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Sample records for maps reveal cosmic

  1. Revealing cosmic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amit P. S.; Shimon, Meir; Keating, Brian G.

    2012-10-01

    Cosmological Birefringence, a rotation of the polarization plane of radiation coming to us from distant astrophysical sources, may reveal parity violation in either the electromagnetic or gravitational sectors of the fundamental interactions in nature. Until only recently this phenomenon could be probed with only radio observations or observations at UV wavelengths. Recently, there is a substantial effort to constrain such nonstandard models using observations of the rotation of the polarization plane of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. This can be done via measurements of the B-modes of the CMB or by measuring its TB and EB correlations which vanish in the standard model. In this paper we show that EB correlations-based estimator is the best for upcoming polarization experiments. The EB-based estimator surpasses other estimators because it has the smallest noise and of all the estimators is least affected by systematics. Current polarimeters are optimized for the detection of B-mode polarization from either primordial gravitational waves or by large-scale structures via gravitational lensing. In the paper we also study the optimization of CMB experiments for the detection of cosmological birefringence, in the presence of instrumental systematics, which by themselves are capable of producing EB correlations, potentially mimicking cosmological birefringence.

  2. Cosmic string induced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Landriau, M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2011-02-15

    We compute maps of CMB temperature fluctuations seeded by cosmic strings using high resolution simulations of cosmic strings in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We create full-sky, 18 deg. and 3 deg. CMB maps, including the relevant string contribution at each resolution from before recombination to today. We extract the angular power spectrum from these maps, demonstrating the importance of recombination effects. We briefly discuss the probability density function of the pixel temperatures, their skewness, and kurtosis.

  3. A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J.; Viero, M. P.; Bock, J.; Zahn, O.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H-M.; Conley, A.; George, E. M.; Halverson, N. W.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

  4. Mean maps for cosmic web structures in cosmological initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aung, Han; Cohn, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Haloes, filaments, sheets and voids in the cosmic web can be defined in terms of the eigenvalues of the smoothed shear tensor and a threshold λth. Using analytic methods, we construct mean maps centred on these types of structures for Gaussian random fields corresponding to cosmological initial conditions. Each map also requires a choice of shear at the origin; we consider three possibilities. We find characteristic sizes, shapes and other properties of the central objects in these mean maps and explore how these properties change with varying the threshold and smoothing scale, i.e. varying the separation of the cosmic web into different kinds of components. The mean maps become increasingly complex as the threshold λth decreases to zero. We also describe scatter around these mean maps, subtleties which can arise in their construction, and some comparisons between haloes in the maps and collapsed haloes at final times.

  5. Cosmic Pressure Fronts Mapped by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    A colossal cosmic "weather system" produced by the collision of two giant clusters of galaxies has been imaged by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. For the first time, the pressure fronts in the system can be traced in detail, and they show a bright, but relatively cool 50 million degree Celsius central region embedded in large elongated cloud of 70 million degree Celsius gas, all of which is roiling in a faint "atmosphere"of 100 million degree Celsius gas. "We can compare this to an intergalactic cold front," said Maxim Markevitch of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass. and leader of the international team involved in the analysis of the observations. "A major difference is that in this case, cold means 70 million degree Celsius." The gas clouds are in the core of a galaxy cluster known as Abell 2142. The cluster is six million light years across and contains hundreds of galaxies and enough gas to make a thousand more. It is one of the most massive objects in the universe. Galaxy clusters grow to vast sizes as smaller clusters are pulled inward under the influence of gravity. They collide and merge over the course of billions of years, releasing tremendous amounts of energy that heats the cluster gas to 100 million degrees Celsius. The Chandra data provides the first detailed look at the late stages of this merger process. Previously, scientists had used the German-US Roentgensatellite to produce a broad brush picture of the cluster. The elongated shape of the bright cloud suggested that two clouds were in the process of coalescing into one, but the details remained unclear. Chandra is able to measure variations of temperature, density, and pressure with unprecedented resolution. "Now we can begin to understand the physics of these mergers, which are among the most energetic events in the universe," said Markevitch. "The pressure and density maps of the cluster show a sharp boundary that can only exist in the moving environment of a

  6. Cosmic Lens Reveals Distant Galactic Violence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    By cleverly unraveling the workings of a natural cosmic lens, astronomers have gained a rare glimpse of the violent assembly of a young galaxy in the early Universe. Their new picture suggests that the galaxy has collided with another, feeding a supermassive black hole and triggering a tremendous burst of star formation. Gravitational Lens Diagram Imaging a Distant Galaxy Using a Gravitational Lens CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for details and more graphics. The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to look at a galaxy more than 12 billion light-years from Earth, seen as it was when the Universe was only about 15 percent of its current age. Between this galaxy and Earth lies another distant galaxy, so perfectly aligned along the line of sight that its gravity bends the light and radio waves from the farther object into a circle, or "Einstein Ring." This gravitational lens made it possible for the scientists to learn details of the young, distant galaxy that would have been unobtainable otherwise. "Nature provided us with a magnifying glass to peer into the workings of a nascent galaxy, providing an exciting look at the violent, messy process of building galaxies in the early history of the Universe," said Dominik Riechers, who led this project at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany and now is a Hubble Fellow at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The new picture of the distant galaxy, dubbed PSS J2322+1944, shows a massive reservoir of gas, 16,000 light-years in diameter, that contains the raw material for building new stars. A supermassive black hole is voraciously eating material, and new stars are being born at the rate of nearly 700 Suns per year. By comparison, our Milky Way Galaxy produces the equivalent of about 3-4 Suns per year. The black hole appears to be near the edge, rather than at the center, of the giant gas reservoir, indicating, the astronomers say

  7. Mapping of cosmic radiation dose in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Poje, M; Vuković, B; Radolić, V; Miklavčić, I; Faj, D; Varga Pajtler, M; Planinić, J

    2012-01-01

    The Earth is continually bombarded by high-energy particles coming from the outer space and the sun. These particles, termed cosmic radiation, interact with nuclei of atmospheric constituents and decrease in intensity with depth in the atmosphere. Measurements of photon and gamma radiation, performed with a Radiameter at 1 m above the ground, indicated dose rates of 50-100 nSv/h. The neutron dose rate was measured with the CR-39 track etch detector calibrated by the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field (CERF) facility. Correlation between neutron dose rates and altitudes at 36 sites was examined in order to obtain a significant positive correlation coefficient; the resulting linear regression enabled estimation of a neutron dose at particular altitude. The measured neutron dose rate in Osijek (altitude of 89 m, latitude of 45.31° N) was 110 nSv/h.

  8. Intensity Mapping of Molecular Gas During Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    I present a simple calculation of the expected mean CO brightness temperature from the large-scale distribution of galaxies during cosmic reionization. The calculation is based on the cosmic star formation rate density required to reionize, and keep ionized, the intergalactic medium, and uses standard relationships between star formation rate, IR luminosity, and CO luminosity derived for star-forming galaxies over a wide range in redshift. I find that the mean CO brightness temperature resulting from the galaxies that could reionize the universe at z = 8 is TB ~ 1.1(C/5)(f esc/0.1)-1μK, where f esc is the escape fraction of ionizing photons from the first galaxies and C is the IGM clumping factor. Intensity mapping of the CO emission from the large-scale structure of the star-forming galaxies during cosmic reionization on scales of order 102 to 103 deg2, in combination with H I 21 cm imaging of the neutral IGM, will provide a comprehensive study of the earliest epoch of galaxy formation.

  9. Cosmic Microwave Background Maps from the HACME Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Staren, John W.; Meinhold, Peter R.; Lubin, Philip M.; Childers, Jeffrey D.; Figueiredo, Newton; Gaier, Todd; Lim, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Villela, Thyrso; Wuensche, C. Alexandre

    2000-10-01

    We present cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps from the Santa Barbara HACME balloon experiment (Staren et al.), covering about 1150 square degrees split between two regions in the northern sky, near the stars γ Ursae Minoris and α Leonis, respectively. The FWHM of the beam is ~0.77d in three frequency bands centered on 39, 41, and 43 GHz. The results demonstrate that the thoroughly interconnected scan strategy employed allows efficient removal of 1/f-noise and slightly variable scan-synchronous offsets. The maps display no striping, and the noise correlations are found to be virtually isotropic, decaying on an angular scale ~1°. The noise performance of the experiment resulted in an upper limit on CMB anisotropy. However, our results demonstrate that atmospheric contamination and other systematics resulting from the circular scanning strategy can be accurately controlled and bode well for the planned follow-up experiments BEAST and ACE, since they show that even with the overly cautious assumption that 1/f-noise and offsets will be as dominant as for HACME, the problems they pose can be readily overcome with the mapmaking algorithm discussed. Our prewhitened notch-filter algorithm for destriping and offset removal is proving useful also for other balloon- and ground-based experiments whose scan strategies involve substantial interleaving, e.g., Boomerang.

  10. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, M V; Muller, R A; Smoot, G F; Tyson, J A

    1978-04-01

    We have developed a 33-GHz airborne radiometer system to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 degrees apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of +/-1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 degrees , reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, CA.

  11. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Muller, R. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Tyson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.

  12. A map of the cosmic background radiation at 3 millimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, P.; Villela, T.; Epstein, G.; Smoot, G.

    1985-01-01

    Data from a series of balloon flights covering both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, measuring the large angular scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation at 3.3 mm wavelength are presented. The data cover 85 percent of the sky to a limiting sensitivity of 0.7 mK per 7 deg field of view. The data show a 50-sigma (statistical error only) dipole anisotropy with an amplitude of 3.44 + or - 0.17 mK and a direction of alpha = 11.2 h + or - 0.1 h, and delta = -6.0 deg + or - 1.5 deg. A 90 percent confidence level upper limit of 0.00007 is obtained for the rms quadrupole amplitude. Flights separated by 6 months show the motion of earth around the sun. Galactic contamination is very small, with less than 0.1 mK contribution to the dipole quadrupole terms. A map of the sky has been generated from the data.

  13. Polarized cosmic microwave background map recovery with sparse component separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting this information from microwave surveys requires distinguishing between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which means solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, but very rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to distinguish between the various components. More recent methods, which instead emphasize the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimates of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, we here introduce a new component separation technique dubbed the polarized generalized morphological component analysis (PolGMCA), which refines previous work to specifically work on the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components; ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM). The simulations show that the proposed method achieves a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low-noise and foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements over standard methods, especially on the Galactic center, where estimating the CMB is challenging.

  14. Detecting Low-Contrast Features in the Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Map of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H.; Smith, S. S.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Stubbs, T. J.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing (via nuclear evaporation[1]) secondary 'albedo' or 'splash' particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[2-5], and by ice deposits[6] in permanently shadowed polar craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy lunar albedo protons. Using the CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO, we measure albedo protons (60 to 150 MeV) to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[7]. In addition to using more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, we filter out all solar particle enhancement periods and make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. The average yield of albedo protons from the maria is 0.8% × 0.4% higher than the yield from the highlands. In addition there appear to be localized peaks in the albedo proton yield that are co-located with peaks in trace elemental abundances as measured by the Lunar Prospector Gamma Ray Spectrometer. More data may reveal subtler proton yield variations correlated with latitude, time of day, or the locations of permanently shadowed craters, due to the presence of water frost. Given that the most obvious features in the map have a proton yield only 2σ above average, the search for more subtle regions of enhancement or reduction in proton yield will require precise corrections for small but systematic effects of time and spacecraft altitude on the apparent proton yield. We will show the effects of these trends as well as the latest version of the albedo proton map. References: [1] Bethe (1937) Rev. Mod

  15. Portable cosmic particle detectors for subsurface density mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oláh, László; Gábor Barnaföldi, Gergely; Hamar, Gergö; Surányi, Gergely; Varga, Dezsö

    2016-04-01

    Muography deduces the density length in the interior of the investigated geological object, such as a mountain or volcano by the measurement of the cosmic muon absorption along different paths through the object. If path lengths (average densities) are measured, the average density (path length) can be deduced along the muon paths. A portable, low power consumption cosmic particle tracking detector based on Close Cathode multi-wire proportional chambers [1,2] has been developed for muography based on our earlier developments and experiences at the Wigner RCP of the HAS in Budapest [3,4,5]. The newly developed tracking system consists of six layers with the sensitive area of 0.25 m2 [6]. The spatial resolution of 2 mm provides an angular resolution of 15 mrad. This instrument has been optimized for underground and outdoor measurements: it has a Raspberry pi controlled data acquisition system which includes a custom designed board with a coincidence unit and allows high level remote control, data management and analysis. The individual trigger signals, number of missed triggers, analogue signals from chambers and the temperature are recorded. The duration of data readout (dead time) is 100 microsec. The DAQ software runs on the Raspberry Pi. For standard operation, a graphical user interface has been developed, running on any remote computer with Internet connection (both of wired and wireless) to the Raspberry Pi. A temperature-controlled high-voltage power supply provides a stable and reasonable (> 95 %) tracking performance for the measurements. With total power consumption of 5W, a portable tracking detector can operate for 5 days with a standard 50 Ah battery and with gas (non flammable Ar-CO2 mixture) consumption of 0.5 liter per hour, a 10 l bottle at pressure of 150 bar is enough for four month. The portability (total weight of less than 30 kg) allowed that our tracking detectors have been applied in underground caverns for subsurface density mapping. The

  16. Construction of cosmic string induced temperature anisotropy maps with CMBFAST and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simatos, N.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2001-01-01

    We use the publicly available code CMBFAST, as modified by Pogosian and Vachaspati, to simulate the effects of wiggly cosmic strings on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the modified CMBFAST code, which takes into account vector modes and models wiggly cosmic strings by the one-scale model, we go beyond the angular power spectrum to construct CMB temperature maps with a resolution of a few degrees. The statistics of these maps are then studied using conventional and recently proposed statistical tests optimized for the detection of hidden temperature discontinuities induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We show, however, that these realistic maps cannot be distinguished in a statistically significant way from purely Gaussian maps with an identical power spectrum.

  17. Cosmic "Dig" Reveals Vestiges of the Milky Way's Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-11-01

    Peering through the thick dust clouds of our galaxy's "bulge" (the myriads of stars surrounding its centre), and revealing an amazing amount of detail, a team of astronomers has unveiled an unusual mix of stars in the stellar grouping known as Terzan 5. Never observed anywhere in the bulge before, this peculiar "cocktail" of stars suggests that Terzan 5 is in fact one of the bulge's primordial building blocks, most likely the relic of a proto-galaxy that merged with the Milky Way during its very early days. "The history of the Milky Way is encoded in its oldest fragments, globular clusters and other systems of stars that have witnessed the entire evolution of our galaxy," says Francesco Ferraro from the University of Bologna, lead author of a paper appearing in this week's issue of the journal Nature. "Our study opens a new window on yet another piece of our galactic past." Like archaeologists, who dig through the dust piling up on top of the remains of past civilisations and unearth crucial pieces of the history of mankind, astronomers have been gazing through the thick layers of interstellar dust obscuring the bulge of the Milky Way and have unveiled an extraordinary cosmic relic. The target of the study is the star cluster Terzan 5. The new observations show that this object, unlike all but a few exceptional globular clusters, does not harbour stars which are all born at the same time - what astronomers call a "single population" of stars. Instead, the multitude of glowing stars in Terzan 5 formed in at least two different epochs, the earliest probably some 12 billion years ago and then again 6 billion years ago. "Only one globular cluster with such a complex history of star formation has been observed in the halo of the Milky Way: Omega Centauri," says team member Emanuele Dalessandro. "This is the first time we see this in the bulge." The galactic bulge is the most inaccessible region of our galaxy for astronomical observations: only infrared light can

  18. Giant Cosmic Lens Reveals Secrets of Distant Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope and helped by a gigantic cosmic lens conveniently provided by nature, an international team of astronomers has discovered that a young galaxy had a central disk of gas in which hundreds of new stars were being born every year -- at a time when the Universe was only a fraction of its current age. Artist's Conception of the Star-Forming Disk (Click on Image for Larger Version) VLA Image of PSS J2322+1944 (Click on Image for Larger Version) "This unique look into a very distant, young galaxy gives us unprecedented insight into the process that produced both tremendous numbers of stars and supermassive black holes in forming galaxies," said Chris Carilli, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM, leader of the research team. "This work strongly supports the idea that the stars and the black holes formed simultaneously," he added. The research was published in the April 4 issue of Science Express. The astronomers studied a quasar called PSS J2322+1944, about 12 billion light-years from Earth. The quasar is an extremely luminous object powered by the supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy. At the distance of this quasar, the scientists see the object as it was when the Universe was less than 2 billion years old, about 15 percent of its current age. The discovery required a huge assist from nature. To find the star-forming disk, the astronomers needed to observe natural radio emission from the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule, an important component of the gas that forms stars. However, this molecule emits radio waves at frequencies much higher than the VLA is capable of receiving. At PSS J2322+1944's distance of 12 billion light-years, however, the expansion of the Universe stretched the radio waves, reducing their frequency. CO emission at 230 GigaHertz was shifted to 45 GigaHertz, within the VLA's range. That alone was not enough. The distance that made it

  19. NASA's Chandra Reveals Origin of Key Cosmic Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    WASHINGTON -- New findings from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory have provided a major advance in understanding a type of supernova critical for studying the dark energy that astronomers think pervades the universe. The results show mergers of two dense stellar remnants are the likely cause of many of the supernovae that have been used to measure the accelerated expansion of the universe. These supernovae, called Type Ia, serve as cosmic mile markers to measure expansion of the universe because they can be seen at large distances, and they follow a reliable pattern of brightness. However, until now, scientists have been unsure what actually causes the explosions. "These are such critical objects in understanding the universe," said Marat Gilfanov of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Germany and lead author of the study that appears in the Feb. 18 edition of the journal Nature. "It was a major embarrassment that we did not know how they worked. Now we are beginning to understand what lights the fuse of these explosions." Most scientists agree a Type Ia supernova occurs when a white dwarf star -- a collapsed remnant of an elderly star -- exceeds its weight limit, becomes unstable and explodes. Scientists have identified two main possibilities for pushing the white dwarf over the edge: two white dwarfs merging or accretion, a process in which the white dwarf pulls material from a sun-like companion star until it exceeds its weight limit. "Our results suggest the supernovae in the galaxies we studied almost all come from two white dwarfs merging," said co-author Akos Bogdan, also of Max Planck. "This is probably not what many astronomers would expect." The difference between these two scenarios may have implications for how these supernovae can be used as "standard candles" -- objects of a known brightness -- to track vast cosmic distances. Because white dwarfs can come in a range of masses, the merger of two could result in explosions that vary somewhat in

  20. Recent Results from Broad-Band Intensity Mapping Measurements of Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, Michael B.; CIBER, Herschel-SPIRE

    2016-01-01

    Intensity mapping integrates the total emission in a given spectral band over the universe's history. Tomographic measurements of cosmic structure can be performed using specific line tracers observed in narrow bands, but a wealth of information is also available from broad-band observations performed by instruments capable of capturing high-fidelity, wide-angle images of extragalactic emission. Sensitive to the continuum emission from faint and diffuse sources, these broad-band measurements provide a view on cosmic structure traced by components not readily detected in point source surveys. After accounting for measurement effects and astrophysical foregrounds, the angular power spectra of such data can be compared to predictions from models to yield powerful insights into the history of cosmic structure formation. This talk will highlight some recent measurements of large scale structure performed using broad-band intensity mapping methods that have given new insights on faint, distant, and diffuse components in the extragalactic background light.

  1. Efficient decomposition of cosmic microwave background polarization maps into pure E, pure B, and ambiguous components

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Emory F.

    2011-04-15

    Separation of the B component of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization map from the much larger E component is an essential step in CMB polarimetry. For a map with incomplete sky coverage, this separation is necessarily hampered by the presence of ambiguous modes which could be either E or B modes. I present an efficient pixel-space algorithm for removing the ambiguous modes and separating the map into pure E and B components. The method, which works for arbitrary geometries, does not involve generating a complete basis of such modes and scales the cube of the number of pixels on the boundary of the map.

  2. Cosmic X-ray Flashes Reveal Their Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Astronomers using X-ray, radio, and optical telescopes have announced a big leap in solving the origin of mysterious objects known as X-ray flashes (XRFs) by finding that they originate from blue star forming galaxies. This discovery of the cosmic distance scale effectively ends the widely-held speculation that XRFs are the death-cries from stars exploding in the infant universe. X-ray flashes resemble a lower energy and longer-duration version of a gamma-ray burst, an energetic explosion thought to signal the death of a massive star. The properties of XRFs led to speculation that they were gamma-ray bursts that occurred less than a few billion years after the Big Bang, and whose light had been subsequently weakened and time-stretched by the expansion of the universe. "Now that the very distant origin has been ruled out, X-ray flashes could be due to exploding massive stars, just like gamma-ray bursts" explained Dr. Joshua Bloom at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., lead author on the paper announcing the results to be published in The Astrophysical Journal. Bloom continued: "But the explosion from an X-ray flash would need to contain less matter or less energy than a typical gamma-ray burst. Alternatively, X-ray flashes could be gamma-ray bursts viewed off-axis." These results are being discussed at the "30th Anniversary of the Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts" conference currently being held in Sante Fe, New Mexico. The location of the sources studied by Bloom's group required a careful coordination of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope, along with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (VLA) in Socorro, New Mexico. Chandra and the VLA provided a precise location of the fading X-ray and radio "afterglow" of two X-ray flashes known as XRF 011030 and XRF 020427. The Hubble Space Telescope was used to identify and study galaxies at these locations and estimate their distances to between

  3. VLBA Reveals Formation Region of Giant Cosmic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Astronomers have gained their first glimpse of the mysterious region near a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy, where a powerful stream of subatomic particles spewing outward at nearly the speed of light is formed into a beam, or jet, that then goes nearly straight for thousands of light-years. The astronomers used radio telescopes in Europe and the U.S., including the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to make the most detailed images ever of the center of the galaxy M87, some 50 million light-years away. "This is the first time anyone has seen the region in which a cosmic jet is formed into a narrow beam," said Bill Junor of the University of New Mexico, in Albuquerque. "We had always speculated that the jet had to be made by some mechanism relatively near the black hole, but as we looked closer and closer to the center, we kept seeing an already-formed beam. That was becoming embarrassing, because we were running out of places to put the formation mechanism that we knew had to be there." Junor, along with John Biretta and Mario Livio of the Space Telescope Science Institute, in Baltimore, MD, now have shown that M87's jet is formed within a few tenths of a light-year of the galaxy's core, presumed to be a black hole three billion times more massive than the sun. In the formation region, the jet is seen opening widely, at an angle of about 60 degrees, nearest the black hole, but is squeezed down to only 6 degrees a few light-years away. "The 60-degree angle of the inner part of M87's jet is the widest such angle yet seen in any jet in the universe," said Junor. "We found this by being able to see the jet to within a few hundredths of a light-year of the galaxy's core -- an unprecedented level of detail." The scientists reported their findings in the October 28 issue of the journal Nature. At the center of M87, material being drawn inward by the strong gravitation of the black hole is formed into a rapidly-spinning flat

  4. Testing the mapping between redshift and cosmic scale factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Prada, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    The canonical redshift-scale factor relation, 1/a = 1 + z, is a key element in the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model of the big bang cosmology. Despite its fundamental role, this relation has not yet undergone any observational tests since Lemaître and Hubble established the expansion of the Universe. It is strictly based on the assumption of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric describing a locally homogeneous and isotropic universe and that photons move on null geodesics of the metric. Thus any violation of this assumption, within general relativity or modified gravity, can yield a different mapping between the model redshift z = 1/a - 1 and the actually observed redshift zobs, i.e. zobs ≠ z. Here, we perform a simple test of consistency for the standard redshift-scale factor relation by determining simultaneous observational constraints on the concordance ΛCDM cosmological parameters and a generalized redshift mapping z = f(zobs). Using current baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data we demonstrate that the generalized redshift mapping is strongly degenerated with dark energy. Marginalization over a class of monotonic functions f(zobs) changes substantially degeneracy between matter and dark energy density: the density parameters become anticorrelated with nearly vertical axis of degeneracy. Furthermore, we show that current SN and BAO data, analysed in a framework with the generalized redshift mapping, do not constrain dark energy unless the BAO data include the measurements from the Ly α forest of high-redshift quasars.

  5. Cortical cartography reveals political and physical maps.

    PubMed

    Loring, David W; Gaillard, William Davis; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Meador, Kimford J; Ojemann, Jeffrey G

    2014-05-01

    Advances in functional imaging have provided noninvasive techniques to probe brain organization of multiple constructs including language and memory. Because of high overall rates of agreements with older techniques, including Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping (CSM), some have proposed that those approaches should be largely abandoned because of their invasiveness, and replaced with noninvasive functional imaging methods. High overall agreement, however, is based largely on concordant language lateralization in series dominated by cases of typical cerebral dominance. Advocating a universal switch from Wada testing and cortical stimulation mapping to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) or magnetoencephalography (MEG) ignores the differences in specific expertise across epilepsy centers, many of which often have greater skill with one approach rather than the other, and that Wada, CSM, fMRI, and MEG protocols vary across institutions resulting in different outcomes and reliability. Specific patient characteristics also affect whether Wada or CSM might influence surgical management, making it difficult to accept broad recommendations against currently useful clinical tools. Although the development of noninvasive techniques has diminished the frequency of more invasive approaches, advocating their use to replace Wada testing and CSM across all epilepsy surgery programs without consideration of the different skills, protocols, and expertise at any given center site is ill-advised.

  6. A FOREGROUND-CLEANED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND MAP FROM NON-GAUSSIANITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib

    2011-10-01

    In this Letter, we present a new method to estimate a foreground-cleaned cosmic microwave background (CMB) map at a resolution of 1{sup 0} by minimizing the non-Gaussian properties of the cleaned map which arise dominantly due to diffuse foreground emission components from the Milky Way. We employ simple kurtosis statistic as the measure of non-Gaussian properties and perform a linear combination of five frequency maps provided by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) in its seven-year data release in such a way that the cleaned map has a minimum kurtosis which leads to a non-Gaussianity-minimized, foreground-cleaned CMB map. We validate the method by performing Monte Carlo simulations. To minimize any residual foreground contamination from the cleaned map we flag out the region near the galactic plane based upon results from simulations. Outside the masked region our new estimate of the CMB map matches well with the WMAP's Internal Linear Combination (ILC) map. A simple pseudo-C{sub l} -based CMB TT power spectrum derived from the non-Gaussianity minimized map reproduces the earlier results of WMAP's power spectrum. An important advantage of the method is that it does not introduce any negative bias in angular power spectrum in the low multipole regime, unlike usual ILC method. Comparing our results with the previously published results we argue that CMB results are robust with respect to specific foreground removal algorithms employed.

  7. Simulated cosmic microwave background maps at 0.5 deg resolution: Basic results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have simulated full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy expected from cold dark matter (CDM) models at 0.5 deg and 1.0 deg angular resolution. Statistical properties of the maps are presented as a function of sky coverage, angular resolution, and instrument noise, and the implications of these results for observability of the Doppler peak are discussed. The rms fluctuations in a map are not a particularly robust probe of the existence of a Doppler peak; however, a full correlation analysis can provide reasonable sensitivity. We find that sensitivity to the Doppler peak depends primarily on the fraction of sky covered, and only secondarily on the angular resolution and noise level. Color plates of the simulated maps are presented to illustrate the anisotropies.

  8. Mapping Cosmic Structure Using 21-cm Hydrogen Signal at Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; GBT 21-cm Intensity Mapping Group

    2011-05-01

    We are using the Green Bank Telescope to make 21-cm intensity maps of cosmic structure in a 0.15 Gpc^3 box at redshift of z 1. The intensity mapping technique combines the flux from many galaxies in each pixel, allowing much greater mapping speed than the traditional redshift survey. Measurement is being made at z 1 to take advantage of a window in frequency around 700 MHz where terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI) is currently at a minimum. This minimum is due to a reallocation of this frequency band from analog television to wide area wireless internet and public service usage. We will report progress of our attempt to detect autocorrelation of the 21-cm signal. The ultimate goal of this mapping is to use Baryon Acoustic Oscillations to provide more precise constraints to dark energy models.

  9. A Map of the Cosmic Microwave Background from the BEAST Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, Peter R.; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffrey; Figueiredo, Newton; Gaier, Todd C.; Halevi, Doron; Huey, Gregory G.; Kangas, Miikka; Lawrence, Charles R.; Levy, Alan; Lubin, Philip M.; Malaspina, Marco; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Mejía, Jorge; Natoli, Paolo; O'Dwyer, Ian; O'Neill, Hugh; Parendo, Shane; Pina, Agenor; Seiffert, Michael D.; Stebor, Nathan C.; Tello, Camilo; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Wade, Lawrence A.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    We present the first sky maps from the BEAST (Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope) experiment. BEAST consists of a 2.2 m off-axis Gregorian telescope fed by a cryogenic millimeter wavelength focal plane currently consisting of six Q band (40 GHz) and two Ka band (30 GHz) scalar feed horns feeding cryogenic HEMT amplifiers. Data were collected from two balloon-borne flights in 2000, followed by a lengthy ground observing campaign from the 3.8 km altitude University of California White Mountain Research Station. This paper reports the initial results from the ground-based observations. The instrument produced an annular map covering the sky over 33deg<δ<42deg. The maps cover an area of 2470 deg2 with an effective resolution of 23' FWHM at 40 GHz and 30' at 30 GHz. The map rms (smoothed to 30' and excluding Galactic foregrounds) is 57+/-5 μK (Rayleigh-Jeans) at 40 GHz. Comparison with the instrument noise and correcting for 5% atmospheric attenuation gives a cosmic signal rms contribution of 29+/-3 μK (R-J) or 30+/-3 μK relative to a Planck blackbody of 2.7 K. An estimate of the actual cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky signal requires taking into account the l space filter function of our experiment and analysis techniques, carried out in a companion paper. In addition to the robust detection of CMB anisotropies, we find a strong correlation between small portions of our maps and features in recent Hα maps. In this work we describe the data set and analysis techniques leading to the maps, including data selection, filtering, pointing reconstruction, mapmaking algorithms, and systematic effects.

  10. Peculiar high energy cosmic ray stratospheric event reveals a heavy primary origin particle above the knee region of the cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kopenkin, V.; Fujimoto, Y.

    2005-01-15

    We wish to put forward an explanation for a peculiar cosmic ray event with energy {sigma}E{sub {gamma}}{>=}2x10{sup 15} eV detected in 1975 by the balloon borne emulsion chamber experiment performed in the stratosphere, at the altitude {>=}30 km above sea level. For almost 30 years the event has been described as unusual, invoking new exotic mechanisms or models. In our opinion there is no need for an extraordinary explanation. Contrary to the widespread belief, the event gives us an example of 'unrecognized standard physics'. At the same time this event revealed a variety of features which are of considerable interest for cosmic rays, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. Here we show that the observed family is most likely to be a result of a heavy nucleus interaction with an air nucleus. In this case a primary particle would originally have been in the energy region above 'the knee' of the cosmic ray spectrum.

  11. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  12. Optimal cosmic microwave background map-making in the presence of cross-correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We present an extension of the ROMA map-making algorithm for the generation of optimal cosmic microwave background polarization maps. The new code allows for a possible cross-correlated noise component among the detectors of a CMB experiment. A promising application is the forthcoming LSPE balloon-borne experiment, which is devoted to the accurate observation of CMB polarization at large angular scales. Methods: We generalized the noise covariance matrix in time domain to account for all the off-diagonal terms due to the detector cross-talk. Hence, we performed preliminary forecasts of the LSPE-SWIPE instrument. Results: We found that considering the noise cross-correlation among the detectors results in a more realistic estimate of the angular power spectra. In particular, the extended ROMA algorithm has provided a considerable reduction of the spectra error bars. We expect that this improvement could be crucial in constraining the B-mode polarization at the largest scales.

  13. Recombination patterns reveal information about centromere location on linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Limborg, Morten T; McKinney, Garrett J; Seeb, Lisa W; Seeb, James E

    2016-05-01

    Linkage mapping is often used to identify genes associated with phenotypic traits and for aiding genome assemblies. Still, many emerging maps do not locate centromeres - an essential component of the genomic landscape. Here, we demonstrate that for genomes with strong chiasma interference, approximate centromere placement is possible by phasing the same data used to generate linkage maps. Assuming one obligate crossover per chromosome arm, information about centromere location can be revealed by tracking the accumulated recombination frequency along linkage groups, similar to half-tetrad analyses. We validate the method on a linkage map for sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) with known centromeric regions. Further tests suggest that the method will work well in other salmonids and other eukaryotes. However, the method performed weakly when applied to a male linkage map (rainbow trout; O. mykiss) characterized by low and unevenly distributed recombination - a general feature of male meiosis in many species. Further, a high frequency of double crossovers along chromosome arms in barley reduced resolution for locating centromeric regions on most linkage groups. Despite these limitations, our method should work well for high-density maps in species with strong recombination interference and will enrich many existing and future mapping resources. PMID:26561199

  14. Planetary-scale wave structures of the earth's atmosphere revealed from the COSMIC observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisetty, S. K. A. V. Prasad Rao; Brahmanandam, P. S.; Uma, G.; Babu, A. Narendra; Huang, Ching-Yuang; Kumar, G. Anil; Ram, S. Tulasi; Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    2014-02-01

    GPS radio occultation (GPS RO) method, an active satellite-to-satellite remote sensing technique, is capable of producing accurate, all-weather, round the clock, global refractive index, density, pressure, and temperature profiles of the troposphere and stratosphere. This study presents planetary-scale equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in temperature profiles retrieved using COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) satellites during 2006-2009 and their interactions with background atmospheric conditions. It is found that the Kelvin waves are not only associated with wave periods of higher than 10 days (slow Kelvin waves) with higher zonal wave numbers (either 1 or 2), but also possessing downward phase progression, giving evidence that the source regions of them are located at lower altitudes. A thorough verification of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) reveals that deep convection activity has developed regularly over the Indonesian region, suggesting that the Kelvin waves are driven by the convective activity. The derived Kelvin waves show enhanced (diminished) tendencies during westward (eastward) phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in zonal winds, implying a mutual relation between both of them. The El Niño and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) below 18 km and the QBO features between 18 and 27 km in temperature profiles are observed during May 2006-May 2010 with the help of an adaptive data analysis technique known as Hilbert Huang Transform (HHT). Further, temperature anomalies computed using COSMIC retrieved temperatures are critically evaluated during different phases of ENSO, which has revealed interesting results and are discussed in light of available literature.

  15. A WAVELET-GALERKIN ALGORITHM OF THE E/B DECOMPOSITION OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Liang; Fang Lizhi

    2009-12-01

    We develop an algorithm of separating the E and B modes of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization from the noisy and discretized maps of Stokes parameters Q and U in a finite area. A key step of the algorithm is to take a wavelet-Galerkin discretization of the differential relation between the E, B and Q, U fields. This discretization allows derivative operator to be represented by a matrix, which is exactly diagonal in scale space, and narrowly banded in spatial space. We show that the effect of boundary can be eliminated by dropping a few discrete wavelet transform modes, located on or nearby the boundary. This method reveals that the derivative operators will cause large errors in the E and B power spectra on small scales if the Q and U maps contain Gaussian noise. It also reveals that if the Q and U maps are random, these fields lead to the mixing of E and B modes. Consequently, the B mode will be contaminated if the powers of E modes are much larger than that of B modes. Nevertheless, numerical tests show that the power spectra of both E and B on scales larger than the finest scale by a factor of 4 and higher can reasonably be recovered, even when the power ratio of E to B modes is as large as about 10{sup 2}, and the signal-to-noise ratio is equal to 10 and higher. This is because the Galerkin discretization is free of false correlations and keeps the contamination under control. As wavelet variables contain information of both spatial and scale spaces, the developed method is also effective to recover the spatial structures of the E and B mode fields.

  16. Mapping the Cosmic Web with the largest all-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Peacock, John A.; Jarrett, Thomas H.; Cluver, Michelle E.; Steward, Louise

    2016-10-01

    Our view of the low-redshift Cosmic Web has been revolutionized by galaxy redshift surveys such as 6dFGS, SDSS and 2MRS. However, the trade-off between depth and angular coverage limits a systematic three-dimensional account of the entire sky beyond the Local Volume (z < 0.05). In order to reliably map the Universe to cosmologically significant depths over the full celestial sphere, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. We have undertaken a dedicated program of cross-matching the largest photometric all-sky surveys - 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS - to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts - the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ, Bilicki et al. 2014a) - has been publicly released and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a mean redshift of z=0.08. Here we summarize how this catalog was constructed and how using the WISE mid-infrared sample together with SuperCOSMOS optical data allows us to push to redshift shells of z~ 0.2 -0.3 on unprecedented angular scales. Our catalogs, with ~ 20 million sources in total, provide access to cosmological volumes crucial for studies of local galaxy flows (clustering dipole, bulk flow) and cross-correlations with the cosmic microwave background such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect or lensing studies.

  17. A flat Universe from high-resolution maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    PubMed

    de Bernardis P; Ade; Bock; Bond; Borrill; Boscaleri; Coble; Crill; De Gasperis G; Farese; Ferreira; Ganga; Giacometti; Hivon; Hristov; Iacoangeli; Jaffe; Lange; Martinis; Masi; Mason; Mauskopf; Melchiorri; Miglio; Montroy; Netterfield

    2000-04-27

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K cosmic microwave background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the Universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole Ipeak = (197 +/- 6), with an amplitude delta T200 = (69 +/- 8) microK. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favoured by standard inflationary models.

  18. A Flat Universe from High-Resolution Maps of the Cosmic MicrowaveBackground Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P.A.R.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill,J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Crill, B.P.; De Gasperis, G.; Farese, P.C.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V.V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason,P.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Melchiorri, A.; Miglio, L.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield,C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Prunet, S.; Rao, S.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Sforna, D.; Vittorio, N.

    2000-04-28

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K Cosmic Microwave Background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole {ell}{sub peak} = (197 {+-} 6), with an amplitude DT{sub 200} = (69 {+-} 8){mu}K. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favored by standard inflationary scenarios.

  19. Robust likelihoods for inflationary gravitational waves from maps of cosmic microwave background polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Watts, Duncan J.

    2016-09-01

    The B -mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background provides a unique window into tensor perturbations from inflationary gravitational waves. Survey effects complicate the estimation and description of the power spectrum on the largest angular scales. The pixel-space likelihood yields parameter distributions without the power spectrum as an intermediate step, but it does not have the large suite of tests available to power spectral methods. Searches for primordial B -modes must rigorously reject and rule out contamination. Many forms of contamination vary or are uncorrelated across epochs, frequencies, surveys, or other data treatment subsets. The cross power and the power spectrum of the difference of subset maps provide approaches to reject and isolate excess variance. We develop an analogous joint pixel-space likelihood. Contamination not modeled in the likelihood produces parameter-dependent bias and complicates the interpretation of the difference map. We describe a null test that consistently weights the difference map. Excess variance should either be explicitly modeled in the covariance or be removed through reprocessing the data.

  20. Radiation climate map for analyzing risks to astronauts on the mars surface from galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar B.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Zeitlin, Cary

    2004-01-01

    The potential risks for late effects including cancer, cataracts, and neurological disorders due to exposures to the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a large concern for the human exploration of Mars. Physical models are needed to project the radiation exposures to be received by astronauts in transit to Mars and on the Mars surface, including the understanding of the modification of the GCR by the Martian atmosphere and identifying shielding optimization approaches. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission has been collecting Martian surface topographical data with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Here we present calculations of radiation climate maps of the surface of Mars using the MOLA data, the radiation transport model HZETRN (high charge and high energy transport), and the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model, QMSFRG. Organ doses and the average number of particle hits per cell nucleus from GCR components (protons, heavy ions, and neutrons) are evaluated as a function of the altitude on the Martian surface. Approaches to improve the accuracy of the radiation climate map, presented here using data from the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission, are discussed.

  1. Radiation Climate Map for Analyzing Risks to Astronauts on the Mars Surface from Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar B.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Simonsen, Lisa C.; Zeitlin, Cary

    The potential risks for late effects including cancer, cataracts, and neurological disorders due to exposures to the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a large concern for the human exploration of Mars. Physical models are needed to project the radiation exposures to be received by astronauts in transit to Mars and on the Mars surface, including the understanding of the modification of the GCR by the Martian atmosphere and identifying shielding optimization approaches. The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) mission has been collecting Martian surface topographical data with the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Here we present calculations of radiation climate maps of the surface of Mars using the MOLA data, the radiation transport model HZETRN (high charge and high energy transport), and the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation model, QMSFRG. Organ doses and the average number of particle hits per cell nucleus from GCR components (protons, heavy ions, and neutrons) are evaluated as a function of the altitude on the Martian surface. Approaches to improve the accuracy of the radiation climate map, presented here using data from the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission, are discussed.

  2. Cosmic Electromagnetic Radiation: The sky shine covers an enormous spectrum of frequencies, revealing a cosmic picture in some detail.

    PubMed

    Hafner, E M

    1964-09-18

    Within a few decades astronomy has extended the compass of its observations from the visible spectrum downward to radio waves and upward to the highest energies known to science. The major new accomplishments are in the radio and x-ray bands, and in the associated study of cosmic ray electrons. Synchrotron radiation is known to be a mechanism for radio signals; discrete x-ray sources have been found; the intensity and the charge ratio of galactic electrons are under study. Experimental results at energies above the x-ray region are less firm. The sun surely emits gamma rays at energies of about 1 Mev during flare activity, and instruments in deep space have probably recorded the general galactic glow of similar photons. Upper limits for fluxes have been set at 100 Mev and beyond. To some extent the physical processes which give rise to the extraterrestrial radiation are familiar to workers in the terrestrial laboratory. Synchrotron radiation is an example; the bremsstrahlung of electrons, the production of neutral pions in p-p collisions, and the annihilation of electron and nucleon pairs are others. Some proposed mechanisms are, and perhaps always will be, purely speculative in the sense that they are not directly observable in the laboratory. The inverse Compton effect, possibly one of the sources of a metagalactic sky glow of hard photons, is in this class. There is little chance that spontaneous creation of matter, even if it occurs in nature, can be observed on a terrestrial scale. And the extreme physical conditions proposed for neutron stars are beyond our ability to reproduce. Only through interpretation of astronomical data can we test the validity of these ideas. The many pictures of the universe given by the vast electromagnetic spectrum are essential to the synthesis of our concepts.

  3. Combination of hand mapping and automatic mapping to reveal the Miocene high elevation Pyrenean peneplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Gemma V.; Babault, Julien; Van Den Driessche, Jean

    2016-04-01

    A striking feature of the morphology of the Pyrenees is the occurrence of high-elevation, low-relief surfaces, which are interpreted as remnants of a single Miocene planation surface. Whether the original surface was uplifted or developed at high altitude is debated. This "Miocene Pyrenean peneplain" has been dissected by fluvial and glacial erosion during the Quaternary. Reworking by glacial erosion also provides new smooth surfaces such as glacial cirque floors that must not be confused with the remnants of the original planation surface. The later are convex-up landforms whereas glacial cirque floors are concave-up landforms. To reveal the Miocene high-elevation Pyrenean peneplain, we combined hand mapping and automatic mapping at the scale of the whole chain. From previous mapping in literature and from our own field work, we first perform a map of both the Miocene planation surface remnants and the Quaternary glacial cirque floors. Using Digital Elevation Models, numerical parameters were extracted from this map to characterize the two types of smooth surfaces. The slope is the parameter that helps to delimitate and differentiate the smooth surfaces from the rest of the Pyrenean topography. To distinguish between the two types of smooth surfaces we used the Topographic Index (TPI). This parameter is the difference between the elevation of a point and the mean elevation. Choosing the pertinent radius according to the scale of the landform to map, and the pertinent values interval, we can differentiate the planation surface (convex-up) from the glacial cirque floors (concave-up). A sensitivity test was performed to determine the best radius and the best interval for TPI and slope values to distinguish between the two types of smooth surfaces. Finally, we used a combination of slope values, TPI values and radius to determine automatically the high-elevation, low-relief surfaces in the entire Pyrenees. We verified in the field the presence of the newly mapped high

  4. Identification of galaxy clusters in cosmic microwave background maps using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The Planck satellite was launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency to study the properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). An expected result of the Planck data analysis is the distinction of the various contaminants of the CMB signal. Among these contaminants is the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, which is caused by the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by high energy electrons in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. Aims: We modify a public version of the JADE (Joint Approximate Diagonalization of Eigenmatrices) algorithm, to deal with noisy data, and then use this algorithm as a tool to search for SZ clusters in two simulated datasets. Methods: The first dataset is composed of simple "homemade" simulations and the second of full sky simulations of high angular resolution, available at the LAMBDA (Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis) website. The process of component separation can be summarized in four main steps: (1) pre-processing based on wavelet analysis, which performs an initial cleaning (denoising) of data to minimize the noise level; (2) the separation of the components (emissions) by JADE; (3) the calibration of the recovered SZ map; and (4) the identification of the positions and intensities of the clusters using the SExtractor software. Results: The results show that our JADE-based algorithm is effective in identifying the position and intensity of the SZ clusters, with the purities being higher then 90% for the extracted "catalogues". This value changes slightly according to the characteristics of noise and the number of components included in the input maps. Conclusions: The main highlight of our developed work is the effective recovery rate of SZ sources from noisy data, with no a priori assumptions. This powerful algorithm can be easily implemented and become an interesting complementary option to the "matched filter" algorithm (hereafter MF) widely used in SZ data analysis.

  5. Accelerating the cosmic microwave background map-making procedure through preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlarski, M.; Grigori, L.; Stompor, R.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the sky signal from sequences of time ordered data is one of the key steps in cosmic microwave background (CMB) data analysis, commonly referred to as the map-making problem. Some of the most popular and general methods proposed for this problem involve solving generalised least-squares (GLS) equations with non-diagonal noise weights given by a block-diagonal matrix with Toeplitz blocks. In this work, we study new map-making solvers potentially suitable for applications to the largest anticipated data sets. They are based on iterative conjugate gradient (CG) approaches enhanced with novel, parallel, two-level preconditioners. We apply the proposed solvers to examples of simulated non-polarised and polarised CMB observations and a set of idealised scanning strategies with sky coverage ranging from a nearly full sky down to small sky patches. We discuss their implementation for massively parallel computational platforms and their performance for a broad range of parameters that characterise the simulated data sets in detail. We find that our best new solver can outperform carefully optimised standard solvers used today by a factor of as much as five in terms of the convergence rate and a factor of up to four in terms of the time to solution, without significantly increasing the memory consumption and the volume of inter-processor communication. The performance of the new algorithms is also found to be more stable and robust and less dependent on specific characteristics of the analysed data set. We therefore conclude that the proposed approaches are well suited to address successfully challenges posed by new and forthcoming CMB data sets.

  6. Multiple 10Be records revealing the history of cosmic-ray variations across the Iceland Basin excursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Kazuho; Kamata, Kanae; Maejima, Shun; Sasaki, Sho; Sasaki, Nobuyoshi; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Fujita, Shuji; Motoyama, Hideaki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be is a proxy of cosmic-ray flux, and its natural records provide vital information about the past intensity variability of the geomagnetic field and solar activity. 10Be records also serve as powerful tools for global synchronization among a variety of paleoarchives and for elucidating sedimentary processes on natural remanent magnetization acquisition. However, high-resolution (multi-decadal to multi-centennial) records of 10Be are scarce, especially those older than several tens of thousands of years. Here we present multiple high-resolution 10Be records of the Iceland Basin geomagnetic excursion interval (ca. 170-200 kyr ago) obtained from sediment cores (authigenic 10Be/9Be ratio) and an ice core (atmospheric 10Be flux). Comparing sedimentary 10Be records with relative paleointensity from the same cores, we found differences in the magnetic lock-in depth, even between adjacent cores. The 10Be-proxy records from the sediment and ice cores exhibit common characteristics: an asymmetric large-scale variation, a ∼7-kyr quasi-plateau around the maximum with a characteristic mid-term depression, and multi-millennial fluctuations in cosmic-ray flux during this interval. Minimal-synchronized and stacked 10Be records show that maximum cosmic-ray flux occurred 188.5-190.0 kyr ago and was double the present flux. A wavelet analysis of the stacked curve reveals dominant 4-kyr and secondary 8-kyr periodicities, both of which can be interpreted as intrinsic geomagnetic cycles. The wavelet spectrum of the high-resolution ice-core record shows a periodicity of 1.7 kyr and somewhat intermingled multi-centennial cycles around the maxima of 10Be, which likely represent solar cycles in this period. High-resolution 10Be records from multiple paleoarchives provide both a robust proxy record of cosmic-ray flux and a valuable tool for detailed global synchronization based on cosmic-ray variations.

  7. Synthetic protein interactions reveal a functional map of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Lisa K; Ólafsson, Guðjón; Ledesma-Fernández, Elena; Thorpe, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    To understand the function of eukaryotic cells, it is critical to understand the role of protein-protein interactions and protein localization. Currently, we do not know the importance of global protein localization nor do we understand to what extent the cell is permissive for new protein associations – a key requirement for the evolution of new protein functions. To answer this question, we fused every protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a partner from each of the major cellular compartments and quantitatively assessed the effects upon growth. This analysis reveals that cells have a remarkable and unanticipated tolerance for forced protein associations, even if these associations lead to a proportion of the protein moving compartments within the cell. Furthermore, the interactions that do perturb growth provide a functional map of spatial protein regulation, identifying key regulatory complexes for the normal homeostasis of eukaryotic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13053.001 PMID:27098839

  8. Distributed neural system for emotional intelligence revealed by lesion mapping.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    Cognitive neuroscience has made considerable progress in understanding the neural architecture of human intelligence, identifying a broadly distributed network of frontal and parietal regions that support goal-directed, intelligent behavior. However, the contributions of this network to social and emotional aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here we investigated the neural basis of emotional intelligence in 152 patients with focal brain injuries using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. Latent variable modeling was applied to obtain measures of emotional intelligence, general intelligence and personality from the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Neuroticism-Extroversion-Openness Inventory, respectively. Regression analyses revealed that latent scores for measures of general intelligence and personality reliably predicted latent scores for emotional intelligence. Lesion mapping results further indicated that these convergent processes depend on a shared network of frontal, temporal and parietal brain regions. The results support an integrative framework for understanding the architecture of executive, social and emotional processes and make specific recommendations for the interpretation and application of the MSCEIT to the study of emotional intelligence in health and disease.

  9. Dual-frequency mapping with the Tenerife cosmic microwave background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez de La Cruz, C. M.; Davies, R. D.; Rebolo, R.; Watson, R. A.; Hancock, S.; Lasenby, A. N.

    1995-03-01

    We present maps of the sky at intermediate angular resolution (5 deg) of the declination range 35.0-45.0 deg obtained with the Tenerife cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments using data up until 1992. The data were taken with bean-switching radiometers operating at 10.4 and 14.9 GHz. Right ascension scans were made at 2.5 deg declination intervals centered on decl. +40 deg covering 3500 sq deg of sky. The observations have been compared with known point sources and estimates of Galactic emission as a consistency check on the integrity of the data set. After subtraction of radio sources, the section of our data from R.A. 161 deg to 230 deg has been analyzed using a likelihood method with a Gaussian autocorrelation function. At 10.4 and 14.9 GHz we find evidence for fluctuations with intrinsic amplitudes of square root C0 = 41(+26, -30) and 66(+29, -22) micro-K (68% confidence limits), respectively, on a coherence scale of 4 deg. These levels are consistent with the expected rms sky signal from the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year resuts and with the CMB signal detected at 14.9 and 33 GHz in the decl. = +40 deg strip by Hancock et al. (1994). Our results at 10.4 GHz set strong upper limits on the Galactic contamination at 14.9 GHz, suggesting that the signal found at the latter frequency is probably dominated by cosmological fluctuations.

  10. MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore; Stompor, Radoslaw

    2009-06-09

    MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(1011) time samples, O(108) pixels and O(104) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analysing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

  11. MADmap: A MASSIVELY PARALLEL MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND MAP-MAKER

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, C. M.; Borrill, J. D.; Kisner, T. S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Stompor, R. E-mail: jdborrill@lbl.gov E-mail: a.jaffe@imperial.ac.uk

    2010-03-01

    MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne, and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(10{sup 11}) time samples, O(10{sup 8}) pixels, and O(10{sup 4}) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms, and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analyzing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

  12. Gaussian statistics of the cosmic microwave background: Correlation of temperature extrema in the COBE DMR two-year sky maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function of the extrema points (peaks and valleys) in the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 2 year sky maps as a test for non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. A maximum-likelihood analysis compares the DMR data to n = 1 toy models whose random-phase spherical harmonic components a(sub lm) are drawn from either Gaussian, chi-square, or log-normal parent populations. The likelihood of the 53 GHz (A+B)/2 data is greatest for the exact Gaussian model. There is less than 10% chance that the non-Gaussian models tested describe the DMR data, limited primarily by type II errors in the statistical inference. The extrema correlation function is a stronger test for this class of non-Gaussian models than topological statistics such as the genus.

  13. Reveal the origin of cosmic rays with a dedicated sub-GeV space mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    The highly successful Fermi mission has proved the great potential of studying astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics in high energy gamma rays. One area of improvement is in the 10 MeV to 1 GeV region, where the PSF of Fermi is limited by the presence of the Tungsten converters. Observational evidence of their acceleration by the shockwaves of young supernova remnants (SNRs) is mostly indirect and we lack information on key aspects such as the acceleration efficiency, conditions for escape, and total energy imparted to CRs. Direct emission from CR nuclei has been tentatively found in sub-GeV gamma rays in three remnants, W44, IC443 and W51C. The sub-GeV part of the spectrum is essential to distinguish emission from relativistic electrons and protons. PANGU (PAir-productioN Gamma-ray Unit) is a mission candidate proposed to the ESA-CAS joint mission. To achieve a PSF of ~1° at 100 MeV, PANGU will use a fully active tracker use thin silicon strip detectors. PANGU will provide the most accurate sub-GeV spectral characterisation of cosmic-ray sources (supernova remnants, superbubbles, novae etc.) and of the Fermi bubbles and Galactic wind, to single out the pion-decay signature of accelerated nuclei. PANGU will resolve the diffuse Galactic interstellar emission with unprecedented details to probe the distribution of Galactic cosmic rays and energetic feedback mechanisms. PANGU also provides a unique window to identify the source of ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  14. Characteristics of global precipitable water in ENSO events revealed by COSMIC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Wen-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Yuang; Ho, Shu-Peng; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Zhou, Xin-Jia

    2013-08-01

    Precipitable water (PW) retrievals from FORMOSAT-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) measurements were analyzed and compared with those derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) during the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events from 2007 to 2011. For the three ENSO events in 2007-2011, monthly mean binned COSMIC PW results are in a very high correlation (up to 0.98) with those of SSM/I and AMSR-E over the ocean, generally with root-mean-square differences less than 4 mm. PW retrievals from the three satellites are also of similar latitudinal variations. However, the PW is slightly underestimated by GPS RO, in particular, in the tropical regions. This underestimate may be caused partially by the fact that not all RO measurements can reach the surface. Inter-satellite PW anomaly comparisons for the winter months in the ENSO events, with respect to those during the neutral (non-ENSO) months, show consistent ENSO signals with major PW anomaly near the central Pacific in the warm event and near the Indonesian region and east of Australia in the two cold events. However, the 2007/2008 La Niña is somewhat less correlated for COSMIC with AMSR-E and SSM/I. For the stronger 2010/2011 La Niña, their PW anomalies are in higher correlations of about 0.8.

  15. Revealing W51C as a Cosmic Ray Source Using Fermi-LAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogler, T.; Funk, S.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are commonly believed to be the primary sources of Galactic cosmic rays. Despite intensive study of the non-thermal emission of many SNRs the identification of the accelerated particle type relies heavily on assumptions of ambient-medium parameters that are only loosely constrained. Compelling evidence of hadronic acceleration can be provided by detecting a strong roll-off in the secondary γ-ray spectrum below the {π }0 production threshold energy of about 135 MeV, the so called “pion bump.” Here we use five years of Fermi-Large Area Telescope data to study the spectrum above 60 MeV of the middle-aged SNR W51C. A clear break in the power-law γ-ray spectrum at {E}{{break}}=290+/- 20 {{MeV}} is detected with 9σ significance and we show that this break is most likely associated with the energy production threshold of {π }0mesons. A high-energy break in the γ-ray spectrum at about 2.7 GeV is found with 7.5σ significance. The spectral index at energies beyond this second break is {{{Γ }}}2={2.52}-0.07+0.06 and closely matches the spectral index derived by the MAGIC Collaboration above 75 GeV. Therefore our analysis provides strong evidence to explain the γ-ray spectrum of W51C by a single particle population of protons with a momentum spectrum best described by a broken power law with break momentum {p}{{break}}∼ 80 {{G}}{{e}}{{V}}/c. W51C is the third middle-aged SNR that displays compelling evidence for cosmic-ray acceleration and thus strengthens the case of SNRs as the main source of Galactic cosmic rays.

  16. Probing the cosmic-ray content of galaxy clusters by stacking Fermi-LAT count maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, B.; Tchernin, C.; Eckert, D.; Farnier, C.; Manalaysay, A.; Straumann, U.; Walter, R.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: Radio observations have shown that galaxy clusters are giant reservoirs of cosmic rays (CR). Although a gamma-ray signal from the cluster volume is expected to arise through interactions of CR protons with the ambient plasma, a confirming observation is still missing. Methods: We searched for a cumulative gamma-ray emission in the direction of galaxy clusters by analysing a collection of stacked Fermi-LAT count maps. Additionally, we investigated possible systematic differences in the emission between cool-core and non-cool-core cluster populations. Results: Making use of a sample of 53 clusters selected from the HIFLUGCS catalog, we do not detect a significant signal from the stacked sample. The upper limit on the average flux per cluster derived for the total stacked sample is at the level of a few 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1 at a 95% confidence level in the 1-300 GeV band, assuming power-law spectra with photon indices 2.0, 2.4, 2.8, and 3.2. Separate stacking of the cool-core and non-cool-core clusters in the sample lead to similar values of around 5 × 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1 and 2 × 10-11 ph cm-2 s-1, respectively. Conclusions: Under the assumption that decaying π0, produced in collisions between CRs and the ambient thermal gas, are responsible for gamma-ray emission, we set upper limits on the average CR content in galaxy clusters. For the entire cluster population, our upper limit on the gamma-ray flux translates into an upper limit on the average CR-to-thermal energy ratio of 4.6% for a photon index of 2.4, although it is possible for individual systems to exceed this limit. Our 95% upper limits are at the level expected from numerical simulations, which most likely suggests that the injection of CR at cosmological shocks is less efficient than previously assumed.

  17. Tests for Gaussianity of the MAXIMA-1 cosmic microwave background map.

    PubMed

    Wu, J H; Balbi, A; Borrill, J; Ferreira, P G; Hanany, S; Jaffe, A H; Lee, A T; Rabii, B; Richards, P L; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Winant, C D

    2001-12-17

    Gaussianity of the cosmological perturbations is one of the key predictions of standard inflation, but it is violated by other models of structure formation such as cosmic defects. We present the first test of the Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on subdegree angular scales, where deviations from Gaussianity are most likely to occur. We apply the methods of moments, cumulants, the Kolmogorov test, the chi(2) test, and Minkowski functionals in eigen, real, Wiener-filtered, and signal-whitened spaces, to the MAXIMA-1 CMB anisotropy data. We find that the data, which probe angular scales between 10 arcmin and 5 deg, are consistent with Gaussianity. These results show consistency with the standard inflation and place constraints on the existence of cosmic defects.

  18. Cosmic ray heavy ion LET mapping for aluminum, silicon, and tissue targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Barth, J. M.; Jordan, T. M.

    1987-01-01

    Linear energy transfer (LET) values in aluminum, silicon, and tissue targets have been calculated for 31 galactic cosmic ray ion species in eight different units. The values are described for single event upset (SEU) effect assessments or radiobiological evaluations. The data are presented in graphical and tabular form.

  19. Ongoing cosmic ray acceleration in the supernova remnant W51C revealed with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.; Reichardt, I.; Carmona, E.; Gozzini, S. R.; Jankowski, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) W51C interacts with the molecular clouds of the star-forming region W51B, making the W51 complex one of the most promising targets to study cosmic ray acceleration. Gamma-ray emission from this region was discovered by Fermi/LAT and H.E.S.S., although its location was compatible with the SNR shell, the molecular cloud (MC) and a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) candidate. The modeling of the spectral energy distribution presented by the Fermi/LAT collaboration suggests a hadronic emission mechanism. Furthermore indications of an enhanced flux of low energy cosmic rays in the interaction region between SNR and MC have been reported based on ionization measurements in the mm regime. MAGIC conducted deep observations of W51, yielding a detection of an extended emission with more than 11 standard deviations. We extend the spectrum from the highest Fermi/LAT energies to ~5 TeV and find that it follows a single power law with an index of 2.58+/-0.07stat+/-0.22syst. We restrict the main part of the emission region to the zone where the SNR interacts with the molecular clouds. We also find a tail extending towards the PWN candidate CXO J192318.5+140305, possibly contributing up to 20% of the total flux. The broad band spectral energy distribution can be explained with a hadronic model that implies proton acceleration at least up to 50 TeV. This result, together with the morphology of the source, suggests that we observe ongoing acceleration of ions in the interaction zone between the SNR and the cloud.

  20. Astronomer's new guide to the galaxy: largest map of cold dust revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    -wave camera on the ESO-operated APEX telescope. APEX is located at an altitude of 5100 m on the arid plateau of Chajnantor in the Chilean Andes -- a site that allows optimal viewing in the submillimetre range. The Universe is relatively unexplored at submillimetre wavelengths, as extremely dry atmospheric conditions and advanced detector technology are required for such observations. The interstellar medium -- the material between the stars -- is composed of gas and grains of cosmic dust, rather like fine sand or soot. However, the gas is mostly hydrogen and relatively difficult to detect, so astronomers often search for these dense regions by looking for the faint heat glow of the cosmic dust grains. Submillimetre light allows astronomers to see these dust clouds shining, even though they obscure our view of the Universe at visible light wavelengths. Accordingly, the ATLASGAL map includes the denser central regions of our galaxy, in the direction of the constellation of Sagittarius -- home to a supermassive black hole (ESO 46/08) -- that are otherwise hidden behind a dark shroud of dust clouds. The newly released map also reveals thousands of dense dust clumps, many never seen before, which mark the future birthplaces of massive stars. The clumps are typically a couple of light-years in size, and have masses of between ten and a few thousand times the mass of our Sun. In addition, ATLASGAL has captured images of beautiful filamentary structures and bubbles in the interstellar medium, blown by supernovae and the winds of bright stars. Some striking highlights of the map include the centre of the Milky Way, the nearby massive and dense cloud of molecular gas called Sagittarius B2, and a bubble of expanding gas called RCW120, where the interstellar medium around the bubble is collapsing and forming new stars (see ESO 40/08). "It's exciting to get our first look at ATLASGAL, and we will be increasing the size of the map over the next year to cover all of the galactic plane

  1. Genome-wide Mapping of Drug-DNA Interactions in Cells with COSMIC (Crosslinking of Small Molecules to Isolate Chromatin).

    PubMed

    Erwin, Graham S; Grieshop, Matthew P; Bhimsaria, Devesh; Eguchi, Asuka; Rodríguez-Martínez, José A; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2016-01-01

    The genome is the target of some of the most effective chemotherapeutics, but most of these drugs lack DNA sequence specificity, which leads to dose-limiting toxicity and many adverse side effects. Targeting the genome with sequence-specific small molecules may enable molecules with increased therapeutic index and fewer off-target effects. N-methylpyrrole/N-methylimidazole polyamides are molecules that can be rationally designed to target specific DNA sequences with exquisite precision. And unlike most natural transcription factors, polyamides can bind to methylated and chromatinized DNA without a loss in affinity. The sequence specificity of polyamides has been extensively studied in vitro with cognate site identification (CSI) and with traditional biochemical and biophysical approaches, but the study of polyamide binding to genomic targets in cells remains elusive. Here we report a method, the crosslinking of small molecules to isolate chromatin (COSMIC), that identifies polyamide binding sites across the genome. COSMIC is similar to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), but differs in two important ways: (1) a photocrosslinker is employed to enable selective, temporally-controlled capture of polyamide binding events, and (2) the biotin affinity handle is used to purify polyamide-DNA conjugates under semi-denaturing conditions to decrease DNA that is non-covalently bound. COSMIC is a general strategy that can be used to reveal the genome-wide binding events of polyamides and other genome-targeting chemotherapeutic agents.

  2. Detecting Low-Contrast Features in the Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Map of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Golightly, M. J.; Case, A. W.; Smith, S.; Blake, J. B.; Kasper, J.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing (via nuclear evaporation) secondary 'albedo' or 'splash' particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith, and by ice deposits in permanently shadowed polar craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy ((is) approximately 100 MeV) lunar albedo protons.

  3. Estimate of the cosmological bispectrum from the MAXIMA-1 cosmic microwave background map.

    PubMed

    Santos, M G; Balbi, A; Borrill, J; Ferreira, P G; Hanany, S; Jaffe, A H; Lee, A T; Magueijo, J; Rabii, B; Richards, P L; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Winant, C D; Wu, J H P

    2002-06-17

    We use the measurement of the cosmic microwave background taken during the MAXIMA-1 flight to estimate the bispectrum of cosmological perturbations. We propose an estimator for the bispectrum that is appropriate in the flat sky approximation, apply it to the MAXIMA-1 data, and evaluate errors using bootstrap methods. We compare the estimated value with what would be expected if the sky signal were Gaussian and find that it is indeed consistent, with a chi(2) per degree of freedom of approximately unity. This measurement places constraints on models of inflation.

  4. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRA ESTIMATION USING LINEAR COMBINATION OF WMAP 5 YEAR MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Pramoda Kumar; Jain, Pankaj; Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Souradeep, Tarun

    2010-05-01

    We estimate cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and temperature power spectra using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 5 year foreground contaminated maps. The power spectrum is estimated by using a model-independent method, which does not utilize directly the diffuse foreground templates nor the detector noise model. The method essentially consists of two steps: (1) removal of diffuse foregrounds contamination by making linear combination of individual maps in harmonic space and (2) cross-correlation of foreground cleaned maps to minimize detector noise bias. For the temperature power spectrum we also estimate and subtract residual unresolved point source contamination in the cross-power spectrum using the point source model provided by the WMAP science team. Our TT, TE, and EE power spectra are in good agreement with the published results of the WMAP science team. We perform detailed numerical simulations to test for bias in our procedure. We find that the bias is small in almost all cases. A negative bias at low l in TT power spectrum has been pointed out in an earlier publication. We find that the bias-corrected quadrupole power (l(l + 1)C{sub l} /2{pi}) is 532 {mu}K{sup 2}, approximately 2.5 times the estimate (213.4 {mu}K{sup 2}) made by the WMAP team.

  5. Discriminating between unresolved point sources and `negative' Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters in cosmic microwave background maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2003-10-01

    Clusters of galaxies produce negative features at wavelengths λ > 1.25 mm in cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps by means of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, while point radio sources produce positive peaks. This fact implies that a distribution of unresolved SZ clusters could be detected using the negative asymmetry introduced in the odd moments of the brightness map (skewness and higher), or in the probability distribution function for the fluctuations, once the map has been filtered in order to remove the contribution from primordial CMB fluctuations from large scales. This property provides a consistency check on the recent detections from CBI and BIMA experiments of an excess of power at small angular scales, in order to confirm that they are produced by a distribution of unresolved SZ clusters. However, it will require at least 1.5-2 times more observing time than detection of the corresponding power signal. This approach could also be used with the data of the planned SZ experiments (e.g. ACT, AMI, AMIBA, APEX, 8-m South Pole Telescope).

  6. Genetic mapping of adaptation reveals fitness tradeoffs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ågrena, Jon; Oakley, Christopher G; McKay, John K; Lovell, John T; Schemske, Douglas W

    2013-12-24

    Organisms inhabiting different environments are often locally adapted, and yet despite a considerable body of theory, the genetic basis of local adaptation is poorly understood. Unanswered questions include the number and effect sizes of adaptive loci, whether locally favored loci reduce fitness elsewhere (i.e., fitness tradeoffs), and whether a lack of genetic variation limits adaptation. To address these questions, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) for total fitness in 398 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between locally adapted populations of the highly selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana from Sweden and Italy and grown for 3 consecutive years at the parental sites (>40,000 plants monitored). We show that local adaptation is controlled by relatively few genomic regions of small to modest effect. A third of the 15 fitness QTL we detected showed evidence of tradeoffs, which contrasts with the minimal evidence for fitness tradeoffs found in previous studies. This difference may reflect the power of our multiyear study to distinguish conditionally neutral QTL from those that reflect fitness tradeoffs. In Sweden, but not in Italy, the local genotype underlying fitness QTL was often maladaptive, suggesting that adaptation there is constrained by a lack of adaptive genetic variation, attributable perhaps to genetic bottlenecks during postglacial colonization of Scandinavia or to recent changes in selection regime caused by climate change. Our results suggest that adaptation to markedly different environments can be achieved through changes in relatively few genomic regions, that fitness tradeoffs are common, and that lack of genetic variation can limit adaptation.

  7. Galactic Foreground Contribution to the BEAST Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía, Jorge; Bersanelli, Marco; Burigana, Carlo; Childers, Jeff; Figueiredo, Newton; Kangas, Miikka; Lubin, Philip; Maino, Davide; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Josh; Meinhold, Peter; O'Dwyer, Ian; O'Neill, Hugh; Platania, Paola; Seiffert, Michael; Stebor, Nathan; Tello, Camilo; Villela, Thyrso; Wandelt, Benjamin; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    We report limits on the Galactic foreground emission contribution to the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST) Ka- and Q-band CMB anisotropy maps. We estimate the contribution from the cross-correlations between these maps and the foreground emission templates of an Hα map, a destriped version of the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, and a combined 100 μm IRAS DIRBE map. Our analysis samples the BEAST ~10° declination band into 24 one-hour (R.A.) wide sectors with ~7900 pixels each, where we calculate (1) the linear correlation coefficient between the anisotropy maps and the templates; (2) the coupling constants between the specific intensity units of the templates and the antenna temperature at the BEAST frequencies; and (3) the individual foreground contributions to the BEAST anisotropy maps. The peak sector contributions of the contaminants in the Ka-band are of 56.5% free-free with a coupling constant of 8.3+/-0.4 μK R-1, and 67.4% dust with 45.0+/-2.0 μK MJy-1 sr-1. In the Q band the corresponding values are of 64.4% free-free with 4.1+/-0.2 μK R-1 and 67.5% dust with 24.0+/-1.0 μK MJy-1 sr-1. Using a lower limit of 10% in the relative uncertainty of the coupling constants, we can constrain the sector contributions of each contaminant in both maps to <20% in 21 (free-free), 19 (dust), and 22 (synchrotron) sectors. At this level, all these sectors are found outside of the |b|=14.6d region. By performing the same correlation analysis as a function of Galactic scale height, we conclude that the region within b=+/-17.5d should be removed from the BEAST maps for CMB studies in order to keep individual Galactic contributions below ~1% of the map's rms.

  8. Cosmic X-rays Reveal Evidence For New Form Of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found two stars -- one too small, one too cold -- that reveal cracks in our understanding of the structure of matter. These discoveries open a new window on nuclear physics, offering a link between the vast cosmos and its tiniest constituents. Chandra's observations of RX J1856.5-3754 and 3C58 suggest that the matter in these stars is even denser than nuclear matter found on Earth. This raises the possibility these stars are composed of pure quarks or contain crystals of sub-nuclear particles that normally have only a fleeting existence following high-energy collisions. By combining Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope data, astronomers found that RX J1856 radiates like a solid body with a temperature of 1.2 million degrees Fahrenheit (700,000 degrees Celsius) and has a diameter of about seven miles (11.3 kilometers). This size is too small to reconcile with standard models for neutron stars -- until now the most extreme form of matter known. "Taken at face value, the combined observational evidence points to a star composed not of neutrons, but of quarks in a form known as strange quark matter," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author of a paper on RX J1856 to appear in the June 20, 2002, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "Quarks, thought to be the fundamental constituents of nuclear particles, have never been seen outside a nucleus in Earth-bound laboratories." Observations by Chandra of 3C58 also yielded startling results. A team composed of Patrick Slane and Steven Murray, also of CfA, and David Helfand of Columbia University, New York, failed to detect the expected X-radiation from the hot surface of 3C58, a neutron star believed to have been created in an explosion witnessed by Chinese and Japanese astronomers in A.D. 1181. The team concluded that the star has a temperature of less than one million degrees Celsius, which is far below the predicted

  9. Cosmic Flasher Reveals All!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-09-01

    For more information on magnetars and soft gamma-ray repeaters, see the Background Information which includes a "movie" of the flashing magnetar nebula, as seen by the VLA. Astronomers have found evidence for the most powerful magnetic field ever seen in the universe. They found it by observing a long-sought, short-lived "afterglow" of subatomic particles ejected from a magnetar -- a neutron star with a magnetic field billions of times stronger than any on Earth and 100 times stronger than any other previously known in the Universe. The afterglow is believed to be the aftermath of a massive starquake on the neutron star's surface. "And where there's smoke, there's fire, and we've seen the 'smoke' that tells us there's a magnetar out there," says Dale Frail, who used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to make the discovery. "Nature has created a unique laboratory where there are magnetic fields far stronger than anything that can be created here on Earth. As a result, the study of these objects enables us to study the effects of extraordinarily intense magnetic fields on matter," explains Dr. Morris L. Aizenman, Executive Officer in the Division of Astronomy at the National Science Foundation. Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, along with Shri Kulkarni and Josh Bloom, astronomers at Caltech, discovered radio emission coming from a strange object 15,000 light-years away in our own Milky Way Galaxy. The radio emission was seen after the object experienced an outburst of gamma-rays and X-rays in late August. "This emission comes from particles ejected at nearly the speed of light from the surface of the neutron star interacting with the extremely powerful magnetic field," said Kulkarni. This is the first time this phenomenon, predicted by theorists, has been seen so clearly from a suspected magnetar. "Magnetars are expected to behave in certain ways. Astronomers have seen one type of their predicted activity previously, and now we've seen a completely different piece of evidence that says this is, in fact, a magnetar. That's exciting." Kulkarni said. The new discovery, the scientists say, will allow them to decipher further details about magnetars and their outbursts. SGR 1900+14 VLA Images of SGR 1900+14, with its short-lived radio emission turned off, left, and on, right. The radio emission comes from the interaction of subatomic particles with the magnetar's powerful magnetic field. The circles indicate the area from within which the X-ray emission of SGR 1900+14 comes. Magnetars were proposed in 1992 as a theoretical explanation for objects that repeatedly emit bursts of gamma-rays. These objects, called "soft gamma-ray repeaters," or SGRs, were identified in 1986. There still are only four of these known. They are believed to be rotating, superdense neutron stars, like pulsars, but with much stronger magnetic fields. Neutron stars are the remains of massive stars that explode as a supernova at the end of their normal lifetime. They are so dense that a thimbleful of neutron-star material would weigh 100 million tons. An ordinary pulsar emits "lighthouse beams" of radio waves that rotate with the star. When the star is oriented so that these beams sweep across the Earth, radio telescopes detect regularly-timed pulses. A magnetar is a neutron star with an extremely strong magnetic field, strong enough to rip atoms apart. In the units used by physicists, the strength of a magnetar's magnetic field is about a million billion Gauss; a refrigerator magnet has a field of about 100 Gauss. This superstrong magnetic field produces effects that distinguish magnetars from other neutron stars. First, the magnetic field is thought to act as a brake, slowing the star's rotation. The earlier discovery of pulsations several seconds apart in three SGRs indicated rotation rates slowed just as predicted by magnetar theory. Next, the magnetic field is predicted to cause "starquakes" in which the solid crust of the neutron star is cracked, releasing energy. That energy is released in two forms -- a burst of gamma-rays and X-rays and an ejection of subatomic particles at nearly the speed of light. The gamma-ray and X-ray burst lasts no more than a few minutes, while the ejected particles, interacting with the star's magnetic field, can produce detectable amounts of radio emission for several days. On August 27, the SGR called 1900+14 underwent a tremendous burst, the likes of which had not been seen since 1979. "For a number of years now, I've been routinely looking toward the region of sky where we thought this thing might be," said Frail, "hoping the magnetar would show itself." It did not disappoint; on September 3, the VLA found a new source of radio emission where one had not previously existed. The source quickly faded from view one week later. The immediate importance of this finding is that it provides a new and independent confirmation of the magnetar model. These impulsive particle "winds," predicted by theory, carry as much energy as the flashes of hard X-ray emission and are important in slowing down the spinning magnetar. This discovery also allows astronomers to pinpoint the exact location of the SGR to allow further study of the magnetar with other powerful telescopes. "Trying to find this source of gamma-rays was like nighttime sailing with a broken lighthouse; now, we're no longer in the dark, and can study the magnetar for years to come," said Bloom. In time, the free-flowing particle wind can inflate a nebula called a plerion. "This 'windbag nebula' can tell us a lot about the outflow of particles and the burst history of the object," Frail said. "In fact, studying this phenomenon can give us information about the magnetar that we can't learn any other way." The VLA is an instrument of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  10. News and Views: Herschel reveals a new swan in Cygnus-X; Two models of Type 1a supernovae are both right; Milky Way companions throw doubt on dark matter; Lightning can map volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-06-01

    It appears that both models for the formation of Type 1a supernovae are correct, in different cases. The significance of these supernovae in measurements of cosmic distances and the acceleration of the expansion of the universe mean that the distinction is significant. Careful mapping of the arrangement of galaxies around the Milky Way has revealed that they lie in a plane at right angles to the galactic disc. The results pose a challenge to models of dark matter distribution and galactic structure. An electromagnetic resonance established by lightning could be used to map volatile molecules on other planets, thanks to their effects on the electrical conductivity of planetary atmospheres.

  11. Cosmic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, Brent; Courtois, Helene; Freedman, Wendy; Jarrett, Tom; Madore, Barry; Persson, Eric; Seibert, Mark; Shaya, Ed

    2011-05-01

    It is astonishing that only 30% of the motion of our Galaxy is understood, a fact that highlights a fundamental deficiency in our understanding of the composition of the Universe. Spitzer Cosmic Flows is the photometric component of a program to map the peculiar motions and large-scale flows of galaxies out to 200 Mpc in order to constrain the distribution of mass. This task requires measuring the peculiar velocity of galaxies, a response to the distribution of both baryonic and dark matter, densely sampled over the full sky. With an independent distance measurement, an observed galaxy redshift can be separated into cosmic expansion and peculiar velocity components. Spitzer Cosmic Flows will use IRAC 3.6 micron imaging to obtain independent distances using the correlation between galaxy luminosity and rotation rate (the mid-IR Tully-Fisher relation). The rotational velocity data is being acquired through the Cosmic Flows Large Program on the NRAO Green Bank Telescope and a complementary program of southern targets with the Parkes Telescope. Spitzer Cosmic Flows consists of five distinct samples totaling 4642 galaxies. New observations are required for 3531 galaxies and archival data exists for 1111 galaxies. Each of the samples serves a distinct purpose and/or domain while overlapping to assure a connectivity over a wide range of distances. The photometry of galaxies directly drives the peculiar velocity accuracy of this program. Spitzer IRAC 3.6 micron imaging provides the ability of a single instrument to perform the required imaging over the full sky with exquisite quality. The mid-IR traces the dominant stellar population with negligible extinction. Most importantly, the backgrounds are low from space enabling surface photometry to be extended to many exponential scale-lengths, capturing essentially all the light from the target.

  12. Revealing the flux: Using processed Husimi maps to visualize dynamics of bound systems and mesoscopic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Douglas J.; Borunda, Mario F.; Heller, Eric J.

    2015-04-01

    We elaborate upon the "processed Husimi map" representation for visualizing quantum wave functions using coherent states as a measurement of the local phase space to produce a vector field related to the probability flux. Adapted from the Husimi projection, the processed Husimi map is mathematically related to the flux operator under certain limits but offers a robust and flexible alternative since it can operate away from these limits and in systems that exhibit zero flux. The processed Husimi map is further capable of revealing the full classical dynamics underlying a quantum wave function since it reverse engineers the wave function to yield the underlying classical ray structure. We demonstrate the capabilities of processed Husimi maps on bound systems with and without electromagnetic fields, as well as on open systems on and off resonance, to examine the relationship between closed system eigenstates and mesoscopic transport.

  13. Concept Maps in the Classroom: A New Approach to Reveal Students' Conceptual Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellmann, Daniela; Liefländer, Anne K.; Bogner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    When entering the classroom, adolescents already hold various conceptions on science topics. Concept maps may function as useful tools to reveal such conceptions although labor-intensive analysis often prevents application in typical classroom situations. The authors aimed to provide teachers with an appropriate approach to analyze students'…

  14. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-α emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-02-01

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a 'cosmic web', where most baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-α emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently illuminated by bright quasars at redshift z ≈ 2.3. With a linear projected size of approximately 460 physical kiloparsecs, the Lyman-α emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM 287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark-matter halo and therefore traces intergalactic gas. The estimated cold gas mass of the filament from the observed emission-about 10(12.0 ± 0.5)/C(1/2) solar masses, where C is the gas clumping factor-is more than ten times larger than what is typically found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with subkiloparsec sizes may be missing in current numerical models.

  15. A cosmic web filament revealed in Lyman-α emission around a luminous high-redshift quasar.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F; Madau, Piero

    2014-02-01

    Simulations of structure formation in the Universe predict that galaxies are embedded in a 'cosmic web', where most baryons reside as rarefied and highly ionized gas. This material has been studied for decades in absorption against background sources, but the sparseness of these inherently one-dimensional probes preclude direct constraints on the three-dimensional morphology of the underlying web. Here we report observations of a cosmic web filament in Lyman-α emission, discovered during a survey for cosmic gas fluorescently illuminated by bright quasars at redshift z ≈ 2.3. With a linear projected size of approximately 460 physical kiloparsecs, the Lyman-α emission surrounding the radio-quiet quasar UM 287 extends well beyond the virial radius of any plausible associated dark-matter halo and therefore traces intergalactic gas. The estimated cold gas mass of the filament from the observed emission-about 10(12.0 ± 0.5)/C(1/2) solar masses, where C is the gas clumping factor-is more than ten times larger than what is typically found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that a population of intergalactic gas clumps with subkiloparsec sizes may be missing in current numerical models. PMID:24463517

  16. Internal wave activity in the polar atmospheric regions during 2006 - 2009 revealed by COSMIC radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander; Liou, Yuei-An

    The satellite mission Formosat-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) consists of six micro-satellites, and each of them has four GPS-antennas. It was launched in April 2006, orbiting around the Earth at approximately 800 km. The primary scientific goal of the mission is to demonstrate the value of near-real-time radio occultation (RO) observations in improving operational numerical weather predictions (NWP). The goal is readily shown by assimilating the measurements of atmospheric parameters into used NWP-models. These parameters include density, temperature, pressure and relative humidity fields in the atmosphere. An analysis of their geographic and seasonal distributions is necessary to the understanding of the energy and momentum transfer and the reaction of the polar atmosphere in response to global warming. This task is especially important as the Polar Regions are very sensitive to the change in global temperature and it may be a major cause of global sea level rising. In this work, a statistical analysis of the internal gravity wave (IGW) activity in polar atmospheric regions (latitudes more than 60º) using Formosat-3/COSMIC RO temperature data collected from July 2006 to March 2009 has been performed. Geographic and seasonal distributions of the IGW potential energy (wave activity indicator) in the altitude interval from 15 to 35 km have been determined and analyzed. The obtained results show that the wave activity in the polar atmosphere is strong in winter and spring. The potential energy of IGWs in spring is largest in Antarctic atmospheric region, while it is largest in winter in Arctic region. The wave potential energy increases with altitude up to 35 km in the atmosphere of both Earth’s hemispheres. In Antarctic region, internal waves with high potential energy occur in the atmosphere over the Antarctic Peninsula. In Arctic region, a high wave activity is mainly observed over North Atlantic Ocean (Iceland

  17. The Structure of the MAP2K MEK6 Reveals an Autoinhibitory Dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Xiaoshan; Akella, Radha; He, Haixia; Humphreys, John M.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Lee, Seung-Jae; Tainer, John A.; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2009-07-13

    MAP2Ks are dual-specificity protein kinases functioning at the center of three-tiered MAP kinase modules. The structure of the kinase domain of the MAP2K MEK6 with phosphorylation site mimetic aspartic acid mutations (MEK6/{Delta}N/DD) has been solved at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals an autoinhibited elongated ellipsoidal dimer. The enzyme adopts an inactive conformation, based upon structural queues, despite the phosphomimetic mutations. Gel filtration and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirm that the crystallographically observed ellipsoidal dimer is a feature of MEK6/{Delta}N/DD and full-length unphosphorylated wild-type MEK6 in solution. The interface includes the phosphate binding ribbon of each subunit, part of the activation loop, and a rare 'arginine stack' between symmetry-related arginine residues in the N-terminal lobe. The autoinhibited structure likely confers specificity on active MAP2Ks. The dimer may also serve the function in unphosphorylated MEK6 of preventing activation loop phosphorylation by inappropriate kinases.

  18. Mapping the electrophysiological marker of sleep depth reveals skill maturation in children and adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Salome; Ringli, Maya; LeBourgeois, Monique K.; Geiger, Anja; Buchmann, Andreas; Jenni, Oskar G.; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalographically (EEG) recorded slow wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz), reflecting the depth of sleep, is suggested to play a crucial role in synaptic plasticity. Mapping of SWA by means of high-density EEG reveals that cortical regions showing signs of maturational changes (structural and behavioral) during childhood and adolescence exhibit more SWA. Moreover, the maturation of specific skills is predicted by the topographical distribution of SWA. Thus, SWA topography may serve as a promising neuroimaging tool with prognostic potential. Finally, our data suggest that deep sleep SWA in humans is involved in cortical development that optimizes performance. PMID:22498654

  19. OT2_alopezse_3: Mapping the cosmic ray ionisation rate across the Northern end of the Orion A iant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Sepulcre, A.

    2011-09-01

    Cosmic rays (CR) are ubiquitous in the Galaxy and have the important role of ionizing the dens gas of the ISM. New Herschel observations have shown the huge diagnostic power of the OH+ fundamental transition to measure the CR ionization rate in diffuse clouds. Based on previous "serendipity" observations toward OMC2-FIR4 within the KP CHESS, we discovered a tenuous foreground cloud absorbing the fundamental OH+ line. Similarly, Gupta et al. (2010) found an OH+ absorption component at a similar velocity towards Orion KL and estimated a large CR ionization rate more than 10 times larger than the average value observed in diffuse clouds . We propose here to roughly map the CR ionization rate in the direction of the OMC2 and OMC3 complex to understand its extent, nature, and, finally, the source of ionization.

  20. OBJECTS APPEAR SMALLER AS THEY RECEDE: HOW PROPER MOTIONS CAN DIRECTLY REVEAL THE COSMIC EXPANSION, PROVIDE GEOMETRIC DISTANCES, AND MEASURE THE HUBBLE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2013-11-10

    Objects and structures gravitationally decoupled from the Hubble expansion will appear to shrink in angular size as the universe expands. Observations of extragalactic proper motions can thus directly reveal the cosmic expansion. Relatively static structures such as galaxies or galaxy clusters can potentially be used to measure the Hubble constant, and test masses in large scale structures can measure the overdensity. Since recession velocities and angular separations can be precisely measured, apparent proper motions can also provide geometric distance measurements to static structures. The apparent fractional angular compression of static objects is 15 μas yr{sup –1} in the local universe; this motion is modulated by the overdensity in dynamic expansion-decoupled structures. We use the Titov et al. quasar proper motion catalog to examine the pairwise proper motion of a sparse network of test masses. Small-separation pairs (<200 Mpc comoving) are too few to measure the expected effect, yielding an inconclusive 8.3 ± 14.9 μas yr{sup –1}. Large-separation pairs (200-1500 Mpc) show no net convergence or divergence for z < 1, –2.7 ± 3.7 μas yr{sup –1}, consistent with pure Hubble expansion and significantly inconsistent with static structures, as expected. For all pairs a 'null test' gives –0.36 ± 0.62 μas yr{sup –1}, consistent with Hubble expansion and excludes a static locus at ∼5-10σ significance for z ≅ 0.5-2.0. The observed large-separation pairs provide a reference frame for small-separation pairs that will significantly deviate from the Hubble flow. The current limitation is the number of small-separation objects with precise astrometry, but Gaia will address this and will likely detect the cosmic recession.

  1. Evolutionary origins and dynamics of octoploid strawberry subgenomes revealed by dense targeted capture linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Tennessen, Jacob A; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Liston, Aaron

    2014-12-04

    Whole-genome duplications are radical evolutionary events that have driven speciation and adaptation in many taxa. Higher-order polyploids have complex histories often including interspecific hybridization and dynamic genomic changes. This chromosomal reshuffling is poorly understood for most polyploid species, despite their evolutionary and agricultural importance, due to the challenge of distinguishing homologous sequences from each other. Here, we use dense linkage maps generated with targeted sequence capture to improve the diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca) reference genome and to disentangle the subgenomes of the wild octoploid progenitors of cultivated strawberry, Fragaria virginiana and Fragaria chiloensis. Our novel approach, POLiMAPS (Phylogenetics Of Linkage-Map-Anchored Polyploid Subgenomes), leverages sequence reads to associate informative interhomeolog phylogenetic markers with linkage groups and reference genome positions. In contrast to a widely accepted model, we find that one of the four subgenomes originates with the diploid cytoplasm donor F. vesca, one with the diploid Fragaria iinumae, and two with an unknown ancestor close to F. iinumae. Extensive unidirectional introgression has converted F. iinumae-like subgenomes to be more F. vesca-like, but never the reverse, due either to homoploid hybridization in the F. iinumae-like diploid ancestors or else strong selection spreading F. vesca-like sequence among subgenomes through homeologous exchange. In addition, divergence between homeologous chromosomes has been substantially augmented by interchromosomal rearrangements. Our phylogenetic approach reveals novel aspects of the complicated web of genetic exchanges that occur during polyploid evolution and suggests a path forward for unraveling other agriculturally and ecologically important polyploid genomes.

  2. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  3. THREE-DIMENSIONAL DUST MAPPING REVEALS THAT ORION FORMS PART OF A LARGE RING OF DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafly, E. F.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Green, G.; Finkbeiner, D. P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Kaiser, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Price, P. A.

    2015-02-01

    The Orion Molecular Complex is the nearest site of ongoing high-mass star formation, making it one of the most extensively studied molecular complexes in the Galaxy. We have developed a new technique for mapping the three-dimensional distribution of dust in the Galaxy using Pan-STARRS1 photometry. We isolate the dust at the distance to Orion using this technique, revealing a large (100 pc, 14° diameter), previously unrecognized ring of dust, which we term the ''Orion dust ring''. The ring includes Orion A and B, and is not coincident with current Hα features. The circular morphology suggests formation as an ancient bubble in the interstellar medium, though we have not been able to conclusively identify the source of the bubble. This hint at the history of Orion may have important consequences for models of high-mass star formation and triggered star formation.

  4. Comprehensive polyadenylation site maps in yeast and human reveal pervasive alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Ozsolak, Fatih; Kapranov, Philipp; Foissac, Sylvain; Kim, Sang Woo; Fishilevich, Elane; Monaghan, A Paula; John, Bino; Milos, Patrice M

    2010-12-10

    The emerging discoveries on the link between polyadenylation and disease states underline the need to fully characterize genome-wide polyadenylation states. Here, we report comprehensive maps of global polyadenylation events in human and yeast generated using refinements to the Direct RNA Sequencing technology. This direct approach provides a quantitative view of genome-wide polyadenylation states in a strand-specific manner and requires only attomole RNA quantities. The polyadenylation profiles revealed an abundance of unannotated polyadenylation sites, alternative polyadenylation patterns, and regulatory element-associated poly(A)(+) RNAs. We observed differences in sequence composition surrounding canonical and noncanonical human polyadenylation sites, suggesting novel noncoding RNA-specific polyadenylation mechanisms in humans. Furthermore, we observed the correlation level between sense and antisense transcripts to depend on gene expression levels, supporting the view that overlapping transcription from opposite strands may play a regulatory role. Our data provide a comprehensive view of the polyadenylation state and overlapping transcription. PMID:21145465

  5. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  6. Linkage Mapping Reveals Strong Chiasma Interference in Sockeye Salmon: Implications for Interpreting Genomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Limborg, Morten T.; Waples, Ryan K.; Allendorf, Fred W.; Seeb, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is fundamental for generating new genetic variation and for securing proper disjunction. Further, recombination plays an essential role during the rediploidization process of polyploid-origin genomes because crossovers between pairs of homeologous chromosomes retain duplicated regions. A better understanding of how recombination affects genome evolution is crucial for interpreting genomic data; unfortunately, current knowledge mainly originates from a few model species. Salmonid fishes provide a valuable system for studying the effects of recombination in nonmodel species. Salmonid females generally produce thousands of embryos, providing large families for conducting inheritance studies. Further, salmonid genomes are currently rediploidizing after a whole genome duplication and can serve as models for studying the role of homeologous crossovers on genome evolution. Here, we present a detailed interrogation of recombination patterns in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). First, we use RAD sequencing of haploid and diploid gynogenetic families to construct a dense linkage map that includes paralogous loci and location of centromeres. We find a nonrandom distribution of paralogs that mainly cluster in extended regions distally located on 11 different chromosomes, consistent with ongoing homeologous recombination in these regions. We also estimate the strength of interference across each chromosome; results reveal strong interference and crossovers are mostly limited to one per arm. Interference was further shown to continue across centromeres, but metacentric chromosomes generally had at least one crossover on each arm. We discuss the relevance of these findings for both mapping and population genomic studies. PMID:26384769

  7. Linkage Mapping Reveals Strong Chiasma Interference in Sockeye Salmon: Implications for Interpreting Genomic Data.

    PubMed

    Limborg, Morten T; Waples, Ryan K; Allendorf, Fred W; Seeb, James E

    2015-11-01

    Meiotic recombination is fundamental for generating new genetic variation and for securing proper disjunction. Further, recombination plays an essential role during the rediploidization process of polyploid-origin genomes because crossovers between pairs of homeologous chromosomes retain duplicated regions. A better understanding of how recombination affects genome evolution is crucial for interpreting genomic data; unfortunately, current knowledge mainly originates from a few model species. Salmonid fishes provide a valuable system for studying the effects of recombination in nonmodel species. Salmonid females generally produce thousands of embryos, providing large families for conducting inheritance studies. Further, salmonid genomes are currently rediploidizing after a whole genome duplication and can serve as models for studying the role of homeologous crossovers on genome evolution. Here, we present a detailed interrogation of recombination patterns in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka). First, we use RAD sequencing of haploid and diploid gynogenetic families to construct a dense linkage map that includes paralogous loci and location of centromeres. We find a nonrandom distribution of paralogs that mainly cluster in extended regions distally located on 11 different chromosomes, consistent with ongoing homeologous recombination in these regions. We also estimate the strength of interference across each chromosome; results reveal strong interference and crossovers are mostly limited to one per arm. Interference was further shown to continue across centromeres, but metacentric chromosomes generally had at least one crossover on each arm. We discuss the relevance of these findings for both mapping and population genomic studies. PMID:26384769

  8. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    PubMed

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange. PMID:26083847

  9. GWA Mapping of Anthocyanin Accumulation Reveals Balancing Selection of MYB90 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bac-Molenaar, Johanna A.; Fradin, Emilie F.; Rienstra, Juriaan A.; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Keurentjes, Joost J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of anthocyanin accumulation by osmotic stress was assessed in 360 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. A wide range of natural variation, with phenotypes ranging from green to completely red/purple rosettes, was observed. A genome wide association (GWA) mapping approach revealed that sequence diversity in a small 15 kb region on chromosome 1 explained 40% of the variation observed. Sequence and expression analyses of alleles of the candidate gene MYB90 identified a causal polymorphism at amino acid (AA) position 210 of this transcription factor of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. This amino acid discriminates the two most frequent alleles of MYB90. Both alleles are present in a substantial part of the population, suggesting balancing selection between these two alleles. Analysis of the geographical origin of the studied accessions suggests that the macro climate is not the driving force behind positive or negative selection for anthocyanin accumulation. An important role for local climatic conditions is, therefore, suggested. This study emphasizes that GWA mapping is a powerful approach to identify alleles that are under balancing selection pressure in nature. PMID:26588092

  10. High-Resolution AUV Mapping Reveals Structural Details of Submarine Inflated Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; Thompson, D.; Conlin, D.

    2009-12-01

    The MBARI mapping AUV D. Allan B. has now been used to map volcanic terrain at mid-ocean ridges, back-arc spreading centers, and seamounts. These include the summit caldera and upper south rift zone at Axial Volcano, the summit of Davidson Seamount, the Endeavour hydrothermal fields, the Northeast Lau Spreading Center and West Mata Volcano, and, most recently, the CoAxial, North Cleft and North Gorda historic eruption sites on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges. ROV and submersible dives at most of these sites have provided groundtruth for the textures and features revealed in the roughly 1-m resolution maps. A prominent feature in the maps from four of the sites are inflated flows that did not deflate or drain. These resemble subaerial tumuli but differ in being located on level terrain, apparently atop or very near eruptive vents instead of being in the distal portions of flows. The largest inflated flow at Axial Volcano is on the caldera floor. The main part is 500 by 300 m, and up to 30 m high, with a lobe that extends another 750 m in a sinuous path. It and two nearby, medium-sized inflated flows were first described from sidescan imagery and a submersible dive by Appelgate and Embley (Bull. Volcanol., 54, 447-458, 1992). The AUV maps show clearly the smooth, gently domed relief of the large inflated flow and its sinuous shape on the seafloor, the medium-sized nearby inflated flows, and several additional smaller ones. Particularly striking is a network of 4 to 10 m deep cracks along the crest of each inflation. The cracks occur 30 to 50 m from the margins on all sides of the wider parts of the inflated flows, and become medial cracks along the entire length of the narrow parts, which are nearly triangular in cross-section. An inflation pit 35 m in diameter has a depth equal to the surrounding lava fields. ROV Doc Ricketts dove on these flows in August 2009 and photographed the deeply cracked, uplifted, once flat-lying lineated and ropy sheet flows that form

  11. Mapping replication dynamics in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a link with telomere transcription and antigenic variation

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Rebecca; Marques, Catarina A; Paape, Daniel; Prorocic, Marko; Zurita-Leal, Andrea C; Campbell, Samantha J; Lapsley, Craig; Dickens, Nicholas; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Trypanosoma brucei depends upon switches in its protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat by antigenic variation. VSG switching occurs by frequent homologous recombination, which is thought to require locus-specific initiation. Here, we show that a RecQ helicase, RECQ2, acts to repair DNA breaks, including in the telomeric site of VSG expression. Despite this, RECQ2 loss does not impair antigenic variation, but causes increased VSG switching by recombination, arguing against models for VSG switch initiation through direct generation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). Indeed, we show DSBs inefficiently direct recombination in the VSG expression site. By mapping genome replication dynamics, we reveal that the transcribed VSG expression site is the only telomeric site that is early replicating – a differential timing only seen in mammal-infective parasites. Specific association between VSG transcription and replication timing reveals a model for antigenic variation based on replication-derived DNA fragility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12765.001 PMID:27228154

  12. Design of a wireless sensor network with nanosecond time resolution for mapping of high-energy cosmic ray shower events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Michael P.; Junnarkar, Sachin S.; Fagan, Triesha; O'Neal, Ray H.; Takai, Helio

    2010-04-01

    We describe a low-cost, low-power wireless sensor network we are developing for high time-resolution (ns-scale) characterization of particle showers produced by ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays, to infer shower direction at sites where hard-wired data connections may be inconvenient to install. The front-end particle detector is a scintillator block monitored by a photomultiplier tube (PMT). We keep the sensor nodes synchronized to within 1 ns using periodic highintensity optical pulses from a light-emitting-diode (LED) overdriven at very high current (~30 A) in short (4 ns) bursts. With minimal optics, this signal is resolvable under free-space transmission in ambient light conditions at multi-meter distances using a high-speed avalanche photodiode (APD) receiver at each node. PMT pulse waveforms are digitized relative to this precise time reference on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) using a Time-over-Threshold (ToT)/Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) digitizer developed at BNL. A central server receives timestamped, digitized PMT pulse waveforms from the sensor nodes via Wi-Fi and performs real-time data visualization & analysis. Total cost per sensor node is a few thousand dollars, with total power consumption per sensor node under 1 Watt, suitable for, e.g., solar-powered installations at remote field locations.

  13. Evolution of Chromosome 6 of Solanum Species Revealed by Comparative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization Mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative genome mapping is an important tool in evolutionary research. Here we demonstrate a comparative fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping strategy. A set of 13 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones derived from potato chromosome 6 was used for FISH mapping in seven differen...

  14. Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the United States increased by about one-quarter in the past year. Examinations of mapping trends were in the following categories: (1) Mapping at scales of 1:100, 000; (2) Metric-scale base maps; (3) International mapping, and (4) Planetary mapping. (MA)

  15. Mapping of fiber quality QTLs reveals useful variation and footprints of cotton domestication using introgression lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Wen; Zhu, Xie-Fei; Feng, Liu-Chun; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Fiber quality improvement is a driving force for further cotton domestication and breeding. Here, QTLs for fiber quality were mapped in 115 introgression lines (ILs) first developed from two intraspecific populations of cultivated and feral cotton landraces. A total of 60 QTLs were found, which explained 2.03-16.85% of the phenotypic variance found in fiber quality traits. A total of 36 markers were associated with five fiber traits, 33 of which were found to be associated with QTLs in multiple environments. In addition, nine pairs of common QTLs were identified; namely, one pair of QTLs for fiber elongation, three pairs for fiber length, three pairs for fiber strength and two pairs for micronaire (qMICs). All common QTLs had additive effects in the same direction in both IL populations. We also found five QTL clusters, allowing cotton breeders to focus their efforts on regions of QTLs with the highest percentages of phenotypic variance. Our results also reveal footprints of domestication; for example, fourteen QTLs with positive effects were found to have remained in modern cultivars during domestication, and two negative qMICs that had never been reported before were found, suggesting that the qMICs regions may be eliminated during artificial selection. PMID:27549323

  16. Functional brain mapping of the macaque related to spatial working memory as revealed by PET.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masato; Mikami, Akichika; Ando, Ichiro; Tsukada, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    To define the cortical areas that subserve spatial working memory in a nonhuman primate, we measured regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with [(15)O]H(2)O and positron emission tomography while monkeys performed a visually guided saccade (VGS) task and an oculomotor delayed-response (ODR) task. Both Statistical Parametric Mapping and regions of interest-based analyses revealed an increase of rCBF in the area surrounding the principal sulcus (PS), the superior convexity, the anterior bank of the arcuate sulcus (AS), the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC), the frontal pole (FP), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the lateral bank of the intraparietal sulcus (lIPS) and the prestriate cortex. In the prefrontal cortex (PS, superior convexity, AS, lOFC and FP), rCBF values correlated positively with ODR task performance scores. From the hippocampus, rCBF values correlated negatively with ODR task performance. From the AS, superior convexity, lOFC, FP, ACC and lIPS, rCBF values of the PS correlated positively with rCBF values and negatively with hippocampus rCBF values. These results suggest that neural circuitry in the prefrontal cortex directly contributes the spatial working memory processes and that, in spatial working memory processes, the posterior parietal cortex and hippocampus have a different role to the prefrontal cortex. PMID:14654462

  17. Mapping of fiber quality QTLs reveals useful variation and footprints of cotton domestication using introgression lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-Wen; Zhu, Xie-Fei; Feng, Liu-Chun; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Biao; Zhang, Tian-Zhen; Zhou, Bao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Fiber quality improvement is a driving force for further cotton domestication and breeding. Here, QTLs for fiber quality were mapped in 115 introgression lines (ILs) first developed from two intraspecific populations of cultivated and feral cotton landraces. A total of 60 QTLs were found, which explained 2.03–16.85% of the phenotypic variance found in fiber quality traits. A total of 36 markers were associated with five fiber traits, 33 of which were found to be associated with QTLs in multiple environments. In addition, nine pairs of common QTLs were identified; namely, one pair of QTLs for fiber elongation, three pairs for fiber length, three pairs for fiber strength and two pairs for micronaire (qMICs). All common QTLs had additive effects in the same direction in both IL populations. We also found five QTL clusters, allowing cotton breeders to focus their efforts on regions of QTLs with the highest percentages of phenotypic variance. Our results also reveal footprints of domestication; for example, fourteen QTLs with positive effects were found to have remained in modern cultivars during domestication, and two negative qMICs that had never been reported before were found, suggesting that the qMICs regions may be eliminated during artificial selection. PMID:27549323

  18. Neural correlates of apathy revealed by lesion mapping in participants with traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Kristine M; Monte, Olga Dal; Raymont, Vanessa; Wassermann, Eric M; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    Apathy, common in neurological disorders, is defined as disinterest and loss of motivation, with a reduction in self-initiated activity. Research in diseased populations has shown that apathy is associated with variations in the volume of brain regions such as the anterior cingulate and the frontal lobes. The goal of this study was to determine the neural signatures of apathy in people with penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBIs), as to our knowledge, these have not been studied in this sample. We studied 176 male Vietnam War veterans with pTBIs using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and apathy scores from the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), a structured inventory of symptoms completed by a caregiver. Our results revealed that increased apathy symptoms were associated with brain damage in limbic and cortical areas of the left hemisphere including the anterior cingulate, inferior, middle, and superior frontal regions, insula, and supplementary motor area. Our results are consistent with the literature, and extend them to people with focal pTBI. Apathy is a significant symptom since it can reduce participation of the patient in family and other social interactions, and diminish affective decision-making. PMID:23404730

  19. A Picture on the Wall: Innovative Mapping Reveals Cold-Water Coral Refuge in Submarine Canyon

    PubMed Central

    Huvenne, Veerle A. I.; Tyler, Paul A.; Masson, Doug G.; Fisher, Elizabeth H.; Hauton, Chris; Hühnerbach, Veit; Le Bas, Timothy P.; Wolff, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Cold-water corals are azooxanthellate species found throughout the ocean at water depths down to 5000 m. They occur in patches, reefs or large mound structures up to 380 m high, and as ecosystem engineers create important habitats for a diverse fauna. However, the majority of these habitats are now within reach of deep-sea bottom trawling. Many have been severely damaged or are under threat, despite recent protection initiatives. Here we present a cold-water coral habitat type that so far has been overlooked – quite literally – and that has received minimal impact from human activities. Vertical and overhanging cliffs in deep-sea canyons, revealed using an innovative approach to marine habitat mapping, are shown to provide the perfect substratum for extensive cold-water coral-based communities. Typical canyon-related processes, including locally enhanced internal tides and focussed downslope organic carbon transport, provide favourable environmental conditions (current regime, food input) to sustain the communities, even outside the optimal depth and density envelopes reported elsewhere in the NE Atlantic. Our findings show that deep-sea canyons can form natural refuges for faunal communities sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance, and have the potential to fulfil the crucial role of larval sources for the recolonisation of damaged sites elsewhere on the margin. PMID:22194903

  20. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P; Ploner, Markus; Friston, Karl J; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-12

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using "eyes open" versus "eyes closed" conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders.

  1. A genome-wide map of hyper-edited RNA reveals numerous new sites.

    PubMed

    Porath, Hagit T; Carmi, Shai; Levanon, Erez Y

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine editing is one of the most frequent post-transcriptional modifications, manifested as A-to-G mismatches when comparing RNA sequences with their source DNA. Recently, a number of RNA-seq data sets have been screened for the presence of A-to-G editing, and hundreds of thousands of editing sites identified. Here we show that existing screens missed the majority of sites by ignoring reads with excessive ('hyper') editing that do not easily align to the genome. We show that careful alignment and examination of the unmapped reads in RNA-seq studies reveal numerous new sites, usually many more than originally discovered, and in precisely those regions that are most heavily edited. Specifically, we discover 327,096 new editing sites in the heavily studied Illumina Human BodyMap data and more than double the number of detected sites in several published screens. We also identify thousands of new sites in mouse, rat, opossum and fly. Our results establish that hyper-editing events account for the majority of editing sites. PMID:25158696

  2. Neural correlates of apathy revealed by lesion mapping in participants with traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Kristine M; Monte, Olga Dal; Raymont, Vanessa; Wassermann, Eric M; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    Apathy, common in neurological disorders, is defined as disinterest and loss of motivation, with a reduction in self-initiated activity. Research in diseased populations has shown that apathy is associated with variations in the volume of brain regions such as the anterior cingulate and the frontal lobes. The goal of this study was to determine the neural signatures of apathy in people with penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBIs), as to our knowledge, these have not been studied in this sample. We studied 176 male Vietnam War veterans with pTBIs using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and apathy scores from the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), a structured inventory of symptoms completed by a caregiver. Our results revealed that increased apathy symptoms were associated with brain damage in limbic and cortical areas of the left hemisphere including the anterior cingulate, inferior, middle, and superior frontal regions, insula, and supplementary motor area. Our results are consistent with the literature, and extend them to people with focal pTBI. Apathy is a significant symptom since it can reduce participation of the patient in family and other social interactions, and diminish affective decision-making.

  3. A picture on the wall: innovative mapping reveals cold-water coral refuge in submarine canyon.

    PubMed

    Huvenne, Veerle A I; Tyler, Paul A; Masson, Doug G; Fisher, Elizabeth H; Hauton, Chris; Hühnerbach, Veit; Le Bas, Timothy P; Wolff, George A

    2011-01-01

    Cold-water corals are azooxanthellate species found throughout the ocean at water depths down to 5000 m. They occur in patches, reefs or large mound structures up to 380 m high, and as ecosystem engineers create important habitats for a diverse fauna. However, the majority of these habitats are now within reach of deep-sea bottom trawling. Many have been severely damaged or are under threat, despite recent protection initiatives. Here we present a cold-water coral habitat type that so far has been overlooked--quite literally--and that has received minimal impact from human activities. Vertical and overhanging cliffs in deep-sea canyons, revealed using an innovative approach to marine habitat mapping, are shown to provide the perfect substratum for extensive cold-water coral-based communities. Typical canyon-related processes, including locally enhanced internal tides and focussed downslope organic carbon transport, provide favourable environmental conditions (current regime, food input) to sustain the communities, even outside the optimal depth and density envelopes reported elsewhere in the NE Atlantic. Our findings show that deep-sea canyons can form natural refuges for faunal communities sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance, and have the potential to fulfil the crucial role of larval sources for the recolonisation of damaged sites elsewhere on the margin.

  4. Metabolic connectivity mapping reveals effective connectivity in the resting human brain

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Valentin; Utz, Lukas; Castrillón, Gabriel; Grimmer, Timo; Rauschecker, Josef P.; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Directionality of signaling among brain regions provides essential information about human cognition and disease states. Assessing such effective connectivity (EC) across brain states using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) alone has proven difficult, however. We propose a novel measure of EC, termed metabolic connectivity mapping (MCM), that integrates undirected functional connectivity (FC) with local energy metabolism from fMRI and positron emission tomography (PET) data acquired simultaneously. This method is based on the concept that most energy required for neuronal communication is consumed postsynaptically, i.e., at the target neurons. We investigated MCM and possible changes in EC within the physiological range using “eyes open” versus “eyes closed” conditions in healthy subjects. Independent of condition, MCM reliably detected stable and bidirectional communication between early and higher visual regions. Moreover, we found stable top-down signaling from a frontoparietal network including frontal eye fields. In contrast, we found additional top-down signaling from all major clusters of the salience network to early visual cortex only in the eyes open condition. MCM revealed consistent bidirectional and unidirectional signaling across the entire cortex, along with prominent changes in network interactions across two simple brain states. We propose MCM as a novel approach for inferring EC from neuronal energy metabolism that is ideally suited to study signaling hierarchies in the brain and their defects in brain disorders. PMID:26712010

  5. A picture on the wall: innovative mapping reveals cold-water coral refuge in submarine canyon.

    PubMed

    Huvenne, Veerle A I; Tyler, Paul A; Masson, Doug G; Fisher, Elizabeth H; Hauton, Chris; Hühnerbach, Veit; Le Bas, Timothy P; Wolff, George A

    2011-01-01

    Cold-water corals are azooxanthellate species found throughout the ocean at water depths down to 5000 m. They occur in patches, reefs or large mound structures up to 380 m high, and as ecosystem engineers create important habitats for a diverse fauna. However, the majority of these habitats are now within reach of deep-sea bottom trawling. Many have been severely damaged or are under threat, despite recent protection initiatives. Here we present a cold-water coral habitat type that so far has been overlooked--quite literally--and that has received minimal impact from human activities. Vertical and overhanging cliffs in deep-sea canyons, revealed using an innovative approach to marine habitat mapping, are shown to provide the perfect substratum for extensive cold-water coral-based communities. Typical canyon-related processes, including locally enhanced internal tides and focussed downslope organic carbon transport, provide favourable environmental conditions (current regime, food input) to sustain the communities, even outside the optimal depth and density envelopes reported elsewhere in the NE Atlantic. Our findings show that deep-sea canyons can form natural refuges for faunal communities sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance, and have the potential to fulfil the crucial role of larval sources for the recolonisation of damaged sites elsewhere on the margin. PMID:22194903

  6. HST SPECTRAL MAPPING OF L/T TRANSITION BROWN DWARFS REVEALS CLOUD THICKNESS VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Apai, Daniel; Radigan, Jacqueline; Jayawardhana, Ray; Buenzli, Esther; Burrows, Adam; Reid, Iain Neill

    2013-05-10

    Most directly imaged giant exoplanets are fainter than brown dwarfs with similar spectra. To explain their relative underluminosity, unusually cloudy atmospheres have been proposed. However, with multiple parameters varying between any two objects, it remained difficult to observationally test this idea. We present a new method, sensitive time-resolved Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared spectroscopy, to study two rotating L/T transition brown dwarfs (2M2139 and SIMP0136). The observations provide spatially and spectrally resolved mapping of the cloud decks of the brown dwarfs. The data allow the study of cloud structure variations while other parameters are unchanged. We find that both brown dwarfs display variations of identical nature: J- and H-band brightness variations with minimal color and spectral changes. Our light curve models show that even the simplest surface brightness distributions require at least three elliptical spots. We show that for each source the spectral changes can be reproduced with a linear combination of only two different spectra, i.e., the entire surface is covered by two distinct types of regions. Modeling the color changes and spectral variations together reveal patchy cloud covers consisting of a spatially heterogeneous mix of low-brightness, low-temperature thick clouds and brighter, thin, and warm clouds. We show that the same thick cloud patches seen in our varying brown dwarf targets, if extended to the entire photosphere, predict near-infrared colors/magnitudes matching the range occupied by the directly imaged exoplanets that are cooler and less luminous than brown dwarfs with similar spectral types. This supports the models in which thick clouds are responsible for the near-infrared properties of these ''underluminous'' exoplanets.

  7. Atmospheric Drivers of Greenland Surface Melt Revealed by Self Organizing Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mioduszewski, J.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A. C.; Tedesco, M.; Noble, E. U.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent acceleration in summer surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has occurred concurrently with a rapidly warming Arctic and has been connected to persistent, anomalous circulation patterns over Greenland. To identify patterns that favor enhanced GrIS surface melt and their decadal changes, we first develop a summer Arctic synoptic climatology by employing a nonlinear classification technique known as the self organizing map (SOM). This is applied to daily JJA sea level pressure (SLP) and 500 hPa geopotential height fields obtained from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis product from 1979 to 2014. Model output from Modèle Atmosphérique Régional (MAR) is used to relate meteorological conditions and subsequent Greenland surface melt anomalies to particular circulation regimes. Results demonstrate that circulation patterns featuring positive SLP anomalies from Greenland to the Beaufort Sea support the largest positive surface melt anomalies, particularly over western Greenland. These patterns facilitate strong meridional transport of heat and moisture, contrasted by a dominant zonal flow across the North Atlantic during periods of low surface melt. Additionally, composites of energy balance components reveal that melt events are favored under clear conditions generating positive shortwave radiation anomalies rather than increased downwelling longwave radiation occurring with increased cloud cover. Sea surface temperature anomalies suggest that there may be a linkage between surface melt and recent sea ice loss around Greenland, though a causal relationship is not established. We assess decadal shifts in the SOM nodes, finding an increased frequency of upper level patterns favoring higher 500 hPa geopotential heights primarily over Greenland. The observed increases in GrIS melt through the time period coincides with this shift in SOM node frequency.

  8. HST Spectral Mapping of L/T Transition Brown Dwarfs Reveals Cloud Thickness Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Radigan, Jacqueline; Buenzli, Esther; Burrows, Adam; Reid, Iain Neill; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2013-05-01

    Most directly imaged giant exoplanets are fainter than brown dwarfs with similar spectra. To explain their relative underluminosity, unusually cloudy atmospheres have been proposed. However, with multiple parameters varying between any two objects, it remained difficult to observationally test this idea. We present a new method, sensitive time-resolved Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared spectroscopy, to study two rotating L/T transition brown dwarfs (2M2139 and SIMP0136). The observations provide spatially and spectrally resolved mapping of the cloud decks of the brown dwarfs. The data allow the study of cloud structure variations while other parameters are unchanged. We find that both brown dwarfs display variations of identical nature: J- and H-band brightness variations with minimal color and spectral changes. Our light curve models show that even the simplest surface brightness distributions require at least three elliptical spots. We show that for each source the spectral changes can be reproduced with a linear combination of only two different spectra, i.e., the entire surface is covered by two distinct types of regions. Modeling the color changes and spectral variations together reveal patchy cloud covers consisting of a spatially heterogeneous mix of low-brightness, low-temperature thick clouds and brighter, thin, and warm clouds. We show that the same thick cloud patches seen in our varying brown dwarf targets, if extended to the entire photosphere, predict near-infrared colors/magnitudes matching the range occupied by the directly imaged exoplanets that are cooler and less luminous than brown dwarfs with similar spectral types. This supports the models in which thick clouds are responsible for the near-infrared properties of these "underluminous" exoplanets.

  9. The Nature of Genetic Variation for Complex Traits Revealed by GWAS and Regional Heritability Mapping Analyses.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Armando; Tenesa, Albert; Keightley, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    We use computer simulations to investigate the amount of genetic variation for complex traits that can be revealed by single-SNP genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or regional heritability mapping (RHM) analyses based on full genome sequence data or SNP chips. We model a large population subject to mutation, recombination, selection, and drift, assuming a pleiotropic model of mutations sampled from a bivariate distribution of effects of mutations on a quantitative trait and fitness. The pleiotropic model investigated, in contrast to previous models, implies that common mutations of large effect are responsible for most of the genetic variation for quantitative traits, except when the trait is fitness itself. We show that GWAS applied to the full sequence increases the number of QTL detected by as much as 50% compared to the number found with SNP chips but only modestly increases the amount of additive genetic variance explained. Even with full sequence data, the total amount of additive variance explained is generally below 50%. Using RHM on the full sequence data, a slightly larger number of QTL are detected than by GWAS if the same probability threshold is assumed, but these QTL explain a slightly smaller amount of genetic variance. Our results also suggest that most of the missing heritability is due to the inability to detect variants of moderate effect (∼0.03-0.3 phenotypic SDs) segregating at substantial frequencies. Very rare variants, which are more difficult to detect by GWAS, are expected to contribute little genetic variation, so their eventual detection is less relevant for resolving the missing heritability problem.

  10. Cosmic superstrings.

    PubMed

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe.

  11. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Rexroad, Caird E; Couch, Charlene R; Cordes, Jan F; Reece, Kimberly S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-04-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetics technologies in striped bass breeding programs, we previously developed nearly 500 microsatellite markers. The objectives of this study were to construct a microsatellite linkage map of striped bass and to examine conserved synteny between striped bass and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Of 480 microsatellite markers screened for polymorphism, 289 informative markers were identified and used to genotype two half-sib mapping families. Twenty-six linkage groups were assembled, and only two markers remain unlinked. The sex-averaged map spans 1,623.8 cM with an average marker density of 5.78 cM per marker. Among 287 striped bass microsatellite markers assigned to linkage groups, 169 (58.9%) showed homology to sequences on stickleback chromosomes or scaffolds. Comparison between the stickleback genome and the striped bass linkage map revealed conserved synteny between these two species. This is the first linkage map for any of the Morone species. This map will be useful for molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes of interest in striped bass breeding programs. The conserved synteny between striped bass and stickleback will facilitate fine mapping of genome regions of interest and will serve as a new resource for comparative mapping with other Perciform fishes such as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), and tilapia (Oreochromis ssp.). PMID:21968826

  12. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) reveals conserved synteny with the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Liu, Sixin; Rexroad, Caird E; Couch, Charlene R; Cordes, Jan F; Reece, Kimberly S; Sullivan, Craig V

    2012-04-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and its relatives (genus Morone) are of great importance to fisheries and aquaculture in North America. As part of a collaborative effort to employ molecular genetics technologies in striped bass breeding programs, we previously developed nearly 500 microsatellite markers. The objectives of this study were to construct a microsatellite linkage map of striped bass and to examine conserved synteny between striped bass and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Of 480 microsatellite markers screened for polymorphism, 289 informative markers were identified and used to genotype two half-sib mapping families. Twenty-six linkage groups were assembled, and only two markers remain unlinked. The sex-averaged map spans 1,623.8 cM with an average marker density of 5.78 cM per marker. Among 287 striped bass microsatellite markers assigned to linkage groups, 169 (58.9%) showed homology to sequences on stickleback chromosomes or scaffolds. Comparison between the stickleback genome and the striped bass linkage map revealed conserved synteny between these two species. This is the first linkage map for any of the Morone species. This map will be useful for molecular mapping and marker-assisted selection of genes of interest in striped bass breeding programs. The conserved synteny between striped bass and stickleback will facilitate fine mapping of genome regions of interest and will serve as a new resource for comparative mapping with other Perciform fishes such as European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata), and tilapia (Oreochromis ssp.).

  13. An integrated linkage map reveals candidate genes underlying adaptive variation in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    McKinney, G J; Seeb, L W; Larson, W A; Gomez-Uchida, D; Limborg, M T; Brieuc, M S O; Everett, M V; Naish, K A; Waples, R K; Seeb, J E

    2016-05-01

    Salmonids are an important cultural and ecological resource exhibiting near worldwide distribution between their native and introduced range. Previous research has generated linkage maps and genomic resources for several species as well as genome assemblies for two species. We first leveraged improvements in mapping and genotyping methods to create a dense linkage map for Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha by assembling family data from different sources. We successfully mapped 14 620 SNP loci including 2336 paralogs in subtelomeric regions. This improved map was then used as a foundation to integrate genomic resources for gene annotation and population genomic analyses. We anchored a total of 286 scaffolds from the Atlantic salmon genome to the linkage map to provide a framework for the placement 11 728 Chinook salmon ESTs. Previously identified thermotolerance QTL were found to colocalize with several candidate genes including HSP70, a gene known to be involved in thermal response, as well as its inhibitor. Multiple regions of the genome with elevated divergence between populations were also identified, and annotation of ESTs in these regions identified candidate genes for fitness related traits such as stress response, growth and behaviour. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of combining genomic resources with linkage maps to enhance evolutionary inferences. PMID:26490135

  14. Complete Switchgrass Genetic Maps Reveal Subgenome Collinearity, Preferential Pairing and Multilocus Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Miki; Lanzatella, Christina; Saha, Malay C.; Bouton, Joe; Wu, Rongling; Tobias, Christian M.

    2010-01-01

    Polyploidy is an important aspect of the evolution of flowering plants. The potential of gene copies to diverge and evolve new functions is influenced by meiotic behavior of chromosomes leading to segregation as a single locus or duplicated loci. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) linkage maps were constructed using a full-sib population of 238 plants and SSR and STS markers to access the degree of preferential pairing and the structure of the tetraploid genome and as a step toward identification of loci underlying biomass feedstock quality and yield. The male and female framework map lengths were 1645 and 1376 cM with 97% of the genome estimated to be within 10 cM of a mapped marker in both maps. Each map coalesced into 18 linkage groups arranged into nine homeologous pairs. Comparative analysis of each homology group to the diploid sorghum genome identified clear syntenic relationships and collinear tracts. The number of markers with PCR amplicons that mapped across subgenomes was significantly fewer than expected, suggesting substantial subgenome divergence, while both the ratio of coupling to repulsion phase linkages and pattern of marker segregation indicated complete or near complete disomic inheritance. The proportion of transmission ratio distorted markers was relatively low, but the male map was more extensively affected by distorted transmission ratios and multilocus interactions, associated with spurious linkages. PMID:20407132

  15. A Comprehensive Genetic Map of Murine Chromosome 11 Reveals Extensive Linkage Conservation between Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Buchberg, A. M.; Brownell, E.; Nagata, S.; Jenkins, N. A.; Copeland, N. G.

    1989-01-01

    Interspecific backcross animals from a cross between C57BL/6J and Mus spretus mice were used to generate a comprehensive linkage map of mouse chromosome 11. The relative map positions of genes previously assigned to mouse chromosome 11 by somatic cell hybrid or genetic backcross analysis were determined (Erbb, Rel, Il-3, Csfgm, Trp53-1, Evi-2, Erba, Erbb-2, Csfg, Myhs, Cola-1, Myla, Hox-2 and Pkca). We also analyzed genes that we suspected would map to chromosome 11 by virtue of their location in human chromosomes and the known linkage homologies that exist between murine chromosome 11 and human chromosomes (Mpo, Ngfr, Pdgfr and Fms). Two of the latter genes, Mpo and Ngfr, mapped to mouse chromosome 11. Both genes also mapped to human chromosome 17, extending the degree of linkage conservation observed between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11. Pdgfr and Fms, which are closely linked to Il-3 and Csfgm in humans on chromosome 5, mapped to mouse chromosome 18 rather than mouse chromosome 11, thereby defining yet another conserved linkage group between human and mouse chromosomes. The mouse chromosome 11 linkage map generated in these studies substantially extends the framework for identifying homologous genes in the mouse that are involved in human disease, for elucidating the genes responsible for several mouse mutations, and for gaining insights into chromosome evolution and genome organization. PMID:2567264

  16. Issues of tsunami hazard maps revealed by the 2011 Tohoku tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tsunami scientists are imposed responsibilities of selection for people's tsunami evacuation place after the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami in Japan. A lot of matured people died out of tsunami hazard zone based on tsunami hazard map though students made a miracle by evacuation on their own judgment in Kamaishi city. Tsunami hazard maps were based on numerical model smaller than actual magnitude 9. How can we bridge the gap between hazard map and future disasters? We have to discuss about using tsunami numerical model better enough to contribute tsunami hazard map. How do we have to improve tsunami hazard map? Tsunami hazard map should be revised included possibility of upthrust or downthrust after earthquakes and social information. Ground sank 1.14m below sea level in Ayukawa town, Tohoku. Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism's research shows around 10% people know about tsunami hazard map in Japan. However, people know about their evacuation places (buildings) through experienced drills once a year even though most people did not know about tsunami hazard map. We need wider spread of tsunami hazard with contingency of science (See the botom disaster handbook material's URL). California Emergency Management Agency (CEMA) team practically shows one good practice and solution to me. I followed their field trip in Catalina Island, California in Sep 2011. A team members are multidisciplinary specialists: A geologist, a GIS specialist, oceanographers in USC (tsunami numerical modeler) and a private company, a local policeman, a disaster manager, a local authority and so on. They check field based on their own specialties. They conduct an on-the-spot inspection of ambiguous locations between tsunami numerical model and real field conditions today. The data always become older. They pay attention not only to topographical conditions but also to social conditions: vulnerable people, elementary schools and so on. It takes a long time to check such field

  17. Perched Lava Pond Complex on South Rift of Axial Volcano Revealed in AUV Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.

    2013-12-01

    An extraordinary lava pond complex is located on Axial Volcano's distal south rift. It was discovered in EM300 multibeam bathymetry collected in 1998, and explored and sampled with ROVs Tiburon in 2005 and Doc Ricketts in 2013. It was surveyed with the MBARI Mapping AUV D. Allan B. in 2011, in a complicated mission first flying above the levees at constant depth, then skimming ~5 m over the levees at a different constant depth to survey the floors, then twice switching to constant altitude mode to map outside the ponds. The AUV navigation was adjusted using the MB-System tool mbnavadjust so that bathymetric features match in overlapping and crossing swaths. The ~1-m resolution AUV bathymetry reveals extremely rough terrain, where low-resolution EM300 data had averaged acoustic returns and obscured details of walls, floors, a breach and surrounding flows, and gives context to the ROV observations and samples. The 6 x 1.5 km pond complex has 4 large and several smaller drained ponds with rims 67 to 106 m above the floors. The combined volume before draining was 0.56 km3. The ponds overflowed to build lobate-flow levees with elongate pillows draping outer flanks, then drained, leaving lava veneer on vertical inner walls. Levee rim depths vary by only 10 m and are deeper around the southern ponds. Deep collapse-pits in the levees suggest porosity of pond walls. The eastern levee of the northeastern pond breached, draining the interconnected ponds, and fed thick, rapidly-emplaced, sheet-flows along the complex's east side. These flows travelled at least 5.5 km down-rift and have 19-33 m deep drained ponds. They extended up-rift as well, forming a 10 x 2.5 km ponded flow with level 'bathtub rings' as high as 35 m above the floor marking that flow's high-stand. Despite the breach, at least 0.066 km3 of the molten interior of the large ponds also drained back down the eruptive fissures, as the pond floors are deeper than the sill and sea floor outside the complex. Tumulus

  18. Cosmic Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1984-04-01

    In the remarkable opening section of this book, a well-known Cornell astronomer gives precise thumbnail histories of the 43 basic cosmic discoveries - stars, planets, novae, pulsars, comets, gamma-ray bursts, and the like - that form the core of our knowledge of the universe. Many of them, he points out, were made accidentally and outside the mainstream of astronomical research and funding. This observation leads him to speculate on how many more major phenomena there might be and how they might be most effectively sought out in afield now dominated by large instruments and complex investigative modes and observational conditions. The book also examines discovery in terms of its political, financial, and sociological context - the role of new technologies and of industry and the military in revealing new knowledge; and methods of funding, of peer review, and of allotting time on our largest telescopes. It concludes with specific recommendations for organizing astronomy in ways that will best lead to the discovery of the many - at least sixty - phenomena that Harwit estimates are still waiting to be found.

  19. A dense linkage map for Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) reveals variable chromosomal divergence after an ancestral whole genome duplication event.

    PubMed

    Brieuc, Marine S O; Waters, Charles D; Seeb, James E; Naish, Kerry A

    2014-03-20

    Comparisons between the genomes of salmon species reveal that they underwent extensive chromosomal rearrangements following whole genome duplication that occurred in their lineage 58-63 million years ago. Extant salmonids are diploid, but occasional pairing between homeologous chromosomes exists in males. The consequences of re-diploidization can be characterized by mapping the position of duplicated loci in such species. Linkage maps are also a valuable tool for genome-wide applications such as genome-wide association studies, quantitative trait loci mapping or genome scans. Here, we investigated chromosomal evolution in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) after genome duplication by mapping 7146 restriction-site associated DNA loci in gynogenetic haploid, gynogenetic diploid, and diploid crosses. In the process, we developed a reference database of restriction-site associated DNA loci for Chinook salmon comprising 48528 non-duplicated loci and 6409 known duplicated loci, which will facilitate locus identification and data sharing. We created a very dense linkage map anchored to all 34 chromosomes for the species, and all arms were identified through centromere mapping. The map positions of 799 duplicated loci revealed that homeologous pairs have diverged at different rates following whole genome duplication, and that degree of differentiation along arms was variable. Many of the homeologous pairs with high numbers of duplicated markers appear conserved with other salmon species, suggesting that retention of conserved homeologous pairing in some arms preceded species divergence. As chromosome arms are highly conserved across species, the major resources developed for Chinook salmon in this study are also relevant for other related species.

  20. The Double-Reduction Landscape in Tetraploid Potato as Revealed by a High-Density Linkage Map.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Peter M; Voorrips, Roeland E; Visser, Richard G F; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The creation of genetic linkage maps in polyploid species has been a long-standing problem for which various approaches have been proposed. In the case of autopolyploids, a commonly used simplification is that random bivalents form during meiosis. This leads to relatively straightforward estimation of recombination frequencies using maximum likelihood, from which a genetic map can be derived. However, autopolyploids such as tetraploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) may exhibit additional features, such as double reduction, not normally encountered in diploid or allopolyploid species. In this study, we produced a high-density linkage map of tetraploid potato and used it to identify regions of double reduction in a biparental mapping population. The frequency of multivalents required to produce this degree of double reduction was determined through simulation. We also determined the effect that multivalents or preferential pairing between homologous chromosomes has on linkage mapping. Low levels of multivalents or preferential pairing do not adversely affect map construction when highly informative marker types and phases are used. We reveal the double-reduction landscape in tetraploid potato, clearly showing that this phenomenon increases with distance from the centromeres. PMID:26377683

  1. Multiscale Processes of Hurricane Sandy (2012) as Revealed by the CAMVis-MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.; Li, J. F.; Cheung, S.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Storm Sandy made landfall near Brigantine, New Jersey, devastating surrounding areas and causing tremendous economic loss and hundreds of fatalities (Blake et al., 2013). An estimated damage of $50 billion made Sandy become the second costliest tropical cyclone (TC) in US history, surpassed only by Hurricane Katrina (2005). Central questions to be addressed include (1) to what extent the lead time of severe storm prediction such as Sandy can be extended (e.g., Emanuel 2012); and (2) whether and how advanced global model, supercomputing technology and numerical algorithm can help effectively illustrate the complicated physical processes that are associated with the evolution of the storms. In this study, the predictability of Sandy is addressed with a focus on short-term (or extended-range) genesis prediction as the first step toward the goal of understanding the relationship between extreme events, such as Sandy, and the current climate. The newly deployed Coupled Advanced global mesoscale Modeling (GMM) and concurrent Visualization (CAMVis) system is used for this study. We will show remarkable simulations of Hurricane Sandy with the GMM, including realistic 7-day track and intensity forecast and genesis predictions with a lead time of up to 6 days (e.g., Shen et al., 2013, GRL, submitted). We then discuss the enabling role of the high-resolution 4-D (time-X-Y-Z) visualizations in illustrating TC's transient dynamics and its interaction with tropical waves. In addition, we have finished the parallel implementation of the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (PEEMD, Cheung et al., 2013, AGU13, submitted) method that will be soon integrated into the multiscale analysis package (MAP) for the analysis of tropical weather systems such as TCs and tropical waves. While the original EEMD has previously shown superior performance in decomposition of nonlinear (local) and non-stationary data into different intrinsic modes which stay within the natural

  2. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions.

    PubMed

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-12-09

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone.

  3. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02504.001 PMID:25487987

  4. Cosmic superstrings.

    PubMed

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe. PMID:18534932

  5. HAPPY mapping of a YAC reveals alternative haplotypes in the human immunoglobulin VH locus.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, G; Tomlinson, I M; Cook, G P; Winter, G; Rabbitts, T H; Dear, P H

    1993-01-01

    We have identified and sequenced 14 human immunoglobulin VH segments cloned in a yeast artificial chromosome, and have used a rapid PCR-based technique (HAPPY mapping, 12) to derive the order and approximate distances between them. The sequences mapped comprise thirteen germline VH segments and one rearranged VH3 gene. Comparison of our map with other data suggests the existence of at least two distinct haplotypes, differing in the presence or absence of the consecutive genes DP-78, DP-46 and DP-64, and in the duplication of segments DP-49 and DP-65. Screening of ten individuals confirms the existence of both haplotypes, and indicates that both are common amongst the population. Images PMID:8233786

  6. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping Reveals Regions of the Maize Genome Controlling Root System Architecture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Benfey, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    The quest to determine the genetic basis of root system architecture (RSA) has been greatly facilitated by recent developments in root phenotyping techniques. Methods that are accurate, high throughput, and control for environmental factors are especially attractive for quantitative trait locus mapping. Here, we describe the adaptation of a nondestructive in vivo gel-based root imaging platform for use in maize (Zea mays). We identify a large number of contrasting RSA traits among 25 founder lines of the maize nested association mapping population and locate 102 quantitative trait loci using the B73 (compact RSA) × Ki3 (exploratory RSA) mapping population. Our results suggest that a phenotypic tradeoff exists between small, compact RSA and large, exploratory RSA. PMID:25673779

  7. Global genomic diversity of Oryza sativa varieties revealed by comparative physical mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Kudrna, David A; Pan, Yonglong; Wang, Hao; Liu, Lin; Lin, Haiyan; Zhang, Jianwei; Song, Xiang; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Wing, Rod A; Zhang, Qifa; Luo, Meizhong

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) physical maps embedding a large number of BAC end sequences (BESs) were generated for Oryza sativa ssp. indica varieties Minghui 63 (MH63) and Zhenshan 97 (ZS97) and were compared with the genome sequences of O. sativa spp. japonica cv. Nipponbare and O. sativa ssp. indica cv. 93-11. The comparisons exhibited substantial diversities in terms of large structural variations and small substitutions and indels. Genome-wide BAC-sized and contig-sized structural variations were detected, and the shared variations were analyzed. In the expansion regions of the Nipponbare reference sequence, in comparison to the MH63 and ZS97 physical maps, as well as to the previously constructed 93-11 physical map, the amounts and types of the repeat contents, and the outputs of gene ontology analysis, were significantly different from those of the whole genome. Using the physical maps of four wild Oryza species from OMAP (http://www.omap.org) as a control, we detected many conserved and divergent regions related to the evolution process of O. sativa. Between the BESs of MH63 and ZS97 and the two reference sequences, a total of 1532 polymorphic simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 71,383 SNPs, 1767 multiple nucleotide polymorphisms, 6340 insertions, and 9137 deletions were identified. This study provides independent whole-genome resources for intra- and intersubspecies comparisons and functional genomics studies in O. sativa. Both the comparative physical maps and the GBrowse, which integrated the QTL and molecular markers from GRAMENE (http://www.gramene.org) with our physical maps and analysis results, are open to the public through our Web site (http://gresource.hzau.edu.cn/resource/resource.html).

  8. Genetic map of the human pseudoautosomal region reveals a high rate of recombination in female meiosis at the Xp telomere

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, A.; Fischer, C.; Rappold, G.A. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes the genetic map of the pseudoautosomal region bounded by the telomere of the short arms of the X and Y chromosomes. In males, meiotic exchange on Xp/Yp is confined to this region, leading to highly elevated recombination rates. The map was constructed using 11 pseudoautosomal probes (six of which are new) and typing individuals from 38 CEPH families. All markers have been physically mapped, thus providing the opportunity to compare genetic distance to physical distance through all intervals of the map. This comparison reveals an unexpected high rate of recombination in female meiosis between loci DXYS20 and DXYS78, within 20-80 kb from the telomere. Within this telemore-adjacent region no differences in male and female recombination rates are seen. Furthermore, data from this genetic map support the hypothesis of a linear gradient of recombination across most of the region in male meiosis and provide densely spaced anchor points for linkage studies especially in the telomeric portion of the pseudoautosomal region. 34 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Genetic mapping of sex determination in a wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana, reveals earliest form of sex chromosome.

    PubMed

    Spigler, R B; Lewers, K S; Main, D S; Ashman, T-L

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of separate sexes (dioecy) from hermaphroditism is one of the major evolutionary transitions in plants, and this transition can be accompanied by the development of sex chromosomes. Studies in species with intermediate sexual systems are providing unprecedented insight into the initial stages of sex chromosome evolution. Here, we describe the genetic mechanism of sex determination in the octoploid, subdioecious wild strawberry, Fragaria virginiana Mill., based on a whole-genome simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based genetic map and on mapping sex determination as two qualitative traits, male and female function. The resultant total map length is 2373 cM and includes 212 markers on 42 linkage groups (mean marker spacing: 14 cM). We estimated that approximately 70 and 90% of the total F. virginiana genetic map resides within 10 and 20 cM of a marker on this map, respectively. Both sex expression traits mapped to the same linkage group, separated by approximately 6 cM, along with two SSR markers. Together, our phenotypic and genetic mapping results support a model of gender determination in subdioecious F. virginiana with at least two linked loci (or gene regions) with major effects. Reconstruction of parental genotypes at these loci reveals that both female and hermaphrodite heterogamety exist in this species. Evidence of recombination between the sex-determining loci, an important hallmark of incipient sex chromosomes, suggest that F. virginiana is an example of the youngest sex chromosome in plants and thus a novel model system for the study of sex chromosome evolution.

  10. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  11. A radiation hybrid map of chromosome ID reveals synteny conservation at a wheat speciation locus.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The species cytoplasm specific (scs) genes affect nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions in interspecific hybrids. A radiation hybrid (RH) mapping population of 188 individuals was employed to refine the location of the scsae locus of Tritcum aestivum chromosome 1D. ‘Wheat Zapper’, a comparative genomic...

  12. A Primary Linkage Map of the Porcine Genome Reveals a Low Rate of Genetic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ellegren, H.; Chowdhary, B. P.; Johansson, M.; Marklund, L.; Fredholm, M.; Gustavsson, I.; Andersson, L.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive genetic linkage map of the porcine genome has been developed by typing 128 genetic markers in a cross between the European Wild Boar and a domestic breed (Large White). The marker set includes 68 polymerase chain reaction-formatted microsatellites, 60 anchored reference markers informative for comparative mapping and 47 markers which have been physically assigned by in situ hybridization. Novel multipoint assignments are provided for 54 of the markers. The map covers about 1800 cM, and the average spacing between markers is 11 cM. We used the map data to estimate the genome size in pigs, thereby addressing the total recombination distance in a third mammalian species. A sex-average genome length of 1873 +/- 139 cM was obtained by comparing the recombinational and physical distances in defined regions of the genome. This is strikingly different from the length of the human genome (3800-4000 cM) and is more similar to the mouse estimate (1600 cM). The recombination rate in females was significantly higher than in males. PMID:7982563

  13. Ultrafast Doppler reveals the mapping of cerebral vascular resistivity in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Demené, Charlie; Pernot, Mathieu; Biran, Valérie; Alison, Marianne; Fink, Mathias; Baud, Olivier; Tanter, Mickaël

    2014-01-01

    In vivo mapping of the full vasculature dynamics based on Ultrafast Doppler is showed noninvasively in the challenging case of the neonatal brain. Contrary to conventional pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler Ultrasound limited for >40 years to the estimation of vascular indices at a single location, the ultrafast frame rate (5,000 Hz) obtained using plane-wave transmissions leads to simultaneous estimation of full Doppler spectra in all pixels of wide field-of-view images within a single cardiac cycle and high sensitivity Doppler imaging. Consequently, 2D quantitative maps of the cerebro-vascular resistivity index (RI) are processed and found in agreement with local measurements obtained on large arteries of healthy neonates using conventional PW Doppler. Changes in 2D resistivity maps are monitored during recovery after therapeutic whole-body cooling of full-term neonates treated for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Arterial and venous vessels are unambiguously differentiated on the basis of their distinct hemodynamics. The high spatial (250 × 250 μm2) and temporal resolution (<1 ms) of Ultrafast Doppler imaging combined with deep tissue penetration enable precise quantitative mapping of deep brain vascular dynamics and RI, which is far beyond the capabilities of any other imaging modality. PMID:24667916

  14. Cosmic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    An image based on data taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope reveals a triplet of galaxies intertwined in a cosmic dance. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The three galaxies, catalogued as NGC 7173 (top), 7174 (bottom right) and 7176 (bottom left), are located 106 million light-years away towards the constellation of Piscis Austrinus (the 'Southern Fish'). NGC 7173 and 7176 are elliptical galaxies, while NGC 7174 is a spiral galaxy with quite disturbed dust lanes and a long, twisted tail. This seems to indicate that the two bottom galaxies - whose combined shape bears some resemblance to that of a sleeping baby - are currently interacting, with NGC 7176 providing fresh material to NGC 7174. Matter present in great quantity around the triplet's members also points to the fact that NGC 7176 and NGC 7173 have interacted in the past. Astronomers have suggested that the three galaxies will finally merge into a giant 'island universe', tens to hundreds of times as massive as our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02b/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The triplet is part of a so-called 'Compact Group', as compiled by Canadian astronomer Paul Hickson in the early 1980s. The group, which is the 90th entry in the catalogue and is therefore known as HCG 90, actually contains four major members. One of them - NGC 7192 - lies above the trio, outside of this image, and is another peculiar spiral galaxy. Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of typically four to ten galaxies in close proximity to one another. Another striking example is Robert's Quartet. Compact groups are excellent laboratories for the study of galaxy interactions and their effects, in particular the formation of stars. As the striking image reveals, there are many other galaxies in the field. Some are distant ones, while others seem to be part of the family. Studies made with other telescopes have indeed revealed that the HCG 90 group contains 16 members

  15. Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) Mapping Reveals a Role for Unstudied Genes in Aspergillus Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Christians, Julian K.; Cheema, Manjinder S.; Vergara, Ismael A.; Watt, Cortney A.; Pinto, Linda J.; Chen, Nansheng; Moore, Margo M.

    2011-01-01

    Infections caused by the fungus Aspergillus are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised populations. To identify genes required for virulence that could be used as targets for novel treatments, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting virulence in the progeny of a cross between two strains of A. nidulans (FGSC strains A4 and A91). We genotyped 61 progeny at 739 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) spread throughout the genome, and constructed a linkage map that was largely consistent with the genomic sequence, with the exception of one potential inversion of ∼527 kb on Chromosome V. The estimated genome size was 3705 cM and the average intermarker spacing was 5.0 cM. The average ratio of physical distance to genetic distance was 8.1 kb/cM, which is similar to previous estimates, and variation in recombination rate was significantly positively correlated with GC content, a pattern seen in other taxa. To map QTL affecting virulence, we measured the ability of each progeny strain to kill model hosts, larvae of the wax moth Galleria mellonella. We detected three QTL affecting in vivo virulence that were distinct from QTL affecting in vitro growth, and mapped the virulence QTL to regions containing 7–24 genes, excluding genes with no sequence variation between the parental strains and genes with only synonymous SNPs. None of the genes in our QTL target regions have been previously associated with virulence in Aspergillus, and almost half of these genes are currently annotated as “hypothetical”. This study is the first to map QTL affecting the virulence of a fungal pathogen in an animal host, and our results illustrate the power of this approach to identify a short list of unknown genes for further investigation. PMID:21559404

  16. Whole-genome mapping reveals a large chromosomal inversion on Iberian Brucella suis biovar 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Dias, Ricardo; de Sá, Maria Inácia Corrêa; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2016-08-30

    Optical mapping is a technology able to quickly generate high resolution ordered whole-genome restriction maps of bacteria, being a proven approach to search for diversity among bacterial isolates. In this work, optical whole-genome maps were used to compare closely-related Brucella suis biovar 2 strains. This biovar is the unique isolated in domestic pigs and wild boars in Portugal and Spain and most of the strains share specific molecular characteristics establishing an Iberian clonal lineage that can be differentiated from another lineage mainly isolated in several Central European countries. We performed the BamHI whole-genome optical maps of five B. suis biovar 2 field strains, isolated from wild boars in Portugal and Spain (three from the Iberian lineage and two from the Central European one) as well as of the reference strain B. suis biovar 2 ATCC 23445 (Central European lineage, Denmark). Each strain showed a distinct, highly individual configuration of 228-231 BamHI fragments. Nevertheless, a low divergence was globally observed in chromosome II (1.6%) relatively to chromosome I (2.4%). Optical mapping also disclosed genomic events associated with B. suis strains in chromosome I, namely one indel (3.5kb) and one large inversion (944kb). By using targeted-PCR in a set of 176 B. suis strains, including all biovars and haplotypes, the indel was found to be specific of the reference strain ATCC 23445 and the large inversion was shown to be an exclusive genomic marker of the Iberian clonal lineage of biovar 2.

  17. Whole-genome mapping reveals a large chromosomal inversion on Iberian Brucella suis biovar 2 strains.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Cristina; Dias, Ricardo; de Sá, Maria Inácia Corrêa; Tenreiro, Rogério

    2016-08-30

    Optical mapping is a technology able to quickly generate high resolution ordered whole-genome restriction maps of bacteria, being a proven approach to search for diversity among bacterial isolates. In this work, optical whole-genome maps were used to compare closely-related Brucella suis biovar 2 strains. This biovar is the unique isolated in domestic pigs and wild boars in Portugal and Spain and most of the strains share specific molecular characteristics establishing an Iberian clonal lineage that can be differentiated from another lineage mainly isolated in several Central European countries. We performed the BamHI whole-genome optical maps of five B. suis biovar 2 field strains, isolated from wild boars in Portugal and Spain (three from the Iberian lineage and two from the Central European one) as well as of the reference strain B. suis biovar 2 ATCC 23445 (Central European lineage, Denmark). Each strain showed a distinct, highly individual configuration of 228-231 BamHI fragments. Nevertheless, a low divergence was globally observed in chromosome II (1.6%) relatively to chromosome I (2.4%). Optical mapping also disclosed genomic events associated with B. suis strains in chromosome I, namely one indel (3.5kb) and one large inversion (944kb). By using targeted-PCR in a set of 176 B. suis strains, including all biovars and haplotypes, the indel was found to be specific of the reference strain ATCC 23445 and the large inversion was shown to be an exclusive genomic marker of the Iberian clonal lineage of biovar 2. PMID:27527786

  18. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:24489879

  19. Joint assembly and genetic mapping of the Atlantic horseshoe crab genome reveals ancient whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseshoe crabs are marine arthropods with a fossil record extending back approximately 450 million years. They exhibit remarkable morphological stability over their long evolutionary history, retaining a number of ancestral arthropod traits, and are often cited as examples of “living fossils.” As arthropods, they belong to the Ecdysozoa, an ancient super-phylum whose sequenced genomes (including insects and nematodes) have thus far shown more divergence from the ancestral pattern of eumetazoan genome organization than cnidarians, deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. However, much of ecdysozoan diversity remains unrepresented in comparative genomic analyses. Results Here we apply a new strategy of combined de novo assembly and genetic mapping to examine the chromosome-scale genome organization of the Atlantic horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus. We constructed a genetic linkage map of this 2.7 Gbp genome by sequencing the nuclear DNA of 34 wild-collected, full-sibling embryos and their parents at a mean redundancy of 1.1x per sample. The map includes 84,307 sequence markers grouped into 1,876 distinct genetic intervals and 5,775 candidate conserved protein coding genes. Conclusions Comparison with other metazoan genomes shows that the L. polyphemus genome preserves ancestral bilaterian linkage groups, and that a common ancestor of modern horseshoe crabs underwent one or more ancient whole genome duplications 300 million years ago, followed by extensive chromosome fusion. These results provide a counter-example to the often noted correlation between whole genome duplication and evolutionary radiations. The new, low-cost genetic mapping method for obtaining a chromosome-scale view of non-model organism genomes that we demonstrate here does not require laboratory culture, and is potentially applicable to a broad range of other species. PMID:24987520

  20. Extreme variability in the Xp:Yp pseudoautosomal telomere revealed by telomere variant repeat mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, D.M.; Jeffreys A.J.; Royle, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    The presence of telomere variant repeat units in the proximal regions of human telomeres has been demonstrated but the distribution of these repeats and the extent of allelic variation has not been examined. We have developed a PCR based system to assay the distribution of standard (TTAGGG) and variant (TGAGGG, TCAGGG) repeats at the proximal end of the Xp:Yp telomere repeat array. The 1 kb of DNA immediately adjacent to this telomere exhibits a high level of base substitutional polymorphism. In individuals heterozygous for a flanking polymorphism, allele specific primers have been designed to discriminate between the alleles and, in conjunction with a primer complementary to either TTAGGG, TGAGGG or TCAGGG repeats, to determine the distribution of telomere and variant repeat units at the proximal end of an individual telomere. Among the 41 Xp:Yp telomeres mapped to date only 5 are identical and composed solely of (TTAGGG) repeats at the proximal end. The remaining 36 mapped telomeres are all different, although a subset show similarities and are found in association with the same flanking DNA haplotype, suggesting a common ancestry. The telomere variant repeat mapping technique can be used to examine the turnover of these sequences in human populations and in somatic tissues and tumors.

  1. Comparative mapping reveals partial conservation of synteny at the apomixis locus in Paspalum spp.

    PubMed

    Pupilli, F; Martinez, E J; Busti, A; Calderini, O; Quarin, C L; Arcioni, S

    2004-01-01

    In plants, gametophytic apomixis is a form of asexual reproduction that leads to the formation of seed-derived offspring that are genetically identical to the mother plant. A common set of RFLP markers, including five rice anchor markers previously shown to be linked to apomixis in Paspalum simplex, were used to detect linkage with apomixis in P. notatum and P. malacophyllum. A comparative map of the region around the apomixis locus was constructed for the three Paspalum species, and compared to the rice map. The locus that controls apomixis in P. simplex was almost completely conserved in the closely related species P. malacophyllum, whereas it was only partially represented in the distantly related species P. notatum. Although strong synteny of markers was noted between this locus and a portion of rice chromosome 12 in both P. simplex and P. malacophyllum, the same locus in P. notatum was localized to a hybrid chromosome which carries markers that map to rice chromosomes 2 and 12. All three Paspalum species showed recombination suppression at the apomixis locus; in the case of P. notatum, this might be due to a heterozygosity for a translocation that most probably negatively interferes with chromosomal pairing near the locus. A common set of markers that show linkage with apomixis in all three Paspalum species define a portion of the apomixis-controlling locus that is likely to contain genes critical for apomictic reproduction.

  2. High-Resolution Mutation Mapping Reveals Parallel Experimental Evolution in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Segrè, Ayellet V; Murray, Andrew W

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of evolutionary adaptation is limited by our ability to efficiently identify the genomic locations of adaptive mutations. Here we describe a method that can quickly and precisely map the genetic basis of naturally and experimentally evolved complex traits using linkage analysis. A yeast strain that expresses the evolved trait is crossed to a distinct strain background and DNA from a large pool of progeny that express the trait of interest is hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays that detect thousands of polymorphisms between the two strains. Adaptive mutations are detected by linkage to the polymorphisms from the evolved parent. We successfully tested our method by mapping five known genes to a precision of 0.2–24 kb (0.1–10 cM), and developed computer simulations to test the effect of different factors on mapping precision. We then applied this method to four yeast strains that had independently adapted to a fluctuating glucose–galactose environment. All four strains had acquired one or more missense mutations in GAL80, the repressor of the galactose utilization pathway. When transferred into the ancestral strain, the gal80 mutations conferred the fitness advantage that the evolved strains show in the transition from glucose to galactose. Our results show an example of parallel adaptation caused by mutations in the same gene. PMID:16856782

  3. Homozygosity mapping reveals novel and known mutations in Pakistani families with inherited retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Saqib, Muhammad Arif Nadeem; Nikopoulos, Konstantinos; Ullah, Ehsan; Sher Khan, Falak; Iqbal, Jamila; Bibi, Rabia; Jarral, Afeefa; Sajid, Sundus; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Venturini, Giulia; Ansar, Muhammad; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. This extensive heterogeneity poses a challenge when performing molecular diagnosis of patients, especially in developing countries. In this study, we applied homozygosity mapping as a tool to reduce the complexity given by genetic heterogeneity and identify disease-causing variants in consanguineous Pakistani pedigrees. DNA samples from eight families with autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies were subjected to genome wide homozygosity mapping (seven by SNP arrays and one by STR markers) and genes comprised within the detected homozygous regions were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. All families displayed consistent autozygous genomic regions. Sequence analysis of candidate genes identified four previously-reported mutations in CNGB3, CNGA3, RHO, and PDE6A, as well as three novel mutations: c.2656C > T (p.L886F) in RPGRIP1, c.991G > C (p.G331R) in CNGA3, and c.413-1G > A (IVS6-1G > A) in CNGB1. This latter mutation impacted pre-mRNA splicing of CNGB1 by creating a -1 frameshift leading to a premature termination codon. In addition to better delineating the genetic landscape of inherited retinal dystrophies in Pakistan, our data confirm that combining homozygosity mapping and candidate gene sequencing is a powerful approach for mutation identification in populations where consanguineous unions are common. PMID:25943428

  4. Integrative transcriptome, proteome, phosphoproteome and genetic mapping reveals new aspects in a fiberless mutant of cotton.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qi-Feng; Wu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Man; Pei, Wen-Feng; Li, Xing-Li; Wang, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Ji-Wen; Yu, Shu-Xun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of fiber initiation in cotton (Gossypium spp.), an integrated approach combining transcriptome, iTRAQ-based proteome and genetic mapping was taken to compare the ovules of the Xuzhou 142 wild type (WT) with its fuzzless-lintless (fl) mutant at -3 and 0 day post-anthesis. A total of 1,953 mRNAs, 187 proteins, and 131 phosphoproteins were differentially expressed (DE) between WT and fl, and the levels of transcripts and their encoded proteins and phosphoproteins were highly congruent. A functional analysis suggested that the abundance of proteins were mainly involved in amino sugar, nucleotide sugar and fatty acid metabolism, one carbon pool for folate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis. qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzymatic assays were performed to confirm the regulation of these transcripts and proteins. A molecular mapping located the lintless gene li3 in the fl mutant on chromosome 26 for the first time. A further in-silico physical mapping of DE genes with sequence variations between fl and WT identified one and four candidate genes in the li3 and n2 regions, respectively. Taken together, the transcript abundance, phosphorylation status of proteins at the fiber initiation stage and candidate genes have provided insights into regulatory processes underlying cotton fiber initiation.

  5. Integrative transcriptome, proteome, phosphoproteome and genetic mapping reveals new aspects in a fiberless mutant of cotton

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qi-Feng; Wu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Man; Pei, Wen-Feng; Li, Xing-Li; Wang, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Ji-Wen; Yu, Shu-Xun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of fiber initiation in cotton (Gossypium spp.), an integrated approach combining transcriptome, iTRAQ-based proteome and genetic mapping was taken to compare the ovules of the Xuzhou 142 wild type (WT) with its fuzzless-lintless (fl) mutant at −3 and 0 day post-anthesis. A total of 1,953 mRNAs, 187 proteins, and 131 phosphoproteins were differentially expressed (DE) between WT and fl, and the levels of transcripts and their encoded proteins and phosphoproteins were highly congruent. A functional analysis suggested that the abundance of proteins were mainly involved in amino sugar, nucleotide sugar and fatty acid metabolism, one carbon pool for folate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis. qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzymatic assays were performed to confirm the regulation of these transcripts and proteins. A molecular mapping located the lintless gene li3 in the fl mutant on chromosome 26 for the first time. A further in-silico physical mapping of DE genes with sequence variations between fl and WT identified one and four candidate genes in the li3 and n2 regions, respectively. Taken together, the transcript abundance, phosphorylation status of proteins at the fiber initiation stage and candidate genes have provided insights into regulatory processes underlying cotton fiber initiation. PMID:27075604

  6. A mitochondrial-focused genetic interaction map reveals a scaffold-like complex required for inner membrane organization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hoppins, Suzanne; Collins, Sean R; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Hummel, Eric; Devay, Rachel M; Lackner, Laura L; Westermann, Benedikt; Schuldiner, Maya; Weissman, Jonathan S; Nunnari, Jodi

    2011-10-17

    To broadly explore mitochondrial structure and function as well as the communication of mitochondria with other cellular pathways, we constructed a quantitative, high-density genetic interaction map (the MITO-MAP) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MITO-MAP provides a comprehensive view of mitochondrial function including insights into the activity of uncharacterized mitochondrial proteins and the functional connection between mitochondria and the ER. The MITO-MAP also reveals a large inner membrane-associated complex, which we term MitOS for mitochondrial organizing structure, comprised of Fcj1/Mitofilin, a conserved inner membrane protein, and five additional components. MitOS physically and functionally interacts with both outer and inner membrane components and localizes to extended structures that wrap around the inner membrane. We show that MitOS acts in concert with ATP synthase dimers to organize the inner membrane and promote normal mitochondrial morphology. We propose that MitOS acts as a conserved mitochondrial skeletal structure that differentiates regions of the inner membrane to establish the normal internal architecture of mitochondria.

  7. Cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects which are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characterisitc microwave background anisotropy. It was recently discovered that details of cosmic string evolution are very differnt from the so-called standard model that was assumed in most of the string-induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain.

  8. Cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P.

    1988-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects that are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation that are based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characteristic microwave background anistropy. It has recently been discovered by F. Bouchet and myself that details of cosmic string evolution are very different from the so-called ''standard model'' that has been assumed in most of the string induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain. 29 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  10. Cortical connectivity maps reveal anatomically distinct areas in the parietal cortex of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Aaron A.; Clark, Benjamin J.; Demecha, Alexis J.; Mesina, Lilia; Vos, Jessica M.; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    A central feature of theories of spatial navigation involves the representation of spatial relationships between objects in complex environments. The parietal cortex has long been linked to the processing of spatial visual information and recent evidence from single unit recording in rodents suggests a role for this region in encoding egocentric and world-centered frames. The rat parietal cortex can be subdivided into four distinct rostral-caudal and medial-lateral regions, which includes a zone previously characterized as secondary visual cortex. At present, very little is known regarding the relative connectivity of these parietal subdivisions. Thus, we set out to map the connectivity of the entire anterior-posterior and medial-lateral span of this region. To do this we used anterograde and retrograde tracers in conjunction with open source neuronal segmentation and tracer detection tools to generate whole brain connectivity maps of parietal inputs and outputs. Our present results show that inputs to the parietal cortex varied significantly along the medial-lateral, but not the rostral-caudal axis. Specifically, retrosplenial connectivity is greater medially, but connectivity with visual cortex, though generally sparse, is more significant laterally. Finally, based on connection density, the connectivity between parietal cortex and hippocampus is indirect and likely achieved largely via dysgranular retrosplenial cortex. Thus, similar to primates, the parietal cortex of rats exhibits a difference in connectivity along the medial-lateral axis, which may represent functionally distinct areas. PMID:25601828

  11. HGDP and HapMap Analysis by Ancestry Mapper Reveals Local and Global Population Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Tiago R.; Casey, Jillian P.; Conroy, Judith; Regan, Regina; Fitzpatrick, Darren J.; Shah, Naisha; Sobral, João; Ennis, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of human origins, migrations, and expansions is greatly enhanced by the availability of large datasets of genetic information from different populations and by the development of bioinformatic tools used to analyze the data. We present Ancestry Mapper, which we believe improves on existing methods, for the assignment of genetic ancestry to an individual and to study the relationships between local and global populations. The principle function of the method, named Ancestry Mapper, is to give each individual analyzed a genetic identifier, made up of just 51 genetic coordinates, that corresponds to its relationship to the HGDP reference population. As a consequence, the Ancestry Mapper Id (AMid) has intrinsic biological meaning and provides a tool to measure similarity between world populations. We applied Ancestry Mapper to a dataset comprised of the HGDP and HapMap data. The results show distinctions at the continental level, while simultaneously giving details at the population level. We clustered AMids of HGDP/HapMap and observe a recapitulation of human migrations: for a small number of clusters, individuals are grouped according to continental origins; for a larger number of clusters, regional and population distinctions are evident. Calculating distances between AMids allows us to infer ancestry. The number of coordinates is expandable, increasing the power of Ancestry Mapper. An R package called Ancestry Mapper is available to apply this method to any high density genomic data set. PMID:23189146

  12. Chromatin and RNA Maps Reveal Regulatory Long Noncoding RNAs in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vizán, Pedro; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Beato, Miguel; Di Croce, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Discovering and classifying long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) across all mammalian tissues and cell lines remains a major challenge. Previously, mouse lncRNAs were identified using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) data from a limited number of tissues or cell lines. Additionally, associating a few hundred lncRNA promoters with chromatin states in a single mouse cell line has identified two classes of chromatin-associated lncRNA. However, the discovery and classification of lncRNAs is still pending in many other tissues in mouse. To address this, we built a comprehensive catalog of lncRNAs by combining known lncRNAs with high-confidence novel lncRNAs identified by mapping and de novo assembling billions of RNA-seq reads from eight tissues and a primary cell line in mouse. Next, we integrated this catalog of lncRNAs with multiple genome-wide chromatin state maps and found two different classes of chromatin state-associated lncRNAs, including promoter-associated (plncRNAs) and enhancer-associated (elncRNAs) lncRNAs, across various tissues. Experimental knockdown of an elncRNA resulted in the downregulation of the neighboring protein-coding Kdm8 gene, encoding a histone demethylase. Our findings provide 2,803 novel lncRNAs and a comprehensive catalog of chromatin-associated lncRNAs across different tissues in mouse. PMID:26711262

  13. Comparative mapping reveals quantitative trait loci that affect spawning time in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch)

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, Cristian; Díaz, Nelson F.; Gomez, Gilda; López, María Eugenia; Iturra, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Spawning time in salmonids is a sex-limited quantitative trait that can be modified by selection. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), various quantitative trait loci (QTL) that affect the expression of this trait have been discovered. In this study, we describe four microsatellite loci associated with two possible spawning time QTL regions in coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). The four loci were identified in females from two populations (early and late spawners) produced by divergent selection from the same base population. Three of the loci (OmyFGT34TUF, One2ASC and One19ASC) that were strongly associated with spawning time in coho salmon (p < 0.0002) were previously associated with QTL for the same trait in rainbow trout; a fourth loci (Oki10) with a suggestive association (p = 0.00035) mapped 10 cM from locus OmyFGT34TUF in rainbow trout. The changes in allelic frequency observed after three generations of selection were greater than expected because of genetic drift. This work shows that comparing information from closely-related species is a valid strategy for identifying QTLs for marker-assisted selection in species whose genomes are poorly characterized or lack a saturated genetic map. PMID:22888302

  14. Revealing the Nature of Molecule-Electrode Contact in Tunneling Junctions Using Raw Data Heat Maps.

    PubMed

    Sporrer, Jacob; Chen, Jiahao; Wang, Zhengjia; Thuo, Martin M

    2015-12-17

    Mechanistic understanding of charge transport through molecular tunnel junctions requires reproducible and statistically relevant data sets. This challenge has been overcome by development of large area junctions, especially those based on liquid-metal physi-sorbed top-electrodes, such as eutectic gallium-indium. A challenge with these junctions, however, is an inability to diagnose the quality of contact between the top-electrode and the SAMs. Since tunneling currents are dependent on the distance between the two electrodes, we demonstrate that by analyzing all raw unfitted data derived from a measurement using heat-maps, one can deduce the quality of contact and other minor bias-dependent fluctuations in the charge transport behavior. We demonstrate that the use of 3D plots would be challenging to interpret, but adoption of heat maps clearly captures details on junction quality irrespective of the total size of the data set or molecules used. We propose representation of raw data, rather than reliance on statistics, as proof of quality junctions. PMID:26618717

  15. HGDP and HapMap analysis by Ancestry Mapper reveals local and global population relationships.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Tiago R; Casey, Jillian P; Conroy, Judith; Regan, Regina; Fitzpatrick, Darren J; Shah, Naisha; Sobral, João; Ennis, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of human origins, migrations, and expansions is greatly enhanced by the availability of large datasets of genetic information from different populations and by the development of bioinformatic tools used to analyze the data. We present Ancestry Mapper, which we believe improves on existing methods, for the assignment of genetic ancestry to an individual and to study the relationships between local and global populations. The principle function of the method, named Ancestry Mapper, is to give each individual analyzed a genetic identifier, made up of just 51 genetic coordinates, that corresponds to its relationship to the HGDP reference population. As a consequence, the Ancestry Mapper Id (AMid) has intrinsic biological meaning and provides a tool to measure similarity between world populations. We applied Ancestry Mapper to a dataset comprised of the HGDP and HapMap data. The results show distinctions at the continental level, while simultaneously giving details at the population level. We clustered AMids of HGDP/HapMap and observe a recapitulation of human migrations: for a small number of clusters, individuals are grouped according to continental origins; for a larger number of clusters, regional and population distinctions are evident. Calculating distances between AMids allows us to infer ancestry. The number of coordinates is expandable, increasing the power of Ancestry Mapper. An R package called Ancestry Mapper is available to apply this method to any high density genomic data set.

  16. Fine-scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1.

    PubMed

    Glubb, Dylan M; Maranian, Mel J; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A; Meyer, Kerstin B; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O'Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D P; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Brown, Melissa A; Ponder, Bruce A J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; French, Juliet D

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer individuals and control individuals from 52 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified three independent risk signals: the strongest associations were with 15 correlated variants (iCHAV1), where the minor allele of the best candidate, rs62355902, associated with significantly increased risks of both estrogen-receptor-positive (ER(+): odds ratio [OR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21-1.27, ptrend = 5.7 × 10(-44)) and estrogen-receptor-negative (ER(-): OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.05-1.15, ptrend = 3.0 × 10(-4)) tumors. After adjustment for rs62355902, we found evidence of association of a further 173 variants (iCHAV2) containing three subsets with a range of effects (the strongest was rs113317823 [pcond = 1.61 × 10(-5)]) and five variants composing iCHAV3 (lead rs11949391; ER(+): OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.87-0.93, pcond = 1.4 × 10(-4)). Twenty-six percent of the prioritized candidate variants coincided with four putative regulatory elements that interact with the MAP3K1 promoter through chromatin looping and affect MAP3K1 promoter activity. Functional analysis indicated that the cancer risk alleles of four candidates (rs74345699 and rs62355900 [iCHAV1], rs16886397 [iCHAV2a], and rs17432750 [iCHAV3]) increased MAP3K1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed diminished GATA3 binding to the minor (cancer-protective) allele of rs17432750, indicating a mechanism for its action. We propose that the cancer risk alleles act to increase MAP3K1 expression in vivo and might promote breast cancer cell survival. PMID:25529635

  17. Fine-Scale Mapping of the 5q11.2 Breast Cancer Locus Reveals at Least Three Independent Risk Variants Regulating MAP3K1

    PubMed Central

    Glubb, Dylan M.; Maranian, Mel J.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O’Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A.; Hillman, Kristine M.; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M. Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L.; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Brown, Melissa A.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; French, Juliet D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer individuals and control individuals from 52 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified three independent risk signals: the strongest associations were with 15 correlated variants (iCHAV1), where the minor allele of the best candidate, rs62355902, associated with significantly increased risks of both estrogen-receptor-positive (ER+: odds ratio [OR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21–1.27, ptrend = 5.7 × 10−44) and estrogen-receptor-negative (ER−: OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.05–1.15, ptrend = 3.0 × 10−4) tumors. After adjustment for rs62355902, we found evidence of association of a further 173 variants (iCHAV2) containing three subsets with a range of effects (the strongest was rs113317823 [pcond = 1.61 × 10−5]) and five variants composing iCHAV3 (lead rs11949391; ER+: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.87–0.93, pcond = 1.4 × 10−4). Twenty-six percent of the prioritized candidate variants coincided with four putative regulatory elements that interact with the MAP3K1 promoter through chromatin looping and affect MAP3K1 promoter activity. Functional analysis indicated that the cancer risk alleles of four candidates (rs74345699 and rs62355900 [iCHAV1], rs16886397 [iCHAV2a], and rs17432750 [iCHAV3]) increased MAP3K1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed diminished GATA3 binding to the minor (cancer-protective) allele of rs17432750, indicating a mechanism for its action. We propose that the cancer risk alleles act to increase MAP3K1 expression in vivo and might promote breast cancer cell survival. PMID:25529635

  18. Fine-scale mapping of the 5q11.2 breast cancer locus reveals at least three independent risk variants regulating MAP3K1.

    PubMed

    Glubb, Dylan M; Maranian, Mel J; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Pooley, Karen A; Meyer, Kerstin B; Kar, Siddhartha; Carlebur, Saskia; O'Reilly, Martin; Betts, Joshua A; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Beesley, Jonathan; Canisius, Sander; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A; Ruebner, Matthias; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Pharoah, Paul D P; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Yang, Rongxi; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Menegaux, Florence; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Brüning, Thomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tanaka, Hideo; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Helbig, Sonja; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Lambrechts, Diether; Zhao, Hui; Weltens, Caroline; van Limbergen, Erik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Capra, Fabio; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; See, Mee-Hoong; Cornes, Belinda; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Ikram, M Kamran; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Tang, Anthony; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Brown, Melissa A; Ponder, Bruce A J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Thompson, Deborah J; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; French, Juliet D

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed SNP rs889312 on 5q11.2 to be associated with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry. In an attempt to identify the biologically relevant variants, we analyzed 909 genetic variants across 5q11.2 in 103,991 breast cancer individuals and control individuals from 52 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified three independent risk signals: the strongest associations were with 15 correlated variants (iCHAV1), where the minor allele of the best candidate, rs62355902, associated with significantly increased risks of both estrogen-receptor-positive (ER(+): odds ratio [OR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21-1.27, ptrend = 5.7 × 10(-44)) and estrogen-receptor-negative (ER(-): OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.05-1.15, ptrend = 3.0 × 10(-4)) tumors. After adjustment for rs62355902, we found evidence of association of a further 173 variants (iCHAV2) containing three subsets with a range of effects (the strongest was rs113317823 [pcond = 1.61 × 10(-5)]) and five variants composing iCHAV3 (lead rs11949391; ER(+): OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.87-0.93, pcond = 1.4 × 10(-4)). Twenty-six percent of the prioritized candidate variants coincided with four putative regulatory elements that interact with the MAP3K1 promoter through chromatin looping and affect MAP3K1 promoter activity. Functional analysis indicated that the cancer risk alleles of four candidates (rs74345699 and rs62355900 [iCHAV1], rs16886397 [iCHAV2a], and rs17432750 [iCHAV3]) increased MAP3K1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed diminished GATA3 binding to the minor (cancer-protective) allele of rs17432750, indicating a mechanism for its action. We propose that the cancer risk alleles act to increase MAP3K1 expression in vivo and might promote breast cancer cell survival.

  19. Cell Type-Specific Circuit Mapping Reveals the Presynaptic Connectivity of Developing Cortical Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Cocas, Laura A.; Fernandez, Gloria; Barch, Mariya; Doll, Jason; Zamora Diaz, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex is a dense network composed of local, subcortical, and intercortical synaptic connections. As a result, mapping cell type-specific neuronal connectivity in the cerebral cortex in vivo has long been a challenge for neurobiologists. In particular, the development of excitatory and inhibitory interneuron presynaptic input has been hard to capture. We set out to analyze the development of this connectivity in the first postnatal month using a murine model. First, we surveyed the connectivity of one of the earliest populations of neurons in the brain, the Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells in the neocortex, which are known to be critical for cortical layer formation and are hypothesized to be important in the establishment of early cortical networks. We found that CR cells receive inputs from deeper-layer excitatory neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the first postnatal week. We also found that both excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons received broad inputs in the first postnatal week, including inputs from CR cells. Expanding our analysis into the more mature brain, we assessed the inputs onto inhibitory interneurons and excitatory projection neurons, labeling neuronal progenitors with Cre drivers to study discrete populations of neurons in older cortex, and found that excitatory cortical and subcortical inputs are refined by the fourth week of development, whereas local inhibitory inputs increase during this postnatal period. Cell type-specific circuit mapping is specific, reliable, and effective, and can be used on molecularly defined subtypes to determine connectivity in the cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Mapping cortical connectivity in the developing mammalian brain has been an intractable problem, in part because it has not been possible to analyze connectivity with cell subtype precision. Our study systematically targets the presynaptic connections of discrete neuronal subtypes in both the mature and developing

  20. Cosmic Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    A team of French high-school students sent a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to recreate Viktor Hess's historical experiment that demonstrated the existence of ionizing radiation from the sky--later called cosmic radiation. This discovery earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1936.

  1. Genome-wide association mapping reveals a rich genetic architecture of complex traits in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Keyan; Tung, Chih-Wei; Eizenga, Georgia C.; Wright, Mark H.; Ali, M. Liakat; Price, Adam H.; Norton, Gareth J.; Islam, M. Rafiqul; Reynolds, Andy; Mezey, Jason; McClung, Anna M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; McCouch, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Asian rice, Oryza sativa is a cultivated, inbreeding species that feeds over half of the world's population. Understanding the genetic basis of diverse physiological, developmental, and morphological traits provides the basis for improving yield, quality and sustainability of rice. Here we show the results of a genome-wide association study based on genotyping 44,100 SNP variants across 413 diverse accessions of O. sativa collected from 82 countries that were systematically phenotyped for 34 traits. Using cross-population-based mapping strategies, we identified dozens of common variants influencing numerous complex traits. Significant heterogeneity was observed in the genetic architecture associated with subpopulation structure and response to environment. This work establishes an open-source translational research platform for genome-wide association studies in rice that directly links molecular variation in genes and metabolic pathways with the germplasm resources needed to accelerate varietal development and crop improvement. PMID:21915109

  2. Genome-wide Mapping Reveals Conservation of Promoter DNA Methylation Following Chicken Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues. PMID:25735894

  3. Genome-wide DNA methylation map of human neutrophils reveals widespread inter-individual epigenetic variation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Stockwell, Peter A; Rodger, Euan J; Duncan, Elizabeth J; Parry, Matthew F; Weeks, Robert J; Morison, Ian M

    2015-11-27

    The extent of variation in DNA methylation patterns in healthy individuals is not yet well documented. Identification of inter-individual epigenetic variation is important for understanding phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using neutrophils from a cohort of healthy individuals, we generated base-resolution DNA methylation maps to document inter-individual epigenetic variation. We identified 12851 autosomal inter-individual variably methylated fragments (iVMFs). Gene promoters were the least variable, whereas gene body and upstream regions showed higher variation in DNA methylation. The iVMFs were relatively enriched in repetitive elements compared to non-iVMFs, and were associated with genome regulation and chromatin function elements. Further, variably methylated genes were disproportionately associated with regulation of transcription, responsive function and signal transduction pathways. Transcriptome analysis indicates that iVMF methylation at differentially expressed exons has a positive correlation and local effect on the inclusion of that exon in the mRNA transcript.

  4. Genome-wide mapping reveals conservation of promoter DNA methylation following chicken domestication.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Zhao, Yaofeng; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that environment influences DNA methylation, however, the extent of heritable DNA methylation variation following animal domestication remains largely unknown. Using meDIP-chip we mapped the promoter methylomes for 23,316 genes in muscle tissues of ancestral and domestic chickens. We systematically examined the variation of promoter DNA methylation in terms of different breeds, differentially expressed genes, SNPs and genes undergo genetic selection sweeps. While considerable changes in DNA sequence and gene expression programs were prevalent, we found that the inter-strain DNA methylation patterns were highly conserved in promoter region between the wild and domestic chicken breeds. Our data suggests a global preservation of DNA methylation between the wild and domestic chicken breeds in either a genome-wide or locus-specific scale in chick muscle tissues.

  5. Increasing water vapor transport to the Greenland Ice Sheet revealed using self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Kyle S.; Ramseyer, Craig A.; Rosen, Joshua J.; Mote, Thomas L.; Muthyala, Rohi

    2016-09-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has been losing mass in recent decades, with an acceleration in mass loss since 2000. In this study, we apply a self-organizing map classification to integrated vapor transport data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis to determine if these GrIS mass loss trends are linked to increases in moisture transport to Greenland. We find that "moist" days (i.e., days featuring anomalously intense water vapor transport to Greenland) were significantly more common during 2000-2015 compared to 1979-1994. Furthermore, the two most intense GrIS melt seasons during the last 36 years were either preceded by a record percentage of moist winter days (2010) or occurred during a summer with a record frequency of moist days (2012). We hypothesize that moisture transport events alter the GrIS energy budget by increasing downwelling longwave radiation and turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent energy.

  6. Atom Probe Tomographic Mapping Directly Reveals the Atomic Distribution of Phosphorus in Resin Embedded Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Bartrand, Jonah; Dicken, Quinten; Thevuthasan, S. Theva; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the atomic-scale analysis of biological interfaces within the ferritin protein using atom probe tomography that is facilitated by an advanced specimen preparation approach. Embedding ferritin in an organic polymer resin lacking nitrogen provided chemical contrast to visualise atomic distributions and distinguish the inorganic-organic interface of the ferrihydrite mineral core and protein shell, as well as the organic-organic interface between the ferritin protein shell and embedding resin. In addition, we definitively show the atomic-scale distribution of phosphorus as being at the surface of the ferrihydrite mineral with the distribution of sodium mapped within the protein shell environment with an enhanced distribution at the mineral/protein interface. The sample preparation method is robust and can be directly extended to further enhance the study of biological, organic and inorganic nanomaterials relevant to health, energy or the environment. PMID:26924804

  7. A 3D map of the human genome at kilobase resolution reveals principles of chromatin looping.

    PubMed

    Rao, Suhas S P; Huntley, Miriam H; Durand, Neva C; Stamenova, Elena K; Bochkov, Ivan D; Robinson, James T; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Omer, Arina D; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2014-12-18

    We use in situ Hi-C to probe the 3D architecture of genomes, constructing haploid and diploid maps of nine cell types. The densest, in human lymphoblastoid cells, contains 4.9 billion contacts, achieving 1 kb resolution. We find that genomes are partitioned into contact domains (median length, 185 kb), which are associated with distinct patterns of histone marks and segregate into six subcompartments. We identify ∼10,000 loops. These loops frequently link promoters and enhancers, correlate with gene activation, and show conservation across cell types and species. Loop anchors typically occur at domain boundaries and bind CTCF. CTCF sites at loop anchors occur predominantly (>90%) in a convergent orientation, with the asymmetric motifs "facing" one another. The inactive X chromosome splits into two massive domains and contains large loops anchored at CTCF-binding repeats. PMID:25497547

  8. Myocardial tissue phase mapping reveals impaired myocardial tissue velocities in obesity.

    PubMed

    Rider, Oliver J; Ajufo, Ezimamaka; Ali, Mohammed K; Petersen, Steffen E; Nethononda, Richard; Francis, Jane M; Neubauer, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Although obesity is linked to heart failure on a population level, not all obese subjects develop cardiac failure. As a result, identifying obese subjects with subclinical changes in myocardial velocities may enable earlier detection of those susceptible to developing overt heart failure. As echocardiography is limited in obesity due to limited acoustic window, we used phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to assess myocardial velocities in obese and normal weight subjects. Normal weight (BMI 23 ± 3; n = 40) and obese subjects (BMI 37 ± 7; n = 59) without identifiable cardiovascular risk factors underwent MRI (1.5 Tesla) to determine left ventricular myocardial velocities using phase contrast tissue phase mapping. Systolic function was not different between normal and obese subjects (LVEF 67 ± 5 vs 68 ± 4, p = 0.22). However, obesity was associated with significantly impaired peak radial and longitudinal diastolic myocardial velocity (by 13 and 19 % respectively, both p < 0.001). In addition time-to-peak longitudinal diastolic velocity was delayed in obesity (by 39 ms, p < 0.001). In addition, peak longitudinal diastolic strain was 20 % lower in obesity (p = 0.015) and time-to-peak longitudinal diastolic strain rate significantly delayed in obesity (by 92 ms, p < 0.001).Although peak radial systolic velocity was similar between obese and normal weight subjects (p = 0.14) peak longitudinal systolic velocity was 7 % lower in the obese cohort (p = 0.02). In obesity without co-morbidities, tissue phase mapping has shown subclinical changes in systolic and diastolic function. Given the link between obesity and heart failure, early detection of changes may become clinically important to prevent disease progression.

  9. Rich RNA Structure Landscapes Revealed by Mutate-and-Map Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Pablo; Das, Rhiju

    2015-11-01

    Landscapes exhibiting multiple secondary structures arise in natural RNA molecules that modulate gene expression, protein synthesis, and viral infection [corrected]. We report herein that high-throughput chemical experiments can isolate an RNA's multiple alternative secondary structures as they are stabilized by systematic mutagenesis (mutate-and-map, M2) and that a computational algorithm, REEFFIT, enables unbiased reconstruction of these states' structures and populations. In an in silico benchmark on non-coding RNAs with complex landscapes, M2-REEFFIT recovers 95% of RNA helices present with at least 25% population while maintaining a low false discovery rate (10%) and conservative error estimates. In experimental benchmarks, M2-REEFFIT recovers the structure landscapes of a 35-nt MedLoop hairpin, a 110-nt 16S rRNA four-way junction with an excited state, a 25-nt bistable hairpin, and a 112-nt three-state adenine riboswitch with its expression platform, molecules whose characterization previously required expert mutational analysis and specialized NMR or chemical mapping experiments. With this validation, M2-REEFFIT enabled tests of whether artificial RNA sequences might exhibit complex landscapes in the absence of explicit design. An artificial flavin mononucleotide riboswitch and a randomly generated RNA sequence are found to interconvert between three or more states, including structures for which there was no design, but that could be stabilized through mutations. These results highlight the likely pervasiveness of rich landscapes with multiple secondary structures in both natural and artificial RNAs and demonstrate an automated chemical/computational route for their empirical characterization.

  10. Rich RNA Structure Landscapes Revealed by Mutate-and-Map Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Pablo; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    Landscapes exhibiting multiple secondary structures arise in natural RNA molecules that modulate gene expression, protein synthesis, and viral. We report herein that high-throughput chemical experiments can isolate an RNA’s multiple alternative secondary structures as they are stabilized by systematic mutagenesis (mutate-and-map, M2) and that a computational algorithm, REEFFIT, enables unbiased reconstruction of these states’ structures and populations. In an in silico benchmark on non-coding RNAs with complex landscapes, M2-REEFFIT recovers 95% of RNA helices present with at least 25% population while maintaining a low false discovery rate (10%) and conservative error estimates. In experimental benchmarks, M2-REEFFIT recovers the structure landscapes of a 35-nt MedLoop hairpin, a 110-nt 16S rRNA four-way junction with an excited state, a 25-nt bistable hairpin, and a 112-nt three-state adenine riboswitch with its expression platform, molecules whose characterization previously required expert mutational analysis and specialized NMR or chemical mapping experiments. With this validation, M2-REEFFIT enabled tests of whether artificial RNA sequences might exhibit complex landscapes in the absence of explicit design. An artificial flavin mononucleotide riboswitch and a randomly generated RNA sequence are found to interconvert between three or more states, including structures for which there was no design, but that could be stabilized through mutations. These results highlight the likely pervasiveness of rich landscapes with multiple secondary structures in both natural and artificial RNAs and demonstrate an automated chemical/computational route for their empirical characterization. PMID:26566145

  11. A filtering method to reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A filtering method to reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. The method filters atoms based on the time difference between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom. Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of the evaporating atoms on the surface, it can be used to reveal any crystallographic information contained within APM data. The demonstration of this method is illustrated on: • A pure Al specimen for which crystallographic poles are clearly visible on the desorption patterns easily indexed. • Three Fe-15at.% Cr datasets where crystallographic patterns are less obvious and require this filtering method. PMID:27104149

  12. A filtering method to reveal crystalline patterns from atom probe microscopy desorption maps.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan

    2016-01-01

    A filtering method to reveal the crystallographic information present in Atom Probe Microscopy (APM) data is presented. The method filters atoms based on the time difference between their evaporation and the evaporation of the previous atom. Since this time difference correlates with the location and the local structure of the evaporating atoms on the surface, it can be used to reveal any crystallographic information contained within APM data. The demonstration of this method is illustrated on: •A pure Al specimen for which crystallographic poles are clearly visible on the desorption patterns easily indexed.•Three Fe-15at.% Cr datasets where crystallographic patterns are less obvious and require this filtering method.

  13. Demonstration of Cosmic Microwave Background Delensing Using the Cosmic Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Patricia; Challinor, Anthony; Sherwin, Blake D.; Mak, Daisy

    2016-10-01

    Delensing is an increasingly important technique to reverse the gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and thus reveal primordial signals the lensing may obscure. We present a first demonstration of delensing on Planck temperature maps using the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Reversing the lensing deflections in Planck CMB temperature maps using a linear combination of the 545 and 857 GHz maps as a lensing tracer, we find that the lensing effects in the temperature power spectrum are reduced in a manner consistent with theoretical expectations. In particular, the characteristic sharpening of the acoustic peaks of the temperature power spectrum resulting from successful delensing is detected at a significance of 16 σ , with an amplitude of Adelens=1.12 ±0.07 relative to the expected value of unity. This first demonstration on data of CIB delensing, and of delensing techniques in general, is significant because lensing removal will soon be essential for achieving high-precision constraints on inflationary B -mode polarization.

  14. A RAD-Tag Genetic Map for the Platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) Reveals Mechanisms of Karyotype Evolution Among Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Amores, Angel; Catchen, Julian; Nanda, Indrajit; Warren, Wesley; Walter, Ron; Schartl, Manfred; Postlethwait, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian genomes can vary substantially in haploid chromosome number even within a small taxon (e.g., 3–40 among deer alone); in contrast, teleost fish genomes are stable (24–25 in 58% of teleosts), but we do not yet understand the mechanisms that account for differences in karyotype stability. Among perciform teleosts, platyfish (Xiphophorus maculatus) and medaka (Oryzias latipes) both have 24 chromosome pairs, but threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and green pufferfish (Tetraodon nigroviridis) have just 21 pairs. To understand the evolution of teleost genomes, we made a platyfish meiotic map containing 16,114 mapped markers scored on 267 backcross fish. We tiled genomic contigs along the map to create chromosome-length genome assemblies. Genome-wide comparisons of conserved synteny showed that platyfish and medaka karyotypes remained remarkably similar with few interchromosomal translocations but with numerous intrachromosomal rearrangements (transpositions and inversions) since their lineages diverged ∼120 million years ago. Comparative genomics with platyfish shows how reduced chromosome numbers in stickleback and green pufferfish arose by fusion of pairs of ancestral chromosomes after their lineages diverged from platyfish ∼195 million years ago. Zebrafish and human genomes provide outgroups to root observed changes. These studies identify likely genome assembly errors, characterize chromosome fusion events, distinguish lineage-independent chromosome fusions, show that the teleost genome duplication does not appear to have accelerated the rate of translocations, and reveal the stability of syntenies and gene orders in teleost chromosomes over hundreds of millions of years. PMID:24700104

  15. Asymmetries in Core Collapse Supernovae Revealed by Maps of Radioactive Titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A.; Boggs, S. E.; Reynolds, S. P.; Fryer, C. L.; Madsen, K. K.; Wik, D. R.; Zoglauer, A.; Ellinger, C. I.; Alexander, D. M.; An, H.; Barret, D.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Forster, K.; Giommi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Hornstrup, A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kitaguchi, T.; Koglin, J. E.; Mao, P. H.; Miyasaka, H.; Mori, K.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetry is required by most numerical simulations of stellar core collapse explosions, however the nature differs significantly among models. The spatial distribution of radioactive Ti-44, synthesized in an exploding star near the boundary between material falling back onto the collapsing core and that ejected into the surrounding medium, directly probes the explosion1asymmetries. Cassiopeia A is a young, nearby, core-collapse remnant from which Ti-44 emission has previously been detected, but not imaged. Asymmetries in the explosion have been indirectly inferred from a high ratio of observed Ti-44 emission to that estimated from (56)Ni9, from optical light echoes, and by jet-like features seen in the X-ray and optical ejecta. Here we report on the spatial maps and spectral properties of Ti-44 in Cassiopeia A. We find the Ti-44 to be distributed non-uniformly in the un-shocked interior of the remnant. This may explain the unexpected lack of correlation between the Ti-44 and iron X-ray emission, the latter only being visible in shock heated material. The observed spatial distribution rules out symmetric explosions even with a high level of convective mixing, as well as highly asymmetric bipolar explosions resulting from a fast rotating progenitor. Instead, these observations provide strong evidence for the development of low-mode convective instabilities in core-collapse supernovae.

  16. Global mapping of herpesvirus-host protein complexes reveals a novel transcription strategy for late genes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Zoe H.; Verschueren, Erik; Jang, Gwendolyn M.; Kleffman, Kevin; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Park, Jimin; Von Dollen, John; Maher, M. Cyrus; Johnson, Tasha; Newton, William; Jäger, Stefanie; Shales, Michael; Horner, Julie; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mapping host-pathogen interactions has proven instrumental for understanding how viruses manipulate host machinery and how numerous cellular processes are regulated. DNA viruses such as herpesviruses have relatively large coding capacity and thus can target an extensive network of cellular proteins. To identify the host proteins hijacked by this pathogen, we systematically affinity tagged and purified all 89 proteins of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) from human cells. Mass spectrometry of this material identified over 500 virus-host interactions. KSHV causes AIDS-associated cancers and its interaction network is enriched for proteins linked to cancer and overlaps with proteins that are also targeted by HIV-1. We found that the conserved KSHV protein ORF24 binds to RNA polymerase II and brings it to viral late promoters by mimicking and replacing cellular TATA-box-binding protein (TBP). This is required for herpesviral late gene expression, a complex and poorly understood phase of the viral lifecycle. PMID:25544563

  17. Evidence of Water Quality Degradation in Lower Mekong Basin Revealed by Self-Organizing Map

    PubMed Central

    Chea, Ratha; Grenouillet, Gaël; Lek, Sovan

    2016-01-01

    To reach a better understanding of the spatial variability of water quality in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) was used to classify 117 monitoring sites and hotspots of pollution within the basin identified according to water quality indicators and US-EPA guidelines. Four different clusters were identified based on their similar physicochemical characteristics. The majority of sites in upper (Laos and Thailand) and middle part (Cambodia) of the basin were grouped in two clusters, considered as good quality water with high DO and low nutrient levels. The other two clusters were mostly composed of sites in Mekong delta (Vietnam) and few sites in upstream tributaries (i.e., northwestern Thailand, Tonle Sap Lake, and swamps close to Vientiane), known for moderate to poor quality of water and characterized by high nutrient and dissolved solid levels. Overall, we found that the water in the mainstream was less polluted than its tributaries; eutrophication and salinity could be key factors affecting water quality in LMB. Moreover, the seasonal variation of water quality seemed to be less marked than spatial variation occurring along the longitudinal gradient of Mekong River. Significant degradations were mainly associated with human disturbance and particularly apparent in sites distributed along the man-made canals in Vietnam delta where population growth and agricultural development are intensive. PMID:26731522

  18. Quantitative interaction mapping reveals an extended UBX domain in ASPL that disrupts functional p97 hexamers

    PubMed Central

    Arumughan, Anup; Roske, Yvette; Barth, Carolin; Forero, Laura Lleras; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Redel, Alexandra; Kostova, Simona; McShane, Erik; Opitz, Robert; Faelber, Katja; Rau, Kirstin; Mielke, Thorsten; Daumke, Oliver; Selbach, Matthias; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Rocks, Oliver; Panáková, Daniela; Heinemann, Udo; Wanker, Erich E.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction mapping is a powerful strategy to elucidate the biological function of protein assemblies and their regulators. Here, we report the generation of a quantitative interaction network, directly linking 14 human proteins to the AAA+ ATPase p97, an essential hexameric protein with multiple cellular functions. We show that the high-affinity interacting protein ASPL efficiently promotes p97 hexamer disassembly, resulting in the formation of stable p97:ASPL heterotetramers. High-resolution structural and biochemical studies indicate that an extended UBX domain (eUBX) in ASPL is critical for p97 hexamer disassembly and facilitates the assembly of p97:ASPL heterotetramers. This spontaneous process is accompanied by a reorientation of the D2 ATPase domain in p97 and a loss of its activity. Finally, we demonstrate that overproduction of ASPL disrupts p97 hexamer function in ERAD and that engineered eUBX polypeptides can induce cell death, providing a rationale for developing anti-cancer polypeptide inhibitors that may target p97 activity. PMID:27762274

  19. Global transcriptional start site mapping using differential RNA sequencing reveals novel antisense RNAs in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Maureen K; Bischler, Thorsten; Eisenbart, Sara K; Förstner, Konrad U; Zhang, Aixia; Herbig, Alexander; Nieselt, Kay; Sharma, Cynthia M; Storz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    While the model organism Escherichia coli has been the subject of intense study for decades, the full complement of its RNAs is only now being examined. Here we describe a survey of the E. coli transcriptome carried out using a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach, which can distinguish between primary and processed transcripts, and an automated prediction algorithm for transcriptional start sites (TSS). With the criterion of expression under at least one of three growth conditions examined, we predicted 14,868 TSS candidates, including 5,574 internal to annotated genes (iTSS) and 5,495 TSS corresponding to potential antisense RNAs (asRNAs). We examined expression of 14 candidate asRNAs by Northern analysis using RNA from wild-type E. coli and from strains defective for RNases III and E, two RNases reported to be involved in asRNA processing. Interestingly, nine asRNAs detected as distinct bands by Northern analysis were differentially affected by the rnc and rne mutations. We also compared our asRNA candidates with previously published asRNA annotations from RNA-seq data and discuss the challenges associated with these cross-comparisons. Our global transcriptional start site map represents a valuable resource for identification of transcription start sites, promoters, and novel transcripts in E. coli and is easily accessible, together with the cDNA coverage plots, in an online genome browser.

  20. Evidence of Water Quality Degradation in Lower Mekong Basin Revealed by Self-Organizing Map.

    PubMed

    Chea, Ratha; Grenouillet, Gaël; Lek, Sovan

    2016-01-01

    To reach a better understanding of the spatial variability of water quality in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) was used to classify 117 monitoring sites and hotspots of pollution within the basin identified according to water quality indicators and US-EPA guidelines. Four different clusters were identified based on their similar physicochemical characteristics. The majority of sites in upper (Laos and Thailand) and middle part (Cambodia) of the basin were grouped in two clusters, considered as good quality water with high DO and low nutrient levels. The other two clusters were mostly composed of sites in Mekong delta (Vietnam) and few sites in upstream tributaries (i.e., northwestern Thailand, Tonle Sap Lake, and swamps close to Vientiane), known for moderate to poor quality of water and characterized by high nutrient and dissolved solid levels. Overall, we found that the water in the mainstream was less polluted than its tributaries; eutrophication and salinity could be key factors affecting water quality in LMB. Moreover, the seasonal variation of water quality seemed to be less marked than spatial variation occurring along the longitudinal gradient of Mekong River. Significant degradations were mainly associated with human disturbance and particularly apparent in sites distributed along the man-made canals in Vietnam delta where population growth and agricultural development are intensive.

  1. The mitochondrial genome map of Nelumbo nucifera reveals ancient evolutionary features.

    PubMed

    Gui, Songtao; Wu, Zhihua; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yinzhen; Zhu, Zhixuan; Liang, Dequan; Ding, Yi

    2016-07-22

    Nelumbo nucifera is an evolutionary relic from the Late Cretaceous period. Sequencing the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome is important for elucidating the evolutionary characteristics of basal eudicots. Here, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome was sequenced using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT), and the mitochondrial genome map was constructed after de novo assembly and annotation. The results showed that the 524,797-bp N. nucifera mitochondrial genome has a total of 63 genes, including 40 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 20 tRNA genes. Fifteen collinear gene clusters were conserved across different plant species. Approximately 700 RNA editing sites in the protein-coding genes were identified. Positively selected genes were identified with selection pressure analysis. Nineteen chloroplast-derived fragments were identified, and seven tRNAs were derived from the chloroplast. These results suggest that the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome retains evolutionarily conserved characteristics, including ancient gene content and gene clusters, high levels of RNA editing, and low levels of chloroplast-derived fragment insertions. As the first publicly available basal eudicot mitochondrial genome, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome facilitates further analysis of the characteristics of basal eudicots and provides clues of the evolutionary trajectory from basal angiosperms to advanced eudicots.

  2. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices. PMID:27182110

  3. Connectivity Map-based discovery of parbendazole reveals targetable human osteogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Brum, Andrea M; van de Peppel, Jeroen; van der Leije, Cindy S; Schreuders-Koedam, Marijke; Eijken, Marco; van der Eerden, Bram C J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2015-10-13

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass leading to increased bone fragility and fracture susceptibility. In this study, we have identified pathways that stimulate differentiation of bone forming osteoblasts from human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Gene expression profiling was performed in hMSCs differentiated toward osteoblasts (at 6 h). Significantly regulated genes were analyzed in silico, and the Connectivity Map (CMap) was used to identify candidate bone stimulatory compounds. The signature of parbendazole matches the expression changes observed for osteogenic hMSCs. Parbendazole stimulates osteoblast differentiation as indicated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization, and up-regulation of bone marker genes (alkaline phosphatase/ALPL, osteopontin/SPP1, and bone sialoprotein II/IBSP) in a subset of the hMSC population resistant to the apoptotic effects of parbendazole. These osteogenic effects are independent of glucocorticoids because parbendazole does not up-regulate glucocorticoid receptor (GR) target genes and is not inhibited by the GR antagonist mifepristone. Parbendazole causes profound cytoskeletal changes including degradation of microtubules and increased focal adhesions. Stabilization of microtubules by pretreatment with Taxol inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Parbendazole up-regulates bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene expression and activity. Cotreatment with the BMP-2 antagonist DMH1 limits, but does not block, parbendazole-induced mineralization. Using the CMap we have identified a previously unidentified lineage-specific, bone anabolic compound, parbendazole, which induces osteogenic differentiation through a combination of cytoskeletal changes and increased BMP-2 activity. PMID:26420877

  4. The mitochondrial genome map of Nelumbo nucifera reveals ancient evolutionary features

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Songtao; Wu, Zhihua; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yinzhen; Zhu, Zhixuan; Liang, Dequan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera is an evolutionary relic from the Late Cretaceous period. Sequencing the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome is important for elucidating the evolutionary characteristics of basal eudicots. Here, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome was sequenced using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT), and the mitochondrial genome map was constructed after de novo assembly and annotation. The results showed that the 524,797-bp N. nucifera mitochondrial genome has a total of 63 genes, including 40 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 20 tRNA genes. Fifteen collinear gene clusters were conserved across different plant species. Approximately 700 RNA editing sites in the protein-coding genes were identified. Positively selected genes were identified with selection pressure analysis. Nineteen chloroplast-derived fragments were identified, and seven tRNAs were derived from the chloroplast. These results suggest that the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome retains evolutionarily conserved characteristics, including ancient gene content and gene clusters, high levels of RNA editing, and low levels of chloroplast-derived fragment insertions. As the first publicly available basal eudicot mitochondrial genome, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome facilitates further analysis of the characteristics of basal eudicots and provides clues of the evolutionary trajectory from basal angiosperms to advanced eudicots. PMID:27444405

  5. Superresolution fluorescence mapping of single-nanoparticle catalysts reveals spatiotemporal variations in surface reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; Lucas, J. Matthew; Song, Ping; Beberwyck, Brandon; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Weilin; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2015-01-01

    For the practical application of nanocatalysts, it is desirable to understand the spatiotemporal fluctuations of nanocatalytic activity at the single-nanoparticle level. Here we use time-lapsed superresolution mapping of single-molecule catalysis events on individual nanoparticles to observe time-varying changes in the spatial distribution of catalysis events on Sb-doped TiO2 nanorods and Au triangle nanoplates. Compared with the active sites on well-defined surface facets, the defects of the nanoparticle catalysts possess higher intrinsic reactivity but lower stability. Corners and ends are more reactive but also less stable than flat surfaces. Averaged over time, the most stable sites dominate the total apparent activity of single nanocatalysts. However, the active sites with higher intrinsic activity but lower stability show activity at earlier time points before deactivating. Unexpectedly, some active sites are found to recover their activity (“self-healing”) after deactivation, which is probably due to desorption of the adsorbate. Our superresolution measurement of different types of active catalytic sites, over both space and time, leads to a more comprehensive understanding of reactivity patterns and may enable the design of new and more productive heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:26150516

  6. An integrative architecture for general intelligence and executive function revealed by lesion mapping

    PubMed Central

    Colom, Roberto; Solomon, Jeffrey; Krueger, Frank; Forbes, Chad; Grafman, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Although cognitive neuroscience has made remarkable progress in understanding the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in executive control, the broader functional networks that support high-level cognition and give rise to general intelligence remain to be well characterized. Here, we investigated the neural substrates of the general factor of intelligence (g) and executive function in 182 patients with focal brain damage using voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System were used to derive measures of g and executive function, respectively. Impaired performance on these measures was associated with damage to a distributed network of left lateralized brain areas, including regions of frontal and parietal cortex and white matter association tracts, which bind these areas into a coordinated system. The observed findings support an integrative framework for understanding the architecture of general intelligence and executive function, supporting their reliance upon a shared fronto-parietal network for the integration and control of cognitive representations and making specific recommendations for the application of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System to the study of high-level cognition in health and disease. PMID:22396393

  7. Connectivity Map-based discovery of parbendazole reveals targetable human osteogenic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Brum, Andrea M.; van de Peppel, Jeroen; van der Leije, Cindy S.; Schreuders-Koedam, Marijke; Eijken, Marco; van der Eerden, Bram C. J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mass leading to increased bone fragility and fracture susceptibility. In this study, we have identified pathways that stimulate differentiation of bone forming osteoblasts from human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Gene expression profiling was performed in hMSCs differentiated toward osteoblasts (at 6 h). Significantly regulated genes were analyzed in silico, and the Connectivity Map (CMap) was used to identify candidate bone stimulatory compounds. The signature of parbendazole matches the expression changes observed for osteogenic hMSCs. Parbendazole stimulates osteoblast differentiation as indicated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization, and up-regulation of bone marker genes (alkaline phosphatase/ALPL, osteopontin/SPP1, and bone sialoprotein II/IBSP) in a subset of the hMSC population resistant to the apoptotic effects of parbendazole. These osteogenic effects are independent of glucocorticoids because parbendazole does not up-regulate glucocorticoid receptor (GR) target genes and is not inhibited by the GR antagonist mifepristone. Parbendazole causes profound cytoskeletal changes including degradation of microtubules and increased focal adhesions. Stabilization of microtubules by pretreatment with Taxol inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Parbendazole up-regulates bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene expression and activity. Cotreatment with the BMP-2 antagonist DMH1 limits, but does not block, parbendazole-induced mineralization. Using the CMap we have identified a previously unidentified lineage-specific, bone anabolic compound, parbendazole, which induces osteogenic differentiation through a combination of cytoskeletal changes and increased BMP-2 activity. PMID:26420877

  8. Evidence of Water Quality Degradation in Lower Mekong Basin Revealed by Self-Organizing Map.

    PubMed

    Chea, Ratha; Grenouillet, Gaël; Lek, Sovan

    2016-01-01

    To reach a better understanding of the spatial variability of water quality in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), the Self-Organizing Map (SOM) was used to classify 117 monitoring sites and hotspots of pollution within the basin identified according to water quality indicators and US-EPA guidelines. Four different clusters were identified based on their similar physicochemical characteristics. The majority of sites in upper (Laos and Thailand) and middle part (Cambodia) of the basin were grouped in two clusters, considered as good quality water with high DO and low nutrient levels. The other two clusters were mostly composed of sites in Mekong delta (Vietnam) and few sites in upstream tributaries (i.e., northwestern Thailand, Tonle Sap Lake, and swamps close to Vientiane), known for moderate to poor quality of water and characterized by high nutrient and dissolved solid levels. Overall, we found that the water in the mainstream was less polluted than its tributaries; eutrophication and salinity could be key factors affecting water quality in LMB. Moreover, the seasonal variation of water quality seemed to be less marked than spatial variation occurring along the longitudinal gradient of Mekong River. Significant degradations were mainly associated with human disturbance and particularly apparent in sites distributed along the man-made canals in Vietnam delta where population growth and agricultural development are intensive. PMID:26731522

  9. High-resolution Xist binding maps reveal 2-step spreading during X-inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Kavitha; Rutenberg-Schoenberg, Michael; Bowman, Sarah K.; Kesner, Barry A.; Maier, Verena K.; Kingston, Robert E.; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2014-01-01

    The Xist long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) is essential for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), the process by which mammals compensate for unequal numbers of sex chromosomes1-3. During XCI, Xist coats the future inactive X (Xi)4 and recruits Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to the X-inactivation center (Xic)5. How Xist spreads silencing on a 150 Mb scale is unclear. Here we generate high-resolution maps of Xist binding on the X chromosome across a developmental time course using CHART-seq. In female cells undergoing XCI de novo, Xist follows a two-step mechanism, initially targeting gene-rich islands before spreading to intervening gene-poor domains. Xist is depleted from genes that escape XCI but may concentrate near escapee boundaries. Xist binding is linearly proportional to PRC2 density and H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), suggesting co-migration of Xist and PRC2. Interestingly, when the Xi is acutely stripped off Xist in post-XCI cells, Xist recovers quickly within both gene-rich and -poor domains on a time-scale of hours instead of days, suggesting a previously primed Xi chromatin state. We conclude that Xist spreading takes distinct stage-specific forms: During initial establishment, Xist follows a two-step mechanism, but during maintenance, Xist spreads rapidly to both gene-rich and -poor regions. PMID:24162848

  10. The mitochondrial genome map of Nelumbo nucifera reveals ancient evolutionary features.

    PubMed

    Gui, Songtao; Wu, Zhihua; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zheng, Yinzhen; Zhu, Zhixuan; Liang, Dequan; Ding, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera is an evolutionary relic from the Late Cretaceous period. Sequencing the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome is important for elucidating the evolutionary characteristics of basal eudicots. Here, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome was sequenced using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT), and the mitochondrial genome map was constructed after de novo assembly and annotation. The results showed that the 524,797-bp N. nucifera mitochondrial genome has a total of 63 genes, including 40 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes and 20 tRNA genes. Fifteen collinear gene clusters were conserved across different plant species. Approximately 700 RNA editing sites in the protein-coding genes were identified. Positively selected genes were identified with selection pressure analysis. Nineteen chloroplast-derived fragments were identified, and seven tRNAs were derived from the chloroplast. These results suggest that the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome retains evolutionarily conserved characteristics, including ancient gene content and gene clusters, high levels of RNA editing, and low levels of chloroplast-derived fragment insertions. As the first publicly available basal eudicot mitochondrial genome, the N. nucifera mitochondrial genome facilitates further analysis of the characteristics of basal eudicots and provides clues of the evolutionary trajectory from basal angiosperms to advanced eudicots. PMID:27444405

  11. Cross-species protein interactome mapping reveals species-specific wiring of stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Das, Jishnu; Vo, Tommy V; Wei, Xiaomu; Mellor, Joseph C; Tong, Virginia; Degatano, Andrew G; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Lihua; Cordero, Nicolas A; Kruer-Zerhusen, Nathan; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Lipkin, Steven M; Yoshida, Minoru; Roth, Frederick P; Yu, Haiyuan

    2013-05-21

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has more metazoan-like features than the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet it has similarly facile genetics. We present a large-scale verified binary protein-protein interactome network, "StressNet," based on high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screens of interacting proteins classified as part of stress response and signal transduction pathways in S. pombe. We performed systematic, cross-species interactome mapping using StressNet and a protein interactome network of orthologous proteins in S. cerevisiae. With cross-species comparative network studies, we detected a previously unidentified component (Snr1) of the S. pombe mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1 pathway. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that Snr1 interacted with Sty1 and that deletion of snr1 increased the sensitivity of S. pombe cells to stress. Comparison of StressNet with the interactome network of orthologous proteins in S. cerevisiae showed that most of the interactions among these stress response and signaling proteins are not conserved between species but are "rewired"; orthologous proteins have different binding partners in both species. In particular, transient interactions connecting proteins in different functional modules were more likely to be rewired than conserved. By directly testing interactions between proteins in one yeast species and their corresponding binding partners in the other yeast species with yeast two-hybrid assays, we found that about half of the interactions that are traditionally considered "conserved" form modified interaction interfaces that may potentially accommodate novel functions. PMID:23695164

  12. Genome-Scale Mapping of Escherichia coli σ54 Reveals Widespread, Conserved Intragenic Binding

    PubMed Central

    Bonocora, Richard P.; Smith, Carol; Lapierre, Pascal; Wade, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerases must associate with a σ factor to bind promoter DNA and initiate transcription. There are two families of σ factor: the σ70 family and the σ54 family. Members of the σ54 family are distinct in their ability to bind promoter DNA sequences, in the context of RNA polymerase holoenzyme, in a transcriptionally inactive state. Here, we map the genome-wide association of Escherichia coli σ54, the archetypal member of the σ54 family. Thus, we vastly expand the list of known σ54 binding sites to 135. Moreover, we estimate that there are more than 250 σ54 sites in total. Strikingly, the majority of σ54 binding sites are located inside genes. The location and orientation of intragenic σ54 binding sites is non-random, and many intragenic σ54 binding sites are conserved. We conclude that many intragenic σ54 binding sites are likely to be functional. Consistent with this assertion, we identify three conserved, intragenic σ54 promoters that drive transcription of mRNAs with unusually long 5ʹ UTRs. PMID:26425847

  13. Circuit Architecture of VTA Dopamine Neurons Revealed by Systematic Input-Output Mapping.

    PubMed

    Beier, Kevin T; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; DeLoach, Katherine E; Xie, Stanley; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Schwarz, Lindsay; Gao, Xiaojing J; Kremer, Eric J; Malenka, Robert C; Luo, Liqun

    2015-07-30

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) integrate complex inputs to encode multiple signals that influence motivated behaviors via diverse projections. Here, we combine axon-initiated viral transduction with rabies-mediated trans-synaptic tracing and Cre-based cell-type-specific targeting to systematically map input-output relationships of VTA-DA neurons. We found that VTA-DA (and VTA-GABA) neurons receive excitatory, inhibitory, and modulatory input from diverse sources. VTA-DA neurons projecting to different forebrain regions exhibit specific biases in their input selection. VTA-DA neurons projecting to lateral and medial nucleus accumbens innervate largely non-overlapping striatal targets, with the latter also sending extensive extra-striatal axon collaterals. Using electrophysiology and behavior, we validated new circuits identified in our tracing studies, including a previously unappreciated top-down reinforcing circuit from anterior cortex to lateral nucleus accumbens via VTA-DA neurons. This study highlights the utility of our viral-genetic tracing strategies to elucidate the complex neural substrates that underlie motivated behaviors.

  14. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize.

  15. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize. PMID:27379126

  16. Combined Linkage and Association Mapping Reveals QTL and Candidate Genes for Plant and Ear Height in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Zijian; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Yabin; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Ruixia; Ma, Jinliang; Wang, Shiwei; Zhang, Xuecai; Xia, Zongliang; Chen, Jiafa; Wu, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    Plant height (PH) and ear height (EH) are two very important agronomic traits related to the population density and lodging in maize. In order to better understand of the genetic basis of nature variation in PH and EH, two bi-parental populations and one genome-wide association study (GWAS) population were used to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both traits. Phenotypic data analysis revealed a wide normal distribution and high heritability for PH and EH in the three populations, which indicated that maize height is a highly polygenic trait. A total of 21 QTL for PH and EH in three common genomic regions (bin 1.05, 5.04/05, and 6.04/05) were identified by QTL mapping in the two bi-parental populations under multiple environments. Additionally, 41 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified for PH and EH by GWAS, of which 29 SNPs were located in 19 unique candidate gene regions. Most of the candidate genes were related to plant growth and development. One QTL on Chromosome 1 was further verified in a near-isogenic line (NIL) population, and GWAS identified a C2H2 zinc finger family protein that maybe the candidate gene for this QTL. These results revealed that nature variation of PH and EH are strongly controlled by multiple genes with low effect and facilitated a better understanding of the underlying mechanism of height in maize. PMID:27379126

  17. Mass spectrometry reveals modularity and a complete subunit interaction map of the eukaryotic translation factor eIF3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Sandercock, Alan M; Fraser, Christopher S; Ridlova, Gabriela; Stephens, Elaine; Schenauer, Matthew R; Yokoi-Fong, Theresa; Barsky, Daniel; Leary, Julie A; Hershey, John W; Doudna, Jennifer A; Robinson, Carol V

    2008-11-25

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) plays an important role in translation initiation, acting as a docking site for several eIFs that assemble on the 40S ribosomal subunit. Here, we use mass spectrometry to probe the subunit interactions within the human eIF3 complex. Our results show that the 13-subunit complex can be maintained intact in the gas phase, enabling us to establish unambiguously its stoichiometry and its overall subunit architecture via tandem mass spectrometry and solution disruption experiments. Dissociation takes place as a function of ionic strength to form three stable modules eIF3(c:d:e:l:k), eIF3(f:h:m), and eIF3(a:b:i:g). These modules are linked by interactions between subunits eIF3b:c and eIF3c:h. We confirmed our interaction map with the homologous yeast eIF3 complex that contains the five core subunits found in the human eIF3 and supplemented our data with results from immunoprecipitation. These results, together with the 27 subcomplexes identified with increasing ionic strength, enable us to define a comprehensive interaction map for this 800-kDa species. Our interaction map allows comparison of free eIF3 with that bound to the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV-IRES) RNA. We also compare our eIF3 interaction map with related complexes, containing evolutionarily conserved protein domains, and reveal the location of subunits containing RNA recognition motifs proximal to the decoding center of the 40S subunit of the ribosome.

  18. Revealing the cerebral regions and networks mediating vulnerability to depression: oxidative metabolism mapping of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus; Kanarik, Margus; Kaart, Tanel; Matrov, Denis; Kõiv, Kadri; Mällo, Tanel; Del Río, Joaquin; Tordera, Rosa M; Ramirez, Maria J

    2014-07-01

    The large variety of available animal models has revealed much on the neurobiology of depression, but each model appears as specific to a significant extent, and distinction between stress response, pathogenesis of depression and underlying vulnerability is difficult to make. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that depression occurs in biologically predisposed subjects under impact of adverse life events. We applied the diathesis-stress concept to reveal brain regions and functional networks that mediate vulnerability to depression and response to chronic stress by collapsing data on cerebral long term neuronal activity as measured by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in distinct animal models. Rats were rendered vulnerable to depression either by partial serotonergic lesion or by maternal deprivation, or selected for a vulnerable phenotype (low positive affect, low novelty-related activity or high hedonic response). Environmental adversity was brought about by applying chronic variable stress or chronic social defeat. Several brain regions, most significantly median raphe, habenula, retrosplenial cortex and reticular thalamus, were universally implicated in long-term metabolic stress response, vulnerability to depression, or both. Vulnerability was associated with higher oxidative metabolism levels as compared to resilience to chronic stress. Chronic stress, in contrast, had three distinct patterns of effect on oxidative metabolism in vulnerable vs. resilient animals. In general, associations between regional activities in several brain circuits were strongest in vulnerable animals, and chronic stress disrupted this interrelatedness. These findings highlight networks that underlie resilience to stress, and the distinct response to stress that occurs in vulnerable subjects.

  19. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal. PMID:27067544

  20. Mpath maps multi-branching single-cell trajectories revealing progenitor cell progression during development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmiao; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chakarov, Svetoslav; Ginhoux, Florent; Poidinger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing offers unprecedented resolution of the continuum of state transition during cell differentiation and development. However, tools for constructing multi-branching cell lineages from single-cell data are limited. Here we present Mpath, an algorithm that derives multi-branching developmental trajectories using neighborhood-based cell state transitions. Applied to mouse conventional dendritic cell (cDC) progenitors, Mpath constructs multi-branching trajectories spanning from macrophage/DC progenitors through common DC progenitor to pre-dendritic cells (preDC). The Mpath-generated trajectories detect a branching event at the preDC stage revealing preDC subsets that are exclusively committed to cDC1 or cDC2 lineages. Reordering cells along cDC development reveals sequential waves of gene regulation and temporal coupling between cell cycle and cDC differentiation. Applied to human myoblasts, Mpath recapitulates the time course of myoblast differentiation and isolates a branch of non-muscle cells involved in the differentiation. Our study shows that Mpath is a useful tool for constructing cell lineages from single-cell data. PMID:27356503

  1. Multi-omics maps of cotton fibre reveal epigenetic basis for staged single-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maojun; Wang, Pengcheng; Tu, Lili; Zhu, Sitao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Qinghua; Yuan, Daojun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-05-19

    Epigenetic modifications are highlighted for their great importance in regulating plant development, but their function associated with single-cell differentiation remains undetermined. Here, we used the cotton fibre, which is the epidermal hair on the cotton ovule, as a model to investigate the regulatory role of DNA methylation in cell differentiation. The level of CHH (H = A, T, or C) DNA methylation level was found to increase during fibre development, accompanied by a decrease in RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Examination of nucleosome positioning revealed a gradual transition from euchromatin to heterochromatin for chromatin dynamics in developing fibres, which could shape the DNA methylation landscape. The observed increase in DNA methylation in fibres, compared with other ovule tissue, was demonstrated to be mediated predominantly by an active H3K9me2-dependent pathway rather than the RdDM pathway, which was inactive. Furthermore, integrated multi-omics analyses revealed that dynamic DNA methylation played a role in the regulation of lipid biosynthesis and spatio-temporal modulation of reactive oxygen species during fibre differentiation. Our study illustrates two divergent pathways mediating a continuous increase of DNA methylation and also sheds further light on the epigenetic basis for single-cell differentiation in plants. These data and analyses are made available to the wider research community through a comprehensive web portal.

  2. Atmospheric Drivers of Greenland Surface Melt Revealed by Self-Organizing Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mioduszewski, J. R.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A.; Tedesco, M.; Noble, E. U.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent acceleration in surface melt on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has occurred concurrently with a rapidly warming Arctic and has been connected to persistent, anomalous atmospheric circulation patterns over Greenland. To identify synoptic setups favoring enhanced GrIS surface melt and their decadal changes, we develop a summer Arctic synoptic climatology by employing self-organizing maps. These are applied to daily 500 hPa geopotential height fields obtained from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis, 1979-2014. Particular circulation regimes are related to meteorological conditions and GrIS surface melt estimated with outputs from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régional. Our results demonstrate that the largest positive melt anomalies occur in concert with positive height anomalies near Greenland associated with wind, temperature, and humidity patterns indicative of strong meridional transport of heat and moisture. We find an increased frequency in a 500 hPa ridge over Greenland coinciding with a 63% increase in GrIS melt between the 1979-1988 and 2005-2014 periods, with 75.0% of surface melt changes attributed to thermodynamics, 17% to dynamics, and 8.0% to a combination. We also confirm that the 2007-2012 time period has the largest dynamic forcing relative of any period but also demonstrate that increased surface energy fluxes, temperature, and moisture separate from dynamic changes contributed more to melt even during this period. This implies that GrIS surface melt is likely to continue to increase in response to an ever warmer future Arctic, regardless of future atmospheric circulation patterns.

  3. Conditional Epistatic Interaction Maps Reveal Global Functional Rewiring of Genome Integrity Pathways in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashwani; Beloglazova, Natalia; Bundalovic-Torma, Cedoljub; Phanse, Sadhna; Deineko, Viktor; Gagarinova, Alla; Musso, Gabriel; Vlasblom, James; Lemak, Sofia; Hooshyar, Mohsen; Minic, Zoran; Wagih, Omar; Mosca, Roberto; Aloy, Patrick; Golshani, Ashkan; Parkinson, John; Emili, Andrew; Yakunin, Alexander F; Babu, Mohan

    2016-01-26

    As antibiotic resistance is increasingly becoming a public health concern, an improved understanding of the bacterial DNA damage response (DDR), which is commonly targeted by antibiotics, could be of tremendous therapeutic value. Although the genetic components of the bacterial DDR have been studied extensively in isolation, how the underlying biological pathways interact functionally remains unclear. Here, we address this by performing systematic, unbiased, quantitative synthetic genetic interaction (GI) screens and uncover widespread changes in the GI network of the entire genomic integrity apparatus of Escherichia coli under standard and DNA-damaging growth conditions. The GI patterns of untreated cultures implicated two previously uncharacterized proteins (YhbQ and YqgF) as nucleases, whereas reorganization of the GI network after DNA damage revealed DDR roles for both annotated and uncharacterized genes. Analyses of pan-bacterial conservation patterns suggest that DDR mechanisms and functional relationships are near universal, highlighting a modular and highly adaptive genomic stress response.

  4. A quantitative map of the liver mitochondrial phosphoproteome reveals post-translational control of ketogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; Carson, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alex S.; Hubler, Shane L.; Niemi, Natalie M.; Bailey, Derek J.; Jochem, Adam; Stapleton, Donald S.; Keller, Mark P.; Westphall, Michael S.; Yandell, Brian S.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.; Pagliarini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that play a central role in a diverse array of metabolic processes. Elucidating mitochondrial adaptations to changing metabolic demands and the pathogenic alterations that underlie metabolic disorders represent principal challenges in cell biology. Here, we performed multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to chart the remodeling of the mouse liver mitochondrial proteome and phosphoproteome during both acute and chronic physiological transformations in more than 50 mice. Our analyses reveal that reversible phosphorylation is widespread in mitochondria, and is a key mechanism for regulating ketogenesis during the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, we have demonstrated that phosphorylation of a conserved serine on Hmgcs2 (S456) significantly enhances its catalytic activity in response to increased ketogenic demand. Collectively, our work describes the plasticity of this organelle at high resolution and provides a framework for investigating the roles of proteome restructuring and reversible phosphorylation in mitochondrial adaptation. PMID:23140645

  5. Neural organization of spoken language revealed by lesion-symptom mapping.

    PubMed

    Mirman, Daniel; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ze; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K; Coslett, H Branch; Schwartz, Myrna F

    2015-01-01

    Studies of patients with acquired cognitive deficits following brain damage and studies using contemporary neuroimaging techniques form two distinct streams of research on the neural basis of cognition. In this study, we combine high-quality structural neuroimaging analysis techniques and extensive behavioural assessment of patients with persistent acquired language deficits to study the neural basis of language. Our results reveal two major divisions within the language system-meaning versus form and recognition versus production-and their instantiation in the brain. Phonological form deficits are associated with lesions in peri-Sylvian regions, whereas semantic production and recognition deficits are associated with damage to the left anterior temporal lobe and white matter connectivity with frontal cortex, respectively. These findings provide a novel synthesis of traditional and contemporary views of the cognitive and neural architecture of language processing, emphasizing dual routes for speech processing and convergence of white matter tracts for semantic control and/or integration.

  6. Neural Organization of Spoken Language Revealed by Lesion-Symptom Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Mirman, Daniel; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ze; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K.; Coslett, H. Branch; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of patients with acquired cognitive deficits following brain damage and studies using contemporary neuroimaging techniques form two distinct streams of research on the neural basis of cognition. In this study, we combine high-quality structural neuroimaging analysis techniques and extensive behavioral assessment of patients with persistent acquired language deficits to study the neural basis of language. Our results reveal two major divisions within the language system – meaning vs. form and recognition vs. production – and their instantiation in the brain. Phonological form deficits are associated with lesions in peri-Sylvian regions, whereas semantic production and recognition deficits are associated with damage to the left anterior temporal lobe and white matter connectivity with frontal cortex, respectively. These findings provide a novel synthesis of traditional and contemporary views of the cognitive and neural architecture of language processing, emphasizing dual-routes for speech processing and convergence of white matter tracts for semantic control and/or integration. PMID:25879574

  7. Neural organization of spoken language revealed by lesion-symptom mapping.

    PubMed

    Mirman, Daniel; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Ze; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K; Coslett, H Branch; Schwartz, Myrna F

    2015-01-01

    Studies of patients with acquired cognitive deficits following brain damage and studies using contemporary neuroimaging techniques form two distinct streams of research on the neural basis of cognition. In this study, we combine high-quality structural neuroimaging analysis techniques and extensive behavioural assessment of patients with persistent acquired language deficits to study the neural basis of language. Our results reveal two major divisions within the language system-meaning versus form and recognition versus production-and their instantiation in the brain. Phonological form deficits are associated with lesions in peri-Sylvian regions, whereas semantic production and recognition deficits are associated with damage to the left anterior temporal lobe and white matter connectivity with frontal cortex, respectively. These findings provide a novel synthesis of traditional and contemporary views of the cognitive and neural architecture of language processing, emphasizing dual routes for speech processing and convergence of white matter tracts for semantic control and/or integration. PMID:25879574

  8. Notch2 genetic fate mapping reveals two previously unrecognized mammary epithelial lineages

    PubMed Central

    Šale, Sanja; Lafkas, Daniel; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2013-01-01

    Notch signalling is implicated in stem and progenitor cell fate control in numerous organs. Using conditional in vivo genetic labelling we traced the fate of cells expressing the Notch2 receptor paralogue and uncovered the existence of two previously unrecognized mammary epithelial cell lineages that we term S (Small) and L (Large). S cells appear in a bead-on-a-string formation and are embedded between the luminal and basal/myoepithelial layers in a unique reiterative pattern, whereas single or paired L cells appear among ductal and alveolar cells. Long-term lineage tracing and functional studies indicate that S and L cells regulate ipsi- and contralateral spatial placement of tertiary branches and formation of alveolar clusters. Our findings revise present models of mammary epithelial cell hierarchy, reveal a hitherto undescribed mechanism regulating branching morphogenesis and may have important implications for identification of the cell-of-origin of distinct breast cancer subtypes. PMID:23604318

  9. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  10. A First Glimpse of Wild Lupin Karyotype Variation As Revealed by Comparative Cytogenetic Mapping.

    PubMed

    Susek, Karolina; Bielski, Wojciech K; Hasterok, Robert; Naganowska, Barbara; Wolko, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Insight into plant genomes at the cytomolecular level provides useful information about their karyotype structure, enabling inferences about taxonomic relationships and evolutionary origins. The Old World lupins (OWL) demonstrate a high level of genomic diversification involving variation in chromosome numbers (2n = 32-52), basic chromosome numbers (x = 5-7, 9, 13) and in nuclear genome size (2C DNA = 0.97-2.68 pg). Lupins comprise both crop and wild species and provide an intriguing system to study karyotype evolution. In order to investigate lupin chromosome structure, heterologous FISH was used. Sixteen BACs that had been generated as chromosome markers for the reference species, Lupinus angustifolius, were used to identify chromosomes in the wild species and explore karyotype variation. While all "single-locus" in L. angustifolius, in the wild lupins these clones proved to be "single-locus," "single-locus" with additional signals, "repetitive" or had no detectable BAC-FISH signal. The diverse distribution of the clones in the targeted genomes suggests a complex evolution history, which possibly involved multiple chromosomal changes such as fusions/fissions and repetitive sequence amplification. Twelve BACs were sequenced and we found numerous transposable elements including DNA transposons as well as LTR and non-LTR retrotransposons with varying quantity and composition among the different lupin species. However, at this preliminary stage, no correlation was observed between the pattern of BAC-FISH signals and the repeat content in particular BACs. Here, we describe the first BAC-based chromosome-specific markers for the wild species: L. cosentinii, L. cryptanthus, L. pilosus, L. micranthus and one New World lupin, L. multiflorus. These BACs could constitute the basis for an assignment of the chromosomal and genetic maps of other lupins, e.g., L. albus and L. luteus. Moreover, we identified karyotype variation that helps illustrate the relationships between the

  11. A First Glimpse of Wild Lupin Karyotype Variation As Revealed by Comparative Cytogenetic Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Susek, Karolina; Bielski, Wojciech K.; Hasterok, Robert; Naganowska, Barbara; Wolko, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Insight into plant genomes at the cytomolecular level provides useful information about their karyotype structure, enabling inferences about taxonomic relationships and evolutionary origins. The Old World lupins (OWL) demonstrate a high level of genomic diversification involving variation in chromosome numbers (2n = 32–52), basic chromosome numbers (x = 5–7, 9, 13) and in nuclear genome size (2C DNA = 0.97–2.68 pg). Lupins comprise both crop and wild species and provide an intriguing system to study karyotype evolution. In order to investigate lupin chromosome structure, heterologous FISH was used. Sixteen BACs that had been generated as chromosome markers for the reference species, Lupinus angustifolius, were used to identify chromosomes in the wild species and explore karyotype variation. While all “single-locus” in L. angustifolius, in the wild lupins these clones proved to be “single-locus,” “single-locus” with additional signals, “repetitive” or had no detectable BAC-FISH signal. The diverse distribution of the clones in the targeted genomes suggests a complex evolution history, which possibly involved multiple chromosomal changes such as fusions/fissions and repetitive sequence amplification. Twelve BACs were sequenced and we found numerous transposable elements including DNA transposons as well as LTR and non-LTR retrotransposons with varying quantity and composition among the different lupin species. However, at this preliminary stage, no correlation was observed between the pattern of BAC-FISH signals and the repeat content in particular BACs. Here, we describe the first BAC-based chromosome-specific markers for the wild species: L. cosentinii, L. cryptanthus, L. pilosus, L. micranthus and one New World lupin, L. multiflorus. These BACs could constitute the basis for an assignment of the chromosomal and genetic maps of other lupins, e.g., L. albus and L. luteus. Moreover, we identified karyotype variation that helps illustrate the

  12. Cosmic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Donghui; Schmidt, Fabian

    2014-02-01

    In a perturbed universe, comoving tracers on a two-dimensional surface of constant observed redshift are at different proper times since the big bang. For tracers whose age is known independently, one can measure these perturbations of the proper time. Examples of such sources include cosmic events which only happen during a short period of cosmic history, as well as evolving standard candles and standard rulers. In this paper, we derive a general gauge-invariant linear expression for this perturbation in terms of spacetime perturbations. We show that this perturbation in general contributes a previously overlooked leading order term to observables such as the magnification (although this contribution is generally small). Further, as an illustrative example, we show that the observed temperature perturbations of the cosmic microwave background on large scales (ℓ≪100) are exactly given by these proper-time perturbations. Together with the six ruler perturbations derived in [F. Schmidt and D. Jeong, Phys. Rev. D 86, 083527 (2012)], this completes the set of independent observables which can be measured with standard rulers and candles.

  13. Cosmic rays: the highest-energy messengers.

    PubMed

    Olinto, Angela V

    2007-01-01

    The origin of the most energetic particles ever observed, cosmic rays, will begin to be revealed in the next few years. Newly constructed ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray observatories together with high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino observatories are well positioned to unveil this mystery before the centenary of their discovery in 2012. Cosmic ray sources are likely to involve the most energetic phenomena ever witnessed in the universe.

  14. Motif module map reveals enforcement of aging by continual NF-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Adler, Adam S; Sinha, Saurabh; Kawahara, Tiara L A; Zhang, Jennifer Y; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y

    2007-12-15

    Aging is characterized by specific alterations in gene expression, but their underlying mechanisms and functional consequences are not well understood. Here we develop a systematic approach to identify combinatorial cis-regulatory motifs that drive age-dependent gene expression across different tissues and organisms. Integrated analysis of 365 microarrays spanning nine tissue types predicted fourteen motifs as major regulators of age-dependent gene expression in human and mouse. The motif most strongly associated with aging was that of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Inducible genetic blockade of NF-kappaB for 2 wk in the epidermis of chronologically aged mice reverted the tissue characteristics and global gene expression programs to those of young mice. Age-specific NF-kappaB blockade and orthogonal cell cycle interventions revealed that NF-kappaB controls cell cycle exit and gene expression signature of aging in parallel but not sequential pathways. These results identify a conserved network of regulatory pathways underlying mammalian aging and show that NF-kappaB is continually required to enforce many features of aging in a tissue-specific manner.

  15. Breeding signatures of rice improvement revealed by a genomic variation map from a large germplasm collection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weibo; Wang, Gongwei; Yuan, Meng; Yao, Wen; Lyu, Kai; Zhao, Hu; Yang, Meng; Li, Pingbo; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Quanxiu; Liu, Fang; Dong, Huaxia; Zhang, Lejing; Li, Xinglei; Meng, Xiangzhou; Zhang, Wan; Xiong, Lizhong; He, Yuqing; Wang, Shiping; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Luo, Jie; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Lian, Xingming; Zhang, Qifa

    2015-09-29

    Intensive rice breeding over the past 50 y has dramatically increased productivity especially in the indica subspecies, but our knowledge of the genomic changes associated with such improvement has been limited. In this study, we analyzed low-coverage sequencing data of 1,479 rice accessions from 73 countries, including landraces and modern cultivars. We identified two major subpopulations, indica I (IndI) and indica II (IndII), in the indica subspecies, which corresponded to the two putative heterotic groups resulting from independent breeding efforts. We detected 200 regions spanning 7.8% of the rice genome that had been differentially selected between IndI and IndII, and thus referred to as breeding signatures. These regions included large numbers of known functional genes and loci associated with important agronomic traits revealed by genome-wide association studies. Grain yield was positively correlated with the number of breeding signatures in a variety, suggesting that the number of breeding signatures in a line may be useful for predicting agronomic potential and the selected loci may provide targets for rice improvement.

  16. Transcriptome-wide mapping reveals reversible and dynamic N(1)-methyladenosine methylome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Xushen; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lixia; Shu, Xiaoting; Ma, Shiqing; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-05-01

    N(1)-Methyladenosine (m(1)A) is a prevalent post-transcriptional RNA modification, yet little is known about its abundance, topology and dynamics in mRNA. Here, we show that m(1)A is prevalent in Homo sapiens mRNA, which shows an m(1)A/A ratio of ∼0.02%. We develop the m(1)A-ID-seq technique, based on m(1)A immunoprecipitation and the inherent ability of m(1)A to stall reverse transcription, as a means for transcriptome-wide m(1)A profiling. m(1)A-ID-seq identifies 901 m(1)A peaks (from 600 genes) in mRNA and noncoding RNA and reveals a prominent feature, enrichment in the 5' untranslated region of mRNA transcripts, that is distinct from the pattern for N(6)-methyladenosine, the most abundant internal mammalian mRNA modification. Moreover, m(1)A in mRNA is reversible by ALKBH3, a known DNA/RNA demethylase. Lastly, we show that m(1)A methylation responds dynamically to stimuli, and we identify hundreds of stress-induced m(1)A sites. Collectively, our approaches allow comprehensive analysis of m(1)A modification and provide tools for functional studies of potential epigenetic regulation via the reversible and dynamic m(1)A methylation. PMID:26863410

  17. Breeding signatures of rice improvement revealed by a genomic variation map from a large germplasm collection

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Weibo; Wang, Gongwei; Yuan, Meng; Yao, Wen; Lyu, Kai; Zhao, Hu; Yang, Meng; Li, Pingbo; Zhang, Xing; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Quanxiu; Liu, Fang; Dong, Huaxia; Zhang, Lejing; Li, Xinglei; Meng, Xiangzhou; Zhang, Wan; Xiong, Lizhong; He, Yuqing; Wang, Shiping; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Luo, Jie; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Lian, Xingming; Zhang, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Intensive rice breeding over the past 50 y has dramatically increased productivity especially in the indica subspecies, but our knowledge of the genomic changes associated with such improvement has been limited. In this study, we analyzed low-coverage sequencing data of 1,479 rice accessions from 73 countries, including landraces and modern cultivars. We identified two major subpopulations, indica I (IndI) and indica II (IndII), in the indica subspecies, which corresponded to the two putative heterotic groups resulting from independent breeding efforts. We detected 200 regions spanning 7.8% of the rice genome that had been differentially selected between IndI and IndII, and thus referred to as breeding signatures. These regions included large numbers of known functional genes and loci associated with important agronomic traits revealed by genome-wide association studies. Grain yield was positively correlated with the number of breeding signatures in a variety, suggesting that the number of breeding signatures in a line may be useful for predicting agronomic potential and the selected loci may provide targets for rice improvement. PMID:26358652

  18. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  19. Temporal fate mapping reveals age-linked heterogeneity in naive T lymphocytes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Thea; Gossel, Graeme; Yates, Andrew J.; Seddon, Benedict

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how our T-cell compartments are maintained requires knowledge of their population dynamics, which are typically quantified over days to weeks using the administration of labels incorporated into the DNA of dividing cells. These studies present snapshots of homeostatic dynamics and have suggested that lymphocyte populations are heterogeneous with respect to rates of division and/or death, although resolving the details of such heterogeneity is problematic. Here we present a method of studying the population dynamics of T cells in mice over timescales of months to years that reveals heterogeneity in rates of division and death with respect to the age of the host at the time of thymic export. We use the transplant conditioning drug busulfan to ablate hematopoetic stem cells in young mice but leave the peripheral lymphocyte compartments intact. Following their reconstitution with congenically labeled (donor) bone marrow, we followed the dilution of peripheral host T cells by donor-derived lymphocytes for a year after treatment. Describing these kinetics with mathematical models, we estimate rates of thymic production, division and death of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells. Population-averaged estimates of mean lifetimes are consistent with earlier studies, but we find the strongest support for a model in which both naive T-cell pools contain kinetically distinct subpopulations of older host-derived cells with self-renewing capacity that are resistant to displacement by naive donor lymphocytes. We speculate that these incumbent cells are conditioned or selected for increased fitness through homeostatic expansion into the lymphopenic neonatal environment. PMID:26607449

  20. Genetic mapping with multiple levels of phenotypic information reveals determinants of lymphocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Maranville, Joseph C; Baxter, Shaneen S; Witonsky, David B; Chase, Meredith A; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Clinical response to glucocorticoids, steroid hormones widely used as pharmaceuticals, varies extensively in that many individuals (∼30%) show a weak response to treatment. Although little is known about the molecular basis of this variation, regulatory polymorphisms are likely to play a key role given that glucocorticoids act largely through activation of a transcription factor, the glucocorticoid receptor. In an effort to characterize the molecular basis of variation in glucocorticoid sensitivity, we measured in vitro lymphocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity and transcriptome-wide response to glucocorticoids in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from African American healthy donors. We found that variation in lymphocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity was correlated with transcriptional response at 27 genes (false-discovery rate < 0.1). Furthermore, a genome-wide association scan revealed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for lymphocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity (rs11129354, p = 4 × 10(-8)); it was also associated with transcriptional response at multiple genes, including many (14/27) where transcriptional response was correlated with lymphocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity. Using allelic-imbalance assays, we show that this QTL is a glucocorticoid-dependent cis-regulatory polymorphism for RBMS3, which encodes an RNA-binding protein known as a tumor suppressor. We found that siRNA-mediated knockdown of RBMS3 expression increased cellular proliferation in PBMCs, consistent with the role of the gene as a negative regulator of proliferation. We propose that differences in lymphocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity reflect variation in transcriptional response, which is influenced by a glucocorticoid-dependent regulatory polymorphism that acts in cis relative to RBMS3 and in trans to affect the transcriptional response of multiple distant genes.

  1. Temporal fate mapping reveals age-linked heterogeneity in naive T lymphocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Thea; Gossel, Graeme; Yates, Andrew J; Seddon, Benedict

    2015-12-15

    Understanding how our T-cell compartments are maintained requires knowledge of their population dynamics, which are typically quantified over days to weeks using the administration of labels incorporated into the DNA of dividing cells. These studies present snapshots of homeostatic dynamics and have suggested that lymphocyte populations are heterogeneous with respect to rates of division and/or death, although resolving the details of such heterogeneity is problematic. Here we present a method of studying the population dynamics of T cells in mice over timescales of months to years that reveals heterogeneity in rates of division and death with respect to the age of the host at the time of thymic export. We use the transplant conditioning drug busulfan to ablate hematopoetic stem cells in young mice but leave the peripheral lymphocyte compartments intact. Following their reconstitution with congenically labeled (donor) bone marrow, we followed the dilution of peripheral host T cells by donor-derived lymphocytes for a year after treatment. Describing these kinetics with mathematical models, we estimate rates of thymic production, division and death of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells. Population-averaged estimates of mean lifetimes are consistent with earlier studies, but we find the strongest support for a model in which both naive T-cell pools contain kinetically distinct subpopulations of older host-derived cells with self-renewing capacity that are resistant to displacement by naive donor lymphocytes. We speculate that these incumbent cells are conditioned or selected for increased fitness through homeostatic expansion into the lymphopenic neonatal environment.

  2. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.; Morrison, D.

    1990-02-01

    The role of extraterrestrial impacts in shaping the earth's history is discussed, arguing that cosmic impacts represent just one example of a general shift in thinking that has made the idea of catastrophes respectable in science. The origins of this view are presented and current catastrophic theory is discussed in the context of modern debate on the geological formation of the earth. Various conflicting theories are reviewed and prominent participants in the ongoing scientific controversy concerning catastrophism are introduced.

  3. A multi-population consensus genetic map reveals inconsistent marker order among maps likely attributed to structural variations in the apple genome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Awais; Han, Yuepeng; Zhao, Youfu Frank; Troggio, Michela; Korban, Schuyler S

    2012-01-01

    Genetic maps serve as frameworks for determining the genetic architecture of quantitative traits, assessing structure of a genome, as well as aid in pursuing association mapping and comparative genetic studies. In this study, a dense genetic map was constructed using a high-throughput 1,536 EST-derived SNP GoldenGate genotyping platform and a global consensus map established by combining the new genetic map with four existing reliable genetic maps of apple. The consensus map identified markers with both major and minor conflicts in positioning across all five maps. These major inconsistencies among marker positions were attributed either to structural variations within the apple genome, or among mapping populations, or genotyping technical errors. These also highlighted problems in assembly and anchorage of the reference draft apple genome sequence in regions with known segmental duplications. Markers common across all five apple genetic maps resulted in successful positioning of 2875 markers, consisting of 2033 SNPs and 843 SSRs as well as other specific markers, on the global consensus map. These markers were distributed across all 17 linkage groups, with an average of 169±33 marker per linkage group and with an average distance of 0.70±0.14 cM between markers. The total length of the consensus map was 1991.38 cM with an average length of 117.14±24.43 cM per linkage group. A total of 569 SNPs were mapped onto the genetic map, consisting of 140 recombinant individuals, from our recently developed apple Oligonucleotide pool assays (OPA). The new functional SNPs, along with the dense consensus genetic map, will be useful for high resolution QTL mapping of important traits in apple and for pursuing comparative genetic studies in Rosaceae.

  4. Novel Sequence-Based Mapping of Recently Emerging H5NX Influenza Viruses Reveals Pandemic Vaccine Candidates.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher S; DeDiego, Marta L; Thakar, Juilee; Topham, David J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an avian influenza virus, H5NX subclade 2.3.4.4, emerged and spread to North America. This subclade has frequently reassorted, leading to multiple novel viruses capable of human infection. Four cases of human infections, three leading to death, have already occurred. Existing vaccine strains do not protect against these new viruses, raising a need to identify new vaccine candidate strains. We have developed a novel sequence-based mapping (SBM) tool capable of visualizing complex protein sequence data sets using a single intuitive map. We applied SBM on the complete set of avian H5 viruses in order to better understand hemagglutinin protein variance amongst H5 viruses and identify any patterns associated with this variation. The analysis successfully identified the original reassortments that lead to the emergence of this new subclade of H5 viruses, as well as their known unusual ability to re-assort among neuraminidase subtypes. In addition, our analysis revealed distinct clusters of 2.3.4.4 variants that would not be covered by existing strains in the H5 vaccine stockpile. The results suggest that our method may be useful for pandemic candidate vaccine virus selection. PMID:27494186

  5. Novel Sequence-Based Mapping of Recently Emerging H5NX Influenza Viruses Reveals Pandemic Vaccine Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher S.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Thakar, Juilee; Topham, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, an avian influenza virus, H5NX subclade 2.3.4.4, emerged and spread to North America. This subclade has frequently reassorted, leading to multiple novel viruses capable of human infection. Four cases of human infections, three leading to death, have already occurred. Existing vaccine strains do not protect against these new viruses, raising a need to identify new vaccine candidate strains. We have developed a novel sequence-based mapping (SBM) tool capable of visualizing complex protein sequence data sets using a single intuitive map. We applied SBM on the complete set of avian H5 viruses in order to better understand hemagglutinin protein variance amongst H5 viruses and identify any patterns associated with this variation. The analysis successfully identified the original reassortments that lead to the emergence of this new subclade of H5 viruses, as well as their known unusual ability to re-assort among neuraminidase subtypes. In addition, our analysis revealed distinct clusters of 2.3.4.4 variants that would not be covered by existing strains in the H5 vaccine stockpile. The results suggest that our method may be useful for pandemic candidate vaccine virus selection. PMID:27494186

  6. Cosmic radioactivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, Marcel; Prantzos, Nikos

    1999-07-01

    Radionuclides with half-lives ranging from some years to billions of years presumably synthesized outside of the solar system are now recorded in "live" or "fossil" form in various types of materials, like meteorites or the galactic cosmic rays. They bring specific astrophysical messages, the deciphering of which is briefly reviewed here, with special emphasis on the contribution of Dave Schramm and his collaborators to this exciting field of research. Short-lived radionuclides are also present in the Universe today, as directly testified by the γ-ray lines emitted by the de-excitation of their daughter products. A short review of recent developments in this field is also presented.

  7. One century of cosmic rays - A particle physicist's view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Experiments on cosmic rays and the elementary particles share a common history that dates back to the 19th century. Following the discovery of radioactivity in the 1890s, the paths of the two fields intertwined, especially during the decades after the discovery of cosmic rays. Experiments demonstrated that the primary cosmic rays are positively charged particles, while other studies of cosmic rays revealed various new sub-atomic particles, including the first antiparticle. Techniques developed in common led to the birth of neutrino astronomy in 1987 and the first observation of a cosmic γ-ray source by a ground-based cosmic-ray telescope in 1989.

  8. Topographical Mapping of the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Microbiome Reveals a Diverse Bacterial Community with Antifungal Properties in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, Liam; Woodhams, Douglas C.; Tacchi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The mucosal surfaces of wild and farmed aquatic vertebrates face the threat of many aquatic pathogens, including fungi. These surfaces are colonized by diverse symbiotic bacterial communities that may contribute to fight infection. Whereas the gut microbiome of teleosts has been extensively studied using pyrosequencing, this tool has rarely been employed to study the compositions of the bacterial communities present on other teleost mucosal surfaces. Here we provide a topographical map of the mucosal microbiome of an aquatic vertebrate, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, we revealed novel bacterial diversity at each of the five body sites sampled and showed that body site is a strong predictor of community composition. The skin exhibited the highest diversity, followed by the olfactory organ, gills, and gut. Flectobacillus was highly represented within skin and gill communities. Principal coordinate analysis and plots revealed clustering of external sites apart from internal sites. A highly diverse community was present within the epithelium, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy and pyrosequencing. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that two Arthrobacter sp. skin isolates, a Psychrobacter sp. strain, and a combined skin aerobic bacterial sample inhibit the growth of Saprolegnia australis and Mucor hiemalis, two important aquatic fungal pathogens. These results underscore the importance of symbiotic bacterial communities of fish and their potential role for the control of aquatic fungal diseases. PMID:26209676

  9. Topographical Mapping of the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Microbiome Reveals a Diverse Bacterial Community with Antifungal Properties in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Liam; Woodhams, Douglas C; Tacchi, Luca; Salinas, Irene

    2015-10-01

    The mucosal surfaces of wild and farmed aquatic vertebrates face the threat of many aquatic pathogens, including fungi. These surfaces are colonized by diverse symbiotic bacterial communities that may contribute to fight infection. Whereas the gut microbiome of teleosts has been extensively studied using pyrosequencing, this tool has rarely been employed to study the compositions of the bacterial communities present on other teleost mucosal surfaces. Here we provide a topographical map of the mucosal microbiome of an aquatic vertebrate, the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, we revealed novel bacterial diversity at each of the five body sites sampled and showed that body site is a strong predictor of community composition. The skin exhibited the highest diversity, followed by the olfactory organ, gills, and gut. Flectobacillus was highly represented within skin and gill communities. Principal coordinate analysis and plots revealed clustering of external sites apart from internal sites. A highly diverse community was present within the epithelium, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy and pyrosequencing. Using in vitro assays, we demonstrated that two Arthrobacter sp. skin isolates, a Psychrobacter sp. strain, and a combined skin aerobic bacterial sample inhibit the growth of Saprolegnia australis and Mucor hiemalis, two important aquatic fungal pathogens. These results underscore the importance of symbiotic bacterial communities of fish and their potential role for the control of aquatic fungal diseases. PMID:26209676

  10. Cosmic Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    2000-07-01

    In this tour de force of the ultimate and extreme in astrophysics, renowned astrophysicist and author J. Craig Wheeler takes us on a breathtaking journey to supernovae, black holes, gamma-ray bursts and adventures in hyperspace. This is no far-fetched science fiction tale, but an enthusiastic exploration of ideas at the cutting edge of current astrophysics. Wheeler follows the tortuous life of a star from birth to evolution and death, and goes on to consider the complete collapse of a star into a black hole, worm-hole time machines, the possible birth of baby bubble universes, and the prospect of a revolutionary view of space and time in a ten-dimensional string theory. Along the way he offers evidence that suggests the Universe is accelerating and describes recent developments in understanding gamma-ray bursts--perhaps the most catastrophic cosmic events of all. With the use of lucid analogies, simple language and crystal-clear cartoons, Cosmic Catastrophes makes accessible some of the most exciting and mind-bending objects and ideas in the Universe. J. Craig Wheeler is currently Samuel T. and Fern Yanagisawa Regents Professor of Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin and Vice President of the American Astronomical Society as of 1999.

  11. Cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund

    1988-01-01

    The possible consequences of forming cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings in the early universe are discussed. Lecture 1 describes the group theoretic reasons for and the field theoretic reasons why cosmic strings can form in spontaneously broken gauge theories. Lecture 2 discusses the accretion of matter onto string loops, emphasizing the scenario with a cold dark matter dominated universe. In lecture 3 superconducting cosmic strings are discussed, as is a mechanism which leads to the formation of structure from such strings.

  12. Homozygosity mapping reveals null mutations in FAM161A as a cause of autosomal-recessive retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bandah-Rozenfeld, Dikla; Mizrahi-Meissonnier, Liliana; Farhy, Chen; Obolensky, Alexey; Chowers, Itay; Pe'er, Jacob; Merin, Saul; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Ashery-Padan, Ruth; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2010-09-10

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal degenerations caused by mutations in at least 45 genes. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified a ∼4 Mb homozygous region on chromosome 2p15 in patients with autosomal-recessive RP (arRP). This region partially overlaps with RP28, a previously identified arRP locus. Sequence analysis of 12 candidate genes revealed three null mutations in FAM161A in 20 families. RT-PCR analysis in 21 human tissues revealed high levels of FAM161A expression in the retina and lower levels in the brain and testis. In the human retina, we identified two alternatively spliced transcripts with an intact open reading frame, the major one lacking a highly conserved exon. During mouse embryonic development, low levels of Fam161a transcripts were detected throughout the optic cup. After birth, Fam161a expression was elevated and confined to the photoreceptor layer. FAM161A encodes a protein of unknown function that is moderately conserved in mammals. Clinical manifestations of patients with FAM161A mutations varied but were largely within the spectrum associated with arRP. On funduscopy, pallor of the optic discs and attenuation of blood vessels were common, but bone-spicule-like pigmentation was often mild or lacking. Most patients had nonrecordable electroretinographic responses and constriction of visual fields upon diagnosis. Our data suggest a pivotal role for FAM161A in photoreceptors and reveal that FAM161A loss-of-function mutations are a major cause of arRP, accounting for ∼12% of arRP families in our cohort of patients from Israel and the Palestinian territories.

  13. Cortical Hubs Revealed by Intrinsic Functional Connectivity: Mapping, Assessment of Stability, and Relation to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Randy L.; Sepulcre, Jorge; Talukdar, Tanveer; Krienen, Fenna; Liu, Hesheng; Hedden, Trey; Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that some brain areas act as hubs interconnecting distinct, functionally-specialized systems. These nexuses are intriguing because of their potential role in integration and also because they may augment metabolic cascades relevant to brain disease. To identify regions of high connectivity in the human cerebral cortex, we applied a computationally-efficient approach to map the degree of intrinsic functional connectivity across the brain. Analysis of two separate fMRI datasets (each n=24) demonstrated hubs throughout heteromodal areas of association cortex. Prominent hubs were located within posterior cingulate, lateral temporal, lateral parietal, and medial/lateral prefrontal cortices. Network analysis revealed that many, but not all, hubs were located within regions previously implicated as components of the default network. A third dataset (n=12) demonstrated that the locations of hubs were present across passive and active task states suggesting that they reflect a stable property of cortical network architecture. To obtain an accurate reference map, data were combined across 127 participants to yield a consensus estimate of cortical hubs. Using this consensus estimate, we explored whether the topography of hubs could explain the pattern of vulnerability in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as some models suggest that regions of high activity and metabolism accelerate pathology. PET amyloid imaging in AD (n=10) as compared to older controls (n=29) showed high Aβ deposition in the locations of cortical hubs consistent with the possibility that hubs, while acting as critical waystations for information processing, may also augment the underlying pathological cascade in AD. PMID:19211893

  14. Comparing cosmic web classifiers using information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Florent; Lavaux, Guilhem; Jasche, Jens; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a decision scheme for optimally choosing a classifier, which segments the cosmic web into different structure types (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters). Our framework, based on information theory, accounts for the design aims of different classes of possible applications: (i) parameter inference, (ii) model selection, and (iii) prediction of new observations. As an illustration, we use cosmographic maps of web-types in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to assess the relative performance of the classifiers T-WEB, DIVA and ORIGAMI for: (i) analyzing the morphology of the cosmic web, (ii) discriminating dark energy models, and (iii) predicting galaxy colors. Our study substantiates a data-supported connection between cosmic web analysis and information theory, and paves the path towards principled design of analysis procedures for the next generation of galaxy surveys. We have made the cosmic web maps, galaxy catalog, and analysis scripts used in this work publicly available.

  15. Disentangling the Cosmic Web with Lagrangian Submanifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2016-10-01

    The Cosmic Web is a complicated highly-entangled geometrical object. Remarkably it has formed from practically Gaussian initial conditions, which may be regarded as the simplest departure from exactly uniform universe in purely deterministic mapping. The full complexity of the web is revealed neither in configuration no velocity spaces considered separately. It can be fully appreciated only in six-dimensional (6D) phase space. However, studies of the phase space is complicated by the fact that every projection of it on a three-dimensional (3D) space is multivalued and contained caustics. In addition phase space is not a metric space that complicates studies of geometry. We suggest to use Lagrangian submanifold i.e., x = x(q), where both x and q are 3D vectors instead of the phase space for studies the complexity of cosmic web in cosmological N-body dark matter simulations. Being fully equivalent in dynamical sense to the phase space it has an advantage of being a single valued and also metric space.

  16. A High-Density SNP-Based Linkage Map of the Chicken Genome Reveals Sequence Features Correlated With Recombination Rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resolution of the widely used chicken consensus linkage map was highly enlarged by genotyping a total of 12,945 SNPs on the three existing mapping populations in chicken; the Wageningen (WU), East Lansing (EL) and Uppsala (UPP) mapping populations. A total of 8608 SNPs could be included on the m...

  17. BLAST: CORRELATIONS IN THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 250, 350, AND 500 mum REVEAL CLUSTERING OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Viero, Marco P.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; MacTavish, Carrie J.; Negrello, Mattia; Olmi, Luca

    2009-12-20

    We detect correlations in the cosmic far-infrared background due to the clustering of star-forming galaxies in observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope, at 250, 350, and 500 mum. We perform jackknife and other tests to confirm the reality of the signal. The measured correlations are well fitted by a power law over scales of 5'-25', with DELTAI/I = 15.1% +- 1.7%. We adopt a specific model for submillimeter sources in which the contribution to clustering comes from sources in the redshift ranges 1.3 <= z <= 2.2, 1.5 <= z <= 2.7, and 1.7 <= z <= 3.2, at 250, 350, and 500 mum, respectively. With these distributions, our measurement of the power spectrum, P(k{sub t}heta), corresponds to linear bias parameters, b = 3.8 +- 0.6, 3.9 +- 0.6, and 4.4 +- 0.7, respectively. We further interpret the results in terms of the halo model, and find that at the smaller scales, the simplest halo model fails to fit our results. One way to improve the fit is to increase the radius at which dark matter halos are artificially truncated in the model, which is equivalent to having some star-forming galaxies at z >= 1 located in the outskirts of groups and clusters. In the context of this model, we find a minimum halo mass required to host a galaxy is log(M{sub min}/M{sub sun}) = 11.5{sup +0.4}{sub -0.1}, and we derive effective biases b{sub eff} = 2.2 +- 0.2, 2.4 +- 0.2, and 2.6 +- 0.2, and effective masses log(M{sub eff}/M{sub odot})=12.9+-0.3, 12.8 +- 0.2, and 12.7 +- 0.2, at 250, 350 and 500 mum, corresponding to spatial correlation lengths of r{sub 0} = 4.9, 5.0, and 5.2+-0.7 h{sup -1}Mpc, respectively. Finally, we discuss implications for clustering measurement strategies with Herschel and Planck.

  18. Genome-based metabolic mapping and 13C flux analysis reveal systematic properties of an oleaginous microalga Chlorella protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-02-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and (13)C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary (13)C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and (13)C

  19. Optogenetic mapping after stroke reveals network-wide scaling of functional connections and heterogeneous recovery of the peri-infarct.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana H; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Mohajerani, Majid H; Murphy, Timothy H

    2014-12-01

    We used arbitrary point channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) stimulation and wide-scale voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging in mice to map altered cortical connectivity at 1 and 8 weeks after a targeted cortical stroke. Network analysis based on optogenetic stimulation revealed a symmetrical sham network with distinct sensorimotor and association groupings. This symmetry was disrupted after stroke: at 1 week after stroke, we observed a widespread depression of optogenetically evoked activity that extended to the non-injured hemisphere; by 8 weeks, significant recovery was observed. When we considered the network as a whole, scaling the ChR2-evoked VSD responses from the stroke groups to match the sham group mean resulted in a relative distribution of responses that was indistinguishable from the sham group, suggesting network-wide down-scaling and connectional diaschisis after stroke. Closer inspection revealed that connections that had little connectivity with the peri-infarct, such as contralateral visual areas, tended to escape damage, whereas some connections near the peri-infarct were more severely affected. When connections within the peri-infarct were isolated, we did not observe equal down-scaling of responses after stroke. Peri-infarct sites that had weak connection strength in the sham condition tended to have the greatest relative post-stroke recovery. Our findings suggest that, during recovery, most cortical areas undergo homeostatic upscaling, resulting in a relative distribution of responses that is similar to the pre-stroke (sham) network, albeit still depressed. However, recovery within the peri-infarct zone is heterogeneous and these cortical points do not follow the recovery scaling factor expected for the entire network.

  20. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass andmore » corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted

  1. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  2. In Vivo Mapping of Eukaryotic RNA Interactomes Reveals Principles of Higher-Order Organization and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Aw, Jong Ghut Ashley; Shen, Yang; Wilm, Andreas; Sun, Miao; Lim, Xin Ni; Boon, Kum-Loong; Tapsin, Sidika; Chan, Yun-Shen; Tan, Cheng-Peow; Sim, Adelene Y L; Zhang, Tong; Susanto, Teodorus Theo; Fu, Zhiyan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Wan, Yue

    2016-05-19

    Identifying pairwise RNA-RNA interactions is key to understanding how RNAs fold and interact with other RNAs inside the cell. We present a high-throughput approach, sequencing of psoralen crosslinked, ligated, and selected hybrids (SPLASH), that maps pairwise RNA interactions in vivo with high sensitivity and specificity, genome-wide. Applying SPLASH to human and yeast transcriptomes revealed the diversity and dynamics of thousands of long-range intra- and intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions. Our analysis highlighted key structural features of RNA classes, including the modular organization of mRNAs, its impact on translation and decay, and the enrichment of long-range interactions in noncoding RNAs. Additionally, intermolecular mRNA interactions were organized into network clusters and were remodeled during cellular differentiation. We also identified hundreds of known and new snoRNA-rRNA binding sites, expanding our knowledge of rRNA biogenesis. These results highlight the underexplored complexity of RNA interactomes and pave the way to better understanding how RNA organization impacts biology. PMID:27184079

  3. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Fertility Reduction upon Heat Stress Reveals Developmental Stage-Specific QTLs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bac-Molenaar, Johanna A.; Fradin, Emilie F.; Becker, Frank F.M.; Rienstra, Juriaan A.; van der Schoot, J.; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Keurentjes, Joost J.B.

    2015-01-01

    For crops that are grown for their fruits or seeds, elevated temperatures that occur during flowering and seed or fruit set have a stronger effect on yield than high temperatures during the vegetative stage. Even short-term exposure to heat can have a large impact on yield. In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana to study the effect of short-term heat exposure on flower and seed development. The impact of a single hot day (35°C) was determined in more than 250 natural accessions by measuring the lengths of the siliques along the main inflorescence. Two sensitive developmental stages were identified, one before anthesis, during male and female meiosis, and one after anthesis, during fertilization and early embryo development. In addition, we observed a correlation between flowering time and heat tolerance. Genome-wide association mapping revealed four quantitative trait loci (QTLs) strongly associated with the heat response. These QTLs were developmental stage specific, as different QTLs were detected before and after anthesis. For a number of QTLs, T-DNA insertion knockout lines could validate assigned candidate genes. Our findings show that the regulation of complex traits can be highly dependent on the developmental timing. PMID:26163573

  4. Genome sequencing and mapping reveal loss of heterozygosity as a mechanism for rapid adaptation in the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    PubMed Central

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finley, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Storey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2013-01-01

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually-recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic/genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and higher levels of SNVs than those reported for humans, plants, and P. infestans. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30% of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici. PMID:22712506

  5. Second-Generation Linkage Maps for the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Reveal Errors in Assembly of Genome Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hedgecock, Dennis; Shin, Grace; Gracey, Andrew Y.; Den Berg, David Van; Samanta, Manoj P.

    2015-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, a widely cultivated marine bivalve mollusc, is becoming a genetically and genomically enabled model for highly fecund marine metazoans with complex life-histories. A genome sequence is available for the Pacific oyster, as are first-generation, low-density, linkage and gene-centromere maps mostly constructed from microsatellite DNA markers. Here, higher density, second-generation, linkage maps are constructed from more than 1100 coding (exonic) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as 66 previously mapped microsatellite DNA markers, all typed in five families of Pacific oysters (nearly 172,000 genotypes). The map comprises 10 linkage groups, as expected, has an average total length of 588 cM, an average marker-spacing of 1.0 cM, and covers 86% of a genome estimated to be 616 cM. All but seven of the mapped SNPs map to 618 genome scaffolds; 260 scaffolds contain two or more mapped SNPs, but for 100 of these scaffolds (38.5%), the contained SNPs map to different linkage groups, suggesting widespread errors in scaffold assemblies. The 100 misassembled scaffolds are significantly longer than those that map to a single linkage group. On the genetic maps, marker orders and intermarker distances vary across families and mapping methods, owing to an abundance of markers segregating from only one parent, to widespread distortions of segregation ratios caused by early mortality, as previously observed for oysters, and to genotyping errors. Maps made from framework markers provide stronger support for marker orders and reasonable map lengths and are used to produce a consensus high-density linkage map containing 656 markers. PMID:26248981

  6. Integrated consensus map of cultivated peanut and wild relatives reveals structures of the A and B genomes of Arachis and divergence of the legume genomes.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Bertioli, David J; Varshney, Rajeev K; Moretzsohn, Marcio C; Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Thudi, Mahendar; Pandey, Manish K; Rami, Jean-Francois; Foncéka, Daniel; Gowda, Makanahally V C; Qin, Hongde; Guo, Baozhu; Hong, Yanbin; Liang, Xuanqiang; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2013-04-01

    The complex, tetraploid genome structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) has obstructed advances in genetics and genomics in the species. The aim of this study is to understand the genome structure of Arachis by developing a high-density integrated consensus map. Three recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses between the A genome diploid species, Arachis duranensis and Arachis stenosperma; the B genome diploid species, Arachis ipaënsis and Arachis magna; and between the AB genome tetraploids, A. hypogaea and an artificial amphidiploid (A. ipaënsis × A. duranensis)(4×), were used to construct genetic linkage maps: 10 linkage groups (LGs) of 544 cM with 597 loci for the A genome; 10 LGs of 461 cM with 798 loci for the B genome; and 20 LGs of 1442 cM with 1469 loci for the AB genome. The resultant maps plus 13 published maps were integrated into a consensus map covering 2651 cM with 3693 marker loci which was anchored to 20 consensus LGs corresponding to the A and B genomes. The comparative genomics with genome sequences of Cajanus cajan, Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, and Medicago truncatula revealed that the Arachis genome has segmented synteny relationship to the other legumes. The comparative maps in legumes, integrated tetraploid consensus maps, and genome-specific diploid maps will increase the genetic and genomic understanding of Arachis and should facilitate molecular breeding. PMID:23315685

  7. The Cosmic Web: Geometric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Weygaert, R.; Schaap, W.

    The spatial cosmic matter distribution on scales of a few up to more than a hundred megaparsec displays a salient and pervasive foam-like pattern. Revealed through the painstaking efforts of redshift survey campaigns, it has completely revised our view of the matter distribution on these cosmological scales. The web-like spatial arrangement of galaxies and mass into elongated filaments, sheet-like walls and dense compact clusters, the existence of large near-empty void regions and the hierarchical nature of this mass distribution - marked by substructure over a wide range of scales and densities - are three major characteristics we have come to know as the cosmic web.

  8. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    The Universe is a violent place - as astronomers use increasingly sensitive means and methods to study the diverse processes out there, they become aware of the extraordinary forces acting in the space that surrounds us. With larger telescopes and ever-more sophisticated instruments, new information is gained about remote celestial objects and their behaviour. Among the most intriguing ones are the radio galaxies which emit prodiguous amounts of energy, in the form of fast-moving particles and intense electromagnetic radiation. One of these is known as 3C 445 ; it is located near the celestial equator within the zodiacal constellation Aquarius (The Waterman), at a distance of about 1 billion light-years. It most probably harbours a black hole at its centre, more massive than the one at the centre of our own galaxy, the Milky Way ( ESO PR 19/02 ). This galaxy was first observed from Cambridge (United Kingdom) in the 1950's and was listed as radio source no. 445 in the Third Cambridge Catalogue (1959), hence the name. Later observations revealed a strong outflow from this galaxy's active centre, visible on radio maps as two opposite plasma jets with strong synchrotron radiation ( [2]) originating from rapidly moving electrons in the associated magnetic field (image "a" in PR Photo 26/02 ). Now, a trio of European astronomers [1] have used two advanced instruments, ISAAC and FORS1 on the 8.2-m VLT ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile) to obtain near-infrared images of these jets (images "b" and "c" in PR Photo 26/02 ). As can be clearly seen on the radio picture of 3C 445 obtained with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) radio facility ("a"), the plasma jets of fast particles emanating from the galaxy ram into the surrounding intergalactic medium (mostly primordial hydrogen), thereby producing two "shocks" , both at a distance of approximately 1.5 million light-years from the central galaxy and with particularly strong synchrotron emission. With a total

  9. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H; Jackson, Ian J; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R; Brown, Steve D M

    2015-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss.

  10. The goya mouse mutant reveals distinct newly identified roles for MAP3K1 in the development and survival of cochlear sensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew; Cross, Sally H.; Jackson, Ian J.; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel; Morse, Susan; Nicholson, George; Coghill, Emma; Bowl, Michael R.; Brown, Steve D. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitogen-activated protein kinase, MAP3K1, plays an important role in a number of cellular processes, including epithelial migration during eye organogenesis. In addition, studies in keratinocytes indicate that MAP3K1 signalling through JNK is important for actin stress fibre formation and cell migration. However, MAP3K1 can also act independently of JNK in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. We have identified a mouse mutant, goya, which exhibits the eyes-open-at-birth and microphthalmia phenotypes. In addition, these mice also have hearing loss. The goya mice carry a splice site mutation in the Map3k1 gene. We show that goya and kinase-deficient Map3k1 homozygotes initially develop supernumerary cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) that subsequently degenerate, and a progressive profound hearing loss is observed by 9 weeks of age. Heterozygote mice also develop supernumerary OHCs, but no cellular degeneration or hearing loss is observed. MAP3K1 is expressed in a number of inner-ear cell types, including outer and inner hair cells, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. Investigation of targets downstream of MAP3K1 identified an increase in p38 phosphorylation (Thr180/Tyr182) in multiple cochlear tissues. We also show that the extra OHCs do not arise from aberrant control of proliferation via p27KIP1. The identification of the goya mutant reveals a signalling molecule involved with hair-cell development and survival. Mammalian hair cells do not have the ability to regenerate after damage, which can lead to irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Given the observed goya phenotype, and the many diverse cellular processes that MAP3K1 is known to act upon, further investigation of this model might help to elaborate upon the mechanisms underlying sensory hair cell specification, and pathways important for their survival. In addition, MAP3K1 is revealed as a new candidate gene for human sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26542706

  11. Level crossing analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation: a method for detecting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Movahed, M. Sadegh; Khosravi, Shahram E-mail: khosravi@ipm.ir

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we study the footprint of cosmic string as the topological defects in the very early universe on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We develop the method of level crossing analysis in the context of the well-known Kaiser-Stebbins phenomenon for exploring the signature of cosmic strings. We simulate a Gaussian map by using the best fit parameter given by WMAP-7 and then superimpose cosmic strings effects on it as an incoherent and active fluctuations. In order to investigate the capability of our method to detect the cosmic strings for the various values of tension, Gμ, a simulated pure Gaussian map is compared with that of including cosmic strings. Based on the level crossing analysis, the superimposed cosmic string with Gμ∼>4 × 10{sup −9} in the simulated map without instrumental noise and the resolution R = 1' could be detected. In the presence of anticipated instrumental noise the lower bound increases just up to Gμ∼>5.8 × 10{sup −9}.

  12. Techniques for Revealing 3d Hidden Archeological Features: Morphological Residual Models as Virtual-Polynomial Texture Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, H.; Martínez Rubio, J.; Elorza Arana, A.

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments in 3D scanning technologies are not been accompanied by visualization interfaces. We are still using the same types of visual codes as when maps and drawings were made by hand. The available information in 3D scanning data sets is not being fully exploited by current visualization techniques. In this paper we present recent developments regarding the use of 3D scanning data sets for revealing invisible information from archaeological sites. These sites are affected by a common problem, decay processes, such as erosion, that never ceases its action and endangers the persistence of last vestiges of some peoples and cultures. Rock art engravings, or epigraphical inscriptions, are among the most affected by these processes because they are, due to their one nature, carved at the surface of rocks often exposed to climatic agents. The study and interpretation of these motifs and texts is strongly conditioned by the degree of conservation of the imprints left by our ancestors. Every single detail in the remaining carvings can make a huge difference in the conclusions taken by specialists. We have selected two case-studies severely affected by erosion to present the results of the on-going work dedicated to explore in new ways the information contained in 3D scanning data sets. A new method for depicting subtle morphological features in the surface of objects or sites has been developed. It allows to contrast human patterns still present at the surface but invisible to naked eye or by any other archaeological inspection technique. It was called Morphological Residual Model (MRM) because of its ability to contrast the shallowest morphological details, to which we refer as residuals, contained in the wider forms of the backdrop. Afterwards, we have simulated the process of building Polynomial Texture Maps - a widespread technique that as been contributing to archaeological studies for some years - in a 3D virtual environment using the results of MRM

  13. Mapping the transcription start points of the Staphylococcus aureus eap, emp, and vwb promoters reveals a conserved octanucleotide sequence that is essential for expression of these genes.

    PubMed

    Harraghy, Niamh; Homerova, Dagmar; Herrmann, Mathias; Kormanec, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Mapping the transcription start points of the eap, emp, and vwb promoters revealed a conserved octanucleotide sequence (COS). Deleting this sequence abolished the expression of eap, emp, and vwb. However, electrophoretic mobility shift assays gave no evidence that this sequence was a binding site for SarA or SaeR, known regulators of eap and emp.

  14. Raman chemical mapping reveals site of action of HIV protease inhibitors in HPV16 E6 expressing cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Jarvis, Roger M; Allwood, J William; Batman, Gavin; Moore, Rowan E; Marsden-Edwards, Emma; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N; Goodacre, Royston

    2010-12-01

    It has been shown that the HIV protease inhibitors indinavir and lopinavir may have activity against the human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16 inhibiting HPV E6-mediated proteasomal degradation of p53 in cultured cervical carcinoma cells. However, their mode and site of action is unknown. HPV-negative C33A cervical carcinoma cells and the same cells stably transfected with E6 (C33AE6) were exposed to indinavir and lopinavir at concentrations of 1 mM and 30 μM, respectively. The intracellular distribution of metabolites and metabolic changes induced by these treatments were investigated by Raman microspectroscopic imaging combined with the analysis of cell fractionation products by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). A uniform cellular distribution of proteins was found in drug-treated cells irrespective of cell type. Indinavir was observed to co-localise with nucleic acid in the nucleus, but only in E6 expressing cells. Principal components analysis (PCA) score maps generated on the full Raman hypercube and the corresponding PCA loadings plots revealed that the majority of metabolic variations influenced by the drug exposure within the cells were associated with changes in nucleic acids. Analysis of cell fractionation products by LC-MS confirmed that the level of indinavir in nuclear extracts was approximately eight-fold greater than in the cytoplasm. These data demonstrate that indinavir undergoes enhanced nuclear accumulation in E6-expressing cells, which suggests that this is the most likely site of action for this compound against HPV.

  15. Using patient serum to epitope map soybean glycinins reveals common epitopes shared with many legumes and tree nuts.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Hanaa; Gagnon, Christine; Cober, Elroy; Gleddie, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Soybean consumption is increasing in many Western diets; however, recent reviews suggest that the prevalence of soy allergy can be as high as 0.5% for the general population and up to 13% for children. The immunoglobulin-E (IgE) binding of sera from six soy-sensitive adult human subjects to soybean proteins separated by 2D gel electrophoresis was studied. Synthetic peptide sets spanning the mature glycinin subunit A2 and A3 primary sequences were used to map the IgE-binding regions. Putative epitopes identified in this study were also localized on glycinin hexamer models using bioinformatics software. We identified linear IgE-binding epitopes of the major storage protein Gly m 6 by screening individual soy-sensitive patient sera. These epitopes were then further analysed by 3D in silico model localization and compared to other plant storage protein epitopes. Web-based software applications were also used to study the ability to accurately predict epitopes with mixed results. A total of nine putative IgE-binding epitopes were identified in the glycinin A3 (A3.1-A3.3) and A2 (A2.1-A2.6) subunits. Most patients' sera IgE bound to only one or two epitopes, except for one patient's serum which bound to four different A2 epitopes. Two epitopes (A3.2 and A2.4) overlapped with a previously identified epitope hot spot of 11S globulins from other plant species. Most epitopes were predicted to be exposed on the surface of the 3D model of the glycinin hexamer. Amino acid sequence alignments of soybean acidic glycinins and other plant globulins revealed one dominant epitope hot spot among the four reported hot spots. This study may be helpful for future development of soy allergy immunotherapy and diagnosis.

  16. Gene Organization in Rice Revealed by Full-Length cDNA Mapping and Gene Expression Analysis through Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Kouji; Doi, Koji; Nagata, Toshifumi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Kohji; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Kawai, Jun; Nakamura, Mari; Hirozane-Kishikawa, Tomoko; Kanagawa, Saeko; Arakawa, Takahiro; Takahashi-Iida, Juri; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Sasaki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Shiro; Tagami, Michihira; Yamagata, Harumi; Kurita, Kanako; Kamiya, Kozue; Yamamoto, Mayu; Kikuta, Ari; Bito, Takahito; Fujitsuka, Nahoko; Ito, Kazue; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Choi, Il-Ryong; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Takashi; Murakami, Kazuo; Matsubara, Ken-ichi; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2007-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a model organism for the functional genomics of monocotyledonous plants since the genome size is considerably smaller than those of other monocotyledonous plants. Although highly accurate genome sequences of indica and japonica rice are available, additional resources such as full-length complementary DNA (FL-cDNA) sequences are also indispensable for comprehensive analyses of gene structure and function. We cross-referenced 28.5K individual loci in the rice genome defined by mapping of 578K FL-cDNA clones with the 56K loci predicted in the TIGR genome assembly. Based on the annotation status and the presence of corresponding cDNA clones, genes were classified into 23K annotated expressed (AE) genes, 33K annotated non-expressed (ANE) genes, and 5.5K non-annotated expressed (NAE) genes. We developed a 60mer oligo-array for analysis of gene expression from each locus. Analysis of gene structures and expression levels revealed that the general features of gene structure and expression of NAE and ANE genes were considerably different from those of AE genes. The results also suggested that the cloning efficiency of rice FL-cDNA is associated with the transcription activity of the corresponding genetic locus, although other factors may also have an effect. Comparison of the coverage of FL-cDNA among gene families suggested that FL-cDNA from genes encoding rice- or eukaryote-specific domains, and those involved in regulatory functions were difficult to produce in bacterial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that rice genes can be divided into distinct groups based on transcription activity and gene structure, and that the coverage bias of FL-cDNA clones exists due to the incompatibility of certain eukaryotic genes in bacteria. PMID:18043742

  17. A SNP Based High-Density Linkage Map of Apis cerana Reveals a High Recombination Rate Similar to Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zachary Y.; Wu, Xiao Bo; Zhu, Yong Qiang; Zheng, Hua Jun; Zeng, Zhi Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Background The Eastern honey bee, Apis cerana Fabricius, is distributed in southern and eastern Asia, from India and China to Korea and Japan and southeast to the Moluccas. This species is also widely kept for honey production besides Apis mellifera. Apis cerana is also a model organism for studying social behavior, caste determination, mating biology, sexual selection, and host-parasite interactions. Few resources are available for molecular research in this species, and a linkage map was never constructed. A linkage map is a prerequisite for quantitative trait loci mapping and for analyzing genome structure. We used the Chinese honey bee, Apis cerana cerana to construct the first linkage map in the Eastern honey bee. Results F2 workers (N = 103) were genotyped for 126,990 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After filtering low quality and those not passing the Mendel test, we obtained 3,000 SNPs, 1,535 of these were informative and used to construct a linkage map. The preliminary map contains 19 linkage groups, we then mapped the 19 linkage groups to 16 chromosomes by comparing the markers to the genome of A. mellfiera. The final map contains 16 linkage groups with a total of 1,535 markers. The total genetic distance is 3,942.7 centimorgans (cM) with the largest linkage group (180 loci) measuring 574.5 cM. Average marker interval for all markers across the 16 linkage groups is 2.6 cM. Conclusion We constructed a high density linkage map for A. c. cerana with 1,535 markers. Because the map is based on SNP markers, it will enable easier and faster genotyping assays than randomly amplified polymorphic DNA or microsatellite based maps used in A. mellifera. PMID:24130775

  18. Maps & minds : mapping through the ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1984-01-01

    Throughout time, maps have expressed our understanding of our world. Human affairs have been influenced strongly by the quality of maps available to us at the major turning points in our history. "Maps & Minds" traces the ebb and flow of a few central ideas in the mainstream of mapping. Our expanding knowledge of our cosmic neighborhood stems largely from a small number of simple but grand ideas, vigorously pursued.

  19. Detecting cosmic strings in the CMB with the Canny algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Stephen; Brandenberger, Robert H; Berger, Joshua E-mail: jb454@cornell.edu

    2008-04-15

    Line discontinuities in cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps are a distinctive prediction of models with cosmic strings. These signatures are visible in anisotropy maps with good angular resolution and should be identifiable using edge-detection algorithms. One such algorithm is the Canny algorithm. We study the potential of this algorithm to pick out the line discontinuities generated by cosmic strings. By applying the algorithm to small-scale microwave anisotropy maps generated from theoretical models with and without cosmic strings, we find that, given an angular resolution of several minutes of arc, cosmic strings can be detected down to a limit of the mass per unit length of the string which is one order of magnitude lower than the current upper bounds.

  20. Instantaneous and scale-versatile gourdron theory: pair momentum equation, quasi-stability concept, and statistical indeterminacy revealing masses of elementary, bio-molecular, and cosmic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Flexible particles, including hadrons, atoms, hydrated biological molecules, cells, organs containing water, liquid fuel droplets in engines, and stars commonly break up after becoming a gourd shape rather than that of a string; this leads to cyto-fluid dynamics that can explain the proliferation, differentiation, and replication of biomolecules, onto-biology that clarifies the relationship between information, structure, and function, and the gourd theory that clarifies masses, including quark-leptons and Plank energy. The masses are related to the super-magic numbers, including the asymmetric silver ratio and symmetric yamato ratio, and reveal further mechanisms underlying symmetry breaking. This paper gives further theoretical basis and evidence, because the gourd theory reported previously is a little analogical and instinctive.

  1. SPACE: the SPectroscopic, All-Sky Cosmic Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimatti, A.; Robberto, M.; Baugh, C.; Beckwith, S. W. V.; Content, R.; Daddi, E.; deLucia, G.; Garilli, B.; Guzzo, L.; Kauffmann, G.; Lehnert, M.; Maccagni, D.; Martinez-Sansigre, A.; Pasian, F.; Reid, I. N.; Rosati, P.; Salvaterra, R.; Stiavelli, M.; Wang, Y.; ZapateroOsorio, M.; Balcells, M.; Bersanelli, M.; Gardner, J.P.; Kimble, R.; Clampin, M.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the scientific motivations, the mission concept and the instrumentation of SPACE, a class-M mission proposed for concept study at the first call of the ESA Cosmic-Vision 2015-2025 planning cycle. SPACE aims at producing the largest three-dimensional evolutionary map of the Universe over the past 10 billion years by taking near-IR spectra and measuring redshifts of more than half a billion galaxies at 0 < z < 2 down to AB approximately 23 over 37r sr of the sky. In addition, SPACE will also target a smaller sky field, performing a deep spectroscopic survey of millions of galaxies to AB approximately 26 and at 2 < z < l0+. Owing to the depth, redshift range, volume coverage and quality of its spectra, SPACE will reveal with unique sensitivity most of the fundamental cosmological signatures, including the power spectrum of density fluctuations and its turnover, the baryonic acoustic oscillations imprinted when matter and radiation decoupled, the distance-luminosity relation of cosmological supernovae, the evolution of the cosmic expansion rate, the growth rate of cosmic large-scale structure, the large scale distribution of galaxies. The datasets from the SPACE mission will represent a long lasting legacy that will be data mined for many years to come.

  2. The COBE cosmic 3 K anisotropy experiment: A gravity wave and cosmic string probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Smoot, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Among the experiments to be carried into orbit next year, by the COBE satellite, are differential microwave radiometers. They will make sensitive all-sky maps of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies, giving dipole, quadrupole, and higher order multipole measurements of the background radiation. The experiment will either detect, or place significant constraints on, the existence of cosmic strings and long wavelength gravity waves.

  3. Separation of Gravitational-Wave and Cosmic-Shear Contributions to Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesden, Michael; Cooray, Asantha; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2002-07-01

    Inflationary gravitational waves (GW) contribute to the curl component in the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Cosmic shear--gravitational lensing of the CMB--converts a fraction of the dominant gradient polarization to the curl component. Higher-order correlations can be used to map the cosmic shear and subtract this contribution to the curl. Arcminute resolution will be required to pursue GW amplitudes smaller than those accessible by the Planck surveyor mission. The blurring by lensing of small-scale CMB power leads with this reconstruction technique to a minimum detectable GW amplitude corresponding to an inflation energy near 10(sup 15) GeV .

  4. SNP Discovery and Chromosome Anchoring Provide the First Physically-Anchored Hexaploid Oat Map and Reveal Synteny with Model Species

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Shiaoman; Jellen, Eric N.; Carson, Martin L.; Rines, Howard W.; Obert, Donald E.; Lutz, Joseph D.; Shackelford, Irene; Korol, Abraham B.; Wight, Charlene P.; Gardner, Kyle M.; Hattori, Jiro; Beattie, Aaron D.; Bjørnstad, Åsmund; Bonman, J. Michael; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Sorrells, Mark E.; Brown-Guedira, Gina L.; Mitchell Fetch, Jennifer W.; Harrison, Stephen A.; Howarth, Catherine J.; Ibrahim, Amir; Kolb, Frederic L.; McMullen, Michael S.; Murphy, J. Paul; Ohm, Herbert W.; Rossnagel, Brian G.; Yan, Weikai; Miclaus, Kelci J.; Hiller, Jordan; Maughan, Peter J.; Redman Hulse, Rachel R.; Anderson, Joseph M.; Islamovic, Emir

    2013-01-01

    A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42) has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources. PMID:23533580

  5. SNP discovery and chromosome anchoring provide the first physically-anchored hexaploid oat map and reveal synteny with model species.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Rebekah E; Tinker, Nicholas A; Lazo, Gerard R; Chao, Shiaoman; Jellen, Eric N; Carson, Martin L; Rines, Howard W; Obert, Donald E; Lutz, Joseph D; Shackelford, Irene; Korol, Abraham B; Wight, Charlene P; Gardner, Kyle M; Hattori, Jiro; Beattie, Aaron D; Bjørnstad, Åsmund; Bonman, J Michael; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Sorrells, Mark E; Brown-Guedira, Gina L; Mitchell Fetch, Jennifer W; Harrison, Stephen A; Howarth, Catherine J; Ibrahim, Amir; Kolb, Frederic L; McMullen, Michael S; Murphy, J Paul; Ohm, Herbert W; Rossnagel, Brian G; Yan, Weikai; Miclaus, Kelci J; Hiller, Jordan; Maughan, Peter J; Redman Hulse, Rachel R; Anderson, Joseph M; Islamovic, Emir; Jackson, Eric W

    2013-01-01

    A physically anchored consensus map is foundational to modern genomics research; however, construction of such a map in oat (Avena sativa L., 2n = 6x = 42) has been hindered by the size and complexity of the genome, the scarcity of robust molecular markers, and the lack of aneuploid stocks. Resources developed in this study include a modified SNP discovery method for complex genomes, a diverse set of oat SNP markers, and a novel chromosome-deficient SNP anchoring strategy. These resources were applied to build the first complete, physically-anchored consensus map of hexaploid oat. Approximately 11,000 high-confidence in silico SNPs were discovered based on nine million inter-varietal sequence reads of genomic and cDNA origin. GoldenGate genotyping of 3,072 SNP assays yielded 1,311 robust markers, of which 985 were mapped in 390 recombinant-inbred lines from six bi-parental mapping populations ranging in size from 49 to 97 progeny. The consensus map included 985 SNPs and 68 previously-published markers, resolving 21 linkage groups with a total map distance of 1,838.8 cM. Consensus linkage groups were assigned to 21 chromosomes using SNP deletion analysis of chromosome-deficient monosomic hybrid stocks. Alignments with sequenced genomes of rice and Brachypodium provide evidence for extensive conservation of genomic regions, and renewed encouragement for orthology-based genomic discovery in this important hexaploid species. These results also provide a framework for high-resolution genetic analysis in oat, and a model for marker development and map construction in other species with complex genomes and limited resources. PMID:23533580

  6. Global anisotropies in TeV cosmic rays related to the Sun's local galactic environment from IBEX.

    PubMed

    Schwadron, N A; Adams, F C; Christian, E R; Desiati, P; Frisch, P; Funsten, H O; Jokipii, J R; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Zank, G P

    2014-02-28

    Observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have shown enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission from a narrow, circular ribbon likely centered on the direction of the local interstellar medium (LISM) magnetic field. Here, we show that recent determinations of the local interstellar velocity, based on interstellar atom measurements with IBEX, are consistent with the interstellar modulation of high-energy (tera-electron volts, TeV) cosmic rays and diffusive propagation from supernova sources revealed in global anisotropy maps of ground-based high-energy cosmic-ray observatories (Milagro, Asγ, and IceCube). Establishing a consistent local interstellar magnetic field direction using IBEX ENAs at hundreds to thousands of eV and galactic cosmic rays at tens of TeV has wide-ranging implications for the structure of our heliosphere and its interactions with the LISM, which is particularly important at the time when the Voyager spacecraft are leaving our heliosphere.

  7. Global Anisotropies in TeV Cosmic Rays Related to the Sun's Local Galactic Environment from IBEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Adams, F. C.; Christian, E. R.; Desiati, P.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H. O.; Jokipii, J. R.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Observations with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have shown enhanced energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission from a narrow, circular ribbon likely centered on the direction of the local interstellar medium (LISM) magnetic field. Here, we show that recent determinations of the local interstellar velocity, based on interstellar atom measurements with IBEX, are consistent with the interstellar modulation of high-energy (tera-electron volts, TeV) cosmic rays and diffusive propagation from supernova sources revealed in global anisotropy maps of ground-based high-energy cosmic-ray observatories (Milagro, Asg, and IceCube). Establishing a consistent local interstellar magnetic field direction using IBEX ENAs at hundreds to thousands of eV and galactic cosmic rays at tens of TeV has wide-ranging implications for the structure of our heliosphere and its interactions with the LISM, which is particularly important at the time when the Voyager spacecraft are leaving our heliosphere.

  8. Cosmic rays from cosmic strings with condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-02-15

    We revisit the production of cosmic rays by cusps on cosmic strings. If a scalar field ('Higgs') has a linear interaction with the string world sheet, such as would occur if there is a bosonic condensate on the string, cusps on string loops emit narrow beams of very high energy Higgses which then decay to give a flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. The ultrahigh energy flux and the gamma to proton ratio agree with observations if the string scale is {approx}10{sup 13} GeV. The diffuse gamma ray and proton fluxes are well below current bounds. Strings that are lighter and have linear interactions with scalars produce an excess of direct and diffuse cosmic rays and are ruled out by observations, while heavier strings ({approx}10{sup 15} GeV) are constrained by their gravitational signatures. This leaves a narrow window of parameter space for the existence of cosmic strings with bosonic condensates.

  9. Searching for signatures of cosmic superstrings in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2010-02-01

    Because cosmic superstrings generically form junctions and gauge theoretic strings typically do not, junctions may provide a signature to distinguish between cosmic superstrings and gauge theoretic cosmic strings. In cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps, cosmic strings lead to distinctive line discontinuities. String junctions lead to junctions in these line discontinuities. In turn, edge detection algorithms such as the Canny algorithm can be used to search for signatures of strings in anisotropy maps. We apply the Canny algorithm to simulated maps which contain the effects of cosmic strings with and without string junctions. The Canny algorithm produces edge maps. To distinguish between edge maps from string simulations with and without junctions, we examine the density distribution of edges and pixels crossed by edges. We find that in string simulations without Gaussian noise (such as produced by the dominant inflationary fluctuations) our analysis of the output data from the Canny algorithm can clearly distinguish between simulations with and without string junctions. In the presence of Gaussian noise at the level expected from the current bounds on the contribution of cosmic strings to the total power spectrum of density fluctuations, the distinction between models with and without junctions is more difficult. However, by carefully analyzing the data the models can still be differentiated.

  10. Imaging the cosmic microwave background: The BEAST experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natoli, P.; Bersanelli, M.; Childers, J.; Figueiredo, N.; Halevi, D.; Kangas, M.; Levy, A.; Lubin, P.; Mandolesi, N.; Meinhold, P.; Parendo, S.; Staren, J.; Villela, T.; Wuensche, C.

    2001-02-01

    We describe the Santa Barbara BEAST experiment, a balloon borne telescope to image the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation anisotropy pattern. Some aspects of the map making pipeline are also discussed. .

  11. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus. The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  12. The Genetic Linkage Map of the Medicinal Mushroom Agaricus subrufescens Reveals Highly Conserved Macrosynteny with the Congeneric Species Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rocha de Brito, Manuela; Cabannes, Delphine; Clément, Aurélien; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Comparative linkage mapping can rapidly facilitate the transfer of genetic information from model species to orphan species. This macrosynteny analysis approach has been extensively used in plant species, but few example are available in fungi, and even fewer in mushroom crop species. Among the latter, the Agaricus genus comprises the most cultivable or potentially cultivable species. Agaricus bisporus, the button mushroom, is the model for edible and cultivable mushrooms. We have developed the first genetic linkage map for the basidiomycete A. subrufescens, an emerging mushroom crop known for its therapeutic properties and potential medicinal applications. The map includes 202 markers distributed over 16 linkage groups (LG), and covers a total length of 1701 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.2 cM. Using 96 homologous loci, we also demonstrated the high level of macrosynteny with the genome of A. bisporus The 13 main LG of A. subrufescens were syntenic to the 13 A. bisporus chromosomes. A disrupted synteny was observed for the three remaining A. subrufescens LG. Electronic mapping of a collection of A. subrufescens expressed sequence tags on A. bisporus genome showed that the homologous loci were evenly spread, with the exception of a few local hot or cold spots of homology. Our results were discussed in the light of Agaricus species evolution process. The map provides a framework for future genetic or genomic studies of the medicinal mushroom A. subrufescens. PMID:26921302

  13. Integration of high-resolution physical and genetic map reveals differential recombination frequency between chromosomes and the genome assembling quality in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qunfeng; He, Yuhua; Cheng, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Li, Ji; Huang, Sanwen; Chen, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Cucumber is an important model crop and the first species sequenced in Cucurbitaceae family. Compared to the fast increasing genetic and genomics resources, the molecular cytogenetic researches in cucumber are still very limited, which results in directly the shortage of relation between plenty of physical sequences or genetic data and chromosome structure. We mapped twenty-three fosmids anchored by SSR markers from LG-3, the longest linkage group, and LG-4, the shortest linkage group on pachytene chromosomes 3 and 4, using uorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Integrated molecular cytogenetic maps of chromosomes 3 and 4 were constructed. Except for three SSR markers located on heterochromatin region, the cytological order of markers was concordant with those on the linkage maps. Distinct structural differences between chromosomes 3 and 4 were revealed by the high resolution pachytene chromosomes. The extreme difference of genetic length between LG-3 and LG-4 was mainly attributed to the difference of overall recombination frequency. The significant differentiation of heterochromatin contents in chromosomes 3 and 4 might have a direct correlation with recombination frequency. Meanwhile, the uneven distribution of recombination frequency along chromosome 4 was observed, and recombination frequency of the long arm was nearly 3.5 times higher than that of the short arm. The severe suppression of recombination was exhibited in centromeric and heterochromatin domains of chromosome 4. Whereas a close correlation between the gene density and recombination frequency was observed in chromosome 4, no significant correlation was observed between them along chromosome 3. The comparison between cytogenetic and sequence maps revealed a large gap on the pericentromeric heterochromatin region of sequence map of chromosome 4. These results showed that integrated molecular cytogenetic maps can provide important information for the study of genetic and genomics in cucumber.

  14. Cosmic electrons. [literature review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1974-01-01

    The published literature on cosmic electrons is summarized. The primary and secondary sources of cosmic electrons are discussed, and the propagation of the electrons in the interstellar medium is studied with respect to energy loss mechanisms, age distributions, and spectral modifications during flight. Various portions of the electron and positron spectra are then considered in relation to problems of astrophysics. New information is presented on such topics as the origin of low-energy positrons, the decay kinematics of the pi-mu-e process, the application of age distributions for nuclear cosmic rays to cosmic electrons, and the possibility of nonidentical sources for cosmic electrons and protons.

  15. Insight Into Genomic Changes Accompanying Divergence: Genetic Linkage Maps and Synteny of Lucania goodei and L. parva Reveal a Robertsonian Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Berdan, Emma L.; Kozak, Genevieve M.; Ming, Ray; Rayburn, A. Lane; Kiehart, Ryan; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Linkage maps are important tools in evolutionary genetics and in studies of speciation. We performed a karyotyping study and constructed high-density linkage maps for two closely related killifish species, Lucania parva and L. goodei, that differ in salinity tolerance and still hybridize in their contact zone in Florida. Using SNPs from orthologous EST contigs, we compared synteny between the two species to determine how genomic architecture has shifted with divergence. Karyotyping revealed that L. goodei possesses 24 acrocentric chromosomes (1N) whereas L. parva possesses 23 chromosomes (1N), one of which is a large metacentric chromosome. Likewise, high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism−based linkage maps indicated 24 linkage groups for L. goodei and 23 linkage groups for L. parva. Synteny mapping revealed two linkage groups in L. goodei that were highly syntenic with the largest linkage group in L. parva. Together, this evidence points to the largest linkage group in L. parva being the result of a chromosomal fusion. We further compared synteny between Lucania with the genome of a more distant teleost relative medaka (Oryzias latipes) and found good conservation of synteny at the chromosomal level. Each Lucania LG had a single best match with each medaka chromosome. These results provide the groundwork for future studies on the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation and salinity tolerance in Lucania and other Fundulidae. PMID:24898707

  16. The Cosmic Ray Electron Excess

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Christl, M.; Ganel, O.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, J. W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible sources for the apparent excess of Cosmic Ray Electrons. The presentation reviews the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument, the various parts, how cosmic ray electrons are measured, and shows graphs that review the results of the ATIC instrument measurement. A review of Cosmic Ray Electrons models is explored, along with the source candidates. Scenarios for the excess are reviewed: Supernova remnants (SNR) Pulsar Wind nebulae, or Microquasars. Each of these has some problem that mitigates the argument. The last possibility discussed is Dark Matter. The Anti-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) mission is to search for evidence of annihilations of dark matter particles, to search for anti-nuclei, to test cosmic-ray propagation models, and to measure electron and positron spectra. There are slides explaining the results of Pamela and how to compare these with those of the ATIC experiment. Dark matter annihilation is then reviewed, which represent two types of dark matter: Neutralinos, and kaluza-Kline (KK) particles, which are next explained. The future astrophysical measurements, those from GLAST LAT, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and HEPCAT are reviewed, in light of assisting in finding an explanation for the observed excess. Also the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could help by revealing if there are extra dimensions.

  17. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N.; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L.; et al

    2015-03-20

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, orderedmore » restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.« less

  18. Scanning the landscape of genome architecture of non-O1 and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae by whole genome mapping reveals extensive population genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Carol; Henry, Matthew; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Awosika, Joy; Briska, Adam; Ptashkin, Ryan N; Wagner, Trevor; Rajanna, Chythanya; Tsang, Hsinyi; Johnson, Shannon L; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Chain, Patrick S G; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2015-01-01

    Historically, cholera outbreaks have been linked to V. cholerae O1 serogroup strains or its derivatives of the O37 and O139 serogroups. A genomic study on the 2010 Haiti cholera outbreak strains highlighted the putative role of non O1/non-O139 V. cholerae in causing cholera and the lack of genomic sequences of such strains from around the world. Here we address these gaps by scanning a global collection of V. cholerae strains as a first step towards understanding the population genetic diversity and epidemic potential of non O1/non-O139 strains. Whole Genome Mapping (Optical Mapping) based bar coding produces a high resolution, ordered restriction map, depicting a complete view of the unique chromosomal architecture of an organism. To assess the genomic diversity of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae, we applied a Whole Genome Mapping strategy on a well-defined and geographically and temporally diverse strain collection, the Sakazaki serogroup type strains. Whole Genome Map data on 91 of the 206 serogroup type strains support the hypothesis that V. cholerae has an unprecedented genetic and genomic structural diversity. Interestingly, we discovered chromosomal fusions in two unusual strains that possess a single chromosome instead of the two chromosomes usually found in V. cholerae. We also found pervasive chromosomal rearrangements such as duplications and indels in many strains. The majority of Vibrio genome sequences currently in public databases are unfinished draft sequences. The Whole Genome Mapping approach presented here enables rapid screening of large strain collections to capture genomic complexities that would not have been otherwise revealed by unfinished draft genome sequencing and thus aids in assembling and finishing draft sequences of complex genomes. Furthermore, Whole Genome Mapping allows for prediction of novel V. cholerae non-O1/non-O139 strains that may have the potential to cause future cholera outbreaks.

  19. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  20. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    neutrons, liberating a little energy and creating complexity. Then, the expanding universe cooled some more, and neutrons and protons, no longer kept apart by immense temperatures, found themselves unstable and formed helium nuclei. Then, a little more cooling, and atomic nuclei and electrons were no longer kept apart, and the universe became transparent. Then a little more cooling, and the next instability began: gravitation pulled matter together across cosmic distances to form stars and galaxies. This instability is described as a "negative heat capadty" in which extracting energy from a gravitating system makes it hotter -- clearly the 2nd law of thermodynamics does not apply here! (This is the physicist's part of the answer to e e cummings' question: what is the wonder that's keeping the stars apart?) Then, the next instability is that hydrogen and helium nuclei can fuse together to release energy and make stars burn for billions of years. And then at the end of the fuel source, stars become unstable and explode and liberate the chemical elements back into space. And because of that, on planets like Earth, sustained energy flows support the development of additional instabilities and all kinds of complex patterns. Gravitational instability pulls the densest materials into the core of the Earth, leaving a thin skin of water and air, and makes the interior churn incessantly as heat flows outwards. And the heat from the sun, received mostly near the equator and flowing towards the poles, supports the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulations. And because or that, the physical Earth is full of natural chemical laboratories, concentrating elements here, mixing them there, raising and lowering temperatures, ceaselessly experimenting with uncountable events where new instabilities can arise. At least one of them was the new experiment called life. Now that we know that there are at least as many planets as there are stars, it is hard to imagine that nature's ceasess

  1. SNP discovery and chromosome anchoring provide the first physically-anchored hexaploid oat map and reveal synteny with model species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the first time in many years a comprehensive genome map for cultivated oat has been constructed using a combination of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and validated with a collection of cytogenetically defined germplasm lines. The markers were able to help distinguish the three geno...

  2. A Linkage Map Reveals a Complex Basis for Segregation Distortion in an Interpopulation Cross in the Moss Ceratodon purpureus

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Stuart F.; Willis, John H.; Shaw, A. Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    We report the construction of a linkage map for the moss Ceratodon purpureus (n = 13), based on a cross between geographically distant populations, and provide the first experimental confirmation of maternal chloroplast inheritance in bryophytes. From a mapping population of 288 recombinant haploid gametophytes, genotyped at 121 polymorphic AFLP loci, three gene-based nuclear loci, one chloroplast marker, and sex, we resolved 15 linkage groups resulting in a map length of ∼730 cM. We estimate that the map covers more than three-quarters of the C. purpureus genome. Approximately 35% of the loci were sex linked, not including those in recombining pseudoautosomal regions. Nearly 45% of the loci exhibited significant segregation distortion (α = 0.05). Several pairs of unlinked distorted loci showed significant deviations from multiplicative genotypic frequencies, suggesting that distortion arises from genetic interactions among loci. The distorted autosomal loci all exhibited an excess of the maternal allele, suggesting that these interactions may involve nuclear–cytoplasmic factors. The sex ratio of the progeny was significantly male biased, and the pattern of nonrandom associations among loci indicates that this results from interactions between the sex chromosomes. These results suggest that even in interpopulation crosses, multiple mechanisms act to influence segregation ratios. PMID:17603096

  3. Chandra Reveals Pileup on Cosmic Speedway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    Lobes of unexpectedly hot gas speeding away from a black hole in our galaxy have been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The high temperature and the distance of the lobes from the black hole indicate that violent collisions are occurring between clumps of gas expelled from the vicinity of the black hole. "Just like a super highway, it's a dangerous world out there," said Simone Migliari on the University of Amsterdam, lead author on a paper from a September 6, 2002 issue of Science magazine. "Blobs of gas are getting rear-ended at speeds in excess of a hundred million miles per hours!" The team of scientists from the University of Amsterdam and the National Institute for Space Research (SRON) in Utrecht, The Netherlands, observed the source SS433, a binary star system in our galaxy that consists of a black hole and a massive star. They detected two lobes of hot gas with temperatures of 50 million degrees that are 0.25 light years on either side of the black hole system. A key finding was evidence indicating rapidly moving hot iron atoms. The energies of the X-rays from the iron atoms in the two clouds were shifted by the Doppler effect - the same process that causes the frequency of an ambulance's siren to shift up and down as the ambulance approaches and recedes. By measuring this shift, they concluded that the lobes move away from the vicinity of the black hole in opposite directions at a quarter of the speed of light. The observations indicate that one lobe is moving along a line tilted toward Earth whereas the other one is moving along a line tilted away from Earth. The detection of the hot gas lobes some distance away from the central black hole was a surprise. Earlier observations by Chandra and the Hubble Space Telescope had shown that gas was cooling as it expanded away from the black hole. This led scientists to predict that no hot gas would be found further than a few million kilometers from the black hole. "These new observations prove that the expansion cooling model doesn't work," said Rob Fender of the University of Amsterdam, and a coauthor on the paper. "The gas must get reheated, most likely by high-velocity blobs smashing into lower speed ones." This model is also supported by long-term optical monitoring observations that indicate that matter is ejected every few minutes in bullet-like gaseous blobs from the vicinity of the black hole. The bullets would travel outward for several months without colliding until a faster bullet runs into a slower one, precipitating a pileup that reheats the gas. Future Chandra observations will test this model. The team, which also included Mariano Mendez of SRON, observed SS 433 with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on June 27, 2000, for a period of 9,600 seconds. ACIS was built for NASA by Penn State, University Park, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science in Washington. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, Calif., is the prime contractor for the spacecraft. The Smithsonian's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass.

  4. Cosmic Inflation

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    In 1964, scientists discovered a faint radio hiss coming from the heavens and realized that the hiss wasn’t just noise. It was a message from eons ago; specifically the remnants of the primordial fireball, cooled to about 3 degrees above absolute zero. Subsequent research revealed that the radio hiss was the same in every direction. The temperature of the early universe was uniform to at better than a part in a hundred thousand. And this was weird. According to the prevailing theory, the two sides of the universe have never been in contact. So how could two places that had never been in contact be so similar? One possible explanation was proposed in 1979. Called inflation, the theory required that early in the history of the universe, the universe expanded faster than the speed of light. Confused? Watch this video as Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln makes sense of this mind-bending idea.

  5. Cosmic Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2015-11-21

    In 1964, scientists discovered a faint radio hiss coming from the heavens and realized that the hiss wasn’t just noise. It was a message from eons ago; specifically the remnants of the primordial fireball, cooled to about 3 degrees above absolute zero. Subsequent research revealed that the radio hiss was the same in every direction. The temperature of the early universe was uniform to at better than a part in a hundred thousand. And this was weird. According to the prevailing theory, the two sides of the universe have never been in contact. So how could two places that had never been in contact be so similar? One possible explanation was proposed in 1979. Called inflation, the theory required that early in the history of the universe, the universe expanded faster than the speed of light. Confused? Watch this video as Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln makes sense of this mind-bending idea.

  6. A DNA-centric protein interaction map of ultraconserved elements reveals contribution of transcription factor binding hubs to conservation.

    PubMed

    Viturawong, Tar; Meissner, Felix; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-10-31

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) have been the subject of great interest because of their extreme sequence identity and their seemingly cryptic and largely uncharacterized functions. Although in vivo studies of UCE sequences have demonstrated regulatory activity, protein interactors at UCEs have not been systematically identified. Here, we combined high-throughput affinity purification, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and SILAC quantification to map intrinsic protein interactions for 193 UCE sequences. The interactome contains over 400 proteins, including transcription factors with known developmental roles. We demonstrate based on our data that UCEs consist of strongly conserved overlapping binding sites. We also generated a fine-resolution interactome of a UCE, confirming the hub-like nature of the element. The intrinsic interactions mapped here are reflected in open chromatin, as indicated by comparison with existing ChIP data. Our study argues for a strong contribution of protein-DNA interactions to UCE conservation and provides a basis for further functional characterization of UCEs.

  7. QTL mapping reveals the genetic architecture of loci affecting pre- and post-zygotic isolating barriers in Louisiana Iris

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hybridization among Louisiana Irises has been well established and the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation is known to affect the potential for and the directionality of introgression between taxa. Here we use co-dominant markers to identify regions where QTL are located both within and between backcross maps to compare the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation and fitness traits across treatments and years. Results QTL mapping was used to elucidate the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation between Iris fulva and Iris brevicaulis. Homologous co-dominant EST-SSR markers scored in two backcross populations between I. fulva and I. brevicaulis were used to generate genetic linkage maps. These were used as the framework for mapping QTL associated with variation in 11 phenotypic traits likely responsible for reproductive isolation and fitness. QTL were dispersed throughout the genome, with the exception of one region of a single linkage group (LG) where QTL for flowering time, sterility, and fruit production clustered. In most cases, homologous QTL were not identified in both backcross populations, however, homologous QTL for flowering time, number of growth points per rhizome, number of nodes per inflorescence, and number of flowers per node were identified on several linkage groups. Conclusions Two different traits affecting reproductive isolation, flowering time and sterility, exhibit different genetic architectures, with numerous QTL across the Iris genome controlling flowering time and fewer, less distributed QTL affecting sterility. QTL for traits affecting fitness are largely distributed across the genome with occasional overlap, especially on LG 4, where several QTL increasing fitness and decreasing sterility cluster. Given the distribution and effect direction of QTL affecting reproductive isolation and fitness, we have predicted genomic regions where introgression may be more likely to occur (those regions associated with

  8. Genomewide mapping reveals a combination of different genetic effects causing the genetic basis of heterosis in two elite rice hybrids.

    PubMed

    Li, Lanzhi; He, Xiaohong; Zhang, Hongyan; Wang, Zhiming; Sun, Congwei; Mou, Tongmin; Li, Xinqi; Zhang, Yuanming; Hu, Zhongli

    2015-06-01

    North Carolina design III (NCIII) is one of the most powerful and widely used mating designs for understanding the genetic basis of heterosis. However, the quantitative trait mapping (QTL) conducted in previous studies with this design was mainly based on analysis of variance (ANOVA), composite interval or multiple interval mapping methods. These methodologies could not investigate all kinds of genetic effects, especially epistatic effects, simultaneously on the whole genome. In this study, with a statistical method for mapping epistatic QTL associated with heterosis using the recombinant inbred line (RIL)-based NCIII design, we conducted QTL mapping for nine agronomic traits of two elite hybrids to characterize the mode of gene action contributing to heterosis on a whole genomewide scale. In total, 23 main-effect QTL (M-QTL) and 23 digenic interactions in IJ (indica x japonica) hybrids, 11 M-QTL and 82 digenic interactions in II (indica x indica) hybrid QTLs were identified in the present study. The variation explained by individual M-QTL or interactions ranged from 2.3 to 11.0%. The number of digenic interactions and the total variation explained by interactions of each trait were larger than those of M-QTL. The augmented genetic effect ratio of most M-QTL and digenic interactions in (L1 - L2) data of two backcross populations (L1 and L2) showed complete dominance or overdominance, and in (L1 + L2) data showed an additive effect. Our results indicated that the dominance, overdominance and epistatic effect were important in conditioning the genetic basis of heterosis of the two elite hybrids. The relative contributions of the genetic components varied with traits and the genetic basis of the two hybrids was different.

  9. A high-resolution linkage map for the Z chromosome in chicken reveals hot spots for recombination.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, P; Strömstedt, L; Tordoir, X; Foglio, M; Heath, S; Lechner, D; Hellström, A R; Tixier-Boichard, M; Lathrop, M; Gut, I G; Andersson, L

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive linkage map for chicken chromosome Z was constructed as the result of a large-scale screening of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A total of 308 SNPs were assigned to Z based on the genotype distribution among 182 birds representing several populations. A linkage map comprising 210 markers and spanning 200.9 cM was established by analyzing a small Red junglefowl/White Leghorn intercross. There was excellent agreement between the linkage map for Z and a recently released assembly of the chicken genome (May 2006). Almost all SNPs assigned to chromosome Z in the present study are on Z in the new genome assembly. The remaining 12 loci are all found on unassigned contigs that can now be assigned to Z. The average recombination rate was estimated at 2.7 cM/Mb but there was a very uneven distribution of recombination events with both cold and hot spots of recombination. The existence of one of the major hot spots of recombination, located around position 39.4 Mb, was supported by the observed pattern of linkage disequilibrium. Thirteen markers from unassigned contigs were shown to be located on chromosome W. Three of these contigs included genes that have homologues on chromosome Z. The preliminary assignment of three more genes to the gene-poor W chromosome may be important for studies on the mechanism of sex determination and dosage compensation in birds. PMID:17675841

  10. Mesoscale fronts as foraging habitats: composite front mapping reveals oceanographic drivers of habitat use for a pelagic seabird.

    PubMed

    Scales, Kylie L; Miller, Peter I; Embling, Clare B; Ingram, Simon N; Pirotta, Enrico; Votier, Stephen C

    2014-11-01

    The oceanographic drivers of marine vertebrate habitat use are poorly understood yet fundamental to our knowledge of marine ecosystem functioning. Here, we use composite front mapping and high-resolution GPS tracking to determine the significance of mesoscale oceanographic fronts as physical drivers of foraging habitat selection in northern gannets Morus bassanus. We tracked 66 breeding gannets from a Celtic Sea colony over 2 years and used residence time to identify area-restricted search (ARS) behaviour. Composite front maps identified thermal and chlorophyll-a mesoscale fronts at two different temporal scales-(i) contemporaneous fronts and (ii) seasonally persistent frontal zones. Using generalized additive models (GAMs), with generalized estimating equations (GEE-GAMs) to account for serial autocorrelation in tracking data, we found that gannets do not adjust their behaviour in response to contemporaneous fronts. However, ARS was more likely to occur within spatially predictable, seasonally persistent frontal zones (GAMs). Our results provide proof of concept that composite front mapping is a useful tool for studying the influence of oceanographic features on animal movements. Moreover, we highlight that frontal persistence is a crucial element of the formation of pelagic foraging hotspots for mobile marine vertebrates.

  11. Mesoscale fronts as foraging habitats: composite front mapping reveals oceanographic drivers of habitat use for a pelagic seabird

    PubMed Central

    Scales, Kylie L.; Miller, Peter I.; Embling, Clare B.; Ingram, Simon N.; Pirotta, Enrico; Votier, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The oceanographic drivers of marine vertebrate habitat use are poorly understood yet fundamental to our knowledge of marine ecosystem functioning. Here, we use composite front mapping and high-resolution GPS tracking to determine the significance of mesoscale oceanographic fronts as physical drivers of foraging habitat selection in northern gannets Morus bassanus. We tracked 66 breeding gannets from a Celtic Sea colony over 2 years and used residence time to identify area-restricted search (ARS) behaviour. Composite front maps identified thermal and chlorophyll-a mesoscale fronts at two different temporal scales—(i) contemporaneous fronts and (ii) seasonally persistent frontal zones. Using generalized additive models (GAMs), with generalized estimating equations (GEE-GAMs) to account for serial autocorrelation in tracking data, we found that gannets do not adjust their behaviour in response to contemporaneous fronts. However, ARS was more likely to occur within spatially predictable, seasonally persistent frontal zones (GAMs). Our results provide proof of concept that composite front mapping is a useful tool for studying the influence of oceanographic features on animal movements. Moreover, we highlight that frontal persistence is a crucial element of the formation of pelagic foraging hotspots for mobile marine vertebrates. PMID:25165595

  12. Large-Scale East-Asian eQTL Mapping Reveals Novel Candidate Genes for LD Mapping and the Genomic Landscape of Transcriptional Effects of Sequence Variants

    PubMed Central

    Narahara, Maiko; Higasa, Koichiro; Nakamura, Seiji; Tabara, Yasuharu; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Ishii, Miho; Matsubara, Kenichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamada, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    Profiles of sequence variants that influence gene transcription are very important for understanding mechanisms that affect phenotypic variation and disease susceptibility. Using genotypes at 1.4 million SNPs and a comprehensive transcriptional profile of 15,454 coding genes and 6,113 lincRNA genes obtained from peripheral blood cells of 298 Japanese individuals, we mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 3,804 cis-eQTLs (within 500 kb from target genes) and 165 trans-eQTLs (>500 kb away or on different chromosomes). Cis-eQTLs were often located in transcribed or adjacent regions of genes; among these regions, 5′ untranslated regions and 5′ flanking regions had the largest effects. Epigenetic evidence for regulatory potential accumulated in public databases explained the magnitude of the effects of our eQTLs. Cis-eQTLs were often located near the respective target genes, if not within genes. Large effect sizes were observed with eQTLs near target genes, and effect sizes were obviously attenuated as the eQTL distance from the gene increased. Using a very stringent significance threshold, we identified 165 large-effect trans-eQTLs. We used our eQTL map to assess 8,069 disease-associated SNPs identified in 1,436 genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified genes that might be truly causative, but GWAS might have failed to identify for 148 out of the GWAS-identified SNPs; for example, TUFM (P = 3.3E-48) was identified for inflammatory bowel disease (early onset); ZFP90 (P = 4.4E-34) for ulcerative colitis; and IDUA (P = 2.2E-11) for Parkinson's disease. We identified four genes (P<2.0E-14) that might be related to three diseases and two hematological traits; each expression is regulated by trans-eQTLs on a different chromosome than the gene. PMID:24956270

  13. Atrial fibrillation driven by micro-anatomic intramural re-entry revealed by simultaneous sub-epicardial and sub-endocardial optical mapping in explanted human hearts

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Brian J.; Zhao, Jichao; Csepe, Thomas A.; Moore, Brandon T.; Li, Ning; Jayne, Laura A.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Lim, Praise; Bratasz, Anna; Powell, Kimerly A.; Simonetti, Orlando P.; Higgins, Robert S.D.; Kilic, Ahmet; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Weiss, Raul; Hummel, John D.; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The complex architecture of the human atria may create physical substrates for sustained re-entry to drive atrial fibrillation (AF). The existence of sustained, anatomically defined AF drivers in humans has been challenged partly due to the lack of simultaneous endocardial–epicardial (Endo–Epi) mapping coupled with high-resolution 3D structural imaging. Methods and results Coronary-perfused human right atria from explanted diseased hearts (n = 8, 43–72 years old) were optically mapped simultaneously by three high-resolution CMOS cameras (two aligned Endo–Epi views (330 µm2 resolution) and one panoramic view). 3D gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (GE-MRI, 80 µm3 resolution) revealed the atrial wall structure varied in thickness (1.0 ± 0.7–6.8 ± 2.4 mm), transmural fiber angle differences, and interstitial fibrosis causing transmural activation delay from 23 ± 11 to 43 ± 22 ms at increased pacing rates. Sustained AF (>90 min) was induced by burst pacing during pinacidil (30–100 µM) perfusion. Dual-sided sub-Endo–sub-Epi optical mapping revealed that AF was driven by spatially and temporally stable intramural re-entry with 107 ± 50 ms cycle length and transmural activation delay of 67 ± 31 ms. Intramural re-entrant drivers were captured primarily by sub-Endo mapping, while sub-Epi mapping visualized re-entry or ‘breakthrough’ patterns. Re-entrant drivers were anchored on 3D micro-anatomic tracks (15.4 ± 2.2 × 6.0 ± 2.3 mm2, 2.9 ± 0.9 mm depth) formed by atrial musculature characterized by increased transmural fiber angle differences and interstitial fibrosis. Targeted radiofrequency ablation of the tracks verified these re-entries as drivers of AF. Conclusions Integrated 3D structural–functional mapping of diseased human right atria ex vivo revealed that the complex atrial microstructure caused significant differences between Endo vs. Epi activation during pacing and sustained AF driven by intramural re-entry anchored

  14. Observation of an Anisotropy in the Galactic Cosmic Ray Arrival Direction at 400 TeV with IceCube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Stamatikos, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic ray induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between May 2009 and May 2010. The data include a total of 33 x 10(exp 9) muon events with a median angular resolution of approx. 3 degrees. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high energy skymap shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3 sigma. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  15. Observation of Anisotropy in the Galactic Cosmic Ray Arrival Directions at 400 TEV With IceCube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo, Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Stamatikos, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic ray induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between May 2009 and May 2010. The data include a total of 33x l0(epx 9) muon events with a median angular resolution of approx 3 degrees. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic ray median energies of 20 and 400 Te V. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high energy skymap shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.30 sigma. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  16. A physically anchored genetic map and linkage to avirulence reveals recombination suppression over the proximal region of Hessian fly chromosome A2.

    PubMed Central

    Behura, Susanta K; Valicente, Fernando H; Rider, S Dean; Shun-Chen, Ming; Jackson, Scott; Stuart, Jeffrey J

    2004-01-01

    Resistance in wheat (Triticum aestivum) to the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor), a major insect pest of wheat, is based on a gene-for-gene interaction. Close linkage (3 +/- 2 cM) was discovered between Hessian fly avirulence genes vH3 and vH5. Bulked segregant analysis revealed two DNA markers (28-178 and 23-201) within 10 cM of these loci and only 3 +/- 2 cM apart. However, 28-178 was located in the middle of the short arm of Hessian fly chromosome A2 whereas 23-201 was located in the middle of the long arm of chromosome A2, suggesting the presence of severe recombination suppression over its proximal region. To further test that possibility, an AFLP-based genetic map of the Hessian fly genome was constructed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 20 markers on the genetic map to the polytene chromosomes of the Hessian fly indicated good correspondence between the linkage groups and the four Hessian fly chromosomes. The physically anchored genetic map is the first of any gall midge species. The proximal region of mitotic chromosome A2 makes up 30% of its length but corresponded to <3% of the chromosome A2 genetic map. PMID:15166159

  17. The influence of galactic cosmic ray on all India annual rainfall and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Pal, Jayanti; Guhathakurta, Suchandra

    2015-02-01

    The inverse relation between galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and sunspot numbers (SSN) suggests that the increase (decrease) in GCR count is linked with low (high) solar activity. The present study attempts to reveal the influence of GCR on all India annual rainfall and temperature during the period from 1953 to 2005. The inter-annual variation depicts that during the transition from maximum to minimum count of GCR, the rainfall anomaly shows alternative variation over India. Similar variation has also been observed for maximum temperature. Implementation of Fourier analysis shows an 11 year cycle of cosmic ray and depicts an increase in GCR count in the 11 year interval during the study period. The Fourier analysis of all India annual rainfall (AIR) and temperature also shows an 11 year cycle with a decreasing trend during the 11 year interval. The inter-decadal variation shows that during high GCR count there is a possibility of decrease in rainfall and minimum temperature but an increase in maximum temperature. The seasonal correlation shows a possible proportional association between cosmic ray and rainfall during the post monsoon season. The result further depicts that the sunspot number and temperature is positively correlated during the post-monsoon season. The correlation map of rainfall and temperature shows a meager but significant correlation with cosmic ray over some parts of West and East Indian coasts.

  18. Cosmic Superstrings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2004-12-10

    It is possible that superstrings, as well as other one-dimensional branes, could have been produced in the early universe and then expanded to cosmic size today. I discuss the conditions under which this will occur, and the signatures of these strings. Such cosmic superstrings could be the brightest objects visible in gravitational wave astronomy, and might be distinguishable from gauge theory cosmic strings by their network properties.

  19. Search for Cosmic Strings in Cosmic Microwave BackgroundAnisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, E.; Smoot, GF

    2004-06-01

    We have searched the 1st-year WMAP W-Band CMB anisotropy map for evidence of cosmic strings. We have set a limit of delta = 8 pi G mu/ c2 < 8.2 times 10-6 at 95 percent CL for statistical search for a significant number of strings in the map. We also have set a limit using the uniform distribution of strings model in the WMAP data with delta = 8pi G mu/c2 < 7.34 times 10-5 at 95 percent CL. And the pattern search technique we developed here set a limit delta = 8 pi G mu/c2 < 1.54 times 10-5 at 95 percent CL.

  20. The cosmic history of star formation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, James S

    2011-07-01

    Major advances in observational astronomy over the past 20 years have revolutionized our view of cosmic history, transforming our understanding of how the hot, smooth, early universe evolved into the complex and beautiful universe of stars and galaxies in which we now live. I describe how astronomers have used a range of complementary techniques to map out the rise and fall of star formation over 95% of cosmic time, back to the current observational frontier only ~500 million years after the Big Bang. PMID:21737733

  1. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  2. Change point analysis of travel routes reveals novel insights into foraging strategies and cognitive maps of wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Noser, Rahel; Byrne, Richard W

    2014-05-01

    Efficient space use is a critical challenge for animals relying on stationary resources. It is often difficult with purely observational methods to gain unambiguous insight into any ability of primates to manage and process spatial information. Investigating the visible signs of the decision processes underlying space use often leaves open important issues. We applied the change point test [Byrne et al. (2009). Anim Behav 77: 619-631], a statistical tool to objectively determine change points (CPs) in animal travel paths, to investigate to what degree directional changes in our study group's (Papio ursinus) dry season ranging were associated with important resources and prominent landmarks. One-third of directional changes were associated with fruit feeding, 1/3 with traveling, and 1/3 with dry matter feeding, travel feeding and with drinking. When directional changes were associated with traveling, the subsequent directional changes were likely to result in fruit feeding. Fruit feeding mostly occurred at the apex of the day journeys, while drinking, dry matter feeding, and travel feeding often occurred along straight travel segments. The majority of directional changes did not occur in clusters at distinctive locations, but at distances of more than 120 m apart from each other, many of them along prominent landmarks. We conclude that the CPs do not represent nodes or route bends of a network map. Rather, they represent (1) locations where the decision to turn back to their sleeping site was taken, and (2) locations next to important landmarks (changes of slope, car tracks) where slight adjustment of a movement direction was possible. We found no evidence for a Euclidean map and discuss our findings in the light of a network map representation of space.

  3. Two-dimensional proteome reference map of Rhizobium tropici PRF 81 reveals several symbiotic determinants and strong resemblance with agrobacteria.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Batista, Jesiane Stefania da Silva; Torres, Adalgisa Ribeiro; de Souza Andrade, Diva; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia Vitoria; Hungria, Mariangela

    2012-03-01

    Rhizobium tropici strain PRF 81 is used in commercial inoculants for common-bean crops in Brazil because of its high efficiency in nitrogen fixation and, as in other strains belonging to this species, its tolerance of environmental stresses, representing a useful biological alternative to chemical nitrogen fertilizers. In this study, a proteomic reference map of PRF 81 was obtained by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. In total, 115 spots representing 109 different proteins were successfully identified, contributing to a better understanding of the rhizobia-legume symbiosis and supporting, at proteomics level, a strong resemblance with agrobacteria.

  4. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Kandra, Lili; Hachem, Maher Abou; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Kramhøft, Birte; Svensson, Birte

    2006-09-18

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites as binding barriers. Barley alpha-amylase 1 mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in alpha-amylases.

  5. Genome-Wide Mapping of Structural Variations Reveals a Copy Number Variant That Determines Reproductive Morphology in Cucumber

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Linyong; Chen, Huiming; Bu, Fengjiao; Li, Guangcun; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Sun, Honghe; Jiao, Chen; Blakely, Rachel; Pan, Junsong; Cai, Run; Luo, Ruibang; Van de Peer, Yves; Jacobsen, Evert; Fei, Zhangjun; Huang, Sanwen

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) represent a major source of genetic diversity. However, the functional impact and formation mechanisms of SVs in plant genomes remain largely unexplored. Here, we report a nucleotide-resolution SV map of cucumber (Cucumis sativas) that comprises 26,788 SVs based on deep resequencing of 115 diverse accessions. The largest proportion of cucumber SVs was formed through nonhomologous end-joining rearrangements, and the occurrence of SVs is closely associated with regions of high nucleotide diversity. These SVs affect the coding regions of 1676 genes, some of which are associated with cucumber domestication. Based on the map, we discovered a copy number variation (CNV) involving four genes that defines the Female (F) locus and gives rise to gynoecious cucumber plants, which bear only female flowers and set fruit at almost every node. The CNV arose from a recent 30.2-kb duplication at a meiotically unstable region, likely via microhomology-mediated break-induced replication. The SV set provides a snapshot of structural variations in plants and will serve as an important resource for exploring genes underlying key traits and for facilitating practical breeding in cucumber. PMID:26002866

  6. Genome-Wide Mapping of Structural Variations Reveals a Copy Number Variant That Determines Reproductive Morphology in Cucumber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Mao, Linyong; Chen, Huiming; Bu, Fengjiao; Li, Guangcun; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Sun, Honghe; Jiao, Chen; Blakely, Rachel; Pan, Junsong; Cai, Run; Luo, Ruibang; Van de Peer, Yves; Jacobsen, Evert; Fei, Zhangjun; Huang, Sanwen

    2015-06-01

    Structural variations (SVs) represent a major source of genetic diversity. However, the functional impact and formation mechanisms of SVs in plant genomes remain largely unexplored. Here, we report a nucleotide-resolution SV map of cucumber (Cucumis sativas) that comprises 26,788 SVs based on deep resequencing of 115 diverse accessions. The largest proportion of cucumber SVs was formed through nonhomologous end-joining rearrangements, and the occurrence of SVs is closely associated with regions of high nucleotide diversity. These SVs affect the coding regions of 1676 genes, some of which are associated with cucumber domestication. Based on the map, we discovered a copy number variation (CNV) involving four genes that defines the Female (F) locus and gives rise to gynoecious cucumber plants, which bear only female flowers and set fruit at almost every node. The CNV arose from a recent 30.2-kb duplication at a meiotically unstable region, likely via microhomology-mediated break-induced replication. The SV set provides a snapshot of structural variations in plants and will serve as an important resource for exploring genes underlying key traits and for facilitating practical breeding in cucumber.

  7. High-Resolution Sex-Specific Linkage Maps of the Mouse Reveal Polarized Distribution of Crossovers in Male Germline

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Eric Yi; Morgan, Andrew P.; Chesler, Elissa J.; Wang, Wei; Churchill, Gary A.; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of the first comprehensive linkage map for the laboratory mouse, the architecture of recombination as a basic biological process has become amenable to investigation in mammalian model organisms. Here we take advantage of high-density genotyping and the unique pedigree structure of the incipient Collaborative Cross to investigate the roles of sex and genetic background in mammalian recombination. Our results confirm the observation that map length is longer when measured through female meiosis than through male meiosis, but we find that this difference is modified by genotype at loci on both the X chromosome and the autosomes. In addition, we report a striking concentration of crossovers in the distal ends of autosomes in male meiosis that is absent in female meiosis. The presence of this pattern in both single- and double-recombinant chromosomes, combined with the absence of a corresponding asymmetry in the distribution of double-strand breaks, indicates a regulated sequence of events specific to male meiosis that is anchored by chromosome ends. This pattern is consistent with the timing of chromosome pairing and evolutionary constraints on male recombination. Finally, we identify large regions of reduced crossover frequency that together encompass 5% of the genome. Many of these “cold regions” are enriched for segmental duplications, suggesting an inverse local correlation between recombination rate and mutation rate for large copy number variants. PMID:24578350

  8. Fostered and left behind alleles in peanut: interspecific QTL mapping reveals footprints of domestication and useful natural variation for breeding

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polyploidy can result in genetic bottlenecks, especially for species of monophyletic origin. Cultivated peanut is an allotetraploid harbouring limited genetic diversity, likely resulting from the combined effects of its single origin and domestication. Peanut wild relatives represent an important source of novel alleles that could be used to broaden the genetic basis of the cultigen. Using an advanced backcross population developed with a synthetic amphidiploid as donor of wild alleles, under two water regimes, we conducted a detailed QTL study for several traits involved in peanut productivity and adaptation as well as domestication. Results A total of 95 QTLs were mapped in the two water treatments. About half of the QTL positive effects were associated with alleles of the wild parent and several QTLs involved in yield components were specific to the water-limited treatment. QTLs detected for the same trait mapped to non-homeologous genomic regions, suggesting differential control in subgenomes as a consequence of polyploidization. The noteworthy clustering of QTLs for traits involved in seed and pod size and in plant and pod morphology suggests, as in many crops, that a small number of loci have contributed to peanut domestication. Conclusion In our study, we have identified QTLs that differentiated cultivated peanut from its wild relatives as well as wild alleles that contributed positive variation to several traits involved in peanut productivity and adaptation. These findings offer novel opportunities for peanut improvement using wild relatives. PMID:22340522

  9. Conditional independence mapping of DIGE data reveals PDIA3 protein species as key nodes associated with muscle aerobic capacity

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Kenyani, Jenna; Gray, Donna; Guadagnin, Eleonora; Jarman, Ian H.; Cobley, James N.; Cuthbertson, Daniel J.; Chen, Yi-Wen; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Lisboa, Paulo J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Profiling of protein species is important because gene polymorphisms, splice variations and post-translational modifications may combine and give rise to multiple protein species that have different effects on cellular function. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is one of the most robust methods for differential analysis of protein species, but bioinformatic interrogation is challenging because the consequences of changes in the abundance of individual protein species on cell function are unknown and cannot be predicted. We conducted DIGE of soleus muscle from male and female rats artificially selected as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively). In total 696 protein species were resolved and LC–MS/MS identified proteins in 337 spots. Forty protein species were differentially (P < 0.05, FDR < 10%) expressed between HCR and LCR and conditional independence mapping found distinct networks within these data, which brought insight beyond that achieved by functional annotation. Protein disulphide isomerase A3 emerged as a key node segregating with differences in aerobic capacity and unsupervised bibliometric analysis highlighted further links to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which were confirmed by western blotting. Thus, conditional independence mapping is a useful technique for interrogating DIGE data that is capable of highlighting latent features. PMID:24769234

  10. Anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Desiati, Paolo; DuVernois, Michael

    2016-07-01

    TeV cosmic rays are significantly deflected by the magnetic field of the heliosphere, and they gain or lose energies in heliospheric electric field that in the meantime drives the motion of plasma. These propagation mechanisms will cause the map of TeV cosmic rays seen at the Earth to look different from the map seen in the local interstellar medium without the presence of the heliosphere. We have developed a method of using Liouville's theorem to map out particle distribution function to Earth from the local interstellar medium, where we assume that the cosmic rays have small pitch-angle anisotropy harmonics up to the second order and a small uniform spatial density gradient. The amount of heliospheric distortion can be determined by tracing the trajectories of cosmic rays propagating through the heliosphere. In this paper, we apply this method to TeV cosmic ray propagation through a MHD-kinetic model of the heliosphere and try to fit observations from Tibet ASgamma and IceCube experiments. We are able to locate features in the TeV cosmic ray anisotropy that are associated with the interstellar magnetic field, hydrogen deflection plane, heliotail, and solar corona. Some of the features are also slightly affected by the solar cycle and interstellar magnetic turbulence. The results provide us powerful tools to explore large-scale heliospheric structures as well as to determine the cosmic ray distribution in the local interstellar medium.

  11. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  12. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  13. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  14. Genome-wide Association Study and Admixture Mapping Reveal New Loci Associated with Total IgE Levels in Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Levin, Albert M.; Campbell, Catarina D.; Eng, Celeste; Huntsman, Scott; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Mohajeri, Kiana; O'Roak, Brian J.; Hu, Donglei; Mathias, Rasika A.; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Lurmann, Fred; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Chapela, Rocio; Ford, Jean G.; Lenoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon M.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Borrell, Luisa N.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Sen, Saunak; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Weiss, Scott T.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Mack, Steven J.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Eichler, Evan E.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Williams, L. Keoki; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is a key mediator of allergic inflammation and is frequently elevated in allergic disorders. Objective To identify genetic variants associated with IgE levels in Latinos. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and admixture mapping of total IgE levels in 3,334 Latinos from the Genes-environments & Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study. Replication was evaluated in 454 Latinos, 1,564 European Americans, and 3,187 African Americans from independent studies. Results We confirmed associations of six genes identified by previous GWAS and identified a novel genome-wide significant association of a polymorphism in ZNF365 with total IgE (rs200076616, p=2.3x10−8). We next identified four admixture mapping peaks (6p21.32-p22.1, 13p22-31, 14q23.2, and 22q13.1) where local African, European, and/or Native American ancestry was significantly associated with IgE levels. The most significant peak was 6p21.32-p22.1, where Native American ancestry was associated with lower levels of IgE (p=4.95x10−8). All but 22q13.1 were replicated in an independent sample of Latinos, and two of the peaks were replicated in African Americans (6p21.32-p22.1 and 14q23.2). Fine mapping of 6p21.32-p22.1 identified six genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms in Latinos, two of which replicated in European Americans. Another SNP was peak-wide significant within 14q23.2 in African Americans (rs1741099, p=3.7x10−6), and replicated in non-African American samples (p=0.011). Conclusion We confirmed genetic associations at six genes, and identified novel associations within ZNF365, HLA-DQA1, and 14q23.2. Our results highlight the importance of studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations to uncover novel loci associated with total IgE levels. PMID:25488688

  15. Mapping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolites in fermenting wheat straight-dough reveals succinic acid as pH-determining factor.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Vinay B; Cuyvers, Sven; Lagrain, Bert; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2013-01-15

    Fermenting yeast does not merely cause dough leavening, but also contributes to the bread aroma and might alter dough rheology. Here, the yeast carbon metabolism was mapped during bread straight-dough fermentation. The concentration of most metabolites changed quasi linearly as a function of fermentation time. Ethanol and carbon dioxide concentrations reached up to 60 mmol/100g flour. Interestingly, high levels of glycerol (up to 10 mmol/100g flour) and succinic acid (up to 1.6 mmol/100g flour) were produced during dough fermentation. Further tests showed that, contrary to current belief, the pH decrease in fermenting dough is primarily caused by the production of succinic acid by the yeast instead of carbon dioxide dissolution or bacterial organic acids. Together, our results provide a comprehensive overview of metabolite production during dough fermentation and yield insight into the importance of some of these metabolites for dough properties.

  16. Mapping of Replication Origins in the X Inactivation Center of Vole Microtus levis Reveals Extended Replication Initiation Zone.

    PubMed

    Sherstyuk, Vladimir V; Shevchenko, Alexander I; Zakian, Suren M

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at specific positions termed replication origins. Genome-wide studies of human replication origins have shown that origins are organized into replication initiation zones. However, only few replication initiation zones have been described so far. Moreover, few origins were mapped in other mammalian species besides human and mouse. Here we analyzed pattern of short nascent strands in the X inactivation center (XIC) of vole Microtus levis in fibroblasts, trophoblast stem cells, and extraembryonic endoderm stem cells and confirmed origins locations by ChIP approach. We found that replication could be initiated in a significant part of XIC. We also analyzed state of XIC chromatin in these cell types. We compared origin localization in the mouse and vole XIC. Interestingly, origins associated with gene promoters are conserved in these species. The data obtained allow us to suggest that the X inactivation center of M. levis is one extended replication initiation zone.

  17. Mapping of Replication Origins in the X Inactivation Center of Vole Microtus levis Reveals Extended Replication Initiation Zone.

    PubMed

    Sherstyuk, Vladimir V; Shevchenko, Alexander I; Zakian, Suren M

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at specific positions termed replication origins. Genome-wide studies of human replication origins have shown that origins are organized into replication initiation zones. However, only few replication initiation zones have been described so far. Moreover, few origins were mapped in other mammalian species besides human and mouse. Here we analyzed pattern of short nascent strands in the X inactivation center (XIC) of vole Microtus levis in fibroblasts, trophoblast stem cells, and extraembryonic endoderm stem cells and confirmed origins locations by ChIP approach. We found that replication could be initiated in a significant part of XIC. We also analyzed state of XIC chromatin in these cell types. We compared origin localization in the mouse and vole XIC. Interestingly, origins associated with gene promoters are conserved in these species. The data obtained allow us to suggest that the X inactivation center of M. levis is one extended replication initiation zone. PMID:26038842

  18. Mapping of Replication Origins in the X Inactivation Center of Vole Microtus levis Reveals Extended Replication Initiation Zone

    PubMed Central

    Sherstyuk, Vladimir V.; Shevchenko, Alexander I.; Zakian, Suren M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at specific positions termed replication origins. Genome-wide studies of human replication origins have shown that origins are organized into replication initiation zones. However, only few replication initiation zones have been described so far. Moreover, few origins were mapped in other mammalian species besides human and mouse. Here we analyzed pattern of short nascent strands in the X inactivation center (XIC) of vole Microtus levis in fibroblasts, trophoblast stem cells, and extraembryonic endoderm stem cells and confirmed origins locations by ChIP approach. We found that replication could be initiated in a significant part of XIC. We also analyzed state of XIC chromatin in these cell types. We compared origin localization in the mouse and vole XIC. Interestingly, origins associated with gene promoters are conserved in these species. The data obtained allow us to suggest that the X inactivation center of M. levis is one extended replication initiation zone. PMID:26038842

  19. Comparative mapping of the wild perennial Glycine latifolia and soybean (G. max) reveals extensive chromosome rearrangements in the genus Glycine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sungyul; Thurber, Carrie S; Brown, Patrick J; Hartman, Glen L; Lambert, Kris N; Domier, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Mer.), like many cultivated crops, has a relatively narrow genetic base and lacks diversity for some economically important traits. Glycine latifolia (Benth.) Newell & Hymowitz, one of the 26 perennial wild Glycine species related to soybean in the subgenus Glycine Willd., shows high levels of resistance to multiple soybean pathogens and pests including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. However, limited information is available on the genomes of these perennial Glycine species. To generate molecular resources for gene mapping and identification, high-density linkage maps were constructed for G. latifolia using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated by genotyping by sequencing and evaluated in an F2 population and confirmed in an F5 population. In each population, greater than 2,300 SNP markers were selected for analysis and segregated to form 20 large linkage groups. Marker orders were similar in the F2 and F5 populations. The relationships between G. latifolia linkage groups and G. max and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) chromosomes were examined by aligning SNP-containing sequences from G. latifolia to the genome sequences of G. max and P. vulgaris. Twelve of the 20 G. latifolia linkage groups were nearly collinear with G. max chromosomes. The remaining eight G. latifolia linkage groups appeared to be products of multiple interchromosomal translocations relative to G. max. Large syntenic blocks also were observed between G. latifolia and P. vulgaris. These experiments are the first to compare genome organizations among annual and perennial Glycine species and common bean. The development of molecular resources for species closely related to G. max provides information into the evolution of genomes within the genus Glycine and tools to identify genes within perennial wild relatives of cultivated soybean that could be beneficial to soybean production.

  20. A Complex Recombination Pattern in the Genome of Allotetraploid Brassica napus as Revealed by a High-Density Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Bin; Fan, Chuchuan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus. PMID:25356735

  1. Comparative Mapping of the Wild Perennial Glycine latifolia and Soybean (G. max) Reveals Extensive Chromosome Rearrangements in the Genus Glycine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sungyul; Thurber, Carrie S.; Brown, Patrick J.; Hartman, Glen L.; Lambert, Kris N.; Domier, Leslie L.

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Mer.), like many cultivated crops, has a relatively narrow genetic base and lacks diversity for some economically important traits. Glycine latifolia (Benth.) Newell & Hymowitz, one of the 26 perennial wild Glycine species related to soybean in the subgenus Glycine Willd., shows high levels of resistance to multiple soybean pathogens and pests including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. However, limited information is available on the genomes of these perennial Glycine species. To generate molecular resources for gene mapping and identification, high-density linkage maps were constructed for G. latifolia using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated by genotyping by sequencing and evaluated in an F2 population and confirmed in an F5 population. In each population, greater than 2,300 SNP markers were selected for analysis and segregated to form 20 large linkage groups. Marker orders were similar in the F2 and F5 populations. The relationships between G. latifolia linkage groups and G. max and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) chromosomes were examined by aligning SNP-containing sequences from G. latifolia to the genome sequences of G. max and P. vulgaris. Twelve of the 20 G. latifolia linkage groups were nearly collinear with G. max chromosomes. The remaining eight G. latifolia linkage groups appeared to be products of multiple interchromosomal translocations relative to G. max. Large syntenic blocks also were observed between G. latifolia and P. vulgaris. These experiments are the first to compare genome organizations among annual and perennial Glycine species and common bean. The development of molecular resources for species closely related to G. max provides information into the evolution of genomes within the genus Glycine and tools to identify genes within perennial wild relatives of cultivated soybean that could be beneficial to soybean production. PMID

  2. A complex recombination pattern in the genome of allotetraploid Brassica napus as revealed by a high-density genetic map.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guangqin; Yang, Qingyong; Yi, Bin; Fan, Chuchuan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus.

  3. Comparative mapping of the wild perennial Glycine latifolia and soybean (G. max) reveals extensive chromosome rearrangements in the genus Glycine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sungyul; Thurber, Carrie S; Brown, Patrick J; Hartman, Glen L; Lambert, Kris N; Domier, Leslie L

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Mer.), like many cultivated crops, has a relatively narrow genetic base and lacks diversity for some economically important traits. Glycine latifolia (Benth.) Newell & Hymowitz, one of the 26 perennial wild Glycine species related to soybean in the subgenus Glycine Willd., shows high levels of resistance to multiple soybean pathogens and pests including Alfalfa mosaic virus, Heterodera glycines Ichinohe and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. However, limited information is available on the genomes of these perennial Glycine species. To generate molecular resources for gene mapping and identification, high-density linkage maps were constructed for G. latifolia using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers generated by genotyping by sequencing and evaluated in an F2 population and confirmed in an F5 population. In each population, greater than 2,300 SNP markers were selected for analysis and segregated to form 20 large linkage groups. Marker orders were similar in the F2 and F5 populations. The relationships between G. latifolia linkage groups and G. max and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) chromosomes were examined by aligning SNP-containing sequences from G. latifolia to the genome sequences of G. max and P. vulgaris. Twelve of the 20 G. latifolia linkage groups were nearly collinear with G. max chromosomes. The remaining eight G. latifolia linkage groups appeared to be products of multiple interchromosomal translocations relative to G. max. Large syntenic blocks also were observed between G. latifolia and P. vulgaris. These experiments are the first to compare genome organizations among annual and perennial Glycine species and common bean. The development of molecular resources for species closely related to G. max provides information into the evolution of genomes within the genus Glycine and tools to identify genes within perennial wild relatives of cultivated soybean that could be beneficial to soybean production. PMID

  4. QTL mapping of fungicide sensitivity reveals novel genes and pleiotropy with melanization in the pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Lendenmann, Mark H; Croll, Daniel; McDonald, Bruce A

    2015-07-01

    A major problem associated with the intensification of agriculture is the emergence of fungicide resistance. Azoles are ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors that have been widely used in agriculture and medicine since the 1970s, leading to emergence of increasingly resistant fungal populations. The known genetic mechanisms underlying lower azole sensitivity include mutations affecting the CYP51 gene that encodes the target protein, but in many cases azole resistance is a more complex trait with an unknown genetic basis. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to identify genes affecting azole sensitivity in two crosses of Zymoseptoria tritici, the most damaging wheat pathogen in Europe. Restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) was used to genotype 263 (cross 1) and 261 (cross 2) progeny at ∼ 8500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and construct two dense linkage maps. Azole sensitivity was assessed using high-throughput digital image analysis of colonies growing on Petri dishes with or without the fungicide propiconazole. We identified three QTLs for azole sensitivity, including two that contained novel fungicide sensitivity genes. One of these two QTLs contained only 16 candidate genes, among which four most likely candidates were identified. The third QTL contained ERG6, encoding another protein involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. Known genes in QTLs affecting colony growth included CYP51 and PKS1, a gene affecting melanization in Z. tritici. PKS1 showed compelling evidence for pleiotropy, with a rare segregating allele that increased melanization while decreasing growth rate and propiconazole sensitivity. This study resolved the genetic architecture of an important agricultural trait and led to identification of novel genes that are likely to affect azole sensitivity in Z. tritici. It also provided insight into fitness costs associated with lowered azole sensitivity and suggests a novel fungicide mixture strategy. PMID:25979163

  5. QTL mapping of fungicide sensitivity reveals novel genes and pleiotropy with melanization in the pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Lendenmann, Mark H; Croll, Daniel; McDonald, Bruce A

    2015-07-01

    A major problem associated with the intensification of agriculture is the emergence of fungicide resistance. Azoles are ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors that have been widely used in agriculture and medicine since the 1970s, leading to emergence of increasingly resistant fungal populations. The known genetic mechanisms underlying lower azole sensitivity include mutations affecting the CYP51 gene that encodes the target protein, but in many cases azole resistance is a more complex trait with an unknown genetic basis. We used quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to identify genes affecting azole sensitivity in two crosses of Zymoseptoria tritici, the most damaging wheat pathogen in Europe. Restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RADseq) was used to genotype 263 (cross 1) and 261 (cross 2) progeny at ∼ 8500 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and construct two dense linkage maps. Azole sensitivity was assessed using high-throughput digital image analysis of colonies growing on Petri dishes with or without the fungicide propiconazole. We identified three QTLs for azole sensitivity, including two that contained novel fungicide sensitivity genes. One of these two QTLs contained only 16 candidate genes, among which four most likely candidates were identified. The third QTL contained ERG6, encoding another protein involved in ergosterol biosynthesis. Known genes in QTLs affecting colony growth included CYP51 and PKS1, a gene affecting melanization in Z. tritici. PKS1 showed compelling evidence for pleiotropy, with a rare segregating allele that increased melanization while decreasing growth rate and propiconazole sensitivity. This study resolved the genetic architecture of an important agricultural trait and led to identification of novel genes that are likely to affect azole sensitivity in Z. tritici. It also provided insight into fitness costs associated with lowered azole sensitivity and suggests a novel fungicide mixture strategy.

  6. A complex recombination pattern in the genome of allotetraploid Brassica napus as revealed by a high-density genetic map.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guangqin; Yang, Qingyong; Yi, Bin; Fan, Chuchuan; Edwards, David; Batley, Jacqueline; Zhou, Yongming

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy plays a crucial role in plant evolution. Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC), the most important oil crop in the Brassica genus, is an allotetraploid that originated through natural doubling of chromosomes after the hybridization of its progenitor species, B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and B. oleracea (2n = 18, CC). A better understanding of the evolutionary relationship between B. napus and B. rapa, B. oleracea, as well as Arabidopsis, which has a common ancestor with these three species, will provide valuable information about the generation and evolution of allopolyploidy. Based on a high-density genetic map with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of B. napus with Arabidopsis and its progenitor species B. rapa and B. oleracea. Based on the collinear relationship of B. rapa and B. oleracea in the B. napus genetic map, the B. napus genome was found to consist of 70.1% of the skeleton components of the chromosomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea, with 17.7% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between homoeologous chromosomes between the A- and C-genome and 3.6% of sequences derived from reciprocal translocation between non-homologous chromosomes at both intra- and inter-genomic levels. The current study thus provides insights into the formation and evolution of the allotetraploid B. napus genome, which will allow for more accurate transfer of genomic information from B. rapa, B. oleracea and Arabidopsis to B. napus. PMID:25356735

  7. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  8. Deepening Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    This article is a special blend of research, theory, and practice, with clear insight into the origins of Cosmic Education and cosmic task, while recalling memories of student explorations in botany, in particular, episodes from Mr. Leonard's teaching. Mr. Leonard speaks of a storytelling curriculum that eloquently puts perspective into dimensions…

  9. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  10. Origin of the cosmic network in {Lambda}CDM: Nature vs nurture

    SciTech Connect

    Shandarin, Sergei; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin

    2010-05-15

    The large-scale structure of the Universe, as traced by the distribution of galaxies, is now being revealed by large-volume cosmological surveys. The structure is characterized by galaxies distributed along filaments, the filaments connecting in turn to form a percolating network. Our objective here is to quantitatively specify the underlying mechanisms that drive the formation of the cosmic network: By combining percolation-based analyses with N-body simulations of gravitational structure formation, we elucidate how the network has its origin in the properties of the initial density field (nature) and how its contrast is then amplified by the nonlinear mapping induced by the gravitational instability (nurture).

  11. Origin of the cosmic network in ΛCDM: Nature vs nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandarin, Sergei; Habib, Salman; Heitmann, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe, as traced by the distribution of galaxies, is now being revealed by large-volume cosmological surveys. The structure is characterized by galaxies distributed along filaments, the filaments connecting in turn to form a percolating network. Our objective here is to quantitatively specify the underlying mechanisms that drive the formation of the cosmic network: By combining percolation-based analyses with N-body simulations of gravitational structure formation, we elucidate how the network has its origin in the properties of the initial density field (nature) and how its contrast is then amplified by the nonlinear mapping induced by the gravitational instability (nurture).

  12. Searching for stringy topologies in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-David, Assaf; Rathaus, Ben; Itzhaki, Nissan E-mail: ben.rathaus@gmail.com

    2012-11-01

    We consider a universe with a non-classical stringy topology that has fixed points. We concentrate on the simplest example, an orbifold point, and study its observable imprints on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We show that an orbifold preserves the Gaussian nature of the temperature fluctuations, yet modifies the angular correlation function. A direct signature of an orbifold is a single circle in the CMB that is invariant under rotation by 180°. Searching the 7-year ILC map of WMAP, we find one candidate circle with high statistical significance. However, a closer look reveals that the temperature profile does not fit an orbifold. We place a lower bound on the distance to an orbifold point at ∼ 85% of the distance to the surface of last scattering.

  13. Our Cosmic Insignificance

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and we can make good sense of the idea of cosmic significance and its absence. It is also possible to explain why the vastness of the universe can make us feel insignificant. This impression does turn out to be mistaken, but not for the reasons typically assumed. In fact, we might be of immense cosmic significance—though we cannot, at this point, tell whether this is the case. PMID:25729095

  14. Light from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, Daniele A.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-02-15

    The time-dependent metric of a cosmic string leads to an effective interaction between the string and photons--the ''gravitational Aharonov-Bohm'' effect--and causes cosmic strings to emit light. We evaluate the radiation of pairs of photons from cosmic strings and find that the emission from cusps, kinks and kink-kink collisions occurs with a flat spectrum at all frequencies up to the string scale. Further, cusps emit a beam of photons, kinks emit along a curve, and the emission at a kink-kink collision is in all directions. The emission of light from cosmic strings could provide an important new observational signature of cosmic strings that is within reach of current experiments for a range of string tensions.

  15. Linkage Maps of the dwarf and Normal Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Complex and Their Hybrids Reveal the Genetic Architecture of Population Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, S. M.; Isabel, N.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of population divergence may reveal the evolution of reproductive barriers and the genomic regions implicated in the process. We assembled genetic linkage maps for the dwarf and Normal lake whitefish species complex and their hybrids. A total of 877 AFLP loci and 30 microsatellites were positioned. The homology of mapped loci between families supported the existence of 34 linkage groups (of 40n expected) exhibiting 83% colinearity among linked loci between these two families. Classes of AFLP markers were not randomly distributed among linkage groups. Both AFLP and microsatellites exhibited deviations from Mendelian expectations, with 30.4% exhibiting significant segregation distortion across 28 linkage groups of the four linkage maps in both families (P < 0.00001). Eight loci distributed over seven homologous linkage groups were significantly distorted in both families and the level of distortion, when comparing homologous loci of the same phase between families, was correlated (Spearman R = 0.378, P = 0.0021). These results suggest that substantial divergence incurred during allopatric glacial separation and subsequent sympatric ecological specialization has resulted in several genomic regions that are no longer complementary between dwarf and Normal populations issued from different evolutionary glacial lineages. PMID:17110497

  16. Comparative genetic mapping between octoploid and diploid Fragaria species reveals a high level of colinearity between their genomes and the essentially disomic behavior of the cultivated octoploid strawberry.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Lerceteau-Köhler, Estelle; Barrot, Laure; Sargent, Daniel James; Monfort, Amparo; Simpson, David; Arús, Pere; Guérin, Guy; Denoyes-Rothan, Béatrice

    2008-08-01

    Macrosynteny and colinearity between Fragaria (strawberry) species showing extreme levels of ploidy have been studied through comparative genetic mapping between the octoploid cultivated strawberry (F. xananassa) and its diploid relatives. A comprehensive map of the octoploid strawberry, in which almost all linkage groups are ranged into the seven expected homoeologous groups was obtained, thus providing the first reference map for the octoploid Fragaria. High levels of conserved macrosynteny and colinearity were observed between homo(eo)logous linkage groups and between the octoploid homoeologous groups and their corresponding diploid linkage groups. These results reveal that the polyploidization events that took place along the evolution of the Fragaria genus and the more recent juxtaposition of two octoploid strawberry genomes in the cultivated strawberry did not trigger any major chromosomal rearrangements in genomes involved in F. xananassa. They further suggest the existence of a close relationship between the diploid Fragaria genomes. In addition, despite the possible existence of residual levels of polysomic segregation suggested by the observation of large linkage groups in coupling phase only, the prevalence of linkage groups in coupling/repulsion phase clearly demonstrates that the meiotic behavior is mainly disomic in the cultivated strawberry.

  17. Coding Gene SNP Mapping Reveals QTL Linked to Growth and Stress Response in Brook Charr (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Christopher; Vagner, Marie; Derôme, Nicolas; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Growth performance and reduced stress response are traits of major interest in fish production. Growth and stress-related quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been already identified in several salmonid species, but little effort has been devoted to charrs (genus Salvelinus). Moreover, most QTL studies to date focused on one or very few traits, and little investigation has been devoted to QTL identification for gene expression. Here, our objective was to identify QTL for 27 phenotypes related to growth and stress responses in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis), which is one of the most economically important freshwater aquaculture species in Canada. Phenotypes included 12 growth parameters, six blood and plasma variables, three hepatic variables, and one plasma hormone level as well as the relative expression measurements of five genes of interest linked to growth regulation. QTL analysis relied on a linkage map recently built from S. fontinalis consisting of both single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, n = 266) and microsatellite (n =81) markers in an F2 interstrain hybrid population (n = 171). We identified 63 growth-related QTL and four stress-related QTL across 18 of the 40 linkage groups of the brook charr linkage map. Percent variance explained, confidence interval, and allelic QTL effects also were investigated to provide insight into the genetic architecture of growth- and stress-related QTL. QTL related to growth performance and stress response that were identified could be classified into two groups: (1) a group composed of the numerous, small-effect QTL associated with some traits related to growth (i.e., weight) that may be under the control of a large number of genes or pleiotropic genes, and (2) a group of less numerous QTL associated with growth (i.e., gene expression) and with stress-related QTL that display a larger effect, suggesting that these QTL are under the control of a limited number of genes of major effect. This study represents a first step

  18. A gene expression map of the larval Xenopus laevis head reveals developmental changes underlying the evolution of new skeletal elements.

    PubMed

    Square, Tyler; Jandzik, David; Cattell, Maria; Coe, Alex; Doherty, Jacob; Medeiros, Daniel Meulemans

    2015-01-15

    The morphology of the vertebrate head skeleton is highly plastic, with the number, size, shape, and position of its components varying dramatically between groups. While this evolutionary flexibility has been key to vertebrate success, its developmental and genetic bases are poorly understood. The larval head skeleton of the frog Xenopus laevis possesses a unique combination of ancestral tetrapod features and anuran-specific novelties. We built a detailed gene expression map of the head mesenchyme in X. laevis during early larval development, focusing on transcription factor families with known functions in vertebrate head skeleton development. This map was then compared to homologous gene expression in zebrafish, mouse, and shark embryos to identify conserved and evolutionarily flexible aspects of vertebrate head skeleton development. While we observed broad conservation of gene expression between X. laevis and other gnathostomes, we also identified several divergent features that correlate to lineage-specific novelties. We noted a conspicuous change in dlx1/2 and emx2 expression in the second pharyngeal arch, presaging the differentiation of the reduced dorsal hyoid arch skeletal element typical of modern anamniote tetrapods. In the first pharyngeal arch we observed a shift in the expression of the joint inhibitor barx1, and new expression of the joint marker gdf5, shortly before skeletal differentiation. This suggests that the anuran-specific infrarostral cartilage evolved by partitioning of Meckel's cartilage with a new paired joint. Taken together, these comparisons support a model in which early patterning mechanisms divide the vertebrate head mesenchyme into a highly conserved set of skeletal precursor populations. While subtle changes in this early patterning system can affect skeletal element size, they do not appear to underlie the evolution of new joints or cartilages. In contrast, later expression of the genes that regulate skeletal element

  19. Novel two-dimensional morphometric maps and quantitative analysis reveal marked growth and structural recovery of the rat hippocampal regions from early hypothyroid retardation.

    PubMed

    Farahvar, Arash; Meisami, Esmail

    2007-04-01

    Effects of postnatal hypothyroidism and recovery from this condition on regional growth of the rat hippocampus (HC) were studied using two-dimensional (2D) foldout, morphometric maps of HC and its constituent CA1-CA4 regions. The maps were derived from unfolding serial coronal sections of the rat forebrain, consisting of the entire rostrocaudal extent of HC pyramidal cell layer in the normal control and hypothyroid weanling (P25, postnatal day 25) and young adult (P90) male rats, as well as animals allowed to recover from hypothyroid-induced growth retardation at weaning. The maps revealed novel views of HC regions for assessment of topological relationships and measurement of surface areas of the HC cortical sheet (pyramidal cell layer). In normal control P90 rats, the unfolded HC on each side extended 4 times more laterally than rostrocaudally; total HC surface area was about 40 mm(2), compared to 30 mm(2) in the weanling, indicating 35% growth from P25 to P90; CA1 took up 52% of the total HC surface area, followed by CA3 (31%) and CA2 and CA4, 8% each. Hypothyroidism resulted in significant (p<0.01) 11% and 20% reductions in the HC surface area in P25 and P90 rats, respectively; CA1 and CA4 regions suffered the most reductions while CA3 and CA2 regions the least. Recovering rats examined at P90 exhibited remarkable growth plasticity and recovery in HC regions, as evident by their near normal HC cortical surface area values, compared to age-matched controls. The 2D maps also revealed growth deficits in all HC regions of the hypothyroid rats; recovery in these parameters occurred across all dimensions, although the anterior-posterior growth was more severely affected than the mediolateral one. These results are confirmed and extended by volumetric analysis of laminar volumes of HC regions presented in a companion paper [Farahvar, A., Darwish, N., Sladek, S., Meisami, E., in press. Marked recovery of functional metabolic activity and laminar volumes in the rat

  20. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and y-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  1. Longitudinal distribution of cosmic rays in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.; Venkatesan, D.

    1985-01-01

    The longitudinal distribution of cosmic ray intensity was examined during the years 1974-1976 when the persistent high speed solar wind stream structures produced a well ordered inner heliosphere. Solar wind velocity is mapped back to the Sun and compared with cosmic ray intensity which is represented relative to the solar rotation average. Low solar wind velocity is observed to be a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the occurrence of higher cosmic ray intensities at 1 AU. These relative enhancements cover a restricted range of heliographic longitudes and persist for several solar rotations. The observed solar wind and cosmic ray intensity relationships are consistent with a simple model suggested here in which cosmic ray modulation is very weak in the inner heliosphere, sunward of the first shock crossing on each field line and more intense in the outer heliosphere.

  2. Single-nucleotide resolution mapping of the Gossypium raimondii transcriptome reveals a new mechanism for alternative splicing of introns.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Xiao, Guanghui; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2014-05-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a vital genetic mechanism that enhances the diversity of eukaryotic transcriptomes. Here, we generated 8.3 Gb high-quality RNA-sequencing data from cotton (Gossypium raimondii) and performed a systematic, comparative analysis of AS events. We mapped 85% of the RNA-sequencing data onto the reference genome and identified 154368 splice junctions with 16437 as events in 10197 genes. Intron retention constituted the majority (40%) of all AS events in G. raimondii. Comparison across 11 eukaryote species showed that intron retention is the most common AS type in higher plants. Although transposable elements (TEs) were found in only 2.9% of all G. raimondii introns, they are present in 43% of the retained introns, suggesting that TE-insertion may be an important mechanism for intron retention during AS. The majority of the TE insertions are concentrated 0-40 nt upstream of the 3'-splice site, substantially altering the distribution of branch points from preferred positions and reducing the efficiency of intron splicing by decreasing RNA secondary structure flexibility. Our data suggest that TE-insertion-induced changes in branch point-site distribution are important for intron retention-type AS. Our findings may help explain the vast differences in intron-retention frequencies between vertebrates and higher plants.

  3. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    PubMed Central

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.; Kong, Betty Y.; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vogt, Stefan; Chen, Si; Garwin, Seth A.; Bayer, Amanda R.; Dravid, Vinayak; Woodruff, Teresa K.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2015-01-01

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg induces a series of ‘zinc sparks’ that are necessary for inducing the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches to resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, and 3D elemental tomography for high resolution elemental mapping. We show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands of zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 106 zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. The discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes. PMID:25615666

  4. Development of synaptic networks in the mouse vagal pathway revealed by optical mapping with a voltage-sensitive dye.

    PubMed

    Momose-Sato, Yoko; Sato, Katsushige

    2016-07-01

    The central issue in developmental neuroscience is when and how neural synaptic networks are established and become functional within the central nervous system (CNS). Investigations of the neural network organization have been hampered because conventional electrophysiological means have some technical limitations. In this study, the multiple-site optical recording technique with a voltage-sensitive dye was employed to survey the developmental organization of the vagal system in the mouse embryo. Stimulation of the vagus nerve in E11-E14 mouse embryos elicited optical responses in areas corresponding to the vagal sensory and motor nuclei. Postsynaptic responses in the first-order sensory nucleus, the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), were identified from E11, suggesting that sensory information becomes transferred to the brain at this stage. In addition to the NTS, optical responses were identified in the rostral and contralateral brainstem regions, which corresponded to second/higher order nuclei of the vagus nerve including the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Postsynaptic responses in the second/higher-order nuclei were detected from E12, suggesting that polysynaptic networks were functional at this stage. We discuss the results of our optical mapping, comparing them with previous findings obtained in the chick and rat embryos, and suggest some fundamental principles in the functional organization of synaptic networks in the embryonic brain. PMID:27207499

  5. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    SciTech Connect

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.; Kong, Betty Y.; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vogt, Stefan; Chen, Si; Garwin, Seth A.; Bayer, Amanda R.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-12-15

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg induces a series of ‘zinc sparks’ that are necessary for inducing the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches to resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, and 3D elemental tomography for high resolution elemental mapping. Here we show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands of zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 106 zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. We conclude that the discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes.

  6. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    DOE PAGES

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.; Kong, Betty Y.; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vogt, Stefan; Chen, Si; Garwin, Seth A.; Bayer, Amanda R.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; et al

    2014-12-15

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg induces a series of ‘zinc sparks’ that are necessary for inducing the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches to resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, and 3D elemental tomography for high resolution elemental mapping. Here we show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands ofmore » zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 106 zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. We conclude that the discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes.« less

  7. Quantitative mapping of zinc fluxes in the mammalian egg reveals the origin of fertilization-induced zinc sparks

    SciTech Connect

    Que, Emily L.; Bleher, Reiner; Duncan, Francesca E.; Kong, Betty Y.; Gleber, Sophie C.; Vogt, Stefan; Chen, Si; Garwin, Seth A.; Bayer, Amanda R.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-12-15

    Fertilization of a mammalian egg initiates a series of 'zinc sparks' that are necessary to induce the egg-to-embryo transition. Despite the importance of these zinc-efflux events little is known about their origin. To understand the molecular mechanism of the zinc spark we combined four physical approaches that resolve zinc distributions in single cells: a chemical probe for dynamic live-cell fluorescence imaging and a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence microscopy and three-dimensional elemental tomography for high-resolution elemental mapping. We show that the zinc spark arises from a system of thousands of zinc-loaded vesicles, each of which contains, on average, 10(6) zinc atoms. These vesicles undergo dynamic movement during oocyte maturation and exocytosis at the time of fertilization. The discovery of these vesicles and the demonstration that zinc sparks originate from them provides a quantitative framework for understanding how zinc fluxes regulate cellular processes

  8. Quantitative network mapping of the human kinome interactome reveals new clues for rational kinase inhibitor discovery and individualized cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Jia, Peilin; Wang, Quan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-06-15

    The human kinome is gaining importance through its promising cancer therapeutic targets, yet no general model to address the kinase inhibitor resistance has emerged. Here, we constructed a systems biology-based framework to catalogue the human kinome, including 538 kinase genes, in the broader context of the human interactome. Specifically, we constructed three networks: a kinase-substrate interaction network containing 7,346 pairs connecting 379 kinases to 36,576 phosphorylation sites in 1,961 substrates, a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) containing 92,699 pairs, and an atomic resolution PPIN containing 4,278 pairs. We identified the conserved regulatory phosphorylation motifs (e.g., Ser/Thr-Pro) using a sequence logo analysis. We found the typical anticancer target selection strategy that uses network hubs as drug targets, might lead to a high adverse drug reaction risk. Furthermore, we found the distinct network centrality of kinases creates a high anticancer drug resistance risk by feedback or crosstalk mechanisms within cellular networks. This notion is supported by the systematic network and pathway analyses that anticancer drug resistance genes are significantly enriched as hubs and heavily participate in multiple signaling pathways. Collectively, this comprehensive human kinome interactome map sheds light on anticancer drug resistance mechanisms and provides an innovative resource for rational kinase inhibitor design.

  9. Family-based linkage and association mapping reveals novel genes affecting Plum pox virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pagny, Gaëlle; Paulstephenraj, Pauline S; Poque, Sylvain; Sicard, Ophélie; Cosson, Patrick; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Caballero, Mélodie; Chague, Aurélie; Gourdon, Germain; Negrel, Lise; Candresse, Thierry; Mariette, Stéphanie; Decroocq, Véronique

    2012-11-01

    Sharka is a devastating viral disease caused by the Plum pox virus (PPV) in stone fruit trees and few sources of resistance are known in its natural hosts. Since any knowledge gained from Arabidopsis on plant virus susceptibility factors is likely to be transferable to crop species, Arabidopsis's natural variation was searched for host factors essential for PPV infection. To locate regions of the genome associated with susceptibility to PPV, linkage analysis was performed on six biparental populations as well as on multiparental lines. To refine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, a genome-wide association analysis was carried out using 147 Arabidopsis accessions. Evidence was found for linkage on chromosomes 1, 3 and 5 with restriction of PPV long-distance movement. The most relevant signals occurred within a region at the bottom of chromosome 3, which comprises seven RTM3-like TRAF domain-containing genes. Since the resistance mechanism analyzed here is recessive and the rtm3 knockout mutant is susceptible to PPV infection, it suggests that other gene(s) present in the small identified region encompassing RTM3 are necessary for PPV long-distance movement. In consequence, we report here the occurrence of host factor(s) that are indispensable for virus long-distance movement.

  10. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  11. High-resolution physical mapping in Pennisetum squamulatum reveals extensive chromosomal heteromorphism of the genomic region associated with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yukio; Conner, Joann A; Goel, Shailendra; Morishige, Daryl T; Mullet, John E; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2004-04-01

    Gametophytic apomixis is asexual reproduction as a consequence of parthenogenetic development of a chromosomally unreduced egg. The trait leads to the production of embryos with a maternal genotype, i.e. progeny are clones of the maternal plant. The application of the trait in agriculture could be a tremendous tool for crop improvement through conventional and nonconventional breeding methods. Unfortunately, there are no major crops that reproduce by apomixis, and interspecific hybridization with wild relatives has not yet resulted in commercially viable germplasm. Pennisetum squamulatum is an aposporous apomict from which the gene(s) for apomixis has been transferred to sexual pearl millet by backcrossing. Twelve molecular markers that are linked with apomixis coexist in a tight linkage block called the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR), and several of these markers have been shown to be hemizygous in the polyploid genome of P. squamulatum. High resolution genetic mapping of these markers has not been possible because of low recombination in this region of the genome. We now show the physical arrangement of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing apomixis-linked molecular markers by high resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization on pachytene chromosomes. The size of the ASGR, currently defined as the entire hemizygous region that hybridizes with apomixis-linked bacterial artificial chromosomes, was estimated on pachytene and mitotic chromosomes to be approximately 50 Mbp (a quarter of the chromosome). The ASGR includes highly repetitive sequences from an Opie-2-like retrotransposon family that are particularly abundant in this region of the genome.

  12. Genome-wide mapping of cytosine methylation revealed dynamic DNA methylation patterns associated with genes and centromeres in rice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihuang; Kikuchi, Shinji; Neumann, Pavel; Zhang, Wenli; Wu, Yufeng; Chen, Feng; Jiang, Jiming

    2010-08-01

    We conducted genome-wide mapping of cytosine methylation using methylcytosine immunoprecipitation combined with Illumina sequencing. The chromosomal distribution pattern of methylated DNA is similar to the heterochromatin distribution pattern on rice chromosomes. The DNA methylation patterns of rice genes are similar to those in Arabidopsis thaliana, including distinct methylation patterns asssociated with gene bodies and promoters. The DNA sequences in the core domains of rice Cen4, Cen5 and Cen8 showed elevated methylation levels compared with sequences in the pericentromeric regions. In addition, elevated methylation levels were associated with the DNA sequences in the CENH3-binding subdomains, compared with the sequences in the flanking H3 subdomains. In contrast, the centromeric domain of Cen11, which is composed exclusively of centromeric satellite DNA, is hypomethylated compared with the pericentromeric domains. Thus, the DNA sequences associated with functional centromeres can be either hypomethylated or hypermethylated. The methylation patterns of centromeric DNA appear to be correlated with the composition of the associated DNA sequences. We propose that both hypomethylation and hypermethylation of CENH3-associated DNA sequences can serve as epigenetic marks to distinguish where CENH3 deposition will occur within the surrounding H3 chromatin.

  13. Granger Causality Mapping during Joint Actions Reveals Evidence for Forward Models That Could Overcome Sensory-Motor Delays

    PubMed Central

    Kokal, Idil; Keysers, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Studies investigating joint actions have suggested a central role for the putative mirror neuron system (pMNS) because of the close link between perception and action provided by these brain regions [1], [2], [3]. In contrast, our previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment demonstrated that the BOLD response of the pMNS does not suggest that it directly integrates observed and executed actions during joint actions [4]. To test whether the pMNS might contribute indirectly to the integration process by sending information to brain areas responsible for this integration (integration network), here we used Granger causality mapping (GCM) [5]. We explored the directional information flow between the anterior sites of the pMNS and previously identified integrative brain regions. We found that the left BA44 sent more information than it received to both the integration network (left thalamus, right middle occipital gyrus and cerebellum) and more posterior nodes of the pMNS (BA2). Thus, during joint actions, two anatomically separate networks therefore seem effectively connected and the information flow is predominantly from anterior to posterior areas of the brain. These findings suggest that the pMNS is involved indirectly in joint actions by transforming observed and executed actions into a common code and is part of a generative model that could predict the future somatosensory and visual consequences of observed and executed actions in order to overcome otherwise inevitable neural delays. PMID:20975836

  14. Transcriptome-wide mapping reveals widespread dynamic-regulated pseudouridylation of ncRNA and mRNA.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Schraga; Bernstein, Douglas A; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Jovanovic, Marko; Herbst, Rebecca H; León-Ricardo, Brian X; Engreitz, Jesse M; Guttman, Mitchell; Satija, Rahul; Lander, Eric S; Fink, Gerald; Regev, Aviv

    2014-09-25

    Pseudouridine is the most abundant RNA modification, yet except for a few well-studied cases, little is known about the modified positions and their function(s). Here, we develop Ψ-seq for transcriptome-wide quantitative mapping of pseudouridine. We validate Ψ-seq with spike-ins and de novo identification of previously reported positions and discover hundreds of unique sites in human and yeast mRNAs and snoRNAs. Perturbing pseudouridine synthases (PUS) uncovers which pseudouridine synthase modifies each site and their target sequence features. mRNA pseudouridinylation depends on both site-specific and snoRNA-guided pseudouridine synthases. Upon heat shock in yeast, Pus7p-mediated pseudouridylation is induced at >200 sites, and PUS7 deletion decreases the levels of otherwise pseudouridylated mRNA, suggesting a role in enhancing transcript stability. rRNA pseudouridine stoichiometries are conserved but reduced in cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients, where the PUS DKC1 is mutated. Our work identifies an enhanced, transcriptome-wide scope for pseudouridine and methods to dissect its underlying mechanisms and function.

  15. Transcriptome-wide mapping reveals widespread dynamic regulated pseudouridylation of ncRNA and mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Schraga; Bernstein, Douglas A.; Mumbach, Maxwell R.; Jovanovic, Marko; Herbst, Rebecca H.; León-Ricardo, Brian X.; Engreitz, Jesse M.; Guttman, Mitchell; Satija, Rahul; Lander, Eric S.; Fink, Gerald; Regev, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pseudouridine is the most abundant RNA modification, yet except for a few well-studied cases, little is known about the modified positions and their function(s). Here, we develop Ψ-seq for transcriptome-wide quantitative mapping of pseudouridine. We validate Ψ-seq with spike-ins and de novo identification of previously reported positions and discover hundreds of novel sites in human and yeast mRNAs and snoRNAs. Perturbing pseudouridine synthases (PUSs) uncovers which PUSs modify each site and their target sequence features. mRNA pseudouridinylation depends on both site-specific and snoRNA-guided PUSs. Upon heat shock in yeast, Pus7-mediated pseudouridylation is induced at >200 sites and Pus7 deletion decreases the levels of otherwise pseudouridylated mRNA, suggesting a role in enhancing transcript stability. rRNA pseudouridine stoichiometries are conserved, but reduced in cells from dyskeratosis congenita patients, where the PUS DKC1 is mutated. Our work identifies an enhanced, transcritome-wide scope for pseudouridine, and methods to dissect its underlying mechanisms and function. PMID:25219674

  16. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII’s natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins. PMID:26274323

  17. Genetic interaction mapping reveals a role for the SWI/SNF nucleosome remodeler in spliceosome activation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Kristin L; Ryan, Colm J; Xu, Jiewei; Lipp, Jesse J; Nissen, Kelly E; Roguev, Assen; Shales, Michael; Krogan, Nevan J; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous regulatory connections between pre-mRNA splicing and chromatin have been demonstrated, the precise mechanisms by which chromatin factors influence spliceosome assembly and/or catalysis remain unclear. To probe the genetic network of pre-mRNA splicing in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed an epistatic mini-array profile (E-MAP) and discovered many new connections between chromatin and splicing. Notably, the nucleosome remodeler SWI/SNF had strong genetic interactions with components of the U2 snRNP SF3 complex. Overexpression of SF3 components in ΔSWI/SNF cells led to inefficient splicing of many fission yeast introns, predominantly those with non-consensus splice sites. Deletion of SWI/SNF decreased recruitment of the splicing ATPase Prp2, suggesting that SWI/SNF promotes co-transcriptional spliceosome assembly prior to first step catalysis. Importantly, defects in SWI/SNF as well as SF3 overexpression each altered nucleosome occupancy along intron-containing genes, illustrating that the chromatin landscape both affects--and is affected by--co-transcriptional splicing.

  18. Crosslink Mapping at Amino Acid-Base Resolution Reveals the Path of Scrunched DNA in Initial Transcribing Complexes.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Jared T; Winkelman, Bradford T; Boyce, Julian; Maloney, Michael F; Chen, Albert Y; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    RNA polymerase binds tightly to DNA to recognize promoters with high specificity but then releases these contacts during the initial stage of transcription. We report a site-specific crosslinking approach to map the DNA path in bacterial transcription intermediates at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. After validating the approach by showing that the DNA path in open complexes (RPO) is the same as in high-resolution X-ray structures, we define the path following substrate addition in "scrunched" complexes (RPITC). The DNA bulges that form within the transcription bubble in RPITC are positioned differently on the two strands. Our data suggest that the non-template strand bulge is extruded into solvent in complexes containing a 5-mer RNA, whereas the template strand bulge remains within the template strand tunnel, exerting stress on interactions between the β flap, β' clamp, and σ3.2. We propose that this stress contributes to σ3.2 displacement from the RNA exit channel, facilitating promoter escape. PMID:26257284

  19. A high performance biometric signal and image processing method to reveal blood perfusion towards 3D oxygen saturation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imms, Ryan; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Trico, Michaël.; Summers, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Non-contact imaging photoplethysmography (PPG) is a recent development in the field of physiological data acquisition, currently undergoing a large amount of research to characterize and define the range of its capabilities. Contact-based PPG techniques have been broadly used in clinical scenarios for a number of years to obtain direct information about the degree of oxygen saturation for patients. With the advent of imaging techniques, there is strong potential to enable access to additional information such as multi-dimensional blood perfusion and saturation mapping. The further development of effective opto-physiological monitoring techniques is dependent upon novel modelling techniques coupled with improved sensor design and effective signal processing methodologies. The biometric signal and imaging processing platform (bSIPP) provides a comprehensive set of features for extraction and analysis of recorded iPPG data, enabling direct comparison with other biomedical diagnostic tools such as ECG and EEG. Additionally, utilizing information about the nature of tissue structure has enabled the generation of an engineering model describing the behaviour of light during its travel through the biological tissue. This enables the estimation of the relative oxygen saturation and blood perfusion in different layers of the tissue to be calculated, which has the potential to be a useful diagnostic tool.

  20. Fate mapping reveals that microglia and recruited monocyte-derived macrophages are definitively distinguishable by phenotype in the retina

    PubMed Central

    O’Koren, E. G.; Mathew, R.; Saban, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The recent paradigm shift that microglia are yolk sac-derived, not hematopoietic-derived, is reshaping our knowledge about the isolated role of microglia in CNS diseases, including degenerative conditions of the retina. However, unraveling microglial-specific functions has been hindered by phenotypic overlap of microglia with monocyte-derived macrophages. The latter are differentiated from recruited monocytes in neuroinflammation, including retina. Here we demonstrate the use of fate mapping wherein microglia and monocyte-derived cells are endogenously labeled with different fluorescent reporters. Combining this method with 12-color flow cytometry, we show that these two populations are definitively distinguishable by phenotype in retina. We prove that retinal microglia have a unique CD45lo CD11clo F4/80lo I-A/I-E− signature, conserved in the steady state and during retinal injury. The latter was observed in the widely used light-induced retinal degeneration model and corroborated in other models, including whole-body irradiation/bone-marrow transplantation. The literature contains conflicting observations about whether microglia, including in the retina, increase expression of these markers in neuroinflammation. We show that monocyte-derived macrophages have elevated expression of these surface markers, not microglia. Our resolution of such phenotypic differences may serve as a robust way to help characterize isolated roles of these cells in retinal neuroinflammation and possibly elsewhere in CNS. PMID:26856416

  1. Mapping of PARK2 and PACRG overlapping regulatory region reveals LD structure and functional variants in association with leprosy in unrelated indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rupali; Ali, Shafat; Srivastava, Amit K; Aggarwal, Shweta; Kumar, Bhupender; Manvati, Siddharth; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Jena, Mamta; Garg, Vijay K; Bhattacharya, Sambit N; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium Leprae, where the host genetic background plays an important role toward the disease pathogenesis. Various studies have identified a number of human genes in association with leprosy or its clinical forms. However, non-replication of results has hinted at the heterogeneity among associations between different population groups, which could be due to differently evolved LD structures and differential frequencies of SNPs within the studied regions of the genome. A need for systematic and saturated mapping of the associated regions with the disease is warranted to unravel the observed heterogeneity in different populations. Mapping of the PARK2 and PACRG gene regulatory region with 96 SNPs, with a resolution of 1 SNP per 1 Kb for PARK2 gene regulatory region in a North Indian population, showed an involvement of 11 SNPs in determining the susceptibility towards leprosy. The association was replicated in a geographically distinct and unrelated population from Orissa in eastern India. In vitro reporter assays revealed that the two significantly associated SNPs, located 63.8 kb upstream of PARK2 gene and represented in a single BIN of 8 SNPs, influenced the gene expression. A comparison of BINs between Indian and Vietnamese populations revealed differences in the BIN structures, explaining the heterogeneity and also the reason for non-replication of the associated genomic region in different populations.

  2. Can Convergent Cross Mapping Untangle Idiosyncratic Speleothem Proxy Records to Reveal the Structure of Shared Climate Forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frappier, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid growth and development of speleothem paleoclimatology has generated diverse and important new terrestrial paleoenvironmental proxy records that increasingly illuminate both the enormous potential and great complexity of cave proxy systems and speleothem data. Speleothem records commonly exhibit complex covariation patterns between proxy variables (i.e. carbon and oxygen isotopes, various trace element concentrations and ratios, stratigraphic characteristics, growth rates, etc...). Such covariation patterns frequently change sign and magnitude over time, and often show periods without significant correlation that alternate with times with strongly coupled behavior. These patterns are evident when comparing records between sites and stalagmites, and even within a single stalagmite. Instability in covariation patterns and low long-term correlations both limit our confidence in applying speleothems proxy transfer functions over long time periods. Are these complex covariation patterns meaningful or merely mirages? When two speleothem records show the same result, replication is considered by the community to be evidence that both records are highly sensitive to a common climate signal and are thus reliable proxies for that climate signal. Signals derived from a single speleothem dataset could be noise, and thus of limited value until it is validated by the replication test. Are speleothems naturally idiosyncratic and noisy? Must all speleothem records be duplicated to establish reliability? I consider whether Convergent Cross Mapping (CCM) may offer a fruitful approach to these problems. CCM is a powerful statistical tool developed in George Sugihara's lab for complex dynamical systems that tests the direction of causality and strength of forcing among multiple time-series variables. I apply CCM to speleothem timeseries records to 1) reconstruct the underlying state climate variable of interest over time (in this case, precipitation), and 2) determine the

  3. Genetic Mapping Reveals Broader Role of Vrn-H3 Gene in Root and Shoot Development beyond Heading in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Bungartz, Annemarie; Muzammil, Shumaila; P. Afsharyan, Nazanin; Léon, Jens; Naz, Ali Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to dissect the genetic inheritance and interplay of root, shoot and heading attributes for a better understanding of these traits in crop production. For this, we utilized quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate gene analysis approach using a second filial (F2) population originated from a cross between spring cultivar Cheri and wild barley accession ICB181160. The F2 population comprising 182 plants was phenotyped for root dry weight (RDW), root volume (RV), root length (RL) and shoot dry weight (SDW), tiller number per plant (TIL) and days to heading (HEA). In parallel, this population was genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers distributed across the whole genome. Marker by trait analysis revealed 16 QTL for root and shoot traits localized on chromosomes 1H, 3H, 4H, 5H and 7H. The strongest and a common QTL effect for root, shoot and heading traits was identified on chromosome 7H at the putative region of Vrn-H3 gene. Later, we have established PCR based gene specific marker HvVrnH3 revealing polymorphism for early heading Vrn-H3 allele in Cheri and late heading allele vrn-H3 in ICB181160. Genotyping of these alleles revealed a clear co-segregation of early heading Vrn-H3 allele with lower root and shoot attributes, while late heading vrn-H3 allele with more TIL and higher root biomass suggesting a primary insight on the function of Vrn-H3 gene beyond flowering. Genetic interactions of vernalization genes Vrn-H3 with Vrn-H2 and Vrn-H1 also suggested the major role of Vrn-H3 alleles in determining root and shoot trait variations in barley. We believe, these data provide an opportunity for further research to test a precise significance of early heading on yield components and root associated sustainability in crops like barley and wheat. PMID:27442506

  4. Genetic Mapping Reveals Broader Role of Vrn-H3 Gene in Root and Shoot Development beyond Heading in Barley.

    PubMed

    Arifuzzaman, Md; Günal, Süleyman; Bungartz, Annemarie; Muzammil, Shumaila; P Afsharyan, Nazanin; Léon, Jens; Naz, Ali Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to dissect the genetic inheritance and interplay of root, shoot and heading attributes for a better understanding of these traits in crop production. For this, we utilized quantitative trait loci (QTL) and candidate gene analysis approach using a second filial (F2) population originated from a cross between spring cultivar Cheri and wild barley accession ICB181160. The F2 population comprising 182 plants was phenotyped for root dry weight (RDW), root volume (RV), root length (RL) and shoot dry weight (SDW), tiller number per plant (TIL) and days to heading (HEA). In parallel, this population was genotyped using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers distributed across the whole genome. Marker by trait analysis revealed 16 QTL for root and shoot traits localized on chromosomes 1H, 3H, 4H, 5H and 7H. The strongest and a common QTL effect for root, shoot and heading traits was identified on chromosome 7H at the putative region of Vrn-H3 gene. Later, we have established PCR based gene specific marker HvVrnH3 revealing polymorphism for early heading Vrn-H3 allele in Cheri and late heading allele vrn-H3 in ICB181160. Genotyping of these alleles revealed a clear co-segregation of early heading Vrn-H3 allele with lower root and shoot attributes, while late heading vrn-H3 allele with more TIL and higher root biomass suggesting a primary insight on the function of Vrn-H3 gene beyond flowering. Genetic interactions of vernalization genes Vrn-H3 with Vrn-H2 and Vrn-H1 also suggested the major role of Vrn-H3 alleles in determining root and shoot trait variations in barley. We believe, these data provide an opportunity for further research to test a precise significance of early heading on yield components and root associated sustainability in crops like barley and wheat. PMID:27442506

  5. Multiple Sex-Associated Regions and a Putative Sex Chromosome in Zebrafish Revealed by RAD Mapping and Population Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer L.; Rodríguez Marí, Adriana; Braasch, Ingo; Amores, Angel; Hohenlohe, Paul; Batzel, Peter; Postlethwait, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Within vertebrates, major sex determining genes can differ among taxa and even within species. In zebrafish (Danio rerio), neither heteromorphic sex chromosomes nor single sex determination genes of large effect, like Sry in mammals, have yet been identified. Furthermore, environmental factors can influence zebrafish sex determination. Although progress has been made in understanding zebrafish gonad differentiation (e.g. the influence of germ cells on gonad fate), the primary genetic basis of zebrafish sex determination remains poorly understood. To identify genetic loci associated with sex, we analyzed F2 offspring of reciprocal crosses between Oregon *AB and Nadia (NA) wild-type zebrafish stocks. Genome-wide linkage analysis, using more than 5,000 sequence-based polymorphic restriction site associated (RAD-tag) markers and population genomic analysis of more than 30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in our *ABxNA crosses revealed a sex-associated locus on the end of the long arm of chr-4 for both cross families, and an additional locus in the middle of chr-3 in one cross family. Additional sequencing showed that two SNPs in dmrt1 previously suggested to be functional candidates for sex determination in a cross of ABxIndia wild-type zebrafish, are not associated with sex in our AB fish. Our data show that sex determination in zebrafish is polygenic and that different genes may influence sex determination in different strains or that different genes become more important under different environmental conditions. The association of the end of chr-4 with sex is remarkable because, unique in the karyotype, this chromosome arm shares features with known sex chromosomes: it is highly heterochromatic, repetitive, late replicating, and has reduced recombination. Our results reveal that chr-4 has functional and structural properties expected of a sex chromosome. PMID:22792396

  6. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  7. THE MULTI-PHASE COLD FOUNTAIN IN M82 REVEALED BY A WIDE, SENSITIVE MAP OF THE MOLECULAR INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Leroy, Adam K.; Martini, Paul; Walter, Fabian; Roussel, Hélène; Sandstrom, Karin; Ott, Jürgen; Weiss, Axel; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Schuster, Karl; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava

    2015-12-01

    We present a wide area (≈8 × 8 kpc), sensitive map of CO (2–1) emission around the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Molecular gas extends far beyond the stellar disk, including emission associated with the well-known outflow as far as 3 kpc from M82's midplane. Kinematic signatures of the outflow are visible in both the CO and H i emission: both tracers show a minor axis velocity gradient and together they show double peaked profiles, consistent with a hot outflow bounded by a cone made of a mix of atomic and molecular gas. Combining our CO and H i data with observations of the dust continuum, we study the changing properties of the cold outflow as it leaves the disk. While H{sub 2} dominates the ISM near the disk, the dominant phase of the cool medium changes as it leaves the galaxy and becomes mostly atomic after about a kpc. Several arguments suggest that regardless of phase, the mass in the cold outflow does not make it far from the disk; the mass flux through surfaces above the disk appears to decline with a projected scale length of ≈1–2 kpc. The cool material must also end up distributed over a much wider angle than the hot outflow based on the nearly circular isophotes of dust and CO at low intensity and the declining rotation velocities as a function of height from the plane. The minor axis of M82 appears so striking at many wavelengths because the interface between the hot wind cavity and the cool gas produces Hα, hot dust, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, and scattered UV light. We also show the level at which a face-on version of M82 would be detectable as an outflow based on unresolved spectroscopy. Finally, we consider multiple constraints on the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor, which must change across the galaxy but appears to be only a factor of ≈2 lower than the Galactic value in the outflow.

  8. Cosmic-ray astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry in the interstellar medium is driven by fast ion-molecule reactions. This, of course, demands a mechanism for ionization, and cosmic rays are the ideal candidate as they can operate throughout the majority of both diffuse and dense interstellar clouds. Aside from driving interstellar chemistry via ionization, cosmic rays also interact with the interstellar medium in ways that heat the ambient gas, produce gamma rays, and produce light element isotopes. In this paper we review the observables generated by cosmic-ray interactions with the interstellar medium, focusing primarily on the relevance to astrochemistry.

  9. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  10. Anisotropies in TeV Cosmic Rays Related to the IBEX Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Adams, F. C.; Christian, E.; Desiati, P.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H. O.; Jokipii, J. R.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Zank, G.

    2014-08-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes enhanced Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) emission in the keV energy range from a narrow (~20° wide) "ribbon" in the sky that appears to be centered on the direction of the local interstellar (LIS) magnetic field. The Milagro collaboration, the Asγ collaboration and the IceCube observatory have recently made global maps of cosmic ray fluxes in the TeV energy range, revealing anisotropic structures ordered in part by the local interstellar magnetic field and the interstellar flow. This paper following from a recent publication in Science makes the link between these disparate observations by developing a simple model of the magnetic structure surrounding the heliosphere in the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) that is consistent with both IBEX ENA fluxes and TeV cosmic ray anisotropies. The model also employs the revised velocity direction of the LIC derived from neutral He observations by IBEX. By modeling the propagation of cosmic rays through this magnetic field structure, we specifically show that (1) the large-scale TeV anisotropy provides a roughly consistent orientation for the local interstellar magnetic field at the center of the IBEX Ribbon and corroborates the ~ 3 μG magnitude of the local interstellar magnetic field derived from IBEX observations of the global heliosphere; (2) and small-scale structures in cosmic rays (over < 30° angular scales) are influenced by the interstellar field interaction with the heliosphere at energies < 10 TeV. Thus, we provide a link between IBEX ENA observations, IBEX neutral observations of interstellar He, and TeV cosmic ray anisotropies, which are strongly influenced by the interactions between the local interstellar magnetic field, the flow of the local interstellar plasma, and the global heliosphere.

  11. Palaeoclimatic significance of Phosphorus variability in Tropical and SubTropical speleothems revealed by high-resolution synchrotron micro XRF mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisia, S.; Borsato, A.; Drysdale, R.; Paul, B.; Cotte, M.; Greig, A.

    2012-12-01

    In temperate-humid climate phosphorus (P) concentration in speleothem calcite has commonly been related to vegetation die-back in autumn and subsequent colloidal transport from the soil zone into the cave during high infiltration events. As a consequence, the palaeoclimatic significance of cyclic increases in P concentration within speleothems has been that of a marker for seasonal augmentation of effective infiltration. In wet-tropical settings, however, complex interactions between microbial and hydrological processes may result in the formation of P-rich phases during periods of low infiltration. Here, we investigate the significance of P variability in one modern and two Early Pliocene speleothems formed in caves cut in low-lying, Tertiary marine limestones at Christmas Island and the Nullarbor in Australia by using microscopy and high resolution synchrotron radiation X-ray flourescence mapping. Monitoring data in the modern setting suggest that co-precipitation of P with speleothem calcite occurs when the drip rate decreases and the aquifer is progressively drained (Frisia et al., 2012, Clim. Past Discuss., 8, 2557-2582). Electron microscopy highlights the presence of bacterially-related structures, and synchrotron maps reveal that P is not incorporated in the calcite lattice, and commonly forms phosphates which could be associated with bacteria (not necessarily bio-mediated). Our interpretation of the hydrological significance of P incorporation in tropical speleothems is then used to interpret P peaks, which are commonly associated with micritic and stromatolite-like layers in the two Early Pliocene stalagmites from the Nullarbor. The petrographic structure is almost perfectly reproduced by high-resolution elemental mapping, which reveal a close association of S (as sulphate) with "microbial mats". Synchrotron maps highlight a complex behavior of P relative to other solutes (Mg, Ba, Sr) as well as colloidal traansported elements (Mn, Al, Y) and suggest that

  12. Breeding signature of combining ability improvement revealed by a genomic variation map from recurrent selection population in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinwang; Li, Bao; Zhang, Ka; Hu, Kaining; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong; Tu, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Combining ability is crucial for parent selection in crop hybrid breeding. The present investigation and results had revealed the underlying genetic factors which might contribute in adequate combining ability, further assisting in enhancing heterosis and stability. Here, we conducted a large-scale analysis of genomic variation in order to define genomic regions affecting the combining ability in recurrent selection population of rapeseed. A population of 175 individuals was genotyped with the Brassica60K SNP chip. 525 hybrids were assembled with three different testers and used to evaluate the general combining ability (GCA) in three environments. By detecting the changes of the genomic variation, we identified 376 potential genome regions, spanning 3.03% of rapeseed genome which provided QTL-level resolution on potentially selected variants. More than 96% of these regions were located in the C subgenome, indicating that C subgenome had sustained stronger selection pressure in the breeding program than the A subgenome. In addition, a high level of linkage disequilibrium in rapeseed genome was detected, suggesting that marker-assisted selection for the population improvement might be easily implemented. This study outlines the evidence for high GCA on a genomic level and provided underlying molecular mechanism for recurrent selection improvement in B. napus. PMID:27412721

  13. Physical Connectivity Mapping by Circular Permutation of Human Telomerase RNA Reveals New Regions Critical for Activity and Processivity.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Melissa A; Zappulla, David C

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized ribonucleoprotein complex that extends the 3' ends of chromosomes to counteract telomere shortening. However, increased telomerase activity is associated with ∼90% of human cancers. The telomerase enzyme minimally requires an RNA (hTR) and a specialized reverse transcriptase protein (TERT) for activity in vitro. Understanding the structure-function relationships within hTR has important implications for human disease. For the first time, we have tested the physical-connectivity requirements in the 451-nucleotide hTR RNA using circular permutations, which reposition the 5' and 3' ends. Our extensive in vitro analysis identified three classes of hTR circular permutants with altered function. First, circularly permuting 3' of the template causes specific defects in repeat-addition processivity, revealing that the template recognition element found in ciliates is conserved in human telomerase RNA. Second, seven circular permutations residing within the catalytically important core and CR4/5 domains completely abolish telomerase activity, unveiling mechanistically critical portions of these domains. Third, several circular permutations between the core and CR4/5 significantly increase telomerase activity. Our extensive circular permutation results provide insights into the architecture and coordination of human telomerase RNA and highlight where the RNA could be targeted for the development of antiaging and anticancer therapeutics. PMID:26503788

  14. Breeding signature of combining ability improvement revealed by a genomic variation map from recurrent selection population in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinwang; Li, Bao; Zhang, Ka; Hu, Kaining; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong; Tu, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Combining ability is crucial for parent selection in crop hybrid breeding. The present investigation and results had revealed the underlying genetic factors which might contribute in adequate combining ability, further assisting in enhancing heterosis and stability. Here, we conducted a large-scale analysis of genomic variation in order to define genomic regions affecting the combining ability in recurrent selection population of rapeseed. A population of 175 individuals was genotyped with the Brassica60K SNP chip. 525 hybrids were assembled with three different testers and used to evaluate the general combining ability (GCA) in three environments. By detecting the changes of the genomic variation, we identified 376 potential genome regions, spanning 3.03% of rapeseed genome which provided QTL-level resolution on potentially selected variants. More than 96% of these regions were located in the C subgenome, indicating that C subgenome had sustained stronger selection pressure in the breeding program than the A subgenome. In addition, a high level of linkage disequilibrium in rapeseed genome was detected, suggesting that marker-assisted selection for the population improvement might be easily implemented. This study outlines the evidence for high GCA on a genomic level and provided underlying molecular mechanism for recurrent selection improvement in B. napus. PMID:27412721

  15. Conservation of gene function in the solanaceae as revealed by comparative mapping of domestication traits in eggplant.

    PubMed Central

    Doganlar, Sami; Frary, Anne; Daunay, Marie-Christine; Lester, Richard N; Tanksley, Steven D

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) for domestication-related traits were identified in an interspecific F(2) population of eggplant (Solanum linnaeanum x S. melongena). Although 62 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified in two locations, most of the dramatic phenotypic differences in fruit weight, shape, color, and plant prickliness that distinguish cultivated eggplant from its wild relative could be attributed to six loci with major effects. Comparison of the genomic locations of the eggplant fruit weight, fruit shape, and color QTL with the positions of similar loci in tomato, potato, and pepper revealed that 40% of the different loci have putative orthologous counterparts in at least one of these other crop species. Overall, the results suggest that domestication of the Solanaceae has been driven by mutations in a very limited number of target loci with major phenotypic effects, that selection pressures were exerted on the same loci despite the crops' independent domestications on different continents, and that the morphological diversity of these four crops can be explained by divergent mutations at these loci. PMID:12196413

  16. Mapping physiological G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways reveals a role for receptor phosphorylation in airway contraction

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sophie J.; Iglesias, Max Maza; Kong, Kok Choi; Butcher, Adrian J.; Plouffe, Bianca; Goupil, Eugénie; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; LeGouill, Christian; Russell, Kirsty; Laporte, Stéphane A.; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Bouvier, Michel; Chung, Kian Fan; Amrani, Yassine; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known to initiate a plethora of signaling pathways in vitro. However, it is unclear which of these pathways are engaged to mediate physiological responses. Here, we examine the distinct roles of Gq/11-dependent signaling and receptor phosphorylation-dependent signaling in bronchial airway contraction and lung function regulated through the M3-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M3-mAChR). By using a genetically engineered mouse expressing a G protein-biased M3-mAChR mutant, we reveal the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a role for M3-mAChR phosphorylation in bronchial smooth muscle contraction in health and in a disease state with relevance to human asthma. Furthermore, this mouse model can be used to distinguish the physiological responses that are regulated by M3-mAChR phosphorylation (which include control of lung function) from those responses that are downstream of G protein signaling. In this way, we present an approach by which to predict the physiological/therapeutic outcome of M3-mAChR–biased ligands with important implications for drug discovery. PMID:27071102

  17. Homozygosity mapping and targeted genomic sequencing reveal the gene responsible for cerebellar hypoplasia and quadrupedal locomotion in a consanguineous kindred

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Tekinay, Ayse Begum; Doerschner, Katja; Boyaci, Huseyin; Bilguvar, Kaya; Unal, Hilal; Ors, Aslihan; Onat, O. Emre; Atalar, Ergin; Basak, A. Nazli; Topaloglu, Haluk; Kansu, Tulay; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2011-01-01

    The biological basis for the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans is poorly understood. We investigated a large consanguineous family from Turkey exhibiting an extremely rare phenotype associated with quadrupedal locomotion, mental retardation, and cerebro-cerebellar hypoplasia, linked to a 7.1-Mb region of homozygosity on chromosome 17p13.1–13.3. Diffusion weighted imaging and fiber tractography of the patients' brains revealed morphological abnormalities in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular atrophy of superior, middle, and inferior peduncles of the cerebellum. Structural magnetic resonance imaging showed additional morphometric abnormalities in several cortical areas, including the corpus callosum, precentral gyrus, and Brodmann areas BA6, BA44, and BA45. Targeted sequencing of the entire homozygous region in three affected individuals and two obligate carriers uncovered a private missense mutation, WDR81 p.P856L, which cosegregated with the condition in the extended family. The mutation lies in a highly conserved region of WDR81, flanked by an N-terminal BEACH domain and C-terminal WD40 beta-propeller domains. WDR81 is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. It is highly expressed in the cerebellum and corpus callosum, in particular in the Purkinje cell layer of the cerebellum. WDR81 represents the third gene, after VLDLR and CA8, implicated in quadrupedal locomotion in humans. PMID:21885617

  18. Revealing spatial distribution of soil organic carbon contents and stocks of a disturbed bog relict by in-situ NIR and apparent EC mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, Michel; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Don, Axel; Altdorff, Daniel; van der Kruk, Jan; Huisman, Johan A.

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies showed that in-situ visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy can overcome the limitations of conventional soil sampling. Costs can be reduced and spatial resolution enhanced when mapping field-scale variability of soil organic carbon (SOC). Detailed maps can help to improve SOC management and lead to better estimates of field-scale total carbon stocks. Knowledge of SOC field patterns may also help to reveal processes and factors controlling SOC variability. In this study, we apply in situ vis-NIR and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) mapping to a disturbed bog relict. The major question of this application study was how field-scale in-situ vis-NIR mapping performs for a very heterogeneous area and under difficult grassland conditions and under highly-variable water content conditions. Past intensive peat cutting and deep ploughing in some areas, in combination with a high background heterogeneity of the underlying mineral sediments, have led to a high variability of SOC content (5.6 to 41.3 %), peat layer thickness (25 to 60 cm) and peat degradation states (from nearly fresh to amorphous). Using a field system developed by Veris Technologies (Salina KS, USA), we continuously collected vis-NIR spectra at 10 cm depth (measurement range: 350 nm to 2200 nm) over an area of around 12 ha with a line spacing of about 12 m. The system includes a set of discs for measuring ECa of the first 30 and 90 cm of the soil. The same area was also mapped with a non-invasive electro-magnetic induction (EMI) setup that provided ECa data of the first 25, 50 and 100 cm. For calibration and validation of the spatial data, we took 30 representative soil samples and 15 soil cores of about 90 cm depth, for which peat thickness, water content, pore water EC, bulk density (BD), as well as C and N content were determined for various depths. Preliminary results of the calibration of the NIR spectra to the near-surface SOC contents indicate good data quality despite the

  19. Revealing changes in molecular composition of plant cell walls on the micron-level by Raman mapping and vertex component analysis (VCA).

    PubMed

    Gierlinger, Notburga

    2014-01-01

    At the molecular level the plant cell walls consist of a few nanometer thick semi-crystalline cellulose fibrils embedded in amorphous matrix polymers such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and lignins. The arrangement of these molecules within the cell wall in different plant tissues, cells and cell wall layers is of crucial importance for a better understanding and thus optimized utilization of plant biomass. During the last years Confocal Raman microscopy evolved as a powerful method in plant science by revealing the different molecules in context with the microstructure. In this study two-dimensional spectral maps have been acquired of micro-cross-sections of spruce (softwood) and beech (hardwood). Raman images have been derived by using univariate (band integration, height ratios) and multivariate methods [vertex component analysis (VCA)]. While univariate analysis only visualizes changes in selected band heights or areas, VCA separates anatomical regions and cell wall layers with the most different molecular structures. Beside visualization of the distinguished regions and features the underlying molecular structure can be derived based on the endmember spectra. VCA revealed that the lumen sided S3 layer has a similar molecular composition as the pit membrane, both revealing a clear change in lignin composition compared to all other cell wall regions. Within the S2 layer a lamellar structure was visualized, which was elucidated to derive from slight changes in lignin composition and content and might be due to successive but not uniform lignification during growth. PMID:25071792

  20. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    functional capacity and new effectors governing drug resistance, morphogenesis and virulence, revealing new targets for antifungal drug development. PMID:27341673

  1. Homozygosity Mapping and Whole Exome Sequencing Reveal a Novel Homozygous COL18A1 Mutation Causing Knobloch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Piri, Niloofar; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saleh-Gohari, Nasrollah; Haghighi, Amirreza; Neidhardt, John; Nürnberg, Peter; Berger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the genetic basis of a chorioretinal dystrophy with high myopia of unknown origin in a child of a consanguineous marriage. The proband and ten family members of Iranian ancestry participated in this study. Linkage analysis was carried out with DNA samples of the proband and her parents by using the Human SNP Array 6.0. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed with the patients’ DNA. Specific sequence alterations within the homozygous regions identified by whole exome sequencing were verified by Sanger sequencing. Upon genetic analysis, a novel homozygous frameshift mutation was found in exon 42 of the COL18A1 gene in the patient. Both parents were heterozygous for this sequence variation. Mutations in COL18A1 are known to cause Knobloch syndrome (KS). Retrospective analysis of clinical records of the patient revealed surgical removal of a meningocele present at birth. The clinical features shown by our patient were typical of KS with the exception of chorioretinal degeneration which is a rare manifestation. This is the first case of KS reported in a family of Iranian ancestry. We identified a novel disease-causing (deletion) mutation in the COL18A1 gene leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon in the last exon. The mutation was not present in SNP databases and was also not found in 192 control individuals. Its localization within the endostatin domain implicates a functional relevance of endostatin in KS. A combined approach of linkage analysis and WES led to a rapid identification of the disease-causing mutation even though the clinical description was not completely clear at the beginning. PMID:25392994

  2. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  3. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  4. The Cosmic Web in Our Own Backyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2008-01-01

    On the largest scales, matter is strung out on an intricate pattern known as the cosmic web. The tendrils of this web should reach right into our own cosmic backyard, lacing the Galactic halo with lumps of dark matter. The search for these lumps, lit up by stars that formed within them, is a major astronomical endeavor, although it has failed to find the huge expected population. Is this a dark matter crisis, or does it provide clues to the complexities of gas physics in the early universe? New technologies in the coming decade will reveal the answer.

  5. The cosmic web in our own backyard.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F

    2008-01-01

    On the largest scales, matter is strung out on an intricate pattern known as the cosmic web. The tendrils of this web should reach right into our own cosmic backyard, lacing the Galactic halo with lumps of dark matter. The search for these lumps, lit up by stars that formed within them, is a major astronomical endeavor, although it has failed to find the huge expected population. Is this a dark matter crisis, or does it provide clues to the complexities of gas physics in the early universe? New technologies in the coming decade will reveal the answer. PMID:18174430

  6. The cosmic web in our own backyard.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F

    2008-01-01

    On the largest scales, matter is strung out on an intricate pattern known as the cosmic web. The tendrils of this web should reach right into our own cosmic backyard, lacing the Galactic halo with lumps of dark matter. The search for these lumps, lit up by stars that formed within them, is a major astronomical endeavor, although it has failed to find the huge expected population. Is this a dark matter crisis, or does it provide clues to the complexities of gas physics in the early universe? New technologies in the coming decade will reveal the answer.

  7. A COSMIC VARIANCE COOKBOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: rix@mpia.de E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu

    2011-04-20

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg{sup 2}) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by 'cosmic variance'. This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift z-bar and redshift bin size {Delta}z. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, z-bar , {Delta}z, and stellar mass m{sub *}. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates ({delta}{sigma}{sub v}/{sigma}{sub v}) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at z-bar =2 and with {Delta}z = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is {approx}38%, while it is {approx}27% for GEMS and {approx}12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, the relative cosmic variance is {approx}19% for GOODS, {approx}13% for GEMS, and {approx}6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at z

  8. A Cosmic Variance Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-04-01

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg2) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by "cosmic variance." This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift \\bar{z} and redshift bin size Δz. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, \\bar{z}, Δz, and stellar mass m *. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates (δσ v /σ v ) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at \\bar{z}=2 and with Δz = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m *>1011 M sun is ~38%, while it is ~27% for GEMS and ~12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m * ~ 1010 M sun, the relative cosmic variance is ~19% for GOODS, ~13% for GEMS, and ~6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at \\bar{z}=2 for small fields and massive galaxies, while for larger fields and intermediate mass galaxies, cosmic variance is

  9. Laurentide Ice Sheet dynamics in the Bay of Fundy, Canada, revealed through multibeam sonar mapping of glacial landsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Brian J.; Shaw, John

    2012-12-01

    Recent multibeam sonar data collected in the Bay of Fundy, Canada, interpreted in conjunction with geophysical profiling and sediment sampling, reveal in unprecedented detail a suite of glacial landforms associated with the southwest margin of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. These landforms constitute four glacial landsystems. 1) Subglacial landsystem I: In southwestern Bay of Fundy, the elongated Grand Manan Basin contains ice-contact sediments of possible mid-Wisconsinan age overlain by late-Wisconsinan ice-contact sediments strongly imprinted by iceberg furrows and pits. In places, possible mid-Wisconsinan glaciomarine sediments have been eroded by late-Wisconsinan ice, creating streamlined landforms. Eroded bedrock and megafluted ice-contact sediment on the flanks of Grand Manan Basin indicate the southwest direction of topographically-steered ice. 2) Subglacial landsystem II: Along the southern margin of the Bay of Fundy, an array of drumlins, with superimposed esker complexes, was formed by glacial ice that emanated northwest from the interior of Nova Scotia and was deflected to the southwest by the ice flowing out of the Bay of Fundy to the Gulf of Maine. The esker complexes formed later when the Nova Scotia ice sheet stagnated and meltwater escaped northwest via topographic gaps. 3) Ice-marginal landsystem I: In northern Bay of Fundy, both small De Geer moraines and larger, basin-bounding moraines were created when retreating late-Wisconsinan ice became grounded in relatively shallow water. New radiocarbon ages show that the Owen Basin Moraine in this landsystem was abandoned prior to c. 14,600 14C yr BP (cal BP 17,015-17,270 [0.7], 17,286-17,405 [0.3]). 4) Ice-marginal landsystem II: This distinctive landsystem consists of numerous arcuate moraines, commonly superimposed on one another. This landsystem was formed by thin (170 m), lightly grounded ice that retreated northeast into the Bay of Fundy. The splayed pattern of the ice margin was a response to a large

  10. Next-generation sequencing, FISH mapping and synteny-based modeling reveal mechanisms of decreasing dysploidy in Cucumis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luming; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Li, Dawei; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Jiming; Luan, Feishi; Renner, Susanne S; Hénaff, Elizabeth; Sanseverino, Walter; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Casacuberta, Josep; Senalik, Douglas A; Simon, Philipp W; Chen, Jinfeng; Weng, Yiqun

    2014-01-01

    In the large Cucurbitaceae genus Cucumis, cucumber (C. sativus) is the only species with 2n = 2x = 14 chromosomes. The majority of the remaining species, including melon (C. melo) and the sister species of cucumber, C. hystrix, have 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes, implying a reduction from n = 12 to n = 7. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we investigated chromosome synteny among cucumber, C. hystrix and melon using integrated and complementary approaches. We identified 14 inversions and a C. hystrix lineage-specific reciprocal inversion between C. hystrix and melon. The results reveal the location and orientation of 53 C. hystrix syntenic blocks on the seven cucumber chromosomes, and allow us to infer at least 59 chromosome rearrangement events that led to the seven cucumber chromosomes, including five fusions, four translocations, and 50 inversions. The 12 inferred chromosomes (AK1-AK12) of an ancestor similar to melon and C. hystrix had strikingly different evolutionary fates, with cucumber chromosome C1 apparently resulting from insertion of chromosome AK12 into the centromeric region of translocated AK2/AK8, cucumber chromosome C3 originating from a Robertsonian-like translocation between AK4 and AK6, and cucumber chromosome C5 originating from fusion of AK9 and AK10. Chromosomes C2, C4 and C6 were the result of complex reshuffling of syntenic blocks from three (AK3, AK5 and AK11), three (AK5, AK7 and AK8) and five (AK2, AK3, AK5, AK8 and AK11) ancestral chromosomes, respectively, through 33 fusion, translocation and inversion events. Previous results (Huang, S., Li, R., Zhang, Z. et al., , Nat. Genet. 41, 1275-1281; Li, D., Cuevas, H.E., Yang, L., Li, Y., Garcia-Mas, J., Zalapa, J., Staub, J.E., Luan, F., Reddy, U., He, X., Gong, Z., Weng, Y. 2011a, BMC Genomics, 12, 396) showing that cucumber C7 stayed largely intact during the entire evolution of Cucumis are supported. Results from this study allow a fine-scale understanding of the

  11. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of January 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Marketing and customer service activities in this period are presented as is the progress report of NASTRAN maintenance and support. Tables of disseminations and budget summary conclude the report.

  12. RNAi screens reveal novel metabolic regulators: RIP140, MAP4k4 and the lipid droplet associated fat specific protein (FSP) 27.

    PubMed

    Puri, V; Virbasius, J V; Guilherme, A; Czech, M P

    2008-01-01

    Adipose tissue modulates whole body metabolism and insulin sensitivity by controlling circulating lipid levels and producing molecules that can regulate fatty acid metabolism in such tissues as muscle and liver. We have developed RNA interference (RNAi) screens to identify genes in cultured adipocytes that regulate insulin signalling and key metabolic pathways. These short interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screens identified the transcriptional corepressor receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140) (J Clin Invest 116: 125, 2006) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP4k4) (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103: 2087, 2006) as negative regulators of insulin-responsive hexose uptake and oxidative metabolism. Gene expression profiling revealed that RIP140 depletion upregulates the expression of clusters of genes in the pathways of glucose uptake, glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. RIP140-null mice resist weight gain on a high-fat diet and display enhanced glucose tolerance. MAP4k4 depletion in adipocytes increases many of the RIP140-sensitive genes, increases adipogenesis and mediates some actions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Remarkably, another hit in our RNAi screens was fat specific protein 27 (FSP27), a highly expressed isoform of Cidea. We discovered that FSP27 unexpectedly associates specifically with lipid droplets and regulates fat storage. We conclude that RIP140, MAP4k4 and the novel lipid droplet protein FSP27 are powerful regulators of adipose tissue metabolism and are potential therapeutic targets for controlling metabolic disease. The discovery of these novel proteins validates the power of RNAi screening for discovery of new therapeutic approaches to type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:18171433

  13. Cortex mapping reveals regionally specific patterns of genetic and disease-specific gray-matter deficits in twins discordant for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Tyrone D; Thompson, Paul M; van Erp, Theo G M; Toga, Arthur W; Poutanen, Veli-Pekka; Huttunen, Matti; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Standerskjold-Nordenstam, Carl-Gustav; Narr, Katherine L; Khaledy, Mohammad; Zoumalan, Chris I; Dail, Rajneesh; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2002-03-01

    The symptoms of schizophrenia imply disruption to brain systems supporting higher-order cognitive activity, but whether these systems are impacted differentially against a background of diffuse cortical gray-matter deficit remains ambiguous. Some unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenics also manifest cortical gray-matter deficits, but it is unclear whether these changes are isomorphic with those in patients, and the answer is critical to understanding the neurobiological conditions necessary for disease expression given a predisposing genotype. Here we report three-dimensional cortical surface maps (probabilistic atlases matching subjects' anatomy point by point throughout cortex) in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins discordant for chronic schizophrenia along with demographically matched control twins. A map encoding the average differences between schizophrenia patients and their unaffected MZ co-twins revealed deficits primarily in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and superior parietal lobule. A map encoding variation associated with genetic proximity to a patient (MZ co-twins > DZ co-twins > control twins) isolated deficits primarily in polar and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In each case, the statistical significance was confirmed through analysis of 10,000 Monte Carlo permutations, and the remaining cortex was shown to be significantly less affected by contrast analysis. The disease-related deficits in gray matter were correlated with measures of symptom severity and cognitive dysfunction but not with duration of illness or antipsychotic drug treatment. Genetic and disease-specific influences thus affect gray matter in partially nonoverlapping areas of predominantly heteromodal association cortex, changes that may act synergistically in producing overt behavioral features of the disorder. PMID:11867725

  14. Fusarium graminearum gene deletion mutants map1 and tri5 reveal similarities and differences in the pathogenicity requirements to cause disease on Arabidopsis and wheat floral tissue.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Alayne; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The Ascomycete pathogen Fusarium graminearum can infect all cereal species and lower grain yield, quality and safety. The fungus can also cause disease on Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the disease-causing ability of two F. graminearum mutants was analysed to further explore the parallels between the wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Arabidopsis floral pathosystems. Wild-type F. graminearum (strain PH-1) and two isogenic transformants lacking either the mitogen-activated protein kinase MAP1 gene or the trichodiene synthase TRI5 gene were individually spray- or point-inoculated onto Arabidopsis and wheat floral tissue. Disease development was quantitatively assessed both macroscopically and microscopically and deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin concentrations determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Wild-type strain inoculations caused high levels of disease in both plant species and significant DON production. The map1 mutant caused minimal disease and DON accumulation in both hosts. The tri5 mutant, which is unable to produce DON, exhibited reduced pathogenicity on wheat ears, causing only discrete eye-shaped lesions on spikelets which failed to infect the rachis. By contrast, the tri5 mutant retained full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis floral tissue. This study reveals that DON mycotoxin production is not required for F. graminearum to colonize Arabidopsis floral tissue. PMID:18179606

  15. Genome-Wide Association Mapping in the Global Diversity Set Reveals New QTL Controlling Root System and Related Shoot Variation in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Stephan; Kortz, Annika; Léon, Jens; Naz, Ali A.

    2016-01-01

    The fibrous root system is a visible sign of ecological adaptation among barley natural populations. In the present study, we utilized rich barley diversity to dissect the genetic basis of root system variation and its link with shoot attributes under well-water and drought conditions. Genome-wide association mapping of phenotype data using a dense genetic map (5892 SNP markers) revealed 17 putative QTL for root and shoot traits. Among these, at 14 loci the preeminence of exotic QTL alleles resulted in trait improvements. The most promising QTL were quantified using haplotype analysis at local and global genome levels. The strongest QTL was found on chromosome 1H which accounted for root dry weight and tiller number simultaneously. Candidate gene analysis across the targeted region detected a crucial amino acid substitution mutation in the conserved domain of a WRKY29 transcription factor among genotypes bearing major and minor QTL alleles. Similarly, the drought inducible QTL QRdw.5H (5H, 95.0 cM) seems to underlie 37 amino acid deletion and substitution mutations in the conserved domain of two related genes CBF10B and CBF10A, respectively. The identification and further characterization of these candidate genes will be essential to decipher genetics behind developmental and natural adaptation mechanisms of barley. PMID:27486472

  16. Genome-Wide Association Mapping in the Global Diversity Set Reveals New QTL Controlling Root System and Related Shoot Variation in Barley.

    PubMed

    Reinert, Stephan; Kortz, Annika; Léon, Jens; Naz, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    The fibrous root system is a visible sign of ecological adaptation among barley natural populations. In the present study, we utilized rich barley diversity to dissect the genetic basis of root system variation and its link with shoot attributes under well-water and drought conditions. Genome-wide association mapping of phenotype data using a dense genetic map (5892 SNP markers) revealed 17 putative QTL for root and shoot traits. Among these, at 14 loci the preeminence of exotic QTL alleles resulted in trait improvements. The most promising QTL were quantified using haplotype analysis at local and global genome levels. The strongest QTL was found on chromosome 1H which accounted for root dry weight and tiller number simultaneously. Candidate gene analysis across the targeted region detected a crucial amino acid substitution mutation in the conserved domain of a WRKY29 transcription factor among genotypes bearing major and minor QTL alleles. Similarly, the drought inducible QTL QRdw.5H (5H, 95.0 cM) seems to underlie 37 amino acid deletion and substitution mutations in the conserved domain of two related genes CBF10B and CBF10A, respectively. The identification and further characterization of these candidate genes will be essential to decipher genetics behind developmental and natural adaptation mechanisms of barley. PMID:27486472

  17. VNTR internal structure mapping at the {alpha}-globin 3{prime}HVR locus reveals a hierachy of related lineages in oceania

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J.

    1994-09-01

    Analysis of the {alpha}-globin gene complex in Oceania has revealed many different rearrangements which remove one of the adult globin genes. Frequencies of these deletion chromosomes are elevated by malarial resistance conferred by the resulting {alpha}-thalassaemia. One particular deletion chromosome, designated -{alpha}{sup 3.7}III, is found at high levels in Melanesia and Polynesia: RFLP haplotype analysis shows that this deletion is always found on chromosomes bearing the IIIa haplotype and is likely to be the product of one single rearrangement event. A subset of the -{alpha}{sup 3.7}III chromosomes carries a more recent mutation which generates the haemoglobin variant HbJ{sup Tongariki}. We have characterized the allelic variation at the 3{prime}HVR VNTR locus located 6 kb from the globin genes in each of these groups of chromosomes. We have determined the internal structure of these alleles by RFLP mapping of PCR-amplified DNA: within each group, the allelic diversity results from the insertion and/or deletion of small {open_quotes}motifs{close_quotes} of up to 6 adjacent repeats. Mapping of 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with other haplotypes reveals that these are composed of repeat arrays that are substantially different to those derived from IIIa chromosomes, indicating that interchromosomal recombination between heterologous haplotypes does not account for any of the diversity seen to date. We have recently shown that allelic size variation at the two VNTR loci flanking the {alpha}-globin complex is very closely linked to the haplotypes known to be present at this locus. Here we show that, within a haplotype, VNTR alleles are very closely related to each other on the basis of internal structure and demonstrate that intrachromosomal mutation processes involving small numbers of tandem repeats are the main cause of variation at this locus.

  18. The Astrobiological Case for Our Cosmic Ancestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    With steadily mounting evidence that points to a cosmic origin of terrestrial life, a cultural barrier prevails against admitting that such a connection exists. Astronomy continues to reveal the presence of organic molecules and organic dust on a huge cosmic scale, amounting to a third of interstellar carbon tied up in this form. Just as the overwhelming bulk of organics on Earth stored over geological timescales are derived from the degradation of living cells, so it seems most likely that interstellar organics in large measure also derive from biology. As we enter a new decade -- the year 2010 -- a clear pronouncement of our likely alien ancestry and of the existence of extraterrestrial life on a cosmic scale would seem to be overdue.

  19. The astrobiological case for our cosmic ancestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2010-04-01

    With steadily mounting evidence that points to a cosmic origin of terrestrial life, a cultural barrier prevails against admitting that such a connection exists. Astronomy continues to reveal the presence of organic molecules and organic dust on a huge cosmic scale, amounting to a third of interstellar carbon tied up in this form. Just as the overwhelming bulk of organics on Earth stored over geological timescales are derived from the degradation of living cells, so it seems likely that interstellar organics in large measure also derive from biology. As we enter a new decade - the year 2010 - a clear pronouncement of our likely alien ancestry and of the existence of extraterrestrial life on a cosmic scale would seem to be overdue.

  20. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S.

    2012-12-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  1. A Cosmic Magnifying Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Scanning the heavens for the first time since the successful December 1999 servicing mission, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope imaged a giant, cosmic magnifying glass, a massive cluster of galaxies called Abell 2218. This 'hefty' cluster resides in the constellation Draco, some 2 billion light-years from Earth. The cluster is so massive that its enormous gravitational field deflects light rays passing through it, much as an optical lens bends light to form an image. This phenomenon, called gravitational lensing, magnifies, brightens, and distorts images from faraway objects. The cluster's magnifying powers provides a powerful 'zoom lens' for viewing distant galaxies that could not normally be observed with the largest telescopes. The picture is dominated by spiral and elliptical galaxies. Resembling a string of tree lights, the biggest and brightest galaxies are members of the foreground cluster. Researchers are intrigued by a tiny red dot just left of top center. This dot may be an extremely remote object made visible by the cluster's magnifying powers. Further investigation is needed to confirm the object's identity. The color picture already reveals several arc-shaped features that are embedded in the cluster and cannot be easily seen in the black-and- white image. The colors in this picture yield clues to the ages, distances, and temperatures of stars, the stuff of galaxies. Blue pinpoints hot young stars. The yellow-white color of several of the galaxies represents the combined light of many stars. Red identifies cool stars, old stars, and the glow of stars in distant galaxies. This view is only possible by combining Hubble's unique image quality with the rare lensing effect provided by the magnifying cluster.

  2. RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Martin; Rogers, Sean M.; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Normandeau, Eric; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Dalziel, Anne C.; Chebib, Jobran; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Parallel changes in body shape may evolve in response to similar environmental conditions, but whether such parallel phenotypic changes share a common genetic basis is still debated. The goal of this study was to assess whether parallel phenotypic changes could be explained by genetic parallelism, multiple genetic routes, or both. We first provide evidence for parallelism in fish shape by using geometric morphometrics among 300 fish representing five species pairs of Lake Whitefish. Using a genetic map comprising 3438 restriction site−associated DNA sequencing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we then identified quantitative trait loci underlying body shape traits in a backcross family reared in the laboratory. A total of 138 body shape quantitative trait loci were identified in this cross, thus revealing a highly polygenic architecture of body shape in Lake Whitefish. Third, we tested for evidence of genetic parallelism among independent wild populations using both a single-locus method (outlier analysis) and a polygenic approach (analysis of covariation among markers). The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism. However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes. These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches. PMID:26002924

  3. RAD-QTL Mapping Reveals Both Genome-Level Parallelism and Different Genetic Architecture Underlying the Evolution of Body Shape in Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) Species Pairs.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Martin; Rogers, Sean M; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie; Normandeau, Eric; Gagnaire, Pierre-Alexandre; Dalziel, Anne C; Chebib, Jobran; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Parallel changes in body shape may evolve in response to similar environmental conditions, but whether such parallel phenotypic changes share a common genetic basis is still debated. The goal of this study was to assess whether parallel phenotypic changes could be explained by genetic parallelism, multiple genetic routes, or both. We first provide evidence for parallelism in fish shape by using geometric morphometrics among 300 fish representing five species pairs of Lake Whitefish. Using a genetic map comprising 3438 restriction site-associated DNA sequencing single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we then identified quantitative trait loci underlying body shape traits in a backcross family reared in the laboratory. A total of 138 body shape quantitative trait loci were identified in this cross, thus revealing a highly polygenic architecture of body shape in Lake Whitefish. Third, we tested for evidence of genetic parallelism among independent wild populations using both a single-locus method (outlier analysis) and a polygenic approach (analysis of covariation among markers). The single-locus approach provided limited evidence for genetic parallelism. However, the polygenic analysis revealed genetic parallelism for three of the five lakes, which differed from the two other lakes. These results provide evidence for both genetic parallelism and multiple genetic routes underlying parallel phenotypic evolution in fish shape among populations occupying similar ecological niches.

  4. High-throughput mapping of the promoters of the mouse olfactory receptor genes reveals a new type of mammalian promoter and provides insight into olfactory receptor gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Clowney, E. Josephine; Magklara, Angeliki; Colquitt, Bradley M.; Pathak, Nidhi; Lane, Robert P.; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) genes are the largest mammalian gene family and are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion in olfactory neurons. Using a high-throughput approach, we mapped the transcription start sites of 1085 of the 1400 murine OR genes and performed computational analysis that revealed potential transcription factor binding sites shared by the majority of these promoters. Our analysis produced a hierarchical model for OR promoter recognition in which unusually high AT content, a unique epigenetic signature, and a stereotypically positioned O/E site distinguish OR promoters from the rest of the murine promoters. Our computations revealed an intriguing correlation between promoter AT content and evolutionary plasticity, as the most AT-rich promoters regulate rapidly evolving gene families. Within the AT-rich promoter category the position of the TATA-box does not correlate with the transcription start site. Instead, a spike in GC composition might define the exact location of the TSS, introducing the concept of “genomic contrast” in transcriptional regulation. Finally, our experiments show that genomic neighborhood rather than promoter sequence correlates with the probability of different OR genes to be expressed in the same olfactory cell. PMID:21705439

  5. Edge detection, cosmic strings and the south pole telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Andrew; Brandenberger, Robert E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2009-02-15

    We develop a method of constraining the cosmic string tension G{mu} which uses the Canny edge detection algorithm as a means of searching CMB temperature maps for the signature of the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the potential of this method using high resolution, simulated CMB temperature maps. By modeling the future output from the South Pole Telescope project (including anticipated instrumental noise), we find that cosmic strings with G{mu} > 5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} could be detected.

  6. Interspecific crossing and genetic mapping reveal intrinsic genomic incompatibility between two Senecio species that form a hybrid zone on Mount Etna, Sicily.

    PubMed

    Brennan, A C; Hiscock, S J; Abbott, R J

    2014-09-01

    Studies of hybridizing species can reveal much about the genetic basis and maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow. Here we report a genetic segregation and linkage analysis conducted on F2 progeny of a reciprocal cross between Senecio aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius that form a hybrid zone on Mount Etna, Sicily, aimed at determining the genetic basis of intrinsic hybrid barriers between them. Significant transmission ratio distortion (TRD) was detected at 34 (∼27%) of 127 marker loci located in nine distinct clusters across seven of the ten linkage groups detected, indicating genomic incompatibility between the species. TRD at these loci could not be attributed entirely to post-zygotic selective loss of F2 individuals that failed to germinate or flower (16.7%). At four loci tests indicated that pre-zygotic events, such as meiotic drive in F1 parents or gametophytic selection, contributed to TRD. Additional tests revealed that cytonuclear incompatibility contributed to TRD at five loci, Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) incompatibilities involving epistatic interactions between loci contributed to TRD at four loci, and underdominance (heterozygote disadvantage) was a possible cause of TRD at one locus. Major chromosomal rearrangements were probably not a cause of interspecific incompatibility at the scale that could be examined with current map marker density. Intrinsic genomic incompatibility between S. aethnensis and S. chrysanthemifolius revealed by TRD across multiple genomic regions in early-generation hybrids is likely to impact the genetic structure of the natural hybrid zone on Mount Etna by limiting introgression and promoting divergence across the genome.

  7. Cosmic questions: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Primack, J R; Abrams, N E

    2001-12-01

    This introductory talk at the Cosmic Questions conference sponsored by the AAAS summarizes some earlier pictures of the universe and some pictures based on modern physics and cosmology. The uroboros (snake swallowing its tail) is an example of a traditional picture. The Biblical flat-earth picture was very different from the Greek spherical earth-centered picture, which was the standard view until the end of the Middle Ages. Many people incorrectly assume that the Newtonian picture of stars scattered through otherwise empty space is still the prevailing view. Seeing Earth from space shows the power of a new picture. The Hubble Space Telescope can see all the bright galaxies, all the way to the cosmic Dark Ages. We are at the center of cosmic spheres of time: looking outward is looking backward in time. All the matter and energy in the universe can be represented as a cosmic density pyramid. The laws of physics only allow the material objects in the universe to occupy a wedge-shaped region on a diagram of mass versus size. All sizes--from the smallest size scale, the Planck scale, to the entire visible universe--can be represented on the Cosmic Uroboros. There are interesting connections across this diagram, and the human scale lies in the middle. PMID:11797741

  8. Cosmic questions: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Primack, J R; Abrams, N E

    2001-12-01

    This introductory talk at the Cosmic Questions conference sponsored by the AAAS summarizes some earlier pictures of the universe and some pictures based on modern physics and cosmology. The uroboros (snake swallowing its tail) is an example of a traditional picture. The Biblical flat-earth picture was very different from the Greek spherical earth-centered picture, which was the standard view until the end of the Middle Ages. Many people incorrectly assume that the Newtonian picture of stars scattered through otherwise empty space is still the prevailing view. Seeing Earth from space shows the power of a new picture. The Hubble Space Telescope can see all the bright galaxies, all the way to the cosmic Dark Ages. We are at the center of cosmic spheres of time: looking outward is looking backward in time. All the matter and energy in the universe can be represented as a cosmic density pyramid. The laws of physics only allow the material objects in the universe to occupy a wedge-shaped region on a diagram of mass versus size. All sizes--from the smallest size scale, the Planck scale, to the entire visible universe--can be represented on the Cosmic Uroboros. There are interesting connections across this diagram, and the human scale lies in the middle.

  9. Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  10. Angular 21 cm power spectrum of a scaling distribution of cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Oscar F.; Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, Robert; Fong, José E-mail: wangyi@physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: jose.fong@ens-lyon.fr

    2011-08-01

    Cosmic string wakes lead to a large signal in 21 cm redshift maps at redshifts larger than that corresponding to reionization. Here, we compute the angular power spectrum of 21 cm radiation as predicted by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings whose wakes have undergone shock heating.

  11. Cosmic Ray Albedo Proton Yield Correlated with Lunar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. K.; Spence, H. E.; Case, A. W.; Blake, J. B.; Golightly, M. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Schwadron, N. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Zeitlin, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    High energy cosmic rays constantly bombard the lunar regolith, producing secondary "albedo" or "splash" particles like protons and neutrons, some of which escape back to space. Two lunar missions, Lunar Prospector and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), have shown that the energy distribution of albedo neutrons is modulated by the elemental composition of the lunar regolith[1-4], with reduced neutron fluxes near the lunar poles being the result of collisions with hydrogen nuclei in ice deposits[5] in permanently shadowed craters. Here we investigate an analogous phenomenon with high energy (~100 MeV) lunar albedo protons. LRO has been observing the surface and environment of the Moon since June of 2009. The CRaTER instrument (Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation) on LRO is designed to characterize the lunar radiation environment and its effects on simulated human tissue. CRaTER's multiple solid-state detectors can discriminate the different elements in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) population above ~10 MeV/nucleon, and can also distinguish between primary GCR protons arriving from deep space and albedo particles propagating up from the lunar surface. We use albedo protons with energies greater than 60 MeV to construct a cosmic ray albedo proton map of the Moon. The yield of albedo protons is proportional to the rate of lunar proton detections divided by the rate of incoming GCR detections. The map accounts for time variation in the albedo particles driven by time variations in the primary GCR population, thus revealing any true spatial variation of the albedo proton yield. Our current map is a significant improvement over the proof-of-concept map of Wilson et al.[6]. In addition to including twelve more months of CRaTER data here, we use more numerous minimum ionizing GCR protons for normalization, and we make use of all six of CRaTER's detectors to reduce contamination from spurious non-proton events in the data stream. We find find that the flux

  12. Discovery of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Per

    2013-02-01

    The mysterious invisible radiation that ionized air was studied a century ago by many scientists. Finally, on 7 August 1912, Victor Hess in his seventh balloon flight that year, reached an altitude of about 5000 m. With his electroscopes on board the hydrogen-filled balloon he observed that the ionization instead of decreasing with altitude increased significantly. Hess had discovered cosmic rays, a discovery that gave him the 1936 Nobel Prize in physics. When research resumed after World War I focus was on understanding the nature of the cosmic radiation. Particles or radiation? Positive or negative? Electrons, positrons or protons? Progress came using new instruments like the Geiger-Muller tube and around 1940 it was clear that cosmic rays were mostly protons.

  13. Semilocal cosmic string networks

    SciTech Connect

    Achucarro, Ana; Salmi, Petja; Urrestilla, Jon

    2007-06-15

    We report on a large-scale numerical study of networks of semilocal cosmic strings in flat space in the parameter regime in which they are perturbatively stable. We find a population of segments with an exponential length distribution and indications of a scaling network without significant loop formation. Very deep in the stability regime strings of superhorizon size grow rapidly and ''percolate'' through the box. We believe these should lead at late times to a population of infinite strings similar to topologically stable strings. However, the strings are very light; scalar gradients dominate the energy density, and the network has thus a global texturelike signature. As a result, the observational constraints, at least from the temperature power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, on models predicting semilocal strings should be closer to those on global textures or monopoles, rather than on topologically stable gauged cosmic strings.

  14. FORCE: FORtran for Cosmic Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombi, Stéphane; Szapudi, István

    We review the theory of cosmic errors we have recently developed for count-in-cells statistics. The corresponding FORCE package provides a simple and useful way to compute cosmic covariance on factorial moments and cumulants measured in galaxy catalogs.

  15. Hierarchical cosmic shear power spectrum inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsing, Justin; Heavens, Alan; Jaffe, Andrew H.; Kiessling, Alina; Wandelt, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Till

    2016-02-01

    We develop a Bayesian hierarchical modelling approach for cosmic shear power spectrum inference, jointly sampling from the posterior distribution of the cosmic shear field and its (tomographic) power spectra. Inference of the shear power spectrum is a powerful intermediate product for a cosmic shear analysis, since it requires very few model assumptions and can be used to perform inference on a wide range of cosmological models a posteriori without loss of information. We show that joint posterior for the shear map and power spectrum can be sampled effectively by Gibbs sampling, iteratively drawing samples from the map and power spectrum, each conditional on the other. This approach neatly circumvents difficulties associated with complicated survey geometry and masks that plague frequentist power spectrum estimators, since the power spectrum inference provides prior information about the field in masked regions at every sampling step. We demonstrate this approach for inference of tomographic shear E-mode, B-mode and EB-cross power spectra from a simulated galaxy shear catalogue with a number of important features; galaxies distributed on the sky and in redshift with photometric redshift uncertainties, realistic random ellipticity noise for every galaxy and a complicated survey mask. The obtained posterior distributions for the tomographic power spectrum coefficients recover the underlying simulated power spectra for both E- and B-modes.

  16. The bispectrum of cosmic string temperature fluctuations including recombination effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, Donough; Hindmarsh, Mark

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum from cosmic strings, including the contributions from the last scattering surface, using a well-established Gaussian model for the string energy-momentum correlation functions, and a simplified model for the cosmic fluid. We check our approximation for the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution against the bispectrum obtained from the full sky map of the cosmic string ISW signal used by the Planck team, obtaining good agreement. We validate our model for the last scattering surface contribution by comparing the predicted temperature power spectrum with that obtained from a full Boltzmann code treatment applied to the Unconnected Segment Model of a string network. We find that including the last scattering contribution has only a small impact on the upper limit on the string tension resulting from the bispectrum at Planck resolutions, and argue that the bispectrum is unlikely to be competitive with the power spectrum at any resolution.

  17. Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2015-12-01

    The multi-facet nature of the origin of cosmic rays is such that some of the problems currently met in our path to describing available data are due to oversimplified models of CR acceleration and transport, and others to lack of knowledge of the physical processes at work in certain conditions. On the other hand, the phenomenology of cosmic rays, as arising from better observations, is getting so rich that it makes sense to try to distinguish the problems that derive from too simple views of Nature and those that are challenging the very foundations of the existing paradigms. Here I will briefly discuss some of these issues.

  18. Heterotic cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Katrin; Becker, Melanie; Krause, Axel

    2006-08-15

    We show that all three conditions for the cosmological relevance of heterotic cosmic strings, the right tension, stability and a production mechanism at the end of inflation, can be met in the strongly coupled M-theory regime. Whereas cosmic strings generated from weakly coupled heterotic strings have the well-known problems posed by Witten in 1985, we show that strings arising from M5-branes wrapped around 4-cycles (divisors) of a Calabi-Yau in heterotic M-theory compactifications solve these problems in an elegant fashion.

  19. Galactic cosmic rays and nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kiener, Juergen

    2010-03-01

    The nucleosynthesis of the light elements Li, Be and B by galactic cosmic rays is presented. Observations of cosmic rays and the nuclear reactions responsible for Li, Be and B nucleosynthesis are described, followed by some words on propagation. At the end, some open questions concerning galactic cosmic rays are discussed.

  20. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2014-12-15

    We report that integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. We found that the result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Lastly, taken together, the

  1. Genome-Based Metabolic Mapping and 13C Flux Analysis Reveal Systematic Properties of an Oleaginous Microalga Chlorella protothecoides1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Integrated and genome-based flux balance analysis, metabolomics, and 13C-label profiling of phototrophic and heterotrophic metabolism in Chlorella protothecoides, an oleaginous green alga for biofuel. The green alga Chlorella protothecoides, capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic growth with rapid lipid synthesis, is a promising candidate for biofuel production. Based on the newly available genome knowledge of the alga, we reconstructed the compartmentalized metabolic network consisting of 272 metabolic reactions, 270 enzymes, and 461 encoding genes and simulated the growth in different cultivation conditions with flux balance analysis. Phenotype-phase plane analysis shows conditions achieving theoretical maximum of the biomass and corresponding fatty acid-producing rate for phototrophic cells (the ratio of photon uptake rate to CO2 uptake rate equals 8.4) and heterotrophic ones (the glucose uptake rate to O2 consumption rate reaches 2.4), respectively. Isotope-assisted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry reveals higher metabolite concentrations in the glycolytic pathway and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in heterotrophic cells compared with autotrophic cells. We also observed enhanced levels of ATP, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), reduced, acetyl-Coenzyme A, and malonyl-Coenzyme A in heterotrophic cells consistently, consistent with a strong activity of lipid synthesis. To profile the flux map in experimental conditions, we applied nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis as a complementing strategy to flux balance analysis. The result reveals negligible photorespiratory fluxes and a metabolically low active tricarboxylic acid cycle in phototrophic C. protothecoides. In comparison, high throughput of amphibolic reactions and the tricarboxylic acid cycle with no glyoxylate shunt activities were measured for heterotrophic cells. Taken together, the metabolic network modeling assisted by experimental metabolomics and 13C labeling

  2. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-15

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay l{sup -6} for large multipole l. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At l{approx}500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |f{sub NL}{sup loc}|{approx_equal}10{sup 3}, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at l=10. Current bounds on f{sub NL} are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our f{sub NL} estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  3. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay ℓ-6 for large multipole ℓ. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At ℓ˜500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |fNLloc|≃103, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at ℓ=10. Current bounds on fNL are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our fNL estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  4. High Precision Cosmology with the Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhang, Marzieh

    In this thesis we investigate the two cosmic epochs of inflation and recombination, through their imprints on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. To probe the early universe we develop a map-based maximum-likelihood estimator to measure the amplitude of inflation-induced gravity waves, parametrized by r, from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps. Being optimal by construction, the estimator avoids E-B mixing, a possible source of contamination in the tiny B-mode detection, the target of many current and near future CMB experiments. We explore the leakage from the E- to the B-mode of polarization by using this estimator to study the linear response of the B-mode signal at different scales to variations in the E- mode power. Similarly, for various observational cases, we probe the dependence of r measurement on the signal from different scales of E and B polarization. The estimator is used to make forecasts for Spider-like and Planck-like experimental specifications and to investigate the sky-coverage optimization of the Spider-like case. We compare the forecast errors on r to the results from a similar multipole-based estimator which, by ignoring the mode-mixing, sets a lower limit on the achievable error on r. We find that an experiment with Spider-like specifications with fsky ˜ 0:02--0:2 could place a 2sigma r ≈ 0:014 bound (˜ 95% CL), which rises to 0:02 with an ℓ-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. For the Planck-like survey, a Galaxy-masked ( fsky = 0:75) sky would give 2sigmar ≈ 0:015, rising to ≈ 0:05 with the foreground residuals. We also use a novel information-based framework to compare how different generations of CMB experiments reveal information about the early universe, through their measurements of r. We also probe the epoch of recombination by investigating possible fluctuations in the free electron fraction Xe

  5. Mapping the Interaction Sites between AMPA Receptors and TARPs Reveals a Role for the Receptor N-Terminal Domain in Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Cais, Ondrej; Herguedas, Beatriz; Krol, Karolina; Cull-Candy, Stuart G.; Farrant, Mark; Greger, Ingo H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate fast neurotransmission at excitatory synapses. The extent and fidelity of postsynaptic depolarization triggered by AMPAR activation are shaped by AMPAR auxiliary subunits, including the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). TARPs profoundly influence gating, an effect thought to be mediated by an interaction with the AMPAR ion channel and ligand binding domain (LBD). Here, we show that the distal N-terminal domain (NTD) contributes to TARP modulation. Alterations in the NTD-LBD linker result in TARP-dependent and TARP-selective changes in AMPAR gating. Using peptide arrays, we identify a TARP interaction region on the NTD and define the path of TARP contacts along the LBD surface. Moreover, we map key binding sites on the TARP itself and show that mutation of these residues mediates gating modulation. Our data reveal a TARP-dependent allosteric role for the AMPAR NTD and suggest that TARP binding triggers a drastic reorganization of the AMPAR complex. PMID:25373908

  6. Antigenic mapping of an H9N2 avian influenza virus reveals two discrete antigenic sites and a novel mechanism of immune escape

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Thomas; Reddy, Kolli; James, Joe; Adamiak, Beata; Barclay, Wendy; Shelton, Holly; Iqbal, Munir

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus is a major cause of poultry production loss across Asia leading to the wide use of vaccines. Efficacy of vaccines is often compromised due to the rapid emergence of antigenic variants. To improve the effectiveness of vaccines in the field, a better understanding of the antigenic epitopes of the major antigen, hemagglutinin, is required. To address this, a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were generated against a contemporary Pakistani H9N2 isolate, which represents a major Asian H9N2 viral lineage. Antibodies were characterized in detail and used to select a total of 26 unique ‘escape’ mutants with substitutions across nine different amino acid residues in hemagglutinin including seven that have not been described as antigenic determinants for H9N2 viruses before. Competition assays and structural mapping revealed two novel, discrete antigenic sites “H9-A” and “H9-B”. Additionally, a second subset of escape mutants contained amino acid deletions within the hemagglutinin receptor binding site. This constitutes a novel method of escape for group 1 hemagglutinins and could represent an alternative means for H9N2 viruses to overcome vaccine induced immunity. These results will guide surveillance efforts for arising antigenic variants as well as evidence based vaccine seed selection and vaccine design. PMID:26738561

  7. Genome-Wide Mapping of Targets of Maize Histone Deacetylase HDA101 Reveals Its Function and Regulatory Mechanism during Seed Development[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Liu, Xinye; Xin, Mingming; Du, Jinkun; Hu, Zhaorong; Peng, HuiRu; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu; Yao, Yingyin

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate histone acetylation levels by removing the acetyl group from lysine residues. The maize (Zea mays) HDAC HDA101 influences several aspects of development, including kernel size; however, the molecular mechanism by which HDA101 affects kernel development remains unknown. In this study, we find that HDA101 regulates the expression of transfer cell-specific genes, suggesting that their misregulation may be associated with the defects in differentiation of endosperm transfer cells and smaller kernels observed in hda101 mutants. To investigate HDA101 function during the early stages of seed development, we performed genome-wide mapping of HDA101 binding sites. We observed that, like mammalian HDACs, HDA101 mainly targets highly and intermediately expressed genes. Although loss of HDA101 can induce histone hyperacetylation of its direct targets, this often does not involve variation in transcript levels. A small subset of inactive genes that must be negatively regulated during kernel development is also targeted by HDA101 and its loss leads to hyperacetylation and increased expression of these inactive genes. Finally, we report that HDA101 interacts with members of different chromatin remodeling complexes, such as NFC103/MSI1 and SNL1/SIN3-like protein corepressors. Taken together, our results reveal a complex genetic network regulated by HDA101 during seed development and provide insight into the different mechanisms of HDA101-mediated regulation of transcriptionally active and inactive genes. PMID:26908760

  8. Stratigraphic relationships and timing of the 2012 Havre submarine silicic volcanic eruption revealed by high resolution bathymetric mapping and observations by underwater vehicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, R.; Soule, S. A.; Houghton, B. F.; White, J. D. L.; Manga, M.; Wysoczanski, R. J.; Tani, K.; McPhie, J.; Fornari, D. J.; Jutzeler, M.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Ikegami, F.; Jones, M.; Murch, A.; Fauria, K.; Mitchell, S. J.; Cahalan, R. C.; Conway, C.; McKenzie, W.

    2015-12-01

    The 2012 deep rhyolitic caldera eruption of Havre volcano in the Kermadec arc is the first historic observed submarine eruption that produced a pumice raft observed at the ocean's surface. Ship-based bathymetric surveys before and after the eruption permit the intricacies of eruption styles, products and timescales to be quantified. In 2015 we mapped this submarine volcano in unprecedented detail with two submergence vehicles in tandem, facilitating a wide and comprehensive geological survey and sampling mission. These efforts and observations show highly complex and often simultaneous eruptive behavior from more than 14 vents along two 3 km-long fissures that represent massive ruptures of the caldera walls. This survey also revealed an important role for pre- and inter-eruptive periods of mass wasting processes derived from the intrusion of magma and destablisation of caldera walls. The detailed characterization of the eruption products, and quantification of timescales provides the scientific community with the first glimpse of the nature of submarine, intermediate magnitude, deep silicic caldera eruptions and permits unanswered yet first order fundamental questions of submarine eruption and transport processes to be addressed in the decades to come.

  9. Searching for signatures of cosmic string wakes in 21cm redshift surveys using Minkowski Functionals

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, Evan; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@hep.physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-02-01

    Minkowski Functionals are a powerful tool for analyzing large scale structure, in particular if the distribution of matter is highly non-Gaussian, as it is in models in which cosmic strings contribute to structure formation. Here we apply Minkowski functionals to 21cm maps which arise if structure is seeded by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings embeddded in background fluctuations, and then test for the statistical significance of the cosmic string signals using the Fisher combined probability test. We find that this method allows for detection of cosmic strings with Gμ > 5 × 10{sup −8}, which would be improvement over current limits by a factor of about 3.

  10. Our Cosmic Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donna L.

    2005-01-01

    To help students understand the connection that Earth and the solar system have with the cosmic cycles of stellar evolution, and to give students an appreciation of the beauty and elegance of celestial phenomena, the Chandra X-Ray Center (CXC) educational website contains a stellar evolution module that is available free to teachers. In this…

  11. Heavy cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Donaire, M.; Rajantie, A.

    2006-03-15

    We argue that cosmic strings with high winding numbers generally form in first-order gauge symmetry breaking phase transitions, and we demonstrate this using computer simulations. These strings are heavier than single-winding strings and therefore more easily observable. Their cosmological evolution may also be very different.

  12. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  13. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  14. Mapping the Heavens: Probing Cosmology with Large Surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, Joshua

    2006-01-18

    This talk will provide an overview of recent and on-going sky surveys, focusing on their implications for cosmology. I will place particular emphasis on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the most ambitious mapping of the Universe yet undertaken, showing a virtual fly-through of the survey that reveals the large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution. Recent measurements of this large-scale structure, in combination with observations of the cosmic microwave background, have provided independent evidence for a Universe dominated by dark matter and dark energy as well as insights into how galaxies and larger-scale structures formed. Future planned surveys will build on these foundations to probe the history of the cosmic expansion--and thereby the dark energy--with greater precision.

  15. Mapping the Heavens: Probing Cosmology with Large Surveys

    ScienceCinema

    Frieman, Joshua [Fermilab

    2016-07-12

    This talk will provide an overview of recent and on-going sky surveys, focusing on their implications for cosmology. I will place particular emphasis on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the most ambitious mapping of the Universe yet undertaken, showing a virtual fly-through of the survey that reveals the large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution. Recent measurements of this large-scale structure, in combination with observations of the cosmic microwave background, have provided independent evidence for a Universe dominated by dark matter and dark energy as well as insights into how galaxies and larger-scale structures formed. Future planned surveys will build on these foundations to probe the history of the cosmic expansion--and thereby the dark energy--with greater precision.

  16. Isotopic stack: measurement of heavy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Beaujean, R.; Schmidt, M.; Enge, W.; Siegmon, G.; Krause, J.; Fischer, E.

    1984-07-13

    A stack of plastic nuclear track detectors was exposed to heavy cosmic rays on the pallet of Spacelab 1. Some layers of the stack were rotated with respect to the main stack to determine the arrival time of the particles. After return of the stack the latent particle tracks are revealed by chemical etching. Under the optical microscope the charge, mass, energy, and impact direction of the particles can be deduced from the track geometry.

  17. The Genome and Linkage Map of the Northern Pike (Esox lucius): Conserved Synteny Revealed between the Salmonid Sister Group and the Neoteleostei

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, Eric B.; Minkley, David R.; Leong, Jong S.; Messmer, Amber M.; Jantzen, Johanna R.; von Schalburg, Kristian R.; Lemon, Craig; Bird, Nathan H.; Koop, Ben F.

    2014-01-01

    The northern pike is the most frequently studied member of the Esociformes, the closest order to the diverse and economically important Salmoniformes. The ancestor of all salmonids purportedly experienced a whole-genome duplication (WGD) event, making salmonid species ideal for studying the early impacts of genome duplication while complicating their use in wider analyses of teleost evolution. Studies suggest that the Esociformes diverged from the salmonid lineage prior to the WGD, supporting the use of northern pike as a pre-duplication outgroup. Here we present the first genome assembly, reference transcriptome and linkage map for northern pike, and evaluate the suitability of this species to provide a representative pre-duplication genome for future studies of salmonid and teleost evolution. The northern pike genome sequence is composed of 94,267 contigs (N50 = 16,909 bp) contained in 5,688 scaffolds (N50 = 700,535 bp); the total scaffolded genome size is 878 million bases. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that over 96% of the protein-coding genome is present in the genome assembly. The reference transcriptome was constructed from 13 tissues and contains 38,696 transcripts, which are accompanied by normalized expression data in all tissues. Gene-prediction analysis produced a total of 19,601 northern pike-specific gene models. The first-generation linkage map identifies 25 linkage groups, in agreement with northern pike's diploid karyotype of 2N = 50, and facilitates the placement of 46% of assembled bases onto linkage groups. Analyses reveal a high degree of conserved synteny between northern pike and other model teleost genomes. While conservation of gene order is limited to smaller syntenic blocks, the wider conservation of genome organization implies the northern pike exhibits a suitable approximation of a non-duplicated Protacanthopterygiian genome. This dataset will facilitate future studies of esocid biology and empower ongoing examinations

  18. Anisotropies in TeV Cosmic Rays Related to the Local Interstellar Magnetic Field from the IBEX Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Adams, F. C.; Christian, E.; Desiati, P.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H. O.; Jokipii, J. R.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes enhanced Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) emission in the keV energy range from a narrow (~20° wide) "ribbon" in the sky that appears to be centered on the direction of the local interstellar (LIS) magnetic field. The Milagro collaboration, the Asγ collaboration and the IceCube observatory have recently made global maps of cosmic ray fluxes in the TeV energy range, revealing anisotropic structures ordered in part by the local interstellar magnetic field and the interstellar flow. This paper following from a recent publication in Science makes the link between these disparate observations by developing a simple model of the magnetic structure surrounding the heliosphere in the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) that is consistent with both IBEX ENA fluxes and TeV cosmic ray anisotropies. The model also employs the revised velocity direction of the LIC derived from neutral He observations by IBEX. By modeling the propagation of cosmic rays through this magnetic field structure, we specifically show that (1) the large-scale TeV anisotropy provides a roughly consistent orientation for the local interstellar magnetic field at the center of the IBEX Ribbon and corroborates the ~ 3 μG magnitude of the local interstellar magnetic field derived from IBEX observations of the global heliosphere; (2) and small-scale structures in cosmic rays (over < 30° angular scales) are influenced by the interstellar field interaction with the heliosphere at energies < 10 TeV. Thus, we provide a link between IBEX ENA observations, IBEX neutral observations of interstellar He, and TeV cosmic ray anisotropies, which are strongly influenced by the interactions between the local interstellar magnetic field, the flow of the local interstellar plasma, and the global heliosphere.

  19. Data analysis of cosmic microwave background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abroe, Matthew Edmund

    2004-12-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is a powerful tool for determining and constraining the fundamental properties of our universe. In this thesis we present various computational and statistical techniques used to analyze datasets from CMB experiments, and apply them to both simulated and actual datasets. The algorithms presented in this thesis perform a variety of tasks in relation to the goal of extracting scientific information from CMB data sets. The CMB anisotropy power spectrum is sensitive to numerous parameters that determine the evolutionary and large scale properties of our universe. Now that numerous experiments have mapped the CMB intensity fluctuations on overlapping regions of the sky it is important to ensure that the various experiments are indeed observing the same signal. We cross-correlate the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy maps from the WMAP, MAXIMA-I, and MAXIMA-II experiments. The results conclusively show that the three experiments not only display the same statistical properties of the CMB anisotropy, but also detect the same features wherever the observed sky areas overlap. We conclude that the contribution of systematic errors to these maps is negligible and that MAXIMA and WMAP have accurately mapped the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. Due to a quadrapole anisotropy at last scattering it is predicted that the CMB photons should be linearly polarized, and that the polarization intensity will be roughly an order of magnitude lower than the intensity fluctuations. Two computationally intensive methods for simulating the CMB polarization signal on the sky are presented. Now that CMB polarization experiments are currently producing data sets new algorithms for analyzing polarization time stream data must be developed and tested. We demonstrate how to generate simulations of a polarization experiment in the temporal domain and apply these simulations to the MAXIPOL case. We develop a maximum likelihood map making

  20. Long-Term Fate Mapping Using Conditional Lentiviral Vectors Reveals a Continuous Contribution of Radial Glia-Like Cells to Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aelvoet, Sarah-Ann; Pascual-Brazo, Jesus; Libbrecht, Sarah; Reumers, Veerle; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Newborn neurons are generated throughout life in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Stimulation of adult neurogenesis is considered as an attractive endogenous repair mechanism to treat different neurological disorders. Although tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, important questions remain unanswered, regarding the identity and the behavior of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus. We previously showed that conditional Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors can be used to label neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and to track the migration of their progeny with non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. Here, we applied these Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors to study neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus with bioluminescence imaging and histological techniques. Stereotactic injection of the Cre-Flex vectors into the dentate gyrus of transgenic Nestin-Cre mice resulted in specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells. The labeled cell population could be detected with bioluminescence imaging until 9 months post injection, but no significant increase in the number of labeled cells over time was observed with this imaging technique. Nevertheless, the specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells, combined with histological analysis at different time points, allowed detailed analysis of their neurogenic potential. This long-term fate mapping revealed that a stable pool of labeled nestin-positive neural stem cells continuously contributes to the generation of newborn neurons in the mouse brain until 9 months post injection. In conclusion, the Cre-Flex technology is a valuable tool to address remaining questions regarding neural stem cell identity and behavior in the dentate gyrus. PMID:26600383

  1. A Genetic Relationship between Phosphorus Efficiency and Photosynthetic Traits in Soybean As Revealed by QTL Analysis Using a High-Density Genetic Map.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Yang, Yuming; Zhang, Hengyou; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Xingguo; Yin, Dongmei; Yu, Deyue; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Plant productivity relies on photosynthesis, and the photosynthetic process relies on phosphorus (P). The genetic basis of photosynthesis and P efficiency (PE) affecting yield has been separately characterized in various crop plants. However, the genetic relationship between PE and photosynthesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used a combined analysis of phenotypic correlation, linkage mapping, and expression analysis to dissect the relationship between PE and photosynthesis. We found significant phenotypic correlations between PE and photosynthetic related traits, particularly under low P stress. A total of 172 QTLs for both traits were detected and classified into 29 genomic regions. 12 (41.4%) of 29 regions were detected to be associated with both PE and photosynthetic related traits. Three major QTLs, q14-2, q15-2, and q19-2, were found to be associated with both traits and explained 6.6-58.9% of phenotypic variation. A photosynthetic-specific QTL cluster, q12-1, was detected under both normal and low P conditions, suggesting that genes responsible for this region were less effected by low P stress, and could be used in high photosynthetic efficiency breeding programs. In addition, several candidate genes with significantly differential expression upon low P stress, such as a purple acid phosphatase gene (Glyma.19G193900) within q19-2 region, were considered as promising candidates involved in regulating both soybean PE and photosynthetic capacity. Our results reveal a significant genetic relationship between PE and photosynthetic traits, and uncover several major genomic regions specific or common to these traits. The markers linked closely to these major QTLs may be used for selection of soybean varieties with improved P efficiency and photosynthetic capacity.

  2. A Genetic Relationship between Phosphorus Efficiency and Photosynthetic Traits in Soybean As Revealed by QTL Analysis Using a High-Density Genetic Map

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyan; Yang, Yuming; Zhang, Hengyou; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Xingguo; Yin, Dongmei; Yu, Deyue; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Plant productivity relies on photosynthesis, and the photosynthetic process relies on phosphorus (P). The genetic basis of photosynthesis and P efficiency (PE) affecting yield has been separately characterized in various crop plants. However, the genetic relationship between PE and photosynthesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used a combined analysis of phenotypic correlation, linkage mapping, and expression analysis to dissect the relationship between PE and photosynthesis. We found significant phenotypic correlations between PE and photosynthetic related traits, particularly under low P stress. A total of 172 QTLs for both traits were detected and classified into 29 genomic regions. 12 (41.4%) of 29 regions were detected to be associated with both PE and photosynthetic related traits. Three major QTLs, q14-2, q15-2, and q19-2, were found to be associated with both traits and explained 6.6–58.9% of phenotypic variation. A photosynthetic-specific QTL cluster, q12-1, was detected under both normal and low P conditions, suggesting that genes responsible for this region were less effected by low P stress, and could be used in high photosynthetic efficiency breeding programs. In addition, several candidate genes with significantly differential expression upon low P stress, such as a purple acid phosphatase gene (Glyma.19G193900) within q19-2 region, were considered as promising candidates involved in regulating both soybean PE and photosynthetic capacity. Our results reveal a significant genetic relationship between PE and photosynthetic traits, and uncover several major genomic regions specific or common to these traits. The markers linked closely to these major QTLs may be used for selection of soybean varieties with improved P efficiency and photosynthetic capacity. PMID:27446154

  3. Organelle DNA rearrangement mapping reveals U-turn-like inversions as a major source of genomic instability in Arabidopsis and humans

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Éric; Lepage, Étienne; Tremblay-Belzile, Samuel; Truche, Sébastien; Brisson, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Failure to maintain organelle genome stability has been linked to numerous phenotypes, including variegation and cytosolic male sterility (CMS) in plants, as well as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases in mammals. Here we describe a next-generation sequencing approach that precisely maps and characterizes organelle DNA rearrangements in a single genome-wide experiment. In addition to displaying global portraits of genomic instability, it surprisingly unveiled an abundance of short-range rearrangements in Arabidopsis thaliana and human organelles. Among these, short-range U-turn-like inversions reach 25% of total rearrangements in wild-type Arabidopsis plastids and 60% in human mitochondria. Furthermore, we show that replication stress correlates with the accumulation of this type of rearrangement, suggesting that U-turn-like rearrangements could be the outcome of a replication-dependent mechanism. We also show that U-turn-like rearrangements are mostly generated using microhomologies and are repressed in plastids by Whirly proteins WHY1 and WHY3. A synergistic interaction is also observed between the genes for the plastid DNA recombinase RECA1 and those encoding plastid Whirly proteins, and the triple mutant why1why3reca1 accumulates almost 60 times the WT levels of U-turn-like rearrangements. We thus propose that the process leading to U-turn-like rearrangements may constitute a RecA-independent mechanism to restart stalled forks. Our results reveal that short-range rearrangements, and especially U-turn-like rearrangements, are a major factor of genomic instability in organelles, and this raises the question of whether they could have been underestimated in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25800675

  4. A Genetic Relationship between Phosphorus Efficiency and Photosynthetic Traits in Soybean As Revealed by QTL Analysis Using a High-Density Genetic Map.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Yang, Yuming; Zhang, Hengyou; Chu, Shanshan; Zhang, Xingguo; Yin, Dongmei; Yu, Deyue; Zhang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Plant productivity relies on photosynthesis, and the photosynthetic process relies on phosphorus (P). The genetic basis of photosynthesis and P efficiency (PE) affecting yield has been separately characterized in various crop plants. However, the genetic relationship between PE and photosynthesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we used a combined analysis of phenotypic correlation, linkage mapping, and expression analysis to dissect the relationship between PE and photosynthesis. We found significant phenotypic correlations between PE and photosynthetic related traits, particularly under low P stress. A total of 172 QTLs for both traits were detected and classified into 29 genomic regions. 12 (41.4%) of 29 regions were detected to be associated with both PE and photosynthetic related traits. Three major QTLs, q14-2, q15-2, and q19-2, were found to be associated with both traits and explained 6.6-58.9% of phenotypic variation. A photosynthetic-specific QTL cluster, q12-1, was detected under both normal and low P conditions, suggesting that genes responsible for this region were less effected by low P stress, and could be used in high photosynthetic efficiency breeding programs. In addition, several candidate genes with significantly differential expression upon low P stress, such as a purple acid phosphatase gene (Glyma.19G193900) within q19-2 region, were considered as promising candidates involved in regulating both soybean PE and photosynthetic capacity. Our results reveal a significant genetic relationship between PE and photosynthetic traits, and uncover several major genomic regions specific or common to these traits. The markers linked closely to these major QTLs may be used for selection of soybean varieties with improved P efficiency and photosynthetic capacity. PMID:27446154

  5. Control over the strength of connections between modules: a double dissociation between stimulus format and task revealed by Granger causality mapping in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britt; Soliman, Sherif; O’Malley, Shannon; Danckert, James; Besner, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on theoretical and computational work with the localist dual route reading model and results from behavioral studies, Besner et al. (2011) proposed that the ability to perform tasks that require overriding stimulus-specific defaults (e.g., semantics when naming Arabic numerals, and phonology when evaluating the parity of number words) necessitate the ability to modulate the strength of connections between cognitive modules for lexical representation, semantics, and phonology on a task- and stimulus-specific basis. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate this account by assessing changes in functional connectivity while participants performed tasks that did and did not require such stimulus-task default overrides. The occipital region showing the greatest modulation of BOLD signal strength for the two stimulus types was used as the seed region for Granger causality mapping (GCM). Our GCM analysis revealed a region of rostromedial frontal cortex with a crossover interaction. When participants performed tasks that required overriding stimulus type defaults (i.e., parity judgments of number words and naming Arabic numerals) functional connectivity between the occipital region and rostromedial frontal cortex was present. Statistically significant functional connectivity was absent when the tasks were the default for the stimulus type (i.e., parity judgments of Arabic numerals and reading number words). This frontal region (BA 10) has previously been shown to be involved in goal-directed behavior and maintenance of a specific task set. We conclude that overriding stimulus-task defaults requires a modulation of connection strengths between cognitive modules and that the override mechanism predicted from cognitive theory is instantiated by frontal modulation of neural activity of brain regions specialized for sensory processing. PMID:25870571

  6. QTL mapping in multiple populations and development stages reveals dynamic quantitative trait loci for fruit size in cucumbers of different market classes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit size is an important quality trait in cucumber of different market classes. The genetic and molecular basis of fruit size variations in cucumber is not well understood. In this study, we conducted QTL mapping of fruit size in cucumber using three mapping populations developed from cross betwee...

  7. A highly recombined, high-density, eight-founder wheat MAGIC map reveals extensive segregation distortion and genomic locations of introgression segments.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Keith A; Wittern, Lukas M; Mackay, Ian J

    2016-06-01

    Multiparent Advanced Generation Intercross (MAGIC) mapping populations offer unique opportunities and challenges for marker and QTL mapping in crop species. We have constructed the first eight-parent MAGIC genetic map for wheat, comprising 18 601 SNP markers. We validated the accuracy of our map against the wheat genome sequence and found an improvement in accuracy compared to published genetic maps. Our map shows a notable increase in precision resulting from the three generations of intercrossing required to create the population. This is most pronounced in the pericentromeric regions of the chromosomes. Sixteen percent of mapped markers exhibited segregation distortion (SD) with many occurring in long (>20 cM) blocks. Some of the longest and most distorted blocks were collinear with noncentromeric high-marker-density regions of the genome, suggesting they were candidates for introgression fragments introduced into the bread wheat gene pool from other grass species. We investigated two of these linkage blocks in detail and found strong evidence that one on chromosome 4AL, showing SD against the founder Robigus, is an interspecific introgression fragment. The completed map is available from http://www.niab.com/pages/id/326/Resources.

  8. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of April 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Five articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: GAP 1.0 - Groove Analysis Program, Version 1.0; SUBTRANS - Subband/Transform MATLAB Functions for Image Processing; CSDM - COLD-SAT Dynamic Model; CASRE - Computer Aided Software Reliability Estimation; and XOPPS - OEL Project Planner/Scheduler Tool. Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and disseminations are also described along with a budget summary.

  9. Modeling cosmic void statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the internal structure and spatial distribution of cosmic voids is crucial when considering them as probes of cosmology. We present recent advances in modeling void density- and velocity-profiles in real space, as well as void two-point statistics in redshift space, by examining voids identified via the watershed transform in state-of-the-art ΛCDM n-body simulations and mock galaxy catalogs. The simple and universal characteristics that emerge from these statistics indicate the self-similarity of large-scale structure and suggest cosmic voids to be among the most pristine objects to consider for future studies on the nature of dark energy, dark matter and modified gravity.

  10. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  11. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored. PMID:21469786

  12. T-Cell-Specific Deletion of Map3k1 Reveals the Critical Role for Mekk1 and Jnks in Cdkn1b-Dependent Proliferative Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Suddason, Tesha; Anwar, Saba; Charlaftis, Nikolaos; Gallagher, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    Summary MAPK signaling is important for T lymphocyte development, homeostasis, and effector responses. To better understand the role of Mekk1 (encoded by Map3k1) in T cells, we conditionally deleted Map3k1 in LckCre/+Map3k1f/f mice, and these display larger iNKT cell populations within the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Mekk1 signaling controls splenic and liver iNKT cell expansion in response to glycolipid antigen. LckCre/+Map3k1f/f mice have enhanced liver damage in response to glycolipid antigen. Mekk1 regulates Jnk activation in iNKT cells and binds and transfers Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin onto Carma1. Map3k1 is critical for the regulation of p27Kip1 (encoded by Cdkn1b). PMID:26774476

  13. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    PubMed

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  14. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are reviewed. Particular attention is given to spectral distortions and CMBR temperature anisotropies at large, intermediate, and small angular scales. The implications of the observations for inflationary cosmological models with curvature fluctuation are explored, and it is shown that the limits determined for intermediate-scale CMBR anisotropy almost rule out a baryon-dominated cosmology.

  15. Cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal Mishra, Rekha; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays to and inside the heliosphere, encounter an outward moving solar wind with cyclic magnetic field fluctuation and turbulence, causing convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. Cosmic ray counts from the ground ground-based neutron monitors at different cut of rigidity show intensity changes, which are anti-correlated with sunspot numbers. They also lose energy as they propagate towards the Earth and experience various types of modulations due to different solar activity indices. In this work, we study the first three harmonics of cosmic ray intensity on geo-magnetically quiet days over the period 1965-2014 for Beijing, Moscow and Tokyo neutron monitoring stations located at different cut off rigidity. The amplitude of first harmonic remains high for low cutoff rigidity as compared to high cutoff rigidity on quiet days. The diurnal amplitude significantly decreases during solar activity minimum years. The diurnal time of maximum significantly shifts to an earlier time as compared to the corotational direction having different cutoff rigidities. The time of maximum for first harmonic significantly shifts towards later hours and for second harmonic it shifts towards earlier hours at low cutoff rigidity station as compared to the high cut off rigidity station on quiet days. The amplitude of second/third harmonics shows a good positive correlation with solar wind velocity, while the others (i.e. amplitude and phase) have no significant correlation on quiet days. The amplitude and direction of the anisotropy on quiet days does not show any significant dependence on high-speed solar wind streams for these neutron monitoring stations of different cutoff rigidity threshold. Keywords: cosmic ray, cut off rigidity, quiet days, harmonics, amplitude, phase.

  16. Galactic cosmic ray composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is given of the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) elemental composition and its correlation with first ionization potential. The isotopic composition of heavy nuclei; spallation cross sections; energy spectra of primary nuclei; electrons; positrons; local galactic reference abundances; comparison of solar energetic particles and solar coronal compositions; the hydrogen; lead; nitrogen; helium; and germanium deficiency problems; and the excess of elements are among the topics covered.

  17. Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; van den Berg, Ad; Ebert, Ute

    2013-04-01

    Cosmic Rays in Thunderstorms Cosmic rays are protons and heavier nuclei that constantly bombard the Earth's atmosphere with energies spanning a vast range from 109 to 1021 eV. At typical altitudes up to 10-20 km they initiate large particle cascades, called extensive air showers, that contain millions to billions of secondary particles depending on their initial energy. These particles include electrons, positrons, hadrons and muons, and are concentrated in a compact particle front that propagates at relativistic speed. In addition, the shower leaves behind a trail of lower energy electrons from ionization of air molecules. Under thunderstorm conditions these electrons contribute to the electrical and ionization processes in the cloud. When the local electric field is strong enough the secondary electrons can create relativistic electron run-away avalanches [1] or even non-relativistic avalanches. Cosmic rays could even trigger lightning inception. Conversely, strong electric fields also influence the development of the air shower [2]. Extensive air showers emit a short (tens of nanoseconds) radio pulse due to deflection of the shower particles in the Earth's magnetic field [3]. Antenna arrays, such as AERA, LOFAR and LOPES detect these pulses in a frequency window of roughly 10-100 MHz. These systems are also sensitive to the radiation from discharges associated to thunderstorms, and provide a means to study the interaction of cosmic ray air showers and the electrical processes in thunderstorms [4]. In this presentation we discuss the involved radiation mechanisms and present analyses of thunderstorm data from air shower arrays [1] A. Gurevich et al., Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992) [2] S. Buitink et al., Astropart. Phys. 33, 1 (2010) [3] H. Falcke et al., Nature 435, 313 (2005) [4] S. Buitink et al., Astron. & Astrophys. 467, 385 (2007)

  18. Web life: Cosmic Diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-03-01

    What is it? Cosmic Diary brings together a smorgasbord of blogging astronomers from around the world, with more than 50 contributors commenting on new discoveries and long-standing questions in astronomy - as well as offering insights into their ordinary working lives and outside interests. The site is sponsored by the International Astronomical Union and UNESCO, and it is one of 11 "cornerstone projects" of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009).

  19. Carl Sagan's Cosmic Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Carl; Agel, Jerome

    2000-08-01

    Foreword Freeman Dyson; Personal reflections Ann Druyan; Preface; Part I. Cosmic Perspective: 1. A transitional animal; 2. The Unicorn of Cetus; 3. A message from earth; 4. A message to earth; 5. Experiments in utopias; 6. Chauvinism; 7. Space exploration as a human enterprise I. The scientific interest; 8. Space exploration as a human enterprise II. The public interest; 9. Space exploration as a human enterprise III. The historical interest; Part II. The Solar System: 10. On teaching the first grade; 11. 'The ancient and legendary Gods of old'; 12. The Venus detective story; 13. Venus is hell; 14. Science and 'intelligence'; 15. The moons of Barsoom; 16. The mountains of Mars I. Observations from earth; 17. The mountains of Mars II. Observations from space; 18. The canals of Mars; 19. The lost pictures of Mars; 20. The Ice Age and the cauldron; 21. Beginnings and ends of the Earth; 22. Terraforming the plants; 23. The exploration and utlization of the solar system; Part III. Beyond the Solar System: 24. Some of my best friends are dolphins; 25. 'Hello, central casting? Send me twenty extraterrestrials'; 26. The cosmic connection; 27. Extraterrestrial life: an idea whose time has come; 28. Has the Earth been visited?; 29. A search strategy for detecting extraterrestrial intelligence; 30. If we succeed 31. Cables, drums, and seashells; 32. The night freight to the stars; 33. Astroengineering; 34. Twenty questions: a classification of cosmic civilisations; 35. Galactic cultural exchanges; 36. A passage to elsewhere; 37. Starfolk I. A Fable; 38. Starfolk II. A future; 39. Starfolk III. The cosmic Cheshire cats; Epilog David Morrison; Index.

  20. Cosmic ray modulation over a solar cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Stefan; Manuel, Rex; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    The time-dependent modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere is studied over different polarity cycles by computing 2.5 GV proton intensities using a two-dimensional, time-dependent modulationmodel. By incorporating recent theoretical advances in the relevant transport parameters in the model, we showed in previous work that this approach gave realistic computed intensities over a solar cycle. New in this work is that a time dependence of the solar wind termination shock (TS) position is implemented in our model to study the effect of a dynamic inner heliosheath thickness (the region between the TS and heliopause) on the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. The study reveals that changes in the inner heliosheath thickness, arising from a time-dependent shock position, does affect cosmic-ray intensities everywhere in the heliosphere over a solar cycle, with the smallest effect in the innermost heliosphere. A time-dependent TS position causes a phase difference between the solar activity periods and the corresponding intensity periods. The maximum intensities in response to a solarminimum activity period are found to be dependent on the time-dependent TS profile. It is found that changing the width of the inner heliosheath with time over a solar cycle can shift the time of when the maximum or minimum cosmic-ray intensities occur at various distances throughout the heliosphere, but more significantly in the outer heliosphere. The time-dependent extent of the inner heliosheath, as affected by solar activity conditions, is thus an additional time-dependent factor to be considered in the long-term modulation of cosmic rays.

  1. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  2. How to disentangle the Cosmic Web?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shandarin, Sergei; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2015-04-01

    The Cosmic Web is a complicated highly-entangled geometrical object formed from remarkably simple - Gaussian - initial conditions. The full complexity of the Web can be fully appreciated in the six-dimensional phase space only, which study is, however, impractical due to numerous reasons. Instead, we suggest to use Lagrangian submanifold, i.e., the mapping x = x(q) , where x and q are three dimensional vectors representing Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates. Being fully equivalent in dynamical sense to the phase space, it has the advantage of being a single valued and also metric space. In addition, we propose a new computational paradigm for the analysis of substructure of the Cosmic Web in cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) simulations. We introduce a new data-field - the flip-flop field - which carries wealth of information about the history and dynamics of the structure formation in the universe. The flip-flop (FF) field is an ordered data set in Lagrangian space representing the number of sign reversals of an elementary volume of each collisionless fluid element represented by a computational particle in a N-body simulation. This FF-field is effectively a multi-stream counter of each substructure element of the Cosmic Web. We demonstrate that the very rich subst Partially supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF Grant AST-1209665.

  3. Searching for Cosmic Strings in the Cosmic Microwave Background:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty

    The role of cosmic defects in cosmology is entering its new phase—as a test for several fundamental physics, including unification theories and inflation. We discuss how to use the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to detect cosmic strings, a type of cosmic defects, and how to use this result to constrain the underlying physics. In particular, we use the simulations for the Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) to demonstrate the power of this approach. The required resolution and sensitivity in such a method are discussed, and so is the possible scientific impact.

  4. Effects of anisotropic dynamics on cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2011-08-01

    The dynamics of cosmic strings is considered in anisotropic backgrounds. In particular, the behaviour of infinitely long straight cosmic strings and of cosmic string loops is determined. Small perturbations of a straight cosmic string are calculated. The relevance of these results is discussed with respect to the possible observational imprints of an anisotropic phase on the behaviour of a cosmic string network.

  5. Cosmic-ray record in solar system matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Lal, D.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar cosmic rays (SCR) with bodies in the solar system is discussed, and what the record of that interaction reveals about the history of the solar system is considered. The influence of the energy, charge, and mass of the particles on the interaction is addressed, showing long-term average fluxes of solar protons, predicted production rates for heavy-nuclei tracks and various radionuclides as a function of depth in lunar rock, and integral fluxes of protons emitted by solar flares. The variation of the earth's magnetic field, the gardening of the lunar surface, and the source of meteorites and cosmic dust are studied using the cosmic ray record. The time variation of GCR, SCR, and VH and VVH nuclei is discussed for both the short and the long term.

  6. A cosmic superfluid phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradwohl, Ben-Ami

    1991-01-01

    The universe may have undergone a superfluid-like phase during its evolution, resulting from the injection of nontopological charge into the spontaneously broken vacuum. In the presence of vortices this charge is identified with angular momentum. This leads to turbulent domains on the scale of the correlation length. By restoring the symmetry at low temperatures, the vortices dissociate and push the charges to the boundaries of these domains. The model can be scaled (phenomenologically) to very low energies, it can be incorporated in a late time phase transition and form large scale structure in the boundary layers of the correlation volumes. The novel feature of the model lies in the fact that the dark matter is endowed with coherent motion. The possibilities of identifying this flow around superfluid vortices with the observed large scale bulk motion is discussed. If this identification is possible, then the definite prediction can be made that a more extended map of peculiar velocities would have to reveal large scale circulations in the flow pattern.

  7. Symbols of a cosmic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The world runs on networks over which signals communicate sequences of symbols, e.g. numerals. Examining both engineered and natural communications networks reveals an unsuspected order that depends on contact with an unpredictable entity. This order has three roots. The first is a proof within quantum theory that no evidence can ever determine its explanation, so that an agent choosing an explanation must do so unpredictably. The second root is the showing that clocks that step computers do not "tell time" but serve as self-adjusting symbol-handling agents that regulate "logically synchronized" motion in response to unpredictable disturbances. Such a clock-agent has a certain independence as well as the capacity to communicate via unpredictable symbols with other clock-agents and to adjust its own tick rate in response to that communication. The third root is the noticing of unpredictable symbol exchange in natural systems, including the transmission of symbols found in molecular biology. We introduce a symbol-handling agent as a role played in some cases by a person, for example a physicist who chooses an explanation of given experimental outcomes, and in other cases by some other biological entity, and in still other cases by an inanimate device, such as a computer-based detector used in physical measurements. While we forbear to try to explain the propensity of agents at all levels from cells to civilizations to form and operate networks of logically synchronized symbol-handling agents, we point to this propensity as an overlooked cosmic order, an order structured by the unpredictability ensuing from the proof. Appreciating the cosmic order leads to a conception of agency that replaces volition by unpredictability and reconceives the notion of objectivity in a way that makes a place for agency in the world as described by physics. Some specific implications for physics are outlined.

  8. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  9. Angular correlation of cosmic neutrinos with ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and implications for their sources

    SciTech Connect

    Moharana, Reetanjali; Razzaque, Soebur E-mail: srazzaque@uj.ac.za

    2015-08-01

    Cosmic neutrino events detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory with energy 0∼> 3 TeV have poor angular resolutions to reveal their origin. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with better angular resolutions at 0>6 EeV energies, can be used to check if the same astrophysical sources are responsible for producing both neutrinos and UHECRs. We test this hypothesis, with statistical methods which emphasize invariant quantities, by using data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, Telescope Array and past cosmic-ray experiments. We find that the arrival directions of the cosmic neutrinos are correlated with 0≥ 10 EeV UHECR arrival directions at confidence level ≈ 90%. The strength of the correlation decreases with decreasing UHECR energy and no correlation exists at energy 0∼ 6 EeV . A search in astrophysical databases within 3{sup o} of the arrival directions of UHECRs with energy 0≥ 10 EeV, that are correlated with the IceCube cosmic neutrinos, resulted in 18 sources from the Swift-BAT X-ray catalog with redshift z≤ 0.06. We also found 3 objects in the Kühr catalog of radio sources using the same criteria. The sources are dominantly Seyfert galaxies with Cygnus A being the most prominent member. We calculate the required neutrino and UHECR fluxes to produce the observed correlated events, and estimate the corresponding neutrino luminosity (25 TeV–2.2 PeV) and cosmic-ray luminosity (500 TeV–180 EeV), assuming the sources are the ones we found in the Swift-BAT and Kühr catalogs. We compare these luminosities with the X-ray luminosity of the corresponding sources and discuss possibilities of accelerating protons to 0∼> 10 EeV and produce neutrinos in these sources.

  10. The Cosmic Background Explorer /COBE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, under study by NASA since 1976, will map the spectrum and the angular distribution of diffuse radiation from the universe over the entire wavelength range from 1 micron to 1.3 cm. It carries three instruments: a set of differential microwave radiometers (DMR) at 23.5, 31.4, 53, and 90GHz, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 1 to 100 per cm, and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) covering 1 to 300 microns. They will use the ideal space environment, a one year lifetime, and standard instrument techniques to achieve orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and accuracy, providing a fundamental data base for cosmology. The instruments are united by common purpose as well as similar environmental and orbital requirements. The data from all three experiments will be analyzed together, to distinguish nearby sources of radiation from the cosmologically interesting diffuse background radiations. Construction is planned to begin in 1982 for a launch in 1988.

  11. The Origin of Cosmic Rays: What can GLAST Say?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F.; Digel, Seith; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Moiseev, Alexander; Williamson, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Gamma rays in the band from 30 MeV to 300 GeV, used in combination with direct measurements and with data from radio and X-ray bands, provide a powerful tool for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) with its fine 10-20 arcmin angular resolution will be able to map the sites of acceleration of cosmic rays and their interactions with interstellar matter, It will provide information that is necessary to study the acceleration of energetic particles in supernova shocks, their transport in the interstellar medium and penetration into molecular clouds.

  12. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-11-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determines the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here, we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  13. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema

    Blasi, Pasquale [INAF/Arcetri-Italy and Fermilab, Italy

    2016-07-12

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the “end” of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform “cosmic ray astronomy”, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  14. Cosmic ray driven Galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recchia, S.; Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.

    2016-08-01

    The escape of cosmic rays from the Galaxy leads to a gradient in the cosmic ray pressure that acts as a force on the background plasma, in the direction opposite to the gravitational pull. If this force is large enough to win against gravity, a wind can be launched that removes gas from the Galaxy, thereby regulating several physical processes, including star formation. The dynamics of these cosmic ray driven winds is intrinsically non-linear in that the spectrum of cosmic rays determines the characteristics of the wind (velocity, pressure, magnetic field) and in turn the wind dynamics affects the cosmic ray spectrum. Moreover, the gradient of the cosmic ray distribution function causes excitation of Alfvén waves, that in turn determine the scattering properties of cosmic rays, namely their diffusive transport. These effects all feed into each other so that what we see at the Earth is the result of these non-linear effects. Here we investigate the launch and evolution of such winds, and we determine the implications for the spectrum of cosmic rays by solving together the hydrodynamical equations for the wind and the transport equation for cosmic rays under the action of self-generated diffusion and advection with the wind and the self-excited Alfvén waves.

  15. CosmicSIG science and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, Angela V.

    2014-03-01

    Recent activities of the Cosmic Ray Science Interest Group (CosmicSIG) of the Physics of the Cosmos PAG will be reviewed. CosmicSIG was formed to provide an assessment to NASA HQ and the PCOS program office of the status of current and future missions in the area of cosmic-ray astrophysics. CosmicSIG also strives to act as a focal point and forum for the cosmic ray community.

  16. Cosmic Dawn with WFIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James

    Central objectives: WFIRST-AFTA has tremendous potential for studying the epoch of "Cosmic Dawn" the period encompassing the formation of the first galaxies and quasars, and their impact on the surrounding universe through cosmological reionization. Our goal is to ensure that this potential is realized through the middle stages of mission planning, culminating in designs for both WFIRST and its core surveys that meet the core objectives in dark energy and exoplanet science, while maximizing the complementary Cosmic Dawn science. Methods: We will consider a combined approach to studying Cosmic Dawn using a judicious mixture of guest investigator data analysis of the primary WFIRST surveys, and a specifically designed Guest Observer program to complement those surveys. The Guest Observer program will serve primarily to obtain deep field observations, with particular attention to the capabilities of WFIRST for spectroscopic deep fields using the WFI grism. We will bring to bear our years of experience with slitless spectroscopy on the Hubble Space Telescope, along with an expectation of JWST slitless grism spectroscopy. We will use this experience to examine the implications of WFIRST’s grism resolution and wavelength coverage for deep field observations, and if appropriate, to suggest potential modifications of these parameters to optimize the science return on WFIRST. We have assembled a team of experts specializing in (1) Lyman Break Galaxies at redshifts higher than 7 (2) Quasars at high redshifts (3) Lyman-alpha galaxies as probes of reionization (4) Theoretical simulations of high-redshift galaxies (5) Simulations of grism observations (6) post-processing analysis to find emission line galaxies and high redshift galaxies (7) JWST observations and calibrations. With this team we intend to do end-to-end simulations starting with halo populations and expected spectra of high redshift galaxies and finally extracting what we can learn about (a) reionization

  17. Is the Cosmic Microwave Background a Shell Around Us? or are the Microwaves Everywhere in the Universe?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John

    2015-01-01

    A: The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation fills the universe and travels in all directions. As we see it from here in satellite maps, it is about equally bright in all directions, and thats one of the main reasons we know its cosmic.

  18. Cosmic bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    I briefly review the physics of cosmic bubble collisions in false-vacuum eternal inflation. My purpose is to provide an introduction to the subject for readers unfamiliar with it, focussing on recent work related to the prospects for observing the effects of bubble collisions in cosmology. I will attempt to explain the essential physical points as simply and concisely as possible, leaving most technical details to the references. I make no attempt to be comprehensive or complete. I also present a new solution to Einstein's equations that represents a bubble universe after a collision, containing vacuum energy and ingoing null radiation with an arbitrary density profile.

  19. Cosmological cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Ruth

    1988-01-01

    The effect of an infinite cosmic string on a cosmological background is investigated. It is found that the metric is approximately a scaled version of the empty space string metric, i.e., conical in nature. Results are used to place bounds on the amount of cylindrical gravitational radiation currently emitted by such a string. The gravitational radiation equations are then analyzed explicitly and it is shown that even initially large disturbances are rapidly damped as the expansion proceeds. The implications of the gravitational radiation background and the limitations of the quadrupole formula are discussed.

  20. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  1. Wormhole cosmic censorship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Tonatiuh; Ureña-López, L. Arturo; Miranda, Galaxia

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a Kerr-like wormhole supported by phantom matter, which is an exact solution of the Einstein-phantom field equations. It is shown that the solution has a naked ring singularity which is unreachable to null geodesics falling freely from the outside. Similarly to Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship, that states that all naked singularities in the Universe must be protected by event horizons, here we conjecture from our results that a naked singularity can also be fully protected by the intrinsic properties of a wormhole's throat.

  2. Characteristics of cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salopek, D. S.

    1995-11-01

    The nature of cosmic time is illuminated using Hamilton-Jacobi theory for general relativity. For problems of interest to cosmology, one may solve for the phase of the wave functional by using a line integral in superspace. Each contour of integration corresponds to a particular choice of time hypersurface, and each yields the same answer. In this way, one can construct a covariant formalism where all time hypersurfaces are treated on an equal footing. Using the method of characteristics, explicit solutions for an inflationary epoch with several scalar fields are given. The theoretical predictions of double inflation are compared with recent galaxy data and large angle microwave background anistropies.

  3. The cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Recent limits on spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are reviewed. The various backgrounds are described, and the theoretical implications are assessed. Constraints on inflationary cosmology dominated by cold dark matter (CDM) and on open cosmological models dominated by baryonic dark matter (BDM), with, respectively, primordial random phase scale-invariant curvature fluctuations or non-gaussian isocurvature fluctuations are described. More exotic theories are addressed, and I conclude with the 'bottom line': what theorists expect experimentalists to be measuring within the next two to three years without having to abandon their most cherished theories.