (increasing the size of array dimensions) is a well known optimization technique that can reduce conflict misses. In this paper, we develop the first algorithms for optimal padding of arrays for a set associative cache for arbitrary tile sizes, In addition, we develop the first solution tomore » padding for nested tiles and multi-level caches. The techniques are in implemented in PAdvisor tool. Experimental results with multiple benchmarks demonstrate significant performance improvement from use of PAdvisor for padding.« less

  7. Shifted Transversal Design smart-pooling for high coverage interactome mapping

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiaofeng; Rual, Jean-François; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Boone, Charles; Thierry-Mieg, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    “Smart-pooling,” in which test reagents are multiplexed in a highly redundant manner, is a promising strategy for achieving high efficiency, sensitivity, and specificity in systems-level projects. However, previous applications relied on low redundancy designs that do not leverage the full potential of smart-pooling, and more powerful theoretical constructions, such as the Shifted Transversal Design (STD), lack experimental validation. Here we evaluate STD smart-pooling in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interactome mapping. We employed two STD designs and two established methods to perform ORFeome-wide Y2H screens with 12 baits. We found that STD pooling achieves similar levels of sensitivity and specificity as one-on-one array-based Y2H, while the costs and workloads are divided by three. The screening-sequencing approach is the most cost- and labor-efficient, yet STD identifies about twofold more interactions. Screening-sequencing remains an appropriate method for quickly producing low-coverage interactomes, while STD pooling appears as the method of choice for obtaining maps with higher coverage. PMID:19447967

  8. Land use and land cover digital data from 1:250,000- and 1:100,000- scale maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Science Information Centers (ESIC) distribute digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. The data files are grouped into four basic types. The first type, called a Digital Line Graph (DLG), is line map information in digital form. These data files include information on planimetric base categories, such as transportation, hydrography, and boundaries. The second type, called a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for ground positions that are usually at regularly spaced intervals. The third type, Land Use and Land Cover digital data, provide information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as well as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  9. Using self-organizing maps to identify potential halo white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    García-Berro, Enrique; Torres, Santiago; Isern, Jordi

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of an unsupervised classification of the disk and halo white dwarf populations in the solar neighborhood. The classification is done by merging the results of detailed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, which reproduce very well the characteristics of the white dwarf populations in the solar neighborhood, with a catalogue of real stars. The resulting composite catalogue is analyzed using a competitive learning algorithm. In particular we have used the so-called self-organized map. The MC simulated stars are used as tracers and help in identifying the resulting clusters. The results of such an strategy turn out to be quite satisfactory, suggesting that this approach can provide an useful framework for analyzing large databases of white dwarfs with well determined kinematical, spatial and photometric properties once they become available in the next decade. Moreover, the results are of astrophysical interest as well, since a straightforward interpretation of several recent astronomical observations, like the detected microlensing events in the direction of the Magellanic Clouds, the possible detection of high proper motion white dwarfs in the Hubble Deep Field and the discovery of high velocity white dwarfs in the solar neighborhood, suggests that a fraction of the baryonic dark matter component of our galaxy could be in the form of old and dim halo white dwarfs.

  10. A 1.4-Billion Pixel Map of the Seafloor: BOEM's Mission to Visualize Dynamic Geology and Identify Natural Seep Sites in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, K.; Shedd, W. W.

    2017-12-01

    In May, 2017, the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) published a high-resolution seafloor map of the northern Gulf of Mexico region. The new map, derived from 3-D seismic surveys, provides the scientific community with enhanced resolution and reveals previously undiscovered and poorly resolved geologic features of the continental slope, salt minibasin province, abyssal plain, Mississippi Fan, and the Florida Shelf and Escarpment. It becomes an even more powerful scientific tool when paired with BOEM's public database of 35,000 seafloor features, identifying natural hydrocarbon seeps, hard grounds, mud volcanoes, sediment flows, pockmarks, slumps, and many others. BOEM has mapped the Gulf of Mexico seafloor since 1998 in a regulatory mission to identify natural oil and gas seeps and protect the coral and chemosynthetic communities growing at those sites. The nineteen-year mapping effort, still ongoing, resulted in the creation of the 1.4-billion pixel map and the seafloor features database. With these tools and continual collaboration with academia, professional scientific institutions, and the offshore energy industry, BOEM will continue to incorporate new data to update and expand these two resources on a regular basis. They can be downloaded for free from BOEM's website at https://www.boem.gov/Gulf-of-Mexico-Deepwater-Bathymetry/ and https://www.boem.gov/Seismic-Water-Bottom-Anomalies-Map-Gallery/.

  11. Fabrication and optically pumped lasing of plasmonic nanolaser with regular ZnO/GaN nanoheterojunction array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Peifeng; Lin, En; Wang, Peng; Mei, Mingwei; Huang, Qiuying; Jiao, Jiao; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a novel regularly arrayed plasmonic nanolasers. This main microstructure of the device is composed of a hexagonal array of n-ZnO/p-GaN nanoheterojunctions fabricated using the micro-fabrication method. Furthermore, the optically pumped lasing in the device is demonstrated. The spectroscopy characterization results of the device show that the surface plasmon excited around the NWs surface can be used to stimulate and strongly compress the optical modes in the NW cavity. This electromagnetic confinement effect is employed to optimize the beam quality and increase the light intensity compared to the laser fabricated with the bare NWs array. The impact of the array arrangement on the coherent combining efficiency of the arrayed nanolasers has been numerically studied. The results show that the arrayed hexagonal nanolasers could improve the combining efficiency compared to the nanolaser with the randomly positioned array. Qualitatively, these calculated results agree well with the experimental results of the laser beam spot mapping. This demonstrates the scope for using such architectures to improve the combination efficiency of the arrayed nanolasers.

  12. High Frequency High Spectral Resolution Focal Plane Arrays for AtLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Large collecting area single dish telescope such as ATLAST will be especially effective for medium (R 1000) and high (R 50000) spectral resolution observations. Large focal plane array is a natural solution to increase mapping speed. For medium resolution direct detectors with filter banks (KIDs) and or heterodyne technology can be employed. We will analyze performance limits of comparable KID and SIS focal plane array taking into account quantum limit and high background condition of terrestrial observing site. For large heterodyne focal plane arrays, a high current density AlN junctions open possibility of large instantaneous bandwidth >40%. This and possible multi frequency band FPSs presents a practical challenge for spatial sampling and scanning strategies. We will discuss phase array feeds as a possible solution, including a modular back-end system, which can be shared between KID and SIS based FPA. Finally we will discuss achievable sensitivities and pixel co unts for a high frequency (>500 GHz) FPAs and address main technical challenges: LO distribution, wire counts, bias line multiplexing, and monolithic vs. discrete mixer component integration.

  13. The use of the multiple-gradient array for geoelectrical resistivity and induced polarization imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizebeokhai, Ahzegbobor P.; Oyeyemi, Kehinde D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of most conventional electrode configurations in electrical resistivity survey is often time consuming and labour intensive, especially when using manual data acquisition systems. Often, data acquisition teams tend to reduce data density so as to speed up field operation thereby reducing the survey cost; but this could significantly degrade the quality and resolution of the inverse models. In the present work, the potential of using the multiple-gradient array, a non-conventional electrode configuration, for practical cost effective and rapid subsurface resistivity and induced polarization mapping was evaluated. The array was used to conduct 2D resistivity and time-domain induced polarization imaging along two traverses in a study site at Ota, southwestern Nigeria. The subsurface was characterised and the main aquifer delineated using the inverse resistivity and chargeability images obtained. The performance of the multiple-gradient array was evaluated by correlating the 2D resistivity and chargeability images with those of the conventional Wenner array as well as the result of some soundings conducted along the same traverses using Schlumberger array. The multiple-gradient array has been found to have the advantage of measurement logistics and improved image resolution over the Wenner array.

  14. Identification of subsurface layer with Wenner-Schlumberger arrays configuration geoelectrical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaluddin; Prasetyawati Umar, Emi

    2018-02-01

    One of measurement methods to investigate the condition of the subsurface is by using geoelectric method. This research uses wenner-Schlumberger arrays configuration geoelectrical method which is mapping resistivity that is commonly known as profiling (2D) in order to identify the lateral and vertical anomaly of material resistivity. 2D resistivity cross section is obtained from the result of data- processing on software Res2Dinv. The data were obtained along 70 m using Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with 5 m spaced electrode. The approximated value of resistivity obtained from the data processing ranged from 1000-1548 Ωm and with the iteration error 87.9%. Based on the geological map of Ujung Pandang sheet, the location of the research is an alluvium and coastal precipitation area with grain in forms of gravel, sand, clay, mud, and coral limestone. Thus, by observing and analyzing the variety of the resistivity cross-section from the inversion data, there are areas (a) showing resistivity values ranged from 0.1-0.2 Ωm which is estimated to be salt water intrusion based on the resistivity table of Earth materials, and region (b) which is a mixture of sand and clay material with the range of resistivity values between 1-1000 μm.

  15. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H; Jackson, Ian J; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss. © 2015. Published by The Company of

  16. Mapping protein-protein interactions using yeast two-hybrid assays.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Jitender; Caufield, J Harry; Uetz, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens are an efficient system for mapping protein-protein interactions and whole interactomes. The screens can be performed using random libraries or collections of defined open reading frames (ORFs) called ORFeomes. This protocol describes both library and array-based Y2H screening, with an emphasis on array-based assays. Array-based Y2H is commonly used to test a number of "prey" proteins for interactions with a single "bait" (target) protein or pool of proteins. The advantage of this approach is the direct identification of interacting protein pairs without further downstream experiments: The identity of the preys is known and does not require further confirmation. In contrast, constructing and screening a random prey library requires identification of individual prey clones and systematic retesting. Retesting is typically performed in an array format. © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Identification of novel non-coding small RNAs from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 using high-resolution genome tiling arrays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The identification of non-coding transcripts in human, mouse, and Escherichia coli has revealed their widespread occurrence and functional importance in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic life. In prokaryotes, studies have shown that non-coding transcripts participate in a broad range of cellular functions like gene regulation, stress and virulence. However, very little is known about non-coding transcripts in Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), an obligate human respiratory pathogen responsible for significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. Tiling microarrays enable genome wide mRNA profiling as well as identification of novel transcripts at a high-resolution. Results Here, we describe a high-resolution transcription map of the S. pneumoniae clinical isolate TIGR4 using genomic tiling arrays. Our results indicate that approximately 66% of the genome is expressed under our experimental conditions. We identified a total of 50 non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) from the intergenic regions, of which 36 had no predicted function. Half of the identified sRNA sequences were found to be unique to S. pneumoniae genome. We identified eight overrepresented sequence motifs among sRNA sequences that correspond to sRNAs in different functional categories. Tiling arrays also identified approximately 202 operon structures in the genome. Conclusions In summary, the pneumococcal operon structures and novel sRNAs identified in this study enhance our understanding of the complexity and extent of the pneumococcal 'expressed' genome. Furthermore, the results of this study open up new avenues of research for understanding the complex RNA regulatory network governing S. pneumoniae physiology and virulence. PMID:20525227

  18. Array tomography of physiologically-characterized CNS synapses.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Ricardo A; Micheva, Kristina D; Kiraly, Marianna; Li, Dong; Madison, Daniel V

    2016-08-01

    The ability to correlate plastic changes in synaptic physiology with changes in synaptic anatomy has been very limited in the central nervous system because of shortcomings in existing methods for recording the activity of specific CNS synapses and then identifying and studying the same individual synapses on an anatomical level. We introduce here a novel approach that combines two existing methods: paired neuron electrophysiological recording and array tomography, allowing for the detailed molecular and anatomical study of synapses with known physiological properties. The complete mapping of a neuronal pair allows determining the exact number of synapses in the pair and their location. We have found that the majority of close appositions between the presynaptic axon and the postsynaptic dendrite in the pair contain synaptic specializations. The average release probability of the synapses between the two neurons in the pair is low, below 0.2, consistent with previous studies of these connections. Other questions, such as receptor distribution within synapses, can be addressed more efficiently by identifying only a subset of synapses using targeted partial reconstructions. In addition, time sensitive events can be captured with fast chemical fixation. Compared to existing methods, the present approach is the only one that can provide detailed molecular and anatomical information of electrophysiologically-characterized individual synapses. This method will allow for addressing specific questions about the properties of identified CNS synapses, even when they are buried within a cloud of millions of other brain circuit elements. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. "Gap hunting" to characterize clustered probe signals in Illumina methylation array data.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Shan V; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Feinberg, Andrew P; Hansen, Kasper D; Fallin, M Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The Illumina 450k array has been widely used in epigenetic association studies. Current quality-control (QC) pipelines typically remove certain sets of probes, such as those containing a SNP or with multiple mapping locations. An additional set of potentially problematic probes are those with DNA methylation distributions characterized by two or more distinct clusters separated by gaps. Data-driven identification of such probes may offer additional insights for downstream analyses. We developed a procedure, termed "gap hunting," to identify probes showing clustered distributions. Among 590 peripheral blood samples from the Study to Explore Early Development, we identified 11,007 "gap probes." The vast majority (9199) are likely attributed to an underlying SNP(s) or other variant in the probe, although SNP-affected probes exist that do not produce a gap signals. Specific factors predict which SNPs lead to gap signals, including type of nucleotide change, probe type, DNA strand, and overall methylation state. These expected effects are demonstrated in paired genotype and 450k data on the same samples. Gap probes can also serve as a surrogate for the local genetic sequence on a haplotype scale and can be used to adjust for population stratification. The characteristics of gap probes reflect potentially informative biology. QC pipelines may benefit from an efficient data-driven approach that "flags" gap probes, rather than filtering such probes, followed by careful interpretation of downstream association analyses. Our results should translate directly to the recently released Illumina EPIC array given the similar chemistry and content design.

  20. Large Ka-Band Slot Array for Digital Beam-Forming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Hodges, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    This work describes the development of a large Ka Band Slot Array for the Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer (GLISTIN), a proposed spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar for topographic mapping of ice sheets and glaciers. GLISTIN will collect ice topography measurement data over a wide swath with sub-seasonal repeat intervals using a Ka-band digitally beamformed antenna. For technology demonstration purpose a receive array of size 1x1 m, consisting of 160x160 radiating elements, was developed. The array is divided into 16 sticks, each stick consisting of 160x10 radiating elements, whose outputs are combined to produce 16 digital beams. A transmit array stick was also developed. The antenna arrays were designed using Elliott's design equations with the use of an infinite-array mutual-coupling model. A Floquet wave model was used to account for external coupling between radiating slots. Because of the use of uniform amplitude and phase distribution, the infinite array model yielded identical values for all radiating elements but for alternating offsets, and identical coupling elements but for alternating positive and negative tilts. Waveguide-fed slot arrays are finding many applications in radar, remote sensing, and communications applications because of their desirable properties such as low mass, low volume, and ease of design, manufacture, and deployability. Although waveguide-fed slot arrays have been designed, built, and tested in the past, this work represents several advances to the state of the art. The use of the infinite array model for the radiating slots yielded a simple design process for radiating and coupling slots. Method of moments solution to the integral equations for alternating offset radiating slots in an infinite array environment was developed and validated using the commercial finite element code HFSS. For the analysis purpose, a method of moments code was developed for an infinite array of subarrays. Overall

  1. Sao Paulo Lightning Mapping Array (SP-LMA): Network Assessment and Analyses for Intercomparison Studies and GOES-R Proxy Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. C.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Carey, L. D.; Goodman, S. J.; Rudlosky, S. D.; Albrecht, R.; Morales, C. A.; Anselmo, E. M.; Neves, J. R.; Buechler, D. E.

    2014-01-01

    A 12 station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) network was deployed during October 2011 in the vicinity of Sao Paulo, Brazil (SP-LMA) to contribute total lightning measurements to an international field campaign [CHUVA - Cloud processes of tHe main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribUtion to cloud resolVing modeling and to the GPM (GlobAl Precipitation Measurement)]. The SP-LMA was operational from November 2011 through March 2012 during the Vale do Paraiba campaign. Sensor spacing was on the order of 15-30 km, with a network diameter on the order of 40-50km. The SP-LMA provides good 3-D lightning mapping out to 150 km from the network center, with 2-D coverage considerably farther. In addition to supporting CHUVA science/mission objectives, the SP-LMA is supporting the generation of unique proxy data for the Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), on NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-R (GOES-R: scheduled for a 2015 launch). These proxy data will be used to develop and validate operational algorithms so that they will be ready to use on "day1" following the GOES-R launch. As the CHUVA Vale do Paraiba campaign opportunity was formulated, a broad community-based interest developed for a comprehensive Lightning Location System (LLS) intercomparison and assessment study, leading to the participation and/or deployment of eight other ground-based networks and the space-based Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). The SP-LMA data is being intercompared with lightning observations from other deployed lightning networks to advance our understanding of the capabilities/contributions of each of these networks toward GLM proxy and validation activities. This paper addresses the network assessment including noise reduction criteria, detection efficiency estimates, and statistical and climatological (both temporal and spatially) analyses for intercomparison studies and GOES-R proxy activities.

  2. High density array screening to identify the genetic requirements for transition metal tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bleackley, Mark R; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J R; MacGillivray, Ross T A

    2011-02-01

    Biological systems have developed with a strong dependence on transition metals for accomplishing a number of biochemical reactions. Iron, copper, manganese and zinc are essential for virtually all forms of life with their unique chemistries contributing to a variety of physiological processes including oxygen transport, generation of cellular energy and protein structure and function. Properties of these metals (and to a lesser extent nickel and cobalt) that make them so essential to life also make them extremely cytotoxic in many cases through the formation of damaging oxygen radicals via Fenton chemistry. While life has evolved to exploit the chemistries of transition metals to drive physiological reactions, systems have concomitantly evolved to protect against the damaging effects of these same metals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable tool for studying metal homeostasis with many of the genes identified thus far having homologs in higher eukaryotes including humans. Using high density arrays, we have screened a haploid S. cerevisiae deletion set containing 4786 non-essential gene deletions for strains sensitive to each of Fe, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn and Co and then integrated the six screens using cluster analysis to identify pathways that are unique to individual metals and others with function shared between metals. Genes with no previous implication in metal homeostasis were found to contribute to sensitivity to each metal. Significant overlap was observed between the strains that were sensitive to Mn, Ni, Zn and Co with many of these strains lacking genes for the high affinity Fe transport pathway and genes involved in vacuolar transport and acidification. The results from six genome-wide metal tolerance screens show that there is some commonality between the cellular defenses against the toxicity of Mn, Ni, Zn and Co with Fe and Cu requiring different systems. Additionally, potential new factors been identified that function in tolerance to each of the six

  3. A high-density intraspecific SNP linkage map of pigeonpea (Cajanas cajan L. Millsp.)

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Paritra; Bhutani, Shefali; Dutta, Sutapa; Kumawat, Giriraj; Singh, Bikram Pratap; Chaudhary, A. K.; Yadav, Rekha; Gaikwad, K.; Sevanthi, Amitha Mithra; Datta, Subhojit; Raje, Ranjeet S.; Sharma, Tilak R.; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp.) is a major food legume cultivated in semi-arid tropical regions including the Indian subcontinent, Africa, and Southeast Asia. It is an important source of protein, minerals, and vitamins for nearly 20% of the world population. Due to high carbon sequestration and drought tolerance, pigeonpea is an important crop for the development of climate resilient agriculture and nutritional security. However, pigeonpea productivity has remained low for decades because of limited genetic and genomic resources, and sparse utilization of landraces and wild pigeonpea germplasm. Here, we present a dense intraspecific linkage map of pigeonpea comprising 932 markers that span a total adjusted map length of 1,411.83 cM. The consensus map is based on three different linkage maps that incorporate a large number of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers derived from next generation sequencing data, using Illumina GoldenGate bead arrays, and genotyping with restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. The genotyping-by-sequencing enhanced the marker density but was met with limited success due to lack of common markers across the genotypes of mapping population. The integrated map has 547 bead-array SNP, 319 RAD-SNP, and 65 simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker loci. We also show here correspondence between our linkage map and published genome pseudomolecules of pigeonpea. The availability of a high-density linkage map will help improve the anchoring of the pigeonpea genome to its chromosomes and the mapping of genes and quantitative trait loci associated with useful agronomic traits. PMID:28654689

  4. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Multiple Regions Associated with Head Size in Catfish

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xin; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Bao, Lisui; Zhang, Jiaren; Li, Chao; Wang, Ruijia; Sha, Jin; Zeng, Peng; Zhi, Degui; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Skull morphology is fundamental to evolution and the biological adaptation of species to their environments. With aquaculture fish species, head size is also important for economic reasons because it has a direct impact on fillet yield. However, little is known about the underlying genetic basis of head size. Catfish is the primary aquaculture species in the United States. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study using the catfish 250K SNP array with backcross hybrid catfish to map the QTL for head size (head length, head width, and head depth). One significantly associated region on linkage group (LG) 7 was identified for head length. In addition, LGs 7, 9, and 16 contain suggestively associated regions for head length. For head width, significantly associated regions were found on LG9, and additional suggestively associated regions were identified on LGs 5 and 7. No region was found associated with head depth. Head size genetic loci were mapped in catfish to genomic regions with candidate genes involved in bone development. Comparative analysis indicated that homologs of several candidate genes are also involved in skull morphology in various other species ranging from amphibian to mammalian species, suggesting possible evolutionary conservation of those genes in the control of skull morphologies. PMID:27558670