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Sample records for marathon running performance

  1. Reduced performance difference between sexes in master mountain and city marathon running

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, Matthias A; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    Background The performance in master marathoners has been investigated in flat city marathons but not in mountain marathons. This study examined changes in the sex differences in performance across time in female and male master runners competing in a mountain marathon compared to a flat city marathon. Methods The association between age and performance of finishers in the Jungfrau Marathon, Switzerland, with 1830 meter changes in altitude and a flat city marathon (Lausanne Marathon), Switzerland, were analyzed from 2000 to 2011. Results In both events, athletes in the 35–44 years age group showed the highest number of finishers. In the mountain marathon, the number of female master runners aged > 35 years increased in contrast to female finishers aged < 35 years, while the number of male finishers was unchanged in all age groups. In the city marathon, the number of female finishers was unchanged while the number of male finishers in the age groups for 25–34-year-olds and 35–44-year-olds decreased. In female marathoners, performance improved in athletes aged 35–44 and 55–64 years in the city marathon. Male marathoners improved race time in age group 45–54 years in both the city marathon and the mountain marathon. Female master runners reduced the sex difference in performance in the 45–54-year age group in both competitions and in the 35–44-year age group in the mountain marathon. The sex difference in performance decreased in the 35–44-year age group from 19.1% ± 4.7% to 16.6% ± 1.9% in the mountain marathon (r2 = 0.39, P = 0.03). In age groups 45–54 years, the sex difference decreased from 23.4% ± 1.9% to 15.9% ± 6.1% in the mountain marathon (r2 = 0.39, P < 0.01) and from 34.7% ± 4.6% to 11.8% ± 6.2% in the city marathon (r2 = 0.39, P < 0.01). Conclusion These findings suggest that female master runners aged 35–54 years reduced sex differences in their performance in both mountain and city marathon running. PMID:23637550

  2. Applied physiology of marathon running.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, B; Svedenhag, J

    1985-01-01

    Performance in marathon running is influenced by a variety of factors, most of which are of a physiological nature. Accordingly, the marathon runner must rely to a large extent on a high aerobic capacity. But great variations in maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) have been observed among runners with a similar performance capacity, indicating complementary factors are of importance for performance. The oxygen cost of running or the running economy (expressed, e.g. as VO2 15 at 15 km/h) as well as the fractional utilisation of VO2 max at marathon race pace (%VO2 Ma X VO2 max-1) [where Ma = mean marathon velocity] are additional factors which are known to affect the performance capacity. Together VO2 max, VO2 15 and %VO2 Ma X VO2 max-1 can almost entirely explain the variation in marathon performance. To a similar degree, these variables have also been found to explain the variations in the 'anaerobic threshold'. This factor, which is closely related to the metabolic response to increasing exercise intensities, is the single variable that has the highest predictive power for marathon performance. But a major limiting factor to marathon performance is probably the choice of fuels for the exercising muscles, which factor is related to the %VO2 Ma X VO2 max-1. Present indications are that marathon runners, compared with normal individuals, have a higher turnover rate in fat metabolism at given high exercise intensities expressed both in absolute (m/sec) and relative (%VO2 max) terms. The selection of fat for oxidation by the muscles is important since the stores of the most efficient fuel, the carbohydrates, are limited. The large amount of endurance training done by marathon runners is probably responsible for similar metabolic adaptations, which contribute to a delayed onset of fatigue and raise the VO2 Ma X VO2max-1. There is probably an upper limit in training kilometrage above which there are no improvements in the fractional utilisation of VO2 max at the marathon

  3. Anthropometric and training variables related to half-marathon running performance in recreational female runners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running has been investigated in distances ranging from 100 m to the marathon distance (42.195 km), with the exclusion of the half-marathon distance (21.0975 km). We investigated the association between anthropometric variables, prerace experience, and training variables with race time in 42 recreational, nonprofessional, female half-marathon runners using bi- and multivariate analysis. Body weight (r, 0.60); body mass index (r, 0.48); body fat percentage (r, 0.56); pectoral (r, 0.61), mid-axilla (r, 0.69), triceps (r, 0.49), subscapular (r, 0.61), abdominal (r, 0.59), suprailiac (r, 0.55), and medial calf (r, 0.53) skin-fold thickness; mean speed of the training sessions (r, -0.68); and personal best time in a half-marathon (r, 0.69) correlated with race time after bivariate analysis. Body weight (P = 0.0054), pectoral skin-fold thickness (P = 0.0068), and mean speed of the training sessions (P = 0.0041) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Mean running speed during training was related to mid-axilla (r, -0.31), subscapular (r, -0.38), abdominal (r, -0.44), and suprailiac (r, -0.41) skin-fold thickness, the sum of 8 skin-fold thicknesses (r, -0.36); and percent body fat (r, -0.31). It was determined that variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half-marathon race time, and that skin-fold thicknesses were associated with running speed during training. For practical applications, high running speed during training (as opposed to extensive training) may both reduce upper-body skin-fold thicknesses and improve race performance in recreational female half-marathon runners.

  4. Effects of a concurrent strength and endurance training on running performance and running economy in recreational marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Ferrauti, Alexander; Bergermann, Matthias; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a concurrent strength and endurance training program on running performance and running economy of middle-aged runners during their marathon preparation. Twenty-two (8 women and 14 men) recreational runners (mean ± SD: age 40.0 ± 11.7 years; body mass index 22.6 ± 2.1 kg·m⁻²) were separated into 2 groups (n = 11; combined endurance running and strength training program [ES]: 9 men, 2 women and endurance running [E]: 7 men, and 4 women). Both completed an 8-week intervention period that consisted of either endurance training (E: 276 ± 108 minute running per week) or a combined endurance and strength training program (ES: 240 ± 121-minute running plus 2 strength training sessions per week [120 minutes]). Strength training was focused on trunk (strength endurance program) and leg muscles (high-intensity program). Before and after the intervention, subjects completed an incremental treadmill run and maximal isometric strength tests. The initial values for VO2peak (ES: 52.0 ± 6.1 vs. E: 51.1 ± 7.5 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) and anaerobic threshold (ES: 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. E: 3.4 ± 0.5 m·s⁻¹) were identical in both groups. A significant time × intervention effect was found for maximal isometric force of knee extension (ES: from 4.6 ± 1.4 to 6.2 ± 1.0 N·kg⁻¹, p < 0.01), whereas no changes in body mass occurred. No significant differences between the groups and no significant interaction (time × intervention) were found for VO2 (absolute and relative to VO2peak) at defined marathon running velocities (2.4 and 2.8 m·s⁻¹) and submaximal blood lactate thresholds (2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 mmol·L⁻¹). Stride length and stride frequency also remained unchanged. The results suggest no benefits of an 8-week concurrent strength training for running economy and coordination of recreational marathon runners despite a clear improvement in leg strength, maybe because of an insufficient sample size or a short

  5. Running a Research Marathon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maaravi, Yossi

    2018-01-01

    In the current article, I describe a case of experiential learning that can be used to enhance learning, students' research skills and motivation in academic institutions. We used the already existing process of hackathons--intense computer programming events--and conducted a social science research marathon. Fifty-two graduate students…

  6. Personal best marathon time and longest training run, not anthropometry, predict performance in recreational 24-hour ultrarunners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-08-01

    In recent studies, a relationship between both low body fat and low thicknesses of selected skinfolds has been demonstrated for running performance of distances from 100 m to the marathon but not in ultramarathon. We investigated the association of anthropometric and training characteristics with race performance in 63 male recreational ultrarunners in a 24-hour run using bi and multivariate analysis. The athletes achieved an average distance of 146.1 (43.1) km. In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = -0.25), the sum of 9 skinfolds (r = -0.32), the sum of upper body skinfolds (r = -0.34), body fat percentage (r = -0.32), weekly kilometers ran (r = 0.31), longest training session before the 24-hour run (r = 0.56), and personal best marathon time (r = -0.58) were related to race performance. Stepwise multiple regression showed that both the longest training session before the 24-hour run (p = 0.0013) and the personal best marathon time (p = 0.0015) had the best correlation with race performance. Performance in these 24-hour runners may be predicted (r2 = 0.46) by the following equation: Performance in a 24-hour run, km) = 234.7 + 0.481 (longest training session before the 24-hour run, km) - 0.594 (personal best marathon time, minutes). For practical applications, training variables such as volume and intensity were associated with performance but not anthropometric variables. To achieve maximum kilometers in a 24-hour run, recreational ultrarunners should have a personal best marathon time of ∼3 hours 20 minutes and complete a long training run of ∼60 km before the race, whereas anthropometric characteristics such as low body fat or low skinfold thicknesses showed no association with performance.

  7. Effects of Marathon Running on Aerobic Fitness and Performance in Recreational Runners One Week after a Race.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Fuminori; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Shimazu, Wataru; Nabekura, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    It is not clear whether or not recreational runners can recover aerobic fitness and performance within one week after marathon running. This study aimed to investigate the effects of running a marathon race on aerobic fitness and performance one week later. Eleven recreational runners (six men, five women) completed the race in 3 h 36 min 20 s ± 41 min 34 s (mean ± standard deviation). Before and 7 days after the race, they performed a treadmill running test. Perceived muscle soreness was assessed before the race and for the following 7 days. The magnitude of changes in the treadmill running test was considered possibly trivial for maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O 2 max) (mean difference -1.2 ml/kg/min; ±90% confidence limits 2 ml/kg/min), unclear for %[Formula: see text]O 2 max at anaerobic threshold (AT) (-0.5; ±4.1%) and RE (0.2; ±3.5 ml/kg/km), and likely trivial for both velocity at AT and peak (-0.2; ±0.49 km/h and -0.3; ±0.28 km/h). Perceived muscle soreness increased until 3 days after the race, but there were no clear differences between the values before the race and 4-7 days after it. These results show that physiological capacity associated with marathon running performance is recovered within 7 days after a marathon run.

  8. Effects of Marathon Running on Aerobic Fitness and Performance in Recreational Runners One Week after a Race

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Atsushi; Shimazu, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    It is not clear whether or not recreational runners can recover aerobic fitness and performance within one week after marathon running. This study aimed to investigate the effects of running a marathon race on aerobic fitness and performance one week later. Eleven recreational runners (six men, five women) completed the race in 3 h 36 min 20 s ± 41 min 34 s (mean ± standard deviation). Before and 7 days after the race, they performed a treadmill running test. Perceived muscle soreness was assessed before the race and for the following 7 days. The magnitude of changes in the treadmill running test was considered possibly trivial for maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) (mean difference −1.2 ml/kg/min; ±90% confidence limits 2 ml/kg/min), unclear for %V˙O2max at anaerobic threshold (AT) (−0.5; ±4.1%) and RE (0.2; ±3.5 ml/kg/km), and likely trivial for both velocity at AT and peak (−0.2; ±0.49 km/h and −0.3; ±0.28 km/h). Perceived muscle soreness increased until 3 days after the race, but there were no clear differences between the values before the race and 4–7 days after it. These results show that physiological capacity associated with marathon running performance is recovered within 7 days after a marathon run. PMID:29138757

  9. Energy expenditure and influence of physiologic factors during marathon running.

    PubMed

    Loftin, Mark; Sothern, Melinda; Koss, Cathie; Tuuri, Georgianna; Vanvrancken, Connie; Kontos, Anthony; Bonis, Marc

    2007-11-01

    This study examined energy expenditure and physiologic determinants for marathon performance in recreational runners. Twenty recreational marathon runners participated (10 males aged 41 +/- 11.3 years, 10 females aged 42.7 +/- 11.7 years). Each subject completed a V(.-)O2max and a 1-hour treadmill run at recent marathon pace, and body composition was indirectly determined via dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The male runners exhibited higher V(.-)O2max (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) values (52.6 +/- 5.5) than their female counterparts (41.9 +/- 6.6), although ventilatory threshold (T-vent) values were similar between groups (males: 76.2 +/- 6.1 % of V(.-)O2max, females: 75.1 +/- 5.1%). The male runners expended more energy (2,792 +/- 235 kcal) for their most recent marathon as calculated from the 1-hour treadmill run at marathon pace than the female runners (2,436 +/- 297 kcal). Body composition parameters correlated moderately to highly (r ranging from 0.50 to 0.87) with marathon run time. Also, V(.-)O2max (r = -0.73) and ventilatory threshold (r = -0.73) moderately correlated with marathon run time. As a group, the participants ran near their ventilatory threshold for their most recent marathon (r = 0.74). These results indicate the influence of body size on marathon run performance. In general, the larger male and female runners ran slower and expended more kilocalories than smaller runners. Regardless of marathon finishing time, the runners maintained a pace near their T-vent, and as T-vent or V(.-)O2max increased, marathon performance time decreased.

  10. Physiology and Pathophysiology in Ultra-Marathon Running

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.

    2018-01-01

    In this overview, we summarize the findings of the literature with regards to physiology and pathophysiology of ultra-marathon running. The number of ultra-marathon races and the number of official finishers considerably increased in the last decades especially due to the increased number of female and age-group runners. A typical ultra-marathoner is male, married, well-educated, and ~45 years old. Female ultra-marathoners account for ~20% of the total number of finishers. Ultra-marathoners are older and have a larger weekly training volume, but run more slowly during training compared to marathoners. Previous experience (e.g., number of finishes in ultra-marathon races and personal best marathon time) is the most important predictor variable for a successful ultra-marathon performance followed by specific anthropometric (e.g., low body mass index, BMI, and low body fat) and training (e.g., high volume and running speed during training) characteristics. Women are slower than men, but the sex difference in performance decreased in recent years to ~10–20% depending upon the length of the ultra-marathon. The fastest ultra-marathon race times are generally achieved at the age of 35–45 years or older for both women and men, and the age of peak performance increases with increasing race distance or duration. An ultra-marathon leads to an energy deficit resulting in a reduction of both body fat and skeletal muscle mass. An ultra-marathon in combination with other risk factors, such as extreme weather conditions (either heat or cold) or the country where the race is held, can lead to exercise-associated hyponatremia. An ultra-marathon can also lead to changes in biomarkers indicating a pathological process in specific organs or organ systems such as skeletal muscles, heart, liver, kidney, immune and endocrine system. These changes are usually temporary, depending on intensity and duration of the performance, and usually normalize after the race. In longer ultra-marathons

  11. Physiology and Pathophysiology in Ultra-Marathon Running.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T

    2018-01-01

    In this overview, we summarize the findings of the literature with regards to physiology and pathophysiology of ultra-marathon running. The number of ultra-marathon races and the number of official finishers considerably increased in the last decades especially due to the increased number of female and age-group runners. A typical ultra-marathoner is male, married, well-educated, and ~45 years old. Female ultra-marathoners account for ~20% of the total number of finishers. Ultra-marathoners are older and have a larger weekly training volume, but run more slowly during training compared to marathoners. Previous experience (e.g., number of finishes in ultra-marathon races and personal best marathon time) is the most important predictor variable for a successful ultra-marathon performance followed by specific anthropometric (e.g., low body mass index, BMI, and low body fat) and training (e.g., high volume and running speed during training) characteristics. Women are slower than men, but the sex difference in performance decreased in recent years to ~10-20% depending upon the length of the ultra-marathon. The fastest ultra-marathon race times are generally achieved at the age of 35-45 years or older for both women and men, and the age of peak performance increases with increasing race distance or duration. An ultra-marathon leads to an energy deficit resulting in a reduction of both body fat and skeletal muscle mass. An ultra-marathon in combination with other risk factors, such as extreme weather conditions (either heat or cold) or the country where the race is held, can lead to exercise-associated hyponatremia. An ultra-marathon can also lead to changes in biomarkers indicating a pathological process in specific organs or organ systems such as skeletal muscles, heart, liver, kidney, immune and endocrine system. These changes are usually temporary, depending on intensity and duration of the performance, and usually normalize after the race. In longer ultra-marathons

  12. Maximal oxygen uptake, anaerobic threshold and running economy in women and men with similar performances level in marathons.

    PubMed

    Helgerud, J

    1994-01-01

    Sex differences in running economy (gross oxygen cost of running, CR), maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), anaerobic threshold (Th(an)), percentage utilization of aerobic power (% VO2max), and Th(an) during running were investigated. There were six men and six women aged 20-30 years with a performance time of 2 h 40 min over the marathon distance. The VO2max, Th(an), and CR were measured during controlled running on a treadmill at 1 degree and 3 degrees gradient. From each subject's recorded time of running in the marathon, the average speed (vM) was calculated and maintained during the treadmill running for 11 min. The VO2max was inversely related to body mass (mb), there were no sex differences, and the mean values of the reduced exponent were 0.65 for women and 0.81 for men. These results indicate that for running the unit ml.kg-0.75.min-1 is convenient when comparing individuals with different mb. The VO2max was about 10% (23 ml.kg-0.75.min-1) higher in the men than in the women. The women had on the average 10-12 ml.kg-0.75.min-1 lower VO2 than the men when running at comparable velocities. Disregarding sex, the mean value of CR was 0.211 (SEM 0.005) ml.kg-1.m-1 (resting included), and was independent of treadmill speed. No sex differences in Th(an) expressed as % VO2max or percentage maximal heart rate were found, but Th(an) expressed as VO2 in ml.kg-0.75.min-1 was significantly higher in the men compared to the women. The percentage utilization of fcmax and concentration of blood lactate at vM was higher for the female runners.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Empirical Study of Training and Performance in the Marathon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slovic, Paul

    1977-01-01

    Similar systematic relationships exist between personal characteristics, training, and performance on the marathon, regardless of whether they derive from differences among individuals participating in the same run or from differences within the same person in two separate marathons. (Author)

  14. Running speed during training and percent body fat predict race time in recreational male marathoners

    PubMed Central

    Barandun, Ursula; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Klipstein, Andreas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that personal best marathon time is a strong predictor of race time in male ultramarathoners. We aimed to determine variables predictive of marathon race time in recreational male marathoners by using the same characteristics of anthropometry and training as used for ultramarathoners. Methods Anthropometric and training characteristics of 126 recreational male marathoners were bivariately and multivariately related to marathon race times. Results After multivariate regression, running speed of the training units (β = −0.52, P < 0.0001) and percent body fat (β = 0.27, P < 0.0001) were the two variables most strongly correlated with marathon race times. Marathon race time for recreational male runners may be estimated to some extent by using the following equation (r2 = 0.44): race time ( minutes) = 326.3 + 2.394 × (percent body fat, %) − 12.06 × (speed in training, km/hours). Running speed during training sessions correlated with prerace percent body fat (r = 0.33, P = 0.0002). The model including anthropometric and training variables explained 44% of the variance of marathon race times, whereas running speed during training sessions alone explained 40%. Thus, training speed was more predictive of marathon performance times than anthropometric characteristics. Conclusion The present results suggest that low body fat and running speed during training close to race pace (about 11 km/hour) are two key factors for a fast marathon race time in recreational male marathoner runners. PMID:24198587

  15. Running speed during training and percent body fat predict race time in recreational male marathoners.

    PubMed

    Barandun, Ursula; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Klipstein, Andreas; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that personal best marathon time is a strong predictor of race time in male ultramarathoners. We aimed to determine variables predictive of marathon race time in recreational male marathoners by using the same characteristics of anthropometry and training as used for ultramarathoners. Anthropometric and training characteristics of 126 recreational male marathoners were bivariately and multivariately related to marathon race times. After multivariate regression, running speed of the training units (β = -0.52, P < 0.0001) and percent body fat (β = 0.27, P < 0.0001) were the two variables most strongly correlated with marathon race times. Marathon race time for recreational male runners may be estimated to some extent by using the following equation (r (2) = 0.44): race time ( minutes) = 326.3 + 2.394 × (percent body fat, %) - 12.06 × (speed in training, km/hours). Running speed during training sessions correlated with prerace percent body fat (r = 0.33, P = 0.0002). The model including anthropometric and training variables explained 44% of the variance of marathon race times, whereas running speed during training sessions alone explained 40%. Thus, training speed was more predictive of marathon performance times than anthropometric characteristics. The present results suggest that low body fat and running speed during training close to race pace (about 11 km/hour) are two key factors for a fast marathon race time in recreational male marathoner runners.

  16. Metabolic Factors Limiting Performance in Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.

    2010-01-01

    Each year in the past three decades has seen hundreds of thousands of runners register to run a major marathon. Of those who attempt to race over the marathon distance of 26 miles and 385 yards (42.195 kilometers), more than two-fifths experience severe and performance-limiting depletion of physiologic carbohydrate reserves (a phenomenon known as ‘hitting the wall’), and thousands drop out before reaching the finish lines (approximately 1–2% of those who start). Analyses of endurance physiology have often either used coarse approximations to suggest that human glycogen reserves are insufficient to fuel a marathon (making ‘hitting the wall’ seem inevitable), or implied that maximal glycogen loading is required in order to complete a marathon without ‘hitting the wall.’ The present computational study demonstrates that the energetic constraints on endurance runners are more subtle, and depend on several physiologic variables including the muscle mass distribution, liver and muscle glycogen densities, and running speed (exercise intensity as a fraction of aerobic capacity) of individual runners, in personalized but nevertheless quantifiable and predictable ways. The analytic approach presented here is used to estimate the distance at which runners will exhaust their glycogen stores as a function of running intensity. In so doing it also provides a basis for guidelines ensuring the safety and optimizing the performance of endurance runners, both by setting personally appropriate paces and by prescribing midrace fueling requirements for avoiding ‘the wall.’ The present analysis also sheds physiologically principled light on important standards in marathon running that until now have remained empirically defined: The qualifying times for the Boston Marathon. PMID:20975938

  17. Half-marathon running performance is not improved by a rate of fluid intake above that dictated by thirst sensation in trained distance runners.

    PubMed

    Dion, Tommy; Savoie, Félix A; Asselin, Audrey; Gariepy, Carolanne; Goulet, Eric D B

    2013-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that exercise-induced dehydration (EID) does not impair, and ad libitum drinking optimizes, cycling time-trial (TT) performance. However, the idea that EID ≥ 2 % bodyweight (BW) impairs endurance performance is well ingrained. No study has tested the impact of EID upon running TT performance. We compared the effects of thirst-driven (TD) vs. programmed fluid intake (PFI) aimed at maintaining EID-associated BW loss <2 % on half-marathon performance. Ten trained distance runners underwent, in a randomized, crossover fashion, two, 21.1 km running TTs on a treadmill (30 °C, 42 % relative humidity) while facing a wind speed matching running speed and drinking water (1) according to thirst sensation (TD) or (2) to maintain BW loss <2 % of their pre-exercise BW (PFI), as recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine. Despite that PFI significantly reduced EID from 3.1 ± 0.6 (TD) to 1.3 ± 0.7 % BW (PFI), mean rectal temperature from 39.4 ± 0.4 to 39.1 ± 0.3 °C, mean body temperature from 38.1 ± 0.4 to 37.7 ± 0.2 °C and mean heart rate from 175 ± 9 to 171 ± 8 bpm, neither half-marathon time (TD 89.8 ± 7.7; PFI 89.6 ± 7.7 min) nor running pace (TD 4.3 ± 0.4; PFI 4.2 ± 0.4 min/km) differed significantly between trials. Albeit providing trivial cardiovascular and thermoregulatory advantages, in trained distance runners, PFI (1,380 ± 320 mL/h) offers no performance benefits over TD fluid intake (384 ± 180 mL/h) during a half-marathon raced under warm conditions.

  18. Cardiovascular adaptations to marathon running : the marathoner's heart.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul D

    2007-01-01

    Endurance exercise training produces a series of cardiac adaptations including resting bradycardia, first and second degree atrioventricular block, increased intolerance to orthostatic stress, and enlargement of the left ventricular walls and of all cardiac chambers. Cardiac dimensions may be increased beyond the upper limits of normal and some endurance athletes demonstrate mild reductions in estimated left ventricular ejection fraction. Among athletes, such adaptations occur primarily in well trained endurance athletes. Clinicians should be aware of the cardiac changes accompanying endurance training to avoid unnecessary evaluation of physiological changes. On the other hand, the presence of conduction abnormalities or cardiac enlargement in low level or recreational athletes should prompt a search for pathological causes. Many of these findings were presented in the 1977 report on the marathon and have simply been better defined with subsequent studies.

  19. Compression socks and functional recovery following marathon running: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Stuart A; Till, Eloise S; Maloney, Stephen R; Harris, Gregory A

    2015-02-01

    Compression socks have become a popular recovery aid for distance running athletes. Although some physiological markers have been shown to be influenced by wearing these garments, scant evidence exists on their effects on functional recovery. This research aims to shed light onto whether the wearing of compression socks for 48 hours after marathon running can improve functional recovery, as measured by a timed treadmill test to exhaustion 14 days following marathon running. Athletes (n = 33, age, 38.5 ± 7.2 years) participating in the 2012 Melbourne, 2013 Canberra, or 2013 Gold Coast marathons were recruited and randomized into the compression sock or placebo group. A graded treadmill test to exhaustion was performed 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after each marathon. Time to exhaustion, average and maximum heart rates were recorded. Participants were asked to wear their socks for 48 hours immediately after completion of the marathon. The change in treadmill times (seconds) was recorded for each participant. Thirty-three participants completed the treadmill protocols. In the compression group, average treadmill run to exhaustion time 2 weeks after the marathon increased by 2.6% (52 ± 103 seconds). In the placebo group, run to exhaustion time decreased by 3.4% (-62 ± 130 seconds), P = 0.009. This shows a significant beneficial effect of compression socks on recovery compared with placebo. The wearing of below-knee compression socks for 48 hours after marathon running has been shown to improve functional recovery as measured by a graduated treadmill test to exhaustion 2 weeks after the event.

  20. Sex differences in elite swimming with advanced age are less than marathon running.

    PubMed

    Senefeld, J; Joyner, M J; Stevens, A; Hunter, S K

    2016-01-01

    The sex difference in marathon performance increases with finishing place and age of the runner but whether this occurs among swimmers is unknown. The purpose was to compare sex differences in swimming velocity across world record place (1st-10th), age group (25-89 years), and event distance. We also compared sex differences between freestyle swimming and marathon running. The world's top 10 swimming times of both sexes for World Championship freestyle stroke, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly events and the world's top 10 marathon times in 5-year age groups were obtained. Men were faster than women for freestyle (12.4 ± 4.2%), backstroke (12.8 ± 3.0%), and breaststroke (14.5 ± 3.2%), with the greatest sex differences for butterfly (16.7 ± 5.5%). The sex difference in swimming velocity increased across world record place for freestyle (P < 0.001), breaststroke, and butterfly for all age groups and distances (P < 0.001) because of a greater relative drop-off between first and 10th place for women. The sex difference in marathon running increased with the world record place and the sex difference for marathon running was greater than for swimming (P < 0.001). The sex difference in swimming increased with world record place and age, but was less than for marathon running. Collectively, these results suggest more depth in women's swimming than marathon running. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  2. Marathon running increases circulating endothelial- and thrombocyte-derived microparticles.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Viktoria; Düsing, Philip; Liman, Thomas; Werner, Christian; Herm, Juliane; Bachelier, Katrin; Krüll, Matthias; Brechtel, Lars; Jungehulsing, Gerhard J; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Böhm, Michael; Endres, Matthias; Haeusler, Karl Georg; Laufs, Ulrich

    2018-02-01

    Background Acute vascular effects of high intensity physical activity are incompletely characterized. Circulating microparticles are cellular markers for vascular activation and damage. Methods Microparticles were analysed in 99 marathon runners (49 ± 6 years, 22% female) of the prospective Berlin Beat of Running study. Blood samples were taken within three days before, immediately after and within two days after the marathon run. Endothelial-derived microparticles were labelled with CD144, CD31 and CD62E, platelet-derived microparticles with CD62P and CD42b, leukocyte-derived microparticles with CD45 and monocyte-derived microparticles with CD14. Results Marathon running induced leukocytosis (5.9 ± 0.1 to 14.8 ± 0.3 10 9 /l, p < 0.0001) and increased platelet counts (239 ± 4.6 to 281 ± 5.9 10 9 /l, p < 0.0001) immediately after the marathon. Blood monocytes increased and lymphocytes decreased after the run ( p < 0.0001). Endothelial-derived microparticles were acutely increased ( p = 0.008) due to a 23% increase of apoptotic endothelial-derived microparticles ( p = 0.007) and returned to baseline within two days after the marathon. Thrombocyte-derived microparticles acutely increased by 38% accompanied by an increase in activated and apoptotic thrombocyte-derived microparticles ( p ≤ 0.0001) each. Both monocyte- and leukocyte-derived microparticles were decreased immediately after marathon run ( p < 0.0001) and remained below baseline until day 2. Troponin T increased from 12 to 32 ng/l ( p < 0.0001) immediately after the run and returned to baseline after two days. Conclusion Circulating apoptotic endothelial- and thrombocyte-derived microparticles increased after marathon running consistent with an acute pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory state. Exercise-induced vascular damage reflected by microparticles could indicate potential mechanisms of post-exertional cardiovascular complications. Further

  3. Sex differences in performance-matched marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Helgerud, J; Ingjer, F; Strømme, S B

    1990-01-01

    Six male and six female runners were chosen on the basis of age (20-30 years) and their performance over the marathon distance (mean time = 199.4, SEM 2.3 min for men and 201.8, SEM 1.8 min for women). The purpose was to find possible sex differences in maximal aerobic power (VO2max), anaerobic threshold, running economy, degree and utilization of VO2max (when running a marathon) and amount of training. The results showed that performance-matched male and female marathon runners had approximately the same VO2max (about 60 ml.kg-1.min-1). For both sexes the anaerobic threshold was reached at an exercise intensity of about 83% of VO2max, or 88%-90% of maximal heart rate. The females' running economy was poorer, i.e. their oxygen uptake during running at a standard submaximal speed was higher (P less than 0.05). The heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio and blood lactate concentration also confirmed that a given running speed resulted in higher physiological strain for the females. The percentage utilization of VO2max at the average marathon running speed was somewhat higher for the females, but the difference was not significant. For both sexes the oxygen uptake at average speed was 93%-94% of the oxygen uptake corresponding to the anaerobic threshold. Answers to a questionnaire showed that the females' training programme over the last 2 months prior to running the actual marathon comprised almost twice as many kilometers of running per week compared to the males (60 and 33 km, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Skeletal muscle architectural adaptations to marathon run training.

    PubMed

    Murach, Kevin; Greever, Cory; Luden, Nicholas D

    2015-01-01

    We assessed lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and vastus lateralis (VL) architecture in 16 recreational runners before and after 12 weeks of marathon training. LG fascicle length decreased 10% while pennation angle increased 17% (p < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between diminished blood lactate levels and LG pennation angle change (r = 0.90). No changes were observed in VL. This is the first evidence that run training can modify skeletal muscle architectural features.

  5. Influence of the world's most challenging mountain ultra-marathon on energy cost and running mechanics.

    PubMed

    Vernillo, Gianluca; Savoldelli, Aldo; Zignoli, Andrea; Trabucchi, Pietro; Pellegrini, Barbara; Millet, Grégoire P; Schena, Federico

    2014-05-01

    To examine the effects of the world's most challenging mountain ultra-marathon (Tor des Géants(®) 2012) on the energy cost of three types of locomotion (cycling, level and uphill running) and running kinematics. Before (pre-) and immediately after (post-) the competition, a group of ten male experienced ultra-marathon runners performed in random order three submaximal 4-min exercise trials: cycling at a power of 1.5 W kg(-1) body mass; level running at 9 km h(-1) and uphill running at 6 km h(-1) at an inclination of +15 % on a motorized treadmill. Two video cameras recorded running mechanics at different sampling rates. Between pre- and post-, the uphill-running energy cost decreased by 13.8 % (P = 0.004); no change was noted in the energy cost of level running or cycling (NS). There was an increase in contact time (+10.3 %, P = 0.019) and duty factor (+8.1 %, P = 0.001) and a decrease in swing time (-6.4 %, P = 0.008) in the uphill-running condition. After this extreme mountain ultra-marathon, the subjects modified only their uphill-running patterns for a more economical step mechanics.

  6. Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of South African Marathon Runners During Competition Marathon Runs and Training Sessions: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Nurse, Victoria; Wright, Caradee Y; Allen, Martin; McKenzie, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Marathon runners spend considerable time in outdoor training for and participating in marathons. Outdoor runners may experience high solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. South Africa, where running is popular, experiences high ambient solar UVR levels that may be associated with adverse health effects. This feasibility study explores the use of personal dosimeters to determine solar UVR exposure patterns and possible related acute health risks of four marathon runners during marathons and training sessions in Cape Town and Pretoria. Runners running marathons that started early in the day, and that did not exceed 4 hours, yielded low total solar UVR exposure doses (mean 0.093 SED per exposure period run, median 0.088 SED, range 0.062-0.136 SED; average of 16.54% of ambient solar UVR). Training sessions run during early morning and late afternoon presented similar results. Several challenges hindered analysis including accounting for anatomical position of personal dosimeter and natural shade. To assess health risks, hazard quotients (HQs) were calculated using a hypothetical runner's schedule. Cumulative, annual solar UVR exposure-calculated acute health risks were low (HQ = 0.024) for training sessions and moderate (HQ = 4.922) for marathon runs. While these data and calculations are based on 18 person-days, one can measure marathon runners' personal solar UVR exposure although several challenges must be overcome. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Quantitative T2(*) assessment of knee joint cartilage after running a marathon.

    PubMed

    Hesper, Tobias; Miese, Falk R; Hosalkar, Harish S; Behringer, Michael; Zilkens, Christoph; Antoch, Gerald; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2015-02-01

    To study the effect of repetitive joint loading on the T2(*) assessment of knee joint cartilage. T2(*) mapping was performed in 10 non-professional marathon runners (mean age: 28.7±3.97 years) with no morphologically evident cartilage damage within 48h prior to and following the marathon and after a period of approximately four weeks. Bulk and zonal T2(*) values at the medial and lateral tibiofemoral compartment and the patellofemoral compartment were assessed by means of region of interest analysis. Pre- and post-marathon values were compared. There was a small increase in the T2(*) after running the marathon (30.47±5.16ms versus 29.84±4.97ms, P<0.05) while the T2(*) values before the marathon and those after the period of convalescence were similar (29.84±4.97ms versus 29.81±5.17ms, P=0.855). Regional analyses revealed lower T2(*) values in the medial tibial plateau (P<0.001). It appears that repetitive joint loading has a transient influence on the T2(*) values. However, this effect is small and probably not clinically relevant. The low T2(*) values in the medial tibial plateau may be related to functional demand or early cartilage degeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of a Marathon Run on Serum Lipoproteins, Creatine Kinase, and Lactate Dehydrogenase in Recreational Runners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Toshiko; Hosoi, Teruo; Yoshizaki, Hidekiyo; Loeppky, Jack A.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a marathon run on serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations and serum muscle enzyme activities and follow their recovery after the run. These blood concentrations were measured before, immediately after, and serially after a marathon run in 15 male recreational runners. The triglyceride…

  9. How Biomechanical Improvements in Running Economy Could Break the 2-hour Marathon Barrier.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kram, Rodger; Arellano, Christopher J

    2017-09-01

    A sub-2-hour marathon requires an average velocity (5.86 m/s) that is 2.5% faster than the current world record of 02:02:57 (5.72 m/s) and could be accomplished with a 2.7% reduction in the metabolic cost of running. Although supporting body weight comprises the majority of the metabolic cost of running, targeting the costs of forward propulsion and leg swing are the most promising strategies for reducing the metabolic cost of running and thus improving marathon running performance. Here, we calculate how much time could be saved by taking advantage of unconventional drafting strategies, a consistent tailwind, a downhill course, and specific running shoe design features while staying within the current International Association of Athletic Federations regulations for record purposes. Specifically, running in shoes that are 100 g lighter along with second-half scenarios of four runners alternately leading and drafting, or a tailwind of 6.0 m/s, combined with a 42-m elevation drop could result in a time well below the 2-hour marathon barrier.

  10. What is associated with race performance in male 100-km ultra-marathoners--anthropometry, training or marathon best time?

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Senn, Oliver

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the associations of anthropometry, training, and pre-race experience with race time in 93 recreational male ultra-marathoners (mean age 44.6 years, s = 10.0; body mass 74.0 kg, s = 9.0; height 1.77 m, s = 0.06; body mass index 23.4 kg · m(-2), s = 2.0) in a 100-km ultra-marathon using bivariate and multivariate analysis. In the bivariate analysis, body mass index (r = 0.24), the sum of eight skinfolds (r = 0.55), percent body fat (r = 0.57), weekly running hours (r = -0.29), weekly running kilometres (r = -0.49), running speed during training (r = -0.50), and personal best time in a marathon (r = 0.72) were associated with race time. Results of the multiple regression analysis revealed an independent and negative association of weekly running kilometres and average speed in training with race time, as well as a significant positive association between the sum of eight skinfold thicknesses and race time. There was a significant positive association between 100-km race time and personal best time in a marathon. We conclude that both training and anthropometry were independently associated with race performance. These characteristics remained relevant even when controlling for personal best time in a marathon.

  11. Running multiple marathons is not a risk factor for premature subclinical vascular impairment.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Axel; Suchy, Christiane; Friedrichs, Tasja; Dallinger, Sophia; Grabs, Viola; Haller, Bernhard; Halle, Martin; Scherr, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    Background In contrast to the well-accepted benefits of moderate exercise, recent research has suggested potential deleterious effects of repeated marathon running on the cardiovascular system. We thus performed a comprehensive analysis of markers of subclinical vascular damage in a cohort of runners having finished multiple marathon races successfully. Design This was a prospective, observational study. Methods A total of 97 healthy male Munich marathon participants (mean age 44 ± 10 years) underwent detailed training history, cardiopulmonary exercise testing for assessment of peak oxygen uptake, ultrasound for assessment of intima-media-thickness as well as non-invasive assessments of ankle-brachial index, augmentation index, pulse wave velocity and reactive hyperaemia index. Results Runners had previously completed a median of eight (range 1-500) half marathons, six (1-100) full marathons and three (1-40) ultramarathons; mean weekly and annual training volumes were 59 ± 23 and 1639 ± 979 km. Mean peak oxygen uptake was 50 ± 8 ml/min/kg, and the Munich marathon was finished in 3:45 ± 0:32 h. Runners showed normal mean values for intima-media-thickness (0.60 ± 0.14 mm), ankle-brachial index (1.2 ± 0.1), augmentation index (17 ± 13%), pulse wave velocity (8.7 ± 1.4 cm/s) and reactive hyperaemia index (1.96 ± 0.50). Age was significantly and independently associated with intima-media-thickness ( r = 0.531; p < 0.001), augmentation index ( r = 0.593; p < 0.001) and pulse wave velocity ( r = 0.357; p < 0.001). However, no independent associations of peak oxygen uptake, marathon finishing time, number of completed races or weekly and annual training km with any of the vascular parameters were observed. Conclusions In this cohort of healthy male runners, running multiple marathon races did not pose an additional risk factor for premature subclinical vascular impairment beyond age.

  12. Sex and Age Differences in Trail Half Marathon Running.

    PubMed

    Navalta, James W; Montes, Jeffrey; Tanner, Elizabeth A; Bodell, Nathaniel G; Young, John C

    2018-01-01

    Female participation is growing in trail running races. The purpose was to evaluate sex and age differences in top finishers of a trail running half marathon. Velocity differences between males (M) and females (F) were determined for the top 10 finishers of the Moab Trail Half Marathon from 2012 - 2015 across age, and by finishing place. Differences between age category and between sexes were determined through ANOVA with significance accepted at P < 0.05. A significant difference for running velocity was present between sexes at each age category (20-29 yr F = 2.9±0.3, M = 3.4±0.4 m·sec -1 ; 30-39 yr F = 2.8±0.3, M = 3.3±0.3; 40-49 yr F = 2.7±0.3, M = 3.0±0.5; 50-59 yr F = 2.3±0.2, M = 2.8±0.3; 60-69 yr F = 1.6±0.3, M = 2.2±0.4; P < 0.0001). Sex difference in trail running velocity was consistent (~13%) among all age categories with exception of the oldest group (33%, P = 0.0001). There were significantly greater female finishers in every age category (20 - 29 yr F = 107±18, M = 56±1;, 30 - 39 yr F = 150±34, M = 84±21; 40 - 49 yr F = 112±17, M = 64±16; P < 0.01) until 50 - 59 yr (F = 48±13, M = 41±14; P = 0.50). These data indicate that the widening gap in sex differences observed in road races are ameliorated in a trail running environment that has a larger number of female participants.

  13. Marathon performance in relation to body fat percentage and training indices in recreational male runners.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Giovanni; Knechtle, Beat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of anthropometric characteristics and training indices on marathon race times in recreational male marathoners. Training and anthropometric characteristics were collected for a large cohort of recreational male runners (n = 126) participating in the Basel marathon in Switzerland between 2010 and 2011. Among the parameters investigated, marathon performance time was found to be affected by mean running speed and the mean weekly distance run during the training period prior to the race and by body fat percentage. The effect of body fat percentage became significant as it exceeded a certain limiting value; for a relatively low body fat percentage, marathon performance time correlated only with training indices. Marathon race time may be predicted (r = 0.81) for recreational male runners by the following equation: marathon race time (minutes) = 11.03 + 98.46 exp(-0.0053 mean weekly training distance [km/week]) + 0.387 mean training pace (sec/km) + 0.1 exp(0.23 body fat percentage [%]). The marathon race time results were valid over a range of 165-266 minutes.

  14. Marathon performance in relation to body fat percentage and training indices in recreational male runners

    PubMed Central

    Tanda, Giovanni; Knechtle, Beat

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of anthropometric characteristics and training indices on marathon race times in recreational male marathoners. Methods Training and anthropometric characteristics were collected for a large cohort of recreational male runners (n = 126) participating in the Basel marathon in Switzerland between 2010 and 2011. Results Among the parameters investigated, marathon performance time was found to be affected by mean running speed and the mean weekly distance run during the training period prior to the race and by body fat percentage. The effect of body fat percentage became significant as it exceeded a certain limiting value; for a relatively low body fat percentage, marathon performance time correlated only with training indices. Conclusion Marathon race time may be predicted (r = 0.81) for recreational male runners by the following equation: marathon race time (minutes) = 11.03 + 98.46 exp(−0.0053 mean weekly training distance [km/week]) + 0.387 mean training pace (sec/km) + 0.1 exp(0.23 body fat percentage [%]). The marathon race time results were valid over a range of 165–266 minutes. PMID:24379719

  15. Running Injuries in the Participants of Ljubljana Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Vitez, Luka; Zupet, Petra; Zadnik, Vesna; Drobnič, Matej

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The aim of our study was to determine the self-reported incidence and prevalence of running-related injuries among participants of the 18th Ljubljana Marathon, and to identify risk factors for their occurrence. Methods A customized questionnaire was distributed over registration. Independent samples of t-test and chi-square test were used to calculate the differences in risk factors occurrence in the injured and non-injured group. Factors which appeared significantly more frequently in the injured group were included further into multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The reported lifetime running injury (absence >2 weeks) incidence was: 46% none, 47% rarely, 4% occasionally, and 2% often. Most commonly injured body regions were: knee (30%), ankle and Achilles’ tendon (24%), foot (15%), and calf (12%). Male gender, running history of 1-3 years, and history of previous injuries were risk factors for life-time running injury. In the season preceding the event, 65% of participants had not experienced any running injuries, 19% of them reported minor problems (max 2 weeks absenteeism), but 10% and 7% suffered from moderate (absence 3-4 weeks) or major (more than 4 weeks pause) injuries. BMI was identified as the solely risk factor. Conclusions This self-reported study revealed a 53% lifetime prevalence of running-related injuries, with the predominate involvement of knee, ankle and Achilles’ tendon. One out of three recreational runners experienced at least one minor running injury per season. It seems that male gender, short running experience, previous injury, and BMI do increase the probability for running-related injuries. PMID:29062393

  16. Running Injuries in the Participants of Ljubljana Marathon.

    PubMed

    Vitez, Luka; Zupet, Petra; Zadnik, Vesna; Drobnič, Matej

    2017-10-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the self-reported incidence and prevalence of running-related injuries among participants of the 18 th Ljubljana Marathon, and to identify risk factors for their occurrence. A customized questionnaire was distributed over registration. Independent samples of t-test and chi-square test were used to calculate the differences in risk factors occurrence in the injured and non-injured group. Factors which appeared significantly more frequently in the injured group were included further into multiple logistic regression analysis. The reported lifetime running injury (absence >2 weeks) incidence was: 46% none, 47% rarely, 4% occasionally, and 2% often. Most commonly injured body regions were: knee (30%), ankle and Achilles' tendon (24%), foot (15%), and calf (12%). Male gender, running history of 1-3 years, and history of previous injuries were risk factors for life-time running injury. In the season preceding the event, 65% of participants had not experienced any running injuries, 19% of them reported minor problems (max 2 weeks absenteeism), but 10% and 7% suffered from moderate (absence 3-4 weeks) or major (more than 4 weeks pause) injuries. BMI was identified as the solely risk factor. This self-reported study revealed a 53% lifetime prevalence of running-related injuries, with the predominate involvement of knee, ankle and Achilles' tendon. One out of three recreational runners experienced at least one minor running injury per season. It seems that male gender, short running experience, previous injury, and BMI do increase the probability for running-related injuries.

  17. Long-Term Marathon Running Is Associated with Low Coronary Plaque Formation in Women.

    PubMed

    Roberts, William O; Schwartz, Robert S; Kraus, Stacia Merkel; Schwartz, Jonathan G; Peichel, Gretchen; Garberich, Ross F; Lesser, John R; Oesterle, Stephen N; Wickstrom, Kelly K; Knickelbine, Thomas; Harris, Kevin M

    2017-04-01

    Marathon running is presumed to improve cardiovascular risk, but health benefits of high volume running are unknown. High-resolution coronary computed tomography angiography and cardiac risk factor assessment were completed in women with long-term marathon running histories to compare to sedentary women with similar risk factors. Women who had run at least one marathon per year for 10-25 yr underwent coronary computed tomography angiography, 12-lead ECG, blood pressure and heart rate measurement, lipid panel, and a demographic/health risk factor survey. Sedentary matched controls were derived from a contemporaneous clinical study database. CT scans were analyzed for calcified and noncalcified plaque prevalence, volume, stenosis severity, and calcium score. Women marathon runners (n = 26), age 42-82 yr, with combined 1217 marathons (average 47) exhibited significantly lower coronary plaque prevalence and less calcific plaque volume. The marathon runners also had less risk factors (smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia); significantly lower resting heart rate, body weight, body mass index, and triglyceride levels; and higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels compared with controls (n = 28). The five women runners with coronary plaque had run marathons for more years and were on average 12 yr older (65 vs 53) than the runners without plaque. Women marathon runners had minimal coronary artery calcium counts, lower coronary artery plaque prevalence, and less calcified plaque volume compared with sedentary women. Developing coronary artery plaque in long-term women marathon runners appears related to older age and more cardiac risk factors, although the runners with coronary artery plaque had accumulated significantly more years running marathons.

  18. Does a run/walk strategy decrease cardiac stress during a marathon in non-elite runners?

    PubMed

    Hottenrott, Kuno; Ludyga, Sebastian; Schulze, Stephan; Gronwald, Thomas; Jäger, Frank-Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Although alternating run/walk-periods are often recommended to novice runners, it is unclear, if this particular pacing strategy reduces the cardiovascular stress during prolonged exercise. Therefore, the aim of the study was to compare the effects of two different running strategies on selected cardiac biomarkers as well as marathon performance. Randomized experimental trial in a repeated measure design. Male (n=22) and female subjects (n=20) completed a marathon either with a run/walk strategy or running only. Immediately after crossing the finishing line cardiac biomarkers were assessed in blood taken from the cubital vein. Before (-7 days) and after the marathon (+4 days) subjects also completed an incremental treadmill test. Despite different pacing strategies, run/walk strategy and running only finished the marathon with similar times (04:14:25±00:19:51 vs 04:07:40±00:27:15 [hh:mm:ss]; p=0.377). In both groups, prolonged exercise led to increased B-type natriuretic peptide, creatine kinase MB isoenzyme and myoglobin levels (p<0.001), which returned to baseline 4 days after the marathon. Elevated cTnI concentrations were observable in only two subjects. B-type natriuretic peptide (r=-0.363; p=0.041) and myoglobin levels (r=-0.456; p=0.009) were inversely correlated with the velocity at the individual anaerobic threshold. Run/walk strategy compared to running only reported less muscle pain and fatigue (p=0.006) after the running event. In conclusion, the increase in cardiac biomarkers is a reversible, physiological response to strenuous exercise, indicating temporary stress on the myocyte and skeletal muscle. Although a combined run/walk strategy does not reduce the load on the cardiovascular system, it allows non-elite runners to achieve similar finish times with less (muscle) discomfort. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of training and mental skills preparation on injury incidence and performance in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Hamstra-Wright, Karrie L; Coumbe-Lilley, John E; Kim, Hajwa; McFarland, Jose A; Huxel Bliven, Kellie C

    2013-10-01

    There has been a considerable increase in the number of participants running marathons over the past several years. The 26.2-mile race requires physical and mental stamina to successfully complete it. However, studies have not investigated how running and mental skills preparation influence injury and performance. The purpose of our study was to describe the training and mental skills preparation of a typical group of runners as they began a marathon training program, assess the influence of training and mental skills preparation on injury incidence, and examine how training and mental skills preparation influence marathon performance. Healthy adults (N = 1,957) participating in an 18-week training program for a fall 2011 marathon were recruited for the study. One hundred twenty-five runners enrolled and received 4 surveys: pretraining, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, posttraining. The pretraining survey asked training and mental skills preparation questions. The 6- and 12-week surveys asked about injury incidence. The posttraining survey asked about injury incidence and marathon performance. Tempo runs during training preparation had a significant positive relationship to injury incidence in the 6-week survey (ρ[93] = 0.26, p = 0.01). The runners who reported incorporating tempo and interval runs, running more miles per week, and running more days per week in their training preparation ran significantly faster than did those reporting less tempo and interval runs, miles per week, and days per week (p ≤ 0.05). Mental skills preparation did not influence injury incidence or marathon performance. To prevent injury, and maximize performance, while marathon training, it is important that coaches and runners ensure that a solid foundation of running fitness and experience exists, followed by gradually building volume, and then strategically incorporating runs of various speeds and distances.

  20. Cardiac output and performance during a marathon race in middle-aged recreational runners.

    PubMed

    Billat, Véronique L; Petot, Hélène; Landrain, Morgan; Meilland, Renaud; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance) and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost). We measured the SV, heart rate (HR), CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maximal laboratory test and then during a real marathon race (mean performance: 3 hr 30 min ± 45 min). Our data revealed that HR, SV and CO were all in a high but submaximal steady state during the marathon (87.0 ± 1.6%, 77.2 ± 2.6%, and 68.7 ± 2.8% of maximal values, respectively). Marathon performance was inversely correlated with an upward drift in the CO/speed ratio (mL of CO × m(-1)) (r = -0.65, P < 0.01) and positively correlated with the runner's ability to complete the race at a high percentage of the speed at maximal SV (r = 0.83, P < 0.0002). Our results showed that marathon performance is inversely correlated with cardiac cost and positively correlated with cardiac endurance. The CO response could be a benchmark for race performance in recreational marathon runners.

  1. Cardiac Output and Performance during a Marathon Race in Middle-Aged Recreational Runners

    PubMed Central

    Billat, Véronique L.; Petot, Hélène; Landrain, Morgan; Meilland, Renaud; Koralsztein, Jean Pierre; Mille-Hamard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance) and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost). Methods. We measured the SV, heart rate (HR), CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maximal laboratory test and then during a real marathon race (mean performance: 3 hr 30 min ± 45 min). Results. Our data revealed that HR, SV and CO were all in a high but submaximal steady state during the marathon (87.0 ± 1.6%, 77.2 ± 2.6%, and 68.7 ± 2.8% of maximal values, respectively). Marathon performance was inversely correlated with an upward drift in the CO/speed ratio (mL of CO × m−1) (r = −0.65, P < 0.01) and positively correlated with the runner's ability to complete the race at a high percentage of the speed at maximal SV (r = 0.83, P < 0.0002). Conclusion. Our results showed that marathon performance is inversely correlated with cardiac cost and positively correlated with cardiac endurance. The CO response could be a benchmark for race performance in recreational marathon runners. PMID:22645458

  2. Half-marathoners are younger and slower than marathoners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Zingg, Matthias A; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Age and performance trends of elite and recreational marathoners are well investigated, but not for half-marathoners. We analysed age and performance trends in 508,108 age group runners (125,894 female and 328,430 male half-marathoners and 10,205 female and 43,489 male marathoners) competing between 1999 and 2014 in all flat half-marathons and marathons held in Switzerland using single linear regression analyses, mixed-effects regression analyses and analyses of variance. The number of women and men increased across years in both half-marathons and marathons. There were 12.3 times more female half-marathoners than female marathoners and 7.5 times more male half-marathoners than male marathoners. For both half-marathons and marathons, most of the female and male finishers were recorded in age group 40-44 years. In half-marathons, women (10.29 ± 3.03 km/h) were running 0.07 ± 0.06 km/h faster (p < 0.001) than men (10.22 ± 3.06 km/h). Also in marathon, women (14.77 ± 4.13 km/h) were running 0.28 ± 0.16 km/h faster (p < 0.001) than men (14.48 ± 4.07 km/h). In marathon, women (42.18 ± 10.63 years) were at the same age than men (42.06 ± 10.45 years) (p > 0.05). Also in half-marathon, women (41.40 ± 10.63 years) were at the same age than men (41.31 ± 10.30 years) (p > 0.05). However, women and men marathon runners were older than their counterpart half-marathon runners (p < 0.001). In summary, (1) more athletes competed in half-marathons than in marathons, (2) women were running faster than men, (3) half-marathoners were running slower than marathoners, and (4) half-marathoners were younger than marathoners.

  3. Improved marathon performance by in-race nutritional strategy intervention.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Ernst Albin; Emanuelsen, Anders; Gertsen, Robert Mørkegaard; Sørensen S, S R

    2014-12-01

    It was tested whether a marathon was completed faster by applying a scientifically based rather than a freely chosen nutritional strategy. Furthermore, gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated. Nonelite runners performed a 10 km time trial 7 weeks before Copenhagen Marathon 2013 for estimation of running ability. Based on the time, runners were divided into two similar groups that eventually should perform the marathon by applying the two nutritional strategies. Matched pairs design was applied. Before the marathon, runners were paired based on their prerace running ability. Runners applying the freely chosen nutritional strategy (n = 14; 33.6 ± 9.6 years; 1.83 ± 0.09 m; 77.4 ± 10.6 kg; 45:40 ± 4:32 min for 10 km) could freely choose their in-race intake. Runners applying the scientifically based nutritional strategy (n = 14; 41.9 ± 7.6 years; 1.79 ± 0.11 m; 74.6 ± 14.5 kg; 45:44 ± 4:37 min) were targeting a combined in-race intake of energy gels and water, where the total intake amounted to approximately 0.750 L water, 60 g maltodextrin and glucose, 0.06 g sodium, and 0.09 g caffeine per hr. Gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed by a self-administered postrace questionnaire. Marathon time was 3:49:26 ± 0:25:05 and 3:38:31 ± 0:24:54 hr for runners applying the freely chosen and the scientifically based strategy, respectively (p = .010, effect size=-0.43). Certain runners experienced diverse serious gastrointestinal symptoms, but overall, symptoms were low and not different between groups (p > .05). In conclusion, nonelite runners completed a marathon on average 10:55 min, corresponding to 4.7%, faster by applying a scientifically based rather than a freely chosen nutritional strategy. Furthermore, average values of gastrointestinal symptoms were low and not different between groups.

  4. Is marathon running toxic? An observational study of cardiovascular disease prevalence and longevity in 54 male marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Recent literature suggests reduced benefits associated with high intensity (HIT) and or sustained intensity exercise training (SIT). While important, they tend to contrast with other studies of HIT and SIT and may not be representative of all individuals wishing to participate in activities such as marathon running. The purpose of this observational report is to describe a 45-year history of 54 long distance runners, their incidence of death from cardiovascular disease and their ages at death compared to the normal population. Data were collected longitudinally on all 54 members of a Southern California mens running club by the author, a cardiologist with 45 years of experience, member of the running club, and personal physician for most of the men for over 40 years. Retrospective and observational data were collected from direct professional and personal contact with the 54 men in the running club. Closely monitored group of marathon runners with extreme HIT and SIT revealed a low incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with an extended longevity relative to the general population. The benefits of exercise for reducing risk of chronic disease, including CVD, are well known. Whether these benefits extend to the more intense and prolonged exercise associated with marathon running is unclear. However, as evidenced in the observational data presented here, at least in some populations, years of high-intensity, prolonged exercise may not be as toxic as suggested by others. Whether this is due to self-selection or predisposition is not well understood but merits further study.

  5. Continuous three dimensional analysis of running mechanics during a marathon by means of inertial magnetic measurement units to objectify changes in running mechanics.

    PubMed

    Reenalda, Jasper; Maartens, Erik; Homan, Lotte; Buurke, J H Jaap

    2016-10-03

    Recent developments in wearable and wireless sensor technology allow for a continuous three dimensional analysis of running mechanics in the sport specific setting. The present study is the first to demonstrate the possibility of analyzing three dimensional (3D) running mechanics continuously, by means of inertial magnetic measurement units, to objectify changes in mechanics over the course of a marathon. Three well trained male distance runners ran a marathon while equipped with inertial magnetic measurement units on trunk, pelvis, upper legs, lower legs and feet to obtain a 3D view of running mechanics and to asses changes in running mechanics over the course of a marathon. Data were continuously recorded during the entire 42.2km (26.2Miles) of the Marathon. Data from the individual sensors were transmitted wirelessly to a receiver, mounted on the handlebar of an accompanying cyclist. Anatomical calibration was performed using both static and dynamic procedures and sensor orientations were thus converted to body segment orientations by means of transformation matrices obtained from the segment calibration. Joint angle (hip, knee and ankle) trajectories as well as center of mass (COM) trajectory and acceleration were derived from the sensor data after segment calibration. Data were collected and repeated measures one way ANOVA׳s, with Tukey post-hoc test, were used to statistically analyze differences between the defined kinematic parameters (max hip angle, peak knee flexion at mid-stance and at mid-swing, ankle angle at initial contact and COM vertical displacement and acceleration), averaged over 100 strides, between the first and the last stages (8 and 40km) of the marathon. Significant changes in running mechanics were witnessed between the first and the last stage of the marathon. This study showed the possibility of performing a 3D kinematic analysis of the running technique, in the sport specific setting, by using inertial magnetic measurement units. For

  6. Running Pace Decrease during a Marathon Is Positively Related to Blood Markers of Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Del Coso, Juan; Fernández, David; Abián-Vicen, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; González-Millán, Cristina; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz, Diana; Gallo, César; Calleja-González, Julio; Pérez-González, Benito

    2013-01-01

    Background Completing a marathon is one of the most challenging sports activities, yet the source of running fatigue during this event is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cause(s) of running fatigue during a marathon in warm weather. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 40 amateur runners (34 men and 6 women) for the study. Before the race, body core temperature, body mass, leg muscle power output during a countermovement jump, and blood samples were obtained. During the marathon (27 °C; 27% relative humidity) running fatigue was measured as the pace reduction from the first 5-km to the end of the race. Within 3 min after the marathon, the same pre-exercise variables were obtained. Results Marathoners reduced their running pace from 3.5 ± 0.4 m/s after 5-km to 2.9 ± 0.6 m/s at the end of the race (P<0.05), although the running fatigue experienced by the marathoners was uneven. Marathoners with greater running fatigue (> 15% pace reduction) had elevated post-race myoglobin (1318 ± 1411 v 623 ± 391 µg L−1; P<0.05), lactate dehydrogenase (687 ± 151 v 583 ± 117 U L−1; P<0.05), and creatine kinase (564 ± 469 v 363 ± 158 U L−1; P = 0.07) in comparison with marathoners that preserved their running pace reasonably well throughout the race. However, they did not differ in their body mass change (−3.1 ± 1.0 v −3.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.60) or post-race body temperature (38.7 ± 0.7 v 38.9 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.35). Conclusions/Significance Running pace decline during a marathon was positively related with muscle breakdown blood markers. To elucidate if muscle damage during a marathon is related to mechanistic or metabolic factors requires further investigation. PMID:23460881

  7. Marathon performance, anaerobic threshold, and onset of blood lactate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Matsuura, Y

    1984-09-01

    The study tested the hypothesis that running velocity corresponding to the anaerobic threshold (VAT) would more accurately approximate the actually measured marathon race velocity (VM) than would running velocity corresponding to the so-called onset of blood lactate (4 mM) accumulation (VOBLA). The VAT (4.57 m X s-1) well approximated the VM (4.49 m X s-1), whereas the VOBLA (5.30 m X s-1) differed significantly from the VM. In addition, the VAT (r = 0.781) correlated with VM to a greater extent than did the VOBLA (r = 0.682). When the VAT (X1) was combined with delta % maximum O2 consumption (VO2max) (%VO2max at the OBLA minus %VO2max at the AT; X2) and VO2max (ml X min-1 x kg-1; X3), variation in the VM accounted for increased profoundly from 61 to 88%. Thus one of the useful equations formulated with high predictive accuracy was VM (m X s-1) = 1.312X1 + 0.0346X2 - 0.00993X3 - 1.272. Our study demonstrates that the anaerobic threshold (AT) is more closely associated with marathon running performance and that the degree of the association is raised when delta %VO2max and/or VO2max are combined as additional information.

  8. Running a Marathon Induces Changes in Adipokine Levels and in Markers of Cartilage Degradation – Novel Role for Resistin

    PubMed Central

    Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Leppänen, Tiina; Kekkonen, Riina; Korpela, Riitta; Moilanen, Eeva

    2014-01-01

    Running a marathon causes strenuous joint loading and increased energy expenditure. Adipokines regulate energy metabolism, but recent studies have indicated that they also exert a role in cartilage degradation in arthritis. Our aim was to investigate the effects of running a marathon on the levels of adipokines and indices of cartilage metabolism. Blood samples were obtained from 46 male marathoners before and after a marathon run. We measured levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) as biomarkers of cartilage turnover and/or damage and plasma concentrations of adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin. Mean marathon time was 3∶30∶46±0∶02∶46 (h:min:sec). The exertion more than doubled MMP-3 levels and this change correlated negatively with the marathon time (r = –0.448, p = 0.002). YKL-40 levels increased by 56% and the effect on COMP release was variable. Running a marathon increased the levels of resistin and adiponectin, while leptin levels remained unchanged. The marathon-induced changes in resistin levels were positively associated with the changes in MMP-3 (r = 0.382, p = 0.009) and YKL-40 (r = 0.588, p<0.001) and the pre-marathon resistin levels correlated positively with the marathon induced change in YKL-40 (r = 0.386, p = 0.008). The present results show the impact of running a marathon, and possible load frequency, on cartilage metabolism: the faster the marathon was run, the greater was the increase in MMP-3 levels. Further, the results introduce pro-inflammatory adipocytokine resistin as a novel factor, which enhances during marathon race and associates with markers of cartilage degradation. PMID:25333960

  9. Running a marathon induces changes in adipokine levels and in markers of cartilage degradation--novel role for resistin.

    PubMed

    Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Leppänen, Tiina; Kekkonen, Riina; Korpela, Riitta; Moilanen, Eeva

    2014-01-01

    Running a marathon causes strenuous joint loading and increased energy expenditure. Adipokines regulate energy metabolism, but recent studies have indicated that they also exert a role in cartilage degradation in arthritis. Our aim was to investigate the effects of running a marathon on the levels of adipokines and indices of cartilage metabolism. Blood samples were obtained from 46 male marathoners before and after a marathon run. We measured levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), cartilage oligomeric protein (COMP) and chitinase 3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) as biomarkers of cartilage turnover and/or damage and plasma concentrations of adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin. Mean marathon time was 3:30:46±0:02:46 (h:min:sec). The exertion more than doubled MMP-3 levels and this change correlated negatively with the marathon time (r = -0.448, p = 0.002). YKL-40 levels increased by 56% and the effect on COMP release was variable. Running a marathon increased the levels of resistin and adiponectin, while leptin levels remained unchanged. The marathon-induced changes in resistin levels were positively associated with the changes in MMP-3 (r = 0.382, p = 0.009) and YKL-40 (r = 0.588, p<0.001) and the pre-marathon resistin levels correlated positively with the marathon induced change in YKL-40 (r = 0.386, p = 0.008). The present results show the impact of running a marathon, and possible load frequency, on cartilage metabolism: the faster the marathon was run, the greater was the increase in MMP-3 levels. Further, the results introduce pro-inflammatory adipocytokine resistin as a novel factor, which enhances during marathon race and associates with markers of cartilage degradation.

  10. Effects of training and anthropometric factors on marathon and 100 km ultramarathon race performance

    PubMed Central

    Tanda, Giovanni; Knechtle, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Background Marathon (42 km) and 100 km ultramarathon races are increasing in popularity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential associations of anthropometric and training variables with performance in these long-distance running competitions. Methods Training and anthropometric data from a large cohort of marathoners and 100 km ultramarathoners provided the basis of this work. Correlations between training and anthropometric indices of subjects and race performance were assessed using bivariate and multiple regression analyses. Results A combination of volume and intensity in training was found to be suitable for prediction of marathon and 100 km ultramarathon race pace. The relative role played by these two variables was different, in that training volume was more important than training pace for the prediction of 100 km ultramarathon performance, while the opposite was found for marathon performance. Anthropometric characteristics in terms of body fat percentage negatively affected 42 km and 100 km race performance. However, when this factor was relatively low (ie, less than 15% body fat), the performance of 42 km and 100 km races could be predicted solely on the basis of training indices. Conclusion Mean weekly training distance run and mean training pace were key predictor variables for both marathon and 100 km ultramarathon race performance. Predictive correlations for race performance are provided for runners with a relatively low body fat percentage. PMID:25995653

  11. Aspirin Risks in Perspective: A Comparison against Marathon Running

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin has public health potential to reduce the risk of ischaemic vascular events and sporadic cancer. One objection to the wider use of aspirin for primary prevention, however, is the undesirable effects of the medicine, which include increasing risk of bleeding and haemorrhagic stroke. Marathons also carry risks of serious events such as…

  12. Foot-strike pattern and performance in a marathon.

    PubMed

    Kasmer, Mark E; Liu, Xue-Cheng; Roberts, Kyle G; Valadao, Jason M

    2013-05-01

    To determine prevalence of heel strike in a midsize city marathon, if there is an association between foot-strike classification and race performance, and if there is an association between foot-strike classification and gender. Foot-strike classification (forefoot, midfoot, heel, or split strike), gender, and rank (position in race) were recorded at the 8.1-km mark for 2112 runners at the 2011 Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon. 1991 runners were classified by foot-strike pattern, revealing a heel-strike prevalence of 93.67% (n = 1865). A significant difference between foot-strike classification and performance was found using a Kruskal-Wallis test (P < .0001), with more elite performers being less likely to heel strike. No significant difference between foot-strike classification and gender was found using a Fisher exact test. In addition, subgroup analysis of the 126 non-heel strikers found no significant difference between shoe wear and performance using a Kruskal-Wallis test. The high prevalence of heel striking observed in this study reflects the foot-strike pattern of most mid-distance to long-distance runners and, more important, may predict their injury profile based on the biomechanics of a heel-strike running pattern. This knowledge can help clinicians appropriately diagnose, manage, and train modifications of injured runners.

  13. Alveolar-Membrane Diffusing Capacity Limits Performance in Boston Marathon Qualifiers

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, Kaleen M.; Straub, Allison M.; Uhranowsky, Kathleen A.; Smoliga, James M.; Zavorsky, Gerald S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose (1) to examine the relation between pulmonary diffusing capacity and marathon finishing time, and (2), to evaluate the accuracy of pulmonary diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO) in predicting marathon finishing time relative to that of pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO). Methods 28 runners [18 males, age = 37 (SD 9) years, body mass = 70 (13) kg, height = 173 (9) cm, percent body fat = 17 (7) %] completed a test battery consisting of measurement of DLNO and DLCO at rest, and a graded exercise test to determine running economy and aerobic capacity prior to the 2011 Steamtown Marathon (Scranton, PA). One to three weeks later, all runners completed the marathon (range: 2∶22:38 to 4∶48:55). Linear regressions determined the relation between finishing time and a variety of anthropometric characteristics, resting lung function variables, and exercise parameters. Results In runners meeting Boston Marathon qualification standards, 74% of the variance in marathon finishing time was accounted for by differences in DLNO relative to body surface area (BSA) (SEE = 11.8 min, p<0.01); however, the relation between DLNO or DLCO to finishing time was non-significant in the non-qualifiers (p = 0.14 to 0.46). Whereas both DLCO and DLNO were predictive of finishing time for all finishers, DLNO showed a stronger relation (r2 = 0.30, SEE = 33.4 min, p<0.01) compared to DLCO when considering BSA. Conclusion DLNO is a performance-limiting factor in only Boston qualifiers. This suggests that alveolar-capillary membrane conductance is a limitation to performance in faster marathoners. Additionally, DLNO/BSA predicts marathon finishing time and aerobic capacity more accurately than DLCO. PMID:22984520

  14. WEEKLY RUNNING VOLUME AND RISK OF RUNNING‐RELATED INJURIES AMONG MARATHON RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Juul, Martin Serup; Rasmussen, Sten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate if the risk of injury declines with increasing weekly running volume before a marathon race. Methods: The study was a retrospective cohort study on marathon finishers. Following a marathon, participants completed a web‐based questionnaire. The outcome of interest was a self‐reported running‐related injury. The injury had to be severe enough to cause a reduction in distance, speed, duration or frequency of running for at least 14 days. Primary exposure was self‐reported average weekly volume of running before the marathon categorized into below 30 km/week, 30 to 60 km/week, and above 60 km/week. Results: A total of 68 of the 662 respondents sustained an injury. When adjusting for previous injury and previous marathons, the relative risk (RR) of suffering an injury rose by 2.02 [95% CI: 1.26; 3.24], p < 0.01, among runners with an average weekly training volume below 30 km/week compared with runners with an average weekly training volume of 30‐60 km/week. No significant differences were found between runners exceeding 60 km/week and runners running 30‐60 km/week (RR=1.13 [0.5;2.8], p=0.80). Conclusions: Runners may be advised to run a minimum of 30 km/week before a marathon to reduce their risk of running‐related injury. Level of Evidence: 2b PMID:23593549

  15. Plantar Pressures During Long Distance Running: An Investigation of 10 Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann, Erik; Reaburn, Peter; Tetsworth, Kevin; Imhoff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to record plantar pressures using an in-shoe measuring system before, during, and after a marathon run in ten experienced long-distance runners with a mean age of 37.7 ± 11.5 years. Peak and mean plantar pressures were recorded before, after, and every three km during a marathon race. There were no significant changes over time in peak and mean plantar pressures for either the dominant or non-dominant foot. There were significant between foot peak and mean plantar pressure differences for the total foot (p = 0.0001), forefoot (p = 0.0001), midfoot (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.006), hindfoot (p = 0.0001), first ray (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0001) and MTP (p = 0.05 resp. p = 0.0001). Long-distance runners do not demonstrate significant changes in mean or peak plantar foot pressures over the distance of a marathon race. However, athletes consistently favoured their dominant extremity, applying significantly higher plantar pressures through their dominant foot over the entire marathon distance. Key points Fatigue does not increase foot pressures Every runner has a dominant foot where pressures are higher and that he/she favours Foot pressures do not increase over the distance of a marathon run PMID:27274662

  16. Predictive Variables of Half-Marathon Performance for Male Runners

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Molina, Josué; Ogueta-Alday, Ana; Camara, Jesus; Stickley, Christoper; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José A.; García-López, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to establish and validate various predictive equations of half-marathon performance. Seventy-eight half-marathon male runners participated in two different phases. Phase 1 (n = 48) was used to establish the equations for estimating half-marathon performance, and Phase 2 (n = 30) to validate these equations. Apart from half-marathon performance, training-related and anthropometric variables were recorded, and an incremental test on a treadmill was performed, in which physiological (VO2max, speed at the anaerobic threshold, peak speed) and biomechanical variables (contact and flight times, step length and step rate) were registered. In Phase 1, half-marathon performance could be predicted to 90.3% by variables related to training and anthropometry (Equation 1), 94.9% by physiological variables (Equation 2), 93.7% by biomechanical parameters (Equation 3) and 96.2% by a general equation (Equation 4). Using these equations, in Phase 2 the predicted time was significantly correlated with performance (r = 0.78, 0.92, 0.90 and 0.95, respectively). The proposed equations and their validation showed a high prediction of half-marathon performance in long distance male runners, considered from different approaches. Furthermore, they improved the prediction performance of previous studies, which makes them a highly practical application in the field of training and performance. Key points The present study obtained four equations involving anthropometric, training, physiological and biomechanical variables to estimate half-marathon performance. These equations were validated in a different population, demonstrating narrows ranges of prediction than previous studies and also their consistency. As a novelty, some biomechanical variables (i.e. step length and step rate at RCT, and maximal step length) have been related to half-marathon performance. PMID:28630571

  17. Predictive Variables of Half-Marathon Performance for Male Runners.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Molina, Josué; Ogueta-Alday, Ana; Camara, Jesus; Stickley, Christoper; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José A; García-López, Juan

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to establish and validate various predictive equations of half-marathon performance. Seventy-eight half-marathon male runners participated in two different phases. Phase 1 (n = 48) was used to establish the equations for estimating half-marathon performance, and Phase 2 (n = 30) to validate these equations. Apart from half-marathon performance, training-related and anthropometric variables were recorded, and an incremental test on a treadmill was performed, in which physiological (VO 2max , speed at the anaerobic threshold, peak speed) and biomechanical variables (contact and flight times, step length and step rate) were registered. In Phase 1, half-marathon performance could be predicted to 90.3% by variables related to training and anthropometry (Equation 1), 94.9% by physiological variables (Equation 2), 93.7% by biomechanical parameters (Equation 3) and 96.2% by a general equation (Equation 4). Using these equations, in Phase 2 the predicted time was significantly correlated with performance (r = 0.78, 0.92, 0.90 and 0.95, respectively). The proposed equations and their validation showed a high prediction of half-marathon performance in long distance male runners, considered from different approaches. Furthermore, they improved the prediction performance of previous studies, which makes them a highly practical application in the field of training and performance.

  18. Course and predicting factors of lower-extremity injuries after running a marathon.

    PubMed

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Kolkman, Jelle; van Ochten, John; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Koes, Bart W

    2007-01-01

    To investigate in recreational runners the 3 month prognosis of and medical consumption caused by running injuries occurring shortly before or during a marathon. Possible prognostic factors for persistent complaints were also evaluated. Prospective cohort study. Rotterdam, the Netherlands. One hundred sixty-five recreational marathon runners who reported a new running injury in the month before or during the Rotterdam Marathon 2005 and who were available for follow-up. ASSESSMENT OF DETERMINANTS: Demographic, running (training distance, frequency and duration, experience, etc), lifestyle (other sports, smoking), and injury-related factors were collected at baseline. Persistent complaints of running injuries occurring in the month before or during the Rotterdam marathon at 3 month follow-up. Potential prognostic factors for persistent complaints were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. At 3 month follow-up, 25.5% of the 165 injured runners reported persistent complaints; they had little pain during exercise and almost no pain in rest. Of all 165 male runners, 27 (16.4%) visited a general practitioner because of their running injury and 40 (24.2%) visited a physiotherapist (218 times in total). Persistent complaints at 3 month follow-up were associated with non-musculoskeletal comorbidities [odds ratio (OR), 3.23; confidence interval (CI), 1.24-8.43], and calf injuries (OR, 0.37; CI, 0.13-1.05). One quarter of the runners had persistent complaints of their marathon-related running injury at 3 month follow-up. However, the clinical and social consequences of the injuries seem to be relatively mild. Non-musculoskeletal comorbidities at baseline are related to poor recovery, whereas recovery is also location specific.

  19. A Comparison of the Energetic Cost of Running in Marathon Racing Shoes.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kipp, Shalaya; Frank, Jesse H; Farina, Emily M; Luo, Geng; Kram, Rodger

    2018-04-01

    Reducing the energetic cost of running seems the most feasible path to a sub-2-hour marathon. Footwear mass, cushioning, and bending stiffness each affect the energetic cost of running. Recently, prototype running shoes were developed that combine a new highly compliant and resilient midsole material with a stiff embedded plate. The aim of this study was to determine if, and to what extent, these newly developed running shoes reduce the energetic cost of running compared with established marathon racing shoes. 18 high-caliber athletes ran six 5-min trials (three shoes × two replicates) in prototype shoes (NP), and two established marathon shoes (NS and AB) during three separate sessions: 14, 16, and 18 km/h. We measured submaximal oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production during minutes 3-5 and averaged energetic cost (W/kg) for the two trials in each shoe model. Compared with the established racing shoes, the new shoes reduced the energetic cost of running in all 18 subjects tested. Averaged across all three velocities, the energetic cost for running in the NP shoes (16.45 ± 0.89 W/kg; mean ± SD) was 4.16 and 4.01% lower than in the NS and AB shoes, when shoe mass was matched (17.16 ± 0.92 and 17.14 ± 0.97 W/kg, respectively, both p < 0.001). The observed percent changes were independent of running velocity (14-18 km/h). The prototype shoes lowered the energetic cost of running by 4% on average. We predict that with these shoes, top athletes could run substantially faster and achieve the first sub-2-hour marathon.

  20. Effect of a marathon run on serum lipoproteins, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase in recreational runners.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Toshiko; Hosoi, Teruo; Yoshizaki, Hidekiyo; Loeppky, Jack A

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a marathon run on serum lipid and lipoprotein concentrations and serum muscle enzyme activities and follow their recovery after the run. These blood concentrations were measured before, immediately after, and serially after a marathon run in 15 male recreational runners. The triglyceride level was significantly elevated postrace, then fell 30% below baseline 1 day after the run, and returned to baseline after 1 week. Total cholesterol responded less dramatically but with a similar pattern. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol remained significantly elevated and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was transiently reduced for 3 days after the run. The total cholesterol/high-density cholesterol ratio was significantly lowered for 3 days. Serum lactate dehydrogenase activity significantly doubled postrace and then declined but remained elevated for 2 weeks. Serum creatine kinase activity peaked 24 hr after the run, with a 15-fold rise, and returned to baseline after 1 week. The rise of these enzymes reflects mechanically damaged muscle cells leaking contents into the interstitial fluid. It is concluded that a prolonged strenuous exercise bout in recreational runners, such as a marathon, produces beneficial changes in lipid blood profiles that are significant for only 3 days. However, muscle damage is also evident for 1 week or more from the dramatic and long-lasting effect on enzyme levels. Laboratory values for these runners were outside normal ranges for some days after the race.

  1. Protein Supplementation During or Following a Marathon Run Influences Post-Exercise Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Michael J.; Luden, Nicholas D.; DeWitt, Cash R.; Gross, Melinda C.; Dillon Rios, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    The effects of protein supplementation on the ratings of energy/fatigue, muscle soreness [ascending (A) and descending (D) stairs], and serum creatine kinase levels following a marathon run were examined. Variables were compared between recreational male and female runners ingesting carbohydrate + protein (CP) during the run (CPDuring, n = 8) versus those that were consuming carbohydrate (CHODuring, n = 8). In a second study, outcomes were compared between subjects who consumed CP or CHO immediately following exercise [CPPost (n = 4) versus CHOPost (n = 4)]. Magnitude-based inferences revealed no meaningful differences between treatments 24 h post-marathon. At 72 h, recovery [Δ(72 hr-Pre)] was likely improved with CPDuring versus CHODuring, respectively, for Physical Energy (+14 ± 64 vs −74 ± 70 mm), Mental Fatigue (−52 ± 59 vs +1 ± 11 mm), and Soreness-D (+15 ± 9 vs +21 ± 70 mm). In addition, recovery at 72 h was likely-very likely improved with CPPost versus CHOPost for Physical Fatigue, Mental Energy, and Soreness-A. Thus, protein supplementation did not meaningfully alter recovery during the initial 24 h following a marathon. However, ratings of energy/fatigue and muscle soreness were improved over 72 h when CP was consumed during exercise, or immediately following the marathon. PMID:29534444

  2. Sex- and age-related differences in half-marathon performance and competitiveness in the world's largest half-marathon - the GöteborgsVarvet.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, B; Nikolaidis, P T

    2018-01-01

    In road runners, the age-related performance decline has been well investigated for marathoners, but little is known for half-marathoners. We analysed data from 138,616 runners (48,148 women and 90,469 men) competing between 2014 and 2016 in GöteborgsVarvet, the world's largest half-marathon. The men-to-women ratio in participants increased with age, the fastest race times were observed in age groups ˂35 and 35-39 years in women and in age group 35-39 years in men, the main effect of sex and the sex × age group interaction on race time were trivial, and the competitiveness was denser in men and in the younger age groups. In summary, in half-marathon running in the largest half-marathon in the world, the GöteborgsVarvet, women achieved the fastest race time at an earlier age compared to men where the fastest race times were observed in women in age groups ˂35 and 35-39 years and in men in age group 35-39 years.

  3. Foot-strike pattern and performance in a marathon

    PubMed Central

    Kasmer, Mark E.; Liu, Xue-cheng; Roberts, Kyle G.; Valadao, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To: 1) determine prevalence of heel-strike in a mid-size city marathon, 2) determine if there is an association between foot-strike classification and race performance, and 3) determine if there is an association between foot-strike classification and gender. Methods Foot-strike classification (fore-foot strike, mid-foot strike, heel strike, or split-strike), gender, and rank (position in race) were recorded at the 8.1 kilometer (km) mark for 2,112 runners at the 2011 Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon. Results 1,991 runners were classified by foot-strike pattern, revealing a heel-strike prevalence of 93.67% (n=1,865). A significant difference between foot-strike classification and performance was found using a Kruskal-Wallis test (p < 0.0001), with more elite performers being less likely to heel-strike. No significant difference between foot-strike classification and gender was found using a Fisher’s exact test. Additionally, subgroup analysis of the 126 non-heel strikers found no significant difference between shoe wear and performance using a Kruskal-Wallis test. Conclusions The high prevalence of heel-striking observed in this study reflects the foot-strike pattern of the majority of mid- to long-distance runners and more importantly, may predict their injury profile based on the biomechanics of a heel strike running pattern. This knowledge can aid the clinician in the appropriate diagnosis, management, and training modifications of the injured runner. PMID:23006790

  4. Dietary tendencies as predictors of marathon time in novice marathoners.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patrick B; Ingraham, Stacy J; Lundstrom, Chris; Rhodes, Gregory

    2013-04-01

    The effects of dietary factors such as carbohydrate (CHO) on endurance-running performance have been extensively studied under laboratory-based and simulated field conditions. Evidence from "real-life" events, however, is poorly characterized. The purpose of this observational study was to examine the associations between prerace and in-race nutrition tendencies and performance in a sample of novice marathoners. Forty-six college students (36 women and 10 men) age 21.3 ± 3.3 yr recorded diet for 3 d before, the morning of, and during a 26.2-mile marathon. Anthropometric, physiological, and performance measurements were assessed before the marathon so the associations between diet and marathon time could be included as part of a stepwise-regression model. Mean marathon time was 266 ± 42 min. A pre-marathon 2-mile time trial explained 73% of the variability in marathon time (adjusted R2 = .73, p < .001). Day-before + morning-of CHO (DBMC) was the only other significant predictor of marathon time, explaining an additional 4% of the variability in marathon time (adjusted R2 = .77, p = .006). Other factors such as age, body-mass index, gender, day-before + morning-of energy, and in-race CHO were not significant independent predictors of marathon time. In this sample of primarily novice marathoners, DBMC intake was associated with faster marathon time, independent of other known predictors. These results suggest that novice and recreational marathoners should consider consuming a moderate to high amount of CHO in the 24-36 hr before a marathon.

  5. Analysis of performance and age of the fastest 100-mile ultra-marathoners worldwide.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-05-01

    The performance and age of peak ultra-endurance performance have been investigated in single races and single race series but not using worldwide participation data. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in running performance and the age of peak running performance of the best 100-mile ultra-marathoners worldwide. The race times and ages of the annual ten fastest women and men were analyzed among a total of 35,956 finishes (6,862 for women and 29,094 for men) competing between 1998 and 2011 in 100-mile ultra-marathons. The annual top ten performances improved by 13.7% from 1,132±61.8 min in 1998 to 977.6±77.1 min in 2011 for women and by 14.5% from 959.2±36.4 min in 1998 to 820.6±25.7 min in 2011 for men. The mean ages of the annual top ten fastest runners were 39.2±6.2 years for women and 37.2±6.1 years for men. The age of peak running performance was not different between women and men (p>0.05) and showed no changes across the years. These findings indicated that the fastest female and male 100-mile ultra-marathoners improved their race time by ∼14% across the 1998-2011 period at an age when they had to be classified as master athletes. Future studies should analyze longer running distances (>200 km) to investigate whether the age of peak performance increases with increased distance in ultra-marathon running.

  6. Analysis of performance and age of the fastest 100-mile ultra-marathoners worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The performance and age of peak ultra-endurance performance have been investigated in single races and single race series but not using worldwide participation data. The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in running performance and the age of peak running performance of the best 100-mile ultra-marathoners worldwide. METHOD: The race times and ages of the annual ten fastest women and men were analyzed among a total of 35,956 finishes (6,862 for women and 29,094 for men) competing between 1998 and 2011 in 100-mile ultra-marathons. RESULTS: The annual top ten performances improved by 13.7% from 1,132±61.8 min in 1998 to 977.6±77.1 min in 2011 for women and by 14.5% from 959.2±36.4 min in 1998 to 820.6±25.7 min in 2011 for men. The mean ages of the annual top ten fastest runners were 39.2±6.2 years for women and 37.2±6.1 years for men. The age of peak running performance was not different between women and men (p>0.05) and showed no changes across the years. CONCLUSION: These findings indicated that the fastest female and male 100-mile ultra-marathoners improved their race time by ∼14% across the 1998–2011 period at an age when they had to be classified as master athletes. Future studies should analyze longer running distances (>200 km) to investigate whether the age of peak performance increases with increased distance in ultra-marathon running. PMID:23778421

  7. Effects of running a marathon on irisin concentration in men aged over 50.

    PubMed

    Jóźków, Paweł; Koźlenia, Dawid; Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Konefał, Marek; Chmura, Paweł; Młynarska, Katarzyna; Kosowski, Michał; Mędraś, Marek; Chmura, Jan; Ponikowski, Piotr; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2018-05-14

    Our aim was to verify whether running a marathon is associated with changes in irisin concentration in healthy, endurance-trained men. In an observational study, we assessed baseline biochemical and fitness parameters of 28 middle-aged runners (mean ± SD age, BMI, VO 2max : 58 ± 8 years; 24.5 ± 3 kg/m 2 ; 51.1 ± 1.7 ml/kg/min). We evaluated irisin before, immediately after, and 7 days after the marathon. Irisin concentration decreased from a baseline value of 639 ± 427 to 461 ± 255 ng/ml immediately after the marathon (p < 0.05). After 7 days, it was still significantly lower than before the race, at 432 ± 146 ng/ml (p < 0.05). We found no correlations between irisin concentration and the training history of the studied subjects. We conclude that a long-distance run may have a negative impact on irisin release in men. This effect was not correlated with the training history of runners.

  8. Running injuries and associated factors in participants of ING Taipei Marathon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Ling; Shih, Yi-Fen; Chen, Wen-Yin

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the distribution of lower extremity running injuries and their associated factors. Descriptive and exploratory study. 1004 participants of the 2005 ING Taipei International Marathon. We used a self-developed questionnaire to collect data of previous running injuries and applied multivariate logistic regression modeling to examine relationships between these injuries and associated factors. Of the 893 valid questionnaires, 396 (44.4%) reported having previous lower extremity pain related to running. Knee joint pain was the most common problem (32.5%). Hip pain was associated with the racing group, training duration, and medial arch support. Use of knee orthotics (P = 0.002) and ankle braces (P = 0.007) was related to a higher rate of knee and ankle pain. Participants of the full marathon group who practiced on a synthetic track had a higher incidence of ankle pain. A training duration of >60 min was linked to an increased rate of foot pain (P = 0.003). Our data indicated that running injuries were associated with training duration and use of orthotics. Clinicians can use this information in treating or preventing running associated injuries and pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Design of ProjectRun21: a 14-week prospective cohort study of the influence of running experience and running pace on running-related injury in half-marathoners.

    PubMed

    Damsted, Camma; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Sørensen, Henrik; Malisoux, Laurent; Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard

    2017-11-06

    Participation in half-marathon has been steeply increasing during the past decade. In line, a vast number of half-marathon running schedules has surfaced. Unfortunately, the injury incidence proportion for half-marathoners has been found to exceed 30% during 1-year follow-up. The majority of running-related injuries are suggested to develop as overuse injuries, which leads to injury if the cumulative training load over one or more training sessions exceeds the runners' load capacity for adaptive tissue repair. Owing to an increase of load capacity along with adaptive running training, the runners' running experience and pace abilities can be used as estimates for load capacity. Since no evidence-based knowledge exist of how to plan appropriate half-marathon running schedules considering the level of running experience and running pace, the aim of ProjectRun21 is to investigate the association between running experience or running pace and the risk of running-related injury. Healthy runners using Global Positioning System (GPS) watch between 18 and 65 years will be invited to participate in this 14-week prospective cohort study. Runners will be allowed to self-select one of three half-marathon running schedules developed for the study. Running data will be collected objectively by GPS. Injury will be based on the consensus-based time loss definition by Yamato et al.: "Running-related (training or competition) musculoskeletal pain in the lower limbs that causes a restriction on or stoppage of running (distance, speed, duration, or training) for at least 7 days or 3 consecutive scheduled training sessions, or that requires the runner to consult a physician or other health professional". Running experience and running pace will be included as primary exposures, while the exposure to running is pre-fixed in the running schedules and thereby conditioned by design. Time-to-event models will be used for analytical purposes. ProjectRun21 will examine if particular

  10. Similarities and differences among half-marathon runners according to their performance level

    PubMed Central

    Morante, Juan Carlos; Gómez-Molina, Josué; García-López, Juan

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the similarities and differences among half-marathon runners in relation to their performance level. Forty-eight male runners were classified into 4 groups according to their performance level in a half-marathon (min): Group 1 (n = 11, < 70 min), Group 2 (n = 13, < 80 min), Group 3 (n = 13, < 90 min), Group 4 (n = 11, < 105 min). In two separate sessions, training-related, anthropometric, physiological, foot strike pattern and spatio-temporal variables were recorded. Significant differences (p<0.05) between groups (ES = 0.55–3.16) and correlations with performance were obtained (r = 0.34–0.92) in training-related (experience and running distance per week), anthropometric (mass, body mass index and sum of 6 skinfolds), physiological (VO2max, RCT and running economy), foot strike pattern and spatio-temporal variables (contact time, step rate and length). At standardized submaximal speeds (11, 13 and 15 km·h-1), no significant differences between groups were observed in step rate and length, neither in contact time when foot strike pattern was taken into account. In conclusion, apart from training-related, anthropometric and physiological variables, foot strike pattern and step length were the only biomechanical variables sensitive to half-marathon performance, which are essential to achieve high running speeds. However, when foot strike pattern and running speeds were controlled (submaximal test), the spatio-temporal variables were similar. This indicates that foot strike pattern and running speed are responsible for spatio-temporal differences among runners of different performance level. PMID:29364940

  11. Alterations of Vertical Jump Mechanics after a Half-Marathon Mountain Running Race

    PubMed Central

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N.; Noutsos, Konstantinos; Pappas, Achilleas; Bogdanis, Gregory; Vagenas, Georgios; Bayios, Ioannis A.; Boudolos, Konstantinos D.

    2016-01-01

    The fatiguing effect of long-distance running has been examined in the context of a variety of parameters. However, there is scarcity of data regarding its effect on the vertical jump mechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the alterations of countermovement jump (CMJ) mechanics after a half-marathon mountain race. Twenty-seven runners performed CMJs before the race (Pre), immediately after the race (Post 1) and five minutes after Post 1 (Post 2). Instantaneous and ensemble-average analysis focused on jump height and, the maximum peaks and time-to-maximum peaks of: Displacement, vertical force (Fz), anterior-posterior force (Fx), Velocity and Power, in the eccentric (tECC) and concentric (tCON) phase of the jump, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used for statistical analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The jump height decrease was significant in Post 2 (-7.9%) but not in Post 1 (-4.1%). Fx and Velocity decreased significantly in both Post 1 (only in tECC) and Post 2 (both tECC and tCON). Α timing shift of the Fz peaks (earlier during tECC and later during tCON) and altered relative peak times (only in tECC) were also observed. Ensemble-average analysis revealed several time intervals of significant post-race alterations and a timing shift in the Fz-Velocity loop. An overall trend of lowered post-race jump output and mechanics was characterised by altered jump timing, restricted anterior-posterior movement and altered force-velocity relations. The specificity of mountain running fatigue to eccentric muscle work, appears to be reflected in the different time order of the post-race reductions, with the eccentric phase reductions preceding those of the concentric one. Thus, those who engage in mountain running should particularly consider downhill training to optimise eccentric muscular action. Key points The 4.1% reduction of jump height immediately after the race is not statistically significant The eccentric phase alterations of jump mechanics precede

  12. Alterations of Vertical Jump Mechanics after a Half-Marathon Mountain Running Race.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Noutsos, Konstantinos; Pappas, Achilleas; Bogdanis, Gregory; Vagenas, Georgios; Bayios, Ioannis A; Boudolos, Konstantinos D

    2016-06-01

    The fatiguing effect of long-distance running has been examined in the context of a variety of parameters. However, there is scarcity of data regarding its effect on the vertical jump mechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the alterations of countermovement jump (CMJ) mechanics after a half-marathon mountain race. Twenty-seven runners performed CMJs before the race (Pre), immediately after the race (Post 1) and five minutes after Post 1 (Post 2). Instantaneous and ensemble-average analysis focused on jump height and, the maximum peaks and time-to-maximum peaks of: Displacement, vertical force (Fz), anterior-posterior force (Fx), Velocity and Power, in the eccentric (tECC) and concentric (tCON) phase of the jump, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used for statistical analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The jump height decrease was significant in Post 2 (-7.9%) but not in Post 1 (-4.1%). Fx and Velocity decreased significantly in both Post 1 (only in tECC) and Post 2 (both tECC and tCON). Α timing shift of the Fz peaks (earlier during tECC and later during tCON) and altered relative peak times (only in tECC) were also observed. Ensemble-average analysis revealed several time intervals of significant post-race alterations and a timing shift in the Fz-Velocity loop. An overall trend of lowered post-race jump output and mechanics was characterised by altered jump timing, restricted anterior-posterior movement and altered force-velocity relations. The specificity of mountain running fatigue to eccentric muscle work, appears to be reflected in the different time order of the post-race reductions, with the eccentric phase reductions preceding those of the concentric one. Thus, those who engage in mountain running should particularly consider downhill training to optimise eccentric muscular action. Key pointsThe 4.1% reduction of jump height immediately after the race is not statistically significantThe eccentric phase alterations of jump mechanics precede

  13. Comparison of training and anthropometric characteristics between recreational male half-marathoners and marathoners.

    PubMed

    Zillmann, Teresa; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-06-30

    Participation in endurance running such as half-marathon (21-km) and marathon (42-km) has increased over the last decades. We compared 147 recreational male half-marathoners and 126 recreational male marathoners to investigate similarities or differences in their anthropometric and training characteristics. The half-marathoners were heavier (P < 0.05), had longer legs (P < 0.001), thicker upper arms (P < 0.05), a thicker thigh (P < 0.01), a higher sum of skinfold thicknesses (P < 0.01), a higher body fat percentage (P < 0.05) and a higher skeletal muscle mass (P < 0.05) than the marathoners. They had fewer years of experience (P < 0.05), completed fewer weekly training kilometers (P < 0.001), and fewer weekly running hours (P < 0.01) compared to the marathoners. For half-marathoners, body mass index (P = 0.011), percent body fat (P = 0.036) and speed in running during training (P < 0.0001) were related to race time (r2 = 0.47). For marathoners, percent body fat (P = 0.001) and speed in running during training (P < 0.0001) were associated to race time (r2 = 0.47). When body mass index was excluded for the half-marathoners in the multi-variate analysis, r2 decreased to 0.45, therefore body mass index explained only 2% of the variance of half-marathon performance. Percent body fat was significantly and negatively related to running speed during training in both groups. To summarize, half-marathoners showed differences in both anthropometry and training characteristics compared to marathoners that could be related to their lower training volume, most probably due to the shorter race distance they intended to compete. Both groups of athletes seemed to profit from low body fat and a high running speed during training for fast race times.

  14. Performance and age of African and non-African runners in half- and full marathons held in Switzerland, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Aschmann, André; Knechtle, Beat; Cribari, Marco; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Onywera, Vincent; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    Background Endurance running performance of African (AF) and non-African (NAF) athletes is investigated, with better performances seen for Africans. To date, no study has compared the age of peak performance between AF and NAF runners. The present research is an analysis of the age and running performance of top AF and NAF athletes, using the hypothesis that AF athletes were younger and faster than NAF athletes. Methods Age and performance of male and female AF and NAF athletes in half-marathons and marathons held in Switzerland in 2000–2010 were investigated using single and multilevel hierarchical regression analyses. Results For half-marathons, male NAF runners were older than male AF runners (P = 0.02; NAF, 31.1 years ± 6.4 years versus AF, 26.2 years ± 4.9 years), and their running time was longer (P = 0.02; NAF, 65.3 minutes ± 1.7 minutes versus AF, 64.1 minutes ± 0.9 minutes). In marathons, differences between NAF and AF male runners in age (NAF, 33.0 years ± 4.8 years versus AF, 28.6 years ± 3.8 years; P < 0.01) and running time (NAF, 139.5 minutes ± 5.6 minutes versus AF, 133.3 minutes ± 2.7 minutes; P < 0.01) were more pronounced. There was no difference in age (NAF, 31.0 years ± 7.0 years versus AF, 26.7 years ± 6.0 years; P > 0.05) or running time (NAF, 75.0 minutes ± 3.7 minutes versus AF, 75.6 minutes ± 5.3 minutes; P > 0.05) between NAF and AF female half-marathoners. For marathoners, NAF women were older than AF female runners (P = 0.03; NAF, 31.6 years ± 4.8 years versus AF, 27.8 years ± 5.3 years), but their running times were similar (NAF, 162.4 minutes ± 7.2 minutes versus AF, 163.0 minutes ± 7.0 minutes; P > 0.05). Conclusion In Switzerland, the best AF male half-marathoners and marathoners were younger and faster than the NAF counterpart runners. In contrast to the results seen in men, AF and NAF female runners had similar performances. Future studies need to investigate performance and age of AF and NAF marathoners in the

  15. Advanced Running Performance by Genetic Predisposition in Male Dummerstorf Marathon Mice (DUhTP) Reveals Higher Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP) Related mRNA Expression in the Liver and Higher Serum Levels of Progesterone

    PubMed Central

    Brenmoehl, Julia; Walz, Christina; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Schwerin, Manfred; Fuellen, Georg; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Long-term-selected DUhTP mice represent a non-inbred model for inborn physical high-performance without previous training. Abundance of hepatic mRNA in 70-day male DUhTP and control mice was analyzed using the Affymetrix mouse array 430A 2.0. Differential expression analysis with PLIER corrected data was performed using AltAnalyze. Searching for over-representation in biochemical pathways revealed cholesterol metabolism being most prominently affected in DUhTP compared to unselected control mice. Furthermore, pathway analysis by AltAnalyze plus PathVisio indicated significant induction of glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver of DUhTP mice versus unselected control mice. In contrast, gluconeogenesis was partially inactivated as judged from the analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance in DUhTP mice. Analysis of mRNA transcripts related to steroid hormone metabolism inferred elevated synthesis of progesterone and reduced levels of sex steroids. Abundance of steroid delta isomerase-5 mRNA (Hsd3b5, FC 4.97) was increased and steroid 17-alpha-monooxygenase mRNA (Cyp17a1, FC -11.6) was massively diminished in the liver of DUhTP mice. Assessment of steroid profiles by LC-MS revealed increased levels of progesterone and decreased levels of sex steroids in serum from DUhTP mice versus controls. Analysis of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance indicates that sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) may play a major role in metabolic pathway activation in the marathon mouse model DUhTP. Thus, results from bioinformatics modeling of hepatic mRNA transcript abundance correlated with direct steroid analysis by mass spectrometry and further indicated functions of SREBP-1 and steroid hormones for endurance performance in DUhTP mice. PMID:26799318

  16. Similarities and differences in anthropometry and training between recreational male 100-km ultra-marathoners and marathoners.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Several recent investigations showed that the best marathon time of an individual athlete is also a strong predictor variable for the race time in a 100-km ultra-marathon. We investigated similarities and differences in anthropometry and training characteristics between 166 100-km ultra-marathoners and 126 marathoners in recreational male athletes. The association of anthropometric variables and training characteristics with race time was assessed by using bi- and multi-variate analysis. Regarding anthropometry, the marathoners had a significantly lower calf circumference (P < 0.05) and a significantly thicker skinfold at pectoral (P < 0.01), axilla (P < 0.05), and suprailiacal sites (P < 0.05) compared to the ultra-marathoners. Considering training characteristics, the marathoners completed significantly fewer hours (P < 0.001) and significantly fewer kilometres (P < 0.001) during the week, but they were running significantly faster during training (P < 0.001). The multi-variate analysis showed that age (P < 0.0001), body mass (P = 0.011), and percent body fat (P = 0.019) were positively and weekly running kilometres (P < 0.0001) were negatively related to 100-km race times in the ultra-marathoners. In the marathoners, percent body fat (P = 0.002) was positively and speed in running training (P < 0.0001) was negatively associated with marathon race times. In conclusion, these data suggest that performance in both marathoners and 100-km ultra-marathoners is inversely related to body fat. Moreover, marathoners rely more on speed in running during training whereas ultra-marathoners rely on volume in running training.

  17. The Dissertation Marathon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    We all think of a marathon as a long-distance running event with an official distance of 42.195 kilometers (26 miles and 385 yards). Throughout time marathon runners have pursued their longest goals by allowing their body to adapt to the new stresses through training. Training for a marathon takes intense preparation, dedication and skill. It is…

  18. Participation and performance trends of East-African runners in Swiss half-marathons and marathons held between 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examined the changes in participation, performance and age of East African runners competing in half-marathons and marathons held in Switzerland between 2000 and 2010. Methods Race times, sex, age and origin of East African versus Non-African finishers of half-marathon and marathon finishers were analyzed. Results Across time, the number of Kenyan and Ethiopian finishers remained stable (P > 0.05) while the number of Non-African finishers increased for both women and men in both half-marathons and marathons (P < 0.05). In half-marathons, the top ten African women (71 ± 1.4 min) and top three (62.3 ± 0.6 min) and top ten (62.8 ± 0.4 min) African men were faster than their Non-African counterparts (P < 0.05). In marathons, however, there was no difference in race times between the top three African men (130.0 ± 0.0 min) and women (151.7 ± 2.5 min) compared to Non-African men (129.0 ± 1.0 min) and women (150.7 ± 1.2 min) (P > 0.05). In half-marathons and marathons was no difference in age between the best Non-African and the best African runners (P > 0.05). Conclusions During the last decade in Switzerland, the participation of Kenyan and Ethiopian runners in half- and full- marathons remained stable. In marathons there was no difference in age and performance between the top African and the top Non-African runners. Regarding half-marathons, the top African runners were faster but not younger than the top Non-African runners. Future insight should be gained by comparing the present results with participation, performance and age trends for East African runners competing in marathons held in larger countries. PMID:24289794

  19. Running a marathon from −45°C to +55°C in a climate chamber: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Kälin, Kaspar; Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Mydlak, Karsten; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background We describe a runner who completed a self-paced marathon (42.195 km) in a climate chamber with a temperature difference of 100°C, starting at an ambient temperature (Tambient) of −45°C and finishing at an Tambient of +55°C. Methods Tambient was set at −45°C at the start, and was steadily increased at a rate of 1°C at 4.5-minute intervals to +55°C. Before the start, after every 10.5 km, and at the end of the marathon, body mass, urine, and sweat production were measured and samples of venous blood and urine were collected. The runner’s temperature was recorded every 10 seconds at four sites, ie, the rectum for body core temperature (Tcore), and at the forehead, right wrist, and right ankle for surface temperatures (Tskin). Results The subject took 6.5 hours to complete the marathon, during which Tcore varied by 0.9°C (start 37.5°C, peak 38.4°C). The largest difference (∆) of Tskin was recorded at the ankle (∆16°C). The calculated amount of sweat produced increased by 888% from baseline. In the blood samples, myoglobin (+250%) showed the highest change. Of the pituitary hormones, somatotropic hormone (+391%) and prolactin (+221%) increased the most. Regarding fluid regulation hormones, renin (+1145%) and aldosterone (+313%) showed the greatest increase. Conclusion These results show that running a marathon in a climate chamber with a total ∆Tambient of 100°C is possible, and that the Tambient to Tcore relationship is maintained. These results may offer insight into regulatory mechanisms to avoid hypothermia and hyperthermia. The same study is to be performed using more subjects with the same characteristics to validate the present findings. PMID:24198596

  20. Whey Protein Improves Marathon-Induced Injury and Exercise Performance in Elite Track Runners

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kan, Nai-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein has been widely applied to athletes and the fitness field for muscle growth and performance improvement. Limited studies focused on the beneficial effects of whey on aerobic exercise according to biochemical assessments. In the current study, 12 elite male track runners were randomly assigned to whey and maltodextrin groups for 5 weeks' supplementation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of whey protein on physiological adaptions and exercise performance. During this period, three time points (pre-, post-, and end-test) were used to evaluate related biochemical parameters, body composition, and performance. The post-test was set 1 day after a marathon for injury status evaluation and the end-test was also assessed after 1-week recovery from endurance test. The results showed that the whey group exhibited significantly lower aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase indicators after the marathon (post-test), as well as at the end-test (p<0.016). The endurance performance in twelve-minute walk/run was also significantly elevated (p<0.012) possibly due to an increase in the muscle mass and amelioration of exercise injuries. In the current study, we demonstrated that whey protein can also be used for aerobic exercise for better physiological adaptation, in addition to resistance training. Whey protein could be also a potential nutrient supplement with a variety of benefits for amateur runners. PMID:28824296

  1. Effect of age and performance on pacing of marathon runners

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Knechtle, Beat

    2017-01-01

    Pacing strategies in marathon runners have previously been examined, especially with regard to age and performance level separately. However, less information about the age × performance interaction on pacing in age-group runners exists. The aim of the present study was to examine whether runners with similar race time and at different age differ for pacing. Data (women, n=117,595; men, n=180,487) from the “New York City Marathon” between 2006 and 2016 were analyzed. A between–within subjects analysis of variance showed a large main effect of split on race speed (p<0.001, η2=0.538) with the fastest speed in the 5–10 km split and the slowest in the 35–40 km. A small sex × split interaction on race speed was found (p<0.001, η2=0.035) with men showing larger increase in speed at 5 km and women at 25 km and 40 km (end spurt). An age-group × performance group interaction on Δspeed was shown for both sexes at 5 km, 10 km, 15 km, 20 km, 25 km, 30 km, 35 km, and 40 km (p<0.001, 0.001≤η2≤0.004), where athletes in older age-groups presented a relatively more even pace compared with athletes in younger age-groups, a trend that was more remarkable in the relatively slow performance groups. So far, the present study is the first one to observe an age × performance interaction on pacing; ie, older runners pace differently (smaller changes) than younger runners with similar race time. These findings are of great practical interest for coaches working with marathon runners of different age, but similar race time. PMID:28860876

  2. Pacing profiles and pack running at the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the pacing profiles and packing behaviour of athletes competing in the IAAF World Half Marathon Championships. Finishing and split times were collated for 491 men and 347 women across six championships. The mean speeds for each intermediate 5 km and end 1.1 km segments were calculated, and athletes grouped according to finishing time. The best men and women largely maintained their split speeds between 5 km and 15 km, whereas slower athletes had decreased speeds from 5 km onwards. Athletes were also classified by the type of packing behaviour in which they engaged. Those who ran in packs throughout the race had smaller decreases in pace than those who did not, or who managed to do so only to 5 km. While some athletes' reduced speeds from 15 to 20 km might have been caused by fatigue, it was also possibly a tactic to aid a fast finish that was particularly beneficial to medallists. Those athletes who ran with the same competitors throughout sped up most during the finish. Athletes are advised to identify rivals likely to have similar abilities and ambitions and run with them as part of their pre-race strategy.

  3. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Arstikyte, Justina; Vaitkaitiene, Egle; Vaitkaitis, Dinas

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands), and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km), directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD) and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37 ± 30.2 versus 221.80 ± 23.4 min, p = 0.045), ingested less fluids (907 ± 615 versus 1950 ± 488 mL, p = 0.007) during the race, and lost much more weight (−2.4 ± 1.3 versus −1.0 ± 0.8 kg, p = 0.041). Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation. PMID:28828386

  4. Mathematical analysis of running performance and world running records.

    PubMed

    Péronnet, F; Thibault, G

    1989-07-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an empirical model relating human running performance to some characteristics of metabolic energy-yielding processes using A, the capacity of anaerobic metabolism (J/kg); MAP, the maximal aerobic power (W/kg); and E, the reduction in peak aerobic power with the natural logarithm of race duration T, when T greater than TMAP = 420 s. Accordingly, the model developed describes the average power output PT (W/kg) sustained over any T as PT = [S/T(1 - e-T/k2)] + 1/T integral of T O [BMR + B(1 - e-t/k1)]dt where S = A and B = MAP - BMR (basal metabolic rate) when T less than TMAP; and S = A + [Af ln(T/TMAP)] and B = (MAP - BMR) + [E ln(T/TMAP)] when T greater than TMAP; k1 = 30 s and k2 = 20 s are time constants describing the kinetics of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, respectively, at the beginning of exercise; f is a constant describing the reduction in the amount of energy provided from anaerobic metabolism with increasing T; and t is the time from the onset of the race. This model accurately estimates actual power outputs sustained over a wide range of events, e.g., average absolute error between actual and estimated T for men's 1987 world records from 60 m to the marathon = 0.73%. In addition, satisfactory estimations of the metabolic characteristics of world-class male runners were made as follows: A = 1,658 J/kg; MAP = 83.5 ml O2.kg-1.min-1; 83.5% MAP sustained over the marathon distance. Application of the model to analysis of the evolution of A, MAP, and E, and of the progression of men's and women's world records over the years, is presented.

  5. Effects of Mountain Ultra-Marathon Running on ROS Production and Oxidative Damage by Micro-Invasive Analytic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mrakic-Sposta, Simona; Gussoni, Maristella; Moretti, Sarah; Pratali, Lorenza; Giardini, Guido; Tacchini, Philippe; Dellanoce, Cinzia; Tonacci, Alessandro; Mastorci, Francesca; Borghini, Andrea; Montorsi, Michela; Vezzoli, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to gain a detailed insight into the physiological mechanisms involved under extreme conditions, a group of experienced ultra-marathon runners, performing the mountain Tor des Géants® ultra-marathon: 330 km trail-run in Valle d'Aosta, 24000 m of positive and negative elevation changes, was monitored. ROS production rate, antioxidant capacity, oxidative damage and inflammation markers were assessed, adopting micro-invasive analytic techniques. Forty-six male athletes (45.04±8.75 yr, 72.6±8.4 kg, 1.76±0.05 m) were tested. Capillary blood and urine were collected before (Pre-), in the middle (Middle-) and immediately after (Post-) Race. Samples were analyzed for: Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance; Antioxidant Capacity by Electrochemistry; oxidative damage (8-hydroxy-2-deoxy Guanosine: 8-OH-dG; 8-isoprostane: 8-isoPGF2α) and nitric oxide metabolites by enzymatic assays; inflammatory biomarkers (plasma and urine interleukin-6: IL-6-P and IL-6-U) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA); Creatinine and Neopterin by HPLC, hematologic (lactate, glucose and hematocrit) and urine parameters by standard analyses. Twenty-five athletes finished the race, while twenty-one dropped out of it. A significant increase (Post-Race vs Pre) of the ROS production rate (2.20±0.27 vs 1.65±0.22 μmol.min-1), oxidative damage biomarkers (8-OH-dG: 6.32±2.38 vs 4.16±1.25 ng.mg-1 Creatinine and 8-isoPGF2α: 1404.0±518.30 vs 822.51±448.91 pg.mg-1Creatinine), inflammatory state (IL-6-P: 66.42±36.92 vs 1.29±0.54 pg.mL-1 and IL-6-U: 1.33±0.56 vs 0.71±0.17 pg.mL1) and lactate production (+190%), associated with a decrease of both antioxidant capacity (-7%) and renal function (i.e. Creatinine level +76%) was found. The used micro-invasive analytic methods allowed us to perform most of them before, during and immediately after the race directly in the field, by passing the need of storing and transporting samples for further analysis

  6. Endurance running performance in athletes with asthma.

    PubMed

    Freeman, W; Williams, C; Nute, M G

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory assessment was made during maximal and submaximal exercise on 16 endurance trained male runners with asthma (aged 35 +/- 9 years) (mean +/- S.D.). Eleven of these asthmatic athletes had recent performance times over a half-marathon, which were examined in light of the results from the laboratory tests. The maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) of the group was 61.8 +/- 6.3 ml kg-1 min-1 and the maximum ventilation (VEmax) was 138.7 +/- 24.7 l min-1. These maximum cardio-respiratory responses to exercise were positively correlated to the degree of airflow obstruction, defined as the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (expressed as a percentage of predicted normal). The half-marathon performance times of 11 of the athletes ranged from those of recreational to elite runners (82.4 +/- 8.8 min, range 69-94). Race pace was correlated with VO2max (r = 0.863, P less than 0.01) but the highest correlation was with the running velocity at a blood lactate concentration of 2 mmol l-1 (r = 0.971, P less than 0.01). The asthmatic athletes utilized 82 +/- 4% VO2max during the half-marathon, which was correlated with the %VO2max at 2 mmol l-1 blood lactate (r = 0.817, P less than 0.01). The results of this study suggest that athletes with mild to moderate asthma can possess high VO2max values and can develop a high degree of endurance fitness, as defined by their ability to sustain a high percentage of VO2max over an endurance race. In athletes with more severe airflow obstruction, the maximum ventilation rate may be reduced and so VO2max may be impaired. The athletes in the present study have adapted to this limitation by being able to sustain a higher %VO2max before the accumulation of blood lactate, which is an advantage during an endurance race. Therefore, with appropriate training and medication, asthmatics can successfully participate in endurance running at a competitive level.

  7. Changes in running mechanics and spring-mass behavior induced by a mountain ultra-marathon race.

    PubMed

    Morin, J B; Tomazin, K; Edouard, P; Millet, G Y

    2011-04-07

    Changes in running mechanics and spring-mass behavior due to fatigue induced by a mountain ultra-marathon race (MUM, 166km, total positive and negative elevation of 9500m) were studied in 18 ultra-marathon runners. Mechanical measurements were undertaken pre- and 3h post-MUM at 12km h(-1) on a 7m long pressure walkway: contact (t(c)), aerial (t(a)) times, step frequency (f), and running velocity (v) were sampled and averaged over 5-8 steps. From these variables, spring-mass parameters of peak vertical ground reaction force (F(max)), vertical downward displacement of the center of mass (Δz), leg length change (ΔL), vertical (k(vert)) and leg (k(leg)) stiffness were computed. After the MUM, there was a significant increase in f (5.9±5.5%; P<0.001) associated with reduced t(a) (-18.5±17.4%; P<0.001) with no change in t(c), and a significant decrease in both Δz and F(max) (-11.6±10.5 and -6.3±7.3%, respectively; P<0.001). k(vert) increased by 5.6±11.7% (P=0.053), and k(leg) remained unchanged. These results show that 3h post-MUM, subjects ran with a reduced vertical oscillation of their spring-mass system. This is consistent with (i) previous studies concerning muscular structure/function impairment in running and (ii) the hypothesis that these changes in the running pattern could be associated with lower overall impact (especially during the braking phase) supported by the locomotor system at each step, potentially leading to reduced pain during running. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Declines in marathon performance: Sex differences in elite and recreational athletes.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, Gerald S; Tomko, Kelly A; Smoliga, James M

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the age group at which marathon performance declines in top male and female runners and to compare that to the runners of average ability. Another aim of this of this study was to examine the age-related yearly decline in marathon performance between age group winners and the average marathon finisher. Data from the New York (NYC), Boston, and Chicago marathons from 2001-2016 were analyzed. Age, sex, and location were used in multiple linear regression models to determine the rate of decline in marathon times. Winners of each age group were assessed in 5-year increments from 16 through 74 years old (n = 47 per age group). The fastest times were between 25-34 years old, with overall champion males at 28.3 years old, and overall champion females at 30.8 years old (p = 0.004). At 35 years of age up to 74 years of age, female age group winners had a faster yearly decline in marathon finishing times compared to male age group winners, irrespective of marathon location [women = (min:sec) 2:33 per year, n = 336; men = 2:06 per year, n = 373, p < 0.01]. The median times between each age group only slowed beginning at 50 years old, thereafter the decline was similar between both men and women (women = 2:36, n = 140; men = 2:57, n = 150, p = 0.11). The median times were fastest at Boston and similar between Chicago and NYC. In conclusion, the rate of decline at 35 years old up to 74 years old is roughly linear (adjusted r2 = 0.88, p < 0.001) with female age group winners demonstrating 27 s per year greater decline per year compared to male age group winners.

  9. Declines in marathon performance: Sex differences in elite and recreational athletes

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Kelly A.; Smoliga, James M.

    2017-01-01

    The first aim of this study was to determine the age group at which marathon performance declines in top male and female runners and to compare that to the runners of average ability. Another aim of this of this study was to examine the age-related yearly decline in marathon performance between age group winners and the average marathon finisher. Data from the New York (NYC), Boston, and Chicago marathons from 2001–2016 were analyzed. Age, sex, and location were used in multiple linear regression models to determine the rate of decline in marathon times. Winners of each age group were assessed in 5-year increments from 16 through 74 years old (n = 47 per age group). The fastest times were between 25–34 years old, with overall champion males at 28.3 years old, and overall champion females at 30.8 years old (p = 0.004). At 35 years of age up to 74 years of age, female age group winners had a faster yearly decline in marathon finishing times compared to male age group winners, irrespective of marathon location [women = (min:sec) 2:33 per year, n = 336; men = 2:06 per year, n = 373, p < 0.01]. The median times between each age group only slowed beginning at 50 years old, thereafter the decline was similar between both men and women (women = 2:36, n = 140; men = 2:57, n = 150, p = 0.11). The median times were fastest at Boston and similar between Chicago and NYC. In conclusion, the rate of decline at 35 years old up to 74 years old is roughly linear (adjusted r2 = 0.88, p < 0.001) with female age group winners demonstrating 27 s per year greater decline per year compared to male age group winners. PMID:28187185

  10. Age and ultra-marathon performance - 50 to 1,000 km distances from 1969 - 2012.

    PubMed

    Romer, Tobias; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2014-01-01

    We investigated age and performance in distance-limited ultra-marathons held from 50 km to 1,000 km. Age of peak running speed and running speed of the fastest competitors from 1969 to 2012 in 50 km, 100 km, 200 km and 1,000 km ultra-marathons were analyzed using analysis of variance and multi-level regression analyses. The ages of the ten fastest women ever were 40 ± 4 yrs (50 km), 34 ± 7 yrs (100 km), 42 ± 6 yrs (200 km), and 41 ± 5 yrs (1,000 km). The ages were significantly different between 100 km and 200 km and between 100 km and 1,000 km. For men, the ages of the ten fastest ever were 34 ± 6 yrs (50 km), 32 ± 4 yrs (100 km), 44 ± 4 yrs (200 km), and 47 ± 9 yrs (1,000 km). The ages were significantly younger in 50 km compared to 100 km and 200 km and also significantly younger in 100 km compared to 200 km and 1,000 km. The age of the annual ten fastest women decreased in 50 km from 39 ± 8 yrs (1988) to 32 ± 4 yrs (2012) and in men from 35 ± 5 yrs (1977) to 33 ± 5 yrs (2012). In 100 km events, the age of peak running speed of the annual ten fastest women and men remained stable at 34.9 ± 3.2 and 34.5 ± 2.5 yrs, respectively. Peak running speed of top ten runners increased in 50 km and 100 km in women (10.6 ± 1.0 to 15.3 ± 0.7 km/h and 7.3 ± 1.5 to 13.0 ± 0.2 km/h, respectively) and men (14.3 ± 1.2 to 17.5 ± 0.6 km/h and 10.2 ± 1.2 to 15.1 ± 0.2 km/h, respectively). In 200 km and 1,000 km, running speed remained unchanged. In summary, the best male 1,000 km ultra-marathoners were ~15 yrs older than the best male 100 km ultra-marathoners and the best female 1,000 km ultra-marathoners were ~7 yrs older than the best female 100 km ultra-marathoners. The age of the fastest 50 km ultra-marathoners decreased across years whereas it remained unchanged in 100 km ultra-marathoners. These findings may help

  11. Marathon Running, Accreditation of Study Programmes and Professional Development in Consultancies: Are They All about the Same? A Cognitive Perspective on Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Three challenges are presented which address problems of transfer of training: running marathon, accreditation of study programmes, professional development in consultancies. It is discussed in-how-far and why different approaches to transfer of training stress commonalities or differences between these challenges. The results are used to analyse…

  12. Physiological and Biomechanical Mechanisms of Distance Specific Human Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M A

    2017-08-01

    Running events range from 60-m sprints to ultra-marathons covering 100 miles or more, which presents an interesting diversity in terms of the parameters for successful performance. Here, we review the physiological and biomechanical variations underlying elite human running performance in sprint to ultramarathon distances. Maximal running speeds observed in sprint disciplines are achieved by high vertical ground reaction forces applied over short contact times. To create this high force output, sprint events rely heavily on anaerobic metabolism, as well as a high number and large cross-sectional area of type II fibers in the leg muscles. Middle distance running performance is characterized by intermediates of biomechanical and physiological parameters, with the possibility of unique combinations of each leading to high-level performance. The relatively fast velocities in mid-distance events require a high mechanical power output, though ground reaction forces are less than in sprinting. Elite mid-distance runners exhibit local muscle adaptations that, along with a large anaerobic capacity, provide the ability to generate a high power output. Aerobic capacity starts to become an important aspect of performance in middle distance events, especially as distance increases. In distance running events, V˙O2max is an important determinant of performance, but is relatively homogeneous in elite runners. V˙O2 and velocity at lactate threshold have been shown to be superior predictors of elite distance running performance. Ultramarathons are relatively new running events, as such, less is known about physiological and biomechanical parameters that underlie ultra-marathon performance. However, it is clear that performance in these events is related to aerobic capacity, fuel utilization, and fatigue resistance. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in

  13. Comparison between recreational male Ironman triathletes and marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Gianoli, Daniele; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Recent investigations described a personal best marathon time as a predictor variable for an Ironman race time in recreational male Ironman triathletes. Similarities and differences in anthropometry and training were investigated between 83 recreational male Ironman triathletes and 81 recreational male marathoners. Ironman triathletes were significantly taller and had a higher body mass and a higher skin-fold thickness of the calf compared to the marathoners. Weekly training volume in hours was higher in Ironman triathletes. In the Ironman triathletes, percent body fat was related to overall race time and both the split time in cycling and running. The weekly swim kilometres were related to the split time in swimming, and the speed in cycling was related to the bike split time. For the marathoners, the calf skin-fold thickness and running speed during training were related to marathon race time. Although personal best marathon time was a predictor of Ironman race time in male triathletes, anthropometric and training characteristics of male marathoners were different from those of male Ironman triathletes, probably due to training of different muscle groups and metabolic endurance beyond marathon running, as the triathletes are also training for high-level performance in swimming and cycling. Future studies should compare Olympic distance triathletes and road cyclists with Ironman triathletes.

  14. Rate of cardiac arrhythmias and silent brain lesions in experienced marathon runners: rationale, design and baseline data of the Berlin Beat of Running study.

    PubMed

    Haeusler, Karl Georg; Herm, Juliane; Kunze, Claudia; Krüll, Matthias; Brechtel, Lars; Lock, Jürgen; Hohenhaus, Marc; Heuschmann, Peter U; Fiebach, Jochen B; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Endres, Matthias; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan

    2012-08-31

    Regular exercise is beneficial for cardiovascular health but a recent meta-analysis indicated a relationship between extensive endurance sport and a higher risk of atrial fibrillation, an independent risk factor for stroke. However, data on the frequency of cardiac arrhythmias or (clinically silent) brain lesions during and after marathon running are missing. In the prospective observational "Berlin Beat of Running" study experienced endurance athletes underwent clinical examination (CE), 3 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), carotid ultrasound imaging (CUI) and serial blood sampling (BS) within 2-3 days prior (CE, MRI, CUI, BS), directly after (CE, BS) and within 2 days after (CE, MRI, BS) the 38th BMW BERLIN-MARATHON 2011. All participants wore a portable electrocardiogram (ECG)-recorder throughout the 4 to 5 days baseline study period. Participants with pathological MRI findings after the marathon, troponin elevations or detected cardiac arrhythmias will be asked to undergo cardiac MRI to rule out structural abnormalities. A follow-up is scheduled after one year. Here we report the baseline data of the enrolled 110 athletes aged 36-61 years. Their mean age was 48.8 ± 6.0 years, 24.5% were female, 8.2% had hypertension and 2.7% had hyperlipidaemia. Participants have attended a mean of 7.5 ± 6.6 marathon races within the last 5 years and a mean of 16 ± 36 marathon races in total. Their weekly running distance prior to the 38th BMW BERLIN-MARATHON was 65 ± 17 km. Finally, 108 (98.2%) Berlin Beat-Study participants successfully completed the 38th BMW BERLIN-MARATHON 2011. Findings from the "Berlin Beats of Running" study will help to balance the benefits and risks of extensive endurance sport. ECG-recording during the marathon might contribute to identify athletes at risk for cardiovascular events. MRI results will give new insights into the link between physical stress and brain damage. clinicaltrials.gov NCT01428778.

  15. Damage to Liver and Skeletal Muscles in Marathon Runners During a 100 km Run With Regard to Age and Running Speed

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzębski, Zbigniew; Żychowska, Małgorzata; Radzimiński, Łukasz; Konieczna, Anna; Kortas, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) whether damage to liver and skeletal muscles occurs during a 100 km run; (2) whether the metabolic response to extreme exertion is related to the age or running speed of the participant; (3) whether it is possible to determine the optimal running speed and distance for long-distance runners’ health by examining biochemical parameters in venous blood. Fourteen experienced male amateur ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age groups, took part in a 100 km run. Blood samples for liver and skeletal muscle damage indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25, 50, 75 and 100 km, and 24 hours after termination of the run. A considerable increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was observed with the distance covered (p < 0.05), which continued during recovery. An increase in the mean values of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p < 0.05) was observed with each sequential course. The biggest differences between the age groups were found for the activity of liver enzymes and LDH after completing 75 km as well as after 24 hours of recovery. It can be concluded that the response to extreme exertion deteriorates with age in terms of the active movement apparatus. PMID:25964813

  16. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  17. The effects of prolonged running on foot posture: a repeated measures study of half marathon runners using the foot posture index and navicular height

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Different foot postures are associated with alterations in foot function, kinetics and the subsequent occurrence of injury. Little is known about changes in foot posture following prolonged weightbearing exercise. This study aimed to identify changes in foot posture after running a half marathon. Methods Foot posture was measured using the Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) and navicular height in thirty volunteer participants before and after running a half marathon. FPI-6 scores were converted to Rasch logit values and means compared for these and navicular height using an ANOVA. Results There was a 5 mm drop in navicular height in both feet when measured after the half marathon (P < 0.05). The FPI-6 showed a side x time interaction with an increase in score indicating a more ‘pronated’ position in the left foot of + 2 [Rasch value + 1.7] but no change in the right foot (+ 0.4 [+ 0.76]) following the half marathon. Conclusion The apparent differences between the FPI-6 and navicular height on the right foot may be because the FPI-6 takes soft tissue contour changes into consideration whilst the navicular height focuses on skeletal changes. The changes in foot posture towards a more pronated position may have implications for foot function, and therefore risk of injury; shoe fit and comfort and also the effect of therapeutic orthoses worn during prolonged running. PMID:23705863

  18. Mean platelet volume (MPV) predicts middle distance running performance.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Skafidas, Spyros; Tarperi, Cantor; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Running economy and performance in middle distance running depend on several physiological factors, which include anthropometric variables, functional characteristics, training volume and intensity. Since little information is available about hematological predictors of middle distance running time, we investigated whether some hematological parameters may be associated with middle distance running performance in a large sample of recreational runners. The study population consisted in 43 amateur runners (15 females, 28 males; median age 47 years), who successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75-85% of their maximal aerobic power (VO2max). Whole blood was collected 10 min before the run started and immediately thereafter, and hematological testing was completed within 2 hours after sample collection. The values of lymphocytes and eosinophils exhibited a significant decrease compared to pre-run values, whereas those of mean corpuscular volume (MCV), platelets, mean platelet volume (MPV), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils and monocytes were significantly increased after the run. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running time were found for pre-run values of hematocrit, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), MPV, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (RetCHR), and post-run values of MCH, RDW, MPV, monocytes and RetCHR. In multivariate analysis, in which running time was entered as dependent variable whereas age, sex, blood lactate, body mass index, VO2max, mean training regimen and the hematological parameters significantly associated with running performance in univariate analysis were entered as independent variables, only MPV values before and after the trial remained significantly associated with running time. After adjustment for platelet count, the MPV value before the run (p = 0.042), but not thereafter (p = 0.247), remained significantly associated with running

  19. Running away with health: the urban marathon and the construction of 'charitable bodies'.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Sarah; Hardey, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The increase in fundraising through mass-participation running events is emblematic of a series of issues pertinent to contemporary conceptualizations of health and illness. This increasingly popular spectacle serves as an indicator of present-day social relationships and broader cultural and ideological values that pertain to health. It highlights contemporary discourses on citizenship; 'active citizens' can ostentatiously fulfil their rights and responsibilities by raising money for those 'in need'. Involvement in such events comprises an example of the current trend for drawing attention to illness, and sharing one's experiences with others. We examine these issues through a consideration of charity advertisements and offer a fourfold typology of runners in terms of their orientations to both mass-participation running and charity. We conclude that 'charitable bodies' are constructed out of the interrelationships between philanthropic institutions, sport and individual performance.

  20. Rate of cardiac arrhythmias and silent brain lesions in experienced marathon runners: rationale, design and baseline data of the Berlin Beat of Running study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regular exercise is beneficial for cardiovascular health but a recent meta-analysis indicated a relationship between extensive endurance sport and a higher risk of atrial fibrillation, an independent risk factor for stroke. However, data on the frequency of cardiac arrhythmias or (clinically silent) brain lesions during and after marathon running are missing. Methods/ Design In the prospective observational “Berlin Beat of Running” study experienced endurance athletes underwent clinical examination (CE), 3 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), carotid ultrasound imaging (CUI) and serial blood sampling (BS) within 2-3 days prior (CE, MRI, CUI, BS), directly after (CE, BS) and within 2 days after (CE, MRI, BS) the 38th BMW BERLIN-MARATHON 2011. All participants wore a portable electrocardiogram (ECG)-recorder throughout the 4 to 5 days baseline study period. Participants with pathological MRI findings after the marathon, troponin elevations or detected cardiac arrhythmias will be asked to undergo cardiac MRI to rule out structural abnormalities. A follow-up is scheduled after one year. Results Here we report the baseline data of the enrolled 110 athletes aged 36-61 years. Their mean age was 48.8 ± 6.0 years, 24.5% were female, 8.2% had hypertension and 2.7% had hyperlipidaemia. Participants have attended a mean of 7.5 ± 6.6 marathon races within the last 5 years and a mean of 16 ± 36 marathon races in total. Their weekly running distance prior to the 38th BMW BERLIN-MARATHON was 65 ± 17 km. Finally, 108 (98.2%) Berlin Beat-Study participants successfully completed the 38th BMW BERLIN-MARATHON 2011. Discussion Findings from the “Berlin Beats of Running” study will help to balance the benefits and risks of extensive endurance sport. ECG-recording during the marathon might contribute to identify athletes at risk for cardiovascular events. MRI results will give new insights into the link between physical stress

  1. Risk factors for lower extremity injuries among half marathon and marathon runners of the Lage Landen Marathon Eindhoven 2012: A prospective cohort study in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Poppel, D; de Koning, J; Verhagen, A P; Scholten-Peeters, G G M

    2016-02-01

    To determine risk factors for running injuries during the Lage Landen Marathon Eindhoven 2012. Prospective cohort study. Population-based study. This study included 943 runners. Running injuries after the Lage Landen Marathon. Sociodemographic and training-related factors as well as lifestyle factors were considered as potential risk factors and assessed in a questionnaire 1 month before the running event. The association between potential risk factors and injuries was determined, per running distance separately, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. In total, 154 respondents sustained a running injury. Among the marathon runners, in the univariate model, body mass index ≥ 26 kg/m(2), ≤ 5 years of running experience, and often performing interval training, were significantly associated with running injuries, whereas in the multivariate model only ≤ 5 years of running experience and not performing interval training on a regular basis were significantly associated with running injuries. Among marathon runners, no multivariate model could be created because of the low number of injuries and participants. This study indicates that interval training on a regular basis may be recommended to marathon runners to reduce the risk of injury. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Plasma lactate accumulation and distance running performance. 1979.

    PubMed

    Farrell, P A; Wilmore, J H; Coyle, E F; Billing, J E; Costill, D L

    1993-10-01

    Laboratory and field assessments were made on eighteen male distance runners. Performance data were obtained for distances of 3.2, 9.7, 15, 19.3 km (n = 18) and the marathon (n = 13). Muscle fiber composition expressed as percent of slow twitch fibers (%ST), maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), running economy (VO2 for a treadmill velocity of 268 m/min), and the VO2 and treadmill velocity corresponding to the onset of plasma lactate accumulation (OPLA) were determined for each subject. %ST (R > or equal to .47), VO2max (r > or equal to .83), running economy (r > or equal to .49), VO2 in ml/kg min corresponding to the OPLA (r > or equal to .91) and the treadmill velocity corresponding to OPLA (r > or equal to .91) were significantly (p < .05) related to performance at all distances. Multiple regression analysis showed that the treadmill velocity corresponding to the OPLA was most closely related to performance and the addition of other factors did not significantly raise the multiple R values suggesting that these other variables may interact with the purpose of keeping plasma lactates low during distance races. The slowest and fastest marathoners ran their marathons 7 and 3 m/min faster than their treadmill velocities corresponding to their OPLA which indicates that this relationship is independent of the competitive level of the runner. Runners appear to set a race pace which allows the utilization of the largest possible VO2 which just avoids the exponential rise in plasma lactate.

  3. Physiological intensity profile, exercise load and performance predictors of a 65-km mountain ultra-marathon.

    PubMed

    Fornasiero, Alessandro; Savoldelli, Aldo; Fruet, Damiano; Boccia, Gennaro; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico

    2018-06-01

    The aims of the study were to describe the physiological profile of a 65-km (4000-m cumulative elevation gain) running mountain ultra-marathon (MUM) and to identify predictors of MUM performance. Twenty-three amateur trail-runners performed anthropometric evaluations and an uphill graded exercise test (GXT) for VO 2max, ventilatory thresholds (VTs), power outputs (PMax, PVTs) and heart rate response (HRmax, HR@VTs). Heart rate (HR) was monitored during the race and intensity was expressed as: Zone I (VT2) for exercise load calculation (training impulse, TRIMP). Mean race intensity was 77.1%±4.4% of HRmax distributed as: 85.7%±19.4% Zone I, 13.9%±18.6% Zone II, 0.4%±0.9% Zone III. Exercise load was 766±110 TRIMP units. Race time (11.8±1.6h) was negatively correlated with VO 2max (r = -0.66, P <0.001) and PMax (r = -0.73, P <0.001), resulting these variables determinant in predicting MUM performance, whereas exercise thresholds did not improve performance prediction. Laboratory variables explained only 59% of race time variance, underlining the multi-factorial character of MUM performance. Our results support the idea that VT1 represents a boundary of tolerable intensity in this kind of events, where exercise load is extremely high. This information can be helpful in identifying optimal pacing strategies to complete such extremely demanding MUMs.

  4. Participation and performance trends in multistage ultramarathons—the ‘Marathon des Sables’ 2003–2012

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate participation and performance changes in the multistage ultramarathon ‘Marathon des Sables’ from 2003 to 2012. Methods Participation and performance trends in the four- or six-stage running event covering approximately 250 km were analyzed with special emphasis on the nationality and age of the athletes. The relations between gender, age, and nationality of finishers and performance were investigated using regression analyses and analysis of variance. Results Between 2003 and 2012, a number of 7,275 athletes with 938 women (12.9%) and 6,337 men (87.1%) finished the Marathon des Sables. The finisher rate in both women (r2 = 0.62) and men (r2 = 0.60) increased across years (p < 0.01). Men were significantly (p < 0.01) faster than women for overall finishers (5.9 ± 1.6 km·h−1 versus 5.1 ± 1.3 km·h−1) and for the top three finishers (12.2 ± 0.4 km·h−1 versus 8.3 ± 0.6 km·h−1). The gender difference in running speed of the top three athletes decreased (r2 = 0.72; p < 0.01) from 39.5% in 2003 to 24.1% in 2012 with a mean gender difference of 31.7 ± 2.0%. In men, Moroccans won nine of ten competitions, and one edition was won by a Jordanian athlete. In women, eight races were won by Europeans (France five, Luxembourg two, and Spain one, respectively), and two events were won by Moroccan runners. Conclusions The finisher rate in the Marathon des Sables increased this last decade. Men were significantly faster than women with a higher gender difference in performance compared to previous reports. Social or cultural inhibitions may determine the outcome in this event. Future studies need to investigate participation trends regarding nationalities and socioeconomic background, as well as the motivation to compete in ultramarathons. PMID:23849138

  5. Glasgow marathons 1982-1987. A review of medical problems.

    PubMed

    Ridley, S A; Rogers, P N; Wright, I H

    1990-02-01

    The race statistics, whether conditions and incidence of medical problems for the six consecutive years of the Glasgow Marathon are reviewed. The results suggest that the popularity of marathon running is declining but that the competitors are becoming more experienced, seeking medical assistance earlier and, as a result, experiencing fewer and less serious problems at the finish. The effect of weather conditions on the runners' performance is discussed.

  6. A faster running speed is associated with a greater body weight loss in 100-km ultra-marathoners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Wirth, Andrea; Alexander Rüst, Christoph; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In 219 recreational male runners, we investigated changes in body mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma sodium concentration ([Na(+)]), and urine specific gravity as well as fluid intake during a 100-km ultra-marathon. The athletes lost 1.9 kg (s = 1.4) of body mass, equal to 2.5% (s = 1.8) of body mass (P < 0.001), 0.7 kg (s = 1.0) of predicted skeletal muscle mass (P < 0.001), 0.2 kg (s = 1.3) of predicted fat mass (P < 0.05), and 0.9 L (s = 1.6) of predicted total body water (P < 0.001). Haematocrit decreased (P < 0.001), urine specific gravity (P < 0.001), plasma volume (P < 0.05), and plasma [Na(+)] (P < 0.05) all increased. Change in body mass was related to running speed (r = -0.16, P < 0.05), change in plasma volume was associated with change in plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.28, P < 0.0001), and change in body mass was related to both change in plasma [Na(+)] (r = -0.36) and change in plasma volume (r = 0.31) (P < 0.0001). The athletes consumed 0.65 L (s = 0.27) fluid per hour. Fluid intake was related to both running speed (r = 0.42, P < 0.0001) and change in body mass (r = 0.23, P = 0.0006), but not post-race plasma [Na(+)] or change in plasma [Na(+)] (P > 0.05). In conclusion, faster runners lost more body mass, runners lost more body mass when they drank less fluid, and faster runners drank more fluid than slower runners.

  7. Nutrition behaviors, perceptions, and beliefs of recent marathon finishers.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patrick B

    2016-09-01

    To describe the nutrition behaviors, perceptions, and beliefs of marathoners. A survey-based study was conducted with 422 recent marathon finishers (199 men, 223 women). Participants reported their running background, demographics, diets followed, supplements used, and food/fluid intake during their most recent marathon (median 7 days prior), as well as beliefs about hydration, fueling, and sources of nutrition information. Median finishing times were 3:53 (3:26-4:35) and 4:25 (3:50-4:59) h:min for men and women during their most recent marathon. Most participants (66.1%) reported typically following a moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-fat diet, while 66.4% carbohydrate-loaded prior to their most recent marathon. Among 139 participants following a specific diet over the past year, the most common were vegetarian/vegan/pescatarian (n = 39), Paleolithic (n = 16), gluten-free (n = 15), and low-carbohydrate (n = 12). Roughly 35% of participants took a supplement intended to improve running performance over the past month. Women were more likely to follow specific diets (39.0% vs. 26.1%), while men were more likely to recently use performance-enhancing supplements (40.2% vs. 30.0%). Most participants (68.3%) indicated they were likely or very likely to rely on a structured plan to determine fluid intake, and 75% were confident in their ability to hydrate. At least 35.6% of participants thought they could improve marathon performance by 8% or more with nutrition interventions. Scientific journals ranked as the most reliable source of nutrition information, while running coaches ranked as the most likely source to be utilized. Findings from this investigation, such as diets and supplements utilized by marathoners, can be used by practitioners and researchers alike to improve the dissemination of scientifically-based information on nutrition and marathon running.

  8. Marathon Kids UK: study design and protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of a school-based running programme

    PubMed Central

    Routen, Ash C; Harris, Jo P; Cale, Lorraine A; Gorely, Trish; Sherar, Lauren B

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Schools are promising settings for physical activity promotion; however, they are complex and adaptive systems that can influence the quality of programme implementation. This paper presents an evaluation of a school-based running programme (Marathon Kids). The aims of this study are (1) to identify the processes by which schools implement the programme, (2) identify and explain the contextual factors affecting implementation and explications of effectiveness and (3) examine the relationship between the level of implementation and perceived outcomes. Methods Using a realist evaluation framework, a mixed method single-group before-and-after design, strengthened by multiple interim measurements, will be used. Year 5 (9–10 years old) pupils and their teachers will be recruited from six state-funded primary schools in Leicestershire, UK. Data will be collected once prior to implementation, at five discrete time points during implementation and twice following implementation. A weekly implementation log will also be used. At time point 1 (TP1) (September 2016), data on school environment, teacher and pupil characteristics will be collected. At TP1 and TP6 (July 2017), accelerometry, pupil self-reported physical activity and psychosocial data (eg, social support and intention to be active) will be collected. At TP2, TP3 and TP5 (January, March and June 2017), observations will be conducted. At TP2 and TP5, there will be teacher interviews and pupil focus groups. Follow-up teacher interviews will be conducted at TP7 and TP8 (October 2017 and March 2018) and pupil focus group at TP8. In addition, synthesised member checking will be conducted (June 2018) with a mixed sample of schools. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval for this study was obtained through Loughborough University Human Participants Ethics Subcommittee (R16-P032 & R16-P116). Findings will be disseminated via print, online media and dissemination events as well as practitioner and

  9. A comparison of anthropometric and training characteristics between recreational female marathoners and recreational female Ironman triathletes.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2013-02-28

    A personal best marathon time has been reported as a strong predictor variable for an Ironman race time in recreational female Ironman triathletes. This raises the question whether recreational female Ironman triathletes are similar to recreational female marathoners. We investigated similarities and differences in anthropometry and training between 53 recreational female Ironman triathletes and 46 recreational female marathoners. The association of anthropometric variables and training characteristics with race time was investigated using bi- and multi-variate analysis. The Ironman triathletes were younger (P < 0.01), had a lower skin-fold thickness at pectoral (P < 0.001), axillar (P < 0.01), and subscapular (P < 0.05) site, but a thicker skin-fold thickness at the calf site (P < 0.01) compared to the marathoners. Overall weekly training hours were higher in the Ironman triathletes (P < 0.001). The triathletes were running faster during training than the marathoners (P < 0.05). For the triathletes, neither an anthropometric nor a training variable showed an association with overall Ironman race time after bi-variate analysis. In the multi-variate analysis, running speed during training was related to marathon split time for the Ironman triathletes (P = 0.01) and to marathon race time for the marathoners (P = 0.01). To conclude, although personal best marathon time is a strong predictor variable for performance in recreational female Ironman triathletes, there are differences in both anthropometry and training between recreational female Ironman triathletes and recreational female marathoners and different predictor variables for race performance in these two groups of athletes. These findings suggest that recreational female Ironman triathletes are not comparable to recreational female marathoners regarding the association between anthropometric and training characteristics with race time.

  10. Marathon Kids UK: study design and protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of a school-based running programme.

    PubMed

    Chalkley, Anna E; Routen, Ash C; Harris, Jo P; Cale, Lorraine A; Gorely, Trish; Sherar, Lauren B

    2018-05-14

    Schools are promising settings for physical activity promotion; however, they are complex and adaptive systems that can influence the quality of programme implementation. This paper presents an evaluation of a school-based running programme (Marathon Kids). The aims of this study are (1) to identify the processes by which schools implement the programme, (2) identify and explain the contextual factors affecting implementation and explications of effectiveness and (3) examine the relationship between the level of implementation and perceived outcomes. Using a realist evaluation framework, a mixed method single-group before-and-after design, strengthened by multiple interim measurements, will be used. Year 5 (9-10 years old) pupils and their teachers will be recruited from six state-funded primary schools in Leicestershire, UK.Data will be collected once prior to implementation, at five discrete time points during implementation and twice following implementation. A weekly implementation log will also be used. At time point 1 (TP1) (September 2016), data on school environment, teacher and pupil characteristics will be collected. At TP1 and TP6 (July 2017), accelerometry, pupil self-reported physical activity and psychosocial data (eg, social support and intention to be active) will be collected. At TP2, TP3 and TP5 (January, March and June 2017), observations will be conducted. At TP2 and TP5, there will be teacher interviews and pupil focus groups. Follow-up teacher interviews will be conducted at TP7 and TP8 (October 2017 and March 2018) and pupil focus group at TP8. In addition, synthesised member checking will be conducted (June 2018) with a mixed sample of schools. Ethical approval for this study was obtained through Loughborough University Human Participants Ethics Subcommittee (R16-P032 & R16-P116). Findings will be disseminated via print, online media and dissemination events as well as practitioner and/or research journals. © Article author(s) (or their

  11. Non-professional marathon running: RAGE axis and ST2 family changes in relation to open-window effect, inflammation and renal function

    PubMed Central

    Bekos, Christine; Zimmermann, Matthias; Unger, Lukas; Janik, Stefan; Hacker, Philipp; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Koller, Michael; Fritz, Robert; Gäbler, Christian; Kessler, Mario; Nickl, Stefanie; Didcock, Jessica; Altmann, Patrick; Haider, Thomas; Roth, Georg; Klepetko, Walter; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Moser, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting data exist on the relevance of marathon (M) and half marathon (HM) running for health. The number of non-professional athletes finishing M and HM events is steadily growing. In order to investigate molecular changes occurring in amateur athletes, we enrolled 70 non-professional runners finishing a single M (34) or HM (36) event at baseline, the finish line and during recovery, and 30 controls. The measurement of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts, Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist, ST2 and cytokeratin 18 was combined with molecules measured during clinical routine. Results were analyzed in the light of blood cell analysis, lactate measurements, correction for changes in plasma volume and body composition assessments. There were intrinsic differences in body mass index, abdominal body fat percentage and training time between M and HM runners. C-reactive protein changes in M and HM runners. While soluble RAGE, AGEs and ST2 increased immediately after the race in HM runners, HMGB1 increased in HM and M after the race and declined to baseline after a recovery period. We give insights into the regulation of various molecules involved in physical stress reactions and their possible implications for the cardiovascular system or renal function. PMID:27653273

  12. A Performance Analysis of a Stand-Up Paddle Board Marathon Race.

    PubMed

    Schram, Ben L; Hing, Wayne A; Climstein, Mike; Furness, James W

    2017-06-01

    Stand-up paddle boarding (SUP) is a rapidly growing sport and recreational activity in which little scientific research exists. A review of the literature failed to identify a single article pertaining to the physiological demands of SUP competition. The purpose of this study was to conduct a performance analysis of a national-level SUP marathon race. Ten elite SUP athletes (6 male and 4 female athletes) were recruited from the Stand Up Paddle Surfing Association of Australia to have their race performance in the Australian Titles analyzed. Performance variables included SUP speed, course taken, and heart rate (HR), measured with a 15-Hz global positioning system unit. Results demonstrated that there was a variation in distance covered (13.3-13.9 km), peak speed (18.8-26.4 km·h), and only moderate correlations (r = 0.38) of race result to distance covered. Significantly greater amounts of time were spent in the 5- to 10-km·h speed zones (p ≤ 0.05) during the race. Peak HR varied from 168 to 208 b·min among the competitors with the average HR being 168.6 ± 9.8 b·min. Significantly higher durations were spent in elevated HR zones (p ≤ 0.05) with participants spending 89.3% of their race within 80-100% of their age-predicted HRmax. Marathon SUP races seem to involve a high aerobic demand, with maintenance of near-maximal HRs required for the duration of the race. There is a high influence of tactical decisions and extrinsic variables to race results. These results provide a greater understanding of the physiological demands of distance events and may assist in the development of specialized training programs for SUP athletes.

  13. Marathon Month Promotes Healthful Lifestyles for Extension Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Joseph L.; Bell, Beth A.; Toman, John J.; Hastings, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    This article describes Marathon Month, a workplace wellness program for Extension employees. The program promoted physical activity by challenging employees to walk or run the length of a marathon (26.2 mi) or half marathon (13.1 mi) over the course of 1 month. Of the 317 participants, 90% achieved a self-set goal of completing a full or half…

  14. The Middle-Aged Marathon Runner

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Anthony S.

    1982-01-01

    Middle-aged runners form an appreciable number of those engaged in marathon running. They tend to have above average intelligence, high socioeconomic status, and better levels of aerobic fitness than sedentary members of the same age group. “Too much too soon” is the commonest cause of injury. Training before a marathon should last 18 months to two years. Middle-aged runners tend to experience fewer injuries than other marathoners. However, relatively minor complaints will be disastrous to them if they have to stop running. Injuries can occur from lack of warm up exercises, environmental factors such as weather, poor street lighting, carbon monoxide from car exhausts, etc. Some contraindications to marathon running are: poorly controlled diabetes, recent acute pulmonary disease, active rheumatoid arthritis, and recent cardiac conditions. Finishing a marathon involves both agony and ecstasy. PMID:21286102

  15. Comparison of anthropometric and training characteristics between recreational male marathoners and 24-hour ultramarathoners.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Of the anthropometry and training variables used to predict race performance in a 24-hour ultrarun, the personal best marathon time is the strongest predictor in recreational male 24-hour ultramarathoners. This finding raises the question of whether similarities exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners. The association between age, anthropometric variables (ie, body mass, body height, body mass index, percent body fat, skeletal muscle mass, limb circumference, and skinfold thickness at the pectoral, mid axillary, triceps, subscapular, abdominal, suprailiac, front thigh, and medial calf sites), previous experience and training characteristics (ie, volume, speed, and personal best time), and race time for 79 male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and 126 male recreational marathoners was investigated using bivariate and multivariate analysis. The 24-hour ultramarathoners were older (P < 0.05), had a lower circumference at both the upper arm (P < 0.05) and thigh (P < 0.01), and a lower skinfold thickness at the pectoral, axillary, and suprailiac sites (P < 0.05) compared with the marathoners. During training, the 24-hour ultramarathoners were running for more hours per week (P < 0.001) and completed more kilometers (P < 0.001), but were running slower (P < 0.01) compared with the marathoners. In the 24-hour ultramarathoners, neither anthropometric nor training variables were associated with kilometers completed in the race (P > 0.05). In the marathoners, percent body fat (P < 0.001) and running speed during training (P < 0.0001) were related to marathon race times. In summary, differences in anthropometric and training predictor variables do exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners for race performance.

  16. Comparison of anthropometric and training characteristics between recreational male marathoners and 24-hour ultramarathoners

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Of the anthropometry and training variables used to predict race performance in a 24-hour ultrarun, the personal best marathon time is the strongest predictor in recreational male 24-hour ultramarathoners. This finding raises the question of whether similarities exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners. Methods The association between age, anthropometric variables (ie, body mass, body height, body mass index, percent body fat, skeletal muscle mass, limb circumference, and skinfold thickness at the pectoral, mid axillary, triceps, subscapular, abdominal, suprailiac, front thigh, and medial calf sites), previous experience and training characteristics (ie, volume, speed, and personal best time), and race time for 79 male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and 126 male recreational marathoners was investigated using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Results The 24-hour ultramarathoners were older (P < 0.05), had a lower circumference at both the upper arm (P < 0.05) and thigh (P < 0.01), and a lower skinfold thickness at the pectoral, axillary, and suprailiac sites (P < 0.05) compared with the marathoners. During training, the 24-hour ultramarathoners were running for more hours per week (P < 0.001) and completed more kilometers (P < 0.001), but were running slower (P < 0.01) compared with the marathoners. In the 24-hour ultramarathoners, neither anthropometric nor training variables were associated with kilometers completed in the race (P > 0.05). In the marathoners, percent body fat (P < 0.001) and running speed during training (P < 0.0001) were related to marathon race times. Conclusion In summary, differences in anthropometric and training predictor variables do exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners for race performance. PMID:24198595

  17. Sex differences in association of race performance, skin-fold thicknesses, and training variables for recreational half-marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Senn, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between selected skin-fold thicknesses and training variables with a half-marathon race time, for both male and female recreational runners, using bi- and multivariate analysis. In 52 men, two skin-fold thicknesses (abdominal and calf) were significantly and positively correlated with race time; whereas in 15 women, five (pectoral, mid-axilla, subscapular, abdominal, and suprailiac) showed positive and significant relations with total race time. In men, the mean weekly running distance, minimum distance run per week, maximum distance run per week, mean weekly hours of running, number of running training sessions per week, and mean speed of the training sessions were significantly and negatively related to total race time, but not in women. Interaction analyses suggested that race time was more strongly associated with anthropometry in women than men. Race time for the women was independently associated with the sum of eight skin-folds; but for the men, only the mean speed during training sessions was independently associated. Skin-fold thicknesses and training variables in these groups were differently related to race time according to their sex.

  18. Mental Fatigue Impairs Intermittent Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mitchell R; Marcora, Samuele M; Coutts, Aaron J

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of mental fatigue on intermittent running performance. Ten male intermittent team sports players performed two identical self-paced, intermittent running protocols. The two trials were separated by 7 d and preceded, in a randomized-counterbalanced order, by 90 min of either emotionally neutral documentaries (control) or the AX-continuous performance test (AX-CPT; mental fatigue). Subjective ratings of fatigue and vigor were measured before and after these treatments, and motivation was recorded before the intermittent running protocol. Velocity, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood glucose and lactate concentrations, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured throughout the 45-min intermittent running protocol. Session RPE was recorded 30 min after the intermittent running protocol. Subjective ratings of fatigue were higher after the AX-CPT (P = 0.005). This mental fatigue significantly reduced velocity at low intensities (1.28 ± 0.18 m·s vs 1.31 ± 0.17 m·s; P = 0.037), whereas high-intensity running and peak velocities were not significantly affected. Running velocity at all intensities significantly declined over time in both conditions (P < 0.001). Oxygen consumption was significantly lower in the mental fatigue condition (P = 0.007). Other physiological variables, vigor and motivation, were not significantly affected. Ratings of perceived exertion during the intermittent running protocol were not significantly different between conditions despite lower overall velocity in the mental fatigue condition. Session RPE was significantly higher in the mental fatigue condition (P = 0.013). Mental fatigue impairs intermittent running performance. This negative effect of mental fatigue seems to be mediated by higher perception of effort.

  19. Prediction of half-marathon race time in recreational female and male runners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Barandun, Ursula; Knechtle, Patrizia; Zingg, Matthias A; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Half-marathon running is of high popularity. Recent studies tried to find predictor variables for half-marathon race time for recreational female and male runners and to present equations to predict race time. The actual equations included running speed during training for both women and men as training variable but midaxillary skinfold for women and body mass index for men as anthropometric variable. An actual study found that percent body fat and running speed during training sessions were the best predictor variables for half-marathon race times in both women and men. The aim of the present study was to improve the existing equations to predict half-marathon race time in a larger sample of male and female half-marathoners by using percent body fat and running speed during training sessions as predictor variables. In a sample of 147 men and 83 women, multiple linear regression analysis including percent body fat and running speed during training units as independent variables and race time as dependent variable were performed and an equation was evolved to predict half-marathon race time. For men, half-marathon race time might be predicted by the equation (r(2) = 0.42, adjusted r(2) = 0.41, SE = 13.3) half-marathon race time (min) = 142.7 + 1.158 × percent body fat (%) - 5.223 × running speed during training (km/h). The predicted race time correlated highly significantly (r = 0.71, p < 0.0001) to the achieved race time. For women, half-marathon race time might be predicted by the equation (r(2) = 0.68, adjusted r(2) = 0.68, SE = 9.8) race time (min) = 168.7 + 1.077 × percent body fat (%) - 7.556 × running speed during training (km/h). The predicted race time correlated highly significantly (r = 0.89, p < 0.0001) to the achieved race time. The coefficients of determination of the models were slightly higher than for the existing equations. Future studies might include physiological

  20. The baseline serum value of α-amylase is a significant predictor of distance running performance.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Tarperi, Cantor; La Torre, Antonio; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2015-02-01

    This study was planned to investigate whether serum α-amylase concentration may be associated with running performance, physiological characteristics and other clinical chemistry analytes in a large sample of recreational athletes undergoing distance running. Forty-three amateur runners successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75%-85% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Blood was drawn during warm up and 15 min after conclusion of the run. After correction for body weight change, significant post-run increases were observed for serum values of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, creatine kinase (CK), iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), triglycerides, urea and uric acid, whereas the values of body weight, glomerular filtration rate, total and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol were significantly decreased. The concentration of serum α-amylase was unchanged. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running performance were found for gender, VO2max, training regimen and pre-run serum values of α-amylase, CK, glucose, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, LDH, urea and uric acid. In multivariate analysis, only VO2max (p=0.042) and baseline α-amylase (p=0.021) remained significant predictors of running performance. The combination of these two variables predicted 71% of variance in running performance. The baseline concentration of serum α-amylase was positively correlated with variation of serum glucose during the trial (r=0.345; p=0.025) and negatively with capillary blood lactate at the end of the run (r=-0.352; p=0.021). We showed that the baseline serum α-amylase concentration significantly and independently predicts distance running performance in recreational runners.

  1. A systematic review of the efficacy of ergogenic aids for improving running performance.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Matthew M; Astorino, Todd A

    2013-06-01

    Running is a common form of activity worldwide, and participants range from "weekend warriors" to Olympians. Unfortunately, few studies have examined efficacy of various ergogenic aids in runners because the majority of the literature consists of cycling-based protocols, which do not relate to running performance. The majority of running studies conducted markedly vary in regards to specific distance completed, subject fitness level, and effectiveness of the ergogenic aid examined. The aim of this article was to systematically examine the literature concerning utility of several ergogenic aids on middle-distance running (400-5,000 m) and long-distance running (10,000 meters marathon = 42.2 km) performance. In addition, this article highlights the dearth of running-specific studies in the literature and addresses recommendations for future research to optimize running performance through nutritional intervention. Results revealed 23 studies examining effects of various ergogenic aids on running performance, with a mean Physiotherapy Evidence Database score equal to 7.85 ± 0.70. Of these studies, 71% (n = 15) demonstrated improved running performance with ergogenic aid ingestion when compared with a placebo trial. The most effective ergogenic aids for distances from 400 m to 40 km included sodium bicarbonate (4 studies; 1.5 ± 1.1% improvement), sodium citrate (6 studies; 0.3 ± 1.7% improvement), caffeine (CAFF) (7 studies; 1.1 ± 0.4% improvement), and carbohydrate (CHO) (6 studies; 4.1 ± 4.4% improvement). Therefore, runners may benefit from ingestion of sodium bicarbonate to enhance middle distance performance and caffeine and carbohydrate to enhance performance at multiple distances.

  2. Frequency of exercise-induced ST-T-segment deviations and cardiac arrhythmias in recreational endurance athletes during a marathon race: results of the prospective observational Berlin Beat of Running study.

    PubMed

    Herm, Juliane; Töpper, Agnieszka; Wutzler, Alexander; Kunze, Claudia; Krüll, Matthias; Brechtel, Lars; Lock, Jürgen; Fiebach, Jochen B; Heuschmann, Peter U; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Endres, Matthias; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Haeusler, Karl Georg

    2017-08-03

    While regular physical exercise has many health benefits, strenuous physical exercise may have a negative impact on cardiac function. The 'Berlin Beat of Running' study focused on feasibility and diagnostic value of continuous ECG monitoring in recreational endurance athletes during a marathon race. We hypothesised that cardiac arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation are frequently found in a cohort of recreational endurance athletes. The main secondary hypothesis was that pathological laboratory findings in these athletes are (in part) associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Prospective observational cohort study including healthy volunteers. One hundred and nine experienced marathon runners wore a portable ECG recorder during a marathon race in Berlin, Germany. Athletes underwent blood tests 2-3 days prior, directly after and 1-2 days after the race. Overall, 108 athletes (median 48 years (IQR 45-53), 24% women) completed the marathon in 249±43 min. Blinded ECG analysis revealed abnormal findings during the marathon in 18 (16.8%) athletes. Ten (9.3%) athletes had at least one episode of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, one of whom had atrial fibrillation; eight (7.5%) individuals showed transient ST-T-segment deviations. Abnormal ECG findings were associated with advanced age (OR 1.11 per year, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.23), while sex and cardiovascular risk profile had no impact. Directly after the race, high-sensitive troponin T was elevated in 18 (16.7%) athletes and associated with ST-T-segment deviation (OR 9.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 51.5), while age, sex and cardiovascular risk profile had no impact. ECG monitoring during a marathon is feasible. Abnormal ECG findings were present in every sixth athlete. Exercise-induced transient ST-T-segment deviations were associated with elevated high-sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) values. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01428778; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  3. Whole beetroot consumption acutely improves running performance.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Margaret; Eliot, Katie; Heuertz, Rita M; Weiss, Edward

    2012-04-01

    Nitrate ingestion improves exercise performance; however, it has also been linked to adverse health effects, except when consumed in the form of vegetables. The purpose of this study was to determine, in a double-blind crossover study, whether whole beetroot consumption, as a means for increasing nitrate intake, improves endurance exercise performance. Eleven recreationally fit men and women were studied in a double-blind placebo controlled crossover trial performed in 2010. Participants underwent two 5-km treadmill time trials in random sequence, once 75 minutes after consuming baked beetroot (200 g with ≥500 mg nitrate) and once 75 minutes after consuming cranberry relish as a eucaloric placebo. Based on paired t tests, mean running velocity during the 5-km run tended to be faster after beetroot consumption (12.3±2.7 vs 11.9±2.6 km/hour; P=0.06). During the last 1.1 miles (1.8 km) of the 5-km run, running velocity was 5% faster (12.7±3.0 vs 12.1±2.8 km/hour; P=0.02) in the beetroot trial, with no differences in velocity (P≥0.25) in the earlier portions of the 5-km run. No differences in exercise heart rate were observed between trials; however, at 1.8 km into the 5-km run, rating of perceived exertion was lower with beetroot (13.0±2.1 vs 13.7±1.9; P=0.04). Consumption of nitrate-rich, whole beetroot improves running performance in healthy adults. Because whole vegetables have been shown to have health benefits, whereas nitrates from other sources may have detrimental health effects, it would be prudent for individuals seeking performance benefits to obtain nitrates from whole vegetables, such as beetroot. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictor variables for half marathon race time in recreational female runners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running performance has been investigated from 100 m to the marathon distance, except the half marathon distance. To investigate whether anthropometry characteristics or training practices were related to race time in 42 recreational female half marathoners to determine the predictor variables of half-marathon race time and to inform future novice female half marathoners. Observational field study at the 'Half Marathon Basel' in Switzerland. In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = 0.60), body mass index (r = 0.48), body fat (r = 0.56), skin-fold at pectoral (r = 0.61), mid-axilla (r = 0.69), triceps (r = 0.49), subscapular (r = 0.61), abdominal (r = 0.59), suprailiac (r = 0.55) medial calf (r = 0.53) site, and speed of the training sessions (r = -0.68) correlated to race time. Mid-axilla skin-fold (p = 0.04) and speed of the training sessions (p = 0.0001) remained significant after multi-variate analysis. Race time in a half marathon might be predicted by the following equation (r² = 0.71): Race time (min) = 166.7 + 1.7x (mid-axilla skin-fold, mm) - 6.4x (speed in training, km/h). Running speed during training was related to skinfold thickness at mid-axilla (r = -0.31), subscapular (r = -0.38), abdominal (r = -0.44), suprailiacal (r = -0.41), the sum of eight skin-folds (r = -0.36) and percent body fat (r = -0.31). Anthropometric and training variables were related to half-marathon race time in recreational female runners. Skin-fold thicknesses at various upper body locations were related to training intensity. High running speed in training appears to be important for fast half-marathon race times and may reduce upper body skin-fold thicknesses in recreational female half marathoners.

  5. Predictor variables for half marathon race time in recreational female runners

    PubMed Central

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running performance has been investigated from 100 m to the marathon distance, except the half marathon distance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether anthropometry characteristics or training practices were related to race time in 42 recreational female half marathoners to determine the predictor variables of half-marathon race time and to inform future novice female half marathoners. METHODS: Observational field study at the ‘Half Marathon Basel’ in Switzerland. RESULTS: In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = 0.60), body mass index (r = 0.48), body fat (r = 0.56), skin-fold at pectoral (r = 0.61), mid-axilla (r = 0.69), triceps (r = 0.49), subscapular (r = 0.61), abdominal (r = 0.59), suprailiac (r = 0.55) medial calf (r = 0.53) site, and speed of the training sessions (r = -0.68) correlated to race time. Mid-axilla skin-fold (p = 0.04) and speed of the training sessions (p = 0.0001) remained significant after multi-variate analysis. Race time in a half marathon might be predicted by the following equation (r2 = 0.71): Race time (min)  =  166.7 + 1.7x (mid-axilla skin-fold, mm) - 6.4x (speed in training, km/h). Running speed during training was related to skin-fold thickness at mid-axilla (r = -0.31), subscapular (r = -0.38), abdominal (r = -0.44), suprailiacal (r = -0.41), the sum of eight skin-folds (r = -0.36) and percent body fat (r = -0.31). CONCLUSION: Anthropometric and training variables were related to half-marathon race time in recreational female runners. Skin-fold thicknesses at various upper body locations were related to training intensity. High running speed in training appears to be important for fast half-marathon race times and may reduce upper body skin-fold thicknesses in recreational female half marathoners. PMID:21484048

  6. ALICE HLT Run 2 performance overview.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Lindenstruth, Volker; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    For the LHC Run 2 the ALICE HLT architecture was consolidated to comply with the upgraded ALICE detector readout technology. The software framework was optimized and extended to cope with the increased data load. Online calibration of the TPC using online tracking capabilities of the ALICE HLT was deployed. Offline calibration code was adapted to run both online and offline and the HLT framework was extended to support that. The performance of this schema is important for Run 3 related developments. An additional data transport approach was developed using the ZeroMQ library, forming at the same time a test bed for the new data flow model of the O2 system, where further development of this concept is ongoing. This messaging technology was used to implement the calibration feedback loop augmenting the existing, graph oriented HLT transport framework. Utilising the online reconstruction of many detectors, a new asynchronous monitoring scheme was developed to allow real-time monitoring of the physics performance of the ALICE detector, on top of the new messaging scheme for both internal and external communication. Spare computing resources comprising the production and development clusters are run as a tier-2 GRID site using an OpenStack-based setup. The development cluster is running continuously, the production cluster contributes resources opportunistically during periods of LHC inactivity.

  7. Did recent world record marathon runners employ optimal pacing strategies?

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    We apply statistical analysis of high frequency (1 km) split data for the most recent two world-record marathon runs: Run 1 (2:03:59, 28 September 2008) and Run 2 (2:03:38, 25 September 2011). Based on studies in the endurance cycling literature, we develop two principles to approximate 'optimal' pacing in the field marathon. By utilising GPS and weather data, we test, and then de-trend, for each athlete's field response to gradient and headwind on course, recovering standardised proxies for power-based pacing traces. The resultant traces were analysed to ascertain if either runner followed optimal pacing principles; and characterise any deviations from optimality. Whereas gradient was insignificant, headwind was a significant factor in running speed variability for both runners, with Runner 2 targeting the (optimal) parallel variation principle, whilst Runner 1 did not. After adjusting for these responses, neither runner followed the (optimal) 'even' power pacing principle, with Runner 2's macro-pacing strategy fitting a sinusoidal oscillator with exponentially expanding envelope whilst Runner 1 followed a U-shaped, quadratic form. The study suggests that: (a) better pacing strategy could provide elite marathon runners with an economical pathway to significant performance improvements at world-record level; and (b) the data and analysis herein is consistent with a complex-adaptive model of power regulation.

  8. The 100-mile run: preparation, performance, and recovery. A case report.

    PubMed

    Fred, H L

    1981-01-01

    This study analyzed the training methods and racing techniques of 12 athletes who have completed 100-mile runs. It showed that use of aspirin during the race can be dangerous if the run takes place in hot weather. No other consistent correlation was evident, however, between the variables examined and the finishing times. The findings suggest that an average marathoner can finish the 100-mile run without modifying his training program.

  9. Prevalence in running events and running performance of endurance runners following a vegetarian or vegan diet compared to non-vegetarian endurance runners: the NURMI Study.

    PubMed

    Wirnitzer, Katharina; Seyfart, Tom; Leitzmann, Claus; Keller, Markus; Wirnitzer, Gerold; Lechleitner, Christoph; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial and detrimental effects of various vegetarian and vegan diets on the health status are well known. Considering the growing background numbers of vegetarians and vegans, the number of vegetarian and vegan runners is likely to rise, too. Therefore, the Nutrition and Running High Mileage (NURMI) Study was designed as a comparative study to investigate the prevalence of omnivores, vegetarians, and vegans in running events and to detect potential differences in running performance comparing these three subgroups. The NURMI Study will be conducted in three steps following a cross-sectional design. Step 1 will determine epidemiological aspects of endurance runners (any distance) using a short standardized questionnaire. Step 2 will investigate dietary habits and running history from eligible participants (capable of running a half-marathon at least) using an extended standardized questionnaire. Step 3 will collect data after a running event on finishing time and final ranking as well as a post-race rating of perceived exertion, mood status, nutrient and fluid intake during the race. Our study will provide a major contribution to overcome the lack of data on the prevalence and running performance of vegetarian and vegan runners in endurance running events. We estimate the prevalence of vegetarians and vegans participating in a running event to be less compared to the respective proportion of vegetarians and vegans to the general population. Furthermore we will validate the subject's self-assessment of their respective diet. This comparative study may identify possible effects of dietary behavior on running performance und may detect possible differences between the respective subgroups: omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan runners. Trial registration Current controlled trials, ISRCTN73074080.

  10. Physiological and biological factors associated with a 24 h treadmill ultra-marathon performance.

    PubMed

    Millet, G Y; Banfi, J C; Kerherve, H; Morin, J B; Vincent, L; Estrade, C; Geyssant, A; Feasson, L

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the physiological and biological factors associated with ultra-endurance performance. Fourteen male runners volunteered to run on a treadmill as many kilometers as possible over a 24-h period (24TR). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), velocity associated with VO(2max)(VO(2max)) and running economy (RE) at 8 km/h were measured. A muscle biopsy was also performed in the vastus lateralis muscle. The subjects ran 149.2 ± 15.7 km in 18 h 39 ± 41 min of effective attendance on the treadmill, corresponding to 39.4 ± 4.2% of . Standard multiple-regression analysis showed that performance was significantly (R(2) = 0.82; P = 0.005) related to VO(2max) and specific endurance, i.e. the average speed sustained over the 24TR expressed in . VO(2max) was associated with a high capillary tortuosity (R(2) = 0.66; P = 0.01). Specific endurance was significantly related to RE and citrate synthase activity. It is concluded that a high VO(2max) and an associated developed capillary network are essential for ultra-endurance running performance. The ability to maintain a high %VO(2max) over a 24TR is another factor associated with performance and is mainly related to RE and high mitochondrial oxidative capacity in the vastus lateralis. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Effects of gradual-elastic compression stockings on running economy, kinematics, and performance in runners.

    PubMed

    Varela-Sanz, Adrian; España, Javier; Carr, Natasha; Boullosa, Daniel A; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the effect of gradual-elastic compression stockings (GCSs) on running economy (RE), kinematics, and performance in endurance runners. Sixteen endurance trained athletes (age: 34.73 ± 6.27 years; VO2max: 62.83 ± 9.03 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); 38 minutes in 10 km; 1 hour 24 minutes in half marathon) performed in random order 4 bouts of 6 minutes at a recent half-marathon pace on a treadmill to evaluate RE with or without GCSs. Subsequently, 12 athletes were divided into 2 equal groups matched by their VO2max, and they performed a time limit test (T(lim)) on a treadmill at 105% of a recent 10-km pace with or without GCSs for evaluation of physiological responses and running kinematics. There were no significant differences in the RE test in all of the variables analyzed for the conditions, but a moderate reproducibility for some physiological responses was detected in the condition with GCSs. In the T(lim), the group that wore GCSs reached a lower % of maximum heart rate (HRmax) compared with the control group (96.00 ± 2.94 vs. 99.83 ± 0.40) (p = 0.01). Kinematics did not differ between conditions during the T(lim) (p > 0.05). There were improvement trends for time to fatigue (337 vs. 387 seconds; d = 0.32) and a lower VO2peak (≈53 vs. 62 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1); d = 1.19) that were detected with GCSs during the T(lim). These results indicate that GCSs reduce the % of HRmax reached during a test at competition pace. The lower reproducibility of the condition with GCSs perhaps suggests that athletes may possibly need an accommodation period for systematically experiencing the benefits of this garment, but this hypothesis should be further investigated.

  12. Marathon Training in the University Physical Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dernbach, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A course at Northern Illinois University trains college students for running marathons. The course offers information about conditioning, injury prevention, and diet requirements, as well as instruction in long-distance running. Techniques for motivating students are discussed. (PP)

  13. Relationship between age and elite marathon race time in world single age records from 5 to 93 years

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were (i) to investigate the relationship between elite marathon race times and age in 1-year intervals by using the world single age records in marathon running from 5 to 93 years and (ii) to evaluate the sex difference in elite marathon running performance with advancing age. Methods World single age records in marathon running in 1-year intervals for women and men were analysed regarding changes across age for both men and women using linear and non-linear regression analyses for each age for women and men. Results The relationship between elite marathon race time and age was non-linear (i.e. polynomial regression 4th degree) for women and men. The curve was U-shaped where performance improved from 5 to ~20 years. From 5 years to ~15 years, boys and girls performed very similar. Between ~20 and ~35 years, performance was quite linear, but started to decrease at the age of ~35 years in a curvilinear manner with increasing age in both women and men. The sex difference increased non-linearly (i.e. polynomial regression 7th degree) from 5 to ~20 years, remained unchanged at ~20 min from ~20 to ~50 years and increased thereafter. The sex difference was lowest (7.5%, 10.5 min) at the age of 49 years. Conclusion Elite marathon race times improved from 5 to ~20 years, remained linear between ~20 and ~35 years, and started to increase at the age of ~35 years in a curvilinear manner with increasing age in both women and men. The sex difference in elite marathon race time increased non-linearly and was lowest at the age of ~49 years. PMID:25120915

  14. Scaling properties of marathon races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2006-06-01

    Some regularities in popular marathon races are identified in this paper. It is found for high-performance participants (i.e., racing times in the range [2:15,3:15] h), the average velocity as a function of the marathoner's ranking behaves as a power-law, which may be suggesting the presence of critical phenomena. Elite marathoners with racing times below 2:15 h can be considered as outliers with respect to this behavior. For the main marathon pack (i.e., racing times in the range [3:00,6:00] h), the average velocity as a function of the marathoner's ranking behaves linearly. For this racing times, the interpersonal velocity, defined as the difference of velocities between consecutive runners, displays a continuum of scaling behavior ranging from uncorrelated noise for small scales to correlated 1/f-noise for large scales. It is a matter of fact that 1/f-noise is characterized by correlations extended over a wide range of scales, a clear indication of some sort of cooperative effect.

  15. MARATHON Verification (MARV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-01

    comparable with MARATHON 1 in terms of output. Rather, the MARATHON 2 verification cases were designed to ensure correct implementation of the new algorithms...DISCLAIMER The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision unless so designated by...for employment against demands. This study is a comparative verification of the functionality of MARATHON 4 (our newest implementation of MARATHON

  16. Comparing Running Specific and Traditional Prostheses During Running: Assessing Performance and Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    extremity amputation (ILEA) running is limited with respect to biomechanical performance and injury risks. ILEA are able to run with both running...TERMS Kinetics, biomechanics , amputation, prosthesis, transtibial 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...with lower extremity amputation (ILEA) running is limited with respect to biomechanical performance and injury risks. ILEA are able to run with both

  17. Half-marathon and full-marathon runners' hydration practices and perceptions.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Eric K; Wingo, Jonathan E; Richardson, Mark T; Leeper, James D; Neggers, Yasmine H; Bishop, Phil A

    2011-01-01

    The behaviors and beliefs of recreational runners with regard to hydration maintenance are not well elucidated. To examine which beverages runners choose to drink and why, negative performance and health experiences related to dehydration, and methods used to assess hydration status. Cross-sectional study. Marathon registration site. Men (n = 146) and women (n = 130) (age = 38.3 ± 11.3 years) registered for the 2010 Little Rock Half-Marathon or Full Marathon. A 23-item questionnaire was administered to runners when they picked up their race timing chips. Runners were separated into tertiles (Low, Mod, High) based on z scores derived from training volume, expected performance, and running experience. We used a 100-mm visual analog scale with anchors of 0 (never) and 100 (always). Total sample responses and comparisons between tertile groups for questionnaire items are presented. The High group (58±31) reported greater consumption of sport beverages in exercise environments than the Low (42 ± 35 mm) and Mod (39 ± 32 mm) groups (P < .05) and perceived sport beverages to be superior to water in meeting hydration needs (P < .05) and improving performance during runs greater than 1 hour (P < .05). Seventy percent of runners experienced 1 or more incidents in which they believed dehydration resulted in a major performance decrement, and 45% perceived dehydration to have resulted in adverse health effects. Twenty percent of runners reported monitoring their hydration status. Urine color was the method most often reported (7%), whereas only 2% reported measuring changes in body weight. Greater attention should be paid to informing runners of valid techniques to monitor hydration status and developing an appropriate individualized hydration strategy.

  18. Half-Marathon and Full-Marathon Runners' Hydration Practices and Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    O'Neal, Eric K.; Wingo, Jonathan E.; Richardson, Mark T.; Leeper, James D.; Neggers, Yasmine H.; Bishop, Phil A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: The behaviors and beliefs of recreational runners with regard to hydration maintenance are not well elucidated. Objective: To examine which beverages runners choose to drink and why, negative performance and health experiences related to dehydration, and methods used to assess hydration status. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Marathon registration site. Patients or Other Participants: Men (n = 146) and women (n = 130) (age = 38.3 ± 11.3 years) registered for the 2010 Little Rock Half-Marathon or Full Marathon. Intervention(s): A 23-item questionnaire was administered to runners when they picked up their race timing chips. Main Outcome Measure(s): Runners were separated into tertiles (Low, Mod, High) based on z scores derived from training volume, expected performance, and running experience. We used a 100-mm visual analog scale with anchors of 0 (never) and 100 (always). Total sample responses and comparisons between tertile groups for questionnaire items are presented. Results: The High group (58±31) reported greater consumption of sport beverages in exercise environments than the Low (42 ± 35 mm) and Mod (39 ± 32 mm) groups (P < .05) and perceived sport beverages to be superior to water in meeting hydration needs (P < .05) and improving performance during runs greater than 1 hour (P < .05). Seventy percent of runners experienced 1 or more incidents in which they believed dehydration resulted in a major performance decrement, and 45% perceived dehydration to have resulted in adverse health effects. Twenty percent of runners reported monitoring their hydration status. Urine color was the method most often reported (7%), whereas only 2% reported measuring changes in body weight. Conclusions: Greater attention should be paid to informing runners of valid techniques to monitor hydration status and developing an appropriate individualized hydration strategy. PMID:22488182

  19. An Age and Body Mass Handicap for the Marathon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburgh, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    An age and body mass handicap has been previously developed and validated for the 5-kilometer (5K) run. The purpose of this study was to develop a similar handicap for the marathon but with a different age adjustment based on deviations from age group world best marathon times within each sex. The resulting handicap allowed finish time comparisons…

  20. A chronotype comparison of South African and Dutch marathon runners: The role of scheduled race start times and effects on performance.

    PubMed

    Henst, Rob H P; Jaspers, Richard T; Roden, Laura C; Rae, Dale E

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a high prevalence of morning-types was reported among trained South African endurance athletes. Proposed explanations for this observation were that either the chronotype of these athletes is better suited to coping with the early-morning start times of endurance events in South Africa; or habitual early waking for training or endurance events may have conditioned the athletes to adapt and become morning-types. The South African endurance athletes also had earlier chronotypes compared to a control population of less active individuals, suggesting that individuals who are more physically active may have earlier chronotypes. However, since both the South African athlete and control groups showed an overrepresentation of morning-types compared to European and American populations, the South African climate may in part have explained this bias towards morningness. Given the latitude and climate differences between South Africa and the Netherlands, and that South African marathons typically start at about 06:30 while those in the Netherlands start later (±11:00), comparison of South African and Dutch marathon runners and active controls would allow for simultaneous assessment of the effects of marathon start time, degree of physical activity and climate on chronotype. Therefore, the primary aims of this study were: (i) to assess the effect of marathon start time on chronotype in marathon runners and (ii) to determine the extent to which either degree of physical activity or climate might explain the bias towards morningness observed in South African athletes and controls. A secondary aim was to determine whether any relationships exist between chronotype, PERIOD3 (PER3) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism genotype, habitual training habits and marathon performance. Trained male marathon runners from South Africa (n = 95) and the Netherlands (n = 90), and active but non-competitive male controls from South Africa (n = 97) and the

  1. Skeletal muscle plasticity with marathon training in novice runners.

    PubMed

    Luden, N; Hayes, E; Minchev, K; Louis, E; Raue, U; Conley, T; Trappe, S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate leg muscle adaptation in runners preparing for their first marathon. Soleus and vastus lateralis (VL) biopsies were obtained from six recreational runners (23 ± 1 years, 61 ± 3 kg) before (T1), after 13 weeks of run training (T2), and after 3 weeks of taper and marathon (T3). Single muscle fiber size, contractile function (strength, speed, and power) and oxidative enzyme activity [citrate synthase (CS)] were measured at all three time points, and fiber type distribution was determined before and after the 16-week intervention. Training increased VO(2max) ∼9% (P<0.05). All soleus parameters were unchanged. VL MHC I fiber diameter increased (+8%; P<0.05) from T1 to T2. VL MHC I V(o) (-12%), MHC I power (-22%) and MHC IIa power (-29%) were reduced from T1 to T2 (P<0.05). No changes in VL single fiber contractile properties were observed from T2 to T3. No change was observed in soleus CS activity, whereas VL CS activity increased 66% (P<0.05). Our observations indicate that modest marathon training elicits very specific skeletal muscle adaptations that likely support the ability to perform 42.2 km of continuous running - further strengthening the existing body of evidence for skeletal muscle specificity. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Marathon works

    PubMed Central

    Orrantia, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Medical care in rural Canada has long been hampered by insufficient numbers of physicians. How can a rural community’s physicians change the local medical culture and create a new approach to sustaining their practice? OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To create a sustainable, collegial family practice group and address one rural community’s chronically underserviced health care needs. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Elements important to physicians’ well-being were incorporated into the health care group’s functioning to enhance retention and recruitment. The intentional development of a consensus-based approach to decision making has created a supportive team of physicians. Ongoing communication is kept up through regular meetings, retreats, and a Web-based discussion board. Individual physicians retain control of their hours worked each year and their schedules. A novel obstetric call system was introduced to help make schedules more predictable. An internal governance agreement on an alternative payment plan supports varied work schedules, recognizes and funds non-clinical medical work, and pays group members for undertaking health-related projects. CONCLUSION This approach has helped maintain a stable number of physicians in Marathon, Ont, and has increased the number of health care services delivered to the community. PMID:16190174

  3. Circulating miR-1, miR-133a, and miR-206 levels are increased after a half-marathon run.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Clarissa P C; Oliveira, Getúlio P; Madrid, Bibiano; Almeida, Jeeser A; Franco, Octávio L; Pereira, Rinaldo W

    2014-11-01

    Circulating miRNAs are potential biomarkers that can be important molecules driving cell-to-cell communication. To investigate circulating muscle-specific miRNAs in recreational athletes. Three miRNAs from whole plasma before and after a half-marathon were analyzed by qPCR. MiR-1, -133a, and -206 significantly increased after the race. Increased levels of miRNAs after exercise point to potential biomarkers and to the possibility of being functional players following endurance training. These miRNAs are potential biomarkers of muscle damage or adaptation to exercise.

  4. A Review of Mechanics and Injury Trends Among Various Running Styles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    completing a marathon in 2009.1 Annual running injury incidence has recently been reported between 19% and 79%.2 This large number of injuries has...recent kinematic analysis of elite runners wearing shoes who participated in a half marathon indicated that 75% of the runners were heel strikers, 24...7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of North Carolina,Chapel Hill,NC, 27517 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  5. Comment on Dissociation between running economy and running performance in elite Kenyan distance runners.

    PubMed

    Santos-Concejero, Jordan; Tucker, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Mooses and colleagues suggest that running economy alone does not explain superior distance running performance in elite Kenyan runners. Whilst we agree with the multi-factorial hypothesis for Kenyan running success, we do not believe that running economy can be overlooked to the extent that it was based on this particular study. Based on the methods used and the range of athletes tested, in this response letter we question whether this study provides any basis for downplaying the influence of running economy or suggesting that other factors compensate for it to enable superior performance.

  6. Convection-diffusion effects in marathon race dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the face of the recent terrorist attack event on the 2013 Boston Marathon, the increasing participation of recreational runners in large marathon races has imposed important logistical and safety issues for organizers and city authorities. An accurate understanding of the dynamics of the marathon pack along the race course can provide important insights for improving safety and performance of these events. On the other hand, marathon races can be seen as a model of pedestrian movement under confined conditions. This work used data of the 2011 Chicago Marathon event for modeling the dynamics of the marathon pack from the corral zone to the finish line. By considering the marathon pack as a set of particles moving along the race course, the dynamics are modeled as a convection-diffusion partial differential equation with position-dependent mean velocity and diffusion coefficient. A least-squares problem is posed and solved with optimization techniques for fitting field data from the 2011 Chicago Marathon. It was obtained that the mean pack velocity decreases while the diffusion coefficient increases with distance. This means that the dispersion rate of the initially compact marathon pack increases as the marathon race evolves along the race course.

  7. Predictor Variables for Marathon Race Time in Recreational Female Runners

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Wiebke; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We intended to determine predictor variables of anthropometry and training for marathon race time in recreational female runners in order to predict marathon race time for future novice female runners. Methods Anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, body mass index, circumferences of limbs, thicknesses of skin-folds and body fat as well as training variables such as volume and speed in running training were related to marathon race time using bi- and multi-variate analysis in 29 female runners. Results The marathoners completed the marathon distance within 251 (26) min, running at a speed of 10.2 (1.1) km/h. Body mass (r=0.37), body mass index (r=0.46), the circumferences of thigh (r=0.51) and calf (r=0.41), the skin-fold thicknesses of front thigh (r=0.38) and of medial calf (r=0.40), the sum of eight skin-folds (r=0.44) and body fat percentage (r=0.41) were related to marathon race time. For the variables of training, maximal distance ran per week (r=− 0.38), number of running training sessions per week (r=− 0.46) and the speed of the training sessions (r= − 0.60) were related to marathon race time. In the multi-variate analysis, the circumference of calf (P=0.02) and the speed of the training sessions (P=0.0014) were related to marathon race time. Marathon race time might be partially (r 2=0.50) predicted by the following equation: Race time (min)=184.4 + 5.0 x (circumference calf, cm) –11.9 x (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational female marathoners. Conclusions Variables of both anthropometry and training were related to marathon race time in recreational female marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable. For practical applications, a low circumference of calf and a high running speed in training are associated with a fast marathon race time in recreational female runners. PMID:22942994

  8. Predictor variables for marathon race time in recreational female runners.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Wiebke; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-06-01

    We intended to determine predictor variables of anthropometry and training for marathon race time in recreational female runners in order to predict marathon race time for future novice female runners. Anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, body mass index, circumferences of limbs, thicknesses of skin-folds and body fat as well as training variables such as volume and speed in running training were related to marathon race time using bi- and multi-variate analysis in 29 female runners. The marathoners completed the marathon distance within 251 (26) min, running at a speed of 10.2 (1.1) km/h. Body mass (r=0.37), body mass index (r=0.46), the circumferences of thigh (r=0.51) and calf (r=0.41), the skin-fold thicknesses of front thigh (r=0.38) and of medial calf (r=0.40), the sum of eight skin-folds (r=0.44) and body fat percentage (r=0.41) were related to marathon race time. For the variables of training, maximal distance ran per week (r=- 0.38), number of running training sessions per week (r=- 0.46) and the speed of the training sessions (r= - 0.60) were related to marathon race time. In the multi-variate analysis, the circumference of calf (P=0.02) and the speed of the training sessions (P=0.0014) were related to marathon race time. Marathon race time might be partially (r(2)=0.50) predicted by the following equation: Race time (min)=184.4 + 5.0 x (circumference calf, cm) -11.9 x (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational female marathoners. Variables of both anthropometry and training were related to marathon race time in recreational female marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable. For practical applications, a low circumference of calf and a high running speed in training are associated with a fast marathon race time in recreational female runners.

  9. Can anti-gravity running improve performance to the same degree as over-ground running?

    PubMed

    Brennan, Christopher T; Jenkins, David G; Osborne, Mark A; Oyewale, Michael; Kelly, Vincent G

    2018-03-11

    This study examined the changes in running performance, maximal blood lactate concentrations and running kinematics between 85%BM anti-gravity (AG) running and normal over-ground (OG) running over an 8-week training period. Fifteen elite male developmental cricketers were assigned to either the AG or over-ground (CON) running group. The AG group (n = 7) ran twice a week on an AG treadmill and once per week over-ground. The CON group (n = 8) completed all sessions OG on grass. Both AG and OG training resulted in similar improvements in time trial and shuttle run performance. Maximal running performance showed moderate differences between the groups, however the AG condition resulted in less improvement. Large differences in maximal blood lactate concentrations existed with OG running resulting in greater improvements in blood lactate concentrations measured during maximal running. Moderate increases in stride length paired with moderate decreases in stride rate also resulted from AG training. The use of AG training to supplement regular OG training for performance should be used cautiously, as extended use over long periods of time could lead to altered stride mechanics and reduced blood lactate.

  10. Aging, Fitness, and Marathon Times in a 91 Year-old Man Who Competed in 627 Marathons.

    PubMed

    Addison, Odessa; Steinbrenner, Gregory; Goldberg, Andrew P; Katzel, Leslie I

    Aging is associated with a decline in maximal aerobic capacity (VO 2max ) that may be attenuated by chronic endurance exercise. This case study chronicles the changes in marathon times in a 91 year old man who completed 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons over 42 years. He began running marathons at age 48. His yearly best times remained fairly constant at ~240 minutes from age 50 - 64 years and then gradually rose to about 260 minutes in his early seventies followed by a curvilinear deterioration as he approached his ninth decade. His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties. Between ages 68 and 89 his VO 2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min. His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO 2max (r 2 =0.87). The decline in marathons times and VO 2max may reflect the contributions of biological aging, changes in exercise training volume and intensity, injuries, and comorbid disease.

  11. Effects of a minimalist shoe on running economy and 5-km running performance.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if minimalist shoes improve time trial performance of trained distance runners and if changes in running economy, shoe mass, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were related to any difference in performance. Twenty-six trained runners performed three 6-min sub-maximal treadmill runs at 11, 13 and 15 km·h(-1) in minimalist and conventional shoes while running economy, stride length, stride rate and footfall pattern were assessed. They then performed a 5-km time trial. In the minimalist shoe, runners completed the trial in less time (effect size 0.20 ± 0.12), were more economical during sub-maximal running (effect size 0.33 ± 0.14) and decreased stride length (effect size 0.22 ± 0.10) and increased stride rate (effect size 0.22 ± 0.11). All but one runner ran with a rearfoot footfall in the minimalist shoe. Improvements in time trial performance were associated with improvements in running economy at 15 km·h(-1) (r = 0.58), with 79% of the improved economy accounted for by reduced shoe mass (P < 0.05). The results suggest that running in minimalist shoes improves running economy and 5-km running performance.

  12. Cardiac troponin increases among marathon runners in the Perth Marathon: the Troponin in Marathons (TRIM) study.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Kelley M; Fatovich, Daniel M; Grasko, Jonathon M; Vasikaran, Samuel D

    2009-01-19

    To determine the prevalence of elevated troponin levels after a marathon, and test for an association with reduced renal clearance. Prospective observational study of entrants running the full (42 km) 2007 Perth Marathon, Western Australia. Elevated troponin levels (> or = 0.1 microg/L) after the race; pre- and post-race survey data, and biochemical parameters. 27% of runners (92/346) enrolled in the study, of whom 88 (96%) completed it. Most were men (71%; 65/92); mean age was 43.1 years (SD, 9.8 years; range, 25-64 years) and mean body mass index (BMI) was 24.1 kg/m(2). Raised troponin levels were seen in 32% of participants (28/88), the highest being 1.4 microg/L. The strongest predictor for developing elevated troponin levels was a decrease in weight (odds ratio [OR], 2.15; 95% CI, 1.27-3.65). Creatinine increase was also associated with elevated troponin levels (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.06), but pre-race estimated glomerular filtration rate, age, sex, BMI, training factors, marathon experience and race time were not. Most runners (99%; 87/88) had elevated levels of ischaemia-modified albumin after the race. Troponin level increases were common among marathon finishers. The strongest predictors were weight loss and an increase in creatinine levels, suggesting that reduced renal clearance is an associated factor. Further study is needed to determine the clinical significance of these findings, and to understand the mechanism.

  13. Study of weather and thermal comfort influence on sport performance: prognostic analysis applied to Rio de Janeiro's city marathon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallotta, M.; Herdies, D. L.; Gonçalves, L. G.

    2013-05-01

    There is nowadays a growing interest in the influence and impacts of weather and climate in human life. The weather conditions analysis shows the utility of this type of tool when applied in sports. These conditions act as a differential in strategy and training, especially for outdoor sports. This study had as aim objective develop weather forecast and thermal comfort evaluation targeted to sports, and hoped that the results can be used to the development of products and weather service in the Olympic Games 2016 in Rio de Janeiro City. The use of weather forecast applied to the sport showed to be efficient for the case of Rio de Janeiro City Marathon, especially due to the high spatial resolution. The WRF simulations for the three marathons studied showed good results for temperature, atmospheric pressure, and relative humidity. On the other hand, the forecast of the wind showed a pattern of overestimation of the real situation in all cases. It was concluded that the WRF model provides, in general, more representative simulations from 36 hours in advance, and with 18 hours of integration they were even better, describing efficiently the synoptic situation that would be found. A review of weather conditions and thermal comfort at specific points of the marathon route showed that there are significant differences between the stages of the marathon, which makes possible to plan the competition strategy under the thermal comfort. It was concluded that a relationship between a situation more thermally comfortable (uncomfortable) and the best (worst) time in Rio de Janeiro City Marathon

  14. The effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Bellenger, Clint R; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-03-01

    The effect of footwear on running economy has been investigated in numerous studies. However, no systematic review and meta-analysis has synthesised the available literature and the effect of footwear on running performance is not known. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners, by reviewing controlled trials that compare different footwear conditions or compare footwear with barefoot. The Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine), CINAHL and SPORTDiscus databases were searched from inception up until April 2014. Included articles reported on controlled trials that examined the effects of footwear or footwear characteristics (including shoe mass, cushioning, motion control, longitudinal bending stiffness, midsole viscoelasticity, drop height and comfort) on running performance or running economy and were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Of the 1,044 records retrieved, 19 studies were included in the systematic review and 14 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No studies were identified that reported effects on running performance. Individual studies reported significant, but trivial, beneficial effects on running economy for comfortable and stiff-soled shoes [standardised mean difference (SMD) <0.12; P < 0.05), a significant small beneficial effect on running economy for cushioned shoes (SMD = 0.37; P < 0.05) and a significant moderate beneficial effect on running economy for training in minimalist shoes (SMD = 0.79; P < 0.05). Meta-analysis found significant small beneficial effects on running economy for light shoes and barefoot compared with heavy shoes (SMD < 0.34; P < 0.01) and for minimalist shoes compared with conventional shoes (SMD = 0.29; P < 0.01). A significant positive association between shoe mass and metabolic cost of running

  15. Regulation of substrate use during the marathon.

    PubMed

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2007-01-01

    The energy required to run a marathon is mainly provided through oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria of the active muscles. Small amounts of energy from substrate phosphorylation are also required during transitions and short periods when running speed is increased. The three inputs for adenosine triphosphate production in the mitochondria include oxygen, free adenosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate, and reducing equivalents. The reducing equivalents are derived from the metabolism of fat and carbohydrate (CHO), which are mobilised from intramuscular stores and also delivered from adipose tissue and liver, respectively. The metabolism of fat and CHO is tightly controlled at several regulatory sites during marathon running. Slower, recreational runners run at 60-65% maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) for approximately 3:45:00 and faster athletes run at 70-75% for approximately 2:45:00. Both groups rely heavily on fat and CHO fuels. However, elite athletes run marathons at speeds requiring between 80% and 90% VO(2max), and finish in times between 2:05:00 and 2:20:00. They are highly adapted to oxidise fat and must do so during training. However, they compete at such high running speeds, that CHO oxidation (also highly adapted) may be the exclusive source of energy while racing. Further work with elite athletes is needed to examine this possibility.

  16. Effect of Arnica D30 in marathon runners. Pooled results from two double-blind placebo controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Tveiten, D; Bruset, S

    2003-10-01

    To examine whether the homeopathic medicine Arnica D30 has an effect on muscle soreness and cell damage after marathon running. The subjects were 82 marathon runners from two separate randomised double-blind placebo controlled trials participating in the Oslo Marathon in 1990 and 1995. Five pills of Arnica D30 or placebo were given morning and evening. Treatment started on the evening before the marathon and continued on day of the race and the three following days. The runners assessed muscular soreness on a visual analogue scale. Muscle enzymes, electrolytes and creatinine were measured before and after the marathon. Muscle soreness immediately after the marathon run was lower in the Arnica group than in the placebo group (P = 0.04). Cell damage measured by enzymes was similar in the Arnica and the placebo group. These pooled results suggest that Arnica D30 has a positive effect on muscle soreness after marathon running, but not on cell damage measured by enzymes.

  17. Running economy : the forgotten factor in elite performance.

    PubMed

    Foster, Carl; Lucia, Alejandro

    2007-01-01

    Running performance depends on maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), the ability to sustain a high percentage of VO(2max) for an extended period of time and running economy. Running economy has been studied relatively less than the other factors. Running economy, measured as steady state oxygen uptake (VO(2)) at intensities below the ventilatory threshold is the standard method. Extrapolation to a common running speed (268 m/min) or as the VO(2) required to run a kilometer is the standard method of assessment. Individuals of East African origin may be systematically more economical, although a smaller body size and a thinner lower leg may be the primary factors. Strategies for improving running economy remain to be developed, although it appears that high intensity running may be a common element acting to improve economy.

  18. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects-a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Robert; Luke, Anthony; Ma, C Benjamin; Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P < 0.05). A high prevalence of knee abnormalities was found in marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences.

  19. Financial Performance of Health Insurers: State-Run Versus Federal-Run Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A; McCue, Michael J; Palazzolo, Jennifer R

    2018-06-01

    Many insurers incurred financial losses in individual markets for health insurance during 2014, the first year of Affordable Care Act mandated changes. This analysis looks at key financial ratios of insurers to compare profitability in 2014 and 2013, identify factors driving financial performance, and contrast the financial performance of health insurers operating in state-run exchanges versus the federal exchange. Overall, the median loss of sampled insurers was -3.9%, no greater than their loss in 2013. Reduced administrative costs offset increases in medical losses. Insurers performed better in states with state-run exchanges than insurers in states using the federal exchange in 2014. Medical loss ratios are the underlying driver more than administrative costs in the difference in performance between states with federal versus state-run exchanges. Policy makers looking to improve the financial performance of the individual market should focus on features that differentiate the markets associated with state-run versus federal exchanges.

  20. Prevalence, Severity and Potential Nutritional Causes of Gastrointestinal Symptoms during a Marathon in Recreational Runners.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Jamie N; Kirk, Ben; Fearn, Robert; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2018-06-24

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) amongst recreational runners during a marathon race, and potential nutritional factors that may contribute. Recreational runners of the 2017 Liverpool ( n = 66) and Dublin ( n = 30) marathons were recruited. GIS were reported post-marathon and we considered GIS in the 7 days prior to the marathon and during the marathon using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Nutritional intake was recorded using food diaries for the day before the race, morning of the race, and during the race; 43% of participants reported moderate (≥4) GIS in the 7 days prior to the marathon and 27% reported moderate symptoms during the marathon with most common symptoms being flatulence (16%) during training, and nausea (8%) during the marathon race. Correlations between all nutritional intake and GIS were not statistically significant ( p > 0.05). There were significant correlations between total GIS score ( r = 0.510, p < 0.001), upper GIS score ( r = 0.346, p = 0.001) and lower GIS score ( r = 0.483, p < 0.001) in training and during the marathon. There appears to be a modest prevalence of GIS in recreational runners, in the week prior to a marathon and during marathon running, although there was no association with nutritional intake before or during the race.

  1. Warm-up with a weighted vest improves running performance via leg stiffness and running economy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, K R; Hopkins, W G; McGuigan, M R; Kilding, A E

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of "strides" with a weighted-vest during a warm-up on endurance performance and its potential neuromuscular and metabolic mediators. A bout of resistance exercise can enhance subsequent high-intensity performance, but little is known about such priming exercise for endurance performance. A crossover with 5-7 days between an experimental and control trial was performed by 11 well-trained distance runners. Each trial was preceded by a warm-up consisting of a 10-min self-paced jog, a 5-min submaximal run to determine running economy, and six 10-s strides with or without a weighted-vest (20% of body mass). After a 10-min recovery period, runners performed a series of jumps to determine leg stiffness and other neuromuscular characteristics, another 5-min submaximal run, and an incremental treadmill test to determine peak running speed. Clinical and non-clinical forms of magnitude-based inference were used to assess outcomes. Correlations and linear regression were used to assess relationships between performance and underlying measures. The weighted-vest condition resulted in a very-large enhancement of peak running speed (2.9%; 90% confidence limits ±0.8%), a moderate increase in leg stiffness (20.4%; ±4.2%) and a large improvement in running economy (6.0%; ±1.6%); there were also small-moderate clear reductions in cardiorespiratory measures. Relationships between change scores showed that changes in leg stiffness could explain all the improvements in performance and economy. Strides with a weighted-vest have a priming effect on leg stiffness and running economy. It is postulated the associated major effect on peak treadmill running speed will translate into enhancement of competitive endurance performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Calcaneus length determines running economy: implications for endurance running performance in modern humans and Neandertals.

    PubMed

    Raichlen, David A; Armstrong, Hunter; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2011-03-01

    The endurance running (ER) hypothesis suggests that distance running played an important role in the evolution of the genus Homo. Most researchers have focused on ER performance in modern humans, or on reconstructing ER performance in Homo erectus, however, few studies have examined ER capabilities in other members of the genus Homo. Here, we examine skeletal correlates of ER performance in modern humans in order to evaluate the energetics of running in Neandertals and early Homo sapiens. Recent research suggests that running economy (the energy cost of running at a given speed) is strongly related to the length of the Achilles tendon moment arm. Shorter moment arms allow for greater storage and release of elastic strain energy, reducing energy costs. Here, we show that a skeletal correlate of Achilles tendon moment arm length, the length of the calcaneal tuber, does not correlate with walking economy, but correlates significantly with running economy and explains a high proportion of the variance (80%) in cost between individuals. Neandertals had relatively longer calcaneal tubers than modern humans, which would have increased their energy costs of running. Calcaneal tuber lengths in early H. sapiens do not significantly differ from those of extant modern humans, suggesting Neandertal ER economy was reduced relative to contemporaneous anatomically modern humans. Endurance running is generally thought to be beneficial for gaining access to meat in hot environments, where hominins could have used pursuit hunting to run prey taxa into hyperthermia. We hypothesize that ER performance may have been reduced in Neandertals because they lived in cold climates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biochemical, physiological, and performance response of a functional watermelon juice enriched in L-citrulline during a half-marathon race

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sánchez, Ascensión; Ramos-Campo, Domingo J.; Fernández-Lobato, Bárbara; Rubio-Arias, Jacobo A.; Alacid, Fernando; Aguayo, Encarna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Watermelon is a rich natural source of l-citrulline. This non-essential amino acid increases exercise performance. Objective: Evaluate the effect of Fashion watermelon juice enriched in l-citrulline (CWJ) (3.45 g per 500 mL) in physical performance and biochemical markers after a half-marathon race. Design: A randomised, double blind, crossover design where 2 h after drinking 500 mL of CWJ or placebo (PLA, beverage without l-citrulline) amateur male runners performed two half-marathon races. Jump height, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were evaluated before and after the races. Moreover, muscle soreness and plasma markers of muscle damage and metabolism were evaluated for 72 h after the races. Results: Muscle soreness perception was significantly lower from 24 to 72 h after the race with CWJ beverage. Immediately after the races, runners under CWJ condition showed plasma lactate and glucose concentrations significantly lower and higher lactate dehydrogenase and l-arginine concentration than runners under PLA. A maintenance of jump heights after the races under CWJ supplementation was found, decreasing significantly with PLA. Conclusion: A single Fashion watermelon juice enriched in l-citrulline dose diminished muscle soreness perception from 24 to 72 h after the race and maintained lower concentrations of plasma lactate after an exhausting exercise. PMID:28659740

  4. Dissociation between running economy and running performance in elite Kenyan distance runners.

    PubMed

    Mooses, Martin; Mooses, Kerli; Haile, Diresibachew Wondimu; Durussel, Jérôme; Kaasik, Priit; Pitsiladis, Yannis Paul

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between running economy (RE) and performance in a homogenous group of competitive Kenyan distance runners. Maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) (68.8 ± 3.8 ml∙kg(-1)∙min(-1)) was determined on a motorised treadmill in 32 Kenyan (25.3 ± 5.0 years; IAAF performance score: 993 ± 77 p) distance runners. Leg anthropometry was assessed and moment arm of the Achilles tendon determined. While Achilles moment arm was associated with better RE (r(2) = 0.30, P = 0.003) and upper leg length, total leg length and total leg length to body height ratio were correlated with running performance (r = 0.42, P = 0.025; r = 0.40, P = 0.030 and r = 0.38, P = 0.043, respectively), RE and maximal time on treadmill (t(max)) were not associated with running performance (r = -0.01, P = 0.965; r = 0.27; P = 0.189, respectively) in competitive Kenyan distance runners. The dissociation between RE and running performance in this homogenous group of runners would suggest that RE can be compensated by other factors to maintain high performance levels and is in line with the idea that RE is only one of many factors explaining elite running performance.

  5. Effects of a 30-min running performed daily after downhill running on recovery of muscle function and running economy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Trevor C; Nosaka, Kazunori; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of a 30-min level running performed daily for 6 days after downhill running (DHR) on indicators of muscle damage and running economy (RE). Fifty men were placed into five groups - control (CON), 40%, 50%, 60% and 70% (10 subjects per group) - by matching the baseline maximal oxygen consumption (V O(2max)) among the groups. Subjects in the 40%, 50%, 60% and 70% groups had a treadmill (0 degrees ) run for 30min at 40%, 50%, 60% and 70% of the pre-determined V O(2max), respectively, at 1-6 days after a bout of 30-min DHR at -15% (-8.5 degrees ). Maximal voluntary isometric strength of the knee extensors, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured before, immediately after and every day for 7 days after DHR. RE was assessed by oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, lactate, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion during a 5-min level running at 85% V O(2max) performed before and at 2, 5 and 7 days after DHR. All muscle damage markers changed significantly (P<0.05) after DHR without significant differences among the groups. The RE parameters showed a significant decrease in RE for 7 days after DHR, but no significant differences in the changes were evident among the groups. These results suggest that the daily running performed after DHR did not have any beneficial or adverse effects on recovery of muscle damage and RE regardless of the intensity.

  6. Physiological demands of running during long distance runs and triathlons.

    PubMed

    Hausswirth, C; Lehénaff, D

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to identify the main metabolic factors which have an influence on the energy cost of running (Cr) during prolonged exercise runs and triathlons. This article proposes a physiological comparison of these 2 exercises and the relationship between running economy and performance. Many terms are used as the equivalent of 'running economy' such as 'oxygen cost', 'metabolic cost', 'energy cost of running', and 'oxygen consumption'. It has been suggested that these expressions may be defined by the rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) at a steady state (i.e. between 60 to 90% of maximal VO2) at a submaximal running speed. Endurance events such as triathlon or marathon running are known to modify biological constants of athletes and should have an influence on their running efficiency. The Cr appears to contribute to the variation found in distance running performance among runners of homogeneous level. This has been shown to be important in sports performance, especially in events like long distance running. In addition, many factors are known or hypothesised to influence Cr such as environmental conditions, participant specificity, and metabolic modifications (e.g. training status, fatigue). The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a lack of fluid balance. Moreover, the increase in circulating free fatty acids and glycerol at the end of these long exercise durations bear witness to the decrease in Cr values. The combination of these factors alters the Cr during exercise and hence could modify the athlete's performance in triathlons or a prolonged run.

  7. Sleep Management Strategy and Performance in an Extreme Mountain Ultra-marathon.

    PubMed

    Poussel, Mathias; Laroppe, Julien; Hurdiel, Rémy; Girard, Julien; Poletti, Laurence; Thil, Catherine; Didelot, Antoine; Chenuel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We intended to assess the relationship between sleep strategies and performance during the North-Face Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc 2013, to test the hypothesis that sleep management can influence athletic performance. Almost all runners specifically adopted sleep management strategies before the race. Among the finishers 72% didn't sleep at all during the race and 28% took a least one break for sleep. Non-sleepers completed the race faster than the sleepers (P = 0.0008). Race time was positively correlated with drowsiness (P < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with the number participations in this race (P = 0.0039). Runners who adopted a sleep management strategy based on increased sleep time before the race completed the race faster (P = 0.0258). Most finishers seemed to be aware of the importance of developing sleep management strategies and increasing sleep time some nights before the race appeared to be the most relevant strategy to improve performance.

  8. Muscular strategy shift in human running: dependence of running speed on hip and ankle muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Tim W; Schache, Anthony G; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-06-01

    Humans run faster by increasing a combination of stride length and stride frequency. In slow and medium-paced running, stride length is increased by exerting larger support forces during ground contact, whereas in fast running and sprinting, stride frequency is increased by swinging the legs more rapidly through the air. Many studies have investigated the mechanics of human running, yet little is known about how the individual leg muscles accelerate the joints and centre of mass during this task. The aim of this study was to describe and explain the synergistic actions of the individual leg muscles over a wide range of running speeds, from slow running to maximal sprinting. Experimental gait data from nine subjects were combined with a detailed computer model of the musculoskeletal system to determine the forces developed by the leg muscles at different running speeds. For speeds up to 7 m s(-1), the ankle plantarflexors, soleus and gastrocnemius, contributed most significantly to vertical support forces and hence increases in stride length. At speeds greater than 7 m s(-1), these muscles shortened at relatively high velocities and had less time to generate the forces needed for support. Thus, above 7 m s(-1), the strategy used to increase running speed shifted to the goal of increasing stride frequency. The hip muscles, primarily the iliopsoas, gluteus maximus and hamstrings, achieved this goal by accelerating the hip and knee joints more vigorously during swing. These findings provide insight into the strategies used by the leg muscles to maximise running performance and have implications for the design of athletic training programs.

  9. Altered Running Economy Directly Translates to Altered Distance-Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Kipp, Shalaya; Spiering, Barry A; Kram, Rodger

    2016-11-01

    Our goal was to quantify if small (1%-3%) changes in running economy quantitatively affect distance-running performance. Based on the linear relationship between metabolic rate and running velocity and on earlier observations that added shoe mass increases metabolic rate by ~1% per 100 g per shoe, we hypothesized that adding 100 and 300 g per shoe would slow 3000-m time-trial performance by 1% and 3%, respectively. Eighteen male sub-20-min 5-km runners completed treadmill testing, and three 3000-m time trials wearing control shoes and identical shoes with 100 and 300 g of discreetly added mass. We measured rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production and calculated metabolic rates for the treadmill tests, and we recorded overall running time for the time trials. Adding mass to the shoes significantly increased metabolic rate at 3.5 m·s by 1.11% per 100 g per shoe (95% confidence interval = 0.88%-1.35%). While wearing the control shoes, participants ran the 3000-m time trial in 626.1 ± 55.6 s. Times averaged 0.65% ± 1.36% and 2.37% ± 2.09% slower for the +100-g and +300-g shoes, respectively (P < 0.001). On the basis of a linear fit of all the data, 3000-m time increased 0.78% per added 100 g per shoe (95% confidence interval = 0.52%-1.04%). Adding shoe mass predictably degrades running economy and slows 3000-m time-trial performance proportionally. Our data demonstrate that laboratory-based running economy measurements can accurately predict changes in distance-running race performance due to shoe modifications.

  10. Five training sessions improves 3000 meter running performance.

    PubMed

    Riiser, A; Ripe, S; Aadland, E

    2015-12-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of two weeks of endurance training on 3000-meter running performance. Secondary we wanted to assess the relationship between baseline running performance and change in running performance over the intervention period. We assigned 36 military recruits to a training group (N.=28) and a control group. The training group was randomly allocated to one of three sub-groups: 1) a 3000 meter group (test race); 2) a 4x4-minutes high-intensity interval group; 3) a continuous training group. The training group exercised five times over a two-week period. The training group improved its 3000 meter running performance with 50 seconds (6%) compared to the control group (P=0.003). Moreover, all sub-groups improved their performance by 37 to 73 seconds (4-8%) compared to the control group (P<0.037). There was a significant relationship between pretest performance and improvement from pre- to post-test (ρ=-0.65, P<0.001) in the training group. We conclude that five endurance training sessions improved 3000 meter running performance and the slowest runners achieved the greatest improvement in running performance.

  11. Prior Design for Dependent Dirichlet Processes: An Application to Marathon Modeling

    PubMed Central

    F. Pradier, Melanie; J. R. Ruiz, Francisco; Perez-Cruz, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel application of Bayesian nonparametrics (BNP) for marathon data modeling. We make use of two well-known BNP priors, the single-p dependent Dirichlet process and the hierarchical Dirichlet process, in order to address two different problems. First, we study the impact of age, gender and environment on the runners’ performance. We derive a fair grading method that allows direct comparison of runners regardless of their age and gender. Unlike current grading systems, our approach is based not only on top world records, but on the performances of all runners. The presented methodology for comparison of densities can be adopted in many other applications straightforwardly, providing an interesting perspective to build dependent Dirichlet processes. Second, we analyze the running patterns of the marathoners in time, obtaining information that can be valuable for training purposes. We also show that these running patterns can be used to predict finishing time given intermediate interval measurements. We apply our models to New York City, Boston and London marathons. PMID:26821155

  12. Potential Relationship between Passive Plantar Flexor Stiffness and Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiromasa; Suga, Tadashi; Takao, Kenji; Tanaka, Takahiro; Misaki, Jun; Miyake, Yuto; Nagano, Akinori; Isaka, Tadao

    2018-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationship between passive stiffness of the plantar flexors and running performance in endurance runners. Forty-eight well-trained male endurance runners and 24 untrained male control subjects participated in this study. Plantar flexor stiffness during passive dorsiflexion was calculated from the slope of the linear portion of the torque-angle curve. Of the endurance runners included in the present study, running economy in 28 endurance runners was evaluated by measuring energy cost during three 4-min trials (14, 16, and 18 km/h) of submaximal treadmill running. Passive stiffness of the plantar flexors was significantly higher in endurance runners than in untrained subjects. Moreover, passive plantar flexor stiffness in endurance runners was significantly correlated with a personal best 5000-m race time. Furthermore, passive plantar flexor stiffness in endurance runners was significantly correlated with energy cost during submaximal running at 16 km/h and 18 km/h, and a trend towards such significance was observed at 14 km/h. The present findings suggest that stiffer plantar flexors may help achieve better running performance, with greater running economy, in endurance runners. Therefore, in the clinical setting, passive stiffness of the plantar flexors may be a potential parameter for assessing running performance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Effect of Carbohydrate Ingestion on Ratings of Perceived Exertion during a Marathon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utter, Alan C.; Kang, Jie; Robertson, Robert J.; Nieman, David C.; Chaloupka, Edward C.; Suminski, Richard R.; Piccinni, Cristiana R.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effects of carbohydrate substrate availability on ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and hormonal regulation during a competitive marathon. Data on marathon runners randomly assigned to receive carbohydrate or placebo indicated that those who ingested carbohydrate rather than placebo beverages were able to run at a higher…

  14. Effects of Heavy Strength Training on Running Performance and Determinants of Running Performance in Female Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Vikmoen, Olav; Raastad, Truls; Seynnes, Olivier; Bergstrøm, Kristoffer; Ellefsen, Stian; Rønnestad, Bent R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of adding strength training to normal endurance training on running performance and running economy in well-trained female athletes. We hypothesized that the added strength training would improve performance and running economy through altered stiffness of the muscle-tendon complex of leg extensors. Methods Nineteen female endurance athletes [maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max): 53±3 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, 5.8 h weekly endurance training] were randomly assigned to either normal endurance training (E, n = 8) or normal endurance training combined with strength training (E+S, n = 11). The strength training consisted of four leg exercises [3 x 4–10 repetition maximum (RM)], twice a week for 11 weeks. Muscle strength, 40 min all-out running distance, running performance determinants and patellar tendon stiffness were measured before and after the intervention. Results E+S increased 1RM in leg exercises (40 ± 15%) and maximal jumping height in counter movement jump (6 ± 6%) and squat jump (9 ± 7%, p < 0.05). This was accompanied by increased muscle fiber cross sectional area of both fiber type I (13 ± 7%) and fiber type II (31 ± 20%) in m. vastus lateralis (p < 0.05), with no change in capillary density in m. vastus lateralis or the stiffness of the patellar tendon. Neither E+S nor E changed running economy, fractional utilization of VO2max or VO2max. There were also no change in running distance during a 40 min all-out running test in neither of the groups. Conclusion Adding heavy strength training to endurance training did not affect 40 min all-out running performance or running economy compared to endurance training only. PMID:26953893

  15. Effects of Music Interventions on Emotional States and Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew M.; Davis, Paul A.; Devonport, Tracey J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two different music interventions on changes in emotional states before and during running, and also explored effects of music interventions upon performance outcome. Volunteer participants (n = 65) who regularly listened to music when running registered online to participate in a three-stage study. Participants attempted to attain a personally important running goal to establish baseline performance. Thereafter, participants were randomly assigned to either a self-selected music group or an Audiofuel music group. Audiofuel produce pieces of music designed to assist synchronous running. The self-selected music group followed guidelines for selecting motivating playlists. In both experimental groups, participants used the Brunel Music Rating Inventory-2 (BMRI-2) to facilitate selection of motivational music. Participants again completed the BMRI-2 post- intervention to assess the motivational qualities of Audiofuel music or the music they selected for use during the study. Results revealed no significant differences between self-selected music and Audiofuel music on all variables analyzed. Participants in both music groups reported increased pleasant emotions and decreased unpleasant emotions following intervention. Significant performance improvements were demonstrated post-intervention with participants reporting a belief that emotional states related to performance. Further analysis indicated that enhanced performance was significantly greater among participants reporting music to be motivational as indicated by high scores on the BMRI-2. Findings suggest that both individual athletes and practitioners should consider using the BMRI-2 when selecting music for running. Key points Listening to music with a high motivational quotient as indicated by scores on the BMRI-2 was associated with enhanced running performance and meta-emotional beliefs that emotions experienced during running helped performance. Beliefs on the

  16. Single muscle fiber adaptations with marathon training.

    PubMed

    Trappe, Scott; Harber, Matthew; Creer, Andrew; Gallagher, Philip; Slivka, Dustin; Minchev, Kiril; Whitsett, David

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of marathon training on single muscle fiber contractile function in a group of recreational runners. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle of seven individuals (22 +/- 1 yr, 177 +/- 3 cm, and 68 +/- 2 kg) before, after 13 wk of run training, and after 3 wk of taper. Slow-twitch myosin heavy chain [(MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers were analyzed for size, strength (P(o)), speed (V(o)), and power. The run training program led to the successful completion of a marathon (range 3 h 56 min to 5 h 35 min). Oxygen uptake during submaximal running and citrate synthase activity were improved (P < 0.05) with the training program. Muscle fiber size declined (P < 0.05) by approximately 20% in both fiber types after training. P(o) was maintained in both fiber types with training and increased (P < 0.05) by 18% in the MHC IIa fibers after taper. This resulted in >60% increase (P < 0.05) in force per cross-sectional area in both fiber types. Fiber V(o) increased (P < 0.05) by 28% in MHC I fibers with training and was unchanged in MHC IIa fibers. Peak power increased (P < 0.05) in MHC I and IIa fibers after training with a further increase (P < 0.05) in MHC IIa fiber power after taper. These data show that marathon training decreased slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fiber size but that it maintained or improved the functional profile of these fibers. A taper period before the marathon further improved the functional profile of the muscle, which was targeted to the fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  17. Influence of slope on subtalar pronation in submaximal running performance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Vinicius Machado; Detoni, Guilherme Cesca; Ferreira, Cristhian; Portela, Bruno Sergio; Queiroga, Marcos Roberto; Tartaruga, Marcus Peikriszwili

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE : To investigate the slope influence on the maximal subtalar pronation in submaximal running speeds. METHODS : Sixteen endurance runners participated of a running economy (RE) test in a treadmill with different slopes (+1%, +5%, +10%, +15%). For each slope a 4-minute run was performed with no rest break for the purpose of measuring the magnitude of kinematic variables by means of a high frequency video camera positioned in a frontal-posterior plane of the individual. RESULTS : No significant differences were verified in maximal subtalar pronation between legs and between the slopes adopted, showing that changes of running technique due to modifications of slope aren't enough to modify the behavior of maximum subtalar pronation. CONCLUSION : The subtalar pronation is independent of slope, which may be influenced by other intervening variables. Level of Evidence II, Diagnostic Study PMID:24453662

  18. Risk factors for lower extremity injuries among male marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Van Middelkoop, M; Kolkman, J; Van Ochten, J; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Koes, B W

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for lower extremity injuries in male marathon runners. A random sample of 1500 recreational male marathon runners was drawn. Possible risk factors were obtained from a baseline questionnaire 1 month before the start of the marathon. Information on injuries sustained shortly before or during the marathon was obtained using a post-race questionnaire. Of the 694 male runners who responded to the baseline and post-race questionnaire, 28% suffered a self-reported running injury on the lower extremities in the month before or during the marathon run. More than six times race participation in the previous 12 months [odds ratio (OR) 1.66; confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.56], a history of running injuries (OR 2.62; CI 1.82-3.78), high education level (OR 0.73; CI 0.51-1.04) and daily smoking (OR 0.23; CI 0.05-1.01) were associated with the occurrence of lower extremity injuries. Among the modifiable risk factor studies, a training distance <40 km a week is a strong protective factor of future calf injuries, and regular interval training is a strong protective factor for knee injuries. Other training characteristics appear to have little or no effect on future injuries.

  19. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in amateur male marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Anna M; Lewicka, Ewa; Dąbrowska-Kugacka, Alicja; Lewicka-Potocka, Zuzanna; Wabich, Elżbieta; Szerszyńska, Anna; Dyda, Julia; Sobolewski, Jakub; Koenner, Jakub; Raczak, Grzegorz

    2018-06-18

    Sports activity has become extremely popular among amateurs. Electrocardiography is a useful tool in screening for cardiac pathologies in athletes; however, there is little data on electrocardiographic abnormalities in the group of amateur athletes. The aim of this study was to analyze the abnormalities in resting and exercise electrocardiograms (ECGs) in a group of amateur athletes, and try to determine whether the criteria applied for the general population or for athletes' ECGs should be implemented in this group. In 40 amateur male marathon runners, 3 consecutive 12-lead ECGs were performed: 2-3 weeks before (stage 1), just after the run (stage 2) and 2-3 weeks after the marathon (stage 3). Resting (stage 1) and exercise (stage 2) ECGs were analyzed following the refined criteria for the assessment of athlete's ECG (changes classified as training-related, borderline or training-unrelated). In resting ECGs, at least 1 abnormality was found in 92.5% of the subjects and the most common was sinus bradycardia (62.5%). In post-exercise ECGs, at least 1 abnormality was present in 77.5% of the subjects and the most common was right atrium enlargement (RAE) (42.5%). Training-related ECG variants were more frequent at rest (82.5% vs 42.5%; p = 0.0008), while borderline variants - after the run (22.5% vs 57.5%; p = 0.0004). Training-unrelated abnormalities were found in 15% and 10% of the subjects, respectively (p-value - nonsignificant), and the most common was T-wave inversion. Even if the refined criteria rather than the criteria used for normal sedentary population were applied, the vast majority of amateur runners showed at least 1 abnormality in resting ECGs, which were mainly training-related variants. However, at rest, in 15% of the subjects, pathologic training-unrelated abnormalities were found. The most frequent post-exercise abnormality was right atrial enlargement. General electrocardiographic screening in amateur athletes should be taken into consideration.

  20. Increased longitudinal contractility and diastolic function at rest in well-trained amateur Marathon runners: a speckle tracking echocardiography study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity reduces cardiovascular risk. There is concern that Marathon running might acutely damage the heart. It is unknown to what extent intensive physical endurance activity influences the cardiac mechanics at resting condition. Methods Eighty-four amateur marathon runners (43 women and 41 men) from Berlin-Brandenburg area who had completed at least one marathon previously underwent clinical examination and echocardiography at least 10 days before the Berlin Marathon at rest. Standard transthoracic echocardiography and 2D strain and strain rate analysis were performed. The 2D Strain and strain rate values were compared to previous published data of healthy untrained individuals. Results The average global longitudinal peak systolic strain of the left ventricle was -23 +/- 2% with peak systolic strain rate -1.39 +/- 0.21/s, early diastolic strain rate 2.0 +/- 0.40/s and late diastolic strain rate 1.21 +/- 0.31/s. These values are significantly higher compared to the previous published values of normal age-adjusted individuals. In addition, no age-related decline of longitudinal contractility in well-trained athletes was observed. Conclusions There is increased overall longitudinal myocardial contractility at rest in experienced endurance athletes compared to the published normal values in the literature indicating a preserved and even supra-normal contractility in the athletes. There is no age dependent decline of the longitudinal 2D Strain values. This underlines the beneficial effects of regular physical exercise even in advanced age. PMID:24571726

  1. LHCb detector and trigger performance in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesca, Dordei

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of b- and c- hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events into two stages, giving room to perform the alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  2. The SPLASH/ICPC integrity marathon in Ibadan, Nigeria: incidence and management of injuries and marathon-related health problems.

    PubMed

    Ogwumike, Omoyemi O; Adeniyi, Ade F

    2013-04-15

    The growing interest in marathon runners and marathons in Nigeria has not been reflected in reports of injuries and other health problems associated with these events. This study therefore outlines the incidence of injuries, marathon-related health problems and delivery of physiotherapy at the maiden and second editions of the Splash 105.5 FM/ICPC Integrity Marathon in Ibadan city, south-west Nigeria in 2009 and 2010. Using a data entry sheet, demographics and information on running experience, past and present injuries and other health problems reported en route and at the finish line by the runners were documented. The prevalence of injuries and other health problems reported by previous and first-time runners were compared. In both events, 16.3% and 17.2% of the runners respectively reported injuries with significant occurrence in first-time runners (p = 0.003 for 2009; p = 0.002 for 2010) mostly at the finish line. The reported injury type and site were muscle cramps and the thigh (39.7% and 76.4% respectively). Heat exhaustion was reported by 42.8% of runners in 2009 and 56.3% in 2010. Cryotherapy was mostly used in combination with other physiotherapy modalities in both years. Most of the injuries and other health problems were reported by first-time marathon runners mainly at the finish line. The most reported site of injury was the thigh while muscle cramps and heat exhaustions were the most reported types of injuries and health problems. First-time marathon runners should be adequately informed of the predisposition to injury during marathons and adequate body conditioning should be emphasized. Ample preparation and effective involvement of the physiotherapy team is essential for management of injured runners en route and at the finish line in a marathon.

  3. The SPLASH/ICPC integrity marathon in Ibadan, Nigeria: incidence and management of injuries and marathon-related health problems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The growing interest in marathon runners and marathons in Nigeria has not been reflected in reports of injuries and other health problems associated with these events. This study therefore outlines the incidence of injuries, marathon-related health problems and delivery of physiotherapy at the maiden and second editions of the Splash 105.5 FM/ICPC Integrity Marathon in Ibadan city, south-west Nigeria in 2009 and 2010. Methods Using a data entry sheet, demographics and information on running experience, past and present injuries and other health problems reported en route and at the finish line by the runners were documented. The prevalence of injuries and other health problems reported by previous and first-time runners were compared. Results In both events, 16.3% and 17.2% of the runners respectively reported injuries with significant occurrence in first-time runners (p = 0.003 for 2009; p = 0.002 for 2010) mostly at the finish line. The reported injury type and site were muscle cramps and the thigh (39.7% and 76.4% respectively). Heat exhaustion was reported by 42.8% of runners in 2009 and 56.3% in 2010. Cryotherapy was mostly used in combination with other physiotherapy modalities in both years. Conclusion Most of the injuries and other health problems were reported by first-time marathon runners mainly at the finish line. The most reported site of injury was the thigh while muscle cramps and heat exhaustions were the most reported types of injuries and health problems. First-time marathon runners should be adequately informed of the predisposition to injury during marathons and adequate body conditioning should be emphasized. Ample preparation and effective involvement of the physiotherapy team is essential for management of injured runners en route and at the finish line in a marathon. PMID:24499546

  4. Running Performance, VO2max, and Running Economy: The Widespread Issue of Endogenous Selection Bias.

    PubMed

    Borgen, Nicolai T

    2018-05-01

    Studies in sport and exercise medicine routinely use samples of highly trained individuals in order to understand what characterizes elite endurance performance, such as running economy and maximal oxygen uptake VO 2max . However, it is not well understood in the literature that using such samples most certainly leads to biased findings and accordingly potentially erroneous conclusions because of endogenous selection bias. In this paper, I review the current literature on running economy and VO 2max , and discuss the literature in light of endogenous selection bias. I demonstrate that the results in a large part of the literature may be misleading, and provide some practical suggestions as to how future studies may alleviate endogenous selection bias.

  5. Optimum polygenic profile to resist exertional rhabdomyolysis during a marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Salinero, Juan José; Lara, Beatriz; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis can occur in individuals performing various types of exercise but it is unclear why some individuals develop this condition while others do not. Previous investigations have determined the role of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to explain inter-individual variability of serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exertional muscle damage. However, there has been no research about the interrelationship among these SNPs. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze seven SNPs that are candidates for explaining individual variations of CK response after a marathon competition (ACE = 287bp Ins/Del, ACTN3 = p.R577X, CKMM = NcoI, IGF2 = C13790G, IL6 = 174G>C, MLCK = C37885A, TNFα = 308G>A). Using Williams and Folland's model, we determined the total genotype score from the accumulated combination of these seven SNPs for marathoners with a low CK response (n = 36; serum CK <400 U·L-1) vs. marathoners with a high CK response (n = 31; serum CK ≥400 U·L-1). At the end of the race, low CK responders had lower serum CK (290±65 vs. 733±405 U·L-1; P<0.01) and myoglobin concentrations (443±328 vs. 1009±971 ng·mL-1, P<0.01) than high CK responders. Although the groups were similar in age, anthropometric characteristics, running experience and training habits, total genotype score was higher in low CK responders than in high CK responders (5.2±1.4 vs. 4.4±1.7 point, P = 0.02). Marathoners with a lower CK response after the race had a more favorable polygenic profile than runners with high serum CK concentrations. This might suggest a significant role of genetic polymorphisms in the levels of exertional muscle damage and rhabdomyolysis. Yet other SNPs, in addition to exercise training, might also play a role in the values of CK after damaging exercise.

  6. Optimum polygenic profile to resist exertional rhabdomyolysis during a marathon

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Marjorie; Salinero, Juan José; Lara, Beatriz; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Exertional rhabdomyolysis can occur in individuals performing various types of exercise but it is unclear why some individuals develop this condition while others do not. Previous investigations have determined the role of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to explain inter-individual variability of serum creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exertional muscle damage. However, there has been no research about the interrelationship among these SNPs. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze seven SNPs that are candidates for explaining individual variations of CK response after a marathon competition (ACE = 287bp Ins/Del, ACTN3 = p.R577X, CKMM = NcoI, IGF2 = C13790G, IL6 = 174G>C, MLCK = C37885A, TNFα = 308G>A). Methods Using Williams and Folland’s model, we determined the total genotype score from the accumulated combination of these seven SNPs for marathoners with a low CK response (n = 36; serum CK <400 U·L-1) vs. marathoners with a high CK response (n = 31; serum CK ≥400 U·L-1). Results At the end of the race, low CK responders had lower serum CK (290±65 vs. 733±405 U·L-1; P<0.01) and myoglobin concentrations (443±328 vs. 1009±971 ng·mL-1, P<0.01) than high CK responders. Although the groups were similar in age, anthropometric characteristics, running experience and training habits, total genotype score was higher in low CK responders than in high CK responders (5.2±1.4 vs. 4.4±1.7 point, P = 0.02). Conclusion Marathoners with a lower CK response after the race had a more favorable polygenic profile than runners with high serum CK concentrations. This might suggest a significant role of genetic polymorphisms in the levels of exertional muscle damage and rhabdomyolysis. Yet other SNPs, in addition to exercise training, might also play a role in the values of CK after damaging exercise. PMID:28257486

  7. Match running performance and fitness in youth soccer.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, M; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Simpson, B M; Bourdon, P C

    2010-11-01

    The activity profiles of highly trained young soccer players were examined in relation to age, playing position and physical capacity. Time-motion analyses (global positioning system) were performed on 77 (U13-U18; fullbacks [FB], centre-backs [CB], midfielders [MD], wide midfielders [W], second strikers [2 (nd)S] and strikers [S]) during 42 international club games. Total distance covered (TD) and very high-intensity activities (VHIA; >16.1 km·h (-1)) were computed during 186 entire player-matches. Physical capacity was assessed via field test measures (e. g., peak running speed during an incremental field test, VVam-eval). Match running performance showed an increasing trend with age ( P<0.001, partial eta-squared (η (2)): 0.20-0.45). When adjusted for age and individual playing time, match running performance was position-dependent ( P<0.001, η (2): 0.13-0.40). MD covered the greater TD; CB the lowest ( P<0.05). Distance for VHIA was lower for CB compared with all other positions ( P<0.05); W and S displayed the highest VHIA ( P<0.05). Relationships between match running performance and physical capacities were position-dependent, with poor or non-significant correlations within FB, CB, MD and W (e. g., VHIA vs. VVam-eval: R=0.06 in FB) but large associations within 2 (nd)S and S positions (e. g., VHIA vs. VVam-eval: R=0.70 in 2 (nd)S). In highly trained young soccer players, the importance of fitness level as a determinant of match running performance should be regarded as a function of playing position.

  8. Running Technique is an Important Component of Running Economy and Performance

    PubMed Central

    FOLLAND, JONATHAN P.; ALLEN, SAM J.; BLACK, MATTHEW I.; HANDSAKER, JOSEPH C.; FORRESTER, STEPHANIE E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite an intuitive relationship between technique and both running economy (RE) and performance, and the diverse techniques used by runners to achieve forward locomotion, the objective importance of overall technique and the key components therein remain to be elucidated. Purpose This study aimed to determine the relationship between individual and combined kinematic measures of technique with both RE and performance. Methods Ninety-seven endurance runners (47 females) of diverse competitive standards performed a discontinuous protocol of incremental treadmill running (4-min stages, 1-km·h−1 increments). Measurements included three-dimensional full-body kinematics, respiratory gases to determine energy cost, and velocity of lactate turn point. Five categories of kinematic measures (vertical oscillation, braking, posture, stride parameters, and lower limb angles) and locomotory energy cost (LEc) were averaged across 10–12 km·h−1 (the highest common velocity < velocity of lactate turn point). Performance was measured as season's best (SB) time converted to a sex-specific z-score. Results Numerous kinematic variables were correlated with RE and performance (LEc, 19 variables; SB time, 11 variables). Regression analysis found three variables (pelvis vertical oscillation during ground contact normalized to height, minimum knee joint angle during ground contact, and minimum horizontal pelvis velocity) explained 39% of LEc variability. In addition, four variables (minimum horizontal pelvis velocity, shank touchdown angle, duty factor, and trunk forward lean) combined to explain 31% of the variability in performance (SB time). Conclusions This study provides novel and robust evidence that technique explains a substantial proportion of the variance in RE and performance. We recommend that runners and coaches are attentive to specific aspects of stride parameters and lower limb angles in part to optimize pelvis movement, and ultimately enhance performance

  9. Defining the determinants of endurance running performance in the heat

    PubMed Central

    James, Carl A.; Hayes, Mark; Willmott, Ashley G. B.; Gibson, Oliver R.; Schlader, Zachary J.; Maxwell, Neil S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In cool conditions, physiologic markers accurately predict endurance performance, but it is unclear whether thermal strain and perceived thermal strain modify the strength of these relationships. This study examined the relationships between traditional determinants of endurance performance and time to complete a 5-km time trial in the heat. Seventeen club runners completed graded exercise tests (GXT) in hot (GXTHOT; 32°C, 60% RH, 27.2°C WBGT) and cool conditions (GXTCOOL; 13°C, 50% RH, 9.3°C WBGT) to determine maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max), running economy (RE), velocity at V̇O2max (vV̇O2max), and running speeds corresponding to the lactate threshold (LT, 2 mmol.l−1) and lactate turnpoint (LTP, 4 mmol.l−1). Simultaneous multiple linear regression was used to predict 5 km time, using these determinants, indicating neither GXTHOT (R2 = 0.72) nor GXTCOOL (R2 = 0.86) predicted performance in the heat as strongly has previously been reported in cool conditions. vV̇O2max was the strongest individual predictor of performance, both when assessed in GXTHOT (r = −0.83) and GXTCOOL (r = −0.90). The GXTs revealed the following correlations for individual predictors in GXTHOT; V̇O2max r = −0.7, RE r = 0.36, LT r = −0.77, LTP r = −0.78 and in GXTCOOL; V̇O2max r = −0.67, RE r = 0.62, LT r = −0.79, LTP r = −0.8. These data indicate (i) GXTHOT does not predict 5 km running performance in the heat as strongly as a GXTCOOL, (ii) as in cool conditions, vV̇O2max may best predict running performance in the heat. PMID:28944273

  10. Exercise and neuromodulators: choline and acetylcholine in marathon runners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Sabounjian, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Certain neurotransmitters (i.e., acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin) are formed from dietary constituents (i.e., choline, tyrosine and tryptophan). Changing the consumption of these precursors alters release of their respective neurotransmitter products. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine is released from the neuromuscular junction and from brain. It is formed from choline, a common constituent in fish, liver, and eggs. Choline is also incorporated into cell membranes; membranes may likewise serve as an alternative choline source for acetylcholine synthesis. In trained athletes, running a 26 km marathon reduced plasma choline by approximately 40%, from 14.1 to 8.4 uM. Changes of similar magnitude have been shown to reduce acetylcholine release from the neuromuscular junction in vivo. Thus, the reductions in plasma choline associated with strenuous exercise may reduce acetylcholine release, and could thereby affect endurance or performance.

  11. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  12. Running with emotion: when affective content hampers working memory performance.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Mammarella, Nicola; Di Domenico, Alberto; Palumbo, Rocco

    2015-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that affective content may undermine rather than facilitate working memory (WM) performance. To this end, participants performed a running WM task with positive, negative and neutral words. In typical running memory tasks, participants are presented with lists of unpredictable length and are asked to recall the last three or four items. We found that accuracy with affective words decreased as lists lengthened, whereas list length did not influence recall of neutral words. We interpreted this pattern of results in terms of a limited resource model of WM in which valence represents additional information that needs to be manipulated, especially in the context of difficult trials. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  13. Frequency of exercise-induced ST-T-segment deviations and cardiac arrhythmias in recreational endurance athletes during a marathon race: results of the prospective observational Berlin Beat of Running study

    PubMed Central

    Herm, Juliane; Töpper, Agnieszka; Wutzler, Alexander; Kunze, Claudia; Krüll, Matthias; Brechtel, Lars; Lock, Jürgen; Fiebach, Jochen B; Heuschmann, Peter U; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Endres, Matthias; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Haeusler, Karl Georg

    2017-01-01

    Objectives While regular physical exercise has many health benefits, strenuous physical exercise may have a negative impact on cardiac function. The ‘Berlin Beat of Running’ study focused on feasibility and diagnostic value of continuous ECG monitoring in recreational endurance athletes during a marathon race. We hypothesised that cardiac arrhythmias and especially atrial fibrillation are frequently found in a cohort of recreational endurance athletes. The main secondary hypothesis was that pathological laboratory findings in these athletes are (in part) associated with cardiac arrhythmias. Design Prospective observational cohort study including healthy volunteers. Setting and participants One hundred and nine experienced marathon runners wore a portable ECG recorder during a marathon race in Berlin, Germany. Athletes underwent blood tests 2–3 days prior, directly after and 1–2 days after the race. Results Overall, 108 athletes (median 48 years (IQR 45–53), 24% women) completed the marathon in 249±43 min. Blinded ECG analysis revealed abnormal findings during the marathon in 18 (16.8%) athletes. Ten (9.3%) athletes had at least one episode of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, one of whom had atrial fibrillation; eight (7.5%) individuals showed transient ST-T-segment deviations. Abnormal ECG findings were associated with advanced age (OR 1.11 per year, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.23), while sex and cardiovascular risk profile had no impact. Directly after the race, high-sensitive troponin T was elevated in 18 (16.7%) athletes and associated with ST-T-segment deviation (OR 9.9, 95% CI 1.9 to 51.5), while age, sex and cardiovascular risk profile had no impact. Conclusions ECG monitoring during a marathon is feasible. Abnormal ECG findings were present in every sixth athlete. Exercise-induced transient ST-T-segment deviations were associated with elevated high-sensitive troponin T (hsTnT) values. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01428778; Results. PMID

  14. North Pole Marathon Laboratory Lessons and Field Success.

    PubMed

    Barwood, Martin J; Burrows, Holly; Cessford, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    This case study documents the training, laboratory preparation, and in-race performance data from Great Britain's top finisher in the 13(th) edition of the UVU North Pole Marathon. We report data from a preparatory laboratory test in simulated cold conditions (-15°C) with and without wind chill during high- and low-intensity expected 'race pace' running. These tests examined the adequacy of the selected clothing assembly and provided recommendations for the race. The tests established that there was no risk of hypothermia, as the clothing assembly provided too much insulation; terminal rectal temperature was 39.25°C. Skin temperature (Tsk) data revealed no impending risk of frostbite; nadir Tsk was 20.2°C at the hamstring. Oxygen consumption data revealed the self-selected high intensity was potentially not sustainable based on estimates of substrate utilization. We recommended: 1) a maximum running speed; 2) some of the clothing base layers could be removed pre-race; 3) vents and/or zips could be used to offload or retain heat; and 4) an even pacing profile should be adopted. The participant completed the race in 6:55:24 (h:mm:ss) in temperatures of -41°C. GPS data revealed a positive pacing template (i.e., marginally quicker in the first half). Neither hypothermia nor frostbite occurred. Peak pace from the laboratory tests was not consistently exceeded. Marathon performance can be undertaken in one of the world's most inhospitable environments when careful consideration is given to clothing insulation and exercise intensity by planning for the dynamic thermal changes that may occur as the race ensues.

  15. For Head Start, a Marathon Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about a pioneering federal preschool program, launched during the War on Poverty that faces reauthorization amid competition from state programs and perennial debates about its efficacy. The nutritional, social, and educational needs of disadvantaged children--combined with opportunities for parents to be involved--have been…

  16. Prevalence of allergy and upper respiratory tract symptoms in runners of the London marathon.

    PubMed

    Robson-Ansley, Paula; Howatson, Glyn; Tallent, Jamie; Mitcheson, Kelly; Walshe, Ian; Toms, Chris; DU Toit, George; Smith, Matt; Ansley, Les

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of self-reported upper respiratory tract (URT) symptoms in athletes has been traditionally associated with opportunistic infection during the temporal suppression of immune function after prolonged exercise. There is little evidence for this, and a competing noninfectious hypothesis has been proposed, whereby the exercise-induced immune system modulations favor the development of atopy and allergic disease, which manifests as URT symptoms. The aim of this study was to examine the association between allergy and URT symptoms in runners after an endurance running event. Two hundred eight runners from the 2010 London Marathon completed the validated Allergy Questionnaire for Athletes (AQUA) and had serum analyzed for total and specific immunoglobulin E response to common inhalant allergens. Participants who completed the marathon and nonrunning controls who lived in the same household were asked to complete a diary on URT symptoms. Forty percent of runners had allergy as defined by both a positive AQUA and elevated specific immunoglobulin E. Forty-seven percent of runners experienced URT symptoms after the marathon. A positive AQUA was a significant predictor of postmarathon URT symptoms in runners. Only 19% of nonrunning controls reported symptoms. The prevalence of allergy in recreational marathon runners was similar to that in elite athletes and higher than that in the general population. There was a strong association between a positive AQUA and URT symptoms. The low proportion of households in which both runners and nonrunners were symptomatic suggests that the nature of symptoms may be allergic or inflammatory based rather than infectious. Allergy is a treatable condition, and its potential effect on performance and health may be avoided by accurate clinical diagnosis and management. Both athletes' and coaches' awareness of the potential implications of poorly managed allergy needs to be raised.

  17. The performance of the CASTOR calorimeter during LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Klundert, Merijn H. F.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    CASTOR is an electromagnetic and hadronic tungsten-quartz sampling Cerenkov calorimeter located at the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The detector has pseudorapidity borders at -5.2 and -6.6. An overview is presented on the various aspects of CASTOR’s performance and their relations during LHC Run 2. The equalisation of CASTOR’s channels is performed using beam-halo muons. Thereafter, CASTOR’s pedestal spectrum is studied. It is shown that noise estimates which are extracted using a fit, give on average a 10% lower threshold than statistical estimates. Gain correction factors, which are needed for the intercalibration, are obtained using a statistical, in-situ applicable method. The results of this method are shown to be reasonably consistent with laboratory measurements. Penultimately the absolute calibration is discussed, with emphasis on the relation between the scale uncertainty and CASTOR’s alignment. It is shown that the alignment’s contribution to the systematic uncertainty is decreased by over 50% in LHC Run 2 w.r.t. LHC Run 1. Finally generalisations of the conclusions to other subsystems and future improvements are discussed.

  18. Neuromuscular Consequences of an Extreme Mountain Ultra-Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Guillaume Y.; Tomazin, Katja; Verges, Samuel; Vincent, Christopher; Bonnefoy, Régis; Boisson, Renée-Claude; Gergelé, Laurent; Féasson, Léonard; Martin, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the physiological consequences of one of the most extreme exercises realized by humans in race conditions: a 166-km mountain ultra-marathon (MUM) with 9500 m of positive and negative elevation change. For this purpose, (i) the fatigue induced by the MUM and (ii) the recovery processes over two weeks were assessed. Evaluation of neuromuscular function (NMF) and blood markers of muscle damage and inflammation were performed before and immediately following (n = 22), and 2, 5, 9 and 16 days after the MUM (n = 11) in experienced ultra-marathon runners. Large maximal voluntary contraction decreases occurred after MUM (−35% [95% CI: −28 to −42%] and −39% [95% CI: −32 to −46%] for KE and PF, respectively), with alteration of maximal voluntary activation, mainly for KE (−19% [95% CI: −7 to −32%]). Significant modifications in markers of muscle damage and inflammation were observed after the MUM as suggested by the large changes in creatine kinase (from 144±94 to 13,633±12,626 UI L−1), myoglobin (from 32±22 to 1,432±1,209 µg L−1), and C-Reactive Protein (from <2.0 to 37.7±26.5 mg L−1). Moderate to large reductions in maximal compound muscle action potential amplitude, high-frequency doublet force, and low frequency fatigue (index of excitation-contraction coupling alteration) were also observed for both muscle groups. Sixteen days after MUM, NMF had returned to initial values, with most of the recovery process occurring within 9 days of the race. These findings suggest that the large alterations in NMF after an ultra-marathon race are multi-factorial, including failure of excitation-contraction coupling, which has never been described after prolonged running. It is also concluded that as early as two weeks after such an extreme running exercise, maximal force capacities have returned to baseline. PMID:21364944

  19. A Laboratory Test for the Examination of Alactic Running Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kibele, Armin; Behm, David

    2005-01-01

    A new testing procedure is introduced to evaluate the alactic running performance in a 10s sprint task with near-maximal movement velocity. The test is performed on a motor-equipped treadmill with inverted polarity that increases mechanical resistance instead of driving the treadmill belt. As a result, a horizontal force has to be exerted against the treadmill surface in order to overcome the resistant force of the engine and to move the surface in a backward direction. For this task, subjects lean with their hands towards the front safety barrier of the treadmill railing with a slightly inclined body posture. The required skill resembles the pushing movement of bobsleigh pilots at the start of a race. Subjects are asked to overcome this mechanical resistance and to cover as much distance as possible within a time period of 10 seconds. Fifteen male students (age: 27.7 ± 4.1 years, body height: 1.82 ± 0.46 m, body mass: 78.3 ± 6.7 kg) participated in a study. As the resistance force was set to 134 N, subjects ran 35.4 ± 2.6 m on the average corresponding to a mean running velocity of 3.52 ± 0.25 m·s-1. The validity of the new test was examined by statistical inference with various measures related to alactic performance including a metabolic equivalent to estimate alactic capacity (2892 ± 525 mL O2), an estimate for the oxygen debt (2662 ± 315 ml), the step test by Margaria to estimate alactic energy flow (1691 ± 171 W), and a test to measure the maximal strength in the leg extensor muscles (2304 ± 351 N). The statistical evaluation showed that the new test is in good agreement with the theoretical assumptions for alactic performance. Significant correlation coefficients were found between the test criteria and the measures for alactic capacity (r = 0.79, p < 0.01) as well as alactic power (r = 0.77, p < 0.01). The testing procedure is easy to administer and it is best suited to evaluate the alactic capacity for bobsleigh pilots as well as for any other

  20. [Osteoarthritis from long-distance running?].

    PubMed

    Hohmann, E; Wörtler, K; Imhoff, A

    2005-06-01

    Long distance running has become a fashionable recreational activity. This study investigated the effects of external impact loading on bone and cartilage introduced by performing a marathon race. Seven beginners were compared to six experienced recreational long distance runners and two professional athletes. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the hip and knee before and after a marathon run. Coronal T1 weighted and STIR sequences were used. The pre MRI served as a baseline investigation and monitored the training effect. All athletes demonstrated normal findings in the pre run scan. All but one athlete in the beginner group demonstrated joint effusions after the race. The experienced and professional runners failed to demonstrate pathology in the post run scans. Recreational and professional long distance runners tolerate high impact forces well. Beginners demonstrate significant changes on the post run scans. Whether those findings are a result of inadequate training (miles and duration) warrant further studies. We conclude that adequate endurance training results in adaptation mechanisms that allow the athlete to compensate for the stresses introduced by long distance running and do not predispose to the onset of osteoarthritis. Significant malalignment of the lower extremity may cause increased focal loading of joint and cartilage.

  1. Whole blood coagulation and platelet activation in the athlete: A comparison of marathon, triathlon and long distance cycling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serious thrombembolic events occur in otherwise healthy marathon athletes during competition. We tested the hypothesis that during heavy endurance sports coagulation and platelets are activated depending on the type of endurance sport with respect to its running fraction. Materials and Methods 68 healthy athletes participating in marathon (MAR, running 42 km, n = 24), triathlon (TRI, swimming 2.5 km + cycling 90 km + running 21 km, n = 22), and long distance cycling (CYC, 151 km, n = 22) were included in the study. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after completion of competition to perform rotational thrombelastometry. We assessed coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) after intrinsically activation and fibrin polymerization (FIBTEM). Furthermore, platelet aggregation was tested after activation with ADP and thrombin activating peptide 6 (TRAP) by using multiple platelet function analyzer. Results Complete data sets were obtained in 58 athletes (MAR: n = 20, TRI: n = 19, CYC: n = 19). CT significantly decreased in all groups (MAR -9.9%, TRI -8.3%, CYC -7.4%) without differences between groups. In parallel, MCF (MAR +7.4%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) and fibrin polymerization (MAR +14.7%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) were significantly increased in all groups. However, platelets were only activated during MAR and TRI as indicated by increased AUC during TRAP-activation (MAR +15.8%) and increased AUC during ADP-activation in MAR (+50.3%) and TRI (+57.5%). Discussion While coagulation is activated during physical activity irrespective of type we observed significant platelet activation only during marathon and to a lesser extent during triathlon. We speculate that prolonged running may increase platelet activity, possibly, due to mechanical alteration. Thus, particularly prolonged running may increase the risk of thrombembolic incidents in running athletes. PMID:20452885

  2. Whole blood coagulation and platelet activation in the athlete: a comparison of marathon, triathlon and long distance cycling.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Alexander A; Staib, A; Görlinger, K; Perrey, M; Dirkmann, D; Kienbaum, P

    2010-02-26

    Serious thrombembolic events occur in otherwise healthy marathon athletes during competition. We tested the hypothesis that during heavy endurance sports coagulation and platelets are activated depending on the type of endurance sport with respect to its running fraction. 68 healthy athletes participating in marathon (MAR, running 42 km, n = 24), triathlon (TRI, swimming 2.5 km + cycling 90 km + running 21 km, n = 22), and long distance cycling (CYC, 151 km, n = 22) were included in the study. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after completion of competition to perform rotational thrombelastometry. We assessed coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) after intrinsically activation and fibrin polymerization (FIBTEM). Furthermore, platelet aggregation was tested after activation with ADP and thrombin activating peptide 6 (TRAP) by using multiple platelet function analyzer. Complete data sets were obtained in 58 athletes (MAR: n = 20, TRI: n = 19, CYC: n = 19). CT significantly decreased in all groups (MAR -9.9%, TRI -8.3%, CYC -7.4%) without differences between groups. In parallel, MCF (MAR +7.4%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) and fibrin polymerization (MAR +14.7%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) were significantly increased in all groups. However, platelets were only activated during MAR and TRI as indicated by increased AUC during TRAP-activation (MAR +15.8%) and increased AUC during ADP-activation in MAR (+50.3%) and TRI (+57.5%). While coagulation is activated during physical activity irrespective of type we observed significant platelet activation only during marathon and to a lesser extent during triathlon. We speculate that prolonged running may increase platelet activity, possibly, due to mechanical alteration. Thus, particularly prolonged running may increase the risk of thrombembolic incidents in running athletes.

  3. Personal best times in an Olympic distance triathlon and in a marathon predict Ironman race time in recreational male triathletes.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define predictor variables for recreational male Ironman triathletes, using age and basic measurements of anthropometry, training, and previous performance to establish an equation for the prediction of an Ironman race time for future recreational male Ironman triathletes. Age and anthropometry, training, and previous experience variables were related to Ironman race time using bivariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 184 recreational male triathletes, of mean age 40.9 ± 8.4 years, height 1.80 ± 0.06 m, and weight 76.3 ± 8.4 kg completed the Ironman within 691 ± 83 minutes. They spent 13.9 ± 5.0 hours per week in training, covering 6.3 ± 3.1 km of swimming, 194.4 ± 76.6 km of cycling, and 45.0 ± 15.9 km of running. In total, 149 triathletes had completed at least one marathon, and 150 athletes had finished at least one Olympic distance triathlon. They had a personal best time of 130.4 ± 44.2 minutes in an Olympic distance triathlon and of 193.9 ± 31.9 minutes in marathon running. In total, 126 finishers had completed both an Olympic distance triathlon and a marathon. After multivariate analysis, both a personal best time in a marathon (P < 0.0001) and in an Olympic distance triathlon (P < 0.0001) were the best variables related to Ironman race time. Ironman race time (minutes) might be partially predicted by the following equation: (r (2) = 0.65, standard error of estimate = 56.8) = 152.1 + 1.332 × (personal best time in a marathon, minutes) + 1.964 × (personal best time in an Olympic distance triathlon, minutes). These results suggest that, in contrast with anthropometric and training characteristics, both the personal best time in an Olympic distance triathlon and in a marathon predict Ironman race time in recreational male Ironman triathletes.

  4. Personal best times in an Olympic distance triathlon and in a marathon predict Ironman race time in recreational male triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to define predictor variables for recreational male Ironman triathletes, using age and basic measurements of anthropometry, training, and previous performance to establish an equation for the prediction of an Ironman race time for future recreational male Ironman triathletes. Methods Age and anthropometry, training, and previous experience variables were related to Ironman race time using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Results A total of 184 recreational male triathletes, of mean age 40.9 ± 8.4 years, height 1.80 ± 0.06 m, and weight 76.3 ± 8.4 kg completed the Ironman within 691 ± 83 minutes. They spent 13.9 ± 5.0 hours per week in training, covering 6.3 ± 3.1 km of swimming, 194.4 ± 76.6 km of cycling, and 45.0 ± 15.9 km of running. In total, 149 triathletes had completed at least one marathon, and 150 athletes had finished at least one Olympic distance triathlon. They had a personal best time of 130.4 ± 44.2 minutes in an Olympic distance triathlon and of 193.9 ± 31.9 minutes in marathon running. In total, 126 finishers had completed both an Olympic distance triathlon and a marathon. After multivariate analysis, both a personal best time in a marathon (P < 0.0001) and in an Olympic distance triathlon (P < 0.0001) were the best variables related to Ironman race time. Ironman race time (minutes) might be partially predicted by the following equation: (r2 = 0.65, standard error of estimate = 56.8) = 152.1 + 1.332 × (personal best time in a marathon, minutes) + 1.964 × (personal best time in an Olympic distance triathlon, minutes). Conclusion These results suggest that, in contrast with anthropometric and training characteristics, both the personal best time in an Olympic distance triathlon and in a marathon predict Ironman race time in recreational male Ironman triathletes. PMID:24198578

  5. Predictor variables for a half marathon race time in recreational male runners

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Lepers, Romuald; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate predictor variables of anthropometry, training, and previous experience in order to predict a half marathon race time for future novice recreational male half marathoners. Eighty-four male finishers in the ‘Half Marathon Basel’ completed the race distance within (mean and standard deviation, SD) 103.9 (16.5) min, running at a speed of 12.7 (1.9) km/h. After multivariate analysis of the anthropometric characteristics, body mass index (r = 0.56), suprailiacal (r = 0.36) and medial calf skin fold (r = 0.53) were related to race time. For the variables of training and previous experience, speed in running of the training sessions (r = −0.54) were associated with race time. After multivariate analysis of both the significant anthropometric and training variables, body mass index (P = 0.0150) and speed in running during training (P = 0.0045) were related to race time. Race time in a half marathon might be partially predicted by the following equation (r2 = 0.44): Race time (min) = 72.91 + 3.045 * (body mass index, kg/m2) −3.884 * (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational male runners. To conclude, variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half marathon race time in recreational male half marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable. PMID:24198577

  6. Predictor variables for a half marathon race time in recreational male runners.

    PubMed

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Lepers, Romuald; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate predictor variables of anthropometry, training, and previous experience in order to predict a half marathon race time for future novice recreational male half marathoners. Eighty-four male finishers in the 'Half Marathon Basel' completed the race distance within (mean and standard deviation, SD) 103.9 (16.5) min, running at a speed of 12.7 (1.9) km/h. After multivariate analysis of the anthropometric characteristics, body mass index (r = 0.56), suprailiacal (r = 0.36) and medial calf skin fold (r = 0.53) were related to race time. For the variables of training and previous experience, speed in running of the training sessions (r = -0.54) were associated with race time. After multivariate analysis of both the significant anthropometric and training variables, body mass index (P = 0.0150) and speed in running during training (P = 0.0045) were related to race time. Race time in a half marathon might be partially predicted by the following equation (r(2) = 0.44): Race time (min) = 72.91 + 3.045 * (body mass index, kg/m(2)) -3.884 * (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational male runners. To conclude, variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half marathon race time in recreational male half marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable.

  7. Evolutionary pattern of improved 1-mile running performance.

    PubMed

    Foster, Carl; de Koning, Jos J; Thiel, Christian

    2014-07-01

    The official world records (WR) for the 1-mile run for men (3:43.13) and for women (4:12.58) have improved 12.2% and 32.3%, respectively, since the first WR recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations. Previous observations have suggested that the pacing pattern for successive laps is characteristically faster-slower-slowest-faster. However, modeling studies have suggested that uneven energy-output distribution, particularly a high velocity at the end of the race, is essentially wasted kinetic energy that could have been used to finish sooner. Here the authors report that further analysis of the pacing pattern in 32 men's WR races is characterized by a progressive reduction in the within-lap variation of pace, suggesting that improving the WR in the 1-mile run is as much about how energetic resources are managed as about the capacity of the athletes performing the race. In the women's WR races, the pattern of lap times has changed little, probably secondary to a lack of depth in the women's fields. Contemporary WR performances have been achieved a coefficient of variation of lap times on the order of 1.5-3.0%. Reasonable projection suggests that the WR is overdue for improving and may require lap times with a coefficient of variation of ~1%.

  8. Is motivation for marathon a protective factor or a risk factor of injury?

    PubMed

    Chalabaev, A; Radel, R; Ben Mahmoud, I; Massiera, B; Deroche, T; d'Arripe-Longueville, F

    2017-12-01

    This research investigated whether and how self-determined motivation predicts perceived susceptibility to injury during competition (marathon). Two correlational studies including 378 (Study 1) and 339 (Study 2) marathon runners were conducted. Participants filled out a questionnaire the day before the race measuring self-determined motivation, perceived susceptibilities to marathon-related injury and to keep running through pain, and control variables. Study 1 showed that self-determined motivation was negatively related to perceived susceptibility to marathon-related injury. Study 2 replicated this finding and showed that this relationship was partially mediated by perceived susceptibility to keep running through pain during the race. Moreover, results indicated that the predictive role of self-determination was mostly driven by controlled forms of motivation, and more particularly external regulation. These results suggest that self-determined motivation for sport is a protective factor of injury. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sex Differences in the Age of Peak Marathon Race Time.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-04-30

    Recent studies showed that women were older than men when achieving their fastest marathon race time. These studies, however, investigated a limited sample of athletes. We investigated the age of peak marathon performance in a large sample of female and male marathon finishers by using data from all finishers. We analyzed the age of peak marathon performance in 1-year and 5-year age intervals of 451,637 runners (i.e. 168,702 women and 282,935 men) who finished the ‘New York City Marathon’ between 2006 and 2016, using analysis of variance and non-linear regression analysis. During these 11 years, men were faster and older than women, the participation of women increased disproportionately to that of men resulting in a decrease of the male-to-female ratio, and relatively more women participated in the younger age groups. Most women were in the age group 30-34 years and most men in the age group 40-44 years. The fastest race time was shown at 29.7 years in women and 34.8 years in men in the 1-year age intervals, and in age group 30-34 years in women and 35-39 years in men in the 5-year age intervals. In contrast to existing findings reporting a higher age of peak marathon performance in women compared to men, we found that women achieved their best marathon race time ~5 years earlier in life than men in both 1-year and 5-year age intervals. Female athletes and their coaches should plan to achieve their fastest marathon race time at the age of ~30 years.

  10. Applied Sports Nutrition Support, Dietary Intake and Body Composition Changes of a Female Athlete Completing 26 Marathons in 26 Days: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    McManus, Chris J; Murray, Kelly A; Parry, David A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this case study is to describe the nutrition practices of a female recreational runner (VO 2 max 48.9 ml · kg -1 · min -1 ) who completed 26 marathons (42.195 km) in 26 consecutive days. Information relating to the nutritional intake of female runners during multi-day endurance events is extremely limited, yet the number of people participating year-on-year continues to increase. This case study reports the nutrition intervention, dietary intake, body composition changes and performance in the lead-up and during the 26 days. Prior to undertaking the 26 marathon challenge, three consultations were held between the athlete and a sports nutrition advisor; planning and tailoring the general diet and race-specific strategies to the endurance challenge. During the marathons, the mean energy and fluid intake was 1039.7 ± 207.9 kcal (607.1 - 1453.2) and 2.39 ± 0.35 L (1.98 - 3.19). Mean hourly carbohydrate intake was 38.9 g·hr -1 . 11 days following the completion of the 26 marathons, body mass had reduced by 4.6 kg and lean body mass increasing by 0.53 kg when compared with 20 days prior. This case study highlights the importance of providing general and event-specific nutrition education when training for such an event. This is particularly prudent for multi-day endurance running events.

  11. Marathon Groups. Facilitating the Personal Growth of Imprisoned, Black Female Heroin Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Kubiak, Larry

    1978-01-01

    Apparent success of the marathon groups in altering the perceptions of Black female heroin addicts toward the future, counseling, and themselves offers preliminary evidence that marathons may have potential as a counseling strategy with these clients. Future research needs to be performed to substantiate or reject these findings. (Author/PD)

  12. Athletes with higher VO2max present reduced oxLDL after a marathon race

    PubMed Central

    Bachi, André L L; Sierra, Ana Paula R; Rios, Francisco J O; Gonçalves, Danieli A; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Abud, Ronaldo L; Victorino, Angélica B; dos Santos, Juliana M B; Kiss, Maria Augusta D P; Pithon-Curi, Tania C; Vaisberg, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Background During a session of prolonged and exhaustive exercise, such as a marathon race, large quantities of free radicals are produced and can oxidise (ox) several molecules, such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL). To prevent oxidative damage, athletes present higher antioxidant levels. However, the effect of marathon running on the natural IgM or IgG anti-oxLDL autoantibodies is not understood. Thus, we investigated the effect of a marathon race on oxidative stress and the mechanisms of control of this stress. Methods Blood samples of 20 marathon runners were collected 24 hours before, immediately and 72 hours after a marathon race to evaluate: plasma lipid profile; serum levels of oxLDL and anti-oxLDL autoantibodies (IgM and IgG isotype) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) was also determined. Results Immediately after the race, oxLDL and TAC levels decreased in comparison to the basal levels; however, the IgM or IgG anti-oxLDL levels remain unchanged. Whereas no differences were observed in the IgM or IgG anti-oxLDL levels 72h after the marathon, the oxLDL and TAC levels returned to the basal values. Significant positive correlations were observed between oxLDL and LDL-cholesterol before, and 72h after the marathon. Significant negative correlations were observed between oxLDL and VO2max immediately after the marathon and 72 h later, as well as between oxLDL and TAC 72 h after the race. Conclusions Athletes with a higher VO2max and total antioxidant activity presented reduced LDL oxidation. The levels of IgM or IgG anti-oxLDL autoantibodies were not affected by running the marathon. PMID:27900109

  13. Male and female Ethiopian and Kenyan runners are the fastest and the youngest in both half and full marathon.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Onywera, Vincent O; Zingg, Matthias A; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    In major marathon races such as the 'World Marathon Majors', female and male East African runners particularly from Ethiopia and Kenya are the fastest. However, whether this trend appears for female and male Ethiopians and Kenyans at recreational level runners (i.e. races at national level) and in shorter road races (e.g. in half-marathon races) has not been studied yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine differences in the performance and the age of female and male runners from East Africa (i.e. Ethiopians and Kenyans) between half- and full marathons. Data from 508,108 athletes (125,894 female and 328,430 male half-marathoners and 10,205 female and 43,489 male marathoners) originating from 126 countries and competing between 1999 and 2014 in all road-based half-marathons and marathons held in one country (Switzerland) were analysed using Chi square (χ(2)) tests, mixed-effects regression analyses and one-way analyses of variance. In half-marathons, 48 women (0.038 %) and 63 men (0.019 %) were from Ethiopia and 80 women (0.063 %) and 134 men (0.040 %) from Kenya. In marathons, three women (0.029 %) and 15 men (0.034 %) were from Ethiopia and two women (0.019 %) and 33 men (0.075 %) from Kenya. There was no statistically significant association between the nationality of East Africans and the format of a race. In both women and men, the fastest race times in half-marathons and marathons were achieved by East African runners (p < 0.001). Ethiopian and Kenyan runners were the youngest in both sexes and formats of race (p < 0.001). In summary, women and men from Ethiopia and Kenya, despite they accounted for <0.1 % in half-marathons and marathons, achieved the fastest race times and were the youngest in both half-marathons and marathons. These findings confirmed in the case of half-marathon the trend previously observed in marathon races for a better performance and a younger age in East African runners from Ethiopia and Kenya.

  14. Cool running: locomotor performance at low body temperature in mammals.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A Daniella; Körtner, Gerhard; Geiser, Fritz

    2012-10-23

    Mammalian torpor saves enormous amounts of energy, but a widely assumed cost of torpor is immobility and therefore vulnerability to predators. Contrary to this assumption, some small marsupial mammals in the wild move while torpid at low body temperatures to basking sites, thereby minimizing energy expenditure during arousal. Hence, we quantified how mammalian locomotor performance is affected by body temperature. The three small marsupial species tested, known to use torpor and basking in the wild, could move while torpid at body temperatures as low as 14.8-17.9°C. Speed was a sigmoid function of body temperature, but body temperature effects on running speed were greater than those in an ectothermic lizard used for comparison. We provide the first quantitative data of movement at low body temperature in mammals, which have survival implications for wild heterothermic mammals, as directional movement at low body temperature permits both basking and predator avoidance.

  15. Increased Circulating Anti-inflammatory Cells in Marathon-trained Runners.

    PubMed

    Rehm, K; Sunesara, I; Marshall, G D

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training can alter immune function. Marathon training has been associated with an increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and an increased activity of inflammatory-based diseases, but the precise mechanisms are unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare levels of circulating CD4+  T cell subsets in the periphery of marathon-trained runners and matched non-marathon controls. 19 recreational marathoners that were 4 weeks from running a marathon and 19 demographically-matched healthy control subjects had the percentage of CD4+ T cell subpopulations (T helper 1, T helper 2, T helper 1/T helper 2 ratio, regulatory T cells, CD4+ IL10+, and CD4+ TGFβ+ (Transforming Growth Factor-beta) measured by flow cytometry. Marathon-trained runners had significantly less T helper 1 and regulatory T cells and significantly more T helper 2, CD4+ IL10+, and TGFβ+ cells than the control subjects. The alterations in the percentage of T helper 1 and T helper 2 cells led to a significantly lower T helper 1/T helper 2 ratio in the marathon-trained runners. These data suggest that endurance-based training can increase the number of anti-inflammatory cells. This may be a potential mechanism for the increased incidence of both infectious and inflammatory diseases observed in endurance athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Effects of forefoot bending elasticity of running shoes on gait and running performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Tu, Kuan-Hua; Liu, Chiang; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of forefoot bending elasticity of running shoes on kinetics and kinematics during walking and running. Twelve healthy male participants wore normal and elastic shoes while walking at 1.5m/s, jogging at 2.5m/s, and running at 3.5m/s. The elastic shoes were designed by modifying the stiffness of flexible shoes with elastic bands added to the forefoot part of the shoe sole. A Kistler force platform and Vicon system were used to collect kinetic and kinematic data during push-off. Electromyography was used to record the muscle activity of the medial gastrocnemius and medial tibialis anterior. A paired dependent t-test was used to compare the various shoes and the level of significance was set at α=.05. The range of motion of the ankle joint and the maximal anterior-posterior propulsive force differed significantly between elastic and flexible shoes in walking and jogging. The contact time and medial gastrocnemius muscle activation in the push-off phase were significantly lower for the elastic shoes compared with the flexible shoes in walking and jogging. The elastic forefoot region of shoes can alter movement characteristics in walking and jogging. However, for running, the elasticity used in this study was not strong enough to exert a similar effect. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An update on the Boston Marathon as a research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Panza, Gregory A; Taylor, Beth A; Zaleski, Amanda L; Thompson, Paul D

    2015-07-01

    The Boston Athletic Association's annual marathon, also referred to as BAA in this article, continues to be a source of subjects for exercise and endurance performance research. We performed a systematic literature review of BAA studies published in the 7 years since our prior report. We identified 20 articles published from January 2008 to February 2015. Nine were related to cardiology; six were related to exercise physiology; four were related to metabolism; and one was related to marathon qualifying times. As in our prior, report cardiovascular studies remained the dominant topic, but with risk factors for atherosclerosis and thrombosis as the present focus. Cardiac issues remain the largest subject area for BAA studies, but with more emphasis on the effect of prolonged exercise on atherosclerotic and thrombotic risk factors. This shift is associated with an increase in marathon participation by older, recreational runners at increased risk of cardiac complications due to exercise.

  18. Sedentary and active: self-reported sitting time among marathon and half-marathon participants.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Geoffrey; Pettee Gabriel, Kelley K; Kohl, Harold William

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that combined physical activity (PA) and inactivity may be more important for chronic disease risk than PA alone. A highly active yet highly sedentary population is needed to study this interaction. The present purpose is to describe the sitting habits of a group of recreational runners and determine if sitting varies with reported training duration or anticipated running velocity. Marathon and half-marathon participants completed the Multicontext Sitting Time Questionnaire and reported peak training duration, anticipated finishing time, and demographic information. Sitting time was described across 5 contexts for workdays and nonworkdays. Total sitting time was analyzed by tertiles of training duration and anticipated event running velocity. 218 participants took part in this study. Median reported training time was 6.5 hours per week. Median total sitting time was higher on workdays than nonworkdays (645 and 480 minutes, respectively, P < .0001). Total sitting time was not associated with training duration or anticipated event running velocity. These results suggest that recreational distance runners are simultaneously highly sedentary and highly active, supporting independence of sedentary behaviors and moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA. This population may provide the characteristics needed to study the joint effects of active and sedentary behaviors on health outcomes.

  19. Reduction in Post-Marathon Peak Oxygen Consumption: Sign of Cardiac Fatigue in Amateur Runners?

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana Paula Rennó; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Francisco, Ricardo Contesini; Barretto, Rodrigo Bellios de Mattos; Sierra, Carlos Anibal; Meneghelo, Romeu Sergio; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Stein, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged aerobic exercise, such as running a marathon, produces supraphysiological stress that can affect the athlete's homeostasis. Some degree of transient myocardial dysfunction ("cardiac fatigue") can be observed for several days after the race. Objective To verify if there are changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity, and cardiac inotropy and lusitropy in amateur marathoners after running a marathon. Methods The sample comprised 6 male amateur runners. All of them underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) one week before the São Paulo Marathon, and 3 to 4 days after that race. They underwent echocardiography 24 hours prior to and immediately after the marathon. All subjects were instructed not to exercise, to maintain their regular diet, ingest the same usual amount of liquids, and rest at least 8 hours a day in the period preceding the CPET. Results The athletes completed the marathon in 221.5 (207; 250) minutes. In the post-marathon CPET, there was a significant reduction in peak oxygen consumption and peak oxygen pulse compared to the results obtained before the race (50.75 and 46.35 mL.kg-1 .min-1; 19.4 and 18.1 mL.btm, respectively). The echocardiography showed a significant reduction in the s' wave (inotropic marker), but no significant change in the E/e' ratio (lusitropic marker). Conclusions In amateur runners, the marathon seems to promote changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity identified within 4 days after the race, with a reduction in the cardiac contractility. Such changes suggest that some degree of "cardiac fatigue" can occur. PMID:26760783

  20. Reduction in Post-Marathon Peak Oxygen Consumption: Sign of Cardiac Fatigue in Amateur Runners?

    PubMed

    Sierra, Ana Paula Rennó; da Silveira, Anderson Donelli; Francisco, Ricardo Contesini; Barretto, Rodrigo Bellios de Mattos; Sierra, Carlos Anibal; Meneghelo, Romeu Sergio; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Stein, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    Prolonged aerobic exercise, such as running a marathon, produces supraphysiological stress that can affect the athlete's homeostasis. Some degree of transient myocardial dysfunction ("cardiac fatigue") can be observed for several days after the race. To verify if there are changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity, and cardiac inotropy and lusitropy in amateur marathoners after running a marathon. The sample comprised 6 male amateur runners. All of them underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) one week before the São Paulo Marathon, and 3 to 4 days after that race. They underwent echocardiography 24 hours prior to and immediately after the marathon. All subjects were instructed not to exercise, to maintain their regular diet, ingest the same usual amount of liquids, and rest at least 8 hours a day in the period preceding the CPET. The athletes completed the marathon in 221.5 (207; 250) minutes. In the post-marathon CPET, there was a significant reduction in peak oxygen consumption and peak oxygen pulse compared to the results obtained before the race (50.75 and 46.35 mL.kg-1 .min-1; 19.4 and 18.1 mL.btm, respectively). The echocardiography showed a significant reduction in the s' wave (inotropic marker), but no significant change in the E/e' ratio (lusitropic marker). In amateur runners, the marathon seems to promote changes in the cardiopulmonary capacity identified within 4 days after the race, with a reduction in the cardiac contractility. Such changes suggest that some degree of "cardiac fatigue" can occur.

  1. Using Physiological Principles to Explain Sex Differences in Running and Swimming Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollman, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Demonstrated sex differences in physical characteristics are used to know the performance differences between first-placed males and females from latest world championships in swimming and running. The performance comparisons (PCs) reveal smaller differences between males and females in running sprint events than longer distance running and the…

  2. Can Unshod Running Reduce Running Injuries?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    while training for the race. Thirty five percent of the injured runners say the injuries impacted their performance during the marathon and six...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Command and General Staff College ATTN...

  3. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    SciT

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databasesmore » used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described.« less

  4. Empirical analysis on the runners' velocity distribution in city marathons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenquan; Meng, Fan

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, much researches have been performed on human temporal activity and mobility patterns, while few investigations have been made to examine the features of the velocity distributions of human mobility patterns. In this paper, we investigated empirically the velocity distributions of finishers in New York City marathon, American Chicago marathon, Berlin marathon and London marathon. By statistical analyses on the datasets of the finish time records, we captured some statistical features of human behaviors in marathons: (1) The velocity distributions of all finishers and of partial finishers in the fastest age group both follow log-normal distribution; (2) In the New York City marathon, the velocity distribution of all male runners in eight 5-kilometer internal timing courses undergoes two transitions: from log-normal distribution at the initial stage (several initial courses) to the Gaussian distribution at the middle stage (several middle courses), and to log-normal distribution at the last stage (several last courses); (3) The intensity of the competition, which is described by the root-mean-square value of the rank changes of all runners, goes weaker from initial stage to the middle stage corresponding to the transition of the velocity distribution from log-normal distribution to Gaussian distribution, and when the competition gets stronger in the last course of the middle stage, there will come a transition from Gaussian distribution to log-normal one at last stage. This study may enrich the researches on human mobility patterns and attract attentions on the velocity features of human mobility.

  5. The sportsman readjustment after transcontinental flight: a study on marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Montaruli, A; Roveda, E; Calogiuri, G; La Torre, A; Carandente, F

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the synchronizing effect of physical activity on the rest-activity cycle after a flight across different time zones, investigating the parameters linked to sleep. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the synchronizing effect of physical activity on the sleep-activity parameters after a flight across different time zones. Eighteen volunteers flew from Milan to New York for the 2007 New York City Marathon. A training program, that consisted of running sessions three times a week for one month, was planned for the twelve athletes that participated in the marathon. The athletes were divided in two groups: Morning Training Group (MTG), trained from 7:00 to 9:00; Evening Training Group (ETG) from 19:00 to 21:00. The Control Group (CG), of 6 non-athletes, did not train before the flight and did not participate in the marathon. In New York, both groups of athletes trained in the morning. Two Actigraph monitoring sessions were performed in all three groups, before the Milan-New York flight and during the stay in New York. The actigraphy made it possible to calculate sleep and activity-specific parameters; sleep and activity patterns were continuously monitored using an actometer on the wrist of the non-dominant hand. Sleep analysis done on the first night in New York showed a significant difference (P<0.05) in the Movement and Fragmentation Index (MFI) between MTG and ETG. In CG and MTG, the MFI increased after the flight, while in ETG, the MFI decreased. Activity analysis demonstrated that, in ETG, evening physical activity in Milan associated with morning activity in New York produced a shift in the Cosine Peak of the rhythm of activity. Physical activity can have a positive effect both on sleep, by improving quality, as well as on the circadian rhythm of activity, by encouraging re-synchronization after the flight.

  6. Fatty acid kinetic responses to running above or below lactate threshold.

    PubMed

    Kanaley, J A; Mottram, C D; Scanlon, P D; Jensen, M D

    1995-08-01

    During running exercise above the lactate threshold (LT), it is unknown whether free fatty acid (FFA) mobilization can meet the energy demands for fatty acid oxidation. This study was performed to determine whether FFA availability is reduced during running exercise above compared with below the LT and to assess whether the level of endurance training influences FFA mobilization. Twelve marathon runners and 12 moderately trained runners ran at a workload that was either above or below their individual LT. Fatty acid oxidation (indirect calorimetry) and FFA release ([1-14C]palmitate) were measured at baseline, throughout exercise, and at recovery. The plasma FFA rate of appearance increased during exercise in both groups; running above or below the LT, but the total FFA availability for 30 min of exercise was greater (P < 0.01) in the below LT group (marathon, 23 +/- 2 mmol; moderate, 21 +/- 2 mmol) than in the above LT group (18 +/- 3 and 13 +/- 3 mmol, respectively). Total fatty acid oxidation (indirect calorimetry) greatly exceeded circulating FFA availability, regardless of training or exercise group (P < 0.01). No statistically significant exercise intensity or training differences in fatty acid oxidation were found (above LT: marathon, 71 +/- 12, moderate, 64 +/- 17 mmol/30 min; below LT: marathon 91 +/- 12, moderate, 60 +/- 5 mmol/30 min). In conclusion, during exercise above or below LT, circulating FFA cannot meet the oxidative needs and intramuscular triglyceride stores must be utilized. Further marathon training does not enhance effective adipose tissue lipolysis during exercise compared with moderate endurance training.

  7. Running Batch Jobs on Peregrine | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    Using Resource Feature to Request Different Node Types Peregrine has several types of compute nodes incompatibility and get the job running. More information about requesting different node types in Peregrine is available. Queues In order to meet the needs of different types of jobs, nodes on Peregrine are available

  8. Optimisation of sprinting performance in running, cycling and speed skating.

    PubMed

    van Ingen Schenau, G J; de Koning, J J; de Groot, G

    1994-04-01

    Sprinting performances rely strongly on a fast acceleration at the start of a sprint and on the capacity to maintain a high velocity in the phase following the start. Simulations based on a model developed in which the generation of metabolic power is related to the mechanical destinations of power showed that for short-lasting sprinting events, the best pacing strategy is an all out effort, even if this strategy causes a strong reduction of the velocity at the end of the race. Even pacing strategies should only be used in exercises lasting longer than 80 to 100 seconds. Sprint runners, speed skaters and cyclists need a large rate of breakdown of energy rich phosphates in the first 4 to 5 seconds of the race (mechanical equivalent > 20 W/kg) in order to accelerate their body, and a power output of more than 10 W/kg in the phase following the start to maintain a high velocity. Maximal speed in running is mainly limited by the necessity to rotate the legs forwards and backwards relative to the hip joint. The acceleration phase, however, relies on powerful extensions of all leg joints. Through a comparison of the hindlimb design of highly specialised animal sprinters (as can be found among predators) and of long distance animal runners (as found among hoofed animals), it is illustrated that these 2 phases of a sprint rely on conflicting requirements: improvement of maximal speed would require lower moments of inertia of the legs whereas a faster acceleration would require the involvement of more muscle mass (not only of the hip and knee extensors but also of the plantar flexors). Maximal speed in cycling and speed skating is not limited by the necessity to move leg segments but rather on air friction and rolling or ice friction. Since the drag coefficients found for speed skaters and cyclists (about 0.8) are considerably higher than those of more streamlined bodies, much progress can still be expected from the reduction of air friction. Speed skaters and especially

  9. Exceptional running and turning performance in a mite.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Samuel; Young, Maria Ho-Yan; Wright, Jonathan C; Whitaker, Dwight L; Ahn, Anna N

    2016-03-01

    The Southern California endemic mite Paratarsotomus macropalpis was filmed in the field on a concrete substrate and in the lab to analyze stride frequency, gait and running speed under different temperature conditions and during turning. At ground temperatures ranging from 45 to 60 °C, mites ran at a mean relative speed of 192.4 ± 2.1 body lengths (BL) s(-1), exceeding the highest previously documented value for a land animal by 12.5%. Stride frequencies were also exceptionally high (up to 135 Hz), and increased with substrate temperature. Juveniles exhibited higher relative speeds than adults and possess proportionally longer legs, which allow for greater relative stride lengths. Although mites accelerated and decelerated rapidly during straight running (7.2 ± 1.2 and -10.1 ± 2.1 m s(-2), respectively), the forces involved were comparable to those found in other animals. Paratarsotomus macropalpis employs an alternating tetrapod gait during steady running. Shallow turns were accomplished by a simple asymmetry in stride length. During tight turns, mites pivoted around the tarsus of the inside third leg (L3), which thus behaved like a grappling hook. Pivot turns were characterized by a 42% decrease in turning radius and a 40% increase in angular velocity compared with non-pivot turns. The joint angle amplitudes of the inner L2 and L3 were negligible during a pivot turn. While exceptional, running speeds in P. macropalpis approximate values predicted from inter-specific scaling relationships. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Cardiac and renal function in a large cohort of amateur marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Hewing, Bernd; Schattke, Sebastian; Spethmann, Sebastian; Sanad, Wasiem; Schroeckh, Sabrina; Schimke, Ingolf; Halleck, Fabian; Peters, Harm; Brechtel, Lars; Lock, Jürgen; Baumann, Gert; Dreger, Henryk; Borges, Adrian C; Knebel, Fabian

    2015-03-21

    Participation of amateur runners in endurance races continues to increase. Previous studies of marathon runners have raised concerns about exercise-induced myocardial and renal dysfunction and damage. In our pooled analysis, we aimed to characterize changes of cardiac and renal function after marathon running in a large cohort of mostly elderly amateur marathon runners. A total of 167 participants of the Berlin-Marathon (female n = 89, male n = 78; age = 50.3 ± 11.4 years) were included and cardiac and renal function was analyzed prior to, immediately after and 2 weeks following the race by echocardiography and blood tests (including cardiac troponin T, NT-proBNP and cystatin C). Among the runners, 58% exhibited a significant increase in cardiac biomarkers after completion of the marathon. Overall, the changes in echocardiographic parameters for systolic or diastolic left and right ventricular function did not indicate relevant myocardial dysfunction. Notably, 30% of all participants showed >25% decrease in cystatin C-estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from baseline directly after the marathon; in 8%, we observed a decline of more than 50%. All cardiac and renal parameters returned to baseline ranges within 2 weeks after the marathon. The increase in cardiac biomarkers after completing a marathon was not accompanied by relevant cardiac dysfunction as assessed by echocardiography. After the race, a high proportion of runners experienced a decrease in cystatin C-estimated GFR, which is suggestive of transient, exercise-related alteration of renal function. However, we did not observe persistent detrimental effects on renal function.

  11. Characterization of Electrocardiogram Changes Throughout a Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Callaway, Clifton; Salcido, David; McEntire, Serina; Roth, Ronald; Hostler, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose There are few data examining cardiovascular physiology throughout a marathon. This study was devised to characterize electrocardiographic activity continuously throughout a marathon. Methods Cardiac activity was recorded from 19 subjects wearing a Holter monitor during a marathon. The 19 subjects (14 men and 5 women) were aged 39 ± 16 years (mean ± SD) and completed a marathon in 4:32:16 ± 1:23:35. Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), T-wave amplitude, T-wave amplitude variability, and T-wave alternans (TWA) were evaluated continuously throughout the marathon. Results Averaged across all subjects, HRV, T-wave amplitude variability, and TWA increased throughout the marathon. Increased variability in T-wave amplitude occurred in 86% of subjects, characterized by complex oscillatory patterns and TWA. Three minutes after the marathon, HR was elevated and HRV was suppressed relative to the pre-marathon state. Conclusion HRV and T-wave amplitude variability, especially in the form of TWA, increase throughout a marathon. Increasing TWA as a marathon progresses likely represents a physiologic process as no arrhythmias or cardiac events were observed. PMID:24832192

  12. Blood lactate thresholds and walking/running economy are determinants of backpack-running performance in trained soldiers.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J; Graham, Scott M; Connaboy, Christopher; Clement, Richard; Pollonini, Luca; Florida-James, Geraint D

    2017-01-01

    We developed a standardized laboratory treadmill protocol for assessing physiological responses to a simulated backpack load-carriage task in trained soldiers, and assessed the efficacy of blood lactate thresholds (LTs) and economy in predicting future backpack running success over an 8-mile course in field conditions. LTs and corresponding physiological responses were determined in 17 elite British soldiers who completed an incremental treadmill walk/run protocol to exhaustion carrying 20 kg backpack load. Treadmill velocity at the breakpoint (r = -0.85) and Δ 1 mmol l(-1) (r = -0.80) LTs, and relative V˙O2 at 4 mmol l(-1) (r = 0.76) and treadmill walk/run velocities of 6.4 (r = 0.76), 7.4 (r = 0.80), 11.4 (r = 0.66) and 12.4 (r = 0.65) km h(-1) were significantly associated with field test completion time. We report for the first time that LTs and backpack walk/run economy are major determinants of backpack load-carriage performance in trained soldiers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myocardial adaptations to recreational marathon training among middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Zilinski, Jodi L; Contursi, Miranda E; Isaacs, Stephanie K; Deluca, James R; Lewis, Gregory D; Weiner, Rory B; Hutter, Adolph M; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Troyanos, Christopher; Dyer, K Sophia; Baggish, Aaron L

    2015-02-01

    Myocardial adaptations to exercise have been well documented among competitive athletes. To what degree cardiac remodeling occurs among recreational exercisers is unknown. We sought to evaluate the effect of recreational marathon training on myocardial structure and function comprehensively. Male runners (n=45; age, 48±7 years; 64% with ≥1 cardiovascular risk factor) participated in a structured marathon-training program. Echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and laboratory evaluation were performed pre and post training to quantify changes in myocardial structure and function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and traditional cardiac risk parameters. Completion of an 18-week running program (25±9 miles/wk) led to increased cardiorespiratory fitness (peak oxygen consumption, 44.6±5.2 versus 46.3±5.4 mL/kg per minute; P<0.001). In this setting, there was a significant structural cardiac remodeling characterized by dilation of the left ventricle (end-diastolic volume, 156±26 versus 172±28 mL, P<0.001), right ventricle (end-diastolic area=27.0±4.8 versus 28.6±4.3 cm(2); P=0.02), and left atrium (end-diastolic volume, 65±19 versus 72±19; P=0.02). Functional adaptations included increases in both early (E'=12.4±2.5 versus 13.2±2.0 cm/s; P=0.007) and late (A'=11.5±1.9 versus 12.2±2.1 cm/s; P=0.02) left ventricular diastolic velocities. Myocardial remodeling was accompanied by beneficial changes in cardiovascular risk factors, including body mass index (27.0±2.7 versus 26.7±2.6 kg/m(2); P<0.001), total cholesterol (199±33 versus 192±29 mg/dL; P=0.01), low-density lipoprotein (120±29 versus 114±26 mg/dL; P=0.01), and triglycerides (100±52 versus 85±36 mg/dL; P=0.02). Among middle-aged men, recreational marathon training is associated with biventricular dilation, enhanced left ventricular diastolic function, and favorable changes in nonmyocardial determinants of cardiovascular risk. Recreational marathon training may, therefore, serve as an

  14. Effect of cycling cadence on subsequent 3 km running performance in well trained triathletes

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, T; Vercruyssen, F; Grego, F; Hausswirth, C; Lepers, R; Vallier, J; Brisswalter, J; Vleck, V

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of three cycling cadences on a subsequent 3000 m track running performance in well trained triathletes. Methods: Nine triathletes completed a maximal cycling test, three cycle-run succession sessions (20 minutes of cycling + a 3000 m run) in random order, and one isolated run (3000 m). During the cycling bout of the cycle-run sessions, subjects had to maintain for 20 minutes one of the three cycling cadences corresponding to 60, 80, and 100 rpm. The metabolic intensity during these cycling bouts corresponded approximately to the cycling competition intensity of our subjects during a sprint triathlon (> 80% O2max). Results: A significant effect of the prior cycling exercise was found on middle distance running performance without any cadence effect (625.7 (40.1), 630.0 (44.8), 637.7 (57.9), and 583.0 (28.3) seconds for the 60 rpm run, 80 rpm run, 100 rpm run, and isolated run respectively). However, during the first 500 m of the run, stride rate and running velocity were significantly higher after cycling at 80 or 100 rpm than at 60 rpm (p<0.05). Furthermore, the choice of 60 rpm was associated with a higher fraction of O2max sustained during running compared with the other conditions (p<0.05). Conclusions: The results confirm the alteration in running performance completed after the cycling event compared with the isolated run. However, no significant effect of the cadence was observed within the range usually used by triathletes. PMID:12663359

  15. ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger: Run-2 performance and Phase-1 upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Ben; Hong, Tae Min; Atlas Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Run-2 performance and Phase-1 upgrade are presented for the hardware-based level-1 calorimeter trigger (L1Calo) for the ATLAS Experiment. This trigger has a latency of about 2.2 microseconds to make a decision to help ATLAS select about 100 kHz of the most interesting collisions from the nominal LHC rate of 40 MHz. We summarize the upgrade after Run-1 (2009-2012) and discuss its performance in Run-2 (2015-current). We also outline the on-going Phase-1 upgrade for the next run (2021-2024) and its expected performance.

  16. Reliability of 5-km Running Performance in a Competitive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Philip; Board, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the reliability of a 5-km time-trial during a competitive outdoor running event. Fifteen endurance runners (age = 29.5 ± 4.3 years, height = 1.75 ± 0.08 m, body mass = 71.0 ± 7.1 kg, 5-km lifetime personal best = 19:13 ± 1:13 minutes) completed two competitive 5-km time-trials over 2 weeks. No systematic…

  17. Unstable rocker shoes promote recovery from marathon-induced muscle damage in novice runners.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, K; Inami, T; Yonezu, T; Kenmotsu, Y; Narita, T; Kawakami, Y; Kanosue, K

    2018-02-01

    We recently reported that wearing unstable rocker shoes (Masai Barefoot Technology: MBT) may enhance recovery from marathon race-induced fatigue. However, this earlier study only utilized a questionnaire. In this study, we evaluated MBT utilizing objective physiological measures of recovery from marathon-induced muscle damages. Twenty-five university student novice runners were divided into two groups. After running a full marathon, one group wore MBT shoes (MBT group), and the control group (CON) wore ordinary shoes daily for 1 week following the race. We measured maximal isometric joint torque, muscle hardness (real time tissue elastography of the strain ratio) in the lower limb muscles before, immediately after, and 1, 3, and 8 days following the marathon. We calculated the magnitude of recovery by observing the difference in each value between the first measurement and the latter measurements. Results showed that isometric torques in knee flexion recovered at the first day after the race in the MBT group while it did not recover even at the eighth day in the CON group. Muscle hardness in the gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis showed enhanced recovery in the MBT group in comparison with the CON group. Also for muscle hardness in the tibialis anterior and biceps femoris, the timing of recovery was delayed in the CON group. In conclusion, wearing MBT shoes enhanced recovery in lower leg and thigh muscles from muscle damage induced by marathon running. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The Relationship between Field Tests of Anaerobic Power and 10-km Run Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnett, Aaron M.; Berg, Kris; Latin, Richard W.; Noble, John M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between several field tests of anaerobic power (e.g., +various sprints, vertical jumps, and a plyometric leap) and distance running performance in trained adult male and female runners. Results indicate that anaerobic power is significantly related to distance running performance and may explain a meaningful…

  19. Effects of Cognitive Demand on Situational Interest and Running Task Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xihe; Chen, Senlin

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effect of cognitive demand on situational interest and performance using running tasks in physical education. Adolescents (N = 179) participated in a field study involving three different levels of cognitive demand. Running performances and situational interest were measured four times with a testing interval of seven days.…

  20. The ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger performance in Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riu, Imma; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The Level-1 trigger is the first event rate reducing step in the ATLAS detector trigger system, with an output rate of up to 100 kHz and decision latency smaller than 2.5 μs. During the LHC shutdown after Run 1, the Level-1 trigger system was upgraded at hardware, firmware and software levels. In particular, a new electronics sub-system was introduced in the real-time data processing path: the Level-1 Topological trigger system. It consists of a single electronics shelf equipped with two Level-1 Topological processor blades. They receive real-time information from the Level-1 calorimeter and muon triggers, which is processed to measure angles between trigger objects, invariant masses or other kinematic variables. Complementary to other requirements, these measurements are taken into account in the final Level-1 trigger decision. The system was installed and commissioning started in 2015 and continued during 2016. As part of the commissioning, the decisions from individual algorithms were simulated and compared with the hardware response. An overview of the Level-1 Topological trigger system design, commissioning process and impact on several event selections are illustrated.

  1. NT-proBNP concentrations in mountain marathoners.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Lippi, Giuseppe; Susta, Daniele; Barassi, Alessandra; D'Eril, Gianvico Melzi; Dogliotti, Giada; Corsi, Massimiliano M

    2010-05-01

    The 76 amino acid N-terminal proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is proposed for evaluating and monitoring heart pathologies characterized by myocardial wall stress. Strenuous exercise might generate transitory ischemia, myocardial stress, and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction, possibly inducing an increase of some biochemical parameter concentrations. An alert has been claimed owing to biochemical and instrumental signs of heart dysfunction in recreational athletes during marathon races. We studied the behaviour of NT-proBNP in 15 mountain marathoners before and after a race. The concentrations of the parameter were lower than that observed in controls at rest and were similar to that observed in professional soccer and rugby players. The concentrations significantly increased after the race. NT-proBNP is low at rest in professional athletes, and the increase after physical exercise is physiological. The marathoners, even when performing races in a high-altitude environment, show NT-proBNP concentrations similar to those of athletes from other sports disciplines, characterized by low levels of effort and by a mix of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism. The increase of NT-proBNP is linked to strenuous physical exercise and to heavy heart effort, testified also by an increase of troponin I. However, the role of the NT-proBNP could be important to screen recreational and professional marathoners to avoid possible heart problems and sudden cardiac death in subjects with occult heart disease. The results of the present study are relevant to the design and evaluation of training programs for improving strength and function of professional marathoners.

  2. Exercise-associated hyponatraemia after a marathon: case series

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, A M; Tunstall-Pedoe, D S; Kerins, M; Terris, J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To review the presentation, treatment and response of those runners from the London Marathon who presented to St Thomas' Hospital with exercise induced hyponatraemia. Design Observational case series. Setting St Thomas' Hospital, a tertiary hospital situated near the finish line of the 2003 London Marathon. Participants All runners who presented to St Thomas' Hospital on the day of the 2003 London Marathon with altered mental state whose serum sodium concentration was less than 135 mmol/L. Main outcome measures Presenting symptoms, volume and type of fluids administered and response to treatment (biochemical and clinical). Results Fourteen patients were diagnosed with exercise associated hyponatraemia with serum sodium concentrations ranging from 116 to 133 mmol/L. Eleven presented with confusion. There were long delays between the finish time and presentation time for some runners. Anecdotal descriptions suggested some runners finished the race with normal mental state then became confused. There was no correlation between running time and serum sodium level. All patients received 0.9% saline and six received 1.8% saline. Despite this, some patients demonstrated falls in serum sodium concentrations. Thirteen to fourteen patients were symptomatically well the following morning, with the remaining patient significantly improved. Conclusion Presentation of exercise associated hyponatraemia may be delayed. Optimal treatment is controversial, but the use of isotonic saline may not result in rises of serum sodium and we would suggest the early use of hypertonic fluids in symptomatic patients. PMID:16816267

  3. [MRI changes of Achilles tendon and hindfoot in experienced runners and beginners during training and after a (half)-marathon competition].

    PubMed

    Freund, W; Billich, C; Brambs, H-J; Weber, F; Schütz, U H

    2011-08-01

    Marathon running is gaining in popularity. Its benefits regarding the cardiovascular system as well as the metabolism are beyond doubt. However, whether or not there are detrimental side effects to the musculoskeletal system such as wear and tear is an unsolved question. We therefore prospectively looked at beginners and experienced runners at a city marathon during training and after the competition for lesions to the Achilles tendon (AT) or hindfoot. 73 healthy subjects were prospectively included in our study. They were recruited from the applicants of the city marathon or half-marathon. They underwent an initial clinical orthopaedic as well as three magnetic resonance (MRI) examinations. The MRI were conducted at the time point of study enrolment, near the end of training and directly (up to 72 hours) after the run. MRI evaluation (fat saturated T (2)-weighted sagittal STIR sequence) was performed by two independent experienced radiologists blinded to the clinical context. The results were compared for subgroups of runners, also a factorial analysis was performed. Statistical results were deemed significant for p ≤ 0.05. 32 women and 41 men were included. In the end there were 53 finishers and 20 non-finishers; 28 seasoned runners and 25 novices. 57 runners had no foot complaints, while 14 had foot pain during training and 13 during the marathon. Mean body weight was 71.6 kg, height was 173 cm, age was 40.2 years. Mean AT diameter was 7.0 mm and showed no change during training or after the marathon. There was no significant influence of gender on other variables investigated. There was a significant and positive correlation between AT diameter and weight (r = 0.37), also AT and height (r = 0.34), while there was negative correlation between height and signal intensity of calcaneus (r = -0.50). The signal intensity of the AT decreased during training. The signal intensity of the calcaneus decreased from inclusion until after the marathon

  4. Gait Characteristics over the Course of a Race in Recreational Marathon Competitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, John E. A.; Prebeau-Menezes, Leif; Szarko, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed gait and function of the supporting limb in participants of a marathon race at three stages: prerace, midrace (18 km), and near the end of the race (36 km). We confirmed that the most successful runners were able to maintain running speed for the duration of the race with little change in speed or gait. Speed slowed progressively…

  5. Shoulder pathoanatomy in marathon kayakers

    PubMed Central

    Hagemann, G; Rijke, A; Mars, M

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of soft and hard tissue abnormalities and their interrelations in the shoulders of marathon kayakers and to examine the pathoanatomical factors that predispose these athletes to injury. Methods: Fifty two long distance kayakers completed a questionnaire. Their shoulders were examined for range of motion, pain, and stability using a standard set of 10 clinical tests. The shoulder was subsequently scanned by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in three planes and evaluated for evidence of injury or other abnormality. The relation of clinical symptoms and MRI findings was investigated with respect to kayaker's age, number of years kayaking, and number of marathon races completed. Results: Thirty subjects were asymptomatic at the time of scanning, and twenty two showed symptoms of pain and/or instability. MRI showed acromioclavicular hypertrophy, acromial or clavicular spur, supraspinatus tendinitis, and partial tear of the supraspinatus as the most common abnormalities. Kayaker's age, number of years kayaking, and number of races completed did not relate significantly to symptoms or to the presence of an abnormality on MRI scan. Of all the pathoanatomical findings that are reported to predispose to rotator cuff injury, only acromial and clavicular spurs were found to correlate highly with supraspinatus muscle pathology. Conclusions: Rotator cuff injuries make up a large portion of the injuries seen in marathon kayakers, about twice the number reported for sprint kayakers. These injuries are the result of secondary impingement factors associated with overuse, possibly specific to kayakers, and not the result of bony restrictions around the shoulder joint. Acromioclavicular hypertrophy is a common finding in marathon kayakers, but is possibly the result of portaging or a previous injury. PMID:15273173

  6. Biological and environmental determinants of 12-minute run performance in youth.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Duarte; Maia, José; Stasinopoulos, Mikis; Gouveia, Élvio Rúbio; Antunes, António M; Thomis, Martine; Lefevre, Johan; Claessens, Albrecht; Hedeker, Donald; Malina, Robert M

    2017-11-01

    The 12-minute run is a commonly used indicator of cardiorespiratory fitness in youth. Variation in growth and maturity status as potential correlates of test performance has not been systematically addressed. To evaluate biological and environmental determinants of 12-minute run performance in Portuguese youth aged 7-17 years. Mixed-longitudinal samples of 187 boys and 142 girls were surveyed in 1996, 1997 and 1998. The 12-minute run was the indicator of cardiorespiratory fitness. Height, body mass and five skinfolds were measured and skeletal maturity was assessed. Physical activity, socioeconomic status and area of residence were obtained with a questionnaire. Multi-level modelling was used for the analysis. Chronological age and sum of five skinfolds were significant predictors of 12-minute run performance. Older boys and girls ran longer distances than younger peers, while high levels of subcutaneous fat were associated with shorter running distances. Rural boys were more proficient in the 12-minute run than urban peers. Skeletal maturity, height, body mass index, physical activity and socioeconomic status were not significant predictors of 12-minute run performances. Age and sum of skinfolds in both sexes and rural residence in boys are significant predictors of 12-minute run performance in Portuguese youth.

  7. The Relationship Between Soldier Performance on the Two-Mile Run and the 20-m Shuttle Run Test.

    PubMed

    Canino, Maria C; Cohen, Bruce S; Redmond, Jan E; Sharp, Marilyn A; Zambraski, Edward J; Foulis, Stephen A

    2018-05-01

    The 20-m shuttle run test (MSRT) is a common field test used to measure aerobic fitness in controlled environments. The U.S. Army currently assesses aerobic fitness with the two-mile run (TMR), but external factors may impact test performance. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the Army Physical Fitness Test TMR performance and the MSRT in military personnel. A group of 531 (403 males and 128 females) active duty soldiers (age: 24.0 ± 4.1 years) performed the MSRT in an indoor facility. Heart rate was monitored for the duration of the test. Post-heart rate and age-predicted maximal heart rate were utilized to determine near-maximal performance on the MSRT. The soldiers provided their most recent Army Physical Fitness Test TMR time (min). A Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression analyses were performed to examine the relationship between TMR time (min) and MSRT score (total number of shuttles completed). The study was approved by the Human Use Review Committee at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massachusetts. A significant, negative correlation exists between TMR time and MSRT score (r = -0.75, p < 0.001). Sex and MSRT score significantly predicted TMR time (adjusted R2 = 0.65, standard error of estimate = 0.97, p < 0.001) with a 95% ratio limits of agreement of ±12.6%. The resulting equation is: TMR = 17.736-2.464 × (sex) - 0.050 × (MSRT) - 0.026 × (MSRT × sex) for predicted TMR time. Males equal zero, females equal one, and MSRT score is the total number of shuttles completed. The MSRT is a strong predictor of the TMR and should be considered as a diagnostic tool when assessing aerobic fitness in active duty soldiers.

  8. Myths and Concerns Re: The Marathon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Robert, L.

    The marathon is a specific form of the psycho-process cluster which has its own identifiable characteristics, the basic one being intensity. The primary objective in structuring the marathon is to intensify physical and emotional contact in order to precipitate, encourage, and accelerate the process of behavior change. Myths which have evolved…

  9. Marathon Writing--A Letter to Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Linda Jones

    Based on a year's work with 16 second grade students, this two-part paper reports the successful use of the Marathon Writing (continuous writing for short periods on a regular basis) strategy in encouraging beginning writers to write independently. The first part of the paper explains the technique of marathon writing, and notes that even though…

  10. Effects of a Marathon Group Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treppa, Jerry A.; Fricke, Lawrence

    1972-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of a weekend marathon group experience on values of self-actualization and on the interpersonal dimnension of personality. Both experimental and control subjects showed significanly positive changes on posttest and follow-up scores. It was premature to believe that the positive effects of a marathon group…

  11. Running Performance With Nutritive and Nonnutritive Sweetened Mouth Rinses.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Keely R; Krishnan, Sridevi; Ringos, Lara; Garcia, Vanessa; Cooper, Jamie A

    2017-09-01

    Using mouth rinse (MR) with carbohydrate during exercise has been shown to act as an ergogenic aid. To investigate if nutritive or nonnutritive sweetened MR affects exercise performance and to assess the influence of sweetness intensity on endurance performance during a time trial (TT). This randomized, single-blinded study had 4 treatment conditions. Sixteen subjects (9 men, 7 women) completed a 12.8-km TT 4 different times. During each TT, subjects mouth-rinsed and expectorated a different solution at time 0 and every 12.5% of the TT. The 4 MR solutions were sucrose (S) (sweet taste and provides energy of 4 kcal/g), a lower-intensity sucralose (S1:1) (artificial sweetener that provides no energy but tastes sweet), a higher-intensity sucralose (S100:1), and water as control (C). Completion times for each TT, heart rate (HR), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were also recorded. Completion time for S was faster than for C (1:03:47 ± 00:02:17 vs 1:06:56 ± 00:02:18, respectively; P < .001) and showed a trend to be faster vs S100:1 (1:03:47 ± 00:02:17 vs 1:05:38 ± 00:02:12, respectively; P = .07). No other TT differences were found. Average HR showed a trend to be higher for S vs C (P = .08). The only difference in average or maximum RPE was for higher maximum RPE in C vs S1:1 (P = .02). A sweet-tasting MR did improve endurance performance compared with water in a significant manner (mean 4.5% improvement; 3+ min.); however, the presence of energy in the sweet MR appeared necessary since the artificial sweeteners did not improve performance more than water alone.

  12. Will women outrun men in ultra-marathon road races from 50 km to 1,000 km?

    PubMed

    Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Karner-Rezek, Klaus; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat; Lepers, Romuald; Rüst, Christoph Alexander

    2014-01-01

    It has been assumed that women would be able to outrun men in ultra-marathon running. The present study investigated the sex differences in running speed in ultra-marathons held worldwide from 50 km to 1,000 km. Changes in running speeds and the sex differences in running speeds in the annual fastest finishers in 50 km, 100 km, 200 km and 1,000 km events held worldwide from 1969-2012 were analysed using linear, non-linear and multi-level regression analyses. For the annual fastest and the annual ten fastest finishers, running speeds increased non-linearly in 50 km and 100 km, but not in 200 km and 1,000 km where running speeds remained unchanged for the annual fastest. The sex differences decreased non-linearly in 50 km and 100 km, but not in 200 and 1,000 km where the sex difference remained unchanged for the annual fastest. For the fastest women and men ever, the sex difference in running speed was lowest in 100 km (5.0%) and highest in 50 km (15.4%). For the ten fastest women and men ever, the sex difference was lowest in 100 km (10.0 ± 3.0%) and highest in 200 km (27.3 ± 5.7%). For both the fastest (r(2) = 0.003, p = 0.82) and the ten fastest finishers ever (r(2) = 0.34, p = 0.41) in 50 km, 100 km, 200 km and 1,000 km, we found no correlation between sex difference in performance and running speed. To summarize, the sex differences in running speeds decreased non-linearly in 50 km and 100 km but remained unchanged in 200 km and 1,000 km, and the sex differences in running speeds showed no change with increasing length of the race distance. These findings suggest that it is very unlikely that women will ever outrun men in ultra-marathons held from 50 km to 100 km.

  13. Coffee Ingestion Enhances One-Mile Running Race Performance.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Neil D; Richardson, Darren L; Thie, James; Taylor, Richard

    2017-11-15

    Caffeine, often in the form of coffee, is frequently supplemented by athletes in an attempt to facilitate improved performance during exercise. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of coffee ingestion as an ergogenic aid prior to a one-mile (1609 m) race. In a double-blind, randomised, crossover, placebo-controlled design 13 trained male runners completed a one-mile race 60 minutes following the ingestion of 0.09 g·kg -1 coffee (COF), 0.09 g·kg -1 decaffeinated coffee (DEC), or a placebo (PLA). All trials were dissolved in 300 ml of hot water. The race completion time was 1.3% faster following the ingestion of COF (04:35:37 ± 00:10:51 mm·ss) compared with DEC (04:39:14 ± 00:11:21 mm·ss; P=0.018; 95%CI: -0.11, -0.01; d=0.32) and 1.9% faster compared with PLA (04:41:00 ± 00:09:57 mm:ss; P=0.006; 95%CI: -0.15, -0.03; d=0.51). A large trial and time interaction for salivary caffeine concentration was observed (P<0.001; η 2 P =0.69) with a very large increase (6.40 ± 1.57 μg·ml -1 , 95%CI: 5.5, 7.3; d=3.86) following the ingestion of COF. However, only a trivial difference between DEC and PLA was observed (P=0.602; 95%CI: -0.09, 0.03; d=0.17). Furthermore, only trivial differences for blood glucose (P=0.839; η 2 P =0.02) and lactate (P=0.096; η 2 P =0.18), and maximal heart rate (P=0.286; η 2 P =0.13) were observed between trials. The results of the present study show that 60 minutes after ingesting 0.09 g·kg -1 of caffeinated coffee one-mile race performance was enhanced by 1.9% and 1.3% compared with placebo and decaffeinated coffee respectively, in trained male runners.

  14. Relationships between triathlon performance and pacing strategy during the run in an international competition.

    PubMed

    Le Meur, Yann; Bernard, Thierry; Dorel, Sylvain; Abbiss, Chris R; Honnorat, Gérard; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine relationships between athlete's pacing strategies and running performance during an international triathlon competition. Running split times for each of the 107 finishers of the 2009 European Triathlon Championships (42 females and 65 males) were determined with the use of a digital synchronized video analysis system. Five cameras were placed at various positions of the running circuit (4 laps of 2.42 km). Running speed and an index of running speed variability (IRSVrace) were subsequently calculated over each section or running split. Mean running speed over the first 1272 m of lap 1 was 0.76 km·h-1 (+4.4%) and 1.00 km·h-1 (+5.6%) faster than the mean running speed over the same section during the three last laps, for females and males, respectively (P < .001). A significant inverse correlation was observed between RSrace and IRSVrace for all triathletes (females r = -0.41, P = .009; males r = -0.65, P = .002; and whole population -0.76, P = .001). Females demonstrated higher IRSVrace compared with men (6.1 ± 0.5 km·h-1 and 4.0 ± 1.4 km·h-1, for females and males, respectively, P = .001) due to greater decrease in running speed over uphill sections. Pacing during the run appears to play a key role in high-level triathlon performance. Elite triathletes should reduce their initial running speed during international competitions, even if high levels of motivation and direct opponents lead them to adopt an aggressive strategy.

  15. Running Jobs on the Peregrine System | High-Performance Computing | NREL

    on the Peregrine high-performance computing (HPC) system. Running Different Types of Jobs Batch jobs scheduling policies - queue names, limits, etc. Requesting different node types Sample batch scripts

  16. Effects of Ramadan intermittent fasting on middle-distance running performance in well-trained runners.

    PubMed

    Brisswalter, Jeanick; Bouhlel, Ezzedine; Falola, Jean Marie; Abbiss, Christopher R; Vallier, Jean Marc; Hausswirth, Christophe; Hauswirth, Christophe

    2011-09-01

    To assess whether Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) affects 5000-m running performance and physiological parameters classically associated with middle-distance performance. Two experimental groups (Ramadan fasting, n = 9, vs control, n = 9) participated in 2 experimental sessions, one before RIF and the other at the last week of fasting. For each session, subjects completed 4 tests in the same order: a maximal running test, a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee extensor, 2 rectangular submaximal exercises on treadmill for 6 minutes at an intensity corresponding to the first ventilatory threshold (VT1), and a running performance test (5000 m). Eighteen, well-trained, middle-distance runners. Maximal oxygen consumption, MVC, running performance, running efficiency, submaximal VO(2) kinetics parameters (VO(2), VO(2)b, time constant τ, and amplitude A1) and anthropometric parameters were recorded or calculated. At the end of Ramadan fasting, a decrease in MVC was observed (-3.2%; P < 0.00001; η, 0.80), associated with an increase in the time constant of oxygen kinetics (+51%; P < 0.00007; η, 0.72) and a decrease in performance (-5%; P < 0.0007; η, 0.51). No effect was observed on running efficiency or maximal aerobic power. These results suggest that Ramadan changes in muscular performance and oxygen kinetics could affect performance during middle-distance events and need to be considered to choose training protocols during RIF.

  17. Physiological correlates of 2-mile run performance as determined using a novel on-demand treadmill.

    PubMed

    Tolfrey, Keith; Hansen, Simon A; Dutton, Katie; McKee, Tom; Jones, Andrew M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of an on-demand motorised treadmill to measure 2-mile (3.2 km) race performance and to examine the physiological variables that best predict this free-running performance in active men. Twelve men (mean (SD): age, 28 (9) years; stature, 1.79 (0.05) m; body mass, 72 (9) kg) completed the study in which maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 max), running economy, and running speedin the abstract section. They appear in the rest of the paper.), running economy, and running speed at VO2 max (vVO2 max), lactate threshold (vLT), and 4 mmol.L-1 fixed blood lactate concentration (v4) were measured. Subsequently, the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) was identified using a series of 30-min treadmill runs. Finally, each participant completed a 2-mile running performance trial on 2 separate occasions, using an on-demand treadmill that adjusts belt speed according to the participant's position on the moving belt. The average 2-mile run speed was 15.7 (SD, 1.9) km.h-1, with small individual differences between repeat-performance trials (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.99, 95% CI 0.953 to 0.996; standard error of measurement as coefficient of variation = 1.5%, 95% CI 1.0% to 2.5%). Bivariate regression analyses identified VO2 max, vVO2 max, VO2 (mL.kg-1.min-1) at MLSS, vLT, v4, and velocity at MLSS (vMLSS) as the strongest individual predictor variables (r2 = 0.69 to 0.87; standard error of the estimate = 1.08 to 0.72 km.h-1) for 2-mile running performance. The vLT and vMLSS explained 85% and 87% of the variance in running performance, respectively, suggesting that there is considerable shared variance between these parameters. In conclusion, the on-demand treadmill system provided a reliable measure of distance running performance. Both vLT and vMLSS were strong predictors of 2-mile running performance, with vMLSS explaining marginally more of the variance.

  18. Iron excess in recreational marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Mettler, S; Zimmermann, M B

    2010-05-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia may impair athletic performance, and iron supplements are commonly consumed by athletes. However, iron overload should be avoided because of the possible long-term adverse health effects. We investigated the iron status of 170 male and female recreational runners participating in the Zürich marathon. Iron deficiency was defined either as a plasma ferritin (PF) concentration <15 microg/l (iron depletion) or as the ratio of the concentrations of transferrin receptor (sTfR) to PF (sTfR:log(PF) index) of > or =4.5 (functional iron deficiency). After excluding subjects with elevated C-reactive protein concentrations, iron overload was defined as PF >200 microg/l. Iron depletion was found in only 2 out of 127 men (1.6% of the male study population) and in 12 out of 43 (28.0%) women. Functional iron deficiency was found in 5 (3.9%) and 11 (25.5%) male and female athletes, respectively. Body iron stores, calculated from the sTfR/PF ratio, were significantly higher (P<0.001) among male compared with female marathon runners. Median PF among males was 104 microg/l, and the upper limit of the PF distribution in males was 628 microg/l. Iron overload was found in 19 out of 127 (15.0%) men but only 2 out of 43 in women (4.7%). Gender (male sex), but not age, was a predictor of higher PF (P<0.001). Iron depletion was present in 28% of female runners but in <2% of males, whereas one in six male runners had signs of iron overload. Although iron supplements are widely used by athletes in an effort to increase performance, our findings indicate excess body iron may be common in male recreational runners and suggest supplements should only be used if tests of iron status indicate deficiency.

  19. Yo-Yo IR1 vs. incremental continuous running test for prediction of 3000-m performance.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Boris; Klose, Andreas; Schelleckes, Katrin; Jekat, Charlotte M; Krüger, Michael; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to compare physiological responses during the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) Test and an incremental continuous running field Test (ICRT) and to analyze their predictive value on 3000-m running performance. Forty moderately trained individuals (18 females) performed the ICRT and Yo-Yo IR1 Test to exhaustion. The ICRT was performed as graded running test with an increase of 2.0 km·h-1 after each 3 min interval for lactate diagnostic. In both tests, blood lactate levels were determined after the test and at 2 and 5 min of recovery. Heart rate (HR) was recorded to monitor differences in HR slopes and HR recovery. Comparison revealed a correlation between ICRT and Yo-Yo IR1 Test performance (R2=0.83, P<0.001), while significant differences in HRmax existed (Yo-Yo IR1, 189±10 bpm; ICRT, 195±16 bpm; P<0.005; ES=0.5). Maximum lactate levels were also different between test (Yo-Yo IR1, 10.1±2.1 mmol∙L-1; ICRT, 11.7±2.4 mmol∙L-1; P<0.01; ES=0.7). Significant inverse correlations were found between the Yo-Yo IR1 Test performance and 3000 m running time (R2=0.77, P<0.0001) as well as the ICRT and 3000 m time (R2=0.90, P<0.0001). Our data suggest that ICRT and Yo-Yo IR1 test are useful field test methods for the prediction of competitive running performances such as 3000-m runs but maximum HR and blood lactate values differ significantly. The ICRT may have higher predictive power for middle- to long- distance running performance such as 3000-m runs offering a reliable test for coaches in the recruitment of athletes or supervision of training concepts.

  20. Relationship between Achilles tendon length and running performance in well-trained male endurance runners.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiromasa; Suga, Tadashi; Takao, Kenji; Tanaka, Takahiro; Misaki, Jun; Miyake, Yuto; Nagano, Akinori; Isaka, Tadao

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) length and running performance, including running economy, in well-trained endurance runners. We also examined the reasonable portion of the AT related to running performance among AT lengths measured in three different portions. The AT lengths at three portions and cross-sectional area (CSA) of 30 endurance runners were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Each AT length was calculated as the distance from the calcaneal tuberosity to the muscle-tendon junction of the soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GM AT ), and gastrocnemius lateralis, respectively. These AT lengths were normalized with shank length. The AT CSA was calculated as the average of 10, 20, and 30 mm above the distal insertion of the AT and normalized with body mass. Running economy was evaluated by measuring energy cost during three 4-minutes submaximal treadmill running trials at 14, 16, and 18 km/h, respectively. Among three AT lengths, only a GM AT correlated significantly with personal best 5000-m race time (r=-.376, P=.046). Furthermore, GM AT correlated significantly with energy cost during submaximal treadmill running trials at 14 km/h and 18 km/h (r=-.446 and -.429, respectively, P<.05 for both), and a trend toward such significance was observed at 16 km/h (r=-.360, P=.050). In contrast, there was no correlation between AT CSA and running performance. These findings suggest that longer AT, especially GM AT , may be advantageous to achieve superior running performance, with better running economy, in endurance runners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Interindividual variability in sweat electrolyte concentration in marathoners.

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Gallo-Salazar, César; Puente, Carlos; Areces, Francisco; Salinero, Juan José; Del Coso, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium (Na(+)) intake during exercise aims to replace the Na(+) lost by sweat to avoid electrolyte imbalances, especially in endurance disciplines. However, Na(+) needs can be very different among individuals because of the great inter-individual variability in sweat electrolyte concentration. The aim of this investigation was to determine sweat electrolyte concentration in a large group of marathoners. A total of 157 experienced runners (141 men and 16 women) completed a marathon race (24.4 ± 3.6 °C and 27.7 ± 4.8 % of humidity). During the race, sweat samples were collected by using sweat patches placed on the runners' forearms. Sweat electrolyte concentration was measured by using photoelectric flame photometry. As a group, sweat Na(+) concentration was 42.9 ± 18.7 mmol·L(-1) (minimal-maximal value = 7.0-95.5 mmol·L(-1)), sweat Cl(-) concentration was 32.2 ± 15.6 mmol·L(-1) (7.3-90.6 mmol·L(-1)) and sweat K(+) concentration was 6.0 ± 0.9 mmol·L(-1) (3.1-8.0 mmol·L(-1)). Women presented lower sweat Na(+) (33.9 ± 12.1 vs 44.0 ± 19.1 mmol·L(-1); P = 0.04) and sweat Cl(-) concentrations (22.9 ± 10.5 vs 33.2 ± 15.8 mmol·L(-1); P = 0.01) than men. A 20 % of individuals presented a sweat Na(+) concentration higher than 60 mmol·L(-1) while this threshold was not surpassed by any female marathoner. Sweat electrolyte concentration did not correlate to sweat rate, age, body characteristics, experience or training. Although there was a significant correlation between sweat Na(+) concentration and running pace (r = 0.18; P = 0.03), this association was weak to interpret that sweat Na(+) concentration increased with running pace. The inter-individual variability in sweat electrolyte concentration was not explained by any individual characteristics except for individual running pace and sex. An important portion (20 %) of marathoners might need special sodium intake recommendations due to

  2. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Dan; Wightman, Sarah; Basevitch, Itay; Johnstone, James; Espejo-Sanchez, Carolina; Beckford, Chelsea; Boal, Mariette; Scruton, Adrian; Ferrandino, Mike; Merzbach, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5–3 h, 3–3.5 h, 3.5–4 h, 4–4.5 h and >4.5 h). Materials and methods A total of 97 recreational marathon runners (age 42.4 ± 9.9 years; mass 69.2 ± 11.3 kg; stature 172.8 ± 9.1 cm), with a marathon finish time of 229.1 ± 48.7 min, of whom n = 34 were female and n = 63 were male, completed an incremental treadmill test for the determination of lactate threshold (LT1), lactate turn point (LT2) and running economy (RE). Following a 7-min recovery, they completed a test to volitional exhaustion starting at LT2 for the assessment of V˙O2max. In addition, all participants completed a questionnaire gathering information on their current training regimes exploring weekly distances, training frequencies, types of sessions, longest run in a week, with estimations of training speed, and load and volume derived from these data. Results Training frequency was shown to be significantly greater for the 2.5–3 h group compared to the 3.5–4 h runners (P < 0.001) and >4.5 h group (P = 0.004), while distance per session (km·session−1) was significantly greater for the 2.5–3 h group (16.1 ± 4.2) compared to the 3.5–4 h group (15.5 ± 5.2; P = 0.01) and >4.5 h group (10.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.001). Race speed correlated with LT1 (r = 0.791), LT2 (r = 0.721) and distance per session (r = 0.563). Conclusion The data highlight profound differences for key components of marathon running (V˙O2max, LT1, LT2, RE and % V˙O2max) within a group of recreational runners with the discriminating training variables being training frequency and the absolute training speed. PMID:29200895

  3. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Dan; Wightman, Sarah; Basevitch, Itay; Johnstone, James; Espejo-Sanchez, Carolina; Beckford, Chelsea; Boal, Mariette; Scruton, Adrian; Ferrandino, Mike; Merzbach, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5-3 h, 3-3.5 h, 3.5-4 h, 4-4.5 h and >4.5 h). A total of 97 recreational marathon runners (age 42.4 ± 9.9 years; mass 69.2 ± 11.3 kg; stature 172.8 ± 9.1 cm), with a marathon finish time of 229.1 ± 48.7 min, of whom n = 34 were female and n = 63 were male, completed an incremental treadmill test for the determination of lactate threshold (LT1), lactate turn point (LT2) and running economy (RE). Following a 7-min recovery, they completed a test to volitional exhaustion starting at LT2 for the assessment of [Formula: see text]. In addition, all participants completed a questionnaire gathering information on their current training regimes exploring weekly distances, training frequencies, types of sessions, longest run in a week, with estimations of training speed, and load and volume derived from these data. Training frequency was shown to be significantly greater for the 2.5-3 h group compared to the 3.5-4 h runners ( P < 0.001) and >4.5 h group ( P = 0.004), while distance per session (km·session -1 ) was significantly greater for the 2.5-3 h group (16.1 ± 4.2) compared to the 3.5-4 h group (15.5 ± 5.2; P = 0.01) and >4.5 h group (10.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.001). Race speed correlated with LT1 ( r = 0.791), LT2 ( r = 0.721) and distance per session ( r = 0.563). The data highlight profound differences for key components of marathon running ([Formula: see text], LT1, LT2, RE and % [Formula: see text]) within a group of recreational runners with the discriminating training variables being training frequency and the absolute training speed.

  4. Effects of Whole-body Vibration Training on Sprint Running Kinematics and Explosive Strength Performance

    PubMed Central

    Giorgos, Paradisis; Elias, Zacharogiannis

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 wk of whole body vibration (WBV) training on sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance. Twenty-four volunteers (12 women and 12 men) participated in the study and were randomised (n = 12) into the experimental and control groups. The WBV group performed a 6-wk program (16-30 min·d-1, 3 times a week) on a vibration platform. The amplitude of the vibration platform was 2.5 mm and the acceleration was 2.28 g. The control group did not participate in any training. Tests were performed Pre and post the training period. Sprint running performance was measured during a 60 m sprint where running time, running speed, step length and step rate were calculated. Explosive strength performance was measured during a counter movement jump (CMJ) test, where jump height and total number of jumps performed in a period of 30 s (30CVJT). Performance in 10 m, 20 m, 40 m, 50 m and 60 m improved significantly after 6 wk of WBV training with an overall improvement of 2.7%. The step length and running speed improved by 5.1% and 3.6%, and the step rate decreased by 3.4%. The countermovement jump height increased by 3.3%, and the explosive strength endurance improved overall by 7.8%. The WBV training period of 6 wk produced significant changes in sprint running kinematics and explosive strength performance. Key pointsWBV training.Sprint running kinematics.Explosive strength performance PMID:24149223

  5. Age-Predicted Maximal Heart Rate in Recreational Marathon Runners: A Cross-Sectional Study on Fox's and Tanaka's Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-01-01

    Age-based prediction equations of maximal heart rate (HRmax), such as the popular formulas Fox's 220-age, or Tanaka's 208-0.7 × age, have been widely used in various populations. Surprisingly, so far these equations have not been validated in marathon runners, despite the importance of the role of HRmax for training purposes in endurance running. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of Fox and Tanaka equations in a large sample of women and men recreational marathon runners. Participants (n = 180, age 43.2 ± 8.5 years, VO2max 46.8 mL/min/kg, finishers in at least one marathon during the last year) performed a graded exercise test on a treadmill, where HRmax was measured. Measured HRmax correlated largely with age in the total sample (r = −0.50, p < 0.001), women (r = −0.60, p < 0.001) and men (r = −0.53, p < 0.001). In women, a large main effect of method on HRmax (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.294) was shown with measured HRmax lower than Fox-HRmax (−4.8 bpm; −8.4, −1.3) and Tanaka-HRmax (−4.9 bpm; −8.1, −1.8). In men, a moderate effect of assessment method on HRmax was found (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.066) with measured HRmax higher than Fox-HRmax (+2.8; 1.0, 4.6), Tanaka-HRmax higher than Fox-HRmax (+1.2; 0.7, 1.7). Based on these findings, it was concluded that Fox and Tanaka' formulas overestimated HRmax by ~5 bpm in women, whereas Fox underestimated HRmax in men by ~3 bpm. Thus, we recommend the further use of Tanaka's formula in men marathon runners. In addition, exercise physiologists and sport scientists should consider the observed differences among various assessment methods when performing exercise testing or prescribing training program relying on HR. PMID:29599724

  6. Age-Predicted Maximal Heart Rate in Recreational Marathon Runners: A Cross-Sectional Study on Fox's and Tanaka's Equations.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-01-01

    Age-based prediction equations of maximal heart rate (HR max ), such as the popular formulas Fox's 220-age, or Tanaka's 208-0.7 × age, have been widely used in various populations. Surprisingly, so far these equations have not been validated in marathon runners, despite the importance of the role of HR max for training purposes in endurance running. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of Fox and Tanaka equations in a large sample of women and men recreational marathon runners. Participants ( n = 180, age 43.2 ± 8.5 years, VO 2max 46.8 mL/min/kg, finishers in at least one marathon during the last year) performed a graded exercise test on a treadmill, where HR max was measured. Measured HR max correlated largely with age in the total sample ( r = -0.50, p < 0.001), women ( r = -0.60, p < 0.001) and men ( r = -0.53, p < 0.001). In women, a large main effect of method on HR max ( p = 0.001, η 2 = 0.294) was shown with measured HR max lower than Fox-HR max (-4.8 bpm; -8.4, -1.3) and Tanaka-HR max (-4.9 bpm; -8.1, -1.8). In men, a moderate effect of assessment method on HR max was found ( p = 0.001, η 2 = 0.066) with measured HR max higher than Fox-HR max (+2.8; 1.0, 4.6), Tanaka-HR max higher than Fox-HR max (+1.2; 0.7, 1.7). Based on these findings, it was concluded that Fox and Tanaka' formulas overestimated HR max by ~5 bpm in women, whereas Fox underestimated HR max in men by ~3 bpm. Thus, we recommend the further use of Tanaka's formula in men marathon runners. In addition, exercise physiologists and sport scientists should consider the observed differences among various assessment methods when performing exercise testing or prescribing training program relying on HR.

  7. Running Performance While Wearing a Heat Dissipating Compression Garment in Male Recreational Runners.

    PubMed

    Leoz-Abaurrea, Iker; Santos-Concejero, Jordan; Grobler, Lara; Engelbrecht, Louise; Aguado-Jiménez, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Leoz-Abaurrea, I, Santos-Concejero, J, Grobler, L, Engelbrecht, L, and Aguado-Jiménez, R. Running performance while wearing a heat dissipating compression garment in male recreational runners. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3367-3372, 2016-The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a heat dissipating compression garment (CG) during a running performance test. Ten male recreational runners (mean ± SD: age 23 ± 3 years; V[Combining Dot Above]O2max 55.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg·min) completed 2 identical sessions wearing either CG or conventional t-shirt (CON). Each trial included a 45-minute run at 60% of the peak treadmill speed (PTS) followed by a time to exhaustion (TTE) run at 80% of the PTS and a 10-minute recovery period. During the tests, thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses were monitored. Participants wearing the CG displayed an impaired running performance (508 ± 281 vs. 580 ± 314 seconds, p = 0.046; effect size [ES] = 0.24). In addition, a higher respiratory exchange ratio (1.06 ± 0.04 vs. 1.02 ± 0.07, p = 0.01; ES = 0.70) was observed at TTE when wearing the CG in comparison to CON. Changes in core temperature did not differ between garments after the 45-minute run (p = 0.96; ES = 0.03) or TTE (1.97 ± 0.32 vs. 1.98 ± 0.38° C; p = 0.93; ES = 0.02) for CG and CON, respectively. During recovery, significantly higher heart rate and blood lactate values were observed when wearing CG (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that the use of a heat dissipating CG may not improve running performance in male recreational runners during a running performance test to exhaustion.

  8. Resting sympatho-vagal balance is related to 10 km running performance in master endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Angelo; Bianco, Antonino; Paoli, Antonio; Cerasola, Dario; Alagna, Saverio; Messina, Giuseppe; Zangla, Daniele; Traina, Marcello

    2018-01-12

    Relationships between heart rate recovery after exercise (HRR, baseline heart rate variability measures (HRV), and time to perform a 10Km running trial (t10Km) were evaluated in "master" athletes of endurance to assess whether the measured indexes may be useful for monitoring the training status of the athletes. Ten "master" athletes of endurance, aged 40-60 years, were recruited. After baseline measures of HRV, the athletes performed a graded maximal test on treadmill and HRR was measured at 1 and 2 minutes from recovery. Subsequently they performed a 10Km running trial and t10Km was related to HRV and HRR indexes. The time to perform a 10Km running trial was significantly correlated with baseline HRV indexes. No correlation was found between t10Km and HRR. Baseline HRV measures, but not HRR, were significantly correlated with the time of performance on 10km running in "master" athletes. The enhanced parasympathetic function at rest appears to be a condition to a better performance on 10km running. HRV can be simple and useful measurements for monitoring the training stratus of athletes and their physical condition in proximity of a competition.

  9. Influence of Number of Contact Efforts on Running Performance During Game-Based Activities.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J; Jenkins, David G

    2015-09-01

    To determine the influence the number of contact efforts during a single bout has on running intensity during game-based activities and assess relationships between physical qualities and distances covered in each game. Eighteen semiprofessional rugby league players (age 23.6 ± 2.8 y) competed in 3 off-side small-sided games (2 × 10-min halves) with a contact bout performed every 2 min. The rules of each game were identical except for the number of contact efforts performed in each bout. Players performed 1, 2, or 3 × 5-s wrestles in the single-, double-, and triple-contact game, respectively. The movement demands (including distance covered and intensity of exercise) in each game were monitored using global positioning system units. Bench-press and back-squat 1-repetition maximum and the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test (30-15IFT) assessed muscle strength and high-intensity-running ability, respectively. There was little change in distance covered during the single-contact game (ES = -0.16 to -0.61), whereas there were larger reductions in the double- (ES = -0.52 to -0.81) and triple-contact (ES = -0.50 to -1.15) games. Significant relationships (P < .05) were observed between 30-15IFT and high-speed running during the single- (r = .72) and double- (r = .75), but not triple-contact (r = .20) game. There is little change in running intensity when only single contacts are performed each bout; however, when multiple contacts are performed, greater reductions in running intensity result. In addition, high-intensity-running ability is only associated with running performance when contact demands are low.

  10. Jim Peters' collapse in the 1954 Vancouver Empire Games marathon.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Tim; Mekler, Jackie; Pedoe, Dan Tunstall

    2008-08-01

    On 7 August 1954, the world 42 km marathon record holder, Jim Peters, collapsed repeatedly during the final 385 metres of the British Empire and Commonwealth Games marathon held in Vancouver, Canada. It has been assumed that Peters collapsed from heatstroke because he ran too fast and did not drink during the race, which was held in windless, cloudless conditions with a dry-bulb temperature of 28 degrees C. Hospital records made available to us indicate that Peters might not have suffered from exertional heatstroke, which classically produces a rectal temperature > 42 degrees C, cerebral effects and, usually, a fatal outcome without vigorous active cooling. Although Peters was unconscious on admission to hospital approximately 60 minutes after he was removed from the race, his rectal temperature was 39.4 degrees C and he recovered fully, even though he was managed conservatively and not actively cooled. We propose that Peters' collapse was more likely due to a combination of hyperthermia-induced fatigue which caused him to stop running; exercise-associated postural hypotension as a result of a low peripheral vascular resistance immediately he stopped running; and combined cerebral effects of hyperthermia, hypertonic hypernatraemia associated with dehydration, and perhaps undiagnosed hypoglycaemia. But none of these conditions should cause prolonged unconsciousness, raising the possibility that Peters might have suffered from a transient encephalopathy, the exact nature of which is not understood.

  11. Effect of post-exercise hydrotherapy water temperature on subsequent exhaustive running performance in normothermic conditions.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Alan; Crampton, David; Egaña, Mikel

    2013-09-01

    Despite the widespread use of cold water immersion (CWI) in normothermic conditions, little data is available on its effect on subsequent endurance performance. This study examined the effect of CWI as a recovery strategy on subsequent running performance in normothermic ambient conditions (∼22°C). Nine endurance-trained men completed two submaximal exhaustive running bouts on three separate occasions. The running bouts (Ex1 and Ex2) were separated by 15min of un-immersed seated rest (CON), hip-level CWI at 8°C (CWI-8) or hip-level CWI at 15°C (CWI-15). Intestinal temperature, blood lactate and heart rate were recorded throughout and V˙O2, running economy and exercise times were recorded during the running sessions. Running time to failure (min) during Ex2 was significantly (p<0.05, ES=0.7) longer following CWI-8 (27.7±6.3) than CON (23.3±5) but not different between CWI-15 (26.3±3.4) and CON (p=0.06, ES=0.7) or CWI-8 and CWI-15 (p=0.4, ES=0.2). Qualitative analyses showed a 95% and 89% likely beneficial effect of CWI-8 and CWI-15 during Ex2 compared with CON, respectively. Time to failure during Ex2 was significantly shorter than Ex1 only during the CON condition. Intestinal temperature and HR were significantly lower for most of Ex2 during CWI-8 and CWI-15 compared with CON but they were similar at failure for the three conditions. Blood lactate, running economy and V˙O2 were not altered by CWI. These data indicate that a 15min period of cold water immersion applied between repeated exhaustive exercise bouts significantly reduces intestinal temperature and enhances post-immersion running performance in normothermic conditions. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultramarathon trail running comparison of performance-matched men and women.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Martin D

    2008-09-01

    To determine whether women matched with men for age and performance in a 50-km trail ultramarathon performed differently than the men in 80- and 161-km trail ultramarathons. Race results from 1990 to 2007 were examined to identify finishers of the Way Too Cool 50-km Race, the American River 80-km Race, and the 161-km Western States Endurance Run in the same year. Matching of women with men for age (mean difference = 1 yr) and 50-km finish time (mean absolute variation = 1.5%) yielded 86 unique pairs from which 161-km performances were compared. A subset of 39 pairs allowed for comparison of all three races. Mean ages of the men and women were 42-44 yr, and mean +/- SD of 50-km running speed was 152 +/- 20 m x min(-1) for both sexes. Mean +/- SD running speeds for the 80-km race (151 +/- 20 and 150 +/- 22 m x min(-1) for the women and men, respectively) and for the 161-km race (102 +/- 13 and 103 +/- 12 m x min(-1) for the women and men, respectively) were not different between the women and men. Women and men who are matched for 50-km trail running performance also perform similarly in trail runs of 80- and 161-km distances.

  13. The repeated bout effect of traditional resistance exercises on running performance across 3 bouts.

    PubMed

    Doma, Kenji; Schumann, Moritz; Leicht, Anthony Scott; Heilbronn, Brian Edward; Damas, Felipe; Burt, Dean

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the repeated bout effect of 3 typical lower body resistance-training sessions on maximal and submaximal effort running performance. Twelve resistance-untrained men (age, 24 ± 4 years; height, 1.81 ± 0.10 m; body mass, 79.3 ± 10.9 kg; peak oxygen uptake, 48.2 ± 6.5 mL·kg -1 ·min -1 ; 6-repetition maximum squat, 71.7 ± 12.2 kg) undertook 3 bouts of resistance-training sessions at 6-repetitions maximum. Countermovement jump (CMJ), lower-body range of motion (ROM), muscle soreness, and creatine kinase (CK) were examined prior to and immediately, 24 h (T24), and 48 h (T48) after each resistance-training bout. Submaximal (i.e., below anaerobic threshold (AT)) and maximal (i.e., above AT) running performances were also conducted at T24 and T48. Most indirect muscle damage markers (i.e., CMJ, ROM, and muscle soreness) and submaximal running performance were significantly improved (P < 0.05; 1.9%) following the third resistance-training bout compared with the second bout. Whilst maximal running performance was also improved following the third bout (P < 0.05; 9.8%) compared with other bouts, the measures were still reduced by 12%-20% versus baseline. However, the increase in CK was attenuated following the second bout (P < 0.05) with no further protection following the third bout (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the initial bout induced the greatest change in CK; however, at least 2 bouts were required to produce protective effects on other indirect muscle damage markers and submaximal running performance measures. This suggests that submaximal running sessions should be avoided for at least 48 h after resistance training until the third bout, although a greater recovery period may be required for maximal running sessions.

  14. Marathon Group: A Six Month Followup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    The results of this study suggest that marathon groups may be an effective method for fostering the process of personal growth and self actualization in relatively healthy, growth seeking college students. (Author)

  15. Opportunity Rover Nears Mars Marathon Feat

    2015-02-10

    In February 2015, NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is approaching a cumulative driving distance on Mars equal to the length of a marathon race. This map shows the rover position relative to where it could surpass that distance.

  16. Predicting One Mile and Two Mile Run Performance from Physiological Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sucec, A. A.

    Twenty-three male distance runners between the ages of 16 and 23 who had achieved a ten-minute or better two-mile performance were tested to determine physical and physiological characteristics to be used in predictive research regarding running performance. Relative body fat ratio, metabolic data, and oxygen intake capability were among the…

  17. Cortisol and Alpha-amylase changes during an Ultra-Running Event.

    PubMed

    Deneen, Whitney P; Jones, Alexis B

    2017-01-01

    Elevated stress hormone concentrations can positively affect an athlete's overall performance during a competition, and in many cases, are necessary to be able to perform exercise. During extreme exercise, the body's ability to utilize energy efficiently can affect an athlete's performance. Elevated hormonal concentrations can have many benefits in regards to an athlete's overall performance during a competition. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of long distance running, such as seen during an ultra-running event (distances beyond 26.2 miles), on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis production of cortisol (CORT) as compared to autonomic nervous system production of salivary alpha-amylase (AA). Despite the well-known effects of exercise on CORT and AA response, it is unclear what effect running beyond the marathon distance has on these levels. This study investigates what effect long duration cardio exercise, such as running up to 100K (kilometers) distance, has on the neuroendocrine system, by means of saliva samples provided by participants signed up for an ultra-marathon event. The findings of this study show that the autonomic nervous system may present a response signal during physical stress that is independent of the HPA axis response. At distances beyond the marathon length, the production of CORT and AA was found to be suppressed for athletes, which could help them in their continued performance. Furthermore, this study recognizes a difference in the overall male and female response to stress in regards to CORT and AA production.

  18. Analysis of Running and Technical Performance in Substitute Players in International Male Rugby Union Competition.

    PubMed

    Lacome, Mathieu; Piscione, Julien; Hager, Jean-Philippe; Carling, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the patterns and performance of substitutions in 18 international 15-a-side men's rugby union matches. A semiautomatic computerized time-motion system compiled 750 performance observations for 375 players (422 forwards, 328 backs). Running and technical-performance measures included total distance run, high-intensity running (>18.0 km/h), number of individual ball possessions and passes, percentage of passes completed, and number of attempted and percentage of successful tackles. A total of 184 substitutions (85.2%) were attributed to tactical and 32 (14.8%) to injury purposes respectively. The mean period for non-injury-purpose substitutions in backs (17.7%) occurred between 70 and 75 min, while forward substitutions peaked equally between 50-55 and 60-65 min (16.4%). Substitutes generally demonstrated improved running performance compared with both starter players who completed games and players whom they replaced (small differences, ES -0.2 to 0.5) in both forwards and backs over their entire time played. There was also a trend for better running performance in forward and back substitutes over their first 10 min of play compared with the final 10 min for replaced players (small to moderate differences, ES 0.3-0.6). Finally, running performance in both forward and back substitutes was generally lower (ES -0.1 to 0.3, unclear or small differences) over their entire 2nd-half time played compared with their first 10 min of play. The impact of substitutes on technical performance was generally considered unclear. This information provides practitioners with practical data relating to the physical and technical contributions of substitutions that subsequently could enable optimization of their impact on match play.

  19. The effect of carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage drinking strategy on 10-mile running performance.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ian; James, Lewis; Croft, Louise; Williams, Clyde

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate the influence of ingesting a carbohydrate-electrolyte (CHO-E) beverage ad libitum or as a prescribed volume on 10-mile run performance and gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort. Nine male recreational runners completed the 10-mile run under the following 3 conditions: no drinking (ND; 0 ml, 0 g CHO), ad libitum drinking (AD; 315 ± 123 ml, 19 ± 7 g CHO), and prescribed drinking (PD; 1,055 ± 90 ml, 64 ± 5 g CHO). During the AD and PD trials, drinks were provided on completion of Miles 2, 4, 6, and 8. Running performance, speed (km/hr), and 10-mile run time were assessed using a global positioning satellite system. The runners' ratings of perceived exertion and GI comfort were recorded on completion of each lap of the 10-mile run. There was a significant difference (p < .10) in performance times for the 10-mile race for the ND, AD, and PD trials, which were 72:05 ± 3:36, 71:14 ± 3:35, and 72:12 ± 3.53 min:s, respectively (p = .094). Ratings of GI comfort were reduced during the PD trial in comparison with both AD and ND trials. In conclusion, runners unaccustomed to habitually drinking CHO-E beverages during training improved their 10-mile race performance with AD drinking a CHO-E beverage, in comparison with drinking a prescribed volume of the same beverage or no drinking.

  20. Some physiological demands of a half-marathon race on recreational runners.

    PubMed

    Williams, C; Nute, M L

    1983-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the physiological demands of a half-marathon race on a group of ten recreational runners (8 men and 2 women). The average running speed was 223.1 +/- 22.7 m.min-1 (mean +/- SD) for the group and this represented 79 +/- 5% VO2 max for these runners. There was a good correlation between VO2 max and performance time for the race (4 = -0.81; p less than 0.01) and an even better correlation between running speed equivalent to a blood lactate concentration of 4 mmol.l-1 and performance times (r = -0.877; p less than 0.01). The blood lactate concentration os 4 of the runners at the end of the race was 5.65 +/- 1.42 mmol.l-1 (mean +/- SD) and the estimated energy expenditure for the group was 6.22 M.J. While there was only a poor correlation between total energy expenditure and performance time for the race, the correlation coefficient was improved when the energy expenditure of each individual was expressed in KJ.kg-1 min-1 (r = 0.938; p less than 0.01).

  1. Effects of Run-Up Velocity on Performance, Kinematics, and Energy Exchanges in The Pole Vault

    PubMed Central

    Linthorne, Nicholas P.; Weetman, A. H. Gemma

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effect of run-up velocity on the peak height achieved by the athlete in the pole vault and on the corresponding changes in the athlete's kinematics and energy exchanges. Seventeen jumps by an experienced male pole vaulter were video recorded in the sagittal plane and a wide range of run-up velocities (4.5-8.5 m/s) was obtained by setting the length of the athlete's run-up (2-16 steps). A selection of performance variables, kinematic variables, energy variables, and pole variables were calculated from the digitized video data. We found that the athlete's peak height increased linearly at a rate of 0.54 m per 1 m/s increase in run-up velocity and this increase was achieved through a combination of a greater grip height and a greater push height. At the athlete's competition run-up velocity (8.4 m/s) about one third of the rate of increase in peak height arose from an increase in grip height and about two thirds arose from an increase in push height. Across the range of run-up velocities examined here the athlete always performed the basic actions of running, planting, jumping, and inverting on the pole. However, he made minor systematic changes to his jumping kinematics, vaulting kinematics, and selection of pole characteristics as the run-up velocity increased. The increase in run-up velocity and changes in the athlete's vaulting kinematics resulted in substantial changes to the magnitudes of the energy exchanges during the vault. A faster run-up produced a greater loss of energy during the take-off, but this loss was not sufficient to negate the increase in run-up velocity and the increase in work done by the athlete during the pole support phase. The athlete therefore always had a net energy gain during the vault. However, the magnitude of this gain decreased slightly as run-up velocity increased. Key pointsIn the pole vault the optimum technique is to run-up as fast as possible.The athlete's vault height increases at a rate of about 0.5 m

  2. Changes in Contributions of Swimming, Cycling, and Running Performances on Overall Triathlon Performance Over a 26-Year Period.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Marques, Elisa A; Lepers, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Figueiredo, P, Marques, EA, and Lepers, R. Changes in contributions of swimming, cycling, and running performances on overall triathlon performance over a 26-year period. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2406-2415, 2016-This study examined the changes in the individual contribution of each discipline to the overall performance of Olympic and Ironman distance triathlons among men and women. Between 1989 and 2014, overall performances and their component disciplines (swimming, cycling and running) were analyzed from the top 50 overall male and female finishers. Regression analyses determined that for the Olympic distance, the split times in swimming and running decreased over the years (r = 0.25-0.43, p ≤ 0.05), whereas the cycling split and total time remained unchanged (p > 0.05), for both sexes. For the Ironman distance, the cycling and running splits and the total time decreased (r = 0.19-0.88, p ≤ 0.05), whereas swimming time remained stable, for both men and women. The average contribution of the swimming stage (∼18%) was smaller than the cycling and running stages (p ≤ 0.05), for both distances and both sexes. Running (∼47%) and then cycling (∼36%) had the greatest contribution to overall performance for the Olympic distance (∼47%), whereas for the Ironman distance, cycling and running presented similar contributions (∼40%, p > 0.05). Across the years, in the Olympic distance, swimming contribution significantly decreased for women and men (r = 0.51 and 0.68, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas running increased for men (r = 0.33, p = 0.014). In the Ironman distance, swimming and cycling contributions changed in an undulating fashion, being inverse between the two segments, for both sexes (p < 0.01), whereas running contribution decreased for men only (r = 0.61, p = 0.001). These findings highlight that strategies to improve running performance should be the main focus on the preparation to compete in the Olympic distance; whereas, in the Ironman, both

  3. Effects of Short or Long Warm-up on Intermediate Running Performance.

    PubMed

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Vatten, Tormod; von Heimburg, Erna

    2017-01-01

    van den Tillaar, R, Vatten, T, and von Heimburg, E. Effects of short or long warm-up on intermediate running performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 37-44, 2017-The aim of the study was to compare the effects of a long warm-up (general + specific) and a short warm-up (specific) on intermediate running performance (3-minute run). Thirteen experienced endurance-trained athletes (age 23.2 ± 2.3 years, body mass 79.8 ± 8.2 kg, body height 1.82 ± 0.05 m) conducted 2 types of warm-ups in a crossover design with 1 week in between: a long warm-up (10 minutes, 80% maximal heart rate, and 8 × 60 m sprint with increasing intensity and 1 minute rest in between) and a short warm-up (8 × 60 m sprint with increasing intensity and 1 minute rest in between). Each warm-up was followed by a 3-minute running test on a nonmotorized treadmill. Total running distance, running velocity at each 30 seconds, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, oxygen uptake, and rate of perceived exertion were measured. No significant differences in running performance variables and physiological parameters were found between the 2 warm-up protocols, except for the rate of perceived exertion and heart rate, which were higher after the long warm-up and after the 3-minute running test compared with the short warm-up. It was concluded that a short warm-up is as effective as a long warm-up for intermediate performance. Therefore, athletes can choose for themselves if they want to include a general part in their warm-up routines, even though it would not enhance their running performance more compared with only using a short, specific warm-up. However, to increase efficiency of time for training or competition, these short, specific warm-ups should be performed instead of long warm-ups.

  4. Effect of resistance training regimens on treadmill running and neuromuscular performance in recreational endurance runners.

    PubMed

    Mikkola, Jussi; Vesterinen, Ville; Taipale, Ritva; Capostagno, Benoit; Häkkinen, Keijo; Nummela, Ari

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of heavy resistance, explosive resistance, and muscle endurance training on neuromuscular, endurance, and high-intensity running performance in recreational endurance runners. Twenty-seven male runners were divided into one of three groups: heavy resistance, explosive resistance or muscle endurance training. After 6 weeks of preparatory training, the groups underwent an 8-week resistance training programme as a supplement to endurance training. Before and after the 8-week training period, maximal strength (one-repetition maximum), electromyographic activity of the leg extensors, countermovement jump height, maximal speed in the maximal anaerobic running test, maximal endurance performance, maximal oxygen uptake ([V·]O(₂max)), and running economy were assessed. Maximal strength improved in the heavy (P = 0.034, effect size ES = 0.38) and explosive resistance training groups (P = 0.003, ES = 0.67) with increases in leg muscle activation (heavy: P = 0.032, ES = 0.38; explosive: P = 0.002, ES = 0.77). Only the heavy resistance training group improved maximal running speed in the maximal anaerobic running test (P = 0.012, ES = 0.52) and jump height (P = 0.006, ES = 0.59). Maximal endurance running performance was improved in all groups (heavy: P = 0.005, ES = 0.56; explosive: P = 0.034, ES = 0.39; muscle endurance: P = 0.001, ES = 0.94), with small though not statistically significant improvements in [V·]O(₂max) (heavy: ES = 0.08; explosive: ES = 0.29; muscle endurance: ES = 0.65) and running economy (ES in all groups < 0.08). All three modes of strength training used concurrently with endurance training were effective in improving treadmill running endurance performance. However, both heavy and explosive strength training were beneficial in improving neuromuscular characteristics, and heavy resistance training in particular contributed to improvements in high-intensity running characteristics. Thus, endurance

  5. The Running Performance Profile of Elite Gaelic Football Match-Play.

    PubMed

    Malone, Shane; Solan, Barry; Collins, Kieran

    2017-01-01

    Malone, S, Solan, B, and Collins, K. The running performance profile of elite Gaelic football match-play. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 30-36, 2017-The current study examined (a) the match running performance of Gaelic football and (b) the decrement in match running performance with respect to position. Global positioning satellite system technologies (4-Hz; VX Sport) were used with 3 elite intercounty teams across 3 full seasons with 250 full game data sets collected. Game movements were classified according to game actions and distance covered across speed zone thresholds (total distance [TD], high-speed running distance [HSRD; ≥17 km·h], sprint distance [SD; ≥22 km·h]; accelerations [n]; peak speed [km·h]). The influence of running performance in each quarter on the subsequent quarter was analyzed across all positional roles. The mean (±SD) TD and HSRD covered during the game were 8,889 ± 1,448 m and 1,596 ± 594 m, respectively. Results show a temporal profile for TD with reductions in the second (-4.1%), third (-5.9%) and fourth (-3.8%) quarters, respectively. There was a significant reduction in HSRD in the second (-8.8%), third (-15.9%), and fourth (-19.8%) quarters when compared to the first quarter (p < 0.001). Positional differences were observed for distance-based measures with the middle 3 positions (half-back, midfield, and half-forward) completing the highest running performances. These positions also showed increased decrements in TD and HSRD and SD across quarters. The current data indicate a reduction in exercise intensity over the duration of elite Gaelic football match-play. It is unclear if this reduction is because of fatigue, pacing, contextual factors, or nutritional strategies employed by players.

  6. Joint power and kinematics coordination in load carriage running: Implications for performance and injury.

    PubMed

    Liew, Bernard X W; Morris, Susan; Netto, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Investigating the impact of incremental load magnitude on running joint power and kinematics is important for understanding the energy cost burden and potential injury-causative mechanisms associated with load carriage. It was hypothesized that incremental load magnitude would result in phase-specific, joint power and kinematic changes within the stance phase of running, and that these relationships would vary at different running velocities. Thirty-one participants performed running while carrying three load magnitudes (0%, 10%, 20% body weight), at three velocities (3, 4, 5m/s). Lower limb trajectories and ground reaction forces were captured, and global optimization was used to derive the variables. The relationships between load magnitude and joint power and angle vectors, at each running velocity, were analyzed using Statistical Parametric Mapping Canonical Correlation Analysis. Incremental load magnitude was positively correlated to joint power in the second half of stance. Increasing load magnitude was also positively correlated with alterations in three dimensional ankle angles during mid-stance (4.0 and 5.0m/s), knee angles at mid-stance (at 5.0m/s), and hip angles during toe-off (at all velocities). Post hoc analyses indicated that at faster running velocities (4.0 and 5.0m/s), increasing load magnitude appeared to alter power contribution in a distal-to-proximal (ankle→hip) joint sequence from mid-stance to toe-off. In addition, kinematic changes due to increasing load influenced both sagittal and non-sagittal plane lower limb joint angles. This study provides a list of plausible factors that may influence running energy cost and injury risk during load carriage running. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Validity of Treadmill-Derived Critical Speed on Predicting 5000-Meter Track-Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Nimmerichter, Alfred; Novak, Nina; Triska, Christoph; Prinz, Bernhard; Breese, Brynmor C

    2017-03-01

    Nimmerichter, A, Novak, N, Triska, C, Prinz, B, and Breese, BC. Validity of treadmill-derived critical speed on predicting 5,000-meter track-running performance. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 706-714, 2017-To evaluate 3 models of critical speed (CS) for the prediction of 5,000-m running performance, 16 trained athletes completed an incremental test on a treadmill to determine maximal aerobic speed (MAS) and 3 randomly ordered runs to exhaustion at the [INCREMENT]70% intensity, at 110% and 98% of MAS. Critical speed and the distance covered above CS (D') were calculated using the hyperbolic speed-time (HYP), the linear distance-time (LIN), and the linear speed inverse-time model (INV). Five thousand meter performance was determined on a 400-m running track. Individual predictions of 5,000-m running time (t = [5,000-D']/CS) and speed (s = D'/t + CS) were calculated across the 3 models in addition to multiple regression analyses. Prediction accuracy was assessed with the standard error of estimate (SEE) from linear regression analysis and the mean difference expressed in units of measurement and coefficient of variation (%). Five thousand meter running performance (speed: 4.29 ± 0.39 m·s; time: 1,176 ± 117 seconds) was significantly better than the predictions from all 3 models (p < 0.0001). The mean difference was 65-105 seconds (5.7-9.4%) for time and -0.22 to -0.34 m·s (-5.0 to -7.5%) for speed. Predictions from multiple regression analyses with CS and D' as predictor variables were not significantly different from actual running performance (-1.0 to 1.1%). The SEE across all models and predictions was approximately 65 seconds or 0.20 m·s and is therefore considered as moderate. The results of this study have shown the importance of aerobic and anaerobic energy system contribution to predict 5,000-m running performance. Using estimates of CS and D' is valuable for predicting performance over race distances of 5,000 m.

  8. Marathon Maternity Oral History Project

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing

  9. Cognitive function in elderly marathon runners: cross-sectional data from the marathon trial (APSOEM).

    PubMed

    Winker, Robert; Lukas, Ina; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmut; Ponocny, Elisabeth; Lehrner, Johann; Tscholakoff, Dimiter; Dal-Bianco, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Cognitive impairment of the elderly contributes to morbidity, loss of quality of life, and impairment of work ability in aging western societies. Thus strategies to maintain cognitive function at an advanced age imply a great challenge to Occupational Medicine. To study whether intensive endurance exercise training is associated with better cognitive performance and increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF). Active elderly marathon runners or bicyclists older than 60 years were recruited and matched with an inactive control group according to age, sex, and education years. After exclusion of various diseases according to the study protocol 56 athletes and 58 controls could be selected for follow-up studies. The influence of endurance training on cognitive function was assessed by the use of the Vienna Neuropsychological Test Battery and the CERAD test battery. Other relevant outcomes were the levels of BDNF, IGF-1, Apo e4 carrier state, and self-ratings. The elderly marathon group performed better only in one specific cognitive task (the Five Point Test, p = 0.04) and almost significantly better in one additional test (the NAI Stroop Test, p = 0.08). Neither BDNF nor IGF-1 was related to the duration of daily exercise and no differences in the basal levels of these humoral growth factors in the exercise and the control cohort were found. Interestingly, we also found significantly decreased BDNF levels in subjects with Alzheimer's disease in the family in spite of the maintained normal cognitive performance (p = 0.01). These results suggest that extensive endurance exercise training might be beneficial for maintaining cognitive function in elderly persons. Our data demonstrate that beneficial endurance training effects are not linked to the upregulation of the examined neurotrophins. Since we found reduced BDNF-levels in subjects with a positive family history of Alzheimer's disease, we speculate that BDNF

  10. Detecting Outliers in Marathon Data by Means of the Andrews Plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehlík, Milan; Wald, Helmut; Bielik, Viktor; Petrovič, Juraj

    2011-09-01

    For an optimal race performance, it is important, that the runner keeps steady pace during most of the time of the competition. First time runners or athletes without many competitions often experience an "blow out" after a few kilometers of the race. This could happen, because of strong emotional experiences or low control of running intensity. Competition pace of half marathon of the middle level recreational athletes is approximately 10 sec quicker than their training pace. If an athlete runs the first third of race (7 km) at a pace that is 20 sec quicker than is his capacity (trainability), he would experience an "blow out" in the last third of the race. This would be reflected by reducing the running intensity and inability to keep steady pace in the last kilometers of the race and in the final time as well. In sports science, there are many diagnostic methods ([3], [2], [6]) that are used for prediction of optimal race pace tempo and final time. Otherwise there is lacking practical evidence of diagnostics methods and its use in the field (competition, race). One of the conditions that needs to be carried out is that athletes have not only similar final times, but it is important that they keep constant pace as much as possible during whole race. For this reason it is very important to find outliers. Our experimental group consisted of 20 recreational trained athletes (mean age 32,6 years±8,9). Before the race the athletes were instructed to run on the basis of their subjective feeling and previous experience. The data (running pace of each kilometer, average and maximal heart rate of each kilometer) were collected by GPS-enabled personal trainer Forerunner 305.

  11. A Comparison of Anthropometric and Training Characteristics between Female and Male Half-Marathoners and the Relationship to Race Time

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Miriam; Rüst, Christoph A.; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lower limb skin-fold thicknesses have been differentially associated with sex in elite runners. Front thigh and medial calf skin-fold appear to be related to 1,500m and 10,000m time in men but 400m time in women. The aim of the present study was to compare anthropometric and training characteristics in recreational female and male half-marathoners. Methods The association between both anthropometry and training characteristics and race time was investigated in 83 female and 147 male recreational half marathoners using bi- and multi-variate analyses. Results In men, body fat percentage (β=0.6), running speed during training (β=-3.7), and body mass index (β=1.9) were related to half-marathon race time after multi-variate analysis. After exclusion of body mass index, r2 decreased from 0.51 to 0.49, but body fat percentage (β=0.8) and running speed during training (β=-4.1) remained predictive. In women, body fat percentage (β=0.75) and speed during training (β=-6.5) were related to race time (r2=0.73). For women, the exclusion of body mass index had no consequence on the predictive variables for half-marathon race time. Conclusion To summarize, in both female and male recreational half-marathoners, both body fat percentage and running speed during training sessions were related to half-marathon race times when corrected with co-variates after multi-variate regression analyses. PMID:24868427

  12. A Comparison of Anthropometric and Training Characteristics between Female and Male Half-Marathoners and the Relationship to Race Time.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Miriam; Rüst, Christoph A; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

    2014-03-01

    Lower limb skin-fold thicknesses have been differentially associated with sex in elite runners. Front thigh and medial calf skin-fold appear to be related to 1,500m and 10,000m time in men but 400m time in women. The aim of the present study was to compare anthropometric and training characteristics in recreational female and male half-marathoners. The association between both anthropometry and training characteristics and race time was investigated in 83 female and 147 male recreational half marathoners using bi- and multi-variate analyses. In men, body fat percentage (β=0.6), running speed during training (β=-3.7), and body mass index (β=1.9) were related to half-marathon race time after multi-variate analysis. After exclusion of body mass index, r (2) decreased from 0.51 to 0.49, but body fat percentage (β=0.8) and running speed during training (β=-4.1) remained predictive. In women, body fat percentage (β=0.75) and speed during training (β=-6.5) were related to race time (r (2) =0.73). For women, the exclusion of body mass index had no consequence on the predictive variables for half-marathon race time. To summarize, in both female and male recreational half-marathoners, both body fat percentage and running speed during training sessions were related to half-marathon race times when corrected with co-variates after multi-variate regression analyses.

  13. Does Carbohydrate Intake During Endurance Running Improve Performance? A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Patrick B

    2016-12-01

    Wilson, PB. Does carbohydrate intake during endurance running improve performance? A critical review. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3539-3559, 2016-Previous review articles assessing the effects of carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged exercise have not focused on running. Given the popularity of distance running and the widespread use of carbohydrate supplements, this article reviewed the evidence for carbohydrate ingestion during endurance running. The criteria for inclusion were (a) experimental studies reported in English language including a performance task, (b) moderate-to-high intensity exercise >60 minutes (intermittent excluded), and (c) carbohydrate ingestion (mouth rinsing excluded). Thirty studies were identified with 76 women and 505 men. Thirteen of the 17 studies comparing a carbohydrate beverage(s) with water or a placebo found a between-condition performance benefit with carbohydrate, although heterogeneity in protocols precludes clear generalizations about the expected effect sizes. Additional evidence suggests that (a) performance benefits are most likely to occur during events >2 hours, although several studies showed benefits for tasks lasting 90-120 minutes; (b) consuming carbohydrate beverages above ad libitum levels increases gastrointestinal discomfort without improving performance; (c) carbohydrate gels do not influence performance for events lasting 16-21 km; and (d) multiple saccharides may benefit events >2 hours if intake is ≥1.3 g·min Given that most participants were fasted young men, inferences regarding women, adolescents, older runners, and those competing in fed conditions are hampered. Future studies should address these limitations to further elucidate the role of carbohydrate ingestion during endurance running.

  14. The Acute Effect of Concurrent Training on Running Performance over 6 Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doma, Kenji; Deakin, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effects of strength training on alternating days and endurance training on consecutive days on running performance for 6 days. Methods: Sixteen male and 8 female moderately trained individuals were evenly assigned into concurrent-training (CCT) and strength-training (ST) groups. The CCT group undertook strength…

  15. Field performance of timber bridges. 6, Hoffman Run stress-laminated deck bridge

    M. A. Ritter; P. D. Hilbrich Lee; G. J. Porter

    The Hoffman Run bridge, located just outside Dahoga, Pennsylvania, was constructed in October 1990. The bridge is a simple-span, single-lane, stress-laminated deck superstructure that is approximately 26 ft long and 16 ft wide. It is the second stress-laminated timber bridge to be constructed of hardwood lumber in Pennsylvania. The performance of the bridge was...

  16. Hematological Changes Following a Marathon Race in Males and Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Christine L.; Mushabac, Lillian H.

    This study investigated the question of hemoconcentration-hemodilution and subsequent vascular fluid shifts evidenced by marathon runners. Blood samples were taken from runners before and after the New York City Marathon of 1978 and the Fiesta Bowl Marathon of the same year. Participants were of both sexes. Tables accompanying this report present…

  17. Excessive Exercise Habits in Marathoners as Novel Indicators of Masked Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Yongbum; Kang, Duk-Ho; Kim, Chul-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background . Excessive exercise such as marathon running increases the risk of cardiovascular events that may be related to myocardial infarction and sudden death. We aimed to investigate that the exercise characteristics can be used as a novel indicator of masked hypertension. Methods . A total of 571 middle-aged recreational male marathoners were assigned to a high blood pressure group (HBPG; n = 214) or a normal blood pressure group (NBPG; n = 357). A graded exercise test was used to examine the hemodynamic response and cardiac events, and the personal exercise characteristics were recorded. Results . Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were higher in the HBPG than in the NBPG ( p < 0.05, all). The marathon history, exercise intensity, and time were longer and higher, whereas the marathon completion duration was shorter in the HBPG than in NBPG ( p < 0.05, all). HBPG showed a higher frequency of alcohol consumption than NBPG ( p < 0.05). Conclusion . More excessive exercise characteristics than the normative individuals. If the individuals exhibit high blood pressure during rest as well as exercise, the exercise characteristics could be used as a novel indicator for masked hypertension.

  18. Excessive Exercise Habits in Marathoners as Novel Indicators of Masked Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kang, Duk-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background. Excessive exercise such as marathon running increases the risk of cardiovascular events that may be related to myocardial infarction and sudden death. We aimed to investigate that the exercise characteristics can be used as a novel indicator of masked hypertension. Methods. A total of 571 middle-aged recreational male marathoners were assigned to a high blood pressure group (HBPG; n = 214) or a normal blood pressure group (NBPG; n = 357). A graded exercise test was used to examine the hemodynamic response and cardiac events, and the personal exercise characteristics were recorded. Results. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were higher in the HBPG than in the NBPG (p < 0.05, all). The marathon history, exercise intensity, and time were longer and higher, whereas the marathon completion duration was shorter in the HBPG than in NBPG (p < 0.05, all). HBPG showed a higher frequency of alcohol consumption than NBPG (p < 0.05). Conclusion. More excessive exercise characteristics than the normative individuals. If the individuals exhibit high blood pressure during rest as well as exercise, the exercise characteristics could be used as a novel indicator for masked hypertension. PMID:28293624

  19. Effects of resistance training on running economy and cross-country performance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Kyle R; Hopkins, Will G; McGuigan, Michael R; Northuis, Mark E; Kilding, Andrew E

    2013-12-01

    Heavy-resistance training and plyometric training offer distinct physiological and neuromuscular adaptations that could enhance running economy and, consequently, distance-running performance. To date, no studies have examined the effect of combining the two modes of training on running economy or performance. Fifty collegiate male and female cross-country runners performed a 5-km time trial and a series of laboratory-based tests to determine aerobic, anthropometric, biomechanical, and neuromuscular characteristics. Thereafter, each athlete participated in a season of six to eight collegiate cross-country races for 13 wk. After the first 4 wk, athletes were randomly assigned to either heavy-resistance or plyometric plus heavy-resistance training. Five days after completing their final competition, runners repeated the same set of laboratory tests. We also estimated the effects of the intervention on competition performance throughout the season using athletes of other teams as controls. Heavy-resistance training produced small-moderate improvements in peak speed, running economy, and neuromuscular characteristics relative to plyometric resistance training, whereas changes in biomechanical measures favored plyometric resistance training. Men made less gains than women in most tests. Both treatments had possibly harmful effects on competition times in men (mean = 0.5%; 90% confidence interval = ±1.2%), but there may have been benefit for some individuals. Both treatments were likely beneficial for all women (-1.2%; ±1.3%), but heavy-resistance training was possibly better than plyometric resistance training. The changes in laboratory-based parameters related to distance-running performance were consistent with the changes in competition times for women but only partly for men. Our data indicate that women should include heavy-resistance training in their programs, but men should be cautious about using it in season until more research establishes whether certain

  20. RAPPORT: running scientific high-performance computing applications on the cloud.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremy; Filippis, Ioannis; Woodbridge, Mark; Bauer, Daniela; Hong, Neil Chue; Jackson, Mike; Butcher, Sarah; Colling, David; Darlington, John; Fuchs, Brian; Harvey, Matt

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing infrastructure is now widely used in many domains, but one area where there has been more limited adoption is research computing, in particular for running scientific high-performance computing (HPC) software. The Robust Application Porting for HPC in the Cloud (RAPPORT) project took advantage of existing links between computing researchers and application scientists in the fields of bioinformatics, high-energy physics (HEP) and digital humanities, to investigate running a set of scientific HPC applications from these domains on cloud infrastructure. In this paper, we focus on the bioinformatics and HEP domains, describing the applications and target cloud platforms. We conclude that, while there are many factors that need consideration, there is no fundamental impediment to the use of cloud infrastructure for running many types of HPC applications and, in some cases, there is potential for researchers to benefit significantly from the flexibility offered by cloud platforms.

  1. Accounting for Laminar Run & Trip Drag in Supersonic Cruise Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodsell, Aga M.; Kennelly, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    An improved laminar run and trip drag correction methodology for supersonic cruise performance testing was derived. This method required more careful analysis of the flow visualization images which revealed delayed transition particularly on the inboard upper surface, even for the largest trip disks. In addition, a new code was developed to estimate the laminar run correction. Once the data were corrected for laminar run, the correct approach to the analysis of the trip drag became evident. Although the data originally appeared confusing, the corrected data are consistent with previous results. Furthermore, the modified approach, which was described in this presentation, extends prior historical work by taking into account the delayed transition caused by the blunt leading edges.

  2. Running Performance of a Pinning-Type Superconducting Magnetic Levitation Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, M.; Iwamoto, T.; Furuse, M.; Fuchino, S.; Ishii, I.

    2006-06-01

    A pinning-type superconducting magnetic levitation guide with bulk high-Tc superconductors was studied for use as a goods transportation system, an energy storage system, etc. A superconducting magnetic levitation running test apparatus with a circular track of ca. 38 m length, 12 m diameter, which comprises the magnetic rail constituted by Nd-B-Fe rare-earth permanent magnets and steel plates, was manufactured to examine loss and high-speed performance of the magnetic levitation guide. Running tests were conducted in air. These tests clarify that a vehicle supported by a superconducting magnetic levitation guide runs stably at speeds greater than 42 km/h above the circular track.

  3. Slow but tenacious: an analysis of running and gripping performance in chameleons.

    PubMed

    Herrel, Anthony; Tolley, Krystal A; Measey, G John; da Silva, Jessica M; Potgieter, Daniel F; Boller, Elodie; Boistel, Renaud; Vanhooydonck, Bieke

    2013-03-15

    Chameleons are highly specialized and mostly arboreal lizards characterized by a suite of derived characters. The grasping feet and tail are thought to be related to the arboreal lifestyle of chameleons, yet specializations for grasping are thought to exhibit a trade-off with running ability. Indeed, previous studies have demonstrated a trade-off between running and clinging performance, with faster species being poorer clingers. Here we investigate the presence of trade-offs by measuring running and grasping performance in four species of chameleon belonging to two different clades (Chamaeleo and Bradypodion). Within each clade we selected a largely terrestrial species and a more arboreal species to test whether morphology and performance are related to habitat use. Our results show that habitat drives the evolution of morphology and performance but that some of these effects are specific to each clade. Terrestrial species in both clades show poorer grasping performance than more arboreal species and have smaller hands. Moreover, hand size best predicts gripping performance, suggesting that habitat use drives the evolution of hand morphology through its effects on performance. Arboreal species also had longer tails and better tail gripping performance. No differences in sprint speed were observed between the two Chamaeleo species. Within Bradypodion, differences in sprint speed were significant after correcting for body size, yet the arboreal species were both better sprinters and had greater clinging strength. These results suggest that previously documented trade-offs may have been caused by differences between clades (i.e. a phylogenetic effect) rather than by design conflicts between running and gripping per se.

  4. Physical activity enhances metabolic fitness independently of cardiorespiratory fitness in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Laye, M J; Nielsen, M B; Hansen, L S; Knudsen, T; Pedersen, B K

    2015-01-01

    High levels of cardiovascular fitness (CRF) and physical activity (PA) are associated with decreased mortality and risk to develop metabolic diseases. The independent contributions of CRF and PA to metabolic disease risk factors are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that runners who run consistently >50 km/wk and/or >2 marathons/yr for the last 5 years have superior metabolic fitness compared to matched sedentary subjects (CRF, age, gender, and BMI). Case-control recruitment of 31 pairs of runner-sedentary subjects identified 10 matched pairs with similar VO2max (mL/min/kg) (similar-VO2max). The similar-VO2max group was compared with a group of age, gender, and BMI matched pairs who had the largest difference in VO2max (different-VO2max). Primary outcomes that defined metabolic fitness including insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting lipids, and fasting insulin were superior in runners versus sedentary controls despite similar VO2max. Furthermore, performance (velocity at VO2max, running economy), improved exercise metabolism (lactate threshold), and skeletal muscle levels of mitochondrial proteins were superior in runners versus sedentary controls with similar VO2max. In conclusion subjects with a high amount of PA have more positive metabolic health parameters independent of CRF. PA is thus a good marker against metabolic diseases.

  5. Physical Activity Enhances Metabolic Fitness Independently of Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Laye, M. J.; Nielsen, M. B.; Hansen, L. S.; Knudsen, T.; Pedersen, B. K.

    2015-01-01

    High levels of cardiovascular fitness (CRF) and physical activity (PA) are associated with decreased mortality and risk to develop metabolic diseases. The independent contributions of CRF and PA to metabolic disease risk factors are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that runners who run consistently >50 km/wk and/or >2 marathons/yr for the last 5 years have superior metabolic fitness compared to matched sedentary subjects (CRF, age, gender, and BMI). Case-control recruitment of 31 pairs of runner-sedentary subjects identified 10 matched pairs with similar VO2max (mL/min/kg) (similar-VO2max). The similar-VO2max group was compared with a group of age, gender, and BMI matched pairs who had the largest difference in VO2max (different-VO2max). Primary outcomes that defined metabolic fitness including insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting lipids, and fasting insulin were superior in runners versus sedentary controls despite similar VO2max. Furthermore, performance (velocity at VO2max, running economy), improved exercise metabolism (lactate threshold), and skeletal muscle levels of mitochondrial proteins were superior in runners versus sedentary controls with similar VO2max. In conclusion subjects with a high amount of PA have more positive metabolic health parameters independent of CRF. PA is thus a good marker against metabolic diseases. PMID:25821340

  6. Match-Play Running Performance and Exercise Intensity in Elite International Women's Rugby Sevens.

    PubMed

    Malone, Shane; Earls, Marian; Shovlin, Aidan; Eddy, Anthony; Winkelman, Nick

    2018-06-14

    Malone, S, Earls, M, Shovlin, A, Eddy, A, and Winkleman, N. Match-play running performance and exercise intensity in elite international women's rugby sevens. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-The aim of the current investigation was to describe the running and physiological performance demands of elite women's rugby sevens match-play. Twenty-seven (n = 27) rugby seven's players (24.4 ± 2.1 years; 168 ± 7.1 cm; 67.9 ± 4.3 kg) were recruited for the current investigation. Across the observational period, 36 games were analyzed; during these games, players wore global positioning system technology (10-Hz, Statsports Viper Pod; STATSports, Newry, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom) and heart rate monitors (Polar Team System, Polar Electro Oy, Kempele, Finland). A total of 250 individual player data sets were obtained for final analysis. Players were categorized based on positional groups; backs and forwards, and monitored across halves of play. The mean distance covered during match-play was 1,625 ± 132 m which equates to a relative running performance of 116.8 ± 9.4 m·min. The high-speed distance of players was 199 ± 44 m, which equates to a relative high-speed running performance of 14.2 ± 3.1 m·min. Significant reductions in high-speed running (p = 0.003; effect size [ES]: 0.23; 90% confidence interval [CI]: 0.11-0.41) and significant increases in lower speed running were observed across halves of play (p = 0.04; ES: 0.33; 90% CI: 0.16-0.54). Across the duration of match-play, players spent over 75% of the time above 80% of heart rate maximum (HRmax). Backs were found to have a higher reduction in total distance (p = 0.345; ES: 0.21; 90% CI: 0.11-0.31), high-speed distance (p = 0.04; ES: 0.61; 90% CI: 0.48-0.77), sprint distance (p = 0.034; ES: 0.11; 90% CI: 0.02-0.21), and average sprint distance (p = 0.03; ES: 0.33; 90% CI: 0.08-0.44) across halves of play when compared to forwards. Normative data are now provided to coaches who need to consider the

  7. The Influence of Rotations on Match Running Performance in Female Australian Football Midfielders.

    PubMed

    Black, Georgia M; Gabbett, Tim J; Johnston, Richard D; Naughton, Geraldine; Cole, Michael H; Dawson, Brian

    2018-04-01

    With female Australian football (AF) gaining popularity, understanding match demands is becoming increasingly important. The aim of this study was to compare running performances of rotated and whole-quarter state-level female AF players during match quarters. Twenty-two state-level female AF midfielders wore Global Positioning System units during 14 games to evaluate activity profiles. The Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) was used as a measure of high-intensity running ability. Data were categorized into whole quarter, rotation bout 1, and rotation bout 2 before being further divided into quartiles. Players were separated into high- or low-Yo-Yo IR1 groups using a median split based on their Yo-Yo IR1 performance. Short (4-6 min), moderate (6-12 min), and long (12-18 min) on-field bout activity profiles were compared with whole-quarter players. High Yo-Yo IR1 performance allowed players to cover greater relative distances (ES = 0.57-0.88) and high-speed distances (ES = 0.57-0.86) during rotations. No differences were reported between Yo-Yo IR1 groups when players were required to play whole quarters (ES ≤ 0.26, likelihood ≤64%). Players who were on field for short to moderate durations exhibited greater activity profiles than whole-quarter players. Superior high-speed running ability results in a greater activity profile than for players who possess lower high-speed running ability. The findings also highlight the importance of short to moderate (4-12 min) rotation periods and may be used to increase high-intensity running performance within quarters in female AF players.

  8. Prevalence of Hyponatremia, Renal Dysfunction, and Other Electrolyte Abnormalities Among Runners Before and After Completing a Marathon or Half Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Michael; Silvers, Scott; McNeil, Rebecca; Diehl, Nancy; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Taylor, Walt; Shapiro, Shane; Roth, Jennifer; Mahoney, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Background: Prior reports on metabolic derangements observed in distance running frequently have small sample sizes, lack prerace laboratory measures, and report sodium as the sole measure. Hypothesis: Metabolic abnormalities—hyponatremia, hypokalemia, renal dysfunction, hemoconcentration—are frequent after completing a full or half marathon. Clinically significant changes occur in these laboratory values after race completion. Study Design: Observational, cross-sectional study. Methods: Consenting marathon and half marathon racers completed a survey as well as finger stick blood sampling on race day of the National Marathon to Fight Breast Cancer (Jacksonville, Florida, February 2008). Parallel blood measures were obtained before and after race completion (prerace, n = 161; postrace, n = 195). Results: The prevalence of prerace and postrace hyponatremia was 8 of 161 (5.0%) and 16 of 195 (8.2%), respectively. Hypokalemia was not present prerace but was present in 1 runner postrace (1 of 195). Renal dysfunction occurred prerace in 14 of 161 (8.7%) and postrace in 83 of 195 (42.6%). Among those with postrace renal dysfunction, 45.8% (38 of 83) were classified as moderate or severe. Hemoconcentration was present in 2 of 161 (1.2%) prerace and 6 of 195 (3.1%) postrace. The mean changes in laboratory values were (postrace minus prerace): sodium, 1.6 mmol/L; potassium, −0.2 mmol/L; blood urea nitrogen, 2.8 mg/dL; creatinine, 0.2 mg/dL; and hemoglobin, 0.3 g/dL for 149 pairs (except blood urea nitrogen, n = 147 pairs). Changes were significant for all comparisons (P < 0.01) except potassium (P = 0.08) and hemoglobin (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Metabolic abnormalities are common among endurance racers, and they may be present prerace, including hyponatremia. The clinical significance of these findings is unknown. Clinical relevance: It is unclear which runners are at risk for developing clinically important metabolic derangements. Participating in prolonged endurance

  9. Fluctuations in running and skill-related performance in elite rugby union match-play.

    PubMed

    Lacome, Mathieu; Piscione, Julien; Hager, Jean-Philippe; Carling, Chris

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated end-game and transient changes in running activities and whether these were concomitantly associated with reductions in skill-related performance in senior international rugby union match-play. Altogether, 18 official matches were analysed (322 individual observations) using computerised video-based tracking and event coding (Amisco Pro ® , SUP, Nice, France). In forwards and backs, trivial to small reductions (% difference: -2.1, ±1.3 to -10.0, ±4.0%) in total distance and that covered at high speeds (>18.0 km h -1 ) occurred in the second- versus the first-half while there were trivial differences in skill-related performance measures (-2.3, ±4.5 to 7.5, ±14.0%). In both positions, small to moderate declines (-42, ±10 to -21, ±7%) occurred in high-speed running in the final 10-min and 5-min periods versus mean values for all other 10-min and 5-min periods throughout the game while only small changes (-18, ±51 to 13, ±41%) in skill-related performance were observed. Trivial changes in running and skill-related performance (-11, ±74 to 7, ±39%) were observed in the 5-min period immediately following the most intense 5-minute periods of play compared to mean performance over the other 5-min periods. These findings suggest that international rugby union players were generally able to maintain skill-related performance over the course of match-play even when declines in running performance occurred.

  10. Fat max as an index of aerobic exercise performance in mice during uphill running

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu

    2018-01-01

    Endurance exercise performance has been used as a representative index in experimental animal models in the field of health sciences, exercise physiology, comparative physiology, food function or nutritional physiology. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Fatmax (the exercise intensity that elicits maximal fat oxidation) as an additional index of endurance exercise performance that can be measured during running at submaximal exercise intensity in mice. We measured both Fatmax and Vo2 peak of trained ICR mice that voluntary exercised for 8 weeks and compared them with a sedentary group of mice at multiple inclinations of 20, 30, 40, and 50° on a treadmill. The Vo2 at Fatmax of the training group was significantly higher than that of the sedentary group at inclinations of 30 and 40° (P < 0.001). The running speed at Fatmax of the training group was significantly higher than that of the sedentary group at inclinations of 20, 30, and 40° (P < 0.05). Blood lactate levels sharply increased in the sedentary group (7.33 ± 2.58 mM) compared to the training group (3.13 ± 1.00 mM, P < 0.01) when running speeds exceeded the Fatmax of sedentary mice. Vo2 at Fatmax significantly correlated to Vo2 peak, running time to fatigue, and lactic acid level during running (P < 0.05) although the reproducibility of Vo2 peak was higher than that of Vo2 at Fatmax. In conclusion, Fatmax can be used as a functional assessment of the endurance exercise performance of mice during submaximal exercise intensity. PMID:29474428

  11. Variability of GPS-derived running performance during official matches in elite professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Al Haddad, Hani; Méndez-Villanueva, Alberto; Torreño, Nacho; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Suárez-Arrones, Luis

    2017-09-22

    The aim of this study was to assess the match-to-match variability obtained using GPS devices, collected during official games in professional soccer players. GPS-derived data from nineteen elite soccer players were collected over two consecutive seasons. Time-motion data for players with more than five full-match were analyzed (n=202). Total distance covered (TD), TD >13-18 km/h, TD >18-21 km/h, TD >21 km/h, number of acceleration >2.5-4 m.s-2 and >4 m.s-2 were calculated. The match-to-match variation in running activity was assessed by the typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV,%) and the magnitude of the CV was calculated (effect size). When all players were pooled together, CVs ranged from 5% to 77% (first half) and from 5% to 90% (second half), for TD and number of acceleration >4 m.s-2, and the magnitude of the CVs were rated from small to moderate (effect size = 0.57-0.98). The CVs were likely to increase with running/acceleration intensity, and were likely to differ between playing positions (e.g., TD > 13-18 km/h 3.4% for second strikers vs 14.2% for strikers and 14.9% for wide-defenders vs 9.7% for wide-midfielders). Present findings indicate that variability in players' running performance is high in some variables and likely position-dependent. Such variability should be taken into account when using these variables to prescribe and/or monitor training intensity/load. GPS-derived match-to-match variability in official games' locomotor performance of professional soccer players is high in some variables, particularly for high-speed running, due to the complexity of match running performance and its most influential factors and reliability of the devices.

  12. The effects of wearing undersized lower-body compression garments on endurance running performance.

    PubMed

    Dascombe, Ben J; Hoare, Trent K; Sear, Joshua A; Reaburn, Peter R; Scanlan, Aaron T

    2011-06-01

    To examine whether wearing various size lower-body compression garments improves physiological and performance parameters related to endurance running in well-trained athletes. Eleven well-trained middle-distance runners and triathletes (age: 28.4 ± 10.0 y; height: 177.3 ± 4.7 cm; body mass: 72.6 ± 8.0 kg; VO2max: 59.0 ± 6.7 mL·kg-1·min-1) completed repeat progressive maximal tests (PMT) and time-to-exhaustion (TTE) tests at 90% VO2max wearing either manufacturer-recommended LBCG (rLBCG), undersized LBCG (uLBCG), or loose running shorts (CONT). During all exercise testing, several systemic and peripheral physiological measures were taken. The results indicated similar effects of wearing rLBCG and uLBCG compared with the control. Across the PMT, wearing either LBCG resulted in significantly (P < .05) increased oxygen consumption, O2 pulse, and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) and decreased running economy, oxyhemoglobin, and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) at low-intensity speeds (8-10 km·h-1). At higher speeds (12-18 km·h-1), wearing LBCG increased regional blood flow (nTHI) and HHb values, but significantly lowered heart rate and TOI. During the TTE, wearing either LBCG significantly (P < .05) increased HHb concentration, whereas wearing uLBCG also significantly (P < .05) increased nTHI. No improvement in endurance running performance was observed in either compression condition. The results suggest that wearing LBCG facilitated a small number of cardiorespiratory and peripheral physiological benefits that appeared mostly related to improvements in venous flow. However, these improvements appear trivial to athletes, as they did not correspond to any improvement in endurance running performance.

  13. Cadets' swimming and running performance with and without a combat uniform.

    PubMed

    Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Kostoulas, Ioannis; Havenetidis, Konstantinos; Giossos, Ioannis; Paxinos, Thrasivoulos

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to examine whether a combat uniform (CU) influences the cadet's exercise performance in and out of the water. Fourteen male Army Officer cadets performed on 6 separate days: (1) a maximal 400-m freestyle swimming trial; (2) a 4 x 50-m all-out freestyle swimming trial with 10 s rest in between; (3) a 50-m swim obstacle course with a CU (CUs); (4) a 50-m swim obstacle course without a CU (NUs); (5) a 1000-m track run with a CU (CU(R)); and (6) a 1000-m track run without a CU (NUR). In each trial, performance time, oxygen uptake (Vo2), lactate concentration ([La]), and capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded. The mean performance time was 44.3 +/- 3.1 s and 33.4 +/- 1.8 s in CUs and NUs trials, respectively. Peak VO2 was similar in CUs, NUs, and 400 m (CUs: 59.1 +/- 1.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), NUs: 57.3 +/- 2.1 ml kg(-1) x min(-1), 400 m: 58.2 +/- 1.6 ml x kg(-1) min(-1)). [La] was higher in CUs than in NUs (CUs: 10.0 +/- 2.0 mmol x L(-1), NUs: 8.5 +/- 1.8 mmol x L(-1)), but it was lower in CUs and NUs than during the 400 m and 4 x 50 m. SpO2 was lower (approximately 4.5%) in CUs than NUs. No differences were observed between running trials. The results suggest that the use of CU during swimming tasks induces high demands for energy and, thus, leads to a significant impairment of the swimming performance of the cadets. However, the influence of the CU seems to be less crucial during dry land running performance.

  14. Neuromuscular factors associated with decline in long-distance running performance in master athletes.

    PubMed

    Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on neuromuscular factors that may affect endurance performance in master athletes. During the last decade, due to the rapid increase in the number of master or veteran participants in endurance sporting competitions, many studies attempted to identify metabolic factors associated with the decrease in endurance, especially long-distance running performance with ageing, focusing on decreases in maximal oxygen consumption. However, neuromuscular factors have been less studied despite the well-known phenomena of strength loss with ageing. For master athletes to perform better in long-distance running events, it is important to reduce muscle fatigue and/or muscle damage, to improve locomotion efficiency and to facilitate recovery. To date, no consensus exists that regular endurance training is beneficial for improving locomotion efficiency, reducing muscle fatigue and muscle damage, and enhancing recovery capacity in master athletes. Some recent studies seem to indicate that master athletes have similar muscle damage to young athletes, but they require a longer recovery time after a long-distance running event. Further analyses of these parameters in master athletes require more experimental and practical interest from researchers and coaches. In particular, more attention should be directed towards the capacity to maintain muscle function with training and the role of neuromuscular factors in long-distance performance decline with ageing using a more cellular and molecular approach.

  15. Numerical performance evaluation of design modifications on a centrifugal pump impeller running in reverse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassanos, Ioannis; Chrysovergis, Marios; Anagnostopoulos, John; Papantonis, Dimitris; Charalampopoulos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the effect of impeller design variations on the performance of a centrifugal pump running as turbine is presented. Numerical simulations were performed after introducing various modifications in the design for various operating conditions. Specifically, the effects of the inlet edge shape, the meridional channel width, the number of blades and the addition of splitter blades on impeller performance was investigated. The results showed that, an increase in efficiency can be achieved by increasing the number of blades and by introducing splitter blades.

  16. "Functional" Inspiratory and Core Muscle Training Enhances Running Performance and Economy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tomas K; McConnell, Alison K; Lin, Hua; Nie, Jinlei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jiayuan

    2016-10-01

    Tong, TK, McConnell, AK, Lin, H, Nie, J, Zhang, H, and Wang, J. "Functional" inspiratory and core muscle training enhances running performance and economy. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2942-2951, 2016-We compared the effects of two 6-week high-intensity interval training interventions. Under the control condition (CON), only interval training was undertaken, whereas under the intervention condition (ICT), interval training sessions were followed immediately by core training, which was combined with simultaneous inspiratory muscle training (IMT)-"functional" IMT. Sixteen recreational runners were allocated to either ICT or CON groups. Before the intervention phase, both groups undertook a 4-week program of "foundation" IMT to control for the known ergogenic effect of IMT (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets per day, 6 days per week). The subsequent 6-week interval running training phase consisted of 3-4 sessions per week. In addition, the ICT group undertook 4 inspiratory-loaded core exercises (10 repetitions per set, 2 sets per day, inspiratory load set at 50% post-IMT P0) immediately after each interval training session. The CON group received neither core training nor functional IMT. After the intervention phase, global inspiratory and core muscle functions increased in both groups (p ≤ 0.05), as evidenced by P0 and a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT) performance, respectively. Compared with CON, the ICT group showed larger improvements in SEPT, running economy at the speed of the onset of blood lactate accumulation, and 1-hour running performance (3.04% vs. 1.57%, p ≤ 0.05). The changes in these variables were interindividually correlated (r ≥ 0.57, n = 16, p ≤ 0.05). Such findings suggest that the addition of inspiratory-loaded core conditioning into a high-intensity interval training program augments the influence of the interval program on endurance running performance and that this may be

  17. Women show similar central and peripheral fatigue to men after half-marathon.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Gennaro; Dardanello, Davide; Tarperi, Cantor; Festa, Luca; La Torre, Antonio; Pellegrini, Barbara; Schena, Federico; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2018-06-01

    Women are known to be less fatigable than men in single-joint exercises, but fatigue induced by running has not been well understood. Here we investigated sex differences in central and peripheral fatigue and in rate of force development (RFD) in the knee extensors after a half-marathon run. Ten male and eight female amateur runners (aged 25-50 years) were evaluated before and immediately after a half-marathon race. Knee extensors forces were obtained under voluntary and electrically evoked isometric contractions. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) force and peak RFD were recorded. Electrically doublet stimuli were delivered during the MVC and at rest to calculate the level of voluntary activation and the resting doublet twitch. After the race, decreases in MVC force (males: -11%, effect size [ES] 0.52; females: -11% ES 0.33), voluntary activation (males: -6%, ES 0.87; females: -4%, ES 0.72), and resting doublet twitch (males: -6%, ES 0.34; females: -8%, ES 0.30) were found to be similar between males and females. The decrease in peak RFD was found to be similar between males and females (males: -14%, ES 0.43; females: -15%, ES 0.14). Half-marathon run induced both central and peripheral fatigue, without any difference between men and women. The maximal and explosive strength loss was found similar between sexes. Together, these findings do not support the need of sex-specific training interventions to increase the tolerance to neuromuscular fatigue in half-marathoners.

  18. The Influence Of Team Rating On Running Performance In Elite Gaelic Football.

    PubMed

    Mangan, Shane; Malone, Shane; Ryan, Martin; Gahan, Jason Mc; Warne, Joe; Martin, Denise; O'Neill, Cian; Burns, Con; Collins, Kieran

    2017-11-06

    It is currently unknown how team rating influences running performance in Gaelic football. GPS technologies were used to quantify match-running performance within 5 elite Gaelic football teams over a period of 5 years (2012-2016). In total 780 player data sets were collected over 95 matches. Running performance variables included total distance, high-speed distance (≥17 km h) and the percentage of high-speed distance. Team ratings were determined objectively using the Elo Ratings System for Gaelic football. Reference team rating had trivial effects on total distance (p = 0.011, partial η2 = 0.008) and high-speed distance (p = 0.011, partial η2 = 0.008). Opposition team rating had small effects on total distance (p = 0.005, partial η2 = 0.016) and high-speed distance (p = 0.001, partial η2 = 0.020). Top tier teams cover greater total distances and high-speed distance than lower tier teams. Players cover considerably less total distance and high-speed distance against tier 3 and tier 4 teams. Tier 1 players ran a significantly higher percentage of distance at high-speed, than players who played for tier 2 teams (p = 0.020). The competitive advantage of top tier Gaelic football teams is closely linked with their ability to demonstrate a higher physical intensity than lower tier teams.

  19. Six-week transition to minimalist shoes improves running economy and time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated if gradually introducing runners to minimalist shoes during training improved running economy and time-trial performance compared to training in conventional shoes. Changes in stride rate, stride length, footfall pattern and ankle plantar-flexor strength were also investigated. Randomised parallel intervention trial. 61 trained runners gradually increased the amount of running performed in either minimalist (n=31) or conventional (n=30) shoes during a six-week standardised training program. 5-km time-trial performance, running economy, ankle plantar-flexor strength, footfall pattern, stride rate and length were assessed in the allocated shoes at baseline and after training. Footfall pattern was determined from the time differential between rearfoot and forefoot (TD R-F ) pressure sensors. The minimalist shoe group improved time-trial performance (effect size (ES): 0.24; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.01, 0.48; p=0.046) and running economy (ES 0.48; 95%CI: 0.22, 0.74; p<0.001) more than the conventional shoe group. There were no minimalist shoe training effects on ankle plantar-flexor concentric (ES: 0.11; 95%CI: -0.18, 0.41; p=0.45), isometric (ES: 0.23; 95%CI: -0.17, 0.64; p=0.25), or eccentric strength (ES: 0.24; 95%CI: -0.17, 0.65; p=0.24). Minimalist shoes caused large reductions in TD R-F (ES: 1.03; 95%CI: 0.65, 1.40; p<0.001) but only two runners changed to a forefoot footfall. Minimalist shoes had no effect on stride rate (ES: 0.04; 95%CI: -0.08, 0.16; p=0.53) or length (ES: 0.06; 95%CI: -0.06, 0.18; p=0.35). Gradually introducing minimalist shoes over a six-week training block is an effective method for improving running economy and performance in trained runners. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Infectious episodes before and after a marathon race.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, B; Ekblom, O; Malm, C

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of self-reported infectious episodes (IE) during 3 weeks before (pre-IE) and 3 weeks after (post-IE) a marathon race and relate these figures to training status, running time, socioeconomic and demographic factors. Two questionnaires, including questions about important factors for IE incidence, were given to a representative cohort of 1694 runners (17% of all finishers) in the Stockholm Marathon 2000. Pre-IE incidence in the cohort was 17% with no difference between women and men. Post-IE incidence in the whole cohort was 19% with no significant (P>0.05) difference between women and men. The post-IE incidence in runners without a pre-IE was 16% (P>0.05 to pre-IE incidence). In the group of runners with pre-IE, 33% experienced an IE after the race also (P<0.05 to Pre-IE incidence). A logistic regression analysis showed that younger age and pre race health status and, for men only, experienced nausea during and after the race were depended factors explaining post-IE incidence. Younger runners were more prone to experience IE both before and after the race. There was no relation between training volume 6 months before the race, finishing time and socioeconomic and demographic factors and pre-IE or post-IE. This study does not support the theory of increased infection rate after exhaustive long-distance running ("The Open Window Theory") in recreational runners, but suggests that the sometimes experienced increased rate of infections among athletes can be caused by strenuous exercise too soon after an infection.

  1. Completing the Results of the 2013 Boston Marathon

    PubMed Central

    Hammerling, Dorit; Cefalu, Matthew; Cisewski, Jessi; Dominici, Francesca; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Paulson, Charles; Smith, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Boston marathon was disrupted by two bombs placed near the finish line. The bombs resulted in three deaths and several hundred injuries. Of lesser concern, in the immediate aftermath, was the fact that nearly 6,000 runners failed to finish the race. We were approached by the marathon's organizers, the Boston Athletic Association (BAA), and asked to recommend a procedure for projecting finish times for the runners who could not complete the race. With assistance from the BAA, we created a dataset consisting of all the runners in the 2013 race who reached the halfway point but failed to finish, as well as all runners from the 2010 and 2011 Boston marathons. The data consist of split times from each of the 5 km sections of the course, as well as the final 2.2 km (from 40 km to the finish). The statistical objective is to predict the missing split times for the runners who failed to finish in 2013. We set this problem in the context of the matrix completion problem, examples of which include imputing missing data in DNA microarray experiments, and the Netflix prize problem. We propose five prediction methods and create a validation dataset to measure their performance by mean squared error and other measures. The best method used local regression based on a K-nearest-neighbors algorithm (KNN method), though several other methods produced results of similar quality. We show how the results were used to create projected times for the 2013 runners and discuss potential for future application of the same methodology. We present the whole project as an example of reproducible research, in that we are able to make the full data and all the algorithms we have used publicly available, which may facilitate future research extending the methods or proposing completely different approaches. PMID:24727904

  2. Completing the results of the 2013 Boston marathon.

    PubMed

    Hammerling, Dorit; Cefalu, Matthew; Cisewski, Jessi; Dominici, Francesca; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Paulson, Charles; Smith, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Boston marathon was disrupted by two bombs placed near the finish line. The bombs resulted in three deaths and several hundred injuries. Of lesser concern, in the immediate aftermath, was the fact that nearly 6,000 runners failed to finish the race. We were approached by the marathon's organizers, the Boston Athletic Association (BAA), and asked to recommend a procedure for projecting finish times for the runners who could not complete the race. With assistance from the BAA, we created a dataset consisting of all the runners in the 2013 race who reached the halfway point but failed to finish, as well as all runners from the 2010 and 2011 Boston marathons. The data consist of split times from each of the 5 km sections of the course, as well as the final 2.2 km (from 40 km to the finish). The statistical objective is to predict the missing split times for the runners who failed to finish in 2013. We set this problem in the context of the matrix completion problem, examples of which include imputing missing data in DNA microarray experiments, and the Netflix prize problem. We propose five prediction methods and create a validation dataset to measure their performance by mean squared error and other measures. The best method used local regression based on a K-nearest-neighbors algorithm (KNN method), though several other methods produced results of similar quality. We show how the results were used to create projected times for the 2013 runners and discuss potential for future application of the same methodology. We present the whole project as an example of reproducible research, in that we are able to make the full data and all the algorithms we have used publicly available, which may facilitate future research extending the methods or proposing completely different approaches.

  3. Performance of the LHCb RICH detectors during the LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanestis, A.; D'Ambrosio, C.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The LHCb RICH system provides hadron identification over a wide momentum range (2-100 GeV/c). This detector system is key to LHCb's precision flavour physics programme, which has unique sensitivity to physics beyond the standard model. This paper reports on the performance of the LHCb RICH in Run II, following significant changes in the detector and operating conditions. The changes include the refurbishment of significant number of photon detectors, assembled using new vacuum technologies, and the removal of the aerogel radiator. The start of Run II of the LHC saw the beam energy increase to 6.5 TeV per beam and a new trigger strategy for LHCb with full online detector calibration. The RICH information has also been made available for all trigger streams in the High Level Trigger for the first time.

  4. Warm-Up Exercises May Not Be So Important for Enhancing Submaximal Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Kazuki; Yamaguchi, Taichi; Shibata, Keisuke

    2018-05-01

    Takizawa, K, Yamaguchi, T, and Shibata, K. Warm-up exercises may not be so important for enhancing submaximal running performance. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1383-1390, 2018-The purpose of this study was to determine an appropriate warm-up intensity for enhancing performance in submaximal running at 90% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max (it assumes 3,000-5,000 m in track events). Seven trained male university athletes took part in this study (age: 21.3 ± 2.1 years, height: 169.3 ± 4.7 cm, body mass: 58.4 ± 5.6 kg, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 73.33 ± 5.46 ml·kg·min). Each subject ran on a treadmill at 90% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max until exhaustion after 1 of 4 warm-up treatments. The 4 warm-up treatments were no warm-up, 15 minutes running at 60% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max, at 70% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max, and at 80% vV[Combining Dot Above]O2max. The running performance was evaluated by time to exhaustion (TTE). V[Combining Dot Above]O2, and vastus lateralis muscle temperature were also measured. There were no significant differences in TTE among the warm-up exercises (p > 0.05). V[Combining Dot Above]O2 in no warm-up showed slower reaction than the other warm-up exercises. Regarding, the vastus lateralis muscle temperature immediately after warm-up, no warm-up was significantly (p < 0.01) lower compared with the other warm-up exercises. Our results suggested that submaximal running performance was not affected by the presence or absence of a warm-up or by warm-up intensity, although physiological changes occurred.

  5. High-intensity cycle interval training improves cycling and running performance in triathletes.

    PubMed

    Etxebarria, Naroa; Anson, Judith M; Pyne, David B; Ferguson, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Effective cycle training for triathlon is a challenge for coaches. We compared the effects of two variants of cycle high-intensity interval training (HIT) on triathlon-specific cycling and running. Fourteen moderately-trained male triathletes ([Formula: see text]O2peak 58.7 ± 8.1 mL kg(-1) min(-1); mean ± SD) completed on separate occasions a maximal incremental test ([Formula: see text]O2peak and maximal aerobic power), 16 × 20 s cycle sprints and a 1-h triathlon-specific cycle followed immediately by a 5 km run time trial. Participants were then pair-matched and assigned randomly to either a long high-intensity interval training (LONG) (6-8 × 5 min efforts) or short high-intensity interval training (SHORT) (9-11 × 10, 20 and 40 s efforts) HIT cycle training intervention. Six training sessions were completed over 3 weeks before participants repeated the baseline testing. Both groups had an ∼7% increase in [Formula: see text]O2peak (SHORT 7.3%, ±4.6%; mean, ±90% confidence limits; LONG 7.5%, ±1.7%). There was a moderate improvement in mean power for both the SHORT (10.3%, ±4.4%) and LONG (10.7%, ±6.8%) groups during the last eight 20-s sprints. There was a small to moderate decrease in heart rate, blood lactate and perceived exertion in both groups during the 1-h triathlon-specific cycling but only the LONG group had a substantial decrease in the subsequent 5-km run time (64, ±59 s). Moderately-trained triathletes should use both short and long high-intensity intervals to improve cycling physiology and performance. Longer 5-min intervals on the bike are more likely to benefit 5 km running performance.

  6. Glucose-fructose likely improves gastrointestinal comfort and endurance running performance relative to glucose-only.

    PubMed

    Wilson, P B; Ingraham, S J

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glucose-fructose (GF) ingestion, relative to glucose-only, would alter performance, metabolism, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, and psychological affect during prolonged running. On two occasions, 20 runners (14 men) completed a 120-min submaximal run followed by a 4-mile time trial (TT). Participants consumed glucose-only (G) or GF (1.2:1 ratio) beverages, which supplied ∼ 1.3 g/min of carbohydrate. Substrate use, blood lactate, psychological affect [Feeling Scale (FS)], and GI distress were measured. Differences between conditions were assessed using magnitude-based inferential statistics. Participants completed the TT 1.9% (-1.9; -4.2, 0.4) faster with GF, representing a likely benefit. FS ratings were possibly higher and GI symptoms were possibly-to-likely lower with GF during the submaximal period and TT. Effect sizes for GI distress and FS ratings were relatively small (Cohen's d = ∼0.2 to 0.4). GF resulted in possibly higher fat oxidation during the submaximal period. No clear differences in lactate were observed. In conclusion, GF ingestion - compared with glucose-only - likely improves TT performance after 2 h of submaximal running, and GI distress and psychological affect are likely mechanisms. These results apply to runners consuming fluid at 500-600 mL/h and carbohydrate at 1.0-1.3 g/min during running at 60-70% VO2peak . © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A Comparison of Mixed-Method Cooling Interventions on Preloaded Running Performance in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Christopher J; Bennett, Kyle J M; Sculley, Dean V; Callister, Robin; Taylor, Lee; Dascombe, Ben J

    2017-03-01

    Stevens, CJ, Bennett, KJM, Sculley, DV, Callister, R, Taylor, L, and Dascombe, BJ. A comparison of mixed-method cooling interventions on preloaded running performance in the heat. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 620-629, 2017-The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effect of combining practical methods to cool the body on endurance running performance and physiology in the heat. Eleven trained male runners completed 4 randomized, preloaded running time trials (20 minutes at 70% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max and a 3 km time trial) on a nonmotorized treadmill in the heat (33° C). Trials consisted of precooling by combined cold-water immersion and ice slurry ingestion (PRE), midcooling by combined facial water spray and menthol mouth rinse (MID), a combination of all methods (ALL), and control (CON). Performance time was significantly faster in MID (13.7 ± 1.2 minutes; p < 0.01) and ALL (13.7 ± 1.4 minutes; p = 0.04) but not PRE (13.9 ± 1.4 minutes; p = 0.24) when compared with CON (14.2 ± 1.2 minutes). Precooling significantly reduced rectal temperature (initially by 0.5 ± 0.2° C), mean skin temperature, heart rate and sweat rate, and increased iEMG activity, whereas midcooling significantly increased expired air volume and respiratory exchange ratio compared with control. Significant decreases in forehead temperature, thermal sensation, and postexercise blood prolactin concentration were observed in all conditions compared with control. Performance was improved with midcooling, whereas precooling had little or no influence. Midcooling may have improved performance through an attenuated inhibitory psychophysiological and endocrine response to the heat.

  8. Marathon Group Therapy with Former Drug Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Richard C.; Mannion, John

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the effects of marathon group therapy on attitudes of former drug users in a residential drug treatment center. Experimental group members responded higher on the group counseling evaluative subscale and lower on the guilt evaluative subscale than control members. (Author)

  9. Behavior Change Outcomes of Marathon Group Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlemann, Max R.; Weigel, Richard G.

    1977-01-01

    This study evaluated behavior change occurring after a marathon group experience, with a focus on individualized rather than shared behavioral change criteria. The individualization of behavior change criteria is based on the assertion that few, if any, single change criteria are appropriate or realistic for assessing change in all individuals.…

  10. Marathon Group Therapy with Female Narcotic Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.

    This study evaluated the impact of structured and unstructured marathon therapy on institutionalized female narcotic addicts. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups: two structured therapy groups, two unstructured therapy groups, and a no-treatment control group. The Personal Orientation Inventory, the Adjective Check List, and a…

  11. The Marathon Group Hypothesis: An Unanswered Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Stephen E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The authors of this article contend that the Guinan and Foulds study was inadequately designed and executed, and the results indicate little of the "usefulness" of the test, much less illuminate the important hypothesis central to the investigation. Specific suggestions for further research in marathon group evaluation are made. (Author)

  12. Marathon Group: Facilitator of Personal Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinan, James F.; Foulds, Melvin L.

    1970-01-01

    This is a report of changes on scales of the Personal Orientation Inventory following a marathon experience. Pretest and posttest results indicated changes in scores of an experimental group on those scales: Inner Direction, Existentiality, Feeling Reactivity, Spontaneity, Self Acceptance, Acceptance of Aggression, Capacity for Intimate Contact.…

  13. Photobiomodulation Therapy on Physiological and Performance Parameters During Running Tests: Dose-Response Effects.

    PubMed

    Dellagrana, Rodolfo André; Rossato, Mateus; Sakugawa, Raphael Luiz; Baroni, Bruno Mafredini; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2018-02-22

    This study was aimed at verifying effects of photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) with different energy doses (15, 30, and 60 J per site) on physiological and performance parameters during running tests. Fifteen male recreational runners participated in a crossover, randomised, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trial. They performed testing protocol in 5 sessions with different treatments: control, placebo, and PBMT with 15, 30 or 60 J per site (14 sites in each lower limb). Physiological and performance variables were assessed during submaximal (at 8 km·h-1 and 9 km·h-1) and maximal running tests. PBMT with 30 J significantly (p<0.05) improved running economy (RE) at 8 and 9 km·h-1 (3.01% and 3.03%, respectively), rate of perceived exertion (RPE) at 8 km·h-1 (7.86%), velocity at VO2MAX (3.07%), peak of velocity (PV) (1.49%), and total time to exhaustion (TTE) (3.41%) compared to placebo. PBMT with 15 J improved RE at 9 km·h-1 (2.98%), RPE at 8 km·h-1 (4.80%), PV (1.33%), TTE (3.06%), and total distance (4.01%) compared to the placebo; while PBMT with 60 J only increased RE at 9 km·h-1 (3.87%) compared to placebo. All PBMT doses positively affected physiological and/or performance parameters; however magnitude-based inference reported that PBMT applied with 30 J led to more beneficial effects than 15 J and 60 J.

  14. Effect of contrast water therapy duration on recovery of running performance.

    PubMed

    Versey, Nathan G; Halson, Shona L; Dawson, Brian T

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether contrast water therapy (CWT) assists acute recovery from high-intensity running and whether a dose-response relationship exists. Ten trained male runners completed 4 trials, each commencing with a 3000-m time trial, followed by 8 × 400-m intervals with 1 min of recovery. Ten minutes postexercise, participants performed 1 of 4 recovery protocols: CWT, by alternating 1 min hot (38°C) and 1 min cold (15°C) for 6 (CWT6), 12 (CWT12), or 18 min (CWT18), or a seated rest control trial. The 3000-m time trial was repeated 2 h later. 3000-m performance slowed from 632 ± 4 to 647 ± 4 s in control, 631 ± 4 to 642 ± 4 s in CWT6, 633 ± 4 to 648 ± 4 s in CWT12, and 631 ± 4 to 647 ± 4 s in CWT18. Following CWT6, performance (smallest worthwhile change of 0.3%) was substantially faster than control (87% probability, 0.8 ± 0.8% mean ± 90% confidence limit), however, there was no effect for CWT12 (34%, 0.0 ± 1.0%) or CWT18 (34%, -0.1 ± 0.8%). There were no substantial differences between conditions in exercise heart rates, or postexercise calf and thigh girths. Algometer thigh pain threshold during CWT12 was higher at all time points compared with control. Subjective measures of thermal sensation and muscle soreness were lower in all CWT conditions at some post-water-immersion time points compared with control; however, there were no consistent differences in whole body fatigue following CWT. Contrast water therapy for 6 min assisted acute recovery from high-intensity running; however, CWT duration did not have a dose-response effect on recovery of running performance.

  15. Effects of Post-Exercise Honey Drink Ingestion on Blood Glucose and Subsequent Running Performance in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Nur Syamsina; Ooi, Foong Kiew; Saat Ismail, Mohammed; Mohamed, Mahaneem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glycogen depletion and hypoglycemia have been associated with fatigue and decrement of performance during prolonged exercise Objectives: This study investigated the effectiveness of Acacia honey drink as a post-exercise recovery aid on glucose metabolism and subsequent running performance in the heat. Patients and Methods: Ten subjects participated in this randomized cross-over study. All subjects performed 2 trials. In each trial, all subjects went through a glycogen depletion phase (Run-1), 2-hour rehydration phase and time trial running phase (Run-2). In Run-1, subjects were required to run on a treadmill at 65% VO2max in the heat (31°C, 70% relative humidity) for 60 min. During 2-hour rehydration phase, subjects drank either plain water (PW) or honey drink (HD) with amount equivalent to 150% of body weight loss in 3 boluses (60%, 50% and 40% subsequently) at 0, 30 and 60 min. In Run-2, the longest distance covered in 20 min was recorded for determining running performance. Two-way repeated measured ANOVA and paired t-test were used for analysis. Results: Running distance in Run-2 covered by the subjects in the honey drink HD trial (3420 ± 350 m) was significantly (P < 0.01) longer compared to plain water PW trial (3120 ± 340 m). In general, plasma glucose, serum insulin and osmolality were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in HD compared to PW during the rehydration phase and Run-2. Conclusions: These findings indicate that rehydration with honey drink improves running performance and glucose metabolism compared to plain water in the heat. Thus, honey drink can be recommended for rehydration purpose for athletes who compete in the heat. PMID:26448850

  16. Improved performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker in LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Argent, P.; Dufour, L.; Grillo, L.; de Vries, J. A.; Ukleja, A.; Aaij, R.; Archilli, F.; Bachmann, S.; Berninghoff, D.; Birnkraut, A.; Blouw, J.; De Cian, M.; Ciezarek, G.; Färber, C.; Demmer, M.; Dettori, F.; Gersabeck, E.; Grabowski, J.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Khanji, B.; Kolpin, M.; Kucharczyk, M.; Malecki, B. P.; Merk, M.; Mulder, M.; Müller, J.; Mueller, V.; Pellegrino, A.; Pikies, M.; Rachwal, B.; Schmelzer, T.; Spaan, B.; Szczekowski, M.; van Tilburg, J.; Tolk, S.; Tuning, N.; Uwer, U.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.

    2017-11-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is a gaseous detector covering an area of 5 × 6 m2 with 12 double layers of straw tubes. The performance of the detector is presented based on data of the LHC Run 2 running period from 2015 and 2016. Occupancies and operational experience for data collected in pp, pPb and PbPb collisions are described. An updated study of the ageing effects is presented showing no signs of gain deterioration or other radiation damage effects. In addition several improvements with respect to LHC Run 1 data taking are introduced. A novel real-time calibration of the time-alignment of the detector and the alignment of the single monolayers composing detector modules are presented, improving the drift-time and position resolution of the detector by 20%. Finally, a potential use of the improved resolution for the timing of charged tracks is described, showing the possibility to identify low-momentum hadrons with their time-of-flight.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker in Run 1 of the LHC: tracker properties

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-05-03

    The tracking performance parameters of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) as part of the ATLAS inner detector are described in this paper for different data-taking conditions in proton-proton, proton-lead and lead-lead collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The performance is studied using data collected during the first period of LHC operation (Run 1) and is compared with Monte Carlo simulations. The performance of the TRT, operating with two different gas mixtures (xenon-based and argon-based) and its dependence on the TRT occupancy is presented. Furthermore, these studies show that the tracking performance of the TRT is similar for themore » two gas mixtures and that a significant contribution to the particle momentum resolution is made by the TRT up to high particle densities.« less

  18. Overspeed HIIT in Lower-Body Positive Pressure Treadmill Improves Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Gojanovic, Boris; Shultz, Rebecca; Feihl, Francois; Matheson, Gordon

    2015-12-01

    Optimal high-intensity interval training (HIIT) regimens for running performance are unknown, although most protocols result in some benefit to key performance factors (running economy (RE), anaerobic threshold (AT), or maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max)). Lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) treadmills offer the unique possibility to partially unload runners and reach supramaximal speeds. We studied the use of LBPP to test an overspeed HIIT protocol in trained runners. Eleven trained runners (35 ± 8 yr, VO2max, 55.7 ± 6.4 mL·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) were randomized to an LBPP (n = 6) or a regular treadmill (CON, n = 5), eight sessions over 4 wk of HIIT program. Four to five intervals were run at 100% of velocity at VO2max (vVO2max) during 60% of time to exhaustion at vVO2max (Tlim) with a 1:1 work:recovery ratio. Performance outcomes were 2-mile track time trial, VO2max, vVO2max, vAT, Tlim, and RE. LBPP sessions were carried out at 90% body weight. Group-time effects were present for vVO2max (CON, 17.5 vs. 18.3, P = 0.03; LBPP, 19.7 vs. 22.3 km·h⁻¹; P < 0.001) and Tlim (CON, 307.0 vs. 404.4 s, P = 0.28; LBPP, 444.5 vs. 855.5, P < 0.001). Simple main effects for time were present for field performance (CON, -18; LBPP, -25 s; P = 0.002), VO2max (CON, 57.6 vs. 59.6; LBPP, 54.1 vs. 55.1 mL·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹; P = 0.04) and submaximal HR (157.7 vs. 154.3 and 151.4 vs. 148.5 bpm; P = 0.002). RE was unchanged. A 4-wk HIIT protocol at 100% vVO2max improves field performance, vVO2max, VO2max and submaximal HR in trained runners. Improvements are similar if intervals are run on a regular treadmill or at higher speeds on a LPBB treadmill with 10% body weight reduction. LBPP could provide an alternative for taxing HIIT sessions.

  19. Longitudinal development of match-running performance in elite male youth soccer players.

    PubMed

    Saward, C; Morris, J G; Nevill, M E; Nevill, A M; Sunderland, C

    2016-08-01

    This study longitudinally examined age-related changes in the match-running performance of retained and released elite youth soccer players aged 8-18 years. The effect of playing position on age-related changes was also considered. Across three seasons, 263 elite youth soccer players were assessed in 1-29 competitive matches (988 player-matches). For each player-match, total distance and distances covered at age group-specific speed zones (low-speed, high-speed, sprinting) were calculated using 1 Hz or 5 Hz GPS. Mixed modeling predicted that match-running performance developed nonlinearly, with age-related changes best described with quadratic age terms. Modeling predicted that playing position significantly modified age-related changes (P < 0.05) and retained players covered significantly more low-speed distance compared with released players (P < 0.05), by 75 ± 71 m/h (mean ± 95% CI; effect size ± 95% CI: 0.35 ± 0.34). Model intercepts randomly varied, indicating differences between players in match-running performance unexplained by age, playing position or status. These findings may assist experts in developing training programs specific to the match play demands of players of different ages and playing positions. Although retained players covered more low-speed distance than released players, further study of the actions comprising low-speed distance during match play is warranted to better understand factors differentiating retained and released players. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Resveratrol enhances exercise training responses in rats selectively bred for high running performance.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nikolett; Sarga, Linda; Csende, Zsolt; Koltai, Erika; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Davies, Kelvin J A; Kouretas, Dimitris; Wessner, Barbara; Radak, Zsolt

    2013-11-01

    High Capacity Runner (HCR) rats have been developed by divergent artificial selection for treadmill endurance running capacity to explore an aerobic biology-disease connection. The beneficial effects of resveratrol supplementation have been demonstrated in endurance running and the antioxidant capacity of resveratrol is also demonstrated. In this study we examine whether 12 weeks of treadmill exercise training and/or resveratrol can enhance performance in HCR. Indeed, resveratrol increased aerobic performance and strength of upper limbs of these rats. Moreover, we have found that resveratrol activated the AMP-activated protein kinase, SIRT1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (p<0.05). The changes in mitochondrial fission/fusion and Lon protease/HSP78 levels suggest that exercise training does not significantly induce damage of proteins. Moreover, neither exercise training nor resveratrol supplementation altered the content of protein carbonyls. Changes in the levels of forkhead transcription factor 1 and SIRT4 could suggest increased fat utilization and improved insulin sensitivity. These data indicate, that resveratrol supplementation enhances aerobic performance due to the activation of the AMPK-SIRT1-PGC-1α pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of age, maturity and body dimensions on match running performance in highly trained under-15 soccer players.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare, in 36 highly trained under-15 soccer players, the respective effects of age, maturity and body dimensions on match running performance. Maximal sprinting (MSS) and aerobic speeds were estimated. Match running performance was analysed with GPS (GPSport, 1 Hz) during 19 international friendly games (n = 115 player-files). Total distance and distance covered >16 km h(-1) (D > 16 km h(-1)) were collected. Players advanced in age and/or maturation, or having larger body dimensions presented greater locomotor (Cohen's d for MSS: 0.5-1.0, likely to almost certain) and match running performances (D > 16 km h(-1): 0.2-0.5, possibly to likely) than their younger, less mature and/or smaller teammates. These age-, maturation- and body size-related differences were of larger magnitude for field test measures versus match running performance. Compared with age and body size (unclear to likely), maturation (likely to almost certainly for all match variables) had the greatest impact on match running performance. The magnitude of the relationships between age, maturation and body dimensions and match running performance were position-dependent. Within a single age-group in the present player sample, maturation had a substantial impact on match running performance, especially in attacking players. Coaches may need to consider players' maturity status when assessing their on-field playing performance.

  2. Effects of Cycling vs. Running Training on Endurance Performance in Preparation for Inline Speed Skating.

    PubMed

    Stangier, Carolin; Abel, Thomas; Hesse, Clemens; Claen, Stephanie; Mierau, Julia; Hollmann, Wildor; Strüder, Heiko K

    2016-06-01

    Winter weather conditions restrict regular sport-specific endurance training in inline speed skating. As a result, this study was designed to compare the effects of cycling and running training programs on inline speed skaters' endurance performance. Sixteen (8 men, 8 women) high-level athletes (mean ± SD 24 ± 8 years) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (running and cycling). Both groups trained twice a week for 8 weeks, one group on a treadmill and the other on a cycle ergometer. Training intensity and duration was individually calculated (maximal fat oxidation: ∼52% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak: 500 kcal per session). Before and after the training intervention, all athletes performed an incremental specific (inline speed skating) and 1 nonspecific (cycling or running) step test according to the group affiliation. In addition to blood lactate concentration, oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2), ventilatory equivalent (VE/V[Combining Dot Above]O2), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and heart rate were measured. The specific posttest revealed significantly increased absolute V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak values (2.9 ± 0.4, 3.4 ± 0.7, p = 0.01) and submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values (p ≤ 0.01). VE/V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and RER significantly decreased at maximal (46.6 ± 6.6, 38.5 ± 3.4, p = 0.005; 1.1 ± 0.03, 1.0 ± 0.04, p = 0.001) and submaximal intensities (p ≤ 0.04). None of the analysis revealed a significant group effect (p ≥ 0.15). The results indicate that both cycling vs. running exercise at ∼52% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak had a positive effect on the athletes' endurance performance. The increased submaximal V[Combining Dot Above]O2 values indicate a reduction in athletes' inline speed skating technique. Therefore, athletes would benefit from a focus on technique training in the subsequent period.

  3. Effects of Acutely Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure on Running Economy and Physical Performance in Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Kilding, Andrew E; Dobson, Bryan P; Ikeda, Erika

    2016-07-01

    Kilding, AE, Dobson, BP, and Ikeda, E. Effects of acutely intermittent hypoxic exposure on running economy and physical performance in basketball players. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2033-2042, 2016-The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short duration intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE) on physical performance in basketball players. Using a single-blind placebo-controlled group design, 14 trained basketball players were subjected to 15 days of passive short duration IHE (n = 7), or normoxic control (CON, n = 7), using a biofeedback nitrogen dilution device. A range of physiological, performance, and hematological variables were measured at baseline, and 10 days after IHE. After intervention, the IHE group, relative to the CON group, exhibited improvements in the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 (+4.8 ± 1.6%; effect size [ES]: 1.0 ± 0.4) and repeated high-intensity exercise test performance (-3.5 ± 1.6%; ES: -0.4 ± 0.2). Changes in hematological parameters were minimal, although soluble transferrin receptor increased after IHE (+9.2 ± 10.1%; ES: 0.3 ± 0.3). Running economy at 11 km·h (-9.0 ± 9.7%; ES: -0.7 ± 0.7) and 13 km·h was improved (-8.2 ± 6.9%; ES: -0.7 ± 0.5), but changes to V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, HRpeak, and lactate were unclear. In summary, acutely IHE resulted in worthwhile changes in physical performance tests among competitive basketball players. However, physiological measures explaining the performance enhancement were in most part unclear.

  4. Controlled-frequency breath swimming improves swimming performance and running economy.

    PubMed

    Lavin, K M; Guenette, J A; Smoliga, J M; Zavorsky, G S

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can negatively impact athletic performance, but swimming has beneficial effects on the respiratory system and may reduce susceptibility to fatigue. Limiting breath frequency during swimming further stresses the respiratory system through hypercapnia and mechanical loading and may lead to appreciable improvements in respiratory muscle strength. This study assessed the effects of controlled-frequency breath (CFB) swimming on pulmonary function. Eighteen subjects (10 men), average (standard deviation) age 25 (6) years, body mass index 24.4 (3.7) kg/m(2), underwent baseline testing to assess pulmonary function, running economy, aerobic capacity, and swimming performance. Subjects were then randomized to either CFB or stroke-matched (SM) condition. Subjects completed 12 training sessions, in which CFB subjects took two breaths per length and SM subjects took seven. Post-training, maximum expiratory pressure improved by 11% (15) for all 18 subjects (P < 0.05) while maximum inspiratory pressure was unchanged. Running economy improved by 6 (9)% in CFB following training (P < 0.05). Forced vital capacity increased by 4% (4) in SM (P < 0.05) and was unchanged in CFB. These findings suggest that limiting breath frequency during swimming may improve muscular oxygen utilization during terrestrial exercise in novice swimmers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Cardiorespiratory, neuromuscular and kinematic responses to stationary running performed in water and on dry land.

    PubMed

    Alberton, Cristine Lima; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Pinto, Stephanie Santana; Tartaruga, Marcus Peikriszwili; da Silva, Eduardo Marczwski; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the cardiorespiratory, neuromuscular and kinematic responses obtained during the stationary running in aquatic and dry land environments. Twelve women took part in the experimental protocol. Stationary running was performed for 4 min at three submaximal cadences and for 15 s at maximal velocity, with the collection of kinematic (peak hip angular velocity (AV)), cardiorespiratory (oxygen uptake (VO(2))) and neuromuscular variables (electromyographic (EMG) signal from the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST) and short head of the biceps femoris (BF) muscles) in land-based and water-based test protocols. Factorial ANOVA was used, with an alpha level of 0.05. AV was significantly higher when the exercise was performed on land, and became significantly higher as the execution cadence increased. Similarly, VO(2) was significantly higher in the land-based exercise and rose as cadence increased. With the increase in the submaximal execution cadences, there was no corresponding increase in the EMG signal from the VL, BF, RF and ST muscles in either environment, though such a significantly increase was seen between the submaximal cadences and the maximal velocity. Dry land presented significantly greater EMG signal responses for all muscles at the submaximal cadences, except for the ST muscle. However, at the maximal velocity, all the analyzed muscle groups showed similar responses in both environments. In summary, for both environments, cardiorespiratory responses can be maximized by increasing the submaximal cadences, while neuromuscular responses are only optimized by using maximal velocity.

  6. Lower body symmetry and running performance in elite Jamaican track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Trivers, Robert; Fink, Bernhard; Russell, Mark; McCarty, Kristofor; James, Bruce; Palestis, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    In a study of degree of lower body symmetry in 73 elite Jamaican track and field athletes we show that both their knees and ankles (but not their feet) are-on average-significantly more symmetrical than those of 116 similarly aged controls from the rural Jamaican countryside. Within the elite athletes, events ranged from the 100 to the 800 m, and knee and ankle asymmetry was lower for those running the 100 m dashes than those running the longer events with turns. Nevertheless, across all events those with more symmetrical knees and ankles (but not feet) had better results compared to international standards. Regression models considering lower body symmetry combined with gender, age and weight explain 27 to 28% of the variation in performance among athletes, with symmetry related to about 5% of this variation. Within 100 m sprinters, the results suggest that those with more symmetrical knees and ankles ran faster. Altogether, our work confirms earlier findings that knee and probably ankle symmetry are positively associated with sprinting performance, while extending these findings to elite athletes.

  7. Lower Body Symmetry and Running Performance in Elite Jamaican Track and Field Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Trivers, Robert; Fink, Bernhard; Russell, Mark; McCarty, Kristofor; James, Bruce; Palestis, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    In a study of degree of lower body symmetry in 73 elite Jamaican track and field athletes we show that both their knees and ankles (but not their feet) are–on average–significantly more symmetrical than those of 116 similarly aged controls from the rural Jamaican countryside. Within the elite athletes, events ranged from the 100 to the 800 m, and knee and ankle asymmetry was lower for those running the 100 m dashes than those running the longer events with turns. Nevertheless, across all events those with more symmetrical knees and ankles (but not feet) had better results compared to international standards. Regression models considering lower body symmetry combined with gender, age and weight explain 27 to 28% of the variation in performance among athletes, with symmetry related to about 5% of this variation. Within 100 m sprinters, the results suggest that those with more symmetrical knees and ankles ran faster. Altogether, our work confirms earlier findings that knee and probably ankle symmetry are positively associated with sprinting performance, while extending these findings to elite athletes. PMID:25401732

  8. Mini-marathon groups: psychological "first aid" following disasters.

    PubMed

    Terr, L C

    1992-01-01

    Large group counseling sessions for soldiers following battle have been commonly used since World War II. The author conceptualizes and demonstrates how these mini-marathon sessions can be adapted to support all ages and types of civilians involved in disasters. Mini-marathons take about 3 hours and are divided into three sections: story sharing, symptom sharing, and suggestions for self-help, including sharing tales of heroism and survival. After an initial mini-marathon session, a second session may be held emphasizing creativity. The author also describes how mini-marathons can be adapted for therapists who will lead their own sessions.

  9. Six Sessions of Sprint Interval Training Improves Running Performance in Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Koral, Jerome; Oranchuk, Dustin J; Herrera, Roberto; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2018-03-01

    Koral, J, Oranchuk, DJ, Herrera, R, and Millet, GY. Six sessions of sprint interval training improves running performance in trained athletes. J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 617-623, 2018-Sprint interval training (SIT) is gaining popularity with endurance athletes. Various studies have shown that SIT allows for similar or greater endurance, strength, and power performance improvements than traditional endurance training but demands less time and volume. One of the main limitations in SIT research is that most studies were performed in a laboratory using expensive treadmills or ergometers. The aim of this study was to assess the performance effects of a novel short-term and highly accessible training protocol based on maximal shuttle runs in the field (SIT-F). Sixteen (12 male, 4 female) trained trail runners completed a 2-week procedure consisting of 4-7 bouts of 30 seconds at maximal intensity interspersed by 4 minutes of recovery, 3 times a week. Maximal aerobic speed (MAS), time to exhaustion at 90% of MAS before test (Tmax at 90% MAS), and 3,000-m time trial (TT3000m) were evaluated before and after training. Data were analyzed using a paired samples t-test, and Cohen's (d) effect sizes were calculated. Maximal aerobic speed improved by 2.3% (p = 0.01, d = 0.22), whereas peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) increased by 2.4% (p = 0.009, d = 0.33) and 2.8% (p = 0.002, d = 0.41), respectively. TT3000m was 6% shorter (p < 0.001, d = 0.35), whereas Tmax at 90% MAS was 42% longer (p < 0.001, d = 0.74). Sprint interval training in the field significantly improved the 3,000-m run, time to exhaustion, PP, and MP in trained trail runners. Sprint interval training in the field is a time-efficient and cost-free means of improving both endurance and power performance in trained athletes.

  10. Six Sessions of Sprint Interval Training Improves Running Performance in Trained Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Oranchuk, Dustin J.; Herrera, Roberto; Millet, Guillaume Y.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Koral, J, Oranchuk, DJ, Herrera, R, and Millet, GY. Six sessions of sprint interval training improves running performance in trained athletes. J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 617–623, 2018—Sprint interval training (SIT) is gaining popularity with endurance athletes. Various studies have shown that SIT allows for similar or greater endurance, strength, and power performance improvements than traditional endurance training but demands less time and volume. One of the main limitations in SIT research is that most studies were performed in a laboratory using expensive treadmills or ergometers. The aim of this study was to assess the performance effects of a novel short-term and highly accessible training protocol based on maximal shuttle runs in the field (SIT-F). Sixteen (12 male, 4 female) trained trail runners completed a 2-week procedure consisting of 4–7 bouts of 30 seconds at maximal intensity interspersed by 4 minutes of recovery, 3 times a week. Maximal aerobic speed (MAS), time to exhaustion at 90% of MAS before test (Tmax at 90% MAS), and 3,000-m time trial (TT3000m) were evaluated before and after training. Data were analyzed using a paired samples t-test, and Cohen's (d) effect sizes were calculated. Maximal aerobic speed improved by 2.3% (p = 0.01, d = 0.22), whereas peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) increased by 2.4% (p = 0.009, d = 0.33) and 2.8% (p = 0.002, d = 0.41), respectively. TT3000m was 6% shorter (p < 0.001, d = 0.35), whereas Tmax at 90% MAS was 42% longer (p < 0.001, d = 0.74). Sprint interval training in the field significantly improved the 3,000-m run, time to exhaustion, PP, and MP in trained trail runners. Sprint interval training in the field is a time-efficient and cost-free means of improving both endurance and power performance in trained athletes. PMID:29076961

  11. Relationship between jumping ability and running performance in events of varying distance.

    PubMed

    Hudgins, Brandon; Scharfenberg, Jessica; Triplett, N Travis; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2013-03-01

    Running performance consists of a combination of aerobic and anaerobic capabilities, varying based on the distance of the event. It may be also dependent on factors relating to lower body power. Lower body power is commonly assessed by various modes of jumping tests. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if jumping performance would have some relationship to running performance in different distance events. This study involved 33 competitive track and field runners who participated in events ranging from 60 to 5,000 m (10 sprinters: height = 1.72 ± 10.26 m, mass = 67.80 ± 10.83 kg; 11 middle-distance runners: height = 1.77 ± 0.08 m, mass = 64.40 ± 8.02 kg; 12 long-distance runners: height = 1.73 ± 0.11 m, mass = 60.42 ± 10.36 kg). All subjects were competitive NCAA Division I athletes. Subjects were tested on a single occasion in a 3-jump test (TSJP), which was the distance covered during 3 two-leg standing long jumps performed in immediate succession. Time in the 60, 100, 200, 800, 3,000, and 5,000 m was obtained from recent race performances. The mean TSJP for sprinters, middle-distance runners, and long-distance runners were 8.24 ± 1.32, 6.59 ± 1.23, and 5.61 ± 0.88 m, respectively. The mean 60, 100, 200, 800, 3,000, and 5,000 m performances were 7.28 ± 0.78, 11.25 ± 0.87, 23.47 ± 2.25, 127.17 ± 15.13, 562.09 ± 60.54, and 987.65 ± 117.19 seconds, respectively. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) were observed between TSJP and running performance for all distances (60 m: 0.97 seconds, 100 m: 1.00 seconds, 200 m: 0.97 seconds, 800 m: 0.83 seconds, 3,000 m: 0.72 seconds, and 5,000 m: 0.71 seconds). The strength of the correlations, in general, was strongest to weakest based on event distance from the shortest distance (60 m) to the longest distance (5,000 m). Thus, the contribution of muscle power, as possibly determined by TSJP, maybe most important in shorter distance races (60, 100, and 200 m). However, because of the significant

  12. Runners in their forties dominate ultra-marathons from 50 to 3,100 miles

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, Matthias Alexander; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated performance trends and the age of peak running speed in ultra-marathons from 50 to 3,100 miles. METHODS: The running speed and age of the fastest competitors in 50-, 100-, 200-, 1,000- and 3,100-mile events held worldwide from 1971 to 2012 were analyzed using single- and multi-level regression analyses. RESULTS: The number of events and competitors increased exponentially in 50- and 100-mile events. For the annual fastest runners, women improved in 50-mile events, but not men. In 100-mile events, both women and men improved their performance. In 1,000-mile events, men became slower. For the annual top ten runners, women improved in 50- and 100-mile events, whereas the performance of men remained unchanged in 50- and 3,100-mile events but improved in 100-mile events. The age of the annual fastest runners was approximately 35 years for both women and men in 50-mile events and approximately 35 years for women in 100-mile events. For men, the age of the annual fastest runners in 100-mile events was higher at 38 years. For the annual fastest runners of 1,000-mile events, the women were approximately 43 years of age, whereas for men, the age increased to 48 years of age. For the annual fastest runners of 3,100-mile events, the age in women decreased to 35 years and was approximately 39 years in men. CONCLUSION: The running speed of the fastest competitors increased for both women and men in 100-mile events but only for women in 50-mile events. The age of peak running speed increased in men with increasing race distance to approximately 45 years in 1,000-mile events, whereas it decreased to approximately 39 years in 3,100-mile events. In women, the upper age of peak running speed increased to approximately 51 years in 3,100-mile events. PMID:24626948

  13. Beetroot juice does not enhance altitude running performance in well-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Josh Timothy; Oliver, Samuel James; Lewis-Jones, Tammy Maria; Wylie, Lee John; Macdonald, Jamie Hugo

    2015-06-01

    We hypothesized that acute dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) provided as concentrated beetroot juice supplement would improve endurance running performance of well-trained runners in normobaric hypoxia. Ten male runners (mean (SD): sea level maximal oxygen uptake, 66 (7) mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); 10 km personal best, 36 (2) min) completed incremental exercise to exhaustion at 4000 m and a 10-km treadmill time-trial at 2500 m simulated altitude on separate days after supplementation with ∼7 mmol NO3(-) and a placebo at 2.5 h before exercise. Oxygen cost, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were determined during the incremental exercise test. Differences between treatments were determined using means [95% confidence intervals], paired sample t tests, and a probability of individual response analysis. NO3(-) supplementation increased plasma nitrite concentration (NO3(-), 473 (226) nmol·L(-1) vs. placebo, 61 (37) nmol·L(-1), P < 0.001) but did not alter time to exhaustion during the incremental test (NO3(-), 402 (80) s vs. placebo 393 (62) s, P = 0.5) or time to complete the 10-km time-trial (NO3(-), 2862 (233) s vs. placebo, 2874 (265) s, P = 0.6). Further, no practically meaningful beneficial effect on time-trial performance was observed as the 11 [-60 to 38] s improvement was less than the a priori determined minimum important difference (51 s), and only 3 runners experienced a "likely, probable" performance improvement. NO3(-) also did not alter oxygen cost, arterial oxygen saturation, heart rate, or RPE. Acute dietary NO3(-) supplementation did not consistently enhance running performance of well-trained athletes in normobaric hypoxia.

  14. The Influence of Carbohydrate Mouth Rinse on Self-Selected Intermittent Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ian; Homewood, George; Williams, Clyde; Carter, James; Goosey-Tolfrey, Vicky L

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the influence of mouth rinsing a carbohydrate solution on self-selected intermittent variable-speed running performance. Eleven male amateur soccer players completed a modified version of the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) on 2 occasions separated by 1 wk. The modified LIST allowed the self-selection of running speeds during Block 6 of the protocol (75-90 min). Players rinsed and expectorated 25 ml of noncaloric placebo (PLA) or 10% maltodextrin solution (CHO) for 10 s, routinely during Block 6 of the LIST. Self-selected speeds during the walk and cruise phases of the LIST were similar between trials. Jogging speed was significantly faster during the CHO (11.3 ± 0.7 km · h(-1)) than during the PLA trial (10.5 ± 1.3 km · h(-1)) (p = .010); 15-m sprint speeds were not different between trials (PLA: 2.69 ± 0.18 s: CHO: 2.65 ± 0.13 s) (F(2, 10), p = .157), but significant benefits were observed for sprint distance covered (p = .024). The threshold for the smallest worthwhile change in sprint performance was set at 0.2 s. Inferential statistical analysis showed the chance that CHO mouth rinse was beneficial, negligible, or detrimental to repeated sprint performance was 86%, 10%, and 4%, respectively. In conclusion, mouth rinsing and expectorating a 10% maltodextrin solution was associated with a significant increase in self-selected jogging speed. Repeated 15-m sprint performance was also 86% likely to benefit from routinely mouth rinsing a carbohydrate solution in comparison with a taste-matched placebo.

  15. Effects of body-mapping-designed clothing on heat stress and running performance in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Li, Yi; Yao, Lei; Chen, Yajun; Guo, Yueping; Wong, Stephen H S; Ng, Frency S F; Hu, Junyan

    2017-10-01

    To investigate clothing-induced differences in human thermal response and running performance, eight male athletes participated in a repeated-measure study by wearing three sets of clothing (CloA, CloB, and CloC). CloA and CloB were body-mapping-designed with 11% and 7% increased capacity of heat dissipation respectively than CloC, the commonly used running clothing. The experiments were conducted by using steady-state running followed by an all-out performance running in a controlled hot environment. Participants' thermal responses such as core temperature (T c ), mean skin temperature ([Formula: see text]), heat storage (S), and the performance running time were measured. CloA resulted in shorter performance time than CloC (323.1 ± 10.4 s vs. 353.6 ± 13.2 s, p = 0.01), and induced the lowest [Formula: see text], smallest ΔT c , and smallest S in the resting and running phases. This study indicated that clothing made with different heat dissipation capacities affects athlete thermal responses and running performance in a hot environment. Practitioner Summary: A protocol that simulated the real situation in running competitions was used to investigate the effects of body-mapping-designed clothing on athletes' thermal responses and running performance. The findings confirmed the effects of optimised clothing with body-mapping design and advanced fabrics, and ensured the practical advantage of developed clothing on exercise performance.

  16. ATLAS Distributed Computing Experience and Performance During the LHC Run-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipčič, A.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    ATLAS Distributed Computing during LHC Run-1 was challenged by steadily increasing computing, storage and network requirements. In addition, the complexity of processing task workflows and their associated data management requirements led to a new paradigm in the ATLAS computing model for Run-2, accompanied by extensive evolution and redesign of the workflow and data management systems. The new systems were put into production at the end of 2014, and gained robustness and maturity during 2015 data taking. ProdSys2, the new request and task interface; JEDI, the dynamic job execution engine developed as an extension to PanDA; and Rucio, the new data management system, form the core of Run-2 ATLAS distributed computing engine. One of the big changes for Run-2 was the adoption of the Derivation Framework, which moves the chaotic CPU and data intensive part of the user analysis into the centrally organized train production, delivering derived AOD datasets to user groups for final analysis. The effectiveness of the new model was demonstrated through the delivery of analysis datasets to users just one week after data taking, by completing the calibration loop, Tier-0 processing and train production steps promptly. The great flexibility of the new system also makes it possible to execute part of the Tier-0 processing on the grid when Tier-0 resources experience a backlog during high data-taking periods. The introduction of the data lifetime model, where each dataset is assigned a finite lifetime (with extensions possible for frequently accessed data), was made possible by Rucio. Thanks to this the storage crises experienced in Run-1 have not reappeared during Run-2. In addition, the distinction between Tier-1 and Tier-2 disk storage, now largely artificial given the quality of Tier-2 resources and their networking, has been removed through the introduction of dynamic ATLAS clouds that group the storage endpoint nucleus and its close-by execution satellite sites. All stable

  17. Is Marathon Training Harder than the Ironman Training? An ECO-method Comparison.

    PubMed

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Moreno-Pérez, Diego; Cardona, Claudia A; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Muñoz, Iker; Sellés, Sergio; Cejuela, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the absolute and relative training load of the Marathon (42k) and the Ironman (IM) training in recreational trained athletes. Methods: Fifteen Marathoners and Fifteen Triathletes participated in the study. Their performance level was the same relative to the sex's absolute winner at the race. No differences were presented neither in age, nor in body weight, height, BMI, running VO 2max max, or endurance training experience ( p > 0.05). They all trained systematically for their respective event (IM or 42k). Daily training load was recorded in a training log, and the last 16 weeks were compared. Before this, gas exchange and lactate metabolic tests were conducted in order to set individual training zones. The Objective Load Scale (ECOs) training load quantification method was applied. Differences between IM and 42k athletes' outcomes were assessed using Student's test and significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results: As expected, Competition Time was significantly different (IM 11 h 45 min ± 1 h 54 min vs. 42k 3 h 6 min ± 28 min, p < 0.001). Similarly, Training Weekly Avg Time (IM 12.9 h ± 2.6 vs. 42k 5.2 ± 0.9), and Average Weekly ECOs (IM 834 ± 171 vs. 42k 526 ± 118) were significantly higher in IM ( p < 0.001). However, the Ratio between Training Load and Training Time was superior for 42k runners when comparing ECOs (IM 65.8 ± 11.8 vs. 42k 99.3 ± 6.8) ( p < 0.001). Finally, all ratios between training time or load vs. Competition Time were superior for 42k ( p < 0.001) (Training Time/Race Time: IM 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 1.7 ± 0.5), (ECOs Training Load/Race Time: IM 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 2.9 ± 1.0). Conclusions: In spite of IM athletes' superior training time and total or weekly training load, when comparing the ratios between training load and training time, and training time or training load vs. competition time, the preparation of a 42k showed to be harder.

  18. Is Marathon Training Harder than the Ironman Training? An ECO-method Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Moreno-Pérez, Diego; Cardona, Claudia A.; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Muñoz, Iker; Sellés, Sergio; Cejuela, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the absolute and relative training load of the Marathon (42k) and the Ironman (IM) training in recreational trained athletes. Methods: Fifteen Marathoners and Fifteen Triathletes participated in the study. Their performance level was the same relative to the sex's absolute winner at the race. No differences were presented neither in age, nor in body weight, height, BMI, running VO2max max, or endurance training experience (p > 0.05). They all trained systematically for their respective event (IM or 42k). Daily training load was recorded in a training log, and the last 16 weeks were compared. Before this, gas exchange and lactate metabolic tests were conducted in order to set individual training zones. The Objective Load Scale (ECOs) training load quantification method was applied. Differences between IM and 42k athletes' outcomes were assessed using Student's test and significance level was set at p < 0.05. Results: As expected, Competition Time was significantly different (IM 11 h 45 min ± 1 h 54 min vs. 42k 3 h 6 min ± 28 min, p < 0.001). Similarly, Training Weekly Avg Time (IM 12.9 h ± 2.6 vs. 42k 5.2 ± 0.9), and Average Weekly ECOs (IM 834 ± 171 vs. 42k 526 ± 118) were significantly higher in IM (p < 0.001). However, the Ratio between Training Load and Training Time was superior for 42k runners when comparing ECOs (IM 65.8 ± 11.8 vs. 42k 99.3 ± 6.8) (p < 0.001). Finally, all ratios between training time or load vs. Competition Time were superior for 42k (p < 0.001) (Training Time/Race Time: IM 1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 1.7 ± 0.5), (ECOs Training Load/Race Time: IM 1.2 ± 0.3 vs. 42k 2.9 ± 1.0). Conclusions: In spite of IM athletes' superior training time and total or weekly training load, when comparing the ratios between training load and training time, and training time or training load vs. competition time, the preparation of a 42k showed to be harder. PMID:28611674

  19. Melanoma markers in marathon runners: increase with sun exposure and physical strain.

    PubMed

    Richtig, Erika; Ambros-Rudolph, Christina M; Trapp, Michael; Lackner, Helmut K; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Kerl, Helmut; Schwaberger, Guenther

    2008-01-01

    Marathon runners seem to have an increased melanoma risk. To identify potential melanoma markers. 150 marathon runners volunteered to take part in the skin cancer screening campaign. After the runners completed a questionnaire about melanoma risk factors, types of sportswear and training programs, they received a total skin examination. The number of lentigines and nevi on the left shoulder and the left buttock were counted in each participant using templates in standardized positions. The potential association of training sportswear and training parameters with the number of lentigines and nevi on the left shoulder was evaluated. The mean number of lentigines on the left shoulder was 19.6 +/- 18.2 (SD), whereas no lentigines were found on the left buttock (p = 0.000). The number of nevi also differed significantly between the 2 localizations with higher numbers on the left shoulder (p = 0.000). While lifetime sunburn history and type of sportswear correlated with the number of lentigines, training parameters had an impact on the number of nevi. Independent of their mean weekly running time, runners with higher heart rates while training, higher training velocities and higher physical strain indexes showed more nevi on the shoulder than the other runners (p = 0.029, 0.046, 0.038, respectively). Sun exposure and high physical strain lead to an increase in melanoma markers such as lentigines and nevi in marathon runners. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. How to prevent the next Marathon Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    David, Frank S; Dixit, Richa

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, several drug companies have exploited U.S. regulatory policies to acquire exclusive rights to cheap therapies and substantially raise their prices, and Federal agencies and state governments are exploring various ways to prevent or punish such behavior in the future. Among these cases, however, Marathon Pharmaceuticals' handling of Emflaza (deflazacort) is unique, because the drug was previously only available abroad, and was never previously sold in the U.S. before the company obtained FDA approval for it. Thus, laws and policies designed to address price hikes on already-marketed drugs are unlikely to prevent additional Marathon-like scenarios. In this article, we describe in more detail the unique features of Emflaza compared with these other recent cases of drug price increases, determine the likelihood that similar situations will arise in the future, and explore legislative and administrative options to specifically prevent such behavior.

  1. Factors affecting running performance in 6-12-year-olds: The Health Oriented Pedagogical Project (HOPP).

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Per Morten; Mamen, Asgeir; Gammelsrud, Heidi; Lindberg, Morten; Hjelle, Ole Petter

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors affecting running performance in children. A cross-sectional study exploring the relationships between height, weight, waist circumference, muscle mass, body fat percentage, relevant biomarkers, and the Andersen intermittent running test in 2272 children aged 6 to 12 years. Parental education level was used as a non-physiological explanatory variable. Mean values (SD) and percentiles are presented as reference values. Height (β = 6.4, p < .0001), high values of haemoglobin (β = 18, p = .013) and low percentage of body fat (β = -7.5, p < .0001) showed an association with results from the running test. In addition, high parental education level showed a positive association with the running test. Boys display better running performance than girls at all age ages, except 7 years old, probably because of additional muscle mass and less fatty tissue. Height and increased level of haemoglobin positively affected running performance. Lower body fat percentage and high parental education level correlated with better running performance.

  2. Short-term heat acclimation improves the determinants of endurance performance and 5-km running performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    James, Carl A; Richardson, Alan J; Watt, Peter W; Willmott, Ashley G B; Gibson, Oliver R; Maxwell, Neil S

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of 5 days of controlled short-term heat acclimation (STHA) on the determinants of endurance performance and 5-km performance in runners, relative to the impairment afforded by moderate heat stress. A control group (CON), matched for total work and power output (2.7 W·kg -1 ), differentiated thermal and exercise contributions of STHA on exercise performance. Seventeen participants (10 STHA, 7 CON) completed graded exercise tests (GXTs) in cool (13 °C, 50% relative humidity (RH), pre-training) and hot conditions (32 °C, 60% RH, pre- and post-training), as well as 5-km time trials (TTs) in the heat, pre- and post-training. STHA reduced resting (p = 0.01) and exercising (p = 0.04) core temperature alongside a smaller change in thermal sensation (p = 0.04). Both groups improved the lactate threshold (LT, p = 0.021), lactate turnpoint (LTP, p = 0.005) and velocity at maximal oxygen consumption (vV̇O 2max ; p = 0.031) similarly. Statistical differences between training methods were observed in TT performance (STHA, -6.2(5.5)%; CON, -0.6(1.7)%, p = 0.029) and total running time during the GXT (STHA, +20.8(12.7)%; CON, +9.8(1.2)%, p = 0.006). There were large mean differences in change in maximal oxygen consumption between STHA +4.0(2.2) mL·kg -1 ·min -1 (7.3(4.0)%) and CON +1.9(3.7) mL·kg -1 ·min -1 (3.8(7.2)%). Running economy (RE) deteriorated following both training programmes (p = 0.008). Similarly, RE was impaired in the cool GXT, relative to the hot GXT (p = 0.004). STHA improved endurance running performance in comparison with work-matched normothermic training, despite equality of adaptation for typical determinants of performance (LT, LTP, vV̇O 2max ). Accordingly, these data highlight the ergogenic effect of STHA, potentially via greater improvements in maximal oxygen consumption and specific thermoregulatory and associated thermal perception adaptations absent in normothermic training.

  3. Pacing, packing and sex-based differences in Olympic and IAAF World Championship marathons.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pacing profiles and packing behaviours of athletes in Olympic and World Championship marathons. Finishing and split times were collated for 673 men and 549 women across nine competitions. The mean speeds for each intermediate 5 km and end 2.2 km segments were calculated. Medallists of both sexes maintained even-paced running from 10 km onwards whereas slower finishers dropped off the lead pack at approximately half-distance. Athletes who ran with the same opponents throughout slowed the least in the second half (P < 0.001, men: ES ≥ 1.19; women: ES ≥ 1.06), whereas other strategies such as moving between packs or running alone were less successful. Overall, women slowed less (P < 0.001, ES = 0.44) and were more likely to run a negative split (P < 0.001), and their more conservative start meant fewer women dropped out (P < 0.001). This also meant that women medallists sped up in the final 2.2 km, which might have decided the medal positions. Marathon runners are advised to identify rivals with similar abilities and ambitions to run alongside provided they start conservatively. Coaches should note important sex-based differences in tactics adopted and design training programmes accordingly.

  4. Tinea pedis in European marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, C; Baspeyras, M; de La Salmonière, P; Benderdouche, M; Couprie, B; Accoceberry, I; Weill, F X; Derouin, F; Feuilhade de Chauvin, M

    2002-03-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that 15% of the population in industrial countries suffer from tinea pedis (athlete's foot) and that persons who do sports are a high-risk population. To investigate the responsibility of dermatophytes in interdigital lesions of the feet in European marathon runners and to identify associated risk factors. Runners of the 14th Médoc Marathon (n = 147) were interviewed on risk factors for tinea pedis and underwent physical and mycological examinations. Interdigital lesions of the feet were found in 66 runners (45%). A dermatophyte was isolated in 45 runners (31%), 12 of whom were asymptomatic. Trichophyton interdigitale and T. rubrum accounted for 49% and 35.5%, respectively, of the cases of tinea pedis. Thirty-three (22%) of the 102 runners free of dermatophyte infection had lesions resembling those of tinea pedis. Increasing age and use of communal bathing facilities were predictive of T. rubrum culture. Marathon runners are at high risk for tinea pedis, but dermatophytes are responsible for only half of the foot lesions found in runners. The existence of asymptomatic carriers calls for prophylactic measures.

  5. Long-running telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services: experience, performance and scientific output

    PubMed Central

    Geissbuhler, Antoine; Jethwani, Kamal; Kovarik, Carrie; Person, Donald A; Vladzymyrskyy, Anton; Zanaboni, Paolo; Zolfo, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To summarize the experience, performance and scientific output of long-running telemedicine networks delivering humanitarian services. Methods Nine long-running networks – those operating for five years or more– were identified and seven provided detailed information about their activities, including performance and scientific output. Information was extracted from peer-reviewed papers describing the networks’ study design, effectiveness, quality, economics, provision of access to care and sustainability. The strength of the evidence was scored as none, poor, average or good. Findings The seven networks had been operating for a median of 11 years (range: 5–15). All networks provided clinical tele-consultations for humanitarian purposes using store-and-forward methods and five were also involved in some form of education. The smallest network had 15 experts and the largest had more than 500. The clinical caseload was 50 to 500 cases a year. A total of 59 papers had been published by the networks, and 44 were listed in Medline. Based on study design, the strength of the evidence was generally poor by conventional standards (e.g. 29 papers described non-controlled clinical series). Over half of the papers provided evidence of sustainability and improved access to care. Uncertain funding was a common risk factor. Conclusion Improved collaboration between networks could help attenuate the lack of resources reported by some networks and improve sustainability. Although the evidence base is weak, the networks appear to offer sustainable and clinically useful services. These findings may interest decision-makers in developing countries considering starting, supporting or joining similar telemedicine networks. PMID:22589567

  6. Dietary nitrate supplementation improves sprint and high-intensity intermittent running performance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jell, Harry; Fulford, Jonathan; Carter, James; Nyman, Lara; Bailey, Stephen J; Jones, Andrew M

    2016-12-30

    The influence of dietary nitrate (NO 3 - ) supplementation on indices of maximal sprint and intermittent exercise performance is unclear. To investigate the effects of NO 3 - supplementation on sprint running performance, and cognitive function and exercise performance during the sport-specific Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 1 test (IR1). In a double-blind, randomized, crossover study, 36 male team-sport players received NO 3 - -rich (BR; 70 mL·day -1 ; 6.4 mmol of NO 3 - ), and NO 3 - -depleted (PL; 70 mL·day -1 ; 0.04 mmol NO 3 - ) beetroot juice for 5 days. On day 5 of supplementation, subjects completed a series of maximal 20-m sprints followed by the Yo-Yo IR1. Cognitive tasks were completed prior to, during and immediately following the Yo-Yo IR1. BR improved sprint split times relative to PL at 20 m (1.2%; BR 3.98 ± 0.18 vs. PL 4.03 ± 0.19 s; P < 0.05), 10 m (1.6%; BR 2.53 ± 0.12 vs. PL 2.57 ± 0.19 s; P < 0.05) and 5 m (2.3%; BR 1.73 ± 0.09 vs. PL 1.77 ± 0.09 s; P < 0.05). The distance covered in the Yo-Yo IR1 test improved by 3.9% (BR 1422 ± 502 vs. PL 1369 ± 505 m; P < 0.05). The reaction time to the cognitive tasks was shorter in BR (615 ± 98 ms) than PL (645 ± 120 ms; P < 0.05) at rest but not during the Yo-Yo IR1. There was no difference in response accuracy. Dietary NO 3 - supplementation enhances maximal sprint and high-intensity intermittent running performance in competitive team sport players. Our findings suggest that NO 3 - supplementation has the potential to improve performance in single-sprint or multiple-sprint (team) sports. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The influence of wearing compression stockings on performance indicators and physiological responses following a prolonged trail running exercise.

    PubMed

    Vercruyssen, Fabrice; Easthope, Christopher; Bernard, Thierry; Hausswirth, Christophe; Bieuzen, Francois; Gruet, Mathieu; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing compression socks (CS) on performance indicators and physiological responses during prolonged trail running. Eleven trained runners completed a 15.6 km trail run at a competition intensity whilst wearing or not wearing CS. Counter movement jump, maximal voluntary contraction and the oxygenation profile of vastus lateralis muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method were measured before and following exercise. Run time, heart rate (HR), blood lactate concentration and ratings of perceived exertion were evaluated during the CS and non-CS sessions. No significant difference in any dependent variables was observed during the run sessions. Run times were 5681.1 ± 503.5 and 5696.7 ± 530.7 s for the non-CS and CS conditions, respectively. The relative intensity during CS and non-CS runs corresponded to a range of 90.5-91.5% HRmax. Although NIRS measurements such as muscle oxygen uptake and muscle blood flow significantly increased following exercise (+57.7% and + 42.6%,+59.2% and + 32.4%, respectively for the CS and non-CS sessions, P<0.05), there was no difference between the run conditions. The findings suggest that competitive runners do not gain any practical or physiological benefits from wearing CS during prolonged off-road running.

  8. Comparison of physiological and acid-base balance response during uphill, level and downhill running performed at constant velocity.

    PubMed

    Maciejczyk, Marcin; Więcek, M; Szymura, J; Szyguła, Z

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the physiological and the acid-base balance response to running at various slope angles. Ten healthy men 22.3 ± 1.56 years old participated in the study. The study consisted of completing the graded test until exhaustion and three 45-minute runs. For the first 30 minutes, runs were performed with an intensity of approximately 50% VO2max, while in the final 15 minutes the slope angle of treadmill was adjusted (0°; +4.5°; -4.5°), and a fixed velocity of running was maintained. During concentric exercise, a significant increase in the levels of physiological indicators was reported; during eccentric exercise, a significant decrease in the level of the analyzed indicators was observed. Level running did not cause significant changes in the indicators of acid-base balance. The indicators of acid-base balance changed significantly in the case of concentric muscle work (in comparison to level running) and after the eccentric work, significant and beneficial changes were observed in most of the biochemical indicators. The downhill run can be used for a partial regeneration of the body during exercise, because during this kind of effort an improvement of running economy was observed, and this type of effort did not impair the acid-base balance of body.

  9. Self-Actualization Effects Of A Marathon Growth Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Dorothy S.; Medvene, Arnold M.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a marathon group experience on university student's level of self-actualization two days and six weeks after the experience. Gains in self-actualization as a result of marathon group participation depended upon an individual's level of ego strength upon entering the group. (Author)

  10. Marathon Group Therapy: Potential for University Counseling Centers and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger, Thomas; Harris, Rafael S., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A descriptive analysis of marathon group therapy was conducted, specifying issues of set-up, screening, preparation, start-up, introduction to group process, facilitating therapeutic moments throughout the weekend, termination, and follow-up. Factors and dynamics unique to this modality are outlined for marathon groups in university counseling…

  11. Marathon Race Affects Neutrophil Surface Molecules: Role of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue induced by marathon races was observed in terms of inflammatory and immunological outcomes. Neutrophil survival and activation are essential for inflammation resolution and contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marathon races on surface molecules related to neutrophil adhesion and extrinsic apoptosis pathway and its association with inflammatory markers. We evaluated 23 trained male runners at the São Paulo International Marathon 2013. The following components were measured: hematological and inflammatory mediators, muscle damage markers, and neutrophil function. The marathon race induced an increased leukocyte and neutrophil counts; creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), CK-MB, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-8 levels. C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations were significantly higher 24 h and 72 h after the marathon race. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased 72 h after the marathon race. We also observed an increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and decreasedTNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) expression immediately after and 24 h after the marathon race. We observed an increased DNA fragmentation and L-selectin and Fas receptor expressions in the recovery period, indicating a possible slow rolling phase and delayed neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Marathon racing affects neutrophils adhesion and survival in the course of inflammation, supporting the “open-window” post-exercise hypothesis. PMID:27911915

  12. Shoe cleat position during cycling and its effect on subsequent running performance in triathletes.

    PubMed

    Viker, Tomas; Richardson, Matt X

    2013-01-01

    Research with cyclists suggests a decreased load on the lower limbs by placing the shoe cleat more posteriorly, which may benefit subsequent running in a triathlon. This study investigated the effect of shoe cleat position during cycling on subsequent running. Following bike-run training sessions with both aft and traditional cleat positions, 13 well-trained triathletes completed a 30 min simulated draft-legal triathlon cycling leg, followed by a maximal 5 km run on two occasions, once with aft-placed and once with traditionally placed cleats. Oxygen consumption, breath frequency, heart rate, cadence and power output were measured during cycling, while heart rate, contact time, 200 m lap time and total time were measured during running. Cardiovascular measures did not differ between aft and traditional cleat placement during the cycling protocol. The 5 km run time was similar for aft and traditional cleat placement, at 1084 ± 80 s and 1072 ± 64 s, respectively, as was contact time during km 1 and 5, and heart rate and running speed for km 5 for the two cleat positions. Running speed during km 1 was 2.1% ± 1.8 faster (P < 0.05) for the traditional cleat placement. There are no beneficial effects of an aft cleat position on subsequent running in a short distance triathlon.

  13. Calibration and performance of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter during the LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerda Alberich, L.

    2018-02-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic sampling calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal uses iron absorbers and scintillators as active material and it covers the central region | η| < 1.7. Jointly with the other sub-detectors it is designed for measurements of hadrons, jets, tau-particles and missing transverse energy. It also assists in muon identification. TileCal is regularly monitored and calibrated by several different calibration systems: a Cs radioactive source, a laser light system to check the PMT response, and a charge injection system (CIS) to check the front-end electronics. These calibration systems, in conjunction with data collected during proton-proton collisions, Minimum Bias (MB) events, provide extensive monitoring of the instrument and a means for equalizing the calorimeter response at each stage of the signal propagation. The performance of the calorimeter has been established with cosmic ray muons and the large sample of the proton-proton collisions and compared to Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The response of high momentum isolated muons is also used to study the energy response at the electromagnetic scale, isolated hadrons are used as a probe of the hadronic response. The calorimeter time resolution is studied with multijet events. A description of the different TileCal calibration systems and the results on the calorimeter performance during the LHC Run 2 are presented. The results on the pile-up noise and response uniformity studies are also discussed.

  14. Transient myocardial tissue and function changes during a marathon in less fit marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Valerie; Tizon-Marcos, Helena; Poirier, Paul; Pibarot, Philippe; Gilbert, Philippe; Amyot, Marc; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Després, Jean-Pierre; Bertrand, Olivier; Larose, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Although regular physical activity improves health, strenuous exercise might transiently increase cardiac risk. Training and fitness might provide protection. We prospectively studied 20 recreational marathon runners without known cardiovascular disease or symptoms: at peak training before, immediately after, and 3 months after a 42.2-km marathon. Changes in global/segmental myocardial function, edema, resting perfusion, and fibrosis were measured. At peak training, runners exercised 8.1 ± 2.3 hours and 62 ± 18 km per week with mean maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) of 53.2 ± 8.3 mL/kg/min. In response to the marathon, global left ventricular and right ventricular ejection fraction decreased in half of the runners; these runners had poorer peak training distance, training time, and fitness level. Change in global left ventricular ejection fraction was associated with VO2max. Overall, 36% of segments developed edema, 53% decreased function, and 59% decreased perfusion. Significant agreement was observed between segment decreasing function, decreasing perfusion, and developing edema. Myocardial changes were reversible at 3 months. Completing a marathon leads to localized myocardial edema, diminished perfusion, and decreased function occurring more extensively in less trained and fit runners. Although reversible, these changes might contribute to the transient increase in cardiac risk reported during sustained vigorous exercise. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Sprint and Run Times with Performance on the Wingate Anaerobic Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Gerald D.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Male volunteers were studied to examine the relationship between the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) and sprint-run times and to determine the influence of age and weight. Results indicate the WAnT is a moderate predictor of dash and run times but becomes a stronger predictor when adjusted for body weight. (Author/MT)

  16. An Electromagnetic Sensor for the Autonomous Running of Visually Impaired and Blind Athletes (Part I: The Fixed Infrastructure).

    PubMed

    Pieralisi, Marco; Di Mattia, Valentina; Petrini, Valerio; De Leo, Alfredo; Manfredi, Giovanni; Russo, Paola; Scalise, Lorenzo; Cerri, Graziano

    2017-02-14

    Sport is one of the best ways to promote the social integration of people affected by physical disability, because it helps them to increase their self-esteem by facing difficulties and overcoming their disabilities. Nowadays, a large number of sports can be easily played by visually impaired and blind athletes without any special supports, but, there are some disciplines that require the presence of a sighted guide. In this work, the attention will be focused on marathons, during which athletes with visual disorders have to be linked to the sighted guide by means of a non-stretchable elbow tether, with an evident reduction of their performance and autonomy. In this context, this paper presents a fixed electromagnetic infrastructure to equip a standard running racetrack in order to help a blind athlete to safely run without the presence of a sighted guide. The athlete runs inside an invisible hallway, just wearing a light and a comfortable sensor unit. The patented system has been homemade, designed, realized and finally tested by a blind Paralympic marathon champion with encouraging results and interesting suggestions for technical improvements. In this paper (Part I), the transmitting unit, whose main task is to generate the two magnetic fields that delimit the safe hallway, is presented and discussed.

  17. Performance of the ATLAS track reconstruction algorithms in dense environments in LHC Run 2.

    PubMed

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; Abidi, S H; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adachi, S; Adamczyk, L; Adelman, J; Adersberger, M; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agheorghiesei, C; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akatsuka, S; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albicocco, P; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alshehri, A A; Alstaty, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Santos, S P Amor Dos; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Angerami, A; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antrim, D J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Araujo Ferraz, V; Arce, A T H; Ardell, R E; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagnaia, P; Bahrasemani, H; Baines, J T; Bajic, M; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barranco Navarro, L; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beermann, T A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernardi, G; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethani, A; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Beyer, J; Bianchi, R M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bielski, R; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; Billoud, T R V; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bisanz, T; Bittrich, C; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blue, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Boerner, D; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bokan, P; Bold, T; Boldyrev, A S; Bolz, A E; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Bortfeldt, J; Bortoletto, D; Bortolotto, V; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bossio Sola, J D; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; 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Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zou, R; Zur Nedden, M; Zwalinski, L

    2017-01-01

    With the increase in energy of the Large Hadron Collider to a centre-of-mass energy of 13 [Formula: see text] for Run 2, events with dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, became a focus for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model. These environments are characterized by charged-particle separations of the order of the tracking detectors sensor granularity. Basic track quantities are compared between 3.2 fb[Formula: see text] of data collected by the ATLAS experiment and simulation of proton-proton collisions producing high-transverse-momentum jets at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 [Formula: see text]. The impact of charged-particle separations and multiplicities on the track reconstruction performance is discussed. The track reconstruction efficiency in the cores of jets with transverse momenta between 200 and 1600 [Formula: see text] is quantified using a novel, data-driven, method. The method uses the energy loss, [Formula: see text], to identify pixel clusters originating from two charged particles. Of the charged particles creating these clusters, the measured fraction that fail to be reconstructed is [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] for jet transverse momenta of 200-400 [Formula: see text] and 1400-1600 [Formula: see text], respectively.

  18. Performance of the ATLAS track reconstruction algorithms in dense environments in LHC Run 2

    SciT

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.

    With the increase in energy of the Large Hadron Collider to a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV for Run 2, events with dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, became a focus for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model. These environments are characterized by charged-particle separations of the order of the tracking detectors sensor granularity. Basic track quantities are compared between 3.2 fb -1 of data collected by the ATLAS experiment and simulation of proton–proton collisions producing high-transverse-momentum jets at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The impact of charged-particle separations andmore » multiplicities on the track reconstruction performance is discussed. The track reconstruction efficiency in the cores of jets with transverse momenta between 200 and 1600 GeV is quantified using a novel, data-driven, method. The method uses the energy loss, dE/dx, to identify pixel clusters originating from two charged particles. Of the charged particles creating these clusters, the measured fraction that fail to be reconstructed is 0.061±0.006 (stat.)±0.014 (syst.) and 0.093±0.017 (stat.)±0.021 (syst.) for jet transverse momenta of 200–400 GeV and 1400–1600 GeV, respectively.« less

  19. Performance of the ATLAS track reconstruction algorithms in dense environments in LHC Run 2

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2017-10-11

    With the increase in energy of the Large Hadron Collider to a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV for Run 2, events with dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, became a focus for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model. These environments are characterized by charged-particle separations of the order of the tracking detectors sensor granularity. Basic track quantities are compared between 3.2 fb -1 of data collected by the ATLAS experiment and simulation of proton–proton collisions producing high-transverse-momentum jets at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The impact of charged-particle separations andmore » multiplicities on the track reconstruction performance is discussed. The track reconstruction efficiency in the cores of jets with transverse momenta between 200 and 1600 GeV is quantified using a novel, data-driven, method. The method uses the energy loss, dE/dx, to identify pixel clusters originating from two charged particles. Of the charged particles creating these clusters, the measured fraction that fail to be reconstructed is 0.061±0.006 (stat.)±0.014 (syst.) and 0.093±0.017 (stat.)±0.021 (syst.) for jet transverse momenta of 200–400 GeV and 1400–1600 GeV, respectively.« less

  20. Evaluating the influence of massage on leg strength, swelling, and pain following a half-marathon.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Lance G; Dawson, Kimberley A; Tiidus, Peter M

    2004-11-01

    Massage therapy is commonly used following endurance running races with the expectation that it will enhance post-run recovery of muscle function and reduce soreness. A limited number of studies have reported little or no influence of massage therapy on post-exercise muscle recovery. However, no studies have been conducted in a field setting to assess the potential for massage to influence muscle recovery following an actual endurance running race. To evaluate the potential for repeated massage therapy interventions to influence recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle soreness, recovery of quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and reduction of upper leg muscle swelling over a two week recovery period following an actual road running race. Twelve adult recreational runners (8 male, 4 female) completed a half marathon (21.1 km) road race. On days 1,4, 8, and 11 post-race, subjects received 30 minutes of standardized massage therapy performed by a registered massage therapist on a randomly assigned massage treatment leg, while the other (control) leg received no massage treatment. Two days prior to the race (baseline) and preceding the treatments on post-race days 1, 4, 8, and 11 the following measures were conducted on each of the massage and control legs: strength of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, leg swelling, and soreness perception. At day 1, post-race quadriceps peak torque was significantly reduced (p < 0.05), and soreness and leg circumference significantly elevated (p < 0.05) relative to pre-race values with no difference between legs. This suggested that exercise-induced muscle disruption did occur. Comparing the rate of return to baseline measures between the massaged and control legs, revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). All measures had returned to baseline at day 11. Massage did not affect the recovery of muscles in terms of physiological measures of strength, swelling, or soreness. However, questionnaires revealed that 7 of the 12

  1. Running High-Throughput Jobs on Peregrine | High-Performance Computing |

    unique name (using "name=") and usse the task name to create a unique output file name. For runs on and how many tasks to give to each worker at a time using the NITRO_COORD_OPTIONS environment . Finally, you start Nitro by executing launch_nitro.sh. Sample Nitro job script To run a job using the

  2. Does core strength training influence running kinetics, lower-extremity stability, and 5000-M performance in runners?

    PubMed

    Sato, Kimitake; Mokha, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Although strong core muscles are believed to help athletic performance, few scientific studies have been conducted to identify the effectiveness of core strength training (CST) on improving athletic performance. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 6 weeks of CST on ground reaction forces (GRFs), stability of the lower extremity, and overall running performance in recreational and competitive runners. After a screening process, 28 healthy adults (age, 36.9 +/- 9.4 years; height, 168.4 +/- 9.6 cm; mass, 70.1 +/- 15.3 kg) volunteered and were divided randomly into 2 groups (n = 14 in each group). A test-retest design was used to assess the differences between CST (experimental) and no CST (control) on GRF measures, lower-extremity stability scores, and running performance. The GRF variables were determined by calculating peak impact, active vertical GRFs (vGRFs), and duration of the 2 horizontal GRFs (hGRFs), as measured while running across a force plate. Lower-extremity stability was assessed using the Star Excursion Balance Test. Running performance was determined by 5000-m run time measured on outdoor tracks. Six 2 (pre, post) x 2 (CST, control) mixed-design analyses of variance were used to determine the influence of CST on each dependent variable, p < 0.05. Twenty subjects completed the study (nexp = 12 and ncon = 8). A significant interaction occurred, with the CST group showing faster times in the 5000-m run after 6 weeks. However, CST did not significantly influence GRF variables and lower-leg stability. Core strength training may be an effective training method for improving performance in runners.

  3. Rehabilitation of a marathon runner with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Tara Beth; Stevens, Jennifer E

    2008-12-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy that affects nerve roots and peripheral nerves leading to motor neuropathy and flaccid paralysis. This case report describes the physical therapy examination, intervention, and outcomes for a marathon runner with GBS. The patient was a 30-year-old male marathon runner who presented with acutely evolving motor and sensory deficits that initially stabilized and then worsened. Both GBS and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were considered as diagnoses, and medical treatment included a combination of intravenous administration of immunoglobulins, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroids. During his stay in an acute inpatient rehabilitation facility, the intervention was focused on regaining functional independence and strength with care not to induce fatigue or relapse. After three weeks in an acute inpatient rehabilitation facility, the patient showed marked gains in Functional Independence Measure scores and muscle performance as measured by manual muscle testing.

  4. Effects of age and spa treatment on match running performance over two consecutive games in highly trained young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Horobeanu, Cosmin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Simpson, Ben M; Bourdon, Pitre C

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of age and spa treatment (i.e. combined sauna, cold water immersion, and jacuzzi) on match running performance over two consecutive matches in highly trained young soccer players. Fifteen pre- (age 12.8 ± 0.6 years) and 13 post- (15.9 ± 1 y) peak height velocity (PHV) players played two matches (Matches 1 and 2) within 48 h against the same opposition, with no specific between-match recovery intervention (control). Five post-PHV players also completed another set of two consecutive matches, with spa treatment implemented after the first match. Match running performance was assessed using a global positioning system with very-high-intensity running (> 16.1-19.0 km · h(-1)), sprinting distance (>19 km · h(-1)), and peak match speed determined. Match 2 very-high-intensity running was "possibly" impaired in post-PHV players (-9 ± 33%; ± 90% confidence limits), whereas it was "very likely" improved for the pre-PHV players (+27 ± 22%). The spa treatment had a beneficial impact on Match 2 running performance, with a "likely" rating for sprinting distance (+30 ± 67%) and "almost certain" for peak match speed (+6.4 ± 3%). The results suggest that spa treatment is an effective recovery intervention for post-PHV players, while its value in pre-PHV players is questionable.

  5. Influence of Hydration on Physiological Function and Performance During Trail Running in the Heat

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Lopez, Rebecca M.; Ganio, Matthew S.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Walker Yeargin, Susan; Yamamoto, Linda M.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Roti, Melissa W.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Maresh, Carl M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Authors of most field studies have not observed decrements in physiologic function and performance with increases in dehydration, although authors of well-controlled laboratory studies have consistently reported this relationship. Investigators in these field studies did not control exercise intensity, a known modulator of body core temperature. Objective: To directly examine the effect of moderate water deficit on the physiologic responses to various exercise intensities in a warm outdoor setting. Design: Semirandomized, crossover design. Setting: Field setting. Patients or Other Participants: Seventeen distance runners (9 men, 8 women; age  =  27 ± 7 years, height  =  171 ± 9 cm, mass  =  64.2 ± 9.0 kg, body fat  =  14.6% ± 5.5%). Intervention(s): Participants completed four 12-km runs (consisting of three 4-km loops) in the heat (average wet bulb globe temperature  =  26.5°C): (1) a hydrated, race trial (HYR), (2) a dehydrated, race trial (DYR), (3) a hydrated, submaximal trial (HYS), and (4) a dehydrated, submaximal trial (DYS). Main Outcome Measure(s): For DYR and DYS trials, dehydration was measured by body mass loss. In the submaximal trials, participants ran at a moderate pace that was matched by having them speed up or slow down based on pace feedback provided by researchers. Intestinal temperature was recorded using ingestible thermistors, and participants wore heart rate monitors to measure heart rate. Results: Body mass loss in relation to a 3-day baseline was greater for the DYR (−4.30% ± 1.25%) and DYS trials (−4.59% ± 1.32%) than for the HYR (−2.05% ± 1.09%) and HYS (−2.0% ± 1.24%) trials postrun (P < .001). Participants ran faster for the HYR (53.15 ± 6.05 minutes) than for the DYR (55.7 ± 7.45 minutes; P < .01), but speed was similar for HYS (59.57 ± 5.31 minutes) and DYS (59.44 ± 5.44 minutes; P > .05). Intestinal temperature immediately postrun was greater for DYR than for HYR (P

  6. T-Shirt fabric and color affect the physiological strain but not 10 km outdoor running performance.

    PubMed

    DE Alcantara Borba, Diego; Ferreira, João B; Coelho, Leonardo G; Martini, Angelo R; Lgonçalves Madeira, Luciana; Coelho, Daniel B; Prado, Luciano S; Bemben, Michael G; Rodrigues, Luiz O

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of T-Shirt fabric and color on the 10 km outdoor running performance. Six men and six women (mean±SD: age: 27±5 years; height: 1.70±0.13 m; weight: 64.0±12.7 kg; body surface area: 1.73±0.29 m2; Σskinfolds: 107±24 mm; VO2max: 40.2±8.4 mL.kg-1.min-1) took part in five experimental trials, during each of which they wore: 1) no T-shirt (CON); 2) white polyester T-shirt (WP); 3) black polyester T-shirt (BP); 4) white cotton T-shirt (WC); and 5) black cotton T-shirt (BC). Average running velocity (pace) was calculated from each 2 km running time. Rectal, skin and T-shirt temperatures, heart rates and Physiological Strain Index (PSI) were measured before and after the 10 km runs and at the end of each 2 km. There were no differences in pace, heart rate, rectal and skin temperatures among conditions (P>0.05). PSI was higher in BC and WC conditions when compared to BP and WP conditions. T-shirt temperature was higher for the BC when compared to WP, BP and WC conditions. Rectal temperature and heart rate increased simultaneously with reduced pace throughout self-paced running (P<0.05). Despite fabric type T-shirt altered PSI, running performance in the 10 km run was not affected by T-shirt type or color.

  7. Match running performance and skill execution improves with age but not the number of disposals in young Australian footballers.

    PubMed

    Gastin, Paul B; Tangalos, Christie; Torres, Lorena; Robertson, Sam

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated age-related differences in maturity, physical and functional characteristics and playing performance in youth Australian Football (AF). Young male players (n = 156) were recruited from 12 teams across 6 age groups (U10-U15) of a recreational AF club. All players were tested for body size, maturity and fitness. Player performance was assessed during a match in which disposals (kicks and handballs) and their effectiveness were coded from a video recording and match running performance measured using Global Positioning System. Significant main effects (P < 0.01) for age group were observed for age, years to peak height velocity, body mass, height, 20 m sprint, maximal speed over 20 m, vertical jump, 20 m multistage shuttle run, match distance, high-speed running distance, peak speed, number of effective disposals and percentage of effective disposals. Age-related differences in fitness characteristics (speed, lower body power and endurance) appeared to transfer to match running performance. The frequency in which players disposed of the football did not differ between age groups, however the effectiveness of each disposal (i.e., % effective disposals) improved with age. Match statistics, particularly those that evaluate skill execution outcome (i.e., effectiveness), are useful to assess performance and to track player development over time. Differences between age groups, and probably variability within age groups, are strongly associated with chronological age and maturity.

  8. Heavy strength training improves running and cycling performance following prolonged submaximal work in well-trained female athletes.

    PubMed

    Vikmoen, Olav; Rønnestad, Bent R; Ellefsen, Stian; Raastad, Truls

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of adding heavy strength training to female duathletes' normal endurance training on both cycling and running performance. Nineteen well-trained female duathletes ( V O 2max cycling: 54 ± 3 ml∙kg -1 ∙min -1 , VO 2max running: 53 ± 3 ml∙kg -1 ∙min -1 ) were randomly assigned to either normal endurance training ( E , n  = 8) or normal endurance training combined with strength training ( E+S , n  = 11). The strength training consisted of four lower body exercises [3 × 4-10 repetition maximum (RM)] twice a week for 11 weeks. Running and cycling performance were assessed using 5-min all-out tests, performed immediately after prolonged periods of submaximal work (3 h cycling or 1.5 h running). E+S increased 1RM in half squat (45 ± 22%) and lean mass in the legs (3.1 ± 4.0%) more than E Performance during the 5-min all-out test increased in both cycling (7.0 ± 4.5%) and running (4.7 ± 6.0%) in E+S, whereas no changes occurred in E The changes in running performance were different between groups. E+S reduced oxygen consumption and heart rate during the final 2 h of prolonged cycling, whereas no changes occurred in E No changes occurred during the prolonged running in any group. Adding strength training to normal endurance training in well-trained female duathletes improved both running and cycling performance when tested immediately after prolonged submaximal work. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  9. The power of auditory-motor synchronization in sports: enhancing running performance by coupling cadence with the right beats.

    PubMed

    Bood, Robert Jan; Nijssen, Marijn; van der Kamp, John; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli, like music and metronomes, are often used in sports. Adjusting movement tempo to acoustic stimuli (i.e., auditory-motor synchronization) may be beneficial for sports performance. However, music also possesses motivational qualities that may further enhance performance. Our objective was to examine the relative effects of auditory-motor synchronization and the motivational impact of acoustic stimuli on running performance. To this end, 19 participants ran to exhaustion on a treadmill in 1) a control condition without acoustic stimuli, 2) a metronome condition with a sequence of beeps matching participants' cadence (synchronization), and 3) a music condition with synchronous motivational music matched to participants' cadence (synchronization+motivation). Conditions were counterbalanced and measurements were taken on separate days. As expected, time to exhaustion was significantly longer with acoustic stimuli than without. Unexpectedly, however, time to exhaustion did not differ between metronome and motivational music conditions, despite differences in motivational quality. Motivational music slightly reduced perceived exertion of sub-maximal running intensity and heart rates of (near-)maximal running intensity. The beat of the stimuli -which was most salient during the metronome condition- helped runners to maintain a consistent pace by coupling cadence to the prescribed tempo. Thus, acoustic stimuli may have enhanced running performance because runners worked harder as a result of motivational aspects (most pronounced with motivational music) and more efficiently as a result of auditory-motor synchronization (most notable with metronome beeps). These findings imply that running to motivational music with a very prominent and consistent beat matched to the runner's cadence will likely yield optimal effects because it helps to elevate physiological effort at a high perceived exertion, whereas the consistent and correct cadence induced by auditory

  10. The Power of Auditory-Motor Synchronization in Sports: Enhancing Running Performance by Coupling Cadence with the Right Beats

    PubMed Central

    Bood, Robert Jan; Nijssen, Marijn; van der Kamp, John; Roerdink, Melvyn

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic stimuli, like music and metronomes, are often used in sports. Adjusting movement tempo to acoustic stimuli (i.e., auditory-motor synchronization) may be beneficial for sports performance. However, music also possesses motivational qualities that may further enhance performance. Our objective was to examine the relative effects of auditory-motor synchronization and the motivational impact of acoustic stimuli on running performance. To this end, 19 participants ran to exhaustion on a treadmill in 1) a control condition without acoustic stimuli, 2) a metronome condition with a sequence of beeps matching participants’ cadence (synchronization), and 3) a music condition with synchronous motivational music matched to participants’ cadence (synchronization+motivation). Conditions were counterbalanced and measurements were taken on separate days. As expected, time to exhaustion was significantly longer with acoustic stimuli than without. Unexpectedly, however, time to exhaustion did not differ between metronome and motivational music conditions, despite differences in motivational quality. Motivational music slightly reduced perceived exertion of sub-maximal running intensity and heart rates of (near-)maximal running intensity. The beat of the stimuli –which was most salient during the metronome condition– helped runners to maintain a consistent pace by coupling cadence to the prescribed tempo. Thus, acoustic stimuli may have enhanced running performance because runners worked harder as a result of motivational aspects (most pronounced with motivational music) and more efficiently as a result of auditory-motor synchronization (most notable with metronome beeps). These findings imply that running to motivational music with a very prominent and consistent beat matched to the runner’s cadence will likely yield optimal effects because it helps to elevate physiological effort at a high perceived exertion, whereas the consistent and correct cadence induced by

  11. Pilates training improves 5-km run performance by changing metabolic cost and muscle activity in trained runners

    PubMed Central

    Finatto, Paula; Silva, Edson Soares Da; Okamura, Alexandre B.; Almada, Bruna P.; Oliveira, Henrique B.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Strength training improves distance running economy and performance. This finding is based predominantly on maximal and explosive strength programmes applied to locomotor muscles, particularly on the lower limbs. It is not certain whether a minimization of metabolic cost (Cmet) and an improvement in running performance is feasible with strength training of the postural and trunk muscles. Methods Using kinematic, neuromuscular and metabolic measurements of running at two different speeds before and after a 12-week Pilates training programme, we tested the hypothesis that core training might improve the running Cmet and performance of trained runners. Thirty-two individuals were randomly assigned to the control group (CG, n = 16) or the Pilates group (PG, n = 16). Results Confirming our hypothesis, a significant improvement (p<0.05) was observed for running performance in the PG (pre: 25.65±0.4 min; post: 23.23±0.4 min) compared to the CG (pre: 25.33±0.58 min; post: 24.61±0.52 min). Similarly, the PG (4.33±0.07 J.kg-1.m-1) had better responses than the CG (4.71±0.11 J.kg-1.m-1) during post-training for Cmet. These findings were accompanied by decreased electromyographic activity of the postural muscles at submaximal running intensities in the PG. Conclusions Overall, these results provide a rationale for selecting strength training strategies that target adaptations on specific postural and locomotor muscles for trained distance runners. PMID:29561907

  12. Pilates training improves 5-km run performance by changing metabolic cost and muscle activity in trained runners.

    PubMed

    Finatto, Paula; Silva, Edson Soares Da; Okamura, Alexandre B; Almada, Bruna P; Oliveira, Henrique B; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo A

    2018-01-01

    Strength training improves distance running economy and performance. This finding is based predominantly on maximal and explosive strength programmes applied to locomotor muscles, particularly on the lower limbs. It is not certain whether a minimization of metabolic cost (Cmet) and an improvement in running performance is feasible with strength training of the postural and trunk muscles. Using kinematic, neuromuscular and metabolic measurements of running at two different speeds before and after a 12-week Pilates training programme, we tested the hypothesis that core training might improve the running Cmet and performance of trained runners. Thirty-two individuals were randomly assigned to the control group (CG, n = 16) or the Pilates group (PG, n = 16). Confirming our hypothesis, a significant improvement (p<0.05) was observed for running performance in the PG (pre: 25.65±0.4 min; post: 23.23±0.4 min) compared to the CG (pre: 25.33±0.58 min; post: 24.61±0.52 min). Similarly, the PG (4.33±0.07 J.kg-1.m-1) had better responses than the CG (4.71±0.11 J.kg-1.m-1) during post-training for Cmet. These findings were accompanied by decreased electromyographic activity of the postural muscles at submaximal running intensities in the PG. Overall, these results provide a rationale for selecting strength training strategies that target adaptations on specific postural and locomotor muscles for trained distance runners.

  13. Running performance and thermal sensation in the heat are improved with menthol mouth rinse but not ice slurry ingestion.

    PubMed

    Stevens, C J; Thoseby, B; Sculley, D V; Callister, R; Taylor, L; Dascombe, B J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a cooling strategy designed to predominately lower thermal state with a strategy designed to lower thermal sensation on endurance running performance and physiology in the heat. Eleven moderately trained male runners completed familiarization and three randomized, crossover 5-km running time trials on a non-motorized treadmill in hot conditions (33 °C). The trials included ice slurry ingestion before exercise (ICE), menthol mouth rinse during exercise (MEN), and no intervention (CON). Running performance was significantly improved with MEN (25.3 ± 3.5 min; P = 0.01), but not ICE (26.3 ± 3.2 min; P = 0.45) when compared with CON (26.0 ± 3.4 min). Rectal temperature was significantly decreased with ICE (by 0.3 ± 0.2 °C; P < 0.01), which persisted for 2 km of the run and MEN significantly decreased perceived thermal sensation (between 4 and 5 km) and ventilation (between 1 and 2 km) during the time trial. End-exercise blood prolactin concentration was elevated with MEN compared with CON (by 25.1 ± 24.4 ng/mL; P = 0.02). The data demonstrate that a change in the perception of thermal sensation during exercise from menthol mouth rinse was associated with improved endurance running performance in the heat. Ice slurry ingestion reduced core temperature but did not decrease thermal sensation during exercise or improve running performance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. 5000 Meter Run Performance is not Enhanced 24 Hrs After an Intense Exercise Bout and Cold Water Immersion.

    PubMed

    Stenson, Mary C; Stenson, Matthew R; Matthews, Tracey D; Paolone, Vincent J

    2017-06-01

    Cold water immersion (CWI) is used by endurance athletes to speed recovery between exercise bouts, but little evidence is available on the effects of CWI on subsequent endurance performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CWI following an acute bout of interval training on 5000 m run performance 24 hrs after interval training, perceived muscle soreness (PMS), range of motion (ROM), thigh circumference (TC), and perceived exertion (RPE). Nine endurance-trained males completed 2 trials, each consisting of an interval training session of 8 repetitions of 1200 m at a running pace equal to 75% of VO 2 peak, either a control or CWI treatment, and a timed 5000 m run 24 hrs post interval training session. CWI was performed for 12 min at 12 degrees Celsius on the legs. Recovery treatments were performed in a counterbalanced design. Run time for 5000 m was not different between the CWI and control trials (CWI = 1317.33 ± 128.33 sec, control = 1303.44 ± 105.53 sec; p = 0.48). PMS increased significantly from baseline to immediately post exercise (BL = 1.17 ± 0.22, POST = 2.81 ± 0.52; p = 0.02) and remained elevated from baseline to 24 hrs post exercise (POST24 = 2.19 ± 0.32; p = 0.02), but no difference was observed between the treatments. No differences were observed for the interaction between time and treatment for TC (λ = 0.73, p = 0.15) and ROM (λ = 0.49; p = 0.10). CWI performed immediately following an interval training exercise bout did not enhance subsequent 5000 m run performance or reduce PMS. CWI may not provide a recovery or performance advantage when athletes are accustomed to the demands of the prior exercise bout.

  15. An Innovative Running Wheel-based Mechanism for Improved Rat Training Performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Chun; Yang, Chin-Lung; Chang, Ching-Ping

    2016-09-19

    This study presents an animal mobility system, equipped with a positioning running wheel (PRW), as a way to quantify the efficacy of an exercise activity for reducing the severity of the effects of the stroke in rats. This system provides more effective animal exercise training than commercially available systems such as treadmills and motorized running wheels (MRWs). In contrast to an MRW that can only achieve speeds below 20 m/min, rats are permitted to run at a stable speed of 30 m/min on a more spacious and high-density rubber running track supported by a 15 cm wide acrylic wheel with a diameter of 55 cm in this work. Using a predefined adaptive acceleration curve, the system not only reduces the operator error but also trains the rats to run persistently until a specified intensity is reached. As a way to evaluate the exercise effectiveness, real-time position of a rat is detected by four pairs of infrared sensors deployed on the running wheel. Once an adaptive acceleration curve is initiated using a microcontroller, the data obtained by the infrared sensors are automatically recorded and analyzed in a computer. For comparison purposes, 3 week training is conducted on rats using a treadmill, an MRW and a PRW. After surgically inducing middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), modified neurological severity scores (mNSS) and an inclined plane test were conducted to assess the neurological damages to the rats. PRW is experimentally validated as the most effective among such animal mobility systems. Furthermore, an exercise effectiveness measure, based on rat position analysis, showed that there is a high negative correlation between the effective exercise and the infarct volume, and can be employed to quantify a rat training in any type of brain damage reduction experiments.

  16. Static Stretching Alters Neuromuscular Function and Pacing Strategy, but Not Performance during a 3-Km Running Time-Trial

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Mayara V.; Duarte, Marcos; Pasqua, Leonardo A.; Lima-Silva, Adriano E.; MacIntosh, Brian R.; Bertuzzi, Rômulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies report that static stretching (SS) impairs running economy. Assuming that pacing strategy relies on rate of energy use, this study aimed to determine whether SS would modify pacing strategy and performance in a 3-km running time-trial. Methods Eleven recreational distance runners performed a) a constant-speed running test without previous SS and a maximal incremental treadmill test; b) an anthropometric assessment and a constant-speed running test with previous SS; c) a 3-km time-trial familiarization on an outdoor 400-m track; d and e) two 3-km time-trials, one with SS (experimental situation) and another without (control situation) previous static stretching. The order of the sessions d and e were randomized in a counterbalanced fashion. Sit-and-reach and drop jump tests were performed before the 3-km running time-trial in the control situation and before and after stretching exercises in the SS. Running economy, stride parameters, and electromyographic activity (EMG) of vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF) and gastrocnemius medialis (GA) were measured during the constant-speed tests. Results The overall running time did not change with condition (SS 11:35±00:31 s; control 11:28±00:41 s, p = 0.304), but the first 100 m was completed at a significantly lower velocity after SS. Surprisingly, SS did not modify the running economy, but the iEMG for the BF (+22.6%, p = 0.031), stride duration (+2.1%, p = 0.053) and range of motion (+11.1%, p = 0.0001) were significantly modified. Drop jump height decreased following SS (−9.2%, p = 0.001). Conclusion Static stretch impaired neuromuscular function, resulting in a slow start during a 3-km running time-trial, thus demonstrating the fundamental role of the neuromuscular system in the self-selected speed during the initial phase of the race. PMID:24905918

  17. Case study: Nutrition and training periodization in three elite marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerf, Trent

    2012-10-01

    Laboratory-based studies demonstrate that fueling (carbohydrate; CHO) and fluid strategies can enhance training adaptations and race-day performance in endurance athletes. Thus, the aim of this case study was to characterize several periodized training and nutrition approaches leading to individualized race-day fluid and fueling plans for 3 elite male marathoners. The athletes kept detailed training logs on training volume, pace, and subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) for each training session over 16 wk before race day. Training impulse/load calculations (TRIMP; min × RPE = load [arbitrary units; AU]) and 2 central nutritional techniques were implemented: periodic low-CHO-availability training and individualized CHO- and fluid-intake assessments. Athletes averaged ~13 training sessions per week for a total average training volume of 182 km/wk and peak volume of 231 km/wk. Weekly TRIMP peaked at 4,437 AU (Wk 9), with a low of 1,887 AU (Wk 16) and an average of 3,082 ± 646 AU. Of the 606 total training sessions, ~74%, 11%, and 15% were completed at an intensity in Zone 1 (very easy to somewhat hard), Zone 2 (at lactate threshold) and Zone 3 (very hard to maximal), respectively. There were 2.5 ± 2.3 low-CHO-availability training bouts per week. On race day athletes consumed 61 ± 15 g CHO in 604 ± 156 ml/hr (10.1% ± 0.3% CHO solution) in the following format: ~15 g CHO in ~150 ml every ~15 min of racing. Their resultant marathon times were 2:11:23, 2:12:39 (both personal bests), and 2:16:17 (a marathon debut). Taken together, these periodized training and nutrition approaches were successfully applied to elite marathoners in training and competition.

  18. The Effect of Different Repeated-High-Intensity-Effort Bouts on Subsequent Running, Skill Performance, and Neuromuscular Function.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J; Jenkins, David G; Speranza, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    To assess the impact of different repeated-high-intensity-effort (RHIE) bouts on player activity profiles, skill involvements, and neuromuscular fatigue during small-sided games. 22 semiprofessional rugby league players (age 24.0 ± 1.8 y, body mass 95.6 ± 7.4 kg). During 4 testing sessions, they performed RHIE bouts that each differed in the combination of contact and running efforts, followed by a 5-min off-side small-sided game before performing a second bout of RHIE activity and another 5-min small-sided game. Global positioning system microtechnology and video recordings provided information on activity profiles and skill involvements. A countermovement jump and a plyometric push-up assessed changes in lower- and upper-body neuromuscular function after each session. After running-dominant RHIE bouts, players maintained running intensities during both games. In the contact-dominant RHIE bouts, reductions in moderate-speed activity were observed from game 1 to game 2 (ES = -0.71 to -1.06). There was also moderately lower disposal efficiency across both games after contact-dominant RHIE activity compared with running-dominant activity (ES = 0.62-1.02). Greater reductions in lower-body fatigue occurred as RHIE bouts became more running dominant (ES = -0.01 to -1.36), whereas upper-body fatigue increased as RHIE bouts became more contact dominant (ES = -0.07 to -1.55). Physical contact causes reductions in running intensity and the quality of skill involvements during game-based activities. In addition, the neuromuscular fatigue experienced by players is specific to the activities performed.

  19. 9. View of bridge looking west. A fundraising marathon is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View of bridge looking west. A fund-raising marathon is in prgress. The traffic levels outside the main arch were added in 1965 when the bridge underwent extensive rehabilitation. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Running ANSYS Fluent on the WinHPC System | High-Performance Computing |

    . If you don't have one, see WinHPC system user basics. Check License Use Status Start > All Jason Lustbader. Run Using Fluent Launcher Start Fluent launcher by opening: Start > All Programs > . Available node groups can be found from HPC Job Manager. Start > All Programs > Microsoft HPC Pack

  1. No positive influence of ingesting chia seed oil on human running performance.

    PubMed

    Nieman, David C; Gillitt, Nicholas D; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dew, Dustin A

    2015-05-15

    Runners (n = 24) reported to the laboratory in an overnight fasted state at 8:00 am on two occasions separated by at least two weeks. After providing a blood sample at 8:00 am, subjects ingested 0.5 liters flavored water alone or 0.5 liters water with 7 kcal kg-1 chia seed oil (random order), provided another blood sample at 8:30 am, and then started running to exhaustion (~70% VO2max). Additional blood samples were collected immediately post- and 1-h post-exercise. Despite elevations in plasma alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during the chia seed oil (337%) versus water trial (35%) (70.8 ± 8.6, 20.3 ± 1.8 μg mL(-1), respectively, p < 0.001), run time to exhaustion did not differ between trials (1.86 ± 0.10, 1.91 ± 0.13 h, p = 0.577, respectively). No trial differences were found for respiratory exchange ratio (RER) (0.92 ± 0.01), oxygen consumption, ventilation, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and plasma glucose and blood lactate. Significant post-run increases were measured for total leukocyte counts, plasma cortisol, and plasma cytokines (Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-8 (IL-8), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), and Tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α)), with no trial differences. Chia seed oil supplementation compared to water alone in overnight fasted runners before and during prolonged, intensive running caused an elevation in plasma ALA, but did not enhance run time to exhaustion, alter RER, or counter elevations in cortisol and inflammatory outcome measures.

  2. Exposure time, running and skill-related performance in international u20 rugby union players during an intensified tournament.

    PubMed

    Carling, Christopher J; Lacome, Mathieu; Flanagan, Eamon; O'Doherty, Pearse; Piscione, Julien

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated exposure time, running and skill-related performance in two international u20 rugby union teams during an intensified tournament: the 2015 Junior World Rugby Championship. Both teams played 5 matches in 19 days. Analyses were conducted using global positioning system (GPS) tracking (Viper 2™, Statsports Technologies Ltd) and event coding (Opta Pro®). Of the 62 players monitored, 36 (57.1%) participated in 4 matches and 23 (36.5%) in all 5 matches while player availability for selection was 88%. Analyses of team running output (all players completing >60-min play) showed that the total and peak 5-minute high metabolic load distances covered were likely-to-very likely moderately higher in the final match compared to matches 1 and 2 in back and forward players. In individual players with the highest match-play exposure (participation in >75% of total competition playing time and >75-min in each of the final 3 matches), comparisons of performance in matches 4 and 5 versus match 3 (three most important matches) reported moderate-to-large decreases in total and high metabolic load distance in backs while similar magnitude reductions occurred in high-speed distance in forwards. In contrast, skill-related performance was unchanged, albeit with trivial and unclear changes, while there were no alterations in either total or high-speed running distance covered at the end of matches. These findings suggest that despite high availability for selection, players were not over-exposed to match-play during an intensified u20 international tournament. They also imply that the teams coped with the running and skill-related demands. Similarly, individual players with the highest exposure to match-play were also able to maintain skill-related performance and end-match running output (despite an overall reduction in the latter). These results support the need for player rotation and monitoring of performance, recovery and intervention strategies during

  3. The long-term effect of minimalist shoes on running performance and injury: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The outcome of the effects of transitioning to minimalist running shoes is a topic of interest for runners and scientists. However, few studies have investigated the longer term effects of running in minimalist shoes. The purpose of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the effects of a 26 week transition to minimalist shoes on running performance and injury risk in trained runners unaccustomed to minimalist footwear. Methods and analysis A randomised parallel intervention design will be used. Seventy-six trained male runners will be recruited. To be eligible, runners must be aged 18–40 years, run with a habitual rearfoot footfall pattern, train with conventional shoes and have no prior experience with minimalist shoes. Runners will complete a standardised transition to either minimalist or control shoes and undergo assessments at baseline, 6 and 26 weeks. 5 km time-trial performance (5TT), running economy, running biomechanics, triceps surae muscle strength and lower limb bone mineral density will be assessed at each time point. Pain and injury will be recorded weekly. Training will be standardised during the first 6 weeks. Primary statistical analysis will compare 5TT between shoe groups at the 6-week time point and injury incidence across the entire 26-week study period. Ethics and dissemination This RCT has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of South Australia. Participants will be required to provide their written informed consent prior to participation in the study. Study findings will be disseminated in the form of journal publications and conference presentations after completion of planned data analysis. Trial registration number This RCT has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613000642785). PMID:26297368

  4. The long-term effect of minimalist shoes on running performance and injury: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-08-21

    The outcome of the effects of transitioning to minimalist running shoes is a topic of interest for runners and scientists. However, few studies have investigated the longer term effects of running in minimalist shoes. The purpose of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate the effects of a 26 week transition to minimalist shoes on running performance and injury risk in trained runners unaccustomed to minimalist footwear. A randomised parallel intervention design will be used. Seventy-six trained male runners will be recruited. To be eligible, runners must be aged 18-40 years, run with a habitual rearfoot footfall pattern, train with conventional shoes and have no prior experience with minimalist shoes. Runners will complete a standardised transition to either minimalist or control shoes and undergo assessments at baseline, 6 and 26 weeks. 5 km time-trial performance (5TT), running economy, running biomechanics, triceps surae muscle strength and lower limb bone mineral density will be assessed at each time point. Pain and injury will be recorded weekly. Training will be standardised during the first 6 weeks. Primary statistical analysis will compare 5TT between shoe groups at the 6-week time point and injury incidence across the entire 26-week study period. This RCT has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the University of South Australia. Participants will be required to provide their written informed consent prior to participation in the study. Study findings will be disseminated in the form of journal publications and conference presentations after completion of planned data analysis. This RCT has been registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613000642785). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Performance of the CMS precision electromagnetic calorimeter at LHC Run II and prospects for High-Luminosity LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhicai

    2018-04-01

    Many physics analyses using the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the LHC require accurate, high-resolution electron and photon energy measurements. Following the excellent performance achieved during LHC Run I at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) is operating at the LHC with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II has achieved unprecedented levels. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) has reached up to 40 interactions in 2016 and may increase further in 2017. These high pileup levels necessitate a retuning of the ECAL readout and trigger thresholds and reconstruction algorithms. In addition, the energy response of the detector must be precisely calibrated and monitored. We present new reconstruction algorithms and calibration strategies that were implemented to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We will show performance results from the 2015-2016 data taking periods and provide an outlook on the expected Run II performance in the years to come. Beyond the LHC, challenging running conditions for CMS are expected after the High-Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) . We review the design and R&D studies for the CMS ECAL and present first test beam studies. Particular challenges at HL-LHC are the harsh radiation environment, the increasing data rates, and the extreme level of pile-up events, with up to 200 simultaneous proton-proton collisions. We present test beam results of hadron irradiated PbWO crystals up to fluences expected at the HL-LHC . We also report on the R&D for the new readout and trigger electronics, which must be upgraded due to the increased trigger and latency requirements at the HL-LHC.

  6. Graded shuttle run performance by playing positions in elite female basketball.

    PubMed

    Štrumbelj, Boro; Vučković, Goran; Jakovljević, Saša; Milanović, Zoran; James, Nic; Erčulj, Frane

    2015-03-01

    A graded shuttle run test was used to assess differences in physiological parameters between playing positions in elite female basketball players. Twenty-four female basketball players (8 guards, 8 forwards, and 8 centers) who played for the senior national teams of Slovenia and Serbia were tested with the 30-15 intermittent fitness test. During the shuttle run, the following physiological parameters were measured: oxygen consumption ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), carbon dioxide production ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), pulmonary ventilation (VE) breath by breath, respiratory quotient, oxygen pulse as the (Equation is included in full-text article.)vs. HR ratio and [LA]. No significant differences were found for any of the measures between the 3 playing positions. Although this finding was surprising, future studies should try to determine whether the tactics used in female basketball determine that the interpositional differences seen in male basketball are not evident.

  7. Running STAR-CCM+ Software on the Peregrine System | High-Performance

    /bin/lmutil lmstat -c 1999@wind-lms.nrel.gov -a module load star-ccm export TMPDIR="/scratch/$USER + -power -rsh "ssh -oStrictHostKeyChecking=no" -machinefile nodelist -np $(($nodes*$cores , type the commands from the SLURM script and make sure the job runs: module load star-ccm export TMPDIR

  8. Effect of fat- and carbohydrate-rich diets on metabolism and running performance in trained adolescent boys.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes Couto, Patricia; Marani Lima, Hessel; Pinheiro Soares, Ruda; Bertuzzi, Romulo; De-Oliveira, Fernando Roberto; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    A randomized crossover trial was designed to analyze the impact of a short-term, isoenergetic fat-rich or carbohydrate (CHO)-rich diet on substrate oxidation rates during submaximal exercise and on performance in a 10,000-m running time trial in trained, mid- to late-pubertal boys. An incremental test was performed to determine the peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak). After 2 days on a fat-rich (24.2% ± 0.8% CHO, 60.4% ± 0.3% fat, and 15.5% ± 1.0% protein), CHO-rich (69.3% ± 1.2% CHO, 15.9% ± 2.1% fat, and 15.1% ± 1.1% protein), or habitual (56.1% ± 7.0% CHO, 27.5% ± 4.9% fat, and 16.5% ± 4.0% protein) diet, 19 trained adolescent boys (15.2 ± 1.5 years) performed a 10-minute constant run at 65% VO2peak to determine the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during exercise and 10,000-m running on an outdoor track. During the constant run, the RER and CHO contribution to energy expenditure were lower, and fat contribution higher, in the fat-rich diet than in the CHO-rich diet (P < 0.05), but the results were not different from those of the habitual diet. Performance in the 10,000-m run after consuming CHO- and fat-rich diets was similar to performance after a habitual diet (50.0 ± 7.0, 51.9 ± 8.3, and 50.9 ± 7.4 minutes, respectively), but consuming a CHO-rich diet enhanced performance compared with that after a fat-rich diet (P = 0.03). These findings indicate that a CHO-rich diet provides additional benefits to 10,000-m running performance in trained adolescent boys compared with a fat-rich diet.

  9. Gait characteristics over the course of a race in recreational marathon competitors.

    PubMed

    Bertram, John E A; Prebeau-Menezes, Leif; Szarko, Matthew J

    2013-03-01

    We analyzed gait and function of the supporting limb in participants of a marathon race at three stages: prerace, midrace (18 km), and near the end of the race (36 km). We confirmed that the most successful runners were able to maintain running speed for the duration of the race with little change in speed or gait. Speed slowed progressively during the race for those with slower race times, but stride frequency-stride length relationships remained normal for the speed they ran. These findings differ from most lab-based studies of fatigue, in which runners are forced to match a constant preset treadmill speed. Small changes in maximum ground force were seen in both slow- and fast-running participants as race end approached.

  10. The impact of exercise intensity on the release of cardiac biomarkers in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Legaz-Arrese, Alejandro; George, Keith; Carranza-García, Luis Enrique; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Moros-García, Teresa; Serrano-Ostáriz, Enrique

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine the influence of exercise intensity on the release of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in amateur marathon runners. Fourteen runners completed three exercise trials of the same duration but at exercise intensities corresponding to: (a) a competitive marathon [mean ± SD: heart rate 159 ± 7 beat min(-1), finish time 202 ± 14 min]; (b) 95% of individual anaerobic threshold [heart rate 144 ± 6 beat min(-1)] and; (c) 85% of individual anaerobic threshold [heart rate 129 ± 5 beat min(-1)]. cTnI and NT-proBNP were assayed from blood samples collected before, 30 min and 3 h post-exercise for each trial. cTnI and NT-proBNP were not different at baseline before each trial. After exercise at 85% of individual anaerobic threshold cTnI was not significantly elevated. Conversely, cTnI was elevated after exercise at 95% of individual anaerobic threshold (0.016 μg L(-1)) and to an even greater extent after exercise at competition intensity (0.054 μg L(-1)). Peak post-exercise values of NT-proBNP were elevated to a similar extent after all exercise trials (P < 0.05). The upper reference limit for cTnI (0.04 μg L(-1)) was exceeded in six subjects at competition intensity. No data for NT-proBNP surpassed its upper reference limit. Peak post-exercise values for cTnI and NT-proBNP were correlated with their respective baseline values. These data suggest exercise intensity influences the release of cTnI, but not NT-proBNP, and that competitive marathon running intensity is required for cTnI to be elevated over its upper reference limit.

  11. The Dynamics of Cardiovascular Biomarkers in non-Elite Marathon Runners.

    PubMed

    Roca, Emma; Nescolarde, Lexa; Lupón, Josep; Barallat, Jaume; Januzzi, James L; Liu, Peter; Cruz Pastor, M; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2017-04-01

    The number of recreational/non-elite athletes participating in marathons is increasing, but data regarding impact of endurance exercise on cardiovascular health are conflicting. This study evaluated 79 recreational athletes of the 2016 Barcelona Marathon (72% men; mean age 39 ± 6 years; 71% ≥35 years). Blood samples were collected at baseline (24-48 h before the race), immediately after the race (1-2 h after the race), and 48-h post-race. Amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, a marker of myocardial strain), ST2 (a marker of extracellular matrix remodeling and fibrosis, inflammation, and myocardial strain), and high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT, a marker of myocyte stress/injury) were assayed. The median (interquartile range, IQR) years of training was 7 (5-11) years and median (IQR) weekly training hours was 6 (5-8) h/week, respectively. The median (IQR) race time (h:min:s) was 3:32:44 (3:18:50-3:51:46). Echocardiographic indices were within normal ranges. Immediately after the race, blood concentration of the three cardiac biomarkers increased significantly, with 1.3-, 1.6-, and 16-fold increases in NT-proBNP, ST2, and hs-TnT, respectively. We found an inverse relationship between weekly training hours and increased ST2 (p = 0.007), and a direct relationship between race time and increased hs-TnT (p < 0.001) and ST2 (p = 0.05). Our findings indicate that preparation for and participation in marathon running may affect multiple pathways affecting the cardiovascular system. More data and long-term follow-up studies in non-elite and elite athletes are needed.

  12. The influence of lower limb impairments on RaceRunning performance in athletes with hypertonia, ataxia or athetosis.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marietta L; Jahed, Sadaf; Tennant, Nicola; Verheul, Martine H G

    2018-03-01

    RaceRunning enables athletes with limited or no walking ability to propel themselves independently using a three-wheeled running bike that has a saddle and a chest plate for support but no pedals. For RaceRunning to be included as a Para athletics event, an evidence-based classification system is required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the association between a range of impairment measures and RaceRunning performance. The following impairment measures were recorded: lower limb muscle strength assessed using Manual Muscle Testing (MMT), selective voluntary motor control assessed using the Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity (SCALE), spasticity recorded using both the Australian Spasticity Assessment Score (ASAS) and Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), passive range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities and the maximum static step length achieved on a stationary bike (MSSL). Associations between impairment measures and 100-meter race speed were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. Sixteen male and fifteen female athletes (27 with cerebral palsy), aged 23 (SD = 7) years, Gross Motor Function Classification System levels ranging from II to V, participated. The MSSL averaged over both legs and the ASAS, MAS, SCALE, and MMT summed over all joints and both legs, significantly correlated with 100 m race performance (rho: 0.40-0.54). Passive knee extension was the only ROM measure that was significantly associated with race speed (rho = 0.48). These results suggest that lower limb spasticity, isometric leg strength, selective voluntary motor control and passive knee extension impact performance in RaceRunning athletes. This supports the potential use of these measures in a future evidence-based classification system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of music on maximal self-paced running performance and passive post-exercise recovery rate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sam; Kimmerly, Derek S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of fast tempo music (FM) on self-paced running performance (heart rate, running speed, ratings of perceived exertion), and slow tempo music (SM) on post-exercise heart rate and blood lactate recovery rates. Twelve participants (5 women) completed three randomly assigned conditions: static noise (control), FM and SM. Each condition consisted of self-paced treadmill running, and supine postexercise recovery periods (20 min each). Average running speed, heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured during the treadmill running period, while HR and blood lactate were measured during the recovery period. Listening to FM during exercise resulted in a faster self-selected running speed (10.8±1.7 vs. 9.9±1.4 km•hour-1, P<0.001) and higher peak HR (184±12 vs. 177±17 beats•min-1, P<0.01) without a corresponding difference in peak RPE (FM, 16.8±1.8 vs. SM 15.7±1.9, P=0.10). Listening to SM during the post-exercise period resulted in faster HR recovery throughout (main effect P<0.001) and blood lactate at the end of recovery (2.8±0.4 vs. 4.7±0.8 mmol•L-1, P<0.05). Listening to FM during exercise can increase self-paced intensity without altering perceived exertion levels while listening to SM after exercise can accelerate the recovery rate back to resting levels.

  14. Influence of music on maximal self-paced running performance and passive post-exercise recovery rate.