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Sample records for marika mgi ragnar

  1. Ragnar Rommetveit's Approach to Everyday Spoken Dialogue from Within.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Sabine; O'Connell, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    The following article presents basic concepts and methods of Ragnar Rommetveit's (born 1924) hermeneutic-dialogical approach to everyday spoken dialogue with a focus on both shared consciousness and linguistically mediated meaning. He developed this approach originally in his engagement of mainstream linguistic and psycholinguistic research of the 1960s and 1970s. He criticized this research tradition for its individualistic orientation and its adherence to experimental methodology which did not allow the engagement of interactively established meaning and understanding in everyday spoken dialogue. As a social psychologist influenced by phenomenological philosophy, Rommetveit opted for an alternative conceptualization of such dialogue as a contextualized, partially private world, temporarily co-established by interlocutors on the basis of shared consciousness. He argued that everyday spoken dialogue should be investigated from within, i.e., from the perspectives of the interlocutors and from a psychology of the second person. Hence, he developed his approach with an emphasis on intersubjectivity, perspectivity and perspectival relativity, meaning potential of utterances, and epistemic responsibility of interlocutors. In his methods, he limited himself for the most part to casuistic analyses, i.e., logical analyses of fictitious examples to argue for the plausibility of his approach. After many years of experimental research on language, he pursued his phenomenologically oriented research on dialogue in English-language publications from the late 1980s up to 2003. During that period, he engaged psycholinguistic research on spoken dialogue carried out by Anglo-American colleagues only occasionally. Although his work remained unfinished and open to development, it provides both a challenging alternative and supplement to current Anglo-American research on spoken dialogue and some overlap therewith. PMID:26597220

  2. Ragnar Rommetveit's Approach to Everyday Spoken Dialogue from Within.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Sabine; O'Connell, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    The following article presents basic concepts and methods of Ragnar Rommetveit's (born 1924) hermeneutic-dialogical approach to everyday spoken dialogue with a focus on both shared consciousness and linguistically mediated meaning. He developed this approach originally in his engagement of mainstream linguistic and psycholinguistic research of the 1960s and 1970s. He criticized this research tradition for its individualistic orientation and its adherence to experimental methodology which did not allow the engagement of interactively established meaning and understanding in everyday spoken dialogue. As a social psychologist influenced by phenomenological philosophy, Rommetveit opted for an alternative conceptualization of such dialogue as a contextualized, partially private world, temporarily co-established by interlocutors on the basis of shared consciousness. He argued that everyday spoken dialogue should be investigated from within, i.e., from the perspectives of the interlocutors and from a psychology of the second person. Hence, he developed his approach with an emphasis on intersubjectivity, perspectivity and perspectival relativity, meaning potential of utterances, and epistemic responsibility of interlocutors. In his methods, he limited himself for the most part to casuistic analyses, i.e., logical analyses of fictitious examples to argue for the plausibility of his approach. After many years of experimental research on language, he pursued his phenomenologically oriented research on dialogue in English-language publications from the late 1980s up to 2003. During that period, he engaged psycholinguistic research on spoken dialogue carried out by Anglo-American colleagues only occasionally. Although his work remained unfinished and open to development, it provides both a challenging alternative and supplement to current Anglo-American research on spoken dialogue and some overlap therewith.

  3. MouseMine: a new data warehouse for MGI.

    PubMed

    Motenko, H; Neuhauser, S B; O'Keefe, M; Richardson, J E

    2015-08-01

    MouseMine (www.mousemine.org) is a new data warehouse for accessing mouse data from Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI). Based on the InterMine software framework, MouseMine supports powerful query, reporting, and analysis capabilities, the ability to save and combine results from different queries, easy integration into larger workflows, and a comprehensive Web Services layer. Through MouseMine, users can access a significant portion of MGI data in new and useful ways. Importantly, MouseMine is also a member of a growing community of online data resources based on InterMine, including those established by other model organism databases. Adopting common interfaces and collaborating on data representation standards are critical to fostering cross-species data analysis. This paper presents a general introduction to MouseMine, presents examples of its use, and discusses the potential for further integration into the MGI interface. PMID:26092688

  4. Integrating text mining into the MGI biocuration workflow.

    PubMed

    Dowell, K G; McAndrews-Hill, M S; Hill, D P; Drabkin, H J; Blake, J A

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge for functional and comparative genomics resource development is the extraction of data from the biomedical literature. Although text mining for biological data is an active research field, few applications have been integrated into production literature curation systems such as those of the model organism databases (MODs). Not only are most available biological natural language (bioNLP) and information retrieval and extraction solutions difficult to adapt to existing MOD curation workflows, but many also have high error rates or are unable to process documents available in those formats preferred by scientific journals.In September 2008, Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) at The Jackson Laboratory initiated a search for dictionary-based text mining tools that we could integrate into our biocuration workflow. MGI has rigorous document triage and annotation procedures designed to identify appropriate articles about mouse genetics and genome biology. We currently screen approximately 1000 journal articles a month for Gene Ontology terms, gene mapping, gene expression, phenotype data and other key biological information. Although we do not foresee that curation tasks will ever be fully automated, we are eager to implement named entity recognition (NER) tools for gene tagging that can help streamline our curation workflow and simplify gene indexing tasks within the MGI system. Gene indexing is an MGI-specific curation function that involves identifying which mouse genes are being studied in an article, then associating the appropriate gene symbols with the article reference number in the MGI database.Here, we discuss our search process, performance metrics and success criteria, and how we identified a short list of potential text mining tools for further evaluation. We provide an overview of our pilot projects with NCBO's Open Biomedical Annotator and Fraunhofer SCAI's ProMiner. In doing so, we prove the potential for the further incorporation of semi

  5. Integrating text mining into the MGI biocuration workflow.

    PubMed

    Dowell, K G; McAndrews-Hill, M S; Hill, D P; Drabkin, H J; Blake, J A

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge for functional and comparative genomics resource development is the extraction of data from the biomedical literature. Although text mining for biological data is an active research field, few applications have been integrated into production literature curation systems such as those of the model organism databases (MODs). Not only are most available biological natural language (bioNLP) and information retrieval and extraction solutions difficult to adapt to existing MOD curation workflows, but many also have high error rates or are unable to process documents available in those formats preferred by scientific journals.In September 2008, Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) at The Jackson Laboratory initiated a search for dictionary-based text mining tools that we could integrate into our biocuration workflow. MGI has rigorous document triage and annotation procedures designed to identify appropriate articles about mouse genetics and genome biology. We currently screen approximately 1000 journal articles a month for Gene Ontology terms, gene mapping, gene expression, phenotype data and other key biological information. Although we do not foresee that curation tasks will ever be fully automated, we are eager to implement named entity recognition (NER) tools for gene tagging that can help streamline our curation workflow and simplify gene indexing tasks within the MGI system. Gene indexing is an MGI-specific curation function that involves identifying which mouse genes are being studied in an article, then associating the appropriate gene symbols with the article reference number in the MGI database.Here, we discuss our search process, performance metrics and success criteria, and how we identified a short list of potential text mining tools for further evaluation. We provide an overview of our pilot projects with NCBO's Open Biomedical Annotator and Fraunhofer SCAI's ProMiner. In doing so, we prove the potential for the further incorporation of semi

  6. MARIKA - A model revision system using qualitative analysis of simulations. [of human orientation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groleau, Nicolas; Frainier, Richard; Colombano, Silvano; Hazelton, Lyman; Szolovits, Peter

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes portions of a novel system called MARIKA (Model Analysis and Revision of Implicit Key Assumptions) to automatically revise a model of the normal human orientation system. The revision is based on analysis of discrepancies between experimental results and computer simulations. The discrepancies are calculated from qualitative analysis of quantitative simulations. The experimental and simulated time series are first discretized in time segments. Each segment is then approximated by linear combinations of simple shapes. The domain theory and knowledge are represented as a constraint network. Incompatibilities detected during constraint propagation within the network yield both parameter and structural model alterations. Interestingly, MARIKA diagnosed a data set from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Vestibular Laboratory as abnormal though the data was tagged as normal. Published results from other laboratories confirmed the finding. These encouraging results could lead to a useful clinical vestibular tool and to a scientific discovery system for space vestibular adaptation.

  7. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas oleovorans strain MGY01 isolated from deep sea water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Runping; Ren, Chong; Huang, Nan; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Runying

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans MGY01 isolated from the deep-sea water of the South China Sea could effectively degrade malachite green. The draft genome of P. oleovorans MGY01 was sequenced and analyzed to gain insights into its efficient metabolic pathway for degrading malachite green. The data obtained revealed 109 Contigs (N50; 128,269 bp) with whole genome size of 5,201,892 bp. The draft genome sequence of strain MGY01 will be helpful in studying the genetic pathways involved in the degradation of malachite green. PMID:25528517

  8. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas oleovorans strain MGY01 isolated from deep sea water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Runping; Ren, Chong; Huang, Nan; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Runying

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas oleovorans MGY01 isolated from the deep-sea water of the South China Sea could effectively degrade malachite green. The draft genome of P. oleovorans MGY01 was sequenced and analyzed to gain insights into its efficient metabolic pathway for degrading malachite green. The data obtained revealed 109 Contigs (N50; 128,269 bp) with whole genome size of 5,201,892 bp. The draft genome sequence of strain MGY01 will be helpful in studying the genetic pathways involved in the degradation of malachite green.

  9. MgI2 -mediated chemoselective cleavage of protecting groups: an alternative to conventional deprotection methodologies.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Mathéo; Davanier, Florian; Dujardin, Gilles; Martinez, Jean; Parrot, Isabelle

    2015-07-27

    The scope of MgI2 as a valuable tool for quantitative and mild chemoselective cleavage of protecting groups is described here. This novel synthetic approach expands the use of protecting groups, widens the concept of orthogonality in synthetic processes, and offers a facile opportunity to release compounds from solid supports.

  10. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on laser cooling of BeI and MgI

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Mingjie Huang, Duohui; Shao, Juxiang; Li, Yuanyuan; Yu, You; Li, Song

    2015-10-28

    We present the ab initio study of spin-orbit coupling effects on laser cooling of BeI and MgI molecules. Potential energy curves for the X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2}, A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2}, and 2{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2,1/2} states are calculated using multi-reference configuration interaction method plus Davidson corrections. Spectroscopic parameters of BeI and MgI are in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical values. The A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} state of MgI is a repulsive state. It is an unsuitable scheme for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2}(υ′)← X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″) transition for laser cooling of MgI. Highly diagonally distributed Franck-Condon factors f{sub 00} for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2} (υ′ = 0) ← X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″ = 0) transitions and suitable radiative lifetimes τ for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2} (υ′ = 0) of BeI and MgI are obtained. Three laser wavelength drives are required for the A{sup 2}Π{sub 1/2,3/2}(υ′)←X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub 1/2} (υ″) transitions of BeI and MgI. The proposed cooling wavelengths of BeI and MgI are both in the violet region. The results imply the feasibility of laser cooling of BeI and MgI, and that laser cooling of BeI is more possible.

  11. Radiation tolerant fiber Bragg gratings for high temperature monitoring at MGy dose levels.

    PubMed

    Morana, A; Girard, S; Marin, E; Marcandella, C; Paillet, P; Périsse, J; Macé, J-R; Boukenter, A; Cannas, M; Ouerdane, Y

    2014-09-15

    We report a method for fabricating fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) resistant to very severe environments mixing high radiation doses (up to 3 MGy) and high temperatures (up to 230°C). Such FBGs have been written in two types of radiation resistant optical fibers (pure-silica and fluorine-doped cores) by exposures to a 800 nm femtosecond IR laser at power exceeding 500 mW and then subjected to a thermal annealing treatment of 15 min at 750°C. Under radiation, our study reveals that the radiation induced Bragg wavelength shift (BWS) at a 3 MGy dose is strongly reduced compared to responses of FBGs written with nonoptimized conditions. The BWS remains lower than 10 pm for temperatures of irradiation ranging from 25°C to 230°C without noticeable decrease of the FBG peak amplitude. For an applicative point of view, this radiation induced BWS corresponds to an additional error on the temperature measurements lower than 1.5°C, opening the way to the development of radiation-tolerant multi-point temperature sensors for nuclear industry. PMID:26466259

  12. The Perennial Blooming of MGII and Their Correlation with MGI in the Pearl River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Group (MG) I and MG II Archaea were first reported over two decades ago. While significant progress has been made on MG I, the progress on MG II has been noticeable slower. The common understanding is that while MG I mainly function as chemolithoautotrophs growing on ammonia and live predominantly in deeper water, MG II live heterotrophically and reside mostly in the photic zone. While some MG I lineages that could conduct ammonium oxidation are frequently found in terrestrial environments, MG II are exclusively found in marine environments and thus named Thalassoarchaea. A few studies showed MG IIs were sporadically blooming in coastal waters and may be influenced by the level of eutrophication between seasons, which inhibited the enrichment and cultivation for MGII. In this study, we quantified the abundance of planktonic MGI (represented by archaeal amoA gene) and MGII (16S rRNA gene) using qPCR in the water column of different salinities (A: 0.8‰; B: 18.1‰; C: 23.9‰: D: 31‰) in the Pearl River Estuary over a 12-month period. The results showed that the abundance of MGII in site C (8.5±10.1×107 copies/L) was significantly higher than the other three sites (A: 3.5±8.8×105 copies/L; B: 2.7±4.5×107 copies/L; D: 2.2±4.4×107 copies/L) in all seasons, indicating the perennial blooming of MGII that might be due to the optimal combination of available organic carbon and salinity at this site. We also observed that the correlation between MGI and MGII became better toward the marine water and was significant at site D (R2: A, 0.06; B, 0.1; C, 0.24; D, 0.64), indicating the potential functional relationship between them with increasing salinity. This allowed us to hypothesize that the growth of MGI in the coastal site is more dependent on release of ammonia from organic matter degradation by MGII and other heterotrophic organisms. The Pearl River estuary may be an ideal environment for testing this hypothesis, which may provide insight into the

  13. Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan

    2011-10-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

  14. Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by γ- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. χ2 test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

  15. Prediction of Pressure-Induced Structural Transition and Mechanical Properties of MgY from First-Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Chun-Ying; Xun, Xian-Chao; Song, Hai-Zhen; Zhang, Fei-Wu; Lu, Zhi-Wen; Zhou, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Using the particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structure prediction, we first predict that MgY alloy undergoes a first-order phase transition from CsCl phase to P4/NMM phase at about 55 GPa with a small volume collapse of 2.63%. The dynamical stability of P4/NMM phase at 55 GPa is evaluated by the phonon spectrum calculation and the electronic structure is discussed. The elastic constants are calculated, after which the bulk moduli, shear moduli, Young's modui, and Debye temperature are derived. The brittleness/ductile behavior, and anisotropy of two phases under pressure are discussed in details. Our results show that external pressure can change the brittle behavior to ductile at 10 GPa for CsCl phase and improve the ductility of MgY alloy. As pressure increases, the elastic anisotropy in shear of CsCl phase decreases, while that of P4/NMM phase remains nearly constant. The elastic anisotropic constructions of the directional dependences of reciprocals of bulk modulus and Young's modulus are also calculated and discussed. Supported by the Henan Joint Funds of the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. U1304612, U1404608, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 51501093, 51374132, and the Special Fund of the Theoretical Physics of China under Grant No. 11247222, Postdoctoral Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 2015M581767, and Young Core Instructor Foundation of Henan Province under Grant No. 2015GGJS-122

  16. Determination of the acid/base properties of MgY and NH4Y molecular sieves by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bilgiç, Ceyda; Tümsek, Fatma

    2007-08-24

    The surface characterization of MgY and NH(4)Y zeolites was performed using inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The adsorption thermodynamic parameters (the standard enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ), standard entropy change (DeltaS degrees ), and free energy change of adsorption (DeltaG degrees ), the dispersive component of the surface free energies (gamma(S)(d)), and the acid-base character of the surface of MgY and NH(4)Y zeolites were estimated using the retention time of different non-polar and polar probes at infinite dilution region. The specific free energy of adsorption (DeltaG(sp)), the specific enthalpy of adsorption (DeltaH(sp)), and the specific entropy of adsorption (DeltaS(sp)) of polar probes on MgY and NH(4)Y zeolites were determined. The values of the DeltaH(sp) were correlated with both the donor and acceptor numbers of the probes to quantify the acidic K(A) and the basic K(D) parameters of the zeolite surfaces. The values obtained for the K(A) and K(D) parameters indicated a basic character for the surface of MgY and NH(4)Y zeolites. PMID:17451721

  17. Microstructures, aging behaviour and mechanical properties in hydrogen and chloride media of backward extruded Mg-Y based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qiuming; Ma, Ning; Fang, Daqing; Li, Hui; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    Microstructures, aging behaviour from room temperature to 300 °C and mechanical properties in different media of backward extruded (BE) Mg-Y based biomaterial have been investigated. The results reveal that BE-Mg-Y based alloy is mainly composed of polygon-shaped grains and fine precipitates. The results of aging response show that BE-Mg-Y based alloy exhibits remarkable age hardening behaviour when the aging temperature is 200 °C and higher. The high mechanical properties of aged BE-Mg-Y based alloy are mostly associated with fine microstructure, solid solution strengthening and the existence of homogeneous precipitates. The hydrogen embrittlement dependence on the aging time is confirmed in BE-Mg-Y based alloy. Additionally, the strength and elongation of BE-Mg-Y based alloy are significantly influenced by the ion concentration in media. These results offer some implications for understanding the reduced strength of Mg based implants in body environment. It is demonstrated that the temporary high mechanical strength in air of BE-Mg-Y based biomaterials is insufficient to evaluate the in vivo mechanical integrity.

  18. From nGy to MGy - New dosimetry with LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Obryk, Barbara

    2013-05-06

    One of the well known advantages of thermoluminescence (TL) detectors made of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium, copper and phosphorus (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) is their very high sensitivity to ionizing radiation. LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors enable measurements of radiation doses from tens of nanograys up to a few kilograys, when the total saturation of the signal of the so-called main dosimetric peak occurs. Only recently, unprecedented high-temperature emission of LiF detectors heated to temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C, was observed after exposures to radiation doses ranging from 1 kGy to 1 MGy. For quantification of the glow-curve shape changes of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in this range of doses and determination of the absorbed dose, the Ultra-High Temperature Ratio coefficient (UHTR) was defined. This newly established dosimetric method was tested in a range of radiation qualities, such as gamma radiation, electron and proton beams, thermal neutron fields and high-energy mixed fields around the SPS and PS accelerators at CERN. The new method for ultra-high dose range monitoring with a single LiF:Mg,Cu,P detector, which is capable of covering at least twelve orders of magnitude of doses, can be used for dosimetry at high energy accelerators, thermonuclear fusion technology facilities and has great potential for accident dosimetry in particular. A number of dosimetric sets with LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors are currently installed around the LHC at CERN.

  19. Efficiency enhancement in dye sensitized solar cells using gel polymer electrolytes based on a tetrahexylammonium iodide and MgI2 binary iodide system.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Dissanayake, M A K L; Jayasundara, W J M J S R; Albinsson, I; Mellander, B-E

    2012-06-28

    Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells have drawn the attention of scientists and technologists as a potential candidate to supplement future energy needs. The conduction of iodide ions in quasi-solid-state polymer electrolytes and the performance of dye sensitized solar cells containing such electrolytes can be enhanced by incorporating iodides having appropriate cations. Gel-type electrolytes, based on PAN host polymers and mixture of salts tetrahexylammonium iodide (Hex4N(+)I(-)) and MgI2, were prepared by incorporating ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate as plasticizers. The salt composition in the binary mixture was varied in order to optimize the performance of solar cells. The electrolyte containing 120% Hex4N(+)I(-) with respect to weight of PAN and without MgI2 showed the highest conductivity out of the compositions studied, 2.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 25 °C, and a glass transition at -102.4 °C. However, the electrolyte containing 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 showed the best solar cell performance highlighting the influence of the cation on the performance of the cell. The predominantly ionic behaviour of the electrolytes was established from the dc polarization data and all the electrolytes exhibit iodide ion transport. Seven different solar cells were fabricated employing different electrolyte compositions. The best cell using the electrolyte with 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 with respect to PAN weight showed 3.5% energy conversion efficiency and 8.6 mA cm(-2) short circuit current density.

  20. Design and assessment of a 6 ps-resolution time-to-digital converter with 5 MGy gamma-dose tolerance for nuclear instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Leroux, P.; De Cock, W.; Steyaert, M.

    2011-07-01

    Time-to-Digital Converters (TDCs) are key building blocks in time-based mixed-signal systems, used for the digitization of analog signals in time domain. A short survey on state-of-the-art TDCs is given. In order to realize a TDC with picosecond time resolution as well as multi MGy gamma-dose radiation tolerance, a novel multi-stage noise-shaping (MASH) delta-sigma ({Delta}{Sigma}) TDC structure is proposed. The converter, implemented in 0.13 {mu}m, achieves a time resolution of 5.6 ps and an ENOB of 11 bits, when the over sampling ratio (OSR) is 250. The TDC core consumes only 1.7 mW, and occupies an area of 0.11 mm{sup 2}. Owing to the usage of circuit level radiation hardened-by-design techniques, such as passive RC oscillators and constant-g{sub m} biasing, the TDC exhibits enhanced radiation tolerance. At a low dose rate of 1.2 kGy/h, the frequency of the counting clock in the TDC remains constant up to at least 160 kGy. Even after a total dose of 3.4 MGy at a high dose rate of 30 kGy/h, the TDC still achieves a time resolution of 10.5 ps with an OSR of 250. (authors)

  1. Life performance of an EPR-insulated power cable exposed in service beyond 3 MGy in high-level radiation area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grüb, R.; Langeset, B.; Maier, P.; Schönbacher, H.

    1983-09-01

    Mechanical and electrical test results are reported for a power cable that has been installed for three and a half years in a high-level radiation area at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The degradation of selected mechanical properties as a function of absorbed dose is compared with results of a short-term irradiation in a nuclear reactor. The tensile test specimens have been taken from the ethylene propylene rubber insulation and the polyvinyl chloride sheath material of the cable after exposure in service. For the measurement of breakdown voltage, short portions of insulated cable have been used. The aim of this work was to verify that the combined functional and environmental stress factors did not lead to more damage of the cable than was expected from the value of absorbed dose, and eventually to predict more precisely the service life of similar cables. The ratios of doses after service and short-term irradiation at 50% reduction of elongation at break were about 0.5 for the insulation and 1.0 for the sheath material at a dose of about 1 MGy. However, the breakdown voltage did not show any significant variation in the dose range covered up to 3.6 MGy. Therefore, a safe lower dose limit may readily be derived from accelerated tests, but the margin until failure in service remains to be determined.

  2. Total body 100-mGy X-irradiation does not induce Alzheimer's disease-like pathogenesis or memory impairment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ji, Bin; Ono, Maiko; Fang, Yaqun; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Izumi-Nakajima, Nakako; Begum, Nasrin; Higuchi, Makoto; Fujimori, Akira; Uehara, Yoshihiko; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Suhara, Tetsuya; Ono, Tetsuya; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    The cause and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are poorly understood. Possible cognitive and behavioral consequences induced by low-dose radiation are important because humans are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Early transcriptional response in murine brain to low-dose X-rays (100 mGy) has been reported, suggesting alterations of molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and AD. To investigate acute and late transcriptional, pathological and cognitive consequences of low-dose radiation, we applied an acute dose of 100-mGy total body irradiation (TBI) with X-rays to C57BL/6J Jms mice. We collected hippocampi and analyzed expression of 84 AD-related genes. Mouse learning ability and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze test. We performed in vivo PET scans with 11C-PIB, a radiolabeled ligand for amyloid imaging, to detect fibrillary amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) accumulation, and examined characteristic AD pathologies with immunohistochemical staining of amyloid precursor protein (APP), Aβ, tau and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). mRNA studies showed significant downregulation of only two of 84 AD-related genes, Apbb1 and Lrp1, at 4 h after irradiation, and of only one gene, Il1α, at 1 year after irradiation. Spatial learning ability and memory were not significantly affected at 1 or 2 years after irradiation. No induction of amyloid fibrillogenesis or changes in APP, Aβ, tau, or p-tau expression was detected at 4 months or 2 years after irradiation. TBI induced early or late transcriptional alteration in only a few AD-related genes but did not significantly affect spatial learning, memory or AD-like pathological change in mice. PMID:23908553

  3. Total body 100-mGy X-irradiation does not induce Alzheimer's disease-like pathogenesis or memory impairment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ji, Bin; Ono, Maiko; Fang, Yaqun; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; Izumi-Nakajima, Nakako; Begum, Nasrin; Higuchi, Makoto; Fujimori, Akira; Uehara, Yoshihiko; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Suhara, Tetsuya; Ono, Tetsuya; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    The cause and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are poorly understood. Possible cognitive and behavioral consequences induced by low-dose radiation are important because humans are exposed to ionizing radiation from various sources. Early transcriptional response in murine brain to low-dose X-rays (100 mGy) has been reported, suggesting alterations of molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and AD. To investigate acute and late transcriptional, pathological and cognitive consequences of low-dose radiation, we applied an acute dose of 100-mGy total body irradiation (TBI) with X-rays to C57BL/6J Jms mice. We collected hippocampi and analyzed expression of 84 AD-related genes. Mouse learning ability and memory were assessed with the Morris water maze test. We performed in vivo PET scans with (11)C-PIB, a radiolabeled ligand for amyloid imaging, to detect fibrillary amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) accumulation, and examined characteristic AD pathologies with immunohistochemical staining of amyloid precursor protein (APP), Aβ, tau and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). mRNA studies showed significant downregulation of only two of 84 AD-related genes, Apbb1 and Lrp1, at 4 h after irradiation, and of only one gene, Il1α, at 1 year after irradiation. Spatial learning ability and memory were not significantly affected at 1 or 2 years after irradiation. No induction of amyloid fibrillogenesis or changes in APP, Aβ, tau, or p-tau expression was detected at 4 months or 2 years after irradiation. TBI induced early or late transcriptional alteration in only a few AD-related genes but did not significantly affect spatial learning, memory or AD-like pathological change in mice.

  4. Effect of Mg doping on the local structure of LiMgyCo1-yO2 cathode material investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. H.; Pan, C. J.; Nithya, C.; Thirunakaran, R.; Gopukumar, S.; Chen, C. H.; Lee, J. F.; Chen, J. M.; Sivashanmugam, A.; Hwang, B. J.

    2014-04-01

    A higher capacity and better cyclability are apparent when magnesium is introduced into the structure of LiCoO2 (y = 0.15). XRD analysis of LiMgyCo1-yO2 (y = 0, 0.1, 0.15), synthesized at 800 °C using a microwave assisted method, shows that the material is in the R-3m space group and to have a slightly expanded unit cell that increases with greater magnesium doping. Structural analysis by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Co K-edge, L-edge and O K-edge shows that the magnesium is located in the transition metal layer rather than in the lithium layer and the charge balance results from the formation of oxygen vacancies rather than Co4+, while cobalt remains in the 3+ oxidation state. Interestingly, oxygen is found to participate in the charge compensation. Both magnesium, in the transition metal layer, and the Co-defect structure are attributed to the contribution towards structural stabilization of LiCoO2, thereby resulting in its enhanced electrochemical performance.

  5. Effect of Mg-DOPING on Magnetic and Transport Behaviour of Nd0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yMgyO3 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Khiem, Nguyen; Hoai Nam, Dao Nguyen; Phuc, Nguyen Xuan

    2001-04-01

    The ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition temperature, TC, of Nd0.7Sr0.3Mn1-yMgyO3 monotonically decreases from -235 K to -180 K with increasing Mg-doping concentration y from 0 to 0.1. Transport measurements show that Mg-doping does not significantly influence the resistivity in the paramagnetic phase in contrast to that in the ferromagnetic phase below TC. Interestingly, the magnetoresistance ratio near TC, in applied fields up to 5 T, increases from 180% for y = 0 to 480% for.y = 0.1. The compounds become spin-glass-like insulators with y ≥ 0.2.

  6. Study of the intergranular coupling of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2-yMgyCu3O10-δ (y = 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurram, A. A.; Khan, Nawazish A.

    2006-06-01

    The intergranular properties of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2-yMgyCu3O10-δ superconductor have been studied by resistivity and AC magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnesium substitution has been found to improve the interplane coupling in the unit cell of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2-yMgyCu3O10-δ, which in turn would enhance the intergranular coupling. The main objective of the present studies was to observe any possible role played by Mg doping in developing and enhancing the intergranular coupling and flux pinning properties of this compound. Any improvement to the intergrain coupling may be promoted by a change in the oxygen content in the final compound. Since the loss and/or intake of oxygen occurs at Ta>=350 °C, the post-annealing experiments were carried out at 500 °C for 3 h in air, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres. It was observed from these studies that the oxygen contents decreased in all the samples after post-annealing in air, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres. The most prominent effects in terms of enhanced superconductivity in the intergranular regions are observed in Mg-doped samples after post-annealing in air. The Mg-doped samples have shown enhanced granular connectivity, since the intergranular coupling peak observed in χ'' in AC susceptibility measurements is shifted to higher temperatures with the increase of Mg concentration. The enhanced intergranular coupling and flux pinning in magnesium-substituted samples is also observed in AC susceptibility measurements in external magnetic fields. The enhancement of intergranular coupling increases the transport critical current density of the samples.

  7. Structural characterization and colour of MgxCu3-xV2O8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) and MgyCu2-yV2O7 (0 ≤ y ≤ 2) compositions.

    PubMed

    Tena, M A; García-Granda, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    In this study, MgxCu3-xV2O8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) and MgyCu2-yV2O7 (0 ≤ y ≤ 2) compositions were synthesized by the chemical coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy and CIE L* a* b* parameters measurements. Melting points of compounds Cu3V2O8 and Cu2V2O7 are 780°C and 790°C, respectively. The addition of small amounts of Mg (II), MgxCu3-xV2O8 (x < 1.0) and MgyCu2-yV2O7 (y < 0.5) fused compositions, was not sufficient to stabilize structures at 800°C. For the Mg2CuV2O8 (x = 2.0) composition fired at 800°C, Mg (II) incorporated into the monoclinic Cu3V2O8 structure stabilizes this crystalline phase. At 1000°C, orthorhombic Mg3V2O8 structure from this composition was obtained. Solid solutions with orthorhombic symmetry were detected from the prepared compositions fired at 1000°C when 1.0 ≤ x ≤ 3.0. The difference of coloration of Cu, Mg vanadates might be explained by the presence of a strong charge transfer band in visible spectra.

  8. Global radiation damage at 300 and 260 K with dose rates approaching 1 MGy s[superscript -1

    SciTech Connect

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse B.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Thorne, Robert E.

    2012-02-27

    Global radiation damage to 19 thaumatin crystals has been measured using dose rates from 3 to 680 kGy s{sup -1}. At room temperature damage per unit dose appears to be roughly independent of dose rate, suggesting that the timescales for important damage processes are less than {approx}1 s. However, at T = 260 K approximately half of the global damage manifested at dose rates of {approx}10 kGy s{sup -1} can be outrun by collecting data at 680 kGy s{sup -1}. Appreciable sample-to-sample variability in global radiation sensitivity at fixed dose rate is observed. This variability cannot be accounted for by errors in dose calculation, crystal slippage or the size of the data sets in the assay.

  9. Global radiation damage at 300 and 260 K with dose rates approaching 1 MGy s{sup −1}

    SciTech Connect

    Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse B.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Thorne, Robert E.

    2012-02-01

    Approximately half of global radiation damage to thaumatin crystals can be outrun at 260 K if data are collected in less than 1 s. Global radiation damage to 19 thaumatin crystals has been measured using dose rates from 3 to 680 kGy s{sup −1}. At room temperature damage per unit dose appears to be roughly independent of dose rate, suggesting that the timescales for important damage processes are less than ∼1 s. However, at T = 260 K approximately half of the global damage manifested at dose rates of ∼10 kGy s{sup −1} can be outrun by collecting data at 680 kGy s{sup −1}. Appreciable sample-to-sample variability in global radiation sensitivity at fixed dose rate is observed. This variability cannot be accounted for by errors in dose calculation, crystal slippage or the size of the data sets in the assay.

  10. MnSOD downregulation induced by extremely low 0.1 mGy single and fractionated X-rays and microgravity treatment in human neuroblastoma cell line, NB-1

    PubMed Central

    Indo, Hiroko P.; Tomiyoshi, Tsukasa; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Tomita, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Masuda, Daisuke; Terada, Masahiro; Ishioka, Noriaki; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Mukai, Chiaki; Majima, Hideyuki J.

    2015-01-01

    A human neuroblastoma cell line, NB-1, was treated with 24 h of microgravity simulation by clinostat, or irradiated with extremely small X-ray doses of 0.1 or 1.0 mGy using single and 10 times fractionation regimes with 1 and 2 h time-intervals. A quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) examination was performed for apoptosis related factors (BAX, CYTC, APAF1, VDAC1–3, CASP3, CASP8, CASP9 P53, AIF, ANT1 and 2, BCL2, MnSOD, autophagy related BECN and necrosis related CYP-40. The qRT-PCR results revealed that microgravity did not result in significant changes except for a upregulation of proapoptotic VDAC2, and downregulations of proapoptotic CASP9 and antiapoptotic MnSOD. After 0.1 mGy fractionation irradiation, there was increased expression of proapoptotic APAF1 and downregulation of proapoptotic CYTC, VDAC2, VDAC3, CASP8, AIF, ANT1, and ANT2, as well as an increase in expression of antiapoptotic BCL2. There was also a decrease in MnSOD expression with 0.1 mGy fractionation irradiation. These results suggest that microgravity and low-dose radiation may decrease apoptosis but may potentially increase oxidative stress. PMID:26388666

  11. MnSOD downregulation induced by extremely low 0.1 mGy single and fractionated X-rays and microgravity treatment in human neuroblastoma cell line, NB-1.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Tomiyoshi, Tsukasa; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Tomita, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Masuda, Daisuke; Terada, Masahiro; Ishioka, Noriaki; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Mukai, Chiaki; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2015-09-01

    A human neuroblastoma cell line, NB-1, was treated with 24 h of microgravity simulation by clinostat, or irradiated with extremely small X-ray doses of 0.1 or 1.0 mGy using single and 10 times fractionation regimes with 1 and 2 h time-intervals. A quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) examination was performed for apoptosis related factors (BAX, CYTC, APAF1, VDAC1-3, CASP3, CASP8, CASP9 P53, AIF, ANT1 and 2, BCL2, MnSOD, autophagy related BECN and necrosis related CYP-40. The qRT-PCR results revealed that microgravity did not result in significant changes except for a upregulation of proapoptotic VDAC2, and downregulations of proapoptotic CASP9 and antiapoptotic MnSOD. After 0.1 mGy fractionation irradiation, there was increased expression of proapoptotic APAF1 and downregulation of proapoptotic CYTC, VDAC2, VDAC3, CASP8, AIF, ANT1, and ANT2, as well as an increase in expression of antiapoptotic BCL2. There was also a decrease in MnSOD expression with 0.1 mGy fractionation irradiation. These results suggest that microgravity and low-dose radiation may decrease apoptosis but may potentially increase oxidative stress. PMID:26388666

  12. Mechanisms that uncouple growth and differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells: restoration of requirement for normal growth-inducing protein without restoring induction of differentiation-inducing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1982-01-01

    There are different macrophage- and granulocyte-inducing (MGI) proteins. Normal myeloid precursors are induced to multiply by one form (MGI-1) and to differentiate by another form (MGI-2). There are clones of myeloid leukemia cells that no longer require MGI-1 for growth but can still be induced to differentiate by MGI-2. After induction of differentiation in these leukemia cells by adding MCI-2 or inducing endogenous production of MGI-2 by lipopolysaccharide, the differentiating leukemia cells, like normal cells, again required MGI-1 for growth. This growth requirement for MGI-1 could not be substituted for by adding other protein growth factors such as epidermal, fibroblast, or nerve growth factor or insulin. Induction of differentiation in these leukemia cells by dexamethasone, arabinonucleoside (cytosine arabinoside), or methotrexate instead of by MGI-2, did not restore the requirement of MGI-1 for growth. Mutant myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate by MGI-2 also did not show this restoration of the requirement of MGI-1 for growth. MGI-1 in normal cells induced cell growth and also induced MGI-2, so that the cells could then differentiate by the endogenously produced MGI-2. However, MGI-1 did not induce production of MGI-2 in the leukemia cells, even though they again required MGI-1 for growth, so that there was no induction of differentiation after adding MGI-1. This lack of induction of differentiation-inducing protein by growth-inducing protein has thus identified an effective mechanism for uncoupling of growth and differentiation in malignant cells. PMID:6981812

  13. First results on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yaowei; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Hak-Kun; Kim, Hong-Tack; Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Son, Soo-Hyun; Bang, Eun-Nam; Hong, Suk-Ho; Yoon, Si-Woo; Zhuang Huidong; Chen Zhongyong

    2012-12-15

    Massive gas injection (MGI) system was developed on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) in 2011 campaign for disruption studies. The MGI valve has a volume of 80 ml and maximum injection pressure of 50 bar, the diameter of valve orifice to vacuum vessel is 18.4 mm, the distance between MGI valve and plasma edge is {approx}3.4 m. The MGI power supply employs a large capacitor of 1 mF with the maximum voltage of 3 kV, the valve can be opened in less than 0.1 ms, and the amount of MGI can be controlled by the imposed voltage. During KSTAR 2011 campaign, MGI disruptions are carried out by triggering MGI during the flat top of circular and limiter discharges with plasma current 400 kA and magnetic field 2-3.5 T, deuterium injection pressure 39.7 bar, and imposed voltage 1.1-1.4 kV. The results show that MGI could mitigate the heat load and prevent runaway electrons with proper MGI amount, and MGI penetration is deeper under higher amount of MGI or lower magnetic field. However, plasma start-up is difficult after some of D{sub 2} MGI disruptions due to the high deuterium retention and consequently strong outgassing of deuterium in next shot, special effort should be made to get successful plasma start-up after deuterium MGI under the graphite first wall.

  14. First results on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yaowei; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Hak-Kun; Kim, Hong-Tack; Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Son, Soo-Hyun; Bang, Eun-Nam; Zhuang, Huidong; Chen, Zhongyong; Hong, Suk-Ho; Yoon, Si-Woo

    2012-12-01

    Massive gas injection (MGI) system was developed on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) in 2011 campaign for disruption studies. The MGI valve has a volume of 80 ml and maximum injection pressure of 50 bar, the diameter of valve orifice to vacuum vessel is 18.4 mm, the distance between MGI valve and plasma edge is ˜3.4 m. The MGI power supply employs a large capacitor of 1 mF with the maximum voltage of 3 kV, the valve can be opened in less than 0.1 ms, and the amount of MGI can be controlled by the imposed voltage. During KSTAR 2011 campaign, MGI disruptions are carried out by triggering MGI during the flat top of circular and limiter discharges with plasma current 400 kA and magnetic field 2-3.5 T, deuterium injection pressure 39.7 bar, and imposed voltage 1.1-1.4 kV. The results show that MGI could mitigate the heat load and prevent runaway electrons with proper MGI amount, and MGI penetration is deeper under higher amount of MGI or lower magnetic field. However, plasma start-up is difficult after some of D2 MGI disruptions due to the high deuterium retention and consequently strong outgassing of deuterium in next shot, special effort should be made to get successful plasma start-up after deuterium MGI under the graphite first wall.

  15. First results on disruption mitigation by massive gas injection in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaowei; Kim, Young-Ok; Kim, Hak-Kun; Kim, Hong-Tack; Kim, Woong-Chae; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Son, Soo-Hyun; Bang, Eun-Nam; Zhuang, Huidong; Chen, Zhongyong; Hong, Suk-Ho; Yoon, Si-Woo

    2012-12-01

    Massive gas injection (MGI) system was developed on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) in 2011 campaign for disruption studies. The MGI valve has a volume of 80 ml and maximum injection pressure of 50 bar, the diameter of valve orifice to vacuum vessel is 18.4 mm, the distance between MGI valve and plasma edge is ~3.4 m. The MGI power supply employs a large capacitor of 1 mF with the maximum voltage of 3 kV, the valve can be opened in less than 0.1 ms, and the amount of MGI can be controlled by the imposed voltage. During KSTAR 2011 campaign, MGI disruptions are carried out by triggering MGI during the flat top of circular and limiter discharges with plasma current 400 kA and magnetic field 2-3.5 T, deuterium injection pressure 39.7 bar, and imposed voltage 1.1-1.4 kV. The results show that MGI could mitigate the heat load and prevent runaway electrons with proper MGI amount, and MGI penetration is deeper under higher amount of MGI or lower magnetic field. However, plasma start-up is difficult after some of D(2) MGI disruptions due to the high deuterium retention and consequently strong outgassing of deuterium in next shot, special effort should be made to get successful plasma start-up after deuterium MGI under the graphite first wall.

  16. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 MgY for the parotid gland, 0.15 MgY for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field.

  17. Competitive Mg2+ block of a large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel in rat skeletal muscle. Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ni2+ also block

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to investigate the effect of intracellular Mg2+ (Mgi2+) on the conductance of the large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel in cultured rat skeletal muscle. Measurements of single-channel current amplitudes indicated that Mgi2+ decreased the K+ currents in a concentration-dependent manner. Increasing Mgi2+ from 0 to 5, 10, 20, and 50 mM decreased channel currents by 34%, 44%, 56%, and 73%, respectively, at +50 mV. The magnitude of the Mgi2+ block increased with depolarization. For membrane potentials of -50, +50, and +90 mV, 20 mM Mgi2+ reduced the currents 22%, 56%, and 70%, respectively. Mgi2+ did not change the reversal potential, indicating that Mg2+ does not permeate the channel. The magnitude of the Mgi2+ block decreased as the concentration of K+ was increased. At a membrane potential of +50 mv, 20 mM Mgi2+ reduced the currents 71%, 56%, and 25% for Ki+ of 75, 150, and 500 mM. These effects of Mgi2+, voltage, and K+ were totally reversible. Although the Woodhull blocking model could approximate the voltage and concentration effects of the Mgi2+ block (Kd approximately 30 mM with 150 mM symmetrical K+; electrical distance approximately 0.22 from the inner surface), the Woodhull model could not account for the effects of K+. Double reciprocal plots of 1/single channel current vs. 1/[K+] in the presence and absence of Mgi2+, indicated that the Mgi2+ block is consistent with apparent competitive inhibition between Mgi2+ and Ki+. Cai2+, Nii2+, and Sri2+ were found to have concentration- and voltage- dependent blocking effects similar, but not identical, to those of Mgi2+. These observations suggest the blocking by Mgi2+ of the large- conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel is mainly nonspecific, competitive with K+, and at least partially electrostatic in nature. PMID:1940847

  18. Niche partitioning of marine group I Crenarchaeota in the euphotic and upper mesopelagic zones of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anyi; Jiao, Nianzhi; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Zao

    2011-11-01

    Marine group I Crenarchaeota (MGI) represents a ubiquitous and numerically predominant microbial population in marine environments. An understanding of the spatial dynamics of MGI and its controlling mechanisms is essential for an understanding of the role of MGI in energy and element cycling in the ocean. In the present study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of MGI in the East China Sea (ECS) by analysis of crenarchaeal 16S rRNA gene, the ammonia monooxygenase gene amoA, and the biotin carboxylase gene accA. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed that these genes were higher in abundance in the mesopelagic than in the euphotic zone. In addition, the crenarchaeal amoA gene was positively correlated with the copy number of the MGI 16S rRNA gene, suggesting that most of the MGI in the ECS are nitrifiers. Furthermore, the ratios of crenarchaeal accA to amoA or to MGI 16S rRNA genes increased from the euphotic to the mesopelagic zone, suggesting that the role of MGI in carbon cycling may change from the epipelagic to the mesopelagic zones. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoretic profiling of the 16S rRNA genes revealed depth partitioning in MGI community structures. Clone libraries of the crenarchaeal amoA and accA genes showed both "shallow" and "deep" groups, and their relative abundances varied in the water column. Ecotype simulation analysis revealed that MGI in the upper ocean could diverge into special ecotypes associated with depth to adapt to the light gradient across the water column. Overall, our results showed niche partitioning of the MGI population and suggested a shift in their ecological functions between the euphotic and mesopelagic zones of the ECS.

  19. Long-Term Musical Group Interaction Has a Positive Influence on Empathy in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitch, Tal-Chen; Cross, Ian; Burnard, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Musical group interaction (MGI) is a complex social setting requiring certain cognitive skills that may also elicit shared psychological states. We argue that many MGI-specific features may also be important for emotional empathy, the ability to experience another person's emotional state. We thus hypothesized that long-term repeated…

  20. 76 FR 38214 - Report to Congress on Abnormal Occurrences; Fiscal Year 2010; Dissemination of Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... iodine-131 for hyperthyroidism resulted in a dose to an embryo of 80 mGy (8 rem) whole body. Prior to the... case and estimated the embryonic exposure (whole body) at 53 to 92 mGy (5.3 to 9.2 rem). The... implant be stopped if there are any ultrasound image questions. The licensee's staff was also trained...

  1. Expecting the Best from Students in Urban Middle Schools. A Report on the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation's Middle Grades Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Terry A.; Canner, Jane

    The Edna McConnell Clark Foundation developed and sponsored the Middle Grades Initiative (MGI), which began in 1989, in five urban school systems: (1) Baltimore (Maryland); (2) Louisville (Kentucky); (3) Milwaukee (Wisconsin); (4) Oakland (California); and (5) San Diego (California). The purpose of MGI was to change the ways schools educate young,…

  2. Designing of the massive gas injection valve for the joint Texas experimental tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Tang, Y.; Wang, S. Y.; Ba, W. G.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Geng, P.; Shao, J.; Zhuang, G.

    2014-08-01

    In order to mitigate the negative effects of the plasma disruption a massive gas injection (MGI) valve is designed for the joint Texas experimental tokamak. The MGI valve is based on the eddy-current repulsion mechanism. It has a fueling volume of 30 ml. The piston of the MGI valve is made by non-ferromagnetic material, so it can be installed close to the vacuum vessel which has a strong toroidal magnetic field. A diode is use to prevent current oscillation in the discharge circuit. The drive coil of the valve is installed outside the gas chamber. The opening characteristics and the gas flow of the MGI valve have been tested by a 60 l vacuum chamber. Owing to the large electromagnetic force the reaction time of the valve is shorter than 0.3 ms. Duration for the opening of the MGI valve is in the order of 10 ms.

  3. Absorbed dose thresholds and absorbed dose rate limitations for studies of electron radiation effects on polyetherimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Edward R., Jr.; Long, Sheila Ann T.; Gray, Stephanie L.; Collins, William D.

    1989-01-01

    The threshold values of total absorbed dose for causing changes in tensile properties of a polyetherimide film and the limitations of the absorbed dose rate for accelerated-exposure evaluation of the effects of electron radiation in geosynchronous orbit were studied. Total absorbed doses from 1 kGy to 100 MGy and absorbed dose rates from 0.01 MGy/hr to 100 MGy/hr were investigated, where 1 Gy equals 100 rads. Total doses less than 2.5 MGy did not significantly change the tensile properties of the film whereas doses higher than 2.5 MGy significantly reduced elongation-to-failure. There was no measurable effect of the dose rate on the tensile properties for accelerated electron exposures.

  4. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation.

  5. Electron spin resonance analysis of tooth enamel does not indicate exposures to large radiation doses in a large proportion of distally-exposed A-bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Yuko; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Cullings, Harry M; Miyazawa, Chuzo; Nakamura, Nori

    2011-01-01

    The atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki led to two different types of radiation exposure; one was direct and brief and the other was indirect and persistent. The latter (so-called exposure to residual radiation) resulted from the presence of neutron activation products in the soil, or from fission products present in the fallout. Compared with the doses from direct exposures, estimations of individual doses from residual radiation have been much more complicated, and estimates vary widely among researchers. The present report bases its conclusions on radiation doses recorded in tooth enamel from survivors in Hiroshima. Those survivors were present at distances of about 3 km or greater from the hypocenter at the time of the explosion, and have DS02 estimated doses (direct exposure doses) of less than 5 mGy (and are regarded as control subjects). Individual doses were estimated by measuring CO(2)(-) radicals in tooth enamel with the electron spin resonance (ESR; or electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR) method. The results from 56 molars donated by 49 survivors provided estimated doses which vary from -200 mGy to 500 mGy, and the median dose was 17 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles are -54 mGy and 137 mGy, respectively) for the buccal parts and 13 mGy (25% and 75% quartiles: -49 mGy and 87 mGy, respectively) for the lingual parts of the molars. Three molars had ESR-estimated doses of 300 to 400 mGy for both the buccal and lingual parts, which indicates possible exposures to excess doses of penetrating radiation, although the origin of such radiation remains to be determined. The results did not support claims that a large fraction of distally-exposed survivors received large doses (e.g. 1 Gy) of external penetrating radiation resulting from residual radiation. PMID:21768749

  6. Occupational and patient exposure in coronary angiography procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Gafar, R.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.; Suliman, I. I.

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac catheterization is the gold standard in the diagnosis and management of coronary artery diseases. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the radiation dose of patients and staff during cardiology procedures. Staff was monitored using thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) chips for 86 procedures. The mean patient dose was 2813.6 μGy m2 and the mean fluoroscopic time was 4.8 min. The mean radiation doses for cardiologists were 0.9 mGy for the forehead, 0.92 mGy for the thyroid, 1.38 mGy for the chest, 1.28 mGy for the waist and 1.41 mGy for the hand. The mean radiation doses for assistants were 0.72 mGy for the chest, 0.82 mGy for the hand. High patient and staff exposure is due to lack of experience and protective equipment, exacerbated by a high workload. Interventional procedures remain operator dependent; therefore, continuous training is crucial.

  7. Effects of (60)Co gamma irradiation on behavior and gill histoarchitecture of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DE MAN).

    PubMed

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-babu, P

    2013-06-01

    Present study was designed to observe the effects of (60)Co gamma radiation in behavioral and histological changes in the gills of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The adult prawns were irradiated with four different dose levels (3mGy, 30mGy, 300mGy and 3000mGy) and the control group (without irradiation) was maintained separately. Behavioral changes like hyperactivity, loss of balance, reduced swimming rate, slower rate of food intake and convulsions were observed in higher dose levels of 300mGy and 3000mGy. The histological alterations such as accumulated haemocytes in haemocoelic spaces, abnormal gill tips, lifted lamellar epithelium, swollen and fused lamellae, hyperplasic, necrotic, clavate-globate and complete disorganization of lamellae were observed in (60)Co gamma irradiated prawns. Significantly more considerable histological alterations were observed in the highest dose level of 3000mGy, but no mortality was evidenced. This study serves as biomonitoring tool to assess the radiation pollution in the aquatic environment.

  8. Reduction of absorbed doses in radiography of the facial skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Julin, P.; Kraepelien, T.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation absorbed doses from radiography of the paranasal sinuses and the facial skeleton were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) on a phantom head using high-sensitivity screens in an Orbix stand. The entrance doses to the skin of the head ranged from 0.31 to 2.9 mGy per exposure. The absorbed dose from a full series of sinus exposures averaged 0.33 mGy for the oral mucous membrane, 0.33 mGy for the maxillary sinus mucous membrane, 0.11 mGy for the parotid gland, 0.15 mGy for the submandibular gland, 0.61 mGy for the eye lens, and 0.75 mGy for the thyroid gland region. A leaded soft collar adapted to the thyroid region reduced the thyroid doses by more than one order of magnitude, but also reduced the image field. The mean energy imparted from a full series of paranasal sinus projections was 4.8 mJ and from a total series of the facial skeleton, 7.9 mJ.

  9. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Sekonya, K.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-10-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy and light yield analysis whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs and light loss can be attributed to a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to possible hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss and light yield loss with increasing dose.

  10. Radiation hardness of plastic scintillators for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jivan, H.; Mellado, B.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Erasmus, R.; Liao, S.; Madhuku, M.; Peters, G.; Solvyanov, O.

    2015-06-01

    The radiation damage in polyvinyl toluene based plastic scintillator EJ200 obtained from ELJEN technology was investigated. This forms part of a comparative study conducted to aid in the upgrade of the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector during which the Gap scintillators will be replaced. Samples subjected to 6 MeV proton irradiation using the tandem accelerator of iThemba LABS, were irradiated with doses of approximately 0.8 MGy, 8 MGy, 25 MGy and 80 MGy. The optical properties were investigated using transmission spectroscopy whilst structural damage was assessed using Raman spectroscopy. Findings indicate that for the dose of 0.8 MGy, no structural damage occurs but a breakdown in the light transfer between base and fluor dopants is observed. For doses of 8 MGy to 80 MGy, structural damage leads to hydrogen loss in the benzene ring of the PVT base which forms free radicals. This results in an additional absorptive component causing increased transmission loss as dose is increased.

  11. An assessment of reference exposure in analogic and digital mammographic units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilly, J. G.; Miguel, C.; Schelin, H. R.; Porto, L. E.; Paschuk, S.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the incident air kerma (Ki,a), half-value layer (HVL), output and voltage accuracy for 28 mammography services were evaluated. All mammographs had high frequency rectification, a focus-film distance greater than 60 cm, automatic exposure control, a Mo-Mo anode-filter combination, and compression system. Twenty-three evaluations were made of analogic imaging systems and 21 of digital imaging systems, two of which were full field digital mammography units. The Ki,a was measured in the beam radiation with a 6 cm3 ionization chamber, calibrated for a mammography range of energy. A standard American College of Radiology mammographic phantom simulated a skull caudal incidence. The average, minimum, and maximum Ki,a values were 10.13 mGy, 3.92 mGy, and 30.41 mGy, respectively. However, when the analogic and digital systems are analyzed separately in two subsets, the values were 8.13 mGy, 3.92 mGy, and 11.78 mGy for the analogic systems and 12.33 mGy, 5.21 mGy, and 30.41 mGy for the digital systems, respectively. The results show that the Ki,a values found in digital systems were higher than those in analogic systems, highlighting the differences between these acquisition systems. All HVL values, measured in the primary beam at 28 kV were found between 0.33 mm Al and 0.43 mm Al. Although the manufacture time of the equipment was approximately 146 months (~12 years) prior, the variation in output was between 0.071 mGy/mAs and 0.164 mGy/mAs for the entire sample.

  12. Research Update: The materials genome initiative: Data sharing and the impact of collaborative ab initio databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anubhav; Persson, Kristin A.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-05-01

    Materials innovations enable new technological capabilities and drive major societal advancements but have historically required long and costly development cycles. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) aims to greatly reduce this time and cost. In this paper, we focus on data reuse in the MGI and, in particular, discuss the impact of three different computational databases based on density functional theory methods to the research community. We also discuss and provide recommendations on technical aspects of data reuse, outline remaining fundamental challenges, and present an outlook on the future of MGI's vision of data sharing.

  13. Investigation of LiF, Mg and Ti (TLD-100) Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, M.; Sina, S.; Faghihi, R.

    2015-01-01

    LiF, Mg and Ti cubical TLD chips (known as TLD-100) are widely used for dosimetry purposes. The repeatability of TL dosimetry is investigated by exposing them to doses of (81, 162 and 40.5 mGy) with 662keV photons of Cs-137. A group of 40 cubical TLD chips was randomly selected from a batch and the values of Element Correction Coefficient (ECC) were obtained 4 times by irradiating them to doses of 81 mGy (two times), 162mGy and 40.5mGy. Results of this study indicate that the average reproducibility of ECC calculation for 40 TLDs is 1.5%, while these values for all chips do not exceed 5%. PMID:26688801

  14. Practical improvements of multi-grid iteration for adaptive mesh refinement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Hisashi; Yamada, Yoshiyuki

    2005-03-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement(AMR) is a powerful tool to efficiently solve multi-scaled problems. However, the vanilla AMR method has a well-known critical demerit, i.e., it cannot be applied to non-local problems. Although multi-grid iteration (MGI) can be regarded as a good remedy for a non-local problem such as the Poisson equation, we observed fundamental difficulties in applying the MGI technique in AMR to realistic problems under complicated mesh layouts because it does not converge or it requires too many iterations even if it does converge. To cope with the problem, when updating the next approximation in the MGI process, we calculate the precise total corrections that are relatively accurate to the current residual by introducing a new iteration for such a total correction. This procedure greatly accelerates the MGI convergence speed especially under complicated mesh layouts.

  15. [sup 222]Rn dosimetry in the dog lung

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Meyers, O.A.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose to cells in bronchial airways in the beagle dog during historical exposures to [sup 222]Rn decay products is calculated using updated information on airway morphometry, call nucleus depth, mucus thickness, physical dosimetry and atmospheric characteristics. The alpha dose per unit exposure to basal call nuclei in the upper airways ranges from 2 to 7 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1] (excluding the trachea) depending upon the exposure protocol used. The dose to alveolar tissue is 3 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1]. In the human lung, the dose factor for the bronchial airways is 9 mGy WLM[sub [minus]1] and for the pulmonary parenchyma 0.5 mGy WLM[sup [minus]1] The human tumors appear primarily in the first few branching airway generations while the only tumors observed in the animals were in the bronchioloalveolar region suggesting a difference in cell sensitivity to alpha radiation.

  16. {sup 222}Rn dosimetry in the dog lung

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Meyers, O.A.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-12-31

    The alpha dose to cells in bronchial airways in the beagle dog during historical exposures to {sup 222}Rn decay products is calculated using updated information on airway morphometry, call nucleus depth, mucus thickness, physical dosimetry and atmospheric characteristics. The alpha dose per unit exposure to basal call nuclei in the upper airways ranges from 2 to 7 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1} (excluding the trachea) depending upon the exposure protocol used. The dose to alveolar tissue is 3 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1}. In the human lung, the dose factor for the bronchial airways is 9 mGy WLM{sub {minus}1} and for the pulmonary parenchyma 0.5 mGy WLM{sup {minus}1} The human tumors appear primarily in the first few branching airway generations while the only tumors observed in the animals were in the bronchioloalveolar region suggesting a difference in cell sensitivity to alpha radiation.

  17. DNA alterations and effects on growth and reproduction in Daphnia magna during chronic exposure to gamma radiation over three successive generations.

    PubMed

    Parisot, Florian; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Alonzo, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    This study examined chronic effects of external Cs-137 gamma radiation on Daphnia magna exposed over three successive generations (F0, F1 and F2) to environmentally relevant dose rates (ranging from 0.007 to 35.4 mGy h(-1)). Investigated endpoints included survival, growth, reproduction and DNA alterations quantified using random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Results demonstrated that radiation effects on survival, growth and reproduction increased in severity from generation F0 to generation F2. Mortality after 21 days at 35.4 mGy h(-1) increased from 20% in F0 to 30% in F2. Growth was affected by a slight reduction in maximum length at 35.4 mGy h(-1) in F0 and by reductions of 5 and 13% in growth rate, respectively, at 4.70 and 35.4 mGy h(-1) in F2. Reproduction was affected by a reduction of 19% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h(-1) in F0 and by a delay of 1.9 days in brood release as low as 0.070 mGy h(-1) in F2. In parallel, DNA alterations became significant at decreasing dose rates over the course of F0 (from 4.70 mGy h(-1) at hatching to 0.007 mGy h(-1) after ∼21 days) and from F0 to F2 (0.070 mGy h(-1) at hatching to 0.007 mGy h(-1) after ∼21 days), demonstrating their rapid accumulation in F0 daphnids and their transmission to offspring generations. Transiently more efficient DNA repair leading to some recovery at the organism level was suggested in F1, with no effect on survival, a slight reduction of 12% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h(-1) and DNA alterations significant at highest dose rates only. The study improved our understanding of long term responses to low doses of radiation at the molecular and organismic levels in a non-human species for a better radioprotection of aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Bridging the Gap: Linking Simulation and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Krajewski, Paul E.; Carsley, John; Stoudt, Mark R.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2012-09-01

    The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) which is a key enabler for the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership, announced in 2011 by U.S. President Barack Obama, was established to accelerate the development and deployment of advanced materials. The MGI is driven by the need to "bridge the gap" between (I) experimental results and computational analysis to enable the rapid development and validation of new mateirals, and (II) the processes required to convert these materials into useable goods.

  19. A novel dendrimer based on poly (L-glutamic acid) derivatives as an efficient and biocompatible gene delivery vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin; Pan, Shirong; Li, Jie; Wang, Chi; Wen, Yuting; Wu, Hongmei; Wang, Cuifeng; Wu, Chuanbin; Feng, Min

    2011-09-01

    Non-viral gene delivery systems based on cationic polymers have faced limitations related to their relative low gene transfer efficiency, cytotoxicity and system instability in vivo. In this paper, a flexible and pompon-like dendrimer composed of poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) G4.0 as the inner core and poly (L-glutamic acid) grafted low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (PLGE) as the surrounding multiple arms was synthesized (MGI dendrimer). The novel MGI dendrimer was designed to combine the merits of size-controlled PAMAM G4.0 and the low toxicity and flexible chains of PLGE. In phosphate-buffered saline dispersions the well-defined DNA/MGI complex above a N/P ratio of 30 showed good stability with particle sizes of approximately 200 nm and a comparatively low polydispersity index. However, the particle size of the DNA/25 kDa polyethylenimine (DNA/PEI 25K) complex was larger than 700 nm under the same salt conditions. The shielding of the compact amino groups at the periphery of flexible PAMAM and biocompatible PLGE chains in MGI resulted in a dramatic decrease of the cytotoxicity compared to native PAMAM G4.0 dendrimer. The in vitro transfection efficiency of DNA/MGI dendrimer complex was higher than that of PAMAM G4.0 dendrimer. Importantly, in serum-containing medium, DNA/MGI complexes at their optimal N/P ratio maintained the same high levels of transfection efficiency as in serum-free medium, while the transfection efficiency of native PAMAM G4.0, PEI 25K and Lipofectamine 2000 were sharply decreased. In vivo gene delivery of pVEGF165/MGI complex into balloon-injured rabbit carotid arteries resulted in significant inhibition of restenosis by increasing VEGF165 expression in local vessels. Therefore, the pompon-like MGI dendrimer may be a promising vector candidate for efficient gene delivery in vivo.

  20. Atrazine is primarily responsible for the toxicity of long-term exposure to a combination of atrazine and inorganic arsenic in the nigrostriatal system of the albino rat.

    PubMed

    Bardullas, Ulises; Giordano, Magda; Rodríguez, Verónica Mireya

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and simultaneous exposure to a variety of chemicals present in the environment is an unavoidable fact. However, given the complexity of studying chemical mixtures, most toxicological studies have focused on the effects of short-term exposure to single substances. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects on the nigrostriatal system of the chronic, simultaneous exposure to two widely distributed substances that have been identified as potential dopaminergic system toxicants, inorganic arsenic (iAs) and atrazine (ATR). Six groups of rats were treated daily for one year with atrazine (10mg ATR/kg), inorganic arsenic (0.5 or 50mgiAs/L of drinking water), or a combination of ATR+0.5mgiAs/L or ATR+50mgiAs/L. The 50mgiAs/L group showed locomotor hypoactivity, while all treatments decreased motor coordination in contrast no effects of treatment were found on the place and response learning tasks. Regarding markers for liver and muscle damage, there were no differences between groups in creatine kinase (CK) or aspartate transaminase (AST) activities, while decreases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were found in some exposed groups. The striatal DA content was significantly reduced in ATR, 0.5mgiAs/L, ATR+0.5mgiAs/L, and ATR+50mgiAs/L groups, in comparison to the control group. The number of mesencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells decreased in the ATR and ATR+0.5mgiAs/L groups compared to the control. In contrast, immunoreactivity to cytochrome oxidase was reduced compared to the control in all treated groups, except for the group treated with 0.5iAsmg alone. Our results indicate that ATR has deleterious effects on dopaminergic neurons and that the combination of ATR and iAs does not exacerbate these effects.

  1. Effect of coal mine waters of variable pH on springwater quality: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zaihua; Yuan, Daoxian; Shen, Zhaoli

    1991-05-01

    Disruption of coal strata during mining accelerates pyrite oxidation by exposing greater surface areas of the reactive mineral to weathering. Acidic water in a coal mine in the Niangziguan spring watershed is related to this process and is characterized by low pH (min. 2.52) and high sulfate (max. 4100 mg/I), iron (max. 257 mg/I), and hardness (max. 2274.45 mg/I). However, it is possible that the kind of acidic coal mine water is subsequently neutralized because of the dissolution of calcite present in the coal strata. The hydrochemical characters of the alkaline coal mine water produced are high pH (max. 8.18), sulfate (max. 542 mg/I), and hardness (max. 1183.56 mg/I) and lower iron (min. 0.12 mg/I). Experiments were conducted to further understand the mechanism of the formation of both acidic and alkaline waters in the spring watershed coal mines by modeling natural conditions with simplification, and the results of the experiments have shown that they are basically successful. The high sulfate (max. 223.82 mg/I) and hardness (max. 435.53 mg/I) of the Niangziguan springs are related to the influence of the neutralized acid coal mine water as demonstrated by analysis of water temperature, total dissolved solid, Q-mode cluster analysis, and sulfur isotopes. The influence of the neutralized acid coal mine water on the pH and iron in the springs is not obvious because of the neutralization effect of calcite in aquifer, the buffer effect of groundwater, and the precipitation of iron. Some measures to prevent the formation of acid and alkaline coal mine water are presented.

  2. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  3. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  4. [The retrospective cytogenetic dosimetry using the results of conventional chromosomal analysis in Chernobyl clean-up workers].

    PubMed

    Maznik, N A; Vinnikov, V A

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the cohortal biodosimetry carried out in 435 Chernobyl clean-up workers, who were surveyed with the conventional cytogenetic technique in terms from several days to 10 years after the end of their duties in the Chernobyl accident exclusive zone. An empirical model of the aberrant cell dynamics was utilized for the calculation of mean initial yields of dicentrics and centric rings in groups with different terms and duration of staying in the Chernobyl zone. Corresponding protracted irradiation doses estimated from aberration levels ranged from 79 to 670 mGy. The probabilistic distribution of the radiation doses was constructed by the applying the Bayesian analysis to initial individual chromosome exchange yields extrapolated to the exposure termination moment. This distribution was characterized by the mean dose about 460 mGy and maximum of probability density in the interval of 50-300 mGy. For the late somatic risk assessment in clean-up workers the probabilistic distribution of equivalentally-acute radiation doses was proposed; that had the mean value about 270 mGy, modal classes of 250-350 mGy and 99.8% of the probability density concentrated within the dose range from 0 to 1000 mGy. PMID:16454338

  5. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  6. Quantitative assessment of the cataractogenic potential of very low doses of neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worgul, B. V.; Medvedovsky, C.; Huang, Y.; Marino, S. A.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Brenner, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the prevalence and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various stages of lens opacification in rats induced by very low doses (2 to 250 mGy) of medium-energy (440 keV) neutrons, compared to those for X rays. Neutron doses were delivered either in a single fraction or in four separate fractions and the irradiated animals were followed for over 100 weeks. At the highest observed dose (250 mGy) and at early observation times, there was evidence of an inverse dose-rate effect; i.e., a fractionated exposure was more potent than a single exposure. Neutron RBEs relative to X rays were estimated using a non-parametric technique. The results were only weakly dependent on time postirradiation. At 30 weeks, for example, 80% confidence intervals for the RBE of acutely delivered neutrons relative to X rays were 8-16 at 250 mGy, 10-20 at 50 mGy, 50-100 at 10 mGy and 250-500 at 2 mGy. The results are consistent with the estimated neutron RBEs in Japanese A-bomb survivors, though broad confidence bounds are present in the Japanese results. Our findings are also consistent with data reported earlier for cataractogenesis induced by heavy ions in rats, mice, and rabbits. We conclude from these results that, at very low doses (<10 mGy), the RBE for neutron-induced cataractogenesis is considerably larger than the RBE of 20 commonly used, and use of a significantly larger value for calculating equivalent dose would be prudent.

  7. Dose and Radioadaptive Response Analysis of Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura A; Mantha, Rebecca R; Devantier, Yvonne; Petoukhov, Eugenia S; Brideau, Chantal L A; Serran, Mandy L; Klokov, Dmitry Y

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency and suppression of genomic instability have been proposed as mechanisms underlying radio-adaptive responses following low-dose radiation exposures. We previously showed that low-dose γ irradiation does not generate radio-adaptation by lowering radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse spleen. Since radiation may exert tissue-specific effects, we extended these results here by examining the effects of γ radiation on cytogenetic damage and proliferative index in bone marrow erythrocytes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) was observed at radiation doses of 100 mGy and greater, and suppression of erythroblast maturation occurred at doses of >500 mGy. A linear dose-response relationship for MN-PCE frequencies in C57BL/6 mice was established for radiation doses between 100 mGy and 1 Gy, with departure from linearity at doses of >1 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased MN-PCE frequencies above baseline following a 20 mGy radiation exposure but did not exhibit radio-sensitivity relative to C57BL/6 mice following 2 Gy exposure. Radio-adaptation of bone marrow erythrocytes was not observed in either strain of mice exposed to low-dose priming γ irradiation (single doses of 20 mGy or 100 mGy or multiple 20 mGy doses) administered at various times prior to acute 2 Gy irradiation, confirming the lack of radio-adaptive response for induction of cytogenetic damage or suppression or erythrocyte proliferation/maturation in bone marrow of these mouse strains. PMID:27649149

  8. Dose and Radioadaptive Response Analysis of Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Laura A.; Mantha, Rebecca R.; Devantier, Yvonne; Petoukhov, Eugenia S.; Brideau, Chantal L. A.; Serran, Mandy L.; Klokov, Dmitry Y.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency and suppression of genomic instability have been proposed as mechanisms underlying radio-adaptive responses following low-dose radiation exposures. We previously showed that low-dose γ irradiation does not generate radio-adaptation by lowering radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse spleen. Since radiation may exert tissue-specific effects, we extended these results here by examining the effects of γ radiation on cytogenetic damage and proliferative index in bone marrow erythrocytes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) was observed at radiation doses of 100 mGy and greater, and suppression of erythroblast maturation occurred at doses of >500 mGy. A linear dose–response relationship for MN-PCE frequencies in C57BL/6 mice was established for radiation doses between 100 mGy and 1 Gy, with departure from linearity at doses of >1 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased MN-PCE frequencies above baseline following a 20 mGy radiation exposure but did not exhibit radio-sensitivity relative to C57BL/6 mice following 2 Gy exposure. Radio-adaptation of bone marrow erythrocytes was not observed in either strain of mice exposed to low-dose priming γ irradiation (single doses of 20 mGy or 100 mGy or multiple 20 mGy doses) administered at various times prior to acute 2 Gy irradiation, confirming the lack of radio-adaptive response for induction of cytogenetic damage or suppression or erythrocyte proliferation/maturation in bone marrow of these mouse strains. PMID:27649149

  9. Patient dose measurements in diagnostic radiology procedures in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Milatović, Aleksandra; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Ivanović, Sonja; Jovanović, Slobodan; Spasić-Jokić, Vesna

    2012-05-01

    It was the aim of the study presented here to estimate for the first time patient dose levels in conventional diagnostic radiology in Montenegro. Measurements of patient dose in terms of entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and kerma-area product (KAP) were performed on at least 10 patients for each examination type, in each of five randomly selected health institutions in Montenegro, so that a total of 872 patients for 16 different examination categories were included in the survey (817 patients for 1049 radiographies and 55 fluoroscopy patients). Exposure settings and individual data were recorded for each patient. Mean, median and third quartile values ESAK of patient doses are reported. The estimated mean ESAK values obtained are as follows: 4.7 mGy for pelvis anteroposterior (AP), 4.5 mGy for lumbar spine AP, 7.8 mGy for lumbar spine lateral (LAT), 3.1 mGy for thoracic spine AP and 4.3 mGy for thoracic spine LAT. When compared with the European diagnostic reference values, the mean ESAK for all studied examination types are found to be below the reference levels, except in chest radiography. Mean ESAK values for chest radiography are 0.9 mGy for posteroanterior (PA) projection and 2.0 mGy for LAT. The results exhibit a wide range of variation. For fluoroscopy examinations, the total KAP was measured. The mean KAP value per procedure for barium meal is found to be 22 Gy cm(2), 41 Gy cm(2) for barium enema and 19 Gy cm(2) for intravenous urography. Broad dose ranges for the same types of examinations indicate the necessity of applying practice optimisation in diagnostic radiology and establishment of national diagnostic reference levels.

  10. Dose and Radioadaptive Response Analysis of Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Bannister, Laura A; Mantha, Rebecca R; Devantier, Yvonne; Petoukhov, Eugenia S; Brideau, Chantal L A; Serran, Mandy L; Klokov, Dmitry Y

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency and suppression of genomic instability have been proposed as mechanisms underlying radio-adaptive responses following low-dose radiation exposures. We previously showed that low-dose γ irradiation does not generate radio-adaptation by lowering radiation-induced cytogenetic damage in mouse spleen. Since radiation may exert tissue-specific effects, we extended these results here by examining the effects of γ radiation on cytogenetic damage and proliferative index in bone marrow erythrocytes of C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. In C57BL/6 mice, the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (MN-PCE) was observed at radiation doses of 100 mGy and greater, and suppression of erythroblast maturation occurred at doses of >500 mGy. A linear dose-response relationship for MN-PCE frequencies in C57BL/6 mice was established for radiation doses between 100 mGy and 1 Gy, with departure from linearity at doses of >1 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased MN-PCE frequencies above baseline following a 20 mGy radiation exposure but did not exhibit radio-sensitivity relative to C57BL/6 mice following 2 Gy exposure. Radio-adaptation of bone marrow erythrocytes was not observed in either strain of mice exposed to low-dose priming γ irradiation (single doses of 20 mGy or 100 mGy or multiple 20 mGy doses) administered at various times prior to acute 2 Gy irradiation, confirming the lack of radio-adaptive response for induction of cytogenetic damage or suppression or erythrocyte proliferation/maturation in bone marrow of these mouse strains.

  11. Determining and Managing Fetal Radiation Dose from Diagnostic Radiology Procedures in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Cavdar, Iffet; Seven, Mehmet; Uslu, Lebriz; Yeyin, Nami; Tanyildizi, Handan; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Acikgoz, A. Serdar; Tuten, Abdullah; Demir, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective We intended to calculate approximate fetal doses in pregnant women who underwent diagnostic radiology procedures and to evaluate the safety of their pregnancies. Materials and Methods We contacted hospitals in different cities in Turkey where requests for fetal dose calculation are usually sent. Fetal radiation exposure was calculated for 304 cases in 218 pregnant women with gestational ages ranging from 5 days to 19 weeks, 2 days. FetDose software (ver. 4.0) was used in fetal dose calculations for radiographic and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The body was divided into three zones according to distance from the fetus. The first zone consisted of the head area, the lower extremities below the knee, and the upper extremities; the second consisted of the cervicothoracic region and upper thighs; and the third consisted of the abdominopelvic area. Fetal doses from radiologic procedures between zones were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test and a Bonferroni-corrected Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The average fetal doses from radiography and CT in the first zone were 0.05 ± 0.01 mGy and 0.81 ± 0.04 mGy, respectively; 0.21 ± 0.05 mGy and 1.77 ± 0.22 mGy, respectively, in the second zone; and 6.42 ± 0.82 mGy and 22.94 ± 1.28 mGy, respectively, in the third zone (p < 0.001). Our results showed that fetal radiation exposures in our group of pregnant women did not reach the level (50 mGy) that is known to increase risk for congenital anomalies. Conclusion Fetal radiation exposure in the diagnostic radiology procedures in our study did not reach risk levels that might have indicated abortion. PMID:26576117

  12. Effect of filter on average glandular dose and image quality in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songsaeng, C.; Krisanachinda, A.; Theerakul, K.

    2016-03-01

    To determine the average glandular dose and entrance surface air kerma in both phantoms and patients to assess image quality for different target-filters (W/Rh and W/Ag) in digital mammography system. The compressed breast thickness, compression force, average glandular dose, entrance surface air kerma, peak kilovoltage and tube current time were recorded and compared between W/Rh and W/Ag target filter. The CNR and the figure of merit were used to determine the effect of target filter on image quality. The mean AGD of the W/Rh target filter was 1.75 mGy, the mean ESAK was 6.67 mGy, the mean CBT was 54.1 mm, the mean CF was 14 1bs. The mean AGD of W/Ag target filter was 2.7 mGy, the mean ESAK was 12.6 mGy, the mean CBT was 75.5 mm, the mean CF was 15 1bs. In phantom study, the AGD was 1.2 mGy at 4 cm, 3.3 mGy at 6 cm and 3.83 mGy at 7 cm thickness. The FOM was 24.6, CNR was 9.02 at thickness 6 cm. The FOM was 18.4, CNR was 8.6 at thickness 7 cm. The AGD from Digital Mammogram system with W/Rh of thinner CBT was lower than the AGD from W/Ag target filter.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of X-ray examinations of paranasal sinuses in pediatric patients*

    PubMed Central

    Cantalupo, Beatriz de Lucena Villa-Chan; Xavier, Aline Carvalho da Silva; da Silva, Clemanzy Mariano Leandro; Andrade, Marcos Ely Almeida; de Barros, Vinícius Saito Monteiro; Khoury, Helen Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the entrance surface air kerma (Ka,e) and air kerma in the region of radiosensitive organs in radiographs of pediatric paranasal sinuses. Materials and Methods Patient data and irradiation parameters were collected in examinations of the paranasal sinuses in children from 0 to 15 years of age at two children's hospitals in the city of Recife, PE, Brazil. We estimated the Ka,e using the X-ray tube outputs and selected parameters. To estimate the air kerma values in the regions of the eyes and thyroid, we used thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results The Ka,e values ranged from 0.065 to 1.446 mGy in cavum radiographs, from 0.104 to 7.298 mGy in Caldwell views, and from 0.113 to 7.824 mGy in Waters views. Air kerma values in the region of the eyes ranged from 0.001 to 0.968 mGy in cavum radiographs and from 0.011 to 0.422 mGy in Caldwell and Waters views . In the thyroid region, air kerma values ranged from 0.005 to 0.932 mGy in cavum radiographs and from 0.002 to 0.972 mGy in Caldwell and Waters views. Conclusion The radiation levels used at the institutions under study were higher than those recommended in international protocols. We recommend that interventions be initiated in order to reduce patient exposure to radiation and therefore the risks associated with radiological examination of the paranasal sinuses. PMID:27141129

  14. Kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging dose during breast radiotherapy: A dose comparison between a left and right breast setup

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Begg, Jarrad; Nelson, Vinod; Metcalfe, Peter

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the delivered dose from a kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) acquired in breast treatment position for a left and right breast setup. The dose was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters positioned within a female anthropomorphic phantom at organ locations. Imaging was performed on an Elekta Synergy XVI system with the phantom setup on a breast board. The image protocol involved 120 kVp, 140 mAs, and a 270° arc rotation clockwise 0° to 270° for the left breast setup and 270° to 180° for the right breast setup (maximum arc rotations possible). The dose delivered to the left breast, right breast, and heart was 5.1 mGy, 3.9 mGy, and 4.0 mGy for the left breast setup kV-CBCT, and 6.4 mGy, 6.0 mGy, and 4.8 mGy for the right breast setup kV-CBCT, respectively. The rotation arc of the kV-CBCT influenced the dose delivered, with the right breast setup kV-CBCT found to deliver a dose of up to 4 mGy or 105% higher to the treated breast′s surface in comparison with the left breast setup. This is attributed to the kV-CBCT source being more proximal to the anterior of the phantom for a right breast setup, whereas the source is more proximal to the posterior of the patient for a left-side scan.

  15. Medical x-ray exposure doses as contaminants of atomic bomb doses.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Antoku, S; Russell, W J; Fujita, S; Sawada, S

    1988-03-01

    Since 1967 at the times of their biennial ABCC/RERF radiological examinations, all Adult Health Study (AHS) subjects have been interviewed to determine the exposures to medical x-rays they experienced in institutions other than RERF in order to estimate the numbers of examinations and corresponding doses which they received. These data have been stored on computer tapes together with the doses these subjects received during their radiological examinations in the ABCC/RERF Department of Radiology. Thus, their medical x-ray doses are available along with their atomic bomb doses (tentative 1965 doses revised, T65DR) for assessment of the role of ionizing radiation in the development of diseases. The medical x-ray doses incurred at RERF were assessed by means of phantom dosimetry. Those at other institutions were determined using phantom dosimetry data and results of surveys for trends in radiological examinations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. By the end of 1982, the average medical x-ray doses to the active bone marrow were 12.04 mGy for A-bomb exposed groups and 8.92 mGy for control groups (not-in-cities); to the male gonads, 2.26 mGy and 1.89 mGy, respectively; and to the female gonads, 17.45 mGy and 12.58 mGy, respectively. Results for Hiroshima and Nagasaki were similar. The main impact of medical x-ray doses was in the lowest T65DR group. Medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.05-500% (mean, 35%) of A-bomb doses in the 10-99 mGy T65DR group. In the 100-999 mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray active bone marrow doses ranged from 0.005-50% (mean, 5%) of their T65DR. In the greater than 1,000-mGy T65DR group, medical x-ray exposures were proportionally less. Female active bone marrow and gonad doses were similar in magnitude to the male active bone marrow doses. Medical x-ray exposures produced smaller doses to the gonads of males than to those of the females. The use of medical x-rays is steadily increasing. Careful consideration of doses from medical sources

  16. Increased apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in the embryonic mouse brain in response to very low-dose X-rays but not 50 Hz magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Shreya; Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Ricket, Nicole; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2014-01-01

    The use of X-rays for medical diagnosis is enhancing exposure to low radiation doses. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic or magnetic fields is also increasing. Epidemiological studies show consistent associations of childhood leukaemia with exposure to magnetic fields but any causal relationship is unclear. A limitation in assessing the consequence of such exposure is the availability of sensitive assays. The embryonic neuronal stem and progenitor cell compartments are radiosensitive tissues. Using sensitive assays, we report a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment following in utero exposure to 10–200 mGy X-rays. Both endpoints show a linear response. We also show that DSB repair is delayed following exposure to doses below 50 mGy compared with 100 mGy. Thus, we demonstrate in vivo consequences of low-dose radiation. In contrast to these impacts, we did not observe any significant induction of DSBs or apoptosis following exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (100 or 300 µT). We conclude that any DSB induction by treatment with magnetic fields is lower than following exposure to 10 mGy X-rays. For comparison, certain procedures involving computed tomography scanning are equivalent to 1–5 mGy X-rays. PMID:25209403

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation at intermediate doses on the performance of reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combernoux, Nicolas; Labed, Véronique; Schrive, Luc; Wyart, Yvan; Carretier, Emilie; Moulin, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study is to explain the degradation of Polyamide (PA) composite reverse osmosis membrane (RO) in function of the irradiation dose. Irradiations were performed with a gamma 60Co source in wet conditions and under oxygen atmosphere. For different doses of 0.2 and 0.5 MGy with a constant dose rate of 0.5 kGy h-1, RO membranes performances (NaCl retention, permeability) were studied before and after irradiation. ATR-FTIR, ion chromatography and gas chromatography were used to characterize structural modification. Results showed that the permeability of RO membranes irradiated at 0.2 MGy exhibited a small decrease, related to scissions of the PVA coating. However, retention did not change at this dose. At 0.5 MGy, permeability showed a large increase of a factor around 2 and retention began to decrease from 99% to 95%. Chromatography measurements revealed a strong link between permselectivity properties variation, ion leakage and oxygen consumption. Add to ATR-FTIR observations, these results emphasized that the cleavages of amide and ester bonds were observed at 0.5 MGy, more precisely the loss of hydrogen bonds between polyamide chains. By different analysis, modifications of the polysulfone layer occur until a dose of 0.2 MGy.

  18. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  19. [Radiotherapy of a glioma in a pregnant woman: evaluation of the foetal dose in conformational 3D or intensity-modulated].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, L; Doyeux, K; Linca, S; Challand, T; Hanzen, C

    2014-12-01

    The purpose was to assess three treatments planning techniques including one in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cerebral irradiation of pregnant woman, in order to limit the dose delivered to the foetus. The treatment provided was 60 Gy to the planning target volume. Estimated foetal dose was measured using an anthropomorphic phantom, on the upper and middle part of the uterus. The first plan consisted in four beams in conformational technique delivered from a Varian accelerator with a 120 leaves collimator, the second one used non-coplanar fields and the third one assessed IMRT. With the conformational technique, the dose at the upper part of the uterus was 8.3 mGy and 6.3 mGy at the middle part. The dose delivered to the foetus was higher with the non-coplanar fields. In IMRT, the dose at the upper part of the uterus was 23.8 mGy and 14.3 mGy at the middle part. The three plans used 6 MV X-rays. Because of the use of leaves and non-coplanar fields, IMRT does not seem to be the optimal technique for the treatment of pregnant woman. However, the dose delivered to the foetus remains low and below the dose of 100 mGy recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection. It seems possible to consider the use of this technique for a better sparing of organs at risk for the mother.

  20. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  1. Increased apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks in the embryonic mouse brain in response to very low-dose X-rays but not 50 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shreya; Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Ricket, Nicole; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2014-11-01

    The use of X-rays for medical diagnosis is enhancing exposure to low radiation doses. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic or magnetic fields is also increasing. Epidemiological studies show consistent associations of childhood leukaemia with exposure to magnetic fields but any causal relationship is unclear. A limitation in assessing the consequence of such exposure is the availability of sensitive assays. The embryonic neuronal stem and progenitor cell compartments are radiosensitive tissues. Using sensitive assays, we report a statistically significant increase in DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation and apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment following in utero exposure to 10-200 mGy X-rays. Both endpoints show a linear response. We also show that DSB repair is delayed following exposure to doses below 50 mGy compared with 100 mGy. Thus, we demonstrate in vivo consequences of low-dose radiation. In contrast to these impacts, we did not observe any significant induction of DSBs or apoptosis following exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (100 or 300 µT). We conclude that any DSB induction by treatment with magnetic fields is lower than following exposure to 10 mGy X-rays. For comparison, certain procedures involving computed tomography scanning are equivalent to 1-5 mGy X-rays.

  2. Radiation induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    A brain weight deficit of about 70 mg was induced at doses of approximately 75-mGy and a deficit of 60 mg was induced at 100 mGy. This confirms the effects projected and observed by Wanner and Edwards. Although the data do not demonstrate a clear dose-response relationship between the 75-mGy and 100-mGy groups, the data are statistically consistent with a dose-response effect because of the overlapping confidence intervals. The lack of a statistically significant observation is most likely related to the small difference in doses and the limited numbers of animals examined. There are several factors that can influence the brain weight of guinea pig pups, such as caging and housing conditions, the sex of the animal, and litter size. These should be taken into account for accurate analysis. Dam weight did not appear to have a significant effect. The confirmation of a micrencephalic effect induced x rays at doses of 75-mGy during this late embryonic stage of development is consistent with the findings of small head size induced in those exposed prior to the eight week of conception at Hiroshima. This implies a mechanism for micrencephaly different from those previously suggested and lends credence to a causal relation between radiation and small head size in humans at low doses as reported by Miller and Mulvihill. 16 refs., 13 tabs.

  3. Paternity analysis reveals significant isolation and near neighbor pollen dispersal in small Cariniana legalis Mart. Kuntze populations in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Tambarussi, Evandro V; Boshier, David; Vencovsky, Roland; Freitas, Miguel L M; Sebbenn, Alexandre M

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the world, large trees are increasingly rare. Cariniana legalis is the tallest tree species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, reaching up to 60 m in height. Due to extensive deforestation of the Atlantic Forest, remnant C. legalis populations are small and spatially isolated, requiring the development of strategies for their conservation. For in situ and ex situ genetic conservation to be effective, it is important to understand the levels and patterns of spatial genetic structure (SGS), and gene flow. We investigated SGS and pollen flow in three small, physically isolated C. legalis stands using microsatellite loci. We measured, mapped, and sampled all C. legalis trees in the three stands: 65 trees from Ibicatu population, 22 trees from MGI, and 4 trees from MGII. We also collected and genotyped 600 seeds from Ibicatu, 250 seeds from MGI, and 200 seeds from MGII. Significant SGS was detected in Ibicatu up to 150 m, but substantial levels of external pollen flow were also detected in Ibicatu (8%), although not in MGI (0.4%) or MGII (0%). Selfing was highest in MGII (18%), the smallest group of trees, compared to MGI (6.4%) and Ibicatu (6%). In MGI and MGII, there was a strong pattern of mating among near-neighbors. Seed collection strategies for breeding, in situ and ex situ conservation and ecological restoration, must ensure collection from seed trees located at distances greater than 350 m and from several forest fragments. PMID:27069608

  4. GASCan 2 payload integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cody, Dennis J.; Concepcion, Allan G.; Watras, Edward C., III

    1995-01-01

    This project, conducted in cooperation with the NASA Advanced Space Design Program, is part of an ongoing effort to place an experiment package into space. The goal of this project is to build and test flight-ready hardware that can be launched from the Space Shuttle. Get Away Special Canister 2 (GASCan 2) consists of three separate experiments. The Ionospheric Properties and Propagation Experiment (IPPE) determines effects of the ionosphere on radio wave propagation. The Microgravity Ignition experiment (MGI) tests the effects of combustion in a microgravity environment. The Rotational Fluid Flow experiment (RFF) examines fluid behavior under varying levels of gravity. This year the following tasks were completed: design of the IPPE antenna, X- and J-cell battery boxes, J-cell battery box enclosure, and structural bumpers; construction of the MGI canisters, MGI mounting brackets, IPPE antenna, and battery boxes; and the selection of the RFF's operating fluid and the analysis of the fluid behavior under microgravity test conditions.

  5. Cascade Cyclizations of Acyclic and Macrocyclic Alkynones: Studies toward the Synthesis of Phomactin A

    PubMed Central

    Ciesielski, Jennifer; Gandon, Vincent; Frontier, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    A study of the reactivity and diastereoselectivity of the Lewis acid-promoted cascade cyclizations of both acyclic and macrocyclic alkynones is described. In these reactions, a β-iodoallenolate intermediate is generated via conjugate addition of iodide to an alkynone, followed by an intramolecular aldol reaction with a tethered aldehyde to afford a cyclohexenyl alcohol. The Lewis acid magnesium iodide (MgI2) was found to promote irreversible ring closure, while cyclizations using BF3·OEt2 as promoter occurred reversibly. For both acyclic and macrocyclic ynones, high diastereoselectivity was observed in the intramolecular aldol reaction. The MgI2 protocol for cyclization was applied to the synthesis of advanced intermediates relevant to the synthesis of phomactin natural products, during which a novel transannular cation-olefin cyclization was observed. DFT calculations were conducted to analyze the mechanism of this unusual MgI2-promoted process. PMID:23724905

  6. Photon and fast neutron dosimetry using aluminium oxide thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Marques, J G; Carvalho, A F; Santos, L; Cardoso, J; Osvay, M

    2006-01-01

    Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeters were used to measure photon and fast neutron doses in a fast neutron beam recently implemented at the Portuguese Research Reactor, Nuclear and Technological Institute, Portugal. The activation of Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y by fast neutrons provides information about the fast neutron component by measuring the activity of the reaction products and the self-induced TL signal. Additionally, the first TL reading after irradiation determines the photon dose. The elemental composition of the dosemeters was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and by particle induced X-ray emission. Results demonstrate that Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y is an adequate material to discriminate photon and fast neutron fields for reactor dosimetry purposes.

  7. Considerations in the Radiologic Evaluation of the Pregnant Orthopaedic Patient.

    PubMed

    Matzon, Jonas L; Lutsky, Kevin F; Ricci, Emily K; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2015-08-01

    Radiographic imaging of the pregnant patient represents a diagnostic and management dilemma for the orthopaedic surgeon. Imaging is often necessary in the setting of trauma; however, in utero radiation exposure can result in deleterious developmental effects in the embryo and fetus. The likelihood of a negative effect is proportional to the radiation dose and the gestational age of the embryo or fetus at the time of exposure. Ionizing radiation doses >100 mGy in the first trimester of pregnancy may lead to spontaneous abortion, malformation, and mental retardation. Whereas plain radiographs of the extremities and cervical spine expose the fetus to minimal doses of radiation of <10 mGy, other commonly performed orthopaedic diagnostic studies, such as CT of the pelvis, emit significantly higher exposure doses of approximately 35 mGy. Non-emitting modalities, such as ultrasonography and MRI, are alternatives for evaluation in the clinical setting. PMID:26116850

  8. Oxygen vacancies controlled multiple magnetic phases in epitaxial single crystal Co0.5(Mg0.55Zn0.45)0.5O1-v thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dapeng; Cao, Qiang; Qiao, Ruimin; Zhu, Shimeng; Yang, Wanli; Xia, Weixing; Tian, Yufeng; Liu, Guolei; Yan, Shishen

    2016-04-01

    High quality single-crystal fcc-Cox(MgyZn1-y)1-xO1-v epitaxial thin films with high Co concentration up to x = 0.5 have been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. Systematic magnetic property characterization and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicate that the coexistence of ferromagnetic regions, superparamagnetic clusters, and non-magnetic boundaries in the as-prepared Cox(MgyZn1-y)1-xO1-v films is a consequence of the intrinsic inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the relative strength of multiple phases could be modulated by controlling the oxygen partial pressure during sample preparation. Armed with both controllable magnetic properties and tunable band-gap, Cox(MgyZn1-y)1-xO1-v films may have promising applications in future spintronics.

  9. Radiation-induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of x rays on brain weight of guinea pig pups at birth was studied for 21-day old embroys exposed in utero to doses of 75 and 100 mGy. When compared to controls and when corrected for body weight, gestation time, litter size, sex, and examiner differences the brains of irradiated pups weighed approximately 46 mg less than those of controls (p<0.001) for the 75-mGy group and about 55 mg less for the 100-mGy group. Brains of females weighed 51 mg less than those of males of the same body weight. Dam weight and caging conditions had no observed effect on brain weight.

  10. Radiation-induced micrencephaly in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, L.K.; Johnston, D.A.; Felleman, D.J.

    1992-11-01

    The effect of x rays on brain weight of guinea pig pups at birth was studied for 21-day old embroys exposed in utero to doses of 75 and 100 mGy. When compared to controls and when corrected for body weight, gestation time, litter size, sex, and examiner differences the brains of irradiated pups weighed approximately 46 mg less than those of controls (p<0.001) for the 75-mGy group and about 55 mg less for the 100-mGy group. Brains of females weighed 51 mg less than those of males of the same body weight. Dam weight and caging conditions had no observed effect on brain weight.

  11. Oxygen vacancies controlled multiple magnetic phases in epitaxial single crystal Co0.5(Mg0.55Zn0.45)0.5O1-v thin films

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dapeng; Cao, Qiang; Qiao, Ruimin; Zhu, Shimeng; Yang, Wanli; Xia, Weixing; Tian, Yufeng; Liu, Guolei; Yan, Shishen

    2016-01-01

    High quality single-crystal fcc-Cox(MgyZn1-y)1-xO1-v epitaxial thin films with high Co concentration up to x = 0.5 have been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy. Systematic magnetic property characterization and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis indicate that the coexistence of ferromagnetic regions, superparamagnetic clusters, and non-magnetic boundaries in the as-prepared Cox(MgyZn1-y)1-xO1-v films is a consequence of the intrinsic inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancies. Furthermore, the relative strength of multiple phases could be modulated by controlling the oxygen partial pressure during sample preparation. Armed with both controllable magnetic properties and tunable band-gap, Cox(MgyZn1-y)1-xO1-v films may have promising applications in future spintronics. PMID:27062992

  12. SU-E-I-09: Application of LiF:Mg,Cu (TLD-100H) Dosimeters for in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Faghihi, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetery is very essential in diagnostic radiology. The goal of this study is to verify the application of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) in obtaining the Entrance skin dose (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. The results of dosimetry performed by TLD-100H, were compared with those obtained by TLD100, which is a common dosimeter in diagnostic radiology. Methods: In this study the ESD values were measured using two types of Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-100, and TLD-100H) for 16 patients undergoing diagnostic radiology (lumbar spine imaging). The ESD values were also obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom for different imaging techniques and different views (AP, and lateral). The TLD chips were annealed with a standard procedure, and the ECC values for each TLD was obtained by exposing the chips to equal amount of radiation. Each time three TLD chips were covered by thin dark plastic covers, and were put at the surface of the phantom or the patient. The average reading of the three chips was used for obtaining the dose. Results: The results show a close agreement between the dose measuered by the two dosimeters.According to the results of this study, the TLD-100H dosimeters have higher sensitivities (i.e.signal(nc)/dose) than TLD-100.The ESD values varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for measurements. Conclusion: The TLD-100H dosimeters are suggested as effective dosimeters for dosimetry in low dose fields because of their higher sensitivities.

  13. Investigation of the Entrance Surface Dose and Dose to Different Organs in Lumbar Spine Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipoorfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Zamani, E; Faghihi, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dose assessment using proper dosimeters is especially important in radiation protection optimization and imaging justification in diagnostic radiology. Objective: The aim of this study is to obtain the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) of patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging using two thermoluminescence dosimeters TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) and GR-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) and also to obtain the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging with several views. Methods: To measure the ESD values of the patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging, the two TLD types were put on their skin surface. The ESD values for different views of lumbar spine imaging were also measured by putting the TLDs at the surface of the Rando phantom. Several TLD chips were inserted inside different organs of Rando phantom to measure the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging. Results: The results indicate that there is a close agreement between the results of the two dosimeters. Based on the results of this experiment, the ESD dose of the 16 patients included in this study varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for GR-200 measurements. The ESDs obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom are in close agreement. Conclusion: According to the results, the GR200 has greater sensitivity than the TLD-100. PMID:25599058

  14. Neuroimmune response and sleep studies after whole body irradiation with high-LET particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquette, C.; Mathieu, J.; Bertho, J.-M.; Galonnier, M.; Wysoki, J.; Maubert, C.; Balanzat, E.; Gerbin, R.; Aigueperse, J.; Clarençon, D.

    2009-10-01

    In order to investigate the biological effects of galactic rays on astronaut cerebral functions after space flight, mice were exposed to different heavy ions (HZE) in whole-body conditions at doses comparable to the galactic flux: 12C, 16O and 20Ne (95 MeV/u, at 42-76 mGy). Animals were also exposed to 42 mGy of 60Co radiation for comparison with HZE. The neuroimmune response, evaluated by interleukin-1 (IL-1) measurement, showed that this cytokine was produced 3 h after irradiation by 16O or 60Co. In contrast, neither 12C (56.7 mGy) nor 20Ne (76 mGy) induced IL-1 production. However, immunohistochemical staining of 12C-irradiated mouse brain tissue showed 2 months later a marked inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus and a diffuse response in parenchyma. Sleep studies were realized before and after exposure to 42 mGy of 16O and 76 mGy of 20Ne: only the 20Ne radiation displayed a small effect. A slight decrease in paradoxical sleep, corresponding to a reduction in the number of episodes of paradoxical sleep, was manifested between 8 and 22 days after exposure. Exposure to 12C and 16O induced no changes either in cellularity of spleen or thymus, or in caspase 3 activity (as much as four months after irradiation). Taken together, these data indicate that the CNS could be sensitive to heavy ions and that responses to HZE impact depend on the nature of the particle, the dose threshold and the time delay to develop biological processes. Differences in responses to different HZE highlight the complex biological phenomena to which astronauts are submitted during space flight.

  15. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays.

  16. Assessment of DNA double-strand breaks induced by intravascular iodinated contrast media following in vitro irradiation and in vivo, during paediatric cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Gould, Richard; McFadden, Sonyia L; Horn, Simon; Prise, Kevin M; Doyle, Philip; Hughes, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric cardiac catheterizations may result in the administration of substantial amounts of iodinated contrast media and ionizing radiation. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of iodinated contrast media in combination with in vitro and in vivo X-ray radiation on lymphocyte DNA. Six concentrations of iodine (15, 17.5, 30, 35, 45, and 52.5 mg of iodine per mL blood) represented volumes of iodinated contrast media used in the clinical setting. Blood obtained from healthy volunteers was mixed with iodinated contrast media and exposed to radiation doses commonly used in paediatric cardiac catheterizations (0 mGy, 70 mGy, 140 mGy, 250 mGy and 450 mGy). Control samples contained no iodine. For in vivo experimentation, pre and post blood samples were collected from children undergoing cardiac catheterization, receiving iodine concentrations of up to 51 mg of iodine per mL blood and radiation doses of up to 400 mGy. Fluorescence microscopy was performed to assess γH2AX-foci induction, which corresponded to the number of DNA double-strand breaks. The presence of iodine in vitro resulted in significant increases of DNA double-strand breaks beyond that induced by radiation for ≥ 17.5 mg/mL iodine to blood. The in vivo effects of contrast media on children undergoing cardiac catheterization resulted in a 19% increase in DNA double-strand breaks in children receiving an average concentration of 19 mg/mL iodine to blood. A larger investigation is required to provide further information of the potential benefit of lowering the amount of iodinated contrast media received during X-ray radiation investigations.

  17. SU-E-J-11: Measurement of Eye Lens Dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with Different CBCT Acquisition Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Dhote, D; Kumar, R; Thakur, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens doses were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT.

  18. Image texture and radiation dose properties in CT.

    PubMed

    Mozejko, David; Kjernlie Andersen, Hilde; Pedersen, Marius; Waaler, Dag; Trægde Martinsen, Anne Catrine

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare image noise properties of GE Discovery HD 750 and Toshiba Aquilion ONE. The uniformity section of a Catphan 600 image quality assurance phantom was scanned with both scanners, at different dose levels and with extension rings simulating patients of different sizes. 36 datasets were obtained and analyzed in terms of noise power spectrum. All the results prove that introduction of extension rings significantly altered the image quality with respect to noise properties. Without extension rings, the Toshiba scanner had lower total visible noise than GE (with GE as reference: FC18 had 82% and FC08 had 80% for 10 mGy, FC18 had 77% and FC08 74% for 15 mGy, FC18 had 80% and FC08 77% for 20 mGy). The total visible noise (TVN) for 20 and 15 mGy were similar for the phantom with the smallest additional extension ring, while Toshiba had higher TVN than GE for the 10 mGy dose level (120% FC18, 110% FC08). For the second and third ring, the GE images had lower TVN than Toshiba images for all dose levels (Toshiba TVN is greater than 155% for all cases). The results indi-cate that GE potentially has less image noise than Toshiba for larger patients. The Toshiba FC18 kernel had higher TVN than the Toshiba FC08 kernel with additional beam hardening correction for all dose levels and phantom sizes (120%, 107%, and 106% for FC18 compared to 110%, 98%, and 97%, for FC08, for 10, 15 and 20 mGy doses, respectively). PMID:27167260

  19. The long-term effects of acute exposure to ionising radiation on survival and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, Elena I; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2016-10-01

    The results of recent studies have provided strong evidence for the transgenerational effects of parental exposure to ionising radiation and chemical mutagens. However, the transgenerational effects of parental exposure on survival and fertility remain poorly understood. To establish whether parental irradiation can affect the survival and fertility of directly exposed organisms and their offspring, crustacean Daphnia magna were given 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000mGy of acute γ-rays. Exposure to 1000 and 10,000mGy significantly compromised the viability of irradiated Daphnia and their first-generation progeny, but did not affect the second-generation progeny. The fertility of F0 and F1Daphnia gradually declined with the dose of parental exposure and significantly decreased at dose of 100mGy and at higher doses. The effects of parental irradiation on the number of broods were only observed among the F0Daphnia exposed to 1000 and 10,000mGy, whereas the brood size was equally affected in the two consecutive generations. In contrast, the F2 total fertility was compromised only among progeny of parents that received the highest dose of 10,000mGy. We propose that the decreased fertility observed among the F2 progeny of parents exposed to 10,000mGy is attributed to transgenerational effects of parental irradiation. Our results also indicate a substantial recovery of the F2 progeny of irradiated F0Daphnia exposed to the lower doses of acute γ-rays. PMID:27288911

  20. Assessment of dedicated low-dose cardiac micro-CT reconstruction algorithms using the left ventricular volume of small rodents as a performance measure

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Joscha; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-correlated microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of mouse models of cardiovascular diseases and the determination of functional parameters as the left ventricular volume. As the current gold standard, the phase-correlated Feldkamp reconstruction (PCF), shows poor performance in case of low dose scans, more sophisticated reconstruction algorithms have been proposed to enable low-dose imaging. In this study, the authors focus on the McKinnon-Bates (MKB) algorithm, the low dose phase-correlated (LDPC) reconstruction, and the high-dimensional total variation minimization reconstruction (HDTV) and investigate their potential to accurately determine the left ventricular volume at different dose levels from 50 to 500 mGy. The results were verified in phantom studies of a five-dimensional (5D) mathematical mouse phantom. Methods: Micro-CT data of eight mice, each administered with an x-ray dose of 500 mGy, were acquired, retrospectively gated for cardiac and respiratory motion and reconstructed using PCF, MKB, LDPC, and HDTV. Dose levels down to 50 mGy were simulated by using only a fraction of the projections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was evaluated as a measure of image quality. Left ventricular volume was determined using different segmentation algorithms (Otsu, level sets, region growing). Forward projections of the 5D mouse phantom were performed to simulate a micro-CT scan. The simulated data were processed the same way as the real mouse data sets. Results: Compared to the conventional PCF reconstruction, the MKB, LDPC, and HDTV algorithm yield images of increased quality in terms of CNR. While the MKB reconstruction only provides small improvements, a significant increase of the CNR is observed in LDPC and HDTV reconstructions. The phantom studies demonstrate that left ventricular volumes can be determined accurately at 500 mGy. For lower dose levels which were simulated for real mouse data sets, the

  1. SU-E-P-08: Establishment of Local Diagnostic Reference Levels of Routine Abdomen Exam in Computed Tomography According to Body Weight

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The national diagnostic reference levels (NDRLs) is an efficient, concise and powerful standard for optimizing radiation protection of a patient. However, for each hospital the dose-reducing potential of focusing on establishment of local DRLs (LDRLs). A lot of study reported that Computed tomography exam contributed majority radiation dose in different medical modalities, therefore, routine abdomen CT exam was choose in initial pilot study in our study. Besides the mAs of routine abdomen CT exam was decided automatic exposure control by linear attenuation is relate to body shape of patient. In this study we would like to establish the local diagnostic reference levels of routine abdomen exam in computed tomography according to body weight of patient. Methods and Materials: There are two clinical CT scanners (a Toshiba Aquilion and a Siemens Sensation) were performed in this study. For CT examinations the basic recommended dosimetric quantity is the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI). The patient sample involved 82 adult patients of both sexes and divided into three groups by their body weight (50–60 kg, 60–70 kg, 70–80 kg).Carried out the routine abdomen examinations, and all exposure parameters have been collected and the corresponding CTDIv and DLP values have been determined. The average values were compared with the European DRLs. Results: The majority of patients (75%) were between 50–70 Kg of body weight, the numbers of patient in each group of weight were 40–50:7; 50–60:29; 60–70:33; 70–80:13. The LDRLs in each group were 10.81mGy, 14.46mGy, 20.27mGy and 21.04mGy, respectively. The DLP were 477mGy, 630mGy, 887mGy and 959mGy, respectively. No matter which group the LDRLs were lower than European DRLs. Conclusions: We would like to state that this was a pioneer work in local hospital in Chiayi. We hope that this may lead the way to further developments in Taiwan.

  2. Perspective: Materials informatics and big data: Realization of the "fourth paradigm" of science in materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ankit; Choudhary, Alok

    2016-05-01

    Our ability to collect "big data" has greatly surpassed our capability to analyze it, underscoring the emergence of the fourth paradigm of science, which is data-driven discovery. The need for data informatics is also emphasized by the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), further boosting the emerging field of materials informatics. In this article, we look at how data-driven techniques are playing a big role in deciphering processing-structure-property-performance relationships in materials, with illustrative examples of both forward models (property prediction) and inverse models (materials discovery). Such analytics can significantly reduce time-to-insight and accelerate cost-effective materials discovery, which is the goal of MGI.

  3. Summary of round robin measurements of radiation induced conductivity in Wesgo AL995 alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    This existing data on radiation induced conductivity (RIC) measurements performed on the same heat of the IEA reference ceramic insulator are summarized. Six different sets of RIC measurements have been performed on Wesgo AL995 at dose rates between 10 Gy/s and 1 MGy/s. In general, good agreement was obtained between the different groups of researchers. The data indicate that the RIC at a test temperature of 400-500{degrees}C is approximately linear with ionizing dose rate up to {approximately}1000 Gy/s, and exhibits an approximately square root dependence on dose rate between 1 kGy/s and 1 MGy/s.

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT Enterography for Active Inflammatory Terminal Ileal Crohn Disease: Comparison of Full-Dose and Half-Dose Images Reconstructed with FBP and Half-Dose Images with SAFIRE.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Namita S; Baker, Mark E; Goenka, Ajit H; Bullen, Jennifer A; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Einstein, David; Feldman, Myra K; Kanmaniraja, Devaraju; Purysko, Andrei S; Vahdat, Noushin; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Herts, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of computed tomographic (CT) enterographic images obtained at half dose and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with those of full-dose CT enterographic images reconstructed with FBP for active inflammatory terminal or neoterminal ileal Crohn disease. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Ninety subjects (45 with active terminal ileal Crohn disease and 45 without Crohn disease) underwent CT enterography with a dual-source CT unit. The reference standard for confirmation of active Crohn disease was active terminal ileal Crohn disease based on ileocolonoscopy or established Crohn disease and imaging features of active terminal ileal Crohn disease. Data from both tubes were reconstructed with FBP (100% exposure); data from the primary tube (50% exposure) were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths 3 and 4, yielding four datasets per CT enterographic examination. The mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) at full dose were 13.1 mGy (median, 7.36 mGy) and 15.9 mGy (median, 13.06 mGy), respectively, and those at half dose were 6.55 mGy (median, 3.68 mGy) and 7.95 mGy (median, 6.5 mGy). Images were subjectively evaluated by eight radiologists for quality and diagnostic confidence for Crohn disease. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated, and the multireader, multicase analysis of variance method was used to compare reconstruction methods on the basis of a noninferiority margin of 0.05. Results The mean AUCs with half-dose scans (FBP, 0.908; SAFIRE 3, 0.935; SAFIRE 4, 0.924) were noninferior to the mean AUC with full-dose FBP scans (0.908; P < .003). The proportion of images with inferior quality was significantly higher with all

  5. Radiation effects on carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastics

    SciTech Connect

    Sasuga, Tsuneo; Udagawa, Akira; Seguchi, Tadao

    1993-12-31

    Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and a newly developed thermoplastic polyimide ``new-TPI`` were applied to carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) as a matrix resin. PEEK and new-TPI showed excellent resistance over 50 MGy to electron irradiation and the crosslinking proceeded predominantly by irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties induced by electron irradiation of the CFRP with the two resins were examined at various temperatures. The flexural strength and modulus measured at {minus}196 and 25{degree}C were scarcely affected up to 120 MGy and both the values measured at high temperature were increased with dose.

  6. SU-E-I-32: Benchmarking Head CT Doses: A Pooled Vs. Protocol Specific Analysis of Radiation Doses in Adult Head CT Examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K; Bostani, M; Cagnon, C; McNitt-Gray, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to collect CT dose index data from adult head exams to establish benchmarks based on either: (a) values pooled from all head exams or (b) values for specific protocols. One part of this was to investigate differences in scan frequency and CT dose index data for inpatients versus outpatients. Methods: We collected CT dose index data (CTDIvol) from adult head CT examinations performed at our medical facilities from Jan 1st to Dec 31th, 2014. Four of these scanners were used for inpatients, the other five were used for outpatients. All scanners used Tube Current Modulation. We used X-ray dose management software to mine dose index data and evaluate CTDIvol for 15807 inpatients and 4263 outpatients undergoing Routine Brain, Sinus, Facial/Mandible, Temporal Bone, CTA Brain and CTA Brain-Neck protocols, and combined across all protocols. Results: For inpatients, Routine Brain series represented 84% of total scans performed. For outpatients, Sinus scans represented the largest fraction (36%). The CTDIvol (mean ± SD) across all head protocols was 39 ± 30 mGy (min-max: 3.3–540 mGy). The CTDIvol for Routine Brain was 51 ± 6.2 mGy (min-max: 36–84 mGy). The values for Sinus were 24 ± 3.2 mGy (min-max: 13–44 mGy) and for Facial/Mandible were 22 ± 4.3 mGy (min-max: 14–46 mGy). The mean CTDIvol for inpatients and outpatients was similar across protocols with one exception (CTA Brain-Neck). Conclusion: There is substantial dose variation when results from all protocols are pooled together; this is primarily a function of the differences in technical factors of the protocols themselves. When protocols are analyzed separately, there is much less variability. While analyzing pooled data affords some utility, reviewing protocols segregated by clinical indication provides greater opportunity for optimization and establishing useful benchmarks.

  7. Patient and staff exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Buls, N; Pages, J; Mana, F; Osteaux, M

    2002-05-01

    Despite a number of efforts being put into the radiological protection of both patient and staff during interventional radiological (IR) procedures during recent years, information about radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures remains scarce. The purpose of this study was to estimate both patient and staff radiation doses during therapeutic ERCP procedures by direct measurement and to compare these results with data from other IR procedures. For 54 patients, effective dose and skin dose were estimated by measuring the dose-area product. For staff, entrance surface doses to the lens of the eye, thyroid and hands were estimated by thermoluminescent dosemeters. A median effective dose of 7.3 mSv and a median entrance surface dose of 271 mGy per procedure were estimated for patients. The gastroenterologist received a median dose of 0.34 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0.30 mGy to the skin at the level of the thyroid and 0.44 mGy to the skin of the hands, per procedure. When comparing the dosimetric quantities presented in this study with data from other IR procedures, it is clear that patient skin doses and doses to staff are high owing to the use of inappropriate X-ray equipment. ERCP requires the same radiation protection practice as all IR procedures. It should be consistently included in future multicentre IR patient and staff dose survey studies at national or international level.

  8. Radiation resistance of the insulating materials used in the magnetic systems of accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. V.; Pupkov, Yu. A.

    2016-07-01

    The radiation resistance of glass-cloth laminate, impregnating epoxy and silicone compounds, lavsan, and other materials used in particle accelerators is measured. Irradiation is performed on an ILU-6 electron accelerator to a dose of 30-100 MGy. Recommendations on the application of the insulating materials are made.

  9. The Medicago Genome Initiative: a model legume database

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Callum J.; Dixon, Richard A.; Farmer, Andrew D.; Flores, Raul; Inman, Jeff; Gonzales, Robert A.; Harrison, Maria J.; Paiva, Nancy L.; Scott, Angela D.; Weller, Jennifer W.; May, Gregory D.

    2001-01-01

    The Medicago Genome Initiative (MGI) is a database of EST sequences of the model legume Medicago truncatula. The database is available to the public and has resulted from a collaborative research effort between the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation and the National Center for Genome Resources to investigate the genome of M.truncatula. MGI is part of the greater integrated Medicago functional genomics program at the Noble Foundation (http://www.noble .org), which is taking a global approach in studying the genetic and biochemical events associated with the growth, development and environmental interactions of this model legume. Our approach will include: large-scale EST sequencing, gene expression profiling, the generation of M.truncatula activation-tagged and promoter trap insertion mutants, high-throughput metabolic profiling, and proteome studies. These multidisciplinary information pools will be interfaced with one another to provide scientists with an integrated, holistic set of tools to address fundamental questions pertaining to legume biology. The public interface to the MGI database can be accessed at http://www.ncgr.org/research/mgi. PMID:11125064

  10. ESR dosimetry study of population in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site.

    PubMed

    Zhumadilov, Kassym; Ivannikov, Alexander; Stepanenko, Valeriy; Zharlyganova, Dinara; Toyoda, Shin; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2013-07-01

    A tooth enamel electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry study was carried out with the purpose of obtaining the individual absorbed radiation doses of population from settlements in the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan, which was exposed to radioactive fallout traces from nuclear explosions in the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site and Lop Nor test base, China. Most of the settlements are located near the central axis of radioactive fallout trace from the most contaminating surface nuclear test, which was conducted on 29 August 1949, with the maximum detected excess dose being 430 ± 93 mGy. A maximum dose of 268 ± 79 mGy was determined from the settlements located close to radioactive fallout trace resulting from surface nuclear tests on 24 August 1956 (Ust-Kamenogorsk, Znamenka, Shemonaikha, Glubokoe, Tavriya and Gagarino). An accidental dose of 56 ± 42 mGy was found in Kurchatov city residents located close to fallout trace after the nuclear test on 7 August 1962. This method was applied to human tooth enamel to obtain individual absorbed doses of residents of the Makanchi, Urdzhar and Taskesken settlements located near the Kazakhstan-Chinese border due to the influence of nuclear tests (1964-1981) at Lop Nor. The highest dose was 123 ± 32 mGy.

  11. The rate of X-ray-induced DNA double-strand break repair in the embryonic mouse brain is unaffected by exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Woodbine, Lisa; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; Barazzuol, Lara; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Jeggo, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Following in utero exposure to low dose radiation (10–200 mGy), we recently observed a linear induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and activation of apoptosis in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. No significant induction of DSB or apoptosis was observed following exposure to magnetic fields (MF). In the present study, we exploited this in vivo system to examine whether exposure to MF before and after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays impacts upon DSB repair rates. Materials and methods: 53BP1 foci were quantified following combined exposure to radiation and MF in the embryonic neuronal stem/progenitor cell compartment. Embryos were exposed in utero to 50 Hz MF at 300 μT for 3 h before and up to 9 h after exposure to 100 mGy X-rays. Controls included embryos exposed to MF or X-rays alone plus sham exposures. Results: Exposure to MF before and after 100 mGy X-rays did not impact upon the rate of DSB repair in the embryonic neuronal stem cell compartment compared to repair rates following radiation exposure alone. Conclusions: We conclude that in this sensitive system MF do not exert any significant level of DNA damage and do not impede the repair of X-ray induced damage. PMID:25786477

  12. Estimates of Average Glandular Dose with Auto-modes of X-ray Exposures in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Izdihar; Chelliah, Kanaga K.; Mustafa, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the average glandular dose (AGD) of radiation among different breast compositions of glandular and adipose tissue with auto-modes of exposure factor selection in digital breast tomosynthesis. Methods: This experimental study was carried out in the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February 2012 and February 2013 using a tomosynthesis digital mammography X-ray machine. The entrance surface air kerma and the half-value layer were determined using a 100H thermoluminescent dosimeter on 50% glandular and 50% adipose tissue (50/50) and 20% glandular and 80% adipose tissue (20/80) commercially available breast phantoms (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc., Norfolk, Virginia, USA) with auto-time, auto-filter and auto-kilovolt modes. Results: The lowest AGD for the 20/80 phantom with auto-time was 2.28 milliGray (mGy) for two dimension (2D) and 2.48 mGy for three dimensional (3D) images. The lowest AGD for the 50/50 phantom with auto-time was 0.97 mGy for 2D and 1.0 mGy for 3D. Conclusion: The AGD values for both phantoms were lower against a high kilovolt peak and the use of auto-filter mode was more practical for quick acquisition while limiting the probability of operator error. PMID:26052465

  13. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, X.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P.

    2008-08-01

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (Cw) was 14.3±0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2±0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study.

  14. Pediatric Computed Tomography. Radiation Dose in Abdominal Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, X.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Dies, P

    2008-08-11

    Computed tomography is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities used in the last years. However, because is one of the techniques that delivered a considerable radiation dose, precautions should be taken into account. Pediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adults, and the probability that no desirable biological effects can occur is greater. To this, also it adds the probability that they will need more radiological studies in the future. The work consisted in determining the received dose by the pediatric patients undergoing abdominal studies in a multislice computed tomograph, according to the dosimetric quantities established by a Code of Practice published by the International Atomic Energy Agency; using a ionization chamber and a phantom that simulates the abdomen of a pediatric patient. The weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}) was 14.3{+-}0.4 mGy, this value is lower than the published by the American College of Radiology, 25 mGy. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD), which is a quantity established by the NOM-229-SSA1-2002 was determined, finding a value of 14.2{+-}0.1 mGy, it is also below the value established, 25 mGy for an adult study.

  15. Nonlinear ionizing radiation-induced changes in eye lens cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression and lens shape

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Ewa; Barnard, Stephen; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; van Geel, Orry; Wu, Weiju; Richards, Shane; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Rothkamm, Kai; Bouffler, Simon; Quinlan, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cataract risk after radiation exposure was established soon after the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today, increased cataract incidence among medical imaging practitioners and after nuclear incidents has highlighted how little is still understood about the biological responses of the lens to low-dose ionizing radiation (IR). Here, we show for the first time that in mice, lens epithelial cells (LECs) in the peripheral region repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after exposure to 20 and 100 mGy more slowly compared with circulating blood lymphocytes, as demonstrated by counts of γH2AX foci in cell nuclei. LECs in the central region repaired DSBs faster than either LECs in the lens periphery or lymphocytes. Although DSB markers (γH2AX, 53BP1 and RAD51) in both lens regions showed linear dose responses at the 1 h timepoint, nonlinear responses were observed in lenses for EdU (5-ethynyl-2′-deoxy-uridine) incorporation, cyclin D1 staining and cell density after 24 h at 100 and 250 mGy. After 10 months, the lens aspect ratio was also altered, an indicator of the consequences of the altered cell proliferation and cell density changes. A best-fit model demonstrated a dose-response peak at 500 mGy. These data identify specific nonlinear biological responses to low (less than 1000 mGy) dose IR-induced DNA damage in the lens epithelium. PMID:25924630

  16. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry for a Probe Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Weineisen, Martina; Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Czernin, Johannes; Eberlein, Uta; Beykan, Seval; Lapa, Constantin; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Krebs, Markus; Kropf, Saskia; Schirbel, Andreas; Buck, Andreas K.; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. EuK-Subkff-68Ga-DOTAGA (68Ga-PSMA Imaging & Therapy [PSMA I&T]) is a recently introduced PET tracer for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe were evaluated. Methods Five patients with a history of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with 91–148 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T (mean ± SD, 128 ± 23 MBq). After an initial series of rapid whole-body scans, 3 static whole-body scans were acquired at 1, 2, and 4 h after tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Results Injection of 150 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T resulted in an effective dose of 3.0 mSv. The kidneys were the critical organ (33 mGy), followed by the urinary bladder wall and spleen (10 mGy each), salivary glands (9 mGy each), and liver (7 mGy). Conclusion 68Ga-PSMA I&T exhibits a favorable dosimetry, delivering organ doses that are comparable to (kidneys) or lower than those delivered by 18F-FDG. PMID:25883128

  17. Comparative analysis between radiation doses obtained by EPR dosimetry using tooth enamel and established analytical methods for the population of radioactively contaminated territories

    PubMed Central

    Ivannikov, Alexander I.; Skvortsov, Valeri G.; Stepanenko, Valeri F.; Zhumadilov, Kassym Sh.

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of radiation doses determined by tooth enamel electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and by an acknowledged analytical method is performed for individual doses and for average doses in population of some settlements of the Bryansk region (Russia), which have been contaminated after the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The analysis is performed for doses in the range of 0–200 mGy for individuals and in the range of 0–50 mGy for the averaged populations. The method of orthogonal distance linear regression is used for the analysis. For both data sets the slopes of the regression line close to unity and the intercept close to zero are obtained, which indicates that doses determined by these two methods agree with each other. The root-mean-square difference between the results of EPR and analytical methods is estimated to be 35 mGy for individual doses and 15 mGy for averaged doses, which is consistent with uncertainty of these methods. PMID:24771210

  18. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis of boar and inobuta testes after the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Abe, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Jin; Kino, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Tong, Bin; Takino, Sachio; Sugano, Yukou; Sugimura, Satoshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Isogai, Emiko; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic radiation exposure associated with the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident on the testes of boar and inobuta (a hybrid of Sus scrofa and Sus scrofa domestica). This study examined the contamination levels of radioactive caesium (Cs), especially (134)Cs and (137)Cs, in the testis of both boar and inobuta during 2012, after the Fukushima accident. Morphological analysis and electron-probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) were also undertaken on the testes. The (134)Cs and (137)Cs levels were 6430 ± 23 and 6820 ± 32 Bq/kg in the boar testes, and 755 ± 13 and 747 ± 17 Bq/kg in the inobuta testes, respectively. The internal and external exposure of total (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the boar testes were 47.1 mGy and 176.2 mGy, respectively, whereas in the inobuta testes, these levels were 6.09 mGy and 59.8 mGy, respectively. Defective spermatogenesis was not detected by the histochemical analysis of radiation-exposed testes for either animal. In neither animal were Cs molecules detected, using EPMA. In conclusion, we showed that adverse radiation-induced effects were not detected in the examined boar and inobuta testes following the chronic radiation exposure associated with the FNPP accident. PMID:26825300

  19. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis of boar and inobuta testes after the Fukushima accident

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Hideaki; Abe, Yasuyuki; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Jin; Kino, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Tong, Bin; Takino, Sachio; Sugano, Yukou; Sugimura, Satoshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Isogai, Emiko; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic radiation exposure associated with the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident on the testes of boar and inobuta (a hybrid of Sus scrofa and Sus scrofa domestica). This study examined the contamination levels of radioactive caesium (Cs), especially 134Cs and 137Cs, in the testis of both boar and inobuta during 2012, after the Fukushima accident. Morphological analysis and electron-probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) were also undertaken on the testes. The 134Cs and 137Cs levels were 6430 ± 23 and 6820 ± 32 Bq/kg in the boar testes, and 755 ± 13 and 747 ± 17 Bq/kg in the inobuta testes, respectively. The internal and external exposure of total 134Cs and 137Cs in the boar testes were 47.1 mGy and 176.2 mGy, respectively, whereas in the inobuta testes, these levels were 6.09 mGy and 59.8 mGy, respectively. Defective spermatogenesis was not detected by the histochemical analysis of radiation-exposed testes for either animal. In neither animal were Cs molecules detected, using EPMA. In conclusion, we showed that adverse radiation-induced effects were not detected in the examined boar and inobuta testes following the chronic radiation exposure associated with the FNPP accident. PMID:26825300

  20. SU-E-I-15: Comparison of Radiation Dose for Radiography and EOS in Adolescent Scoliosis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, B; Walz-Flannigan, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate patient radiation dose for whole spine imaging using EOS, a new biplanar slot-scanning radiographic system and compare with standard scoliosis radiography. Methods: The EOS imaging system (EOS Imaging, Paris, France) consists of two orthogonal x-ray fan beams which simultaneously acquire frontal and lateral projection images of a standing patient. The patient entrance skin air kerma was measured for each projection image using manufacturer-recommended exposure parameters for spine imaging. Organ and effective doses were estimated using a commercially-available Monte Carlo simulation program (PCXMC, STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland) for a 15 year old mathematical phantom model. These results were compared to organ and effective dose estimated for scoliosis radiography using computed radiography (CR) with standard exposure parameters obtained from a survey of pediatric radiographic projections. Results: The entrance skin air kerma for EOS was found to be 0.18 mGy and 0.33 mGy for posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral projections, respectively. This compares to 0.76 mGy and 1.4 mGy for CR, PA and lateral projections. Effective dose for EOS (PA and lateral projections combined) is 0.19 mSv compared to 0.51 mSv for CR. Conclusion: The EOS slot-scanning radiographic system allows for reduced patient radiation dose in scoliosis patients as compared to standard CR radiography.

  1. Dosimetric study of mandible examinations performed with three cone-beam computed tomography scanners.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Helen J; Andrade, Marcos E; Araujo, Max Well; Brasileiro, Izabela V; Kramer, Richard; Huda, Amir

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the air kerma-area product (PKA) and the skin absorbed dose in the region of the eyes, salivary glands and thyroid of the patient from mandible examinations performed with three cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners, i.e. i-CAT classic, Gendex CB-500 and PreXion 3D. For the dosimetric evaluation, an anthropomorphic head phantom (model RS-250) was used to simulate an adult patient. The CBCT examinations were performed using standard and high-resolution protocols for mandible acquisitions for adult patients. During the phantom's exposure, the PKA was measured using an ionising chamber and the absorbed doses to the skin in the region of the eyes, thyroid and salivary glands were estimated using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) positioned on the phantom's surface. The PKA values estimated with the CBCT scanners varied from 26 to 138 µGy m(2). Skin absorbed doses in the region of the eyes varied from 0.07 to 0.34 mGy; at the parotid glands, from 1.31 to 5.93 mGy; at the submandibular glands, from 1.41 to 6.86 mGy; and at the thyroid, from 0.18 to 2.45 mGy. PKA and absorbed doses showed the highest values for the PreXion 3D scanner due to the use of the continuous exposure mode and a high current-time product.

  2. Characterization of heat loads from mitigated and unmitigated vertical displacement events in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Jernigan, T. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Strait, E. J.; Wesley, J. C.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pitts, R. A.; Sugihara, M.; Watkins, J.

    2013-06-15

    Experiments have been conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to study the distribution and repeatability of heat loads and vessel currents resulting from vertical displacement events (VDEs). For unmitigated VDEs, the radiated power fraction appears to be of order 50%, with the remaining power dominantly conducted to the vessel walls. Shot-to-shot scatter in heat loads measured at one toroidal location is not large (<±50%), suggesting that toroidal asymmetries in conducted heat loads are not large. Conducted heat loads are clearly observed during the current quench (CQ) of both mitigated and unmitigated disruptions. Significant poloidal asymmetries in heat loads and radiated power are often observed in the experiments but are not yet understood. Energy dissipated resistively in the conducting walls during the CQ appears to be small (<5%). The mitigating effect of neon massive gas injection (MGI) as a function of MGI trigger delay has also been studied. Improved mitigation is observed as the MGI trigger delay is decreased. For sufficiently early MGI mitigation, close to 100% radiated energy and a reduction of roughly a factor 2 in vessel forces is achieved.

  3. Chernobyl's Subclinical Legacy: Prenatal Exposure to Radioactive Fallout and School Outcomes in Sweden. NBER Working Paper No. 13347

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almond, Douglas; Edlund, Lena; Palme, Marten

    2007-01-01

    Japanese atomic bomb survivors irradiated 8-25 weeks after ovulation subsequently suffered reduced IQ [Otake and Schull, 1998]. Whether these findings generalize to low doses (less than 10 mGy) has not been established. This paper exploits the natural experiment generated by the Chernobyl nuclear accident in April 1986, which caused a spike in…

  4. Low-dose radiation from 18F-FDG PET does not increase cancer frequency or shorten latency but reduces kidney disease in cancer-prone Trp53+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A; Phan, Nghi; Boreham, Douglas R

    2014-07-01

    There is considerable interest in the health effects associated with low-level radiation exposure from medical imaging procedures. Concerns in the medical community that increased radiation exposure from imaging procedures may increase cancer risk among patients are confounded by research showing that low-dose radiation exposure can extend lifespan by increasing the latency period of some types of cancer. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET) scans is 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ((18)F-FDG), which exposes tissue to a low-dose, mixed radiation quality: 634 keV β+ and 511 keV γ-rays. The goal of this research was to investigate how modification of cancer risk associated with exposure to low-dose ionising radiation in cancer-prone Trp53+/- mice is influenced by radiation quality from PET. At 7-8 weeks of age, Trp53+/- female mice were exposed to one of five treatments: 0 Gy, 10 mGy γ-rays, 10 mGy (18)F-FDG, 4 Gy γ-rays, 10 mGy (18)F-FDG + 4 Gy γ-rays (n > 185 per group). The large 4-Gy radiation dose significantly reduced the lifespan by shortening the latency period of cancer and significantly increasing the number of mice with malignancies, compared with unirradiated controls. The 10 mGy γ-rays and 10 mGy PET doses did not significantly modify the frequency or latency period of cancer relative to unirradiated mice. Similarly, the PET scan administered prior to a large 4-Gy dose did not significantly modify the latency or frequency of cancer relative to mice receiving a dose of only 4 Gy. The relative biological effectiveness of radiation quality from (18)F-FDG, with respect to malignancy, is approximately 1. However; when non-cancer endpoints were studied, it was found that the 10-mGy PET group had a significant reduction in kidney lesions (P < 0.021), indicating that a higher absorbed dose (20 ± 0.13 mGy), relative to the whole-body average, which occurs in specific tissues, may not be detrimental.

  5. Low-dose radiation from 18F-FDG PET does not increase cancer frequency or shorten latency but reduces kidney disease in cancer-prone Trp53+/- mice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Phan, Nghi; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    There is considerable interest in the health effects associated with low-level radiation exposure from medical imaging procedures. Concerns in the medical community that increased radiation exposure from imaging procedures may increase cancer risk among patients are confounded by research showing that low-dose radiation exposure can extend lifespan by increasing the latency period of some types of cancer. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET) scans is 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), which exposes tissue to a low-dose, mixed radiation quality: 634 keV β+ and 511 keV γ-rays. The goal of this research was to investigate how modification of cancer risk associated with exposure to low-dose ionising radiation in cancer-prone Trp53+/- mice is influenced by radiation quality from PET. At 7-8 weeks of age, Trp53+/- female mice were exposed to one of five treatments: 0 Gy, 10 mGy γ-rays, 10 mGy 18F-FDG, 4 Gy γ-rays, 10 mGy 18F-FDG + 4 Gy γ-rays (n > 185 per group). The large 4-Gy radiation dose significantly reduced the lifespan by shortening the latency period of cancer and significantly increasing the number of mice with malignancies, compared with unirradiated controls. The 10 mGy γ-rays and 10 mGy PET doses did not significantly modify the frequency or latency period of cancer relative to unirradiated mice. Similarly, the PET scan administered prior to a large 4-Gy dose did not significantly modify the latency or frequency of cancer relative to mice receiving a dose of only 4 Gy. The relative biological effectiveness of radiation quality from 18F-FDG, with respect to malignancy, is approximately 1. Furthermore, when non-cancer endpoints were studied, it was found that the 10-mGy PET group had a significant reduction in kidney lesions (P < 0.021), indicating that a higher absorbed dose (20 ± 0.13 mGy), relative to the whole-body average

  6. Investigation of lung nodule detectability in low-dose 320-slice computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, J. D.; Paul, N. S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2009-05-15

    Low-dose imaging protocols in chest CT are important in the screening and surveillance of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules. Techniques that maintain nodule detectability yet permit dose reduction, particularly for large body habitus, were investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which radiation dose can be minimized while maintaining diagnostic performance through knowledgeable selection of reconstruction techniques. A 320-slice volumetric CT scanner (Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems) was used to scan an anthropomorphic phantom at doses ranging from {approx}0.1 mGy up to that typical of low-dose CT (LDCT, {approx}5 mGy) and diagnostic CT ({approx}10 mGy). Radiation dose was measured via Farmer chamber and MOSFET dosimetry. The phantom presented simulated nodules of varying size and contrast within a heterogeneous background, and chest thickness was varied through addition of tissue-equivalent bolus about the chest. Detectability of a small solid lung nodule (3.2 mm diameter, -37 HU, typically the smallest nodule of clinical significance in screening and surveillance) was evaluated as a function of dose, patient size, reconstruction filter, and slice thickness by means of nine-alternative forced-choice (9AFC) observer tests to quantify nodule detectability. For a given reconstruction filter, nodule detectability decreased sharply below a threshold dose level due to increased image noise, especially for large body size. However, nodule detectability could be maintained at lower doses through knowledgeable selection of (smoother) reconstruction filters. For large body habitus, optimal filter selection reduced the dose required for nodule detection by up to a factor of {approx}3 (from {approx}3.3 mGy for sharp filters to {approx}1.0 mGy for the optimal filter). The results indicate that radiation dose can be reduced below the current low-dose (5 mGy) and ultralow-dose (1 mGy) levels with knowledgeable selection of

  7. Low-dose radiation from 18F-FDG PET does not increase cancer frequency or shorten latency but reduces kidney disease in cancer-prone Trp53+/- mice

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taylor, Kristina; Lemon, Jennifer A.; Phan, Nghi; Boreham, Douglas R.

    2014-05-28

    There is considerable interest in the health effects associated with low-level radiation exposure from medical imaging procedures. Concerns in the medical community that increased radiation exposure from imaging procedures may increase cancer risk among patients are confounded by research showing that low-dose radiation exposure can extend lifespan by increasing the latency period of some types of cancer. The most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography (PET) scans is 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18F-FDG), which exposes tissue to a low-dose, mixed radiation quality: 634 keV β+ and 511 keV γ-rays. The goal of this research was to investigate how modification of cancermore » risk associated with exposure to low-dose ionising radiation in cancer-prone Trp53+/- mice is influenced by radiation quality from PET. At 7-8 weeks of age, Trp53+/- female mice were exposed to one of five treatments: 0 Gy, 10 mGy γ-rays, 10 mGy 18F-FDG, 4 Gy γ-rays, 10 mGy 18F-FDG + 4 Gy γ-rays (n > 185 per group). The large 4-Gy radiation dose significantly reduced the lifespan by shortening the latency period of cancer and significantly increasing the number of mice with malignancies, compared with unirradiated controls. The 10 mGy γ-rays and 10 mGy PET doses did not significantly modify the frequency or latency period of cancer relative to unirradiated mice. Similarly, the PET scan administered prior to a large 4-Gy dose did not significantly modify the latency or frequency of cancer relative to mice receiving a dose of only 4 Gy. The relative biological effectiveness of radiation quality from 18F-FDG, with respect to malignancy, is approximately 1. Furthermore, when non-cancer endpoints were studied, it was found that the 10-mGy PET group had a significant reduction in kidney lesions (P < 0.021), indicating that a higher absorbed dose (20 ± 0.13 mGy), relative to the whole-body average, which occurs in specific tissues, may not be detrimental.« less

  8. The use of an integrated electroanatomic mapping system and intracardiac echocardiography to reduce radiation exposure in children and young adults undergoing ablation of supraventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Douglas Y.; Miyake, Christina Y.; Sherwin, Elizabeth D.; Walsh, Amy; Anderson, Michael J.; Western, Kara; Abrams, Dominic J.; Alexander, Mark E.; Cecchin, Frank; Walsh, Edward P.; Triedman, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Non-fluoroscopic imaging (NFI) devices are increasingly used in ablations. The objective was to determine the utility of intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) in ablating paediatric supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs) and assess whether its integrated use with electroanatomic mapping (EAM) resulted in lower radiation exposure than use of EAM alone. Methods and results Prospective, controlled, single-centre study of patients (pts) age ≥10 years, weight ≥35 kg, with SVT and normal cardiac anatomy. Patients were randomized to ICE + EAM (ICE) or EAM only (no ICE). Both had access to fluoroscopy as needed. Eighty-four pts were enroled (42 ICE, 42 no ICE). Median age was 15 years (range 10.4–23.7 years); 57% had accessory pathways, 42% atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia. There was no difference in radiation dose (9 mGy ICE vs. 23 mGy no ICE, P = 0.37) or fluoroscopy time (1.1 min ICE vs. 1.5 min no ICE, P = 0.38). Transseptal punctures were performed in 25 pts (16 ICE, 9 no ICE), with ICE reducing radiation (8 mGy ICE vs. 62 mGy no ICE, P = 0.002) and fluoroscopy time (1.1 min ICE vs. 4.5 min no ICE, P = 0.01). Zero fluoroscopy was achieved in 13 pts (15% of total, 5 ICE, 8 no ICE), and low-dose cases (<50 mGy) in 57 pts (68% of total, 33 ICE, 24 no ICE). Acute success was 95% for ICE, 88% for no ICE. Conclusion Use of an integrated EAM/ICE system was no better than EAM alone in limiting radiation, but can be helpful for transseptal punctures. Given the low dose savings, use of ICE may be weighed against its financial cost. Low-fluoroscopy cases are performed in most NFI procedures. PMID:23928735

  9. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T.; Miller, William H.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Hoffman, Timothy J.

    2008-09-15

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm Al filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm{sup 3} CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0{+-}5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0{+-}6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0{+-}4.0 mGy and 97.0{+-}5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0{+-}5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  10. TLD assessment of mouse dosimetry during microCT imaging.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Said Daibes; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Miller, H William; Volkert, Wynn A; Hoffman, Timothy J

    2008-09-01

    Advances in laboratory animal imaging have provided new resources for noninvasive biomedical research. Among these technologies is microcomputed tomography (microCT) which is widely used to obtain high resolution anatomic images of small animals. Because microCT utilizes ionizing radiation for image formation, radiation exposure during imaging is a concern. The objective of this study was to quantify the radiation dose delivered during a standard microCT scan. Radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which were irradiated employing an 80 kVp x-ray source, with 0.5 mm A1 filtration and a total of 54 mA s for a full 360 deg rotation of the unit. The TLD data were validated using a 3.2 cm3 CT ion chamber probe. TLD results showed a single microCT scan air kerma of 78.0 +/- 5.0 mGy when using a poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) anesthesia support module and an air kerma of 92.0 +/- 6.0 mGy without the use of the anesthesia module. The validation CT ion chamber study provided a measured radiation air kerma of 81.0 +/- 4.0 mGy and 97.0 +/- 5.0 mGy with and without the PMMA anesthesia module, respectively. Internal TLD analysis demonstrated an average mouse organ radiation absorbed dose of 76.0 +/- 5.0 mGy. The author's results have defined x-ray exposure for a routine microCT study which must be taken into consideration when performing serial molecular imaging studies involving the microCT imaging modality.

  11. Radiation decay of thaumatin crystals at three X-ray energies

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage is an unavoidable obstacle in X-ray crystallographic data collection for macromolecular structure determination, so it is important to know how much radiation a sample can endure before being degraded beyond an acceptable limit. In the literature, the threshold at which the average intensity of all recorded reflections decreases to a certain fraction of the initial value is called the ‘dose limit’. The first estimated D 50 dose-limit value, at which the average diffracted intensity was reduced to 50%, was 20 MGy and was derived from observing sample decay in electron-diffraction experiments. A later X-ray study carried out at 100 K on ferritin protein crystals arrived at a D 50 of 43 MGy, and recommended an intensity reduction of protein reflections to 70%, D 70, corresponding to an absorbed dose of 30 MGy, as a more appropriate limit for macromolecular crystallography. In the macromolecular crystallography community, the rate of intensity decay with dose was then assumed to be similar for all protein crystals. A series of diffraction images of cryocooled (100 K) thaumatin crystals at identical small, 2° rotation intervals were recorded at X-ray energies of 6.33 , 12.66 and 19.00 keV. Five crystals were used for each wavelength. The decay in the average diffraction intensity to 70% of the initial value, for data extending to 2.45 Å resolution, was determined to be about 7.5 MGy at 6.33 keV and about 11 MGy at the two higher energies. PMID:25849388

  12. Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry: Methodology and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert Bruce

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) methodologies for radiation dose reconstruction are investigated using various dosimeter materials. Specifically, methodologies were developed and used that were intended to improve the accuracy and precision of EPR dosimetric techniques, including combining specimen rotation during measurement, use of an internal manganese standard, instrument stabilization techniques and strict measurement protocols. Characterization and quantification of these improvements were preformed on three specific EPR dosimeter materials. The dosimeter materials investigated using these optimized EPR techniques were Walrus teeth, human tooth enamel and alanine dosimeters. Walrus teeth showed the least desirable properties for EPR dosimetry yielding large native signals and low sensitivity (EPR signal per unit dose). The methods for tooth enamel and alanine resulted in large improvements in precision and accuracy. The minimum detectable dose (MDD) found for alanine was approximately 30 mGy (three standard deviations from the measured zero dose value). This is a sensitivity improvement of 5 to 10 over other specialized techniques published in the literature that offer MDD's in the range of 150 mGy to 300 mGy. The accuracy of the method on tooth enamel was comparable to that typically reported in the literature although the measurement precision was increased by about 7. This improvement in measurement precision enables various applications including dose vs. depth profile analysis and a more nondestructive testing evaluation (where the whole sample need not be additively irradiated in order to calibrate its radiation response). A nondestructive evaluation of numerous samples showed that the method could reconstruct the same doses to within 10 mGy of those evaluated destructively. Doses used for this assessment were in the range of 100 to 250 mGy. The method had sufficient stability to measure tooth enamel samples exhibiting extreme anisotropy with a

  13. Dosimetric Quantities for Computed Tomography Examinations of Paediatric Patients on the Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-M, E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Dies, P.

    2010-12-07

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a high dose X ray imaging procedure and its use has rapidly increased in the last two decades fueled by the development of helical CT. The aim of this study is to present values of the dosimetric quantities for CT paediatric examinations of thoracic and abdominal regions. The protocols studied were those of chest, lung-mediastine, chest-abdomen, pulmonary high resolution and mediastine-abdomen, which are the more common examinations performed at ''Hospital Infantil de Mexico Federico Gomez'' in the thoracic-abdominal region. The measurements were performed on a Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 CT Scanner and the equipment used was a CT pencil ionization chamber, connected to an electrometer. This system was calibrated for RQT9 CT beam quality. A PMMA head phantom with diameter of 16 cm and length of 15 cm was also used. The dosimetric quantities measured were the weighted air kerma index (C{sub w}), the volumetric dose index (C{sub vol}) and the CT air kerma-length product. It was found that the pulmonary high resolution examination presented the highest values for the C{sub w}(31.1 mGy) and C{sub vol}(11.1 mGy). The examination with the lowest values of these two quantities was the chest-abdomen protocol with 10.5 mGy for C{sub w} and 5.5 mGy for C{sub vol}. However, this protocol presented the highest value for P{sub KL,CT}(282.2 mGy cm) when considering the average clinical length of the examinations.

  14. A unified gene catalog for the laboratory mouse reference genome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Richardson, J E; Hale, P; Baldarelli, R M; Reed, D J; Recla, J M; Sinclair, R; Reddy, T B K; Bult, C J

    2015-08-01

    We report here a semi-automated process by which mouse genome feature predictions and curated annotations (i.e., genes, pseudogenes, functional RNAs, etc.) from Ensembl, NCBI and Vertebrate Genome Annotation database (Vega) are reconciled with the genome features in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) database (http://www.informatics.jax.org) into a comprehensive and non-redundant catalog. Our gene unification method employs an algorithm (fjoin--feature join) for efficient detection of genome coordinate overlaps among features represented in two annotation data sets. Following the analysis with fjoin, genome features are binned into six possible categories (1:1, 1:0, 0:1, 1:n, n:1, n:m) based on coordinate overlaps. These categories are subsequently prioritized for assessment of annotation equivalencies and differences. The version of the unified catalog reported here contains more than 59,000 entries, including 22,599 protein-coding coding genes, 12,455 pseudogenes, and 24,007 other feature types (e.g., microRNAs, lincRNAs, etc.). More than 23,000 of the entries in the MGI gene catalog have equivalent gene models in the annotation files obtained from NCBI, Vega, and Ensembl. 12,719 of the features are unique to NCBI relative to Ensembl/Vega; 11,957 are unique to Ensembl/Vega relative to NCBI, and 3095 are unique to MGI. More than 4000 genome features fall into categories that require manual inspection to resolve structural differences in the gene models from different annotation sources. Using the MGI unified gene catalog, researchers can easily generate a comprehensive report of mouse genome features from a single source and compare the details of gene and transcript structure using MGI's mouse genome browser.

  15. Effects of radiation dose level on calcification visibility in cone beam breast CT: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Jen; Shaw, Chris C.; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Meng, Yang; Chen, Lingyun; Tu, Shu-Ju; Wang, Tianpeng; Liu, Xinming; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2006-03-01

    To investigate how the radiation dose level affects the detection of microcalcifications (MCs) in cone beam breast CT (CBCT), simulated MCs were embedded in simulated breast tissue and imaged with an experimental CBCT system. The system employs a 30 x 40 cm2 a-Si/CsI based flat panel detector with a pixel size of 194 microns. Three 5 x 5 clusters of simulated calcifications (212-224, 250-280, and 300-355 μm) were embedded in a stack of 11 cm diameter lunch meat and positioned at the center of each slice of lunch meat. 300 projection images over 360 degrees were acquired in the non-binning mode at various dose levels (4.2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mGy) three times, and were reconstructed with the Feldkamp algorithm. After that, 767 x 767 x 9 volume data were extracted from the fifteen reconstructed images for each size group, resulting in 45 CBCT MC phantom images. An observer experiment was performed by counting the number of visible MCs for each MC phantom image. The phantom images were displayed on a review workstation with a 1600 x 1200 CRT monitor and reviewed by six readers independently. The order of the images was randomized for each reader. The ratios of the visible MCs were averaged over all readers and plotted as a function of the dose level. The CNR was calculated for each MC size and each doe level as well. The results showed that the performance of the reconstructed images acquired with 4.2 mGy was similar to the images acquired with 6 mGy, and the images acquired with 18 mGy performed similarly to those acquired with 24 mGy.

  16. Entrance surface dose and image quality: comparison of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in general practitioner clinics, public and private hospitals in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Ahmad Shariff; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Jamal, Noriah; Spelic, David C; Suleiman, Orhan H

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the entrance surface dose (ESD) and image quality of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations conducted at general practitioner (GP) clinics, and public and private hospitals in Malaysia. The surveyed facilities were randomly selected within a given category (28 GP clinics, 20 public hospitals and 15 private hospitals). Only departmental X-ray units were involved in the survey. Chest examinations were done at all facilities, while only hospitals performed abdominal examinations. This study used the x-ray attenuation phantoms and protocols developed for the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey program in the United States. The ESD was calculated from measurements of exposure and clinical geometry. An image quality test tool was used to evaluate the low-contrast detectability and high-contrast detail performance under typical clinical conditions. The median ESD value for the adult chest X-ray examination was the highest (0.25 mGy) at GP clinics, followed by private hospitals (0.22 mGy) and public hospitals (0.17 mGy). The median ESD for the adult abdominal X-ray examination at public hospitals (3.35 mGy) was higher than that for private hospitals (2.81 mGy). Results of image quality assessment for the chest X-ray examination show that all facility types have a similar median spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability. For the abdominal X-ray examination, public hospitals have a similar median spatial resolution but larger low-contrast detectability compared with private hospitals. The results of this survey clearly show that there is room for further improvement in performing chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in Malaysia.

  17. Reconstruction of individual radiation doses for a case-control study of thyroid cancer in French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Bouville, André; Doyon, Françoise; Brindel, Pauline; Cardis, Elisabeth; de Vathaire, Florent

    2008-05-01

    Forty-one atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (plus five safety tests) were conducted in French Polynesia between 1966 and 1974. To evaluate the potential role of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing on a high incidence of thyroid cancer observed since 1985 in French Polynesia, a population-based case-control study was performed. The study included 602 subjects, either cases or controls, all aged less than 40 y at the end of nuclear weapons testing in 1974. Radiation doses to the thyroids of the study subjects were assessed based on the available historical results of radiation measurements. These were mainly found in the annual reports on the radiological situation in French Polynesia that had been sent to the UNSCEAR Secretariat. For each atmospheric nuclear weapons test that contributed substantially to the local deposition of radionuclides, the radiation dose to the thyroid from I intake was estimated. In addition, thyroid doses from the intake of short-lived radioiodines (132I, 133I, 135I) and 132Te, external exposure from gamma-emitted radionuclides deposited on the ground, and ingestion of long-lived Cs were reconstructed. The mean thyroid dose among the study subjects was found to be around 3 mGy while the highest dose was estimated to be around 40 mGy. Doses from short-lived iodine and tellurium isotopes ranged up to 10 mGy. Thyroid doses from external exposure ranged up to 3 mGy, while those from internal exposure due to cesium ingestion did not exceed 1 mGy. The dose estimates that have been obtained are based on a rather limited number of radiation measurements performed on a limited number of islands and are highly uncertain. A thorough compilation of the results of all radiation monitoring that was performed in French Polynesia in 1966-1974 would be likely to greatly improve the reliability and the precision of the dose estimates.

  18. Radium-226 dose to a boy from playing on mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, C.W.; Lucas, H.F.; Lloyd, R.D. )

    1991-08-01

    Two boys born in September 1949 played on uranium mill tailings from about ages 8 to 12. One of these boys was diagnosed as having leukemia at age 15.5. The 226Ra body burden of the survivor was measured at age 38. The whole-body 226Ra content measured by counting in vivo was 0 {plus minus} 17 Bq and independently by Rn breath analysis as 4.3 {plus minus} 2.1 Bq. At the same time, a control subject with no known exposure to 226Ra, matched in age, height, and weight, was also measured. The whole-body content was estimated as 4 {plus minus} 15 Bq and independently by Rn breath analysis as 5.5 {plus minus} 3.7 Bq. The body burden of the control subject was not significantly different from that of the exposed person. The radiation dose to the marrow-free skeleton assuming a constant 226Ra:Ca ratio since birth was 0.49 and 1.33 mGy at ages 14 and 38, respectively. The radiation dose to the marrow-free skeleton assuming 226Ra intake only between ages 8 to 12 was 1.4 and 2.8 mGy at ages 14 and 38, respectively. The best estimate is the mean of these two estimates: 0.9 and 2.1 mGy at ages 14 and 38, respectively. The alpha-particle dose to the red marrow from 226Ra and its decay products was 0.05 mGy at age 14 and 0.10 mGy at age 38. Since no excess was found for the radium dial painters whose doses were much higher, the induction of leukemia by doses of this magnitude would seem quite unlikely.

  19. Manual Gene Ontology annotation workflow at the Mouse Genome Informatics Database.

    PubMed

    Drabkin, Harold J; Blake, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database, the Gene Expression Database and the Mouse Tumor Biology database are integrated components of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource (http://www.informatics.jax.org). The MGI system presents both a consensus view and an experimental view of the knowledge concerning the genetics and genomics of the laboratory mouse. From genotype to phenotype, this information resource integrates information about genes, sequences, maps, expression analyses, alleles, strains and mutant phenotypes. Comparative mammalian data are also presented particularly in regards to the use of the mouse as a model for the investigation of molecular and genetic components of human diseases. These data are collected from literature curation as well as downloads of large datasets (SwissProt, LocusLink, etc.). MGI is one of the founding members of the Gene Ontology (GO) and uses the GO for functional annotation of genes. Here, we discuss the workflow associated with manual GO annotation at MGI, from literature collection to display of the annotations. Peer-reviewed literature is collected mostly from a set of journals available electronically. Selected articles are entered into a master bibliography and indexed to one of eight areas of interest such as 'GO' or 'homology' or 'phenotype'. Each article is then either indexed to a gene already contained in the database or funneled through a separate nomenclature database to add genes. The master bibliography and associated indexing provide information for various curator-reports such as 'papers selected for GO that refer to genes with NO GO annotation'. Once indexed, curators who have expertise in appropriate disciplines enter pertinent information. MGI makes use of several controlled vocabularies that ensure uniform data encoding, enable robust analysis and support the construction of complex queries. These vocabularies range from pick-lists to structured vocabularies such as the GO. All data associations are supported

  20. Non-induction of radioadaptive response in zebrafish embryos by neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Kong, Eva Y.; Kobayashi, Alisa; Suya, Noriyoshi; Uchihori, Yukio; Cheng, Shuk Han; Konishi, Teruaki; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    In vivo neutron-induced radioadaptive response (RAR) was studied using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, was employed to provide 2-MeV neutrons. Neutron doses of 0.6, 1, 25, 50 and 100 mGy were chosen as priming doses. An X-ray dose of 2 Gy was chosen as the challenging dose. Zebrafish embryos were dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf), irradiated with a chosen neutron dose at 5 hpf and the X-ray dose at 10 hpf. The responses of embryos were assessed at 25 hpf through the number of apoptotic signals. None of the neutron doses studied could induce RAR. Non-induction of RAR in embryos having received 0.6- and 1-mGy neutron doses was attributed to neutron-induced hormesis, which maintained the number of damaged cells at below the threshold for RAR induction. On the other hand, non-induction of RAR in embryos having received 25-, 50- and 100-mGy neutron doses was explained by gamma-ray hormesis, which mitigated neutron-induced damages through triggering high-fidelity DNA repair and removal of aberrant cells through apoptosis. Separate experimental results were obtained to verify that high-energy photons could disable RAR. Specifically, 5- or 10-mGy X-rays disabled the RAR induced by a priming dose of 0.88 mGy of alpha particles delivered to 5-hpf zebrafish embryos against a challenging dose of 2 Gy of X-rays delivered to the embryos at 10 hpf. PMID:26850927

  1. Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Di Betta, Erika; Fariselli, Laura; Bergantin, Achille; Locatelli, Federica; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Broggi, Sara; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects. Methods: Treatment plans were created for an anthropomorphic phantom and delivered using a LINAC with stereotactic cones and a multileaf collimator, a CyberKnife system (before and after a supplemental shielding was applied), a TomoTherapy system, and a Gamma Knife unit. For each treatment, 5 Gy were prescribed to the target. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted roughly in the position of the thyroid, sternum, upper lung, lower lung, and gonads. Results: Mean doses ranged from of 4.1 (Gamma Knife) to 62.8 mGy (LINAC with cones) in the thyroid, from 2.3 (TomoTherapy) to 30 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the sternum, from 1.7 (TomoTherapy) to 20 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the upper part of the lungs, from 0.98 (Gamma Knife) to 15 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the lower part of the lungs, and between 0.3 (Gamma Knife) and 10 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the gonads. Conclusions: The peripheral dose absorbed in the sites of interest with a 5 Gy fraction is low. Although the risk of adverse side effects calculated for 20 Gy delivered in 5 Gy fractions is negligible, in the interest of optimum patient radioprotection, further studies are needed to determine the weight of each contributor to the peripheral dose.

  2. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [ILUL]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [IHUH]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [IHUL]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [ILUH]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [ILUL] and [IHUL] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [IHUH] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [ILUH] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure. PMID:26937024

  3. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  4. Non-induction of radioadaptive response in zebrafish embryos by neutrons.

    PubMed

    Ng, Candy Y P; Kong, Eva Y; Kobayashi, Alisa; Suya, Noriyoshi; Uchihori, Yukio; Cheng, Shuk Han; Konishi, Teruaki; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-06-01

    In vivo neutron-induced radioadaptive response (RAR) was studied using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, was employed to provide 2-MeV neutrons. Neutron doses of 0.6, 1, 25, 50 and 100 mGy were chosen as priming doses. An X-ray dose of 2 Gy was chosen as the challenging dose. Zebrafish embryos were dechorionated at 4 h post fertilization (hpf), irradiated with a chosen neutron dose at 5 hpf and the X-ray dose at 10 hpf. The responses of embryos were assessed at 25 hpf through the number of apoptotic signals. None of the neutron doses studied could induce RAR. Non-induction of RAR in embryos having received 0.6- and 1-mGy neutron doses was attributed to neutron-induced hormesis, which maintained the number of damaged cells at below the threshold for RAR induction. On the other hand, non-induction of RAR in embryos having received 25-, 50- and 100-mGy neutron doses was explained by gamma-ray hormesis, which mitigated neutron-induced damages through triggering high-fidelity DNA repair and removal of aberrant cells through apoptosis. Separate experimental results were obtained to verify that high-energy photons could disable RAR. Specifically, 5- or 10-mGy X-rays disabled the RAR induced by a priming dose of 0.88 mGy of alpha particles delivered to 5-hpf zebrafish embryos against a challenging dose of 2 Gy of X-rays delivered to the embryos at 10 hpf.

  5. DIII-D Studies of Massive Gas Injection Fast Shutdowns for Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E; Jernigan, T; Antar, G; Bakhtiari, M; Boedo, J; Combs, S; Evans, T; Gray, D; Groth, M; Humphreys, D; Lasnier, C; Moyer, R; Parks, P; Rudakov, D; Strait, E; Wesley, J; West, W; Whyte, D; Yu, J

    2006-09-29

    Injection of massive quantities of gas is a promising technique for fast shutdown of ITER for the purpose of avoiding divertor and first wall damage from disruptions. Previous experiments using massive gas injection (MGI) to terminate discharges in the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated rapid shutdown with reduced wall heating and halo currents (relative to natural disruptions) and with very small runaway electron (RE) generation [1]. Figure 1 shows time traces which give an overview of shutdown time scales. Typically, of order 5 x 10{sup 22} Ar neutrals are fired over a pulse of 25 ms duration into stationary (non-disrupting) discharges. The observed results are consistent with the following scenario: within several ms of the jet trigger, sufficient Ar neutrals are delivered to the plasma to cause the edge temperature to collapse, initiating the inward propagation of a cold front. The exit flow of the jet [Fig. 1(a)] has a {approx} 9 ms rise time; so the quantity of neutrals which initiates the edge collapse is small (<10{sup 20}). When the cold front reaches q {approx} 2 surface, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes are destabilized [2], mixing hot core plasma with edge impurities. Here, q is the safety factor. Most (>90%) of the plasma thermal energy is lost via impurity radiation during this thermal quench (TQ) phase. Conducted heat loads to the wall are low because of the cold edge temperature. After the TQ, the plasma is very cold (of order several eV), so conducted wall (halo) currents are low, even if the current channel contacts the wall. The plasma current profile broadens and begins decaying resistively. The decaying current generates a toroidal electric field which can accelerate REs; however, RE beam formation appears to be limited in MGI shutdowns. Presently, it is thought that the conducted heat flux and halo current mitigation qualities of the MGI shutdown technique will scale well to a reactor-sized tokamak. However, because of the larger RE gain

  6. Radiation exposure from CT scans in childhood and subsequent risk of leukaemia and brain tumours: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Mark S; Salotti, Jane A; Little, Mark P; McHugh, Kieran; Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Howe, Nicola L; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rajaraman, Preetha; Craft, Alan W; Parker, Louise; de González, Amy Berrington

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Although CT scans are very useful clinically, potential cancer risks exist from associated ionising radiation, in particular for children who are more radiosensitive than adults. We aimed to assess the excess risk of leukaemia and brain tumours after CT scans in a cohort of children and young adults. Methods In our retrospective cohort study, we included patients without previous cancer diagnoses who were first examined with CT in National Health Service (NHS) centres in England, Wales, or Scotland (Great Britain) between 1985 and 2002, when they were younger than 22 years of age. We obtained data for cancer incidence, mortality, and loss to follow-up from the NHS Central Registry from Jan 1, 1985, to Dec 31, 2008. We estimated absorbed brain and red bone marrow doses per CT scan in mGy and assessed excess incidence of leukaemia and brain tumours cancer with Poisson relative risk models. To avoid inclusion of CT scans related to cancer diagnosis, follow-up for leukaemia began 2 years after the first CT and for brain tumours 5 years after the first CT. Findings During follow-up, 74 of 178 604 patients were diagnosed with leukaemia and 135 of 176 587 patients were diagnosed with brain tumours. We noted a positive association between radiation dose from CT scans and leukaemia (excess relative risk [ERR] per mGy 0·036, 95% CI 0·005–0·120; p=0·0097) and brain tumours (0·023, 0·010–0·049; p<0·0001). Compared with patients who received a dose of less than 5 mGy, the relative risk of leukaemia for patients who received a cumulative dose of at least 30 mGy (mean dose 51·13 mGy) was 3·18 (95% CI 1·46–6·94) and the relative risk of brain cancer for patients who received a cumulative dose of 50–74 mGy (mean dose 60·42 mGy) was 2·82 (1·33–6·03). Interpretation Use of CT scans in children to deliver cumulative doses of about 50 mGy might almost triple the risk of leukaemia and doses of about 60 mGy might triple the risk of brain

  7. Vilhelm Bjerknes' vision for scientific weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønås, Sigbjørn

    With his circulation theorem, Vilhelm Bjerknes extended Kelvin's theorem from barotropic to baroclinic environments. In doing so, he built a bridge between the scientific disciplines of hydrodynamics and thermodynamics. Application of his theorem to circulations in atmosphere and ocean led Bjerknes to publish a paper in 1904 expressing a vision and a programme for scientific weather forecasting. With generous funding from the Carnegie Institution of Washington from 1905, Bjerknes for the rest of his life dedicated his scientific strength to his vision. Needed theories on the dynamics of the atmosphere were given in a number of textbooks that he wrote together with his assistants. With the Bergen School of Meteorology he renewed weather forecasting throughout the world. Bjerknes' work inspired Louis Fry Richardson to his famous experiment to compute a change in the state of the atmosphere. Bjerknes and his assistants also inspired Arnt Eliassen and Ragnar Fjørtoft, who played important roles in developing numerical weather prediction after the Second World War. The name of Vilhelm Bjerknes has now been honoured by the establishment of the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research in Bergen, Norway.

  8. Quantitative assessment of MS plaques and brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis using semiautomatic segmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Dastidar, Prasun; Ryymin, Pertti; Lahtinen, Antti J.; Eskola, Hannu; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    1997-05-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain is useful in multiple sclerosis (MS) in order to obtain reliable indices of disease progression. The goal of this project was to estimate the total volume of gliotic and non gliotic plaques in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis with the help of a semiautomatic segmentation method developed at the Ragnar Granit Institute. Youth developed program running on a PC based computer provides de displays of the segmented data, in addition to the volumetric analyses. The volumetric accuracy of the program was demonstrated by segmenting MR images of fluid filed syringes. An anatomical atlas is to be incorporated in the segmentation system to estimate the distribution of MS plaques in various neural pathways of the brain. A total package including MS plaque volume estimation, estimation of brain atrophy and ventricular enlargement, distribution of MS plaques in different neural segments of the brain has ben planned for the near future. Our study confirmed that total lesion volumes in chronic MS disease show a poor correlation to EDSS scores but show a positive correlation to neuropsychological scores. Therefore accurate total volume measurements of MS plaques using the developed semiautomatic segmentation technique helped us to evaluate the degree of neuropsychological impairment.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis of rice after seed ground simulated radiation and spaceflight explains the radiation effects of space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Shi, Jinming; Liang, Shujian; Lei, Huang; Shenyi, Zhang; Sun, Yeqing

    In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed space-flights with ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) and found that the protein expression profiles were changed after seed space environment exposures. Spaceflight represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as cosmic radiation, microgravity and space magnetic fields are involved. Rice seed is in the process of dormant of plant development, showing high resistance against stresses, so the highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to seeds. To further investigate the radiation effects of space environment, we performed on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and compared between the proteomes of seed irra-diated plants and seed spaceflight (20th recoverable satellite) plants from the same rice variety. Space ionization shows low-dose but high energy particle effects, for searching the particle effects, ground radiations with the same low-dose (2mGy) but different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3KeV/µm-C, 30KeV/µm-C, 31KeV/µm-Ne, 62.2KeV/µm-C, 500Kev/µm-Fe) were performed; using 2-D DIGE coupled with clustering and principle component analysis (PCA) for data process and comparison, we found that the holistic protein expression patterns of plants irradiated by LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles were most similar to spaceflight. In addition, although space environment presents a low-dose radiation (0.177 mGy/day on the satellite), the equivalent simulated radiation dose effects should still be evaluated: radiations of LET-62.2KeV/µm carbon particles with different cumulative doses (2mGy, 20mGy, 200mGy, 2000mGy) were further carried out and resulted that the 2mGy radiation still shared most similar proteomic profiles with spaceflight, confirming the low-dose effects of space radiation. Therefore, in the protein expression level

  10. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha H; Wolff, Jan E; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-08

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50-90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point-dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k = 2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low-dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09 ± 0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was -8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD-comparable low-dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However, for single in

  11. WE-D-18A-04: How Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms Affect the MTFs of Variable-Contrast Targets in CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, C.T.; Rong, J.; Dodge, C.W.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine how filtered back-projection (FBP), adaptive statistical (ASiR), and model based (MBIR) iterative reconstruction algorithms affect the measured modulation transfer functions (MTFs) of variable-contrast targets over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. Methods: The Catphan 600 CTP401 module, surrounded by an oval, fat-equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape, was scanned on a GE HD750 CT scanner at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 mGy CTDIvol levels with typical patient scan parameters: 120kVp, 0.8s, 40mm beam width, large SFOV, 2.5mm thickness, 0.984 pitch. The images were reconstructed using GE's Standard kernel with FBP; 20%, 40% and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. A task-based MTF (MTFtask) was computed for six cylindrical targets: 2 low-contrast (Polystyrene, LDPE), 2 medium-contrast (Delrin, PMP), and 2 high-contrast (Teflon, air). MTFtask was used to compare the performance of reconstruction algorithms with decreasing CTDIvol from 24mGy, which is currently used in the clinic. Results: For the air target and 75% dose savings (6 mGy), MBIR MTFtask at 5 lp/cm measured 0.24, compared to 0.20 for 70% ASiR and 0.11 for FBP. Overall, for both high-contrast targets, MBIR MTFtask improved with increasing CTDIvol and consistently outperformed ASiR and FBP near the system's Nyquist frequency. Conversely, for Polystyrene at 6 mGy, MBIR (0.10) and 70% ASiR (0.07) MTFtask was lower than for FBP (0.18). For medium and low-contrast targets, FBP remains the best overall algorithm for improved resolution at low CTDIvol (1–6 mGy) levels, whereas MBIR is comparable at higher dose levels (12–24 mGy). Conclusion: MBIR improved the MTF of small, high-contrast targets compared to FBP and ASiR at doses of 50%–12.5% of those currently used in the clinic. However, for imaging low- and mediumcontrast targets, FBP performed the best across all dose levels. For assessing MTF from different reconstruction algorithms, task-based MTF measurements are necessary.

  12. In Utero Exposure to Iodine-131 from Chernobyl Fallout and Anthropometric Characteristics in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Neta, Gila; Hatch, Maureen; Kitahara, Cari M.; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bolshova, Elena V.; Tereschenko, Valery P.; Tronko, Mykola D.; Brenner, Alina V.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to external radiation has been linked to growth retardation among atomic bomb survivors in adolescence. It is unclear from previous studies whether in utero exposure to internal radiation such as iodine-131 (I-131), which concentrates in the thyroid gland, has an effect on physical growth. We examined the associations between estimated thyroid gland dose from prenatal exposure to I-131 and self-reported height and weight in a cohort of 2,460 individuals exposed to radioactive fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident [mean I-131 dose = 72 (mGy)] and screened for thyroid diseases in adolescence. Using multivariable linear regression models, we estimated the mean differences in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) per unit increase in dose (100 mGy) in models adjusted for gender, age at examination, type of residence (rural/urban) and presence of thyroid disease diagnosed at screening. All of the adjustment factors as well as the trimester of exposure were evaluated as potential modifiers of the dose response. Overall, no significant dose response was found for height (P = 0.29), weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.16). We found significant modification of the dose response for weight and BMI by presence/absence of thyroid disease (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively), but not for other factors. In individuals without thyroid disease (n = 1,856), there was a weak, significant association between I-131 thyroid dose and higher weight (210 g per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) or BMI (70 g/m2 per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) that depended on individuals (n = 52) exposed to ≥500 mGy. In individuals with thyroid disease (n = 579, 67.4% with simple diffuse goiter) no significant association with I-131 for weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.14) was found. These results do not support the hypothesis that in utero exposure to I-131 at levels experienced by a majority of study subjects may be associated with meaningful differences in adolescent anthropometry. However

  13. In utero exposure to iodine-131 from Chernobyl fallout and anthropometric characteristics in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Neta, Gila; Hatch, Maureen; Kitahara, Cari M; Ostroumova, Evgenia; Bolshova, Elena V; Tereschenko, Valery P; Tronko, Mykola D; Brenner, Alina V

    2014-03-01

    Prenatal exposure to external radiation has been linked to growth retardation among atomic bomb survivors in adolescence. It is unclear from previous studies whether in utero exposure to internal radiation such as iodine-131 (I-131), which concentrates in the thyroid gland, has an effect on physical growth. We examined the associations between estimated thyroid gland dose from prenatal exposure to I-131 and self-reported height and weight in a cohort of 2,460 individuals exposed to radioactive fallout from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident [mean I-131 dose = 72 (mGy)] and screened for thyroid diseases in adolescence. Using multivariable linear regression models, we estimated the mean differences in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) per unit increase in dose (100 mGy) in models adjusted for gender, age at examination, type of residence (rural/urban) and presence of thyroid disease diagnosed at screening. All of the adjustment factors as well as the trimester of exposure were evaluated as potential modifiers of the dose response. Overall, no significant dose response was found for height (P = 0.29), weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.16). We found significant modification of the dose response for weight and BMI by presence/absence of thyroid disease (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively), but not for other factors. In individuals without thyroid disease (n = 1,856), there was a weak, significant association between I-131 thyroid dose and higher weight (210 g per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) or BMI (70 g/m² per 100 mGy, P = 0.02) that depended on individuals (n = 52) exposed to ≥500 mGy. In individuals with thyroid disease (n = 579, 67.4% with simple diffuse goiter) no significant association with I-131 for weight (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.14) was found. These results do not support the hypothesis that in utero exposure to I-131 at levels experienced by a majority of study subjects may be associated with meaningful differences in adolescent anthropometry. However

  14. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  15. Characterization of MOSFET dosimeters for low-dose measurements in maxillofacial anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha H; Wolff, Jan E; Kiljunen, Timo; Schulze, Dirk; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize reinforced metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to assess the measurement uncertainty, single exposure low-dose limit with acceptable accuracy, and the number of exposures required to attain the corresponding limit of the thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The second aim was to characterize MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities for two dental photon energy ranges, dose dependency, dose rate dependency, and accumulated dose dependency. A further aim was to compare the performance of MOSFETs with those of TLDs in an anthropomorphic phantom head using a dentomaxillofacial CBCT device. The uncertainty was assessed by exposing 20 MOSFETs and a Barracuda MPD reference dosimeter. The MOSFET dosimeter sensitivities were evaluated for two photon energy ranges (50-90 kVp) using a constant dose and polymethylmethacrylate backscatter material. MOSFET and TLD comparative point-dose measurements were performed on an anthropomorphic phantom that was exposed with a clinical CBCT protocol. The MOSFET single exposure low dose limit (25% uncertainty, k = 2) was 1.69 mGy. An averaging of eight MOSFET exposures was required to attain the corresponding TLD (0.3 mGy) low-dose limit. The sensitivity was 3.09 ± 0.13 mV/mGy independently of the photon energy used. The MOSFET dosimeters did not present dose or dose rate sensitivity but, however, presented a 1% decrease of sensitivity per 1000 mV for accumulated threshold voltages between 8300 mV and 17500 mV. The point doses in an anthropomorphic phantom ranged for MOSFETs between 0.24 mGy and 2.29 mGy and for TLDs between 0.25 and 2.09 mGy, respectively. The mean difference was -8%. The MOSFET dosimeters presented statistically insignificant energy dependency. By averaging multiple exposures, the MOSFET dosimeters can achieve a TLD-comparable low-dose limit and constitute a feasible method for diagnostic dosimetry using anthropomorphic phantoms. However, for single in

  16. SU-C-12A-05: Radiation Dose in High-Pitch Pediatric Cardiac CTA: Correlation Between Lung Dose and CTDIvol, DLP, and Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kino, A; Newman, B; Chan, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiation dose for pediatric high pitch cardiac CTA Methods: A total of 14 cases were included in this study, with mean age of 6.2 years (ranges from 2 months to 15 years). Cardiac CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens). Tube voltage (70, 80 and 100kV) was chosen based on patient weight. All patients were scanned using a high-pitch spiral mode (pitch ranges from 2.5 to 3) with tube current modulation technique (CareDose4D, Siemens). For each case, the three dimensional dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo software package (IMPACT-MC, CT Image GmbH). Scanning parameters of each exam, including tube voltage, tube current, beamshaping filters, beam collimation, were defined in the Monte Carlo calculation. Tube current profile along projection angles was obtained from projection data of each tube, which included data within the over-scanning range along z direction. The volume of lungs was segmented out with CT images (3DSlicer). Lung doses of all patients were calculated and compared with CTDIvol, DLP, and SSDE. Results: The average (range) of CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE of all patients was 1.19 mGy (0.58 to 3.12mGy), 31.54 mGy*cm (12.56 to 99 mGy*cm), 2.26 mGy (1.19 to 6.24 mGy), respectively. Radiation dose to the lungs ranged from 0.83 to 4.18 mGy. Lung doses correlated with CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE with correlation coefficients(k) at 0.98, 0.93, and 0.99. However, for the cases with CTDIvol less than 1mGy, only SSDE preserved a strong correlation with lung doses (k=0.83), while much weaker correlations were found for CTDIvol (k=0.29) and DLP (k=-0.47). Conclusion: Lung doses to pediatric patients during Cardiac CTA were estimated. SSDE showed the most robust correlation with lung doses in contrast to CTDIvol and DLP.

  17. Degradation of the organic molecules in the shallow subsurface of Mars due to irradiation by cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. A.; Vasilyev, G.; Ostryakov, V. M.; Pavlov, A. K.; Mahaffy, P.

    2012-07-01

    Detection of the organic matter on Mars is one of the main goals of the future Martian landing missions. Yet, the degradation of organic molecules by cosmic ray irradiation on Mars is often ignored. We calculate the radiation dose accumulation rates from solar and galactic cosmic rays at various depths in the shallow Martian subsurface. We demonstrate that a 1-billion-year outcrop on Mars accumulates the dosage of ˜500 MGy in the top 0-2 cm and ˜50 MGy at 5-10 cm depths. We show that the preservation of ancient complex organic molecules in the shallow (˜10 cm depth) subsurface of rocks could be highly problematic if the exposure age of a geologic outcrop would exceed 300 Myr. We demonstrate that more simple organic molecules with masses ˜100 amu should have a good chance to survive in the shallow subsurface of rocks. Implications to the sampling strategy for the oncoming Martian missions are discussed.

  18. The effect of electron irradiation on the structure and iron speciation in sodium aluminum (iron) phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanovsky, S. V.; Presniakov, I. A.; Sobolev, A. V.; Glazkova, I. S.; Kadyko, M. I.; Stefanovsky, O. I.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of 8 MeV electron irradiation on the structure of glasses in the series 40 Na2O, (20-x) Al2O3, x Fe2O3, 40 P2O5 (mol.%) and on the iron speciation in these samples was studied by FTIR and Mössbauer spectroscopic techniques. Irradiation up to a dose of 1.0 MGy has no appreciable effects on the character of the bonds within anionic motif of the glass network. Electron irradiation increases the fraction of aluminum in octahedral coordination. Iron in both unirradiated and irradiated glasses is present mainly as Fe(III) (60-75% of the total amount) in the glasses and partly as Fe(II) and the ratio of two forms remains constant up to a dose of 1.0 MGy.

  19. Measured absorbed dose rates from semi-infinite hemispherical volumes of 133Xe.

    PubMed

    Munyon, W J; Barber, D E; Howley, J R

    1986-07-01

    Surface absorbed dose rates from different hemispheric volumes of 133Xe have been measured directly with an extrapolation chamber. The results indicate that a linear relationship exists between the radius of the cloud volume and the surface absorbed dose rate for radii between 0 and 23 cm. If cloud volumes with radii larger than 23 cm are taken to be infinite with respect to the range of the charged particles emitted, the absorbed dose rate calculated based on that assumption will be within the uncertainty of any measurement of absorbed dose rate that might be made. For hemispheric volumes having radii less than or equal to 23 cm, the surface absorbed dose rate in tissue-equivalent material, in mGy h-1, is approximated (+/- 20%) by the product of [1.30 mGy h-1 cm-1 kBq-1 cm3] X [cloud radius, cm] X [cloud activity concentration, kBq cm-3].

  20. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, N.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, D.

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma current channel is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phasemore » is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Finally, clear indications of plasma infra-red emission are observed both before and during the disruptions; this infrared emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads.« less

  1. Application of TL dosemeters for dose distribution measurements at high temperatures in nuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Osvay, M; Deme, S

    2006-01-01

    Al2O3:Mg,Y ceramic thermoluminescence dosemeters were developed at the Institute of Isotopes for high dose applications at room temperatures. The glow curve of Al2O3:Mg,Y exhibits two peaks--one at 250 degrees C (I) and another peak at approximately 400 degrees C (II). In order to extend the application of these dosemeters to high temperatures, the effect of irradiation temperature was investigated using temperature controlled heating system during high dose irradiation at various temperatures (20-100 degrees C). The new calibration and measuring method has been successfully applied for dose mapping within the hermetic zone of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant even at high temperature parts of blocks.

  2. Electron beam irradiation pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification of used newsprint and paper mill wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waheed Khan, A.; Labrie, Jean-Pierre; McKeown, Joseph

    Electron beam pretreatment of used newsprint, pulp, as well as pulp recovered from clarifier sludge and paper mill sludge, caused the dissociation of cellulose from lignin, and rendered them suitable for enzymatic hydrolysis. A maximum dose of 1 MGy for newsprint and 1.5—2.0 MGy for pulp and paper mill sludge was required to render cellulose present in them in a form which, could be enzymatically saccharified to 90% of completion. Saccharification approaching the theoretical yield was obtained in 2 days with a cellulolytic enzyme system obtained from Trichoderma reesei. As a result of irradiation, water soluble lignin breakdown products, NaOH- soluble lignin, free cellobiose, glucose, mannose, xylose and their polymers, and acetic acid were produced from these materials.

  3. Discusión de las aproximaciones utilizadas en el estudio de la recombinación dielectrónica de los metales en envolturas estelares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruzado, A.; di Rocco, H. O.; Ringuelet, A.

    Se calcularon nuevos parámetros atómicos del MgI reemplazando los niveles de energía teóricos por los observados. Con ellos se calculó nuevamente el flujo originado en la Recombinación Dielectrónica (RD) del MgII y se comparó con resultados anteriores. Se evaluó también la posible influencia de diferentes fuentes de opacidad, en el flujo originado en la RD de los metales en atmósferas extendidas de estrellas tempranas. En particular, se calculó la profundidad óptica de las líneas de MgI para diferentes condiciones físicas del medio.

  4. The radiation resistance of thermoset plastics—IV. Melamine-formaldehyde plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfrich, H.-P.; Rösinger, S.; Wilski, H.

    Samples of two melamine-formaldehyde plastics, one filled with asbestos and the other filled with wood flour, were irradiated under two very different conditions. One set of samples was irradiated with electrons, under the exclusion of oxygen, using a high dose rate. The second set was irradiated with γ-rays, in an air environment, using a very low dose rate. This experiment lasted longer than 10 years. Mechanical properties of the asbestos-filled type, measured at room temperature, remained unchanged up to the highest dose and were independent of irradiation conditions. However, polymer deterioration was observed as evidenced by the heat deflection temperature at irradiation doses above 2MGy. The wood-filled samples were considerably deteriorated at doses above 0.1 MGy with the lower dose rate (13.8Gy/h) showing the more severe deterioration. Surface resistance was adversely affected by irradiation but other electrical properties remained unchanged.

  5. Crystal Structures of Mutant Forms of the Yeast F[subscript 1] ATPase Reveal Two Modes of Uncoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenieva, Diana; Symersky, Jindrich; Wang, Yamin; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2010-11-15

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase couples the flow of protons with the phosphorylation of ADP. A class of mutations, the mitochondrial genome integrity (mgi) mutations, has been shown to uncouple this process in the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Four mutant forms of the yeast F{sub 1} ATPase with mgi mutations were crystallized; the structures were solved and analyzed. The analysis identifies two mechanisms of structural uncoupling: one in which the empty catalytic site is altered and in doing so, apparently disrupts substrate (phosphate) binding, and a second where the steric hindrance predicted between {gamma}Leu83 and {beta}{sub DP} residues, Leu-391 and Glu-395, located in Catch 2 region, is reduced allowing rotation of the {gamma}-subunit with less impedance. Overall, the structures provide key insights into the critical interactions in the yeast ATP synthase involved in the coupling process.

  6. Feasibility of Three-Dimensional MR Angiography Image Fusion Guidance for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Tacher, Vania; Desgranges, Pascal; You, Ketsakin; Ridouani, Fourat; Marzelle, Jean; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography image fusion (IF) with live fluoroscopy guidance was used while performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) in five patients with a history of chronic renal disease or severe contrast allergy. Intraprocedural technical success was 100%. Median procedure time was 120 minutes (range, 60-180 min), fluoroscopy time was 40 minutes (range, 17-65 min), dose-area product was 245,867 mGy × cm(2) (range, 68,435-690,053 mGy × cm(2)), and iodinated contrast volume injected was 15 mL (range, 0-40 mL). Technical success was achieved in four of five patients (80%); one case was complicated by a type 1 endoleak on follow-up MR angiography, which was successfully treated. EVAR with MR angiography IF guidance was technically feasible and safe in five patients and reduced or eliminated the use of iodinated contrast media. PMID:26830935

  7. Dosimetry Support of the Ukrainian-American Case-control Study of Leukemia and Related Disorders Among Chornobyl Cleanup Workers.

    PubMed

    Chumak, Vadim; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Kryuchkov, Victor; Bakhanova, Elena; Babkina, Natalya; Bazyka, Dimitry; Gudzenko, Natalya; Hatch, Maureen; Trotsuk, Natalya; Zablotska, Lydia; Golovanov, Ivan; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes dose reconstruction for a joint Ukrainian-American case-control study of leukemia that was conducted in a cohort of 110,645 male Ukrainian cleanup workers of the Chornobyl (Chernobyl) accident who were exposed to various radiation doses over the 1986-1990 time period. Individual bone-marrow doses due to external irradiation along with respective uncertainty distributions were calculated for 1,000 study subjects using the RADRUE method, which employed personal cleanup history data collected in the course of an interview with the subject himself if he was alive or with two proxies if he was deceased. The central estimates of the bone-marrow dose distributions range from 3.7 × 10(-5) to 3,260 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 92 mGy. The uncertainties in the individual stochastic dose estimates can be approximated by lognormal distributions; the average geometric standard deviation is 2.0.

  8. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, N.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, D.

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma current channel is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Finally, clear indications of plasma infra-red emission are observed both before and during the disruptions; this infrared emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads.

  9. Emergency OSL/TL dosimetry with integrated circuits from mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholom, S.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2014-09-01

    Integrated circuits (ICs) from several mobile phones were studied as possible emergency dosimeters using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. Measurement protocols were developed for ICs that take into consideration the effect of sensitization of the samples with increasing dose as well as fading of the signals after sample exposure. It was found that the OSL technique has a higher sensitivity with ICs when compared to TL, while the TL signals were characterized by better stability with time after exposure. Values of minimum measurable doses were found to be in the range between a few tens of mGy and several tens of mGy for the tested samples. It was concluded that ICs from mobile phones could be used for emergency dose reconstruction.

  10. Radiation doses in adult computed tomography practice in Serbia: initial results.

    PubMed

    Arandjic, Danijela; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Hadnadjev, Darka; Stojanovic, Sanja; Bozovic, Predrag; Ceklic, Sandra; Lazarevic, Djordje

    2014-11-01

    This work presents initial data on radiation doses in adult computed tomography (CT) in Serbia. Data were collected in terms of CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) values for head, chest and abdomen examination. The range of CTDIvol values was found to be 53-98, 11-34 and 8.5-227 mGy whereas for DLP was 803-1066, 350-845 and 1066-3078 mGy cm(-1) for head, chest and abdomen examination, respectively. Except for abdomen on one CT unit, all estimated values were in line with the reported data. This work also presents simple method on how to reduce radiation doses when scanning head. Using axial (step-and-shot) instead of helical mode and decreasing tube current-time product leads to significant dose reduction. CTDIvol was decreased by 20 % whereas DLP was reduced for a factor 2. PMID:25063787

  11. Thermoluminescence investigations on xY2O3 (60-x)P2O5·40SiO2 vitroceramics.

    PubMed

    Biró, Barna; Pascu, Andrada; Timar-Gabor, Alida; Simon, Viorica

    2015-04-01

    Thermoluminescence properties of xY2O3·(60-x)P2O5·40SiO2 vitroceramic compounds doped with xY2O3 at various concentrations (0≤x≤30mol%) were studied. Compounds with reduced Y2O3 concentration showed unsatisfactory dosimetric properties, while the vitroceramics composed of 20Y2O3·40P2O5·40SiO2 and 30Y2O3·30P2O5·40SiO2 exhibited bright signals, linear dose response and minimum detectable doses of 16mGy and 4mGy, respectively. Moreover, 30mol% Y2O3 doped vitroceramic exhibited good repeatability, acceptable batch homogeneity and poor fading signal, features that are recommending this material for dosimetry purposes.

  12. Enhancement of runaway production by resonant magnetic perturbation on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Izzo, V. A.; Tong, R. H.; Jiang, Z. H.; Hu, Q. M.; Wei, Y. N.; Yan, W.; Rao, B.; Wang, S. Y.; Ma, T. K.; Li, S. C.; Yang, Z. J.; Ding, D. H.; Wang, Z. J.; Zhang, M.; Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; J-TEXT Team

    2016-07-01

    The suppression of runaways following disruptions is key for the safe operation of ITER. The massive gas injection (MGI) has been developed to mitigate heat loads, electromagnetic forces and runaway electrons (REs) during disruptions. However, MGI may not completely prevent the generation of REs during disruptions on ITER. Resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) has been applied to suppress runaway generation during disruptions on several machines. It was found that strong RMP results in the enhancement of runaway production instead of runaway suppression on J-TEXT. The runaway current was about 50% pre-disruption plasma current in argon induced reference disruptions. With moderate RMP, the runway current decreased to below 30% pre-disruption plasma current. The runaway current plateaus reach 80% of the pre-disruptive current when strong RMP was applied. Strong RMP may induce large size magnetic islands that could confine more runaway seed during disruptions. This has important implications for runaway suppression on large machines.

  13. Low-dose radioisotope scanning and quantitative analysis in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, M K; Freyne, P J; Cullen, M J

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative thyroid scanning using low doses of 99mTc sodium pertechnetate (1.85-3.7 MBq) was performed in 38 cases of congenital hypothyroidism. Of these 38 cases, 29 were scanned at 14 +/- 6 days old, and 9 at 1 year old. The scans show the full range of gland anatomy from athyreotic to normal. All morphologically normal scans had grossly increased uptakes of 99mTc. The incidence of the various thyroid anatomies was different in each age group. The average radiation dose to the thyroid was 2.29 mGy, with at least 70% of patients receiving a dose of 3.0 mGy or less. Such low doses of 99mTc should allow further scanning in later life. Neonatal thyroid scanning reveals the aetiology of congenital hypothyroidism and enables the clinician to assess the short- and long-term needs of the child. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6285837

  14. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. Furthermore, this IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.

  15. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Eidietis, N. W.; Parks, P. B.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2015-10-15

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but this phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. This IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.

  16. Performance of Bragg and long-period gratings written in N- and Ge-doped silica fibers under {gamma}-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilev, S.A.; Dianov, E.M.; Golant, K.M.

    1998-06-01

    In-fiber Bragg and long-period gratings as well as Mach-Zehnder interferometers based on germanium- and nitrogen-doped silica fibers have been investigated under {gamma}-rays. The majority of the experimental results suggest that both types of gratings in both types of fibers are stable with respect to {gamma}-ray doses of up to 1.47 MGy.

  17. First demonstration of rapid shutdown using neon shattered pellet injection for thermal quench mitigation on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Baylor, L. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Shattered pellet injection (SPI) is one of the prime candidates for the ITER disruption mitigation system because of its deeper penetration and larger particle flux than massive gas injection (MGI) (Taylor et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 1872) using deuterium (Commaux et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 112001, Combs et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 400, Baylor et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085013). The ITER disruption mitigation system will likely use mostly high Z species such as neon because of more effective thermal mitigation and pumping constraints on the maximum amount of deuterium or helium that could be injected. An upgrade of the SPI on DIII-D enables ITER relevant injection characteristics in terms of quantities and gas species. This upgraded SPI system was used on DIII-D for the first time in 2014 for a direct comparison with MGI using identical quantities of neon. This comparison enabled the measurements of density perturbations during the thermal quench (TQ) and radiated power and heat loads to the divertor. It showed that SPI using similar quantities of neon provided a faster and stronger density perturbation and neon assimilation, which resulted in a lower conducted energy to the divertor and a faster TQ onset. Radiated power data analysis shows that this was probably due to the much deeper penetration of the neon in the plasma inducing a higher core radiation than in the MGI case. This experiment shows also that the MHD activity during an SPI shutdown (especially during the TQ) is quite different compared to MGI. This favorable TQ energy dissipation was obtained while keeping the current quench (CQ) duration within acceptable limits when scaled to ITER.

  18. Dose-rate effects of protons on in vivo activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.N.; Rusek, A.; Reungpatthanaphong, P.; Honikel, L.; Simon, S.R.

    2010-05-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation and cytokine expression in bone marrow (BM) cells of exposed mice as a function of the dose rate of protons. The cytokines included in this study are pro-inflammatory [i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), and IL-6] and anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-10). We gave male BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0 (sham-controls) or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV protons, delivered at 5 or 10 mGy min{sup -1}, the dose and dose rates found during solar particle events in space. As a reference radiation, groups of mice were exposed to 0 (sham-controls) or 1 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays (10 mGy min{sup -1}). After irradiation, BM cells were collected at 1.5, 3, 24 h, and 1 month for analyses (five mice per treatment group per harvest time). The results indicated that the in vivo time course of effects induced by a single dose of 1 Gy of 100 MeV protons or {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, delivered at 10 mGy min{sup -1}, was similar. Although statistically significant levels of NF-{kappa}B activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in BM cells of exposed mice when compared to those in the corresponding sham controls (Student's t-test, p < 0.05 or < 0.01) were induced by either dose rate, these levels varied over time for each protein. Further, only a dose rate of 5 mGy min{sup -1} induced significant levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The results indicate dose-rate effects of protons.

  19. Secondary cancer-incidence risk estimates for external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Son, Jaeman; Sung, Jiwon; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to estimate radiation-induced secondary cancer risks from high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and external radiotherapy for patients with cervical cancer based on measurements of doses absorbed by various organs. Organ doses from HDR brachytherapy and external radiotherapy were measured using glass rod dosimeters. Doses to out-of-field organs were measured at various loca-tions inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Brachytherapy-associated organ doses were measured using a specialized phantom that enabled applicator insertion, with the pelvis portion of the existing anthropomorphic phantom replaced by this new phantom. Measured organ doses were used to calculate secondary cancer risk based on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII models. In both treatment modalities, organ doses per prescribed dose (PD) mostly depended on the distance between organs. The locations showing the highest and lowest doses were the right kidney (external radiotherapy: 215.2 mGy; brachytherapy: 655.17 mGy) and the brain (external radiotherapy: 15.82 mGy; brachytherapy: 2.49 mGy), respectively. Organ doses to nearby regions were higher for brachytherapy than for external beam therapy, whereas organ doses to distant regions were higher for external beam therapy. Organ doses to distant treatment regions in external radiotherapy were due primarily to out-of-field radiation resulting from scattering and leakage in the gantry head. For brachytherapy, the highest estimated lifetime attributable risk per 100,000 population was to the stomach (88.6), whereas the lowest risks were to the brain (0.4) and eye (0.4); for external radiotherapy, the highest and lowest risks were to the thyroid (305.1) and brain (2.4). These results may help provide a database on the impact of radiotherapy-induced secondary cancer incidence dur-ing cervical cancer treatment, as well as suggest further research on strategies to counteract the risks of radiotherapy-associated secondary

  20. Effect of Body Habitus on Radiation Dose During CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Spine Injections.

    PubMed

    Viola, Ronald J; Nguyen, Giao B; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Stinnett, Sandra S; Hoang, Jenny K; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-10-31

    This study investigated the degree to which body habitus influences radiation dose during CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (ESI). An anthropomorphic phantom containing metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors was scanned at two transverse levels to simulate upper and lower lumbar CTF-guided ESI. Circumferential layers of adipose-equivalent material were sequentially added to model patients of three sizes: small (cross-sectional dimensions 25×30 cm), average (34×39 cm), and oversize (43×48 cm). Point dose rates to skin and internal organs within the CTF beam were measured. Scattered point dose rates 5 cm from the radiation beam were also measured. Direct point dose rates to the internal organs ranged from 0.05-0.11 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom, and from 0.18-0.43 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. Skin direct point dose rates ranged from 0.69-0.71 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom and 0.88-0.94 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. This represents a 180-310% increase in organ point dose rates and 24-36% increase in skin point dose rates in the small habitus compared with the oversize habitus. Scatter point dose rates increased by 83-117% for the small compared to the oversize phantom. Decreasing body habitus results in substantial increases in direct organ and skin point doses as well as scattered dose during simulated CTF-guided procedures. Failure to account for individual variations in body habitus will result in inaccurate dose estimation and inappropriate choice of tube current in CTF-guided procedures.

  1. Triphasic low-dose response in zebrafish embryos irradiated by microbeam protons.

    PubMed

    Choi, Viann Wing Yan; Yum, Emily Hoi Wa; Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Cheng, Shuk Han; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2012-01-01

    The microbeam irradiation system (Single-Particle Irradiation System to Cell, acronym as SPICE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, was employed to irradiate dechorionated zebrafish embryos at the 2-cell stage at 0.75 h post fertilization (hpf) by microbeam protons. Either one or both of the cells of the embryos were irradiated with 10, 20, 40, 50, 80, 100, 160, 200, 300 and 2000 protons each with an energy of 3.37 MeV. The embryos were then returned back to the incubator until 24 hpf for analyses. The levels of apoptosis in zebrafish embryos at 25 hpf were quantified through terminal dUTP transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, with the apoptotic signals captured by a confocal microscope. The results revealed a triphasic dose-response for zebrafish embryos with both cells irradiated at the 2-cell stage, namely, (1) increase in apoptotic signals for < 200 protons (< 30 mGy), (2) hormesis to reduce the apoptotic signals below the spontaneous number for 200-400 protons (at doses of 30-60 mGy), and (3) increase in apoptotic signals again for > 600 protons (at doses > 90 mGy). The dose response for zebrafish embryos with only one cell irradiated at the 2-cell stage was also likely a triphasic one, but the apoptotic signals in the first zone (< 200 protons or < 30 mGy) did not have significant differences from those of the background. At the same time, the experimental data were in line with induction of radiation-induced bystander effect as well as rescue effect in the zebrafish embryos, particular in those embryos with unirradiated cells.

  2. Fast accretion of the earth with a late moon-forming giant impact.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Jacobsen, Stein B

    2011-10-25

    Constraints on the formation history of the Earth are critical for understanding of planet formation processes. (182)Hf-(182)W chronometry of terrestrial rocks points to accretion of Earth in approximately 30 Myr after the formation of the solar system, immediately followed by the Moon-forming giant impact (MGI). Nevertheless, some N-body simulations and (182)Hf-(182)W and (87)Rb-(87)Sr chronology of some lunar rocks have been used to argue for a later formation of the Moon at 52 to > 100 Myr. This discrepancy is often explained by metal-silicate disequilibrium during giant impacts. Here we describe a model of the (182)W isotopic evolution of the accreting Earth, including constraints from partitioning of refractory siderophile elements (Ni, Co, W, V, and Nb) during core formation, which can explain the discrepancy. Our modeling shows that the concentrations of the siderophile elements of the mantle are consistent with high-pressure metal-silicate equilibration in a terrestrial magma ocean. Our analysis shows that the timing of the MGI is inversely correlated with the time scale of the main accretion stage of the Earth. Specifically, the earliest time the MGI could have taken place right at approximately 30 Myr, corresponds to the end of main-stage accretion at approximately 30 Myr. A late MGI (> 52 Myr) requires the main stage of the Earth's accretion to be completed rapidly in < 10.7 ± 2.5 Myr. These are the two end member solutions and a continuum of solutions exists in between these extremes. PMID:22006299

  3. Cosmic radiation exposure of biological test systems during the EXPOSE-E mission.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Körner, Christine; Vanhavere, Filip; Reitz, Günther

    2012-05-01

    In the frame of the EXPOSE-E mission on the Columbus external payload facility EuTEF on board the International Space Station, passive thermoluminescence dosimeters were applied to measure the radiation exposure of biological samples. The detectors were located either as stacks next to biological specimens to determine the depth dose distribution or beneath the sample carriers to determine the dose levels for maximum shielding. The maximum mission dose measured in the upper layer of the depth dose part of the experiment amounted to 238±10 mGy, which relates to an average dose rate of 408±16 μGy/d. In these stacks of about 8 mm height, the dose decreased by 5-12% with depth. The maximum dose measured beneath the sample carriers was 215±16 mGy, which amounts to an average dose rate of 368±27 μGy/d. These values are close to those assessed for the interior of the Columbus module and demonstrate the high shielding of the biological experiments within the EXPOSE-E facility. Besides the shielding by the EXPOSE-E hardware itself, additional shielding was experienced by the external structures adjacent to EXPOSE-E, such as EuTEF and Columbus. This led to a dose gradient over the entire exposure area, from 215±16 mGy for the lowest to 121±6 mGy for maximum shielding. Hence, the doses perceived by the biological samples inside EXPOSE-E varied by 70% (from lowest to highest dose). As a consequence of the high shielding, the biological samples were predominantly exposed to galactic cosmic heavy ions, while electrons and a significant fraction of protons of the radiation belts and solar wind did not reach the samples.

  4. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  5. Lattice parameters and electronic structure of BeMgZnO quaternary solid solutions: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toporkov, M.; Demchenko, D. O.; Zolnai, Z.; Volk, J.; Avrutin, V.; Morkoç, H.; Özgür, Ü.

    2016-03-01

    BexMgyZn1-x-yO semiconductor solid solutions are attractive for UV optoelectronics and electronic devices owing to their wide bandgap and capability of lattice-matching to ZnO. In this work, a combined experimental and theoretical study of lattice parameters, bandgaps, and underlying electronic properties, such as changes in band edge wavefunctions in BexMgyZn1-x-yO thin films, is carried out. Theoretical ab initio calculations predicting structural and electronic properties for the whole compositional range of materials are compared with experimental measurements from samples grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy on (0001) sapphire substrates. The measured a and c lattice parameters for the quaternary alloys BexMgyZn1-x with x = 0-0.19 and y = 0-0.52 are within 1%-2% of those calculated using generalized gradient approximation to the density functional theory. Additionally, composition independent ternary BeZnO and MgZnO bowing parameters were determined for a and c lattice parameters and the bandgap. The electronic properties were calculated using exchange tuned Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional. The measured optical bandgaps of the quaternary alloys are in good agreement with those predicted by the theory. Strong localization of band edge wavefunctions near oxygen atoms for BeMgZnO alloy in comparison to the bulk ZnO is consistent with large Be-related bandgap bowing of BeZnO and BeMgZnO (6.94 eV). The results in aggregate show that precise control over lattice parameters by tuning the quaternary composition would allow strain control in BexMgyZn1-x-yO/ZnO heterostructures with possibility to achieve both compressive and tensile strain, where the latter supports formation of two-dimensional electron gas at the interface.

  6. Household salt as a retrospective dosemeter using optically stimulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Bernhardsson, Christian; Christiansson, Maria; Mattsson, Sören; Rääf, Christopher L

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of a selection of household salts (NaCl) as a retrospective dosemeter for ionising radiation using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The OSL-response of five brands of salt to an absorbed dose in the range from 1 mGy to 9 Gy was investigated using a Risø TL/OSL-15 reader and a (60)Co beam, allowing low dose-rate irradiations. The salt was optically stimulated with blue light (lambda = 470 +/- 30 nm) at a constant stimulation power (CW-OSL) of 20 mW cm(-2). A linear dose response relationship was found in the dose range from 1 mGy to about 100 mGy and above that level, the relationship becomes moderately supra-linear, at least up to 9 Gy. Depending on the sensitivity and background signal, the minimum detectable absorbed dose (MDD) for the household salt when kept at sealed conditions varied from 0.2 to 1.0 mGy, for the household salts investigated. In addition to its widespread abundance and availability, the low MDD suggests that household salt should seriously be considered as an emergency dosemeter. However, the OSL-properties of NaCl under normal household usage need to be more properly investigated as well as the variation in sensitivity by the quality of the radiation. A further optimisation of the read-out sequence for various brands of commercially available salt may further improve the sensitivity, in terms of luminescence yield, and the signal reproducibility. PMID:18797911

  7. Cosmic Radiation Exposure of Biological Test Systems During the EXPOSE-E Mission

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Michael; Bilski, Pawel; Körner, Christine; Vanhavere, Filip; Reitz, Günther

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the frame of the EXPOSE-E mission on the Columbus external payload facility EuTEF on board the International Space Station, passive thermoluminescence dosimeters were applied to measure the radiation exposure of biological samples. The detectors were located either as stacks next to biological specimens to determine the depth dose distribution or beneath the sample carriers to determine the dose levels for maximum shielding. The maximum mission dose measured in the upper layer of the depth dose part of the experiment amounted to 238±10 mGy, which relates to an average dose rate of 408±16 μGy/d. In these stacks of about 8 mm height, the dose decreased by 5–12% with depth. The maximum dose measured beneath the sample carriers was 215±16 mGy, which amounts to an average dose rate of 368±27 μGy/d. These values are close to those assessed for the interior of the Columbus module and demonstrate the high shielding of the biological experiments within the EXPOSE-E facility. Besides the shielding by the EXPOSE-E hardware itself, additional shielding was experienced by the external structures adjacent to EXPOSE-E, such as EuTEF and Columbus. This led to a dose gradient over the entire exposure area, from 215±16 mGy for the lowest to 121±6 mGy for maximum shielding. Hence, the doses perceived by the biological samples inside EXPOSE-E varied by 70% (from lowest to highest dose). As a consequence of the high shielding, the biological samples were predominantly exposed to galactic cosmic heavy ions, while electrons and a significant fraction of protons of the radiation belts and solar wind did not reach the samples. Key Words: Space radiation—Dosimetry—Passive radiation detectors—Thermoluminescence—EXPOSE-E. Astrobiology 12, 387–392. PMID:22680685

  8. Morphological and histological studies on freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de man) irradiated with (60)Co gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-Babu, P

    2013-11-15

    This study was framed to investigate the (60)Co gamma radiation induced morphological and histological variations in freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The LD50 value of (60)Co gamma irradiated M. rosenbergii observed (by probit analysis) at 30 Gy. Prawns were irradiated to four different dose levels (3 mGy, 30 mGy, 300 mGy and 3,000 mGy) using Theratron Phoenix TeleCobalt Unit [P-33] and one control group (without irradiation) maintained separately. Irradiated groups exhibited several morphological variations such as discoloration; damaged rostrum; opaque coloration in cephalothorax; black bands and dot formation in abdomen; deformed uropods and telson in tail regions when compared with control group. The Hepato Somatic Index reflected the severity of radiation on hepatopancreas. Histological variations in gills, hepatopancreas and muscles of irradiated groups were observed. In gills, structural changes such as swollen and fused lamellae, abnormal gill tips, hyperplasic, necrotic and clavate-globate lamellae were observed in gamma irradiated prawns. Accumulation of hemocytes in hemocoelic space, interstitial sinuses filled with abnormal infiltrated hemocytes, the tubular epithelium with ruptured basal laminae, abnormal and coagulated lumen, necrotic tubules, thickened basal laminae, tissue debris, necrotic hepatocytes were observed in irradiated prawn hepatopancreas. In muscle, shrinkage of muscular fiber and necrotic musculature were observed in irradiated prawns. These structural alterations of the organs it is felt could affect the vital physiological functions such as respiration, osmotic and ionic regulation in gills and muscles; absorption, storage and secretion of the hepatopancreas which in turn could adversely affect the growth and survival of freshwater prawn M. rosenbergii.

  9. RZ Cas, KO Aql and S Equ: a Piece of Cake of Case A RLOF?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Greve, J. P.; Mennekens, N.; Rensbergen, W. V.; Yungelson, L.

    2009-08-01

    We determine the present evolutionary state and the restrictions on the initial mass ratios of RZ Cas, KO Aql and S Equ. The gainers are in an early main sequence stage (X_c > 0.5), with KO Aql being almost unevolved. The initial donor/gainer mass ratios Mdi /Mgi must be larger than three to obtain the present mass and luminosity of the gainers. However, conservative mass transfer leads to considerable overflow of the gainer's radius over the Roche radius.

  10. Survey of mammography practice in Croatia: equipment performance, image quality and dose.

    PubMed

    Faj, Dario; Posedel, Dario; Stimac, Damir; Ivezic, Zdravko; Kasabasic, Mladen; Ivkovic, Ana; Kubelka, Dragan; Ilakovac, Vesna; Brnic, Zoran; Bjelac, Olivera Ciraj

    2008-01-01

    A national audit of mammography equipment performance, image quality and dose has been conducted in Croatia. Film-processing parameters, optical density (OD), average glandular dose (AGD) to the standard breast, viewing conditions and image quality were examined using TOR(MAM) test object. Average film gradient ranged from 2.6 to 3.7, with a mean of 3.1. Tube voltage used for imaging of the standard 45 mm polymethylmethacrylate phantom ranged from 24 to 34 kV, and OD ranged from 0.75 to 1.94 with a mean of 1.26. AGD to the standard breast ranged from 0.4 to 2.3 mGy with a mean of 1.1 mGy. Besides clinical conditions, the authors have imaged the standard phantom in the referent conditions with 28 kV and OD as close as possible to 1.5. Then, AGD ranged from 0.5 to 2.6 mGy with a mean of 1.3 mGy. Image viewing conditions were generally unsatisfying with ambient light up to 500 lx and most of the viewing boxes with luminance between 1000 and 2000 cd per m(2). TOR(MAM) scoring of images taken in clinical and referent conditions was done by local radiologists in local image viewing conditions and by the referent radiologist in good image viewing conditions. Importance of OD and image viewing conditions for diagnostic information were analysed. The survey showed that the main problem in Croatia is the lack of written quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) procedures. Consequently, equipment performance, image quality and dose are unstable and activities to improve image quality or to reduce the dose are not evidence-based. This survey also had an educational purpose, introducing in Croatia the QC based on European Commission Guidelines.

  11. Comparison of slot scanning digital mammography system with full-field digital mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C.-J.; Shaw, Chris C.; Geiser, William; Chen, Lingyun; Arribas, Elsa; Stephens, Tanya; Davis, Paul L.; Ayyar, Geetha P.; Dogan, Basak E.; Nguyen, Victoria A.; Whitman, Gary J.; Yang, Wei T.

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare microcalcification detectability of two commercial full-field digital mammography (DM) systems. The first unit was a flat panel based DM system (FFDM) which employed an anti-scatter grid method to reject scatter, and the second unit was a charge-coupled device-based DM system (SSDM) which used scanning slot imaging geometry to reduce scatter radiation. Both systems have comparable scatter-to-primary ratios. In this study, 125-160 and 200-250 {mu}m calcium carbonate grains were used to simulate microcalcifications and imaged by both DM systems. The calcium carbonate grains were overlapped with a 5-cm-thick 50% adipose/50% glandular simulated breast tissue slab and an anthropomorphic breast phantom (RMI 165, Gammex) for imaging at two different mean glandular dose levels: 0.87 and 1.74 mGy. A reading study was conducted with seven board certified mammographers with images displayed on review workstations. A five-point confidence level rating was used to score each detection task. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed and the area under the ROC curve (A{sub z}) was used to quantify and compare the performances of these two systems. The results showed that with the simulated breast tissue slab (uniform background), the SSDM system resulted in higher A{sub z}'s than the FFDM system at both MGD levels with the difference statistically significant at 0.87 mGy only. With the anthropomorphic breast phantom (tissue structure background), the SSDM system performed better than the FFDM system at 0.87 mGy but worse at 1.74 mGy. However, the differences were not found to be statistically significant.

  12. Risk of leukaemia mortality from exposure to ionising radiation in US nuclear workers: a pooled case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Robert D; Bertke, Stephen; Waters, Kathleen M; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K

    2015-01-01

    Objective To follow-up on earlier studies of the leukaemogenicity of occupational ionising radiation exposure. Methods We conducted a nested case-control analysis of leukaemia mortality in a pooled cohort of US nuclear workers followed through 2005. Each case was matched to four controls on attained age. Exposures were estimated from available records. General relative risk models were used to estimate the excess relative risk (ERR) of leukaemia, excluding chronic lymphocytic (CLL), acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia and CLL while controlling for potential confounders. Preferred exposure lags and time-windows of risks were calculated using joint maximum likelihood. Dose-response was also examined using linear, linear-quadratic, categorical and restricted cubic spline models. Results There were 369 leukaemia deaths in 105 245 US nuclear workers. The adjusted ERR for non-CLL leukaemia was 0.09 (95% CI −0.17 to 0.65) per 100 mGy. Elevated non-CLL risks were observed from exposures occurring 6–14 years prior to attained age of cases (ERR per 100 mGy=1.9; 95% CI <0 to 8.0). Lagged models indicated non-linearity of risk at very low (<10 mGy) and high (>100 mGy) doses, which contributed to the imprecision of results in linear models. Similar risk attenuation was not evident in time-windows-based models. Conclusions Risk estimates were in reasonable agreement with previous estimates, with the temporality of non-CLL leukaemia risk as a dominant factor in dose-response analyses. Future research should focus on methods that improve evaluations of the dose-response, particularly in the low-dose range. PMID:23000827

  13. Fast accretion of the earth with a late moon-forming giant impact.

    PubMed

    Yu, Gang; Jacobsen, Stein B

    2011-10-25

    Constraints on the formation history of the Earth are critical for understanding of planet formation processes. (182)Hf-(182)W chronometry of terrestrial rocks points to accretion of Earth in approximately 30 Myr after the formation of the solar system, immediately followed by the Moon-forming giant impact (MGI). Nevertheless, some N-body simulations and (182)Hf-(182)W and (87)Rb-(87)Sr chronology of some lunar rocks have been used to argue for a later formation of the Moon at 52 to > 100 Myr. This discrepancy is often explained by metal-silicate disequilibrium during giant impacts. Here we describe a model of the (182)W isotopic evolution of the accreting Earth, including constraints from partitioning of refractory siderophile elements (Ni, Co, W, V, and Nb) during core formation, which can explain the discrepancy. Our modeling shows that the concentrations of the siderophile elements of the mantle are consistent with high-pressure metal-silicate equilibration in a terrestrial magma ocean. Our analysis shows that the timing of the MGI is inversely correlated with the time scale of the main accretion stage of the Earth. Specifically, the earliest time the MGI could have taken place right at approximately 30 Myr, corresponds to the end of main-stage accretion at approximately 30 Myr. A late MGI (> 52 Myr) requires the main stage of the Earth's accretion to be completed rapidly in < 10.7 ± 2.5 Myr. These are the two end member solutions and a continuum of solutions exists in between these extremes.

  14. First demonstration of rapid shutdown using neon shattered pellet injection for thermal quench mitigation on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Shiraki, Daisuke; Baylor, Larry R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; Meitner, S. J.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; et al

    2016-03-02

    Shattered pellet injection (SPI) is one of the prime candidates for the ITER disruption mitigation system because of its deeper penetration and larger particle flux than massive gas injection (MGI) (Taylor et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 1872) using deuterium (Commaux et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 112001, Combs et al 2010 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 38 400, Baylor et al 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 085013). The ITER disruption mitigation system will likely use mostly high Z species such as neon because of more effective thermal mitigation and pumping constraints on the maximum amount of deuterium or helium that couldmore » be injected. An upgrade of the SPI on DIII-D enables ITER relevant injection characteristics in terms of quantities and gas species. This upgraded SPI system was used on DIII-D for the first time in 2014 for a direct comparison with MGI using identical quantities of neon. This comparison enabled the measurements of density perturbations during the thermal quench (TQ) and radiated power and heat loads to the divertor. It showed that SPI using similar quantities of neon provided a faster and stronger density perturbation and neon assimilation, which resulted in a lower conducted energy to the divertor and a faster TQ onset. Radiated power data analysis shows that this was probably due to the much deeper penetration of the neon in the plasma inducing a higher core radiation than in the MGI case. This experiment shows also that the MHD activity during an SPI shutdown (especially during the TQ) is quite different compared to MGI. Furthermore, this favorable TQ energy dissipation was obtained while keeping the current quench (CQ) duration within acceptable limits when scaled to ITER.« less

  15. Effect of Body Habitus on Radiation Dose During CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Spine Injections.

    PubMed

    Viola, Ronald J; Nguyen, Giao B; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Stinnett, Sandra S; Hoang, Jenny K; Kranz, Peter G

    2014-10-31

    This study investigated the degree to which body habitus influences radiation dose during CT fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided lumbar epidural steroid injections (ESI). An anthropomorphic phantom containing metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors was scanned at two transverse levels to simulate upper and lower lumbar CTF-guided ESI. Circumferential layers of adipose-equivalent material were sequentially added to model patients of three sizes: small (cross-sectional dimensions 25×30 cm), average (34×39 cm), and oversize (43×48 cm). Point dose rates to skin and internal organs within the CTF beam were measured. Scattered point dose rates 5 cm from the radiation beam were also measured. Direct point dose rates to the internal organs ranged from 0.05-0.11 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom, and from 0.18-0.43 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. Skin direct point dose rates ranged from 0.69-0.71 mGy/10mAs in the oversized phantom and 0.88-0.94 mGy/10mAs in the small phantom. This represents a 180-310% increase in organ point dose rates and 24-36% increase in skin point dose rates in the small habitus compared with the oversize habitus. Scatter point dose rates increased by 83-117% for the small compared to the oversize phantom. Decreasing body habitus results in substantial increases in direct organ and skin point doses as well as scattered dose during simulated CTF-guided procedures. Failure to account for individual variations in body habitus will result in inaccurate dose estimation and inappropriate choice of tube current in CTF-guided procedures. PMID:25363254

  16. Suitability of Chinese oil well loggers for an epidemiologic study of the carcinogenic effects of neutrons.

    PubMed

    Inskip, P D; Wang, Z Y; Fen, Y S

    1991-11-01

    Neutron exposures to 191 well loggers at four oil fields in China were measured over a 3-mo period using CR-39 polycarbonate dosimeters. Doses (96% less than 0.02 mGy) were slightly lower than literature values for well loggers in North America, possibly because of differences in drilling activity. Because doses are so low, an epidemiologic study of cancer among Chinese well loggers is unlikely to be informative about the carcinogenicity of neutrons relative to sparsely ionizing radiation.

  17. The feasibility of refuse-fired energy generation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christman, W. M., III

    1982-02-01

    The City of Philadelphia presently disposes of 816, 480 megagrams per year (MGY) of residential refuse, with 1 megagram = 10 to the 3rd power hilograms. Alternatives to a base case of continued incineration and landfilling are evaluated. It is assured that the feasibility studies will yield compatible products and will run a uniform economic analysis against the base case, using as inputs the outputs of the feasibility analyses.

  18. Volatile evolution induced by energetic He++ ions in a polyurethane and the effects of previous gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. J.; Wetteland, C. J.

    2005-07-01

    Irradiation of polymer samples using an accelerated beam of He++ ions passed through a 10 μm thick window of havar foil, has been performed. Such an irradiation simulates the effects of large α radiation doses, on a vastly reduced time-scale. The experimental set up was designed to allow analysis of volatiles evolved from the irradiated samples by means of a residual gas analyser (RGA). This was located in close proximity to the sample chamber. A radiation study on a poly(urethane) materials using an RGA to analyse volatiles indicated the dominant degradation products to be H2, CO and CO2. A series of polyurethane samples previously conditioned by γ irradiation to between 1 and 5 MGy were irradiated in the ion beam. Identification of differences in trends in the rates of volatile evolution between these samples indicated the precise vacuum conditions at the time of irradiation had a major influence. There was also an indication that the surface of the sample had a small effect on rates of volatile evolution. Comparative plots of CO and CO2 evolution for series of 5 × 1 MGy irradiations indicated variations in behaviour between samples with different γ doses. Evolution during the first 1 MGy was inhibited for the unirradiated sample, the extent of inhibition diminished with increasing γ dose and was no longer evident in a sample with 1.5 MGy γ dose. H2 does not show an equivalent inhibition. Evidence for a low dose crosslinking reaction is put forward as the reason for the inhibition. Chemical reaction mechanisms are postulated and used to explain the differences in behaviour observed between CO/CO2 and H2.

  19. External radiation doses in a household from a patient receiving a therapeutic amount of {sup 131}I

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.

    1992-06-01

    Gamma-ray measurements were carried out during a 4-week period in a household to determine the external dose to family members from a patient who was being treated for hyperthyroidism with the administration of 220 MBq of {sup 131}I. The measured doses in air were 0.08 and 0.09 mGy for the children and 0.49 mGy for the spouse. The doses delivered at various locations within the house, the breakdown for various activities of family member, and the potential doses for other scenarios are also given. Based on these results and those of past studies, doses to individuals from such therapy are seen to be generally higher than the annual limits set for members of the general public for nuclear facility higher than the annual limits set for members of the general public for nuclear facility operations in the US and, and in certain situations, doses could even exceed 5 mGy for some family members. In terms of collective dose, this source of exposure is estimated to be about the same as the contribution from the nuclear fuel cycle and equivalent to or larger than other environmental sources, such as luminous timepieces, smoke detectors, thorium gas mantles, dental prostheses, welding rods, and opthalmic glass.

  20. External radiation doses in a household from a patient receiving a therapeutic amount of sup 131 I

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.M.

    1992-06-01

    Gamma-ray measurements were carried out during a 4-week period in a household to determine the external dose to family members from a patient who was being treated for hyperthyroidism with the administration of 220 MBq of {sup 131}I. The measured doses in air were 0.08 and 0.09 mGy for the children and 0.49 mGy for the spouse. The doses delivered at various locations within the house, the breakdown for various activities of family member, and the potential doses for other scenarios are also given. Based on these results and those of past studies, doses to individuals from such therapy are seen to be generally higher than the annual limits set for members of the general public for nuclear facility higher than the annual limits set for members of the general public for nuclear facility operations in the US and, and in certain situations, doses could even exceed 5 mGy for some family members. In terms of collective dose, this source of exposure is estimated to be about the same as the contribution from the nuclear fuel cycle and equivalent to or larger than other environmental sources, such as luminous timepieces, smoke detectors, thorium gas mantles, dental prostheses, welding rods, and opthalmic glass.

  1. Postnatal quality of life, depressive symptoms, and social support among women in southern India.

    PubMed

    Bodhare, Trupti N; Sethi, Pruthwiraj; Bele, Samir D; Gayatri, Dasari; Vivekanand, Achanta

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of postnatal quality of life (QOL) has remained a poorly researched area in India. The present cross-sectional study assessed postnatal QOL, using the Mother Generated Index (MGI) and its associated risk factors, and was conducted during January-March 2013 among 274 mothers, 6-8 weeks postnatally. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to evaluate sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics and social support. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and QOL using the MGI. The vast majority (90.1 percent) of respondents in our study had a primary MGI score <5, those with significantly higher prevalence of physical problems and psychological distress. A total of 39.8 percent of respondents were screened as having other (not major) depressive symptoms and 4.7 percent as having major depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analysis revealed that age (β = 0.033, p = .018) and socioeconomic status (β = 0.156, p < .001) were significantly positively associated with QOL, while increased depressive symptom scores (β = -0.075, p < .001) were significantly negatively associated with QOL. A wide spectrum of QOL aspects were reported, including physical, emotional, social, and economic concerns by the mothers. Prevention, evaluation, and treatment of postnatal depressive symptoms and impaired QOL are warranted, taking into account the role of various biopsychosocial risk factors and specific concerns raised by the mothers. PMID:25719436

  2. Should we educate care staff to improve the oral health and oral hygiene of people with intellectual disability in residential care? Real world lessons from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin; Guerin, Suzanne; Nunn, June

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the impact of a multitiered oral health educational program on the oral health and oral hygiene of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In a controlled pretest, posttest trial, with cluster randomization, a pyramidal training program was delivered to residential staff who cared for a randomly allocated, purposively stratified intervention group of people with ID living in community care homes. A control group lived in centers where staff received no training. Clinical measures were carried out pre- and posttest. Difference in Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and Plaque Index (PI) was measured posttest using ANCOVA. Seventy-six participants took part, representing 49.0% of the invited sample (n = 155). Fourteen did not receive clinical examination. There was one dropout 6-9 months later. A 10.5% and 8.5% reduction in mean MGI and PI was evident at posttest but did not show statistically significant difference, when controlling for baseline covariates (p > 0.05, ANCOVA). Mean MGI and PI scores were not significantly different among people with ID whose care staff had and had not received oral health training. Limitations are discussed. The results indicate that this program failed to significantly improve oral health or oral hygiene, despite the intervention being "educationally" successful. More research is needed.

  3. Association of macroscopic gut inflammation with disease activity, functional status and quality of life in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hascelik, Gulen; Oz, Bengi; Olmez, Nese; Memis, Asuman; Yoruk, Gazi; Unsal, Belkis; Ekinci, Nese

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the frequency of intestinal inflammation and its association with disease activity, functional status and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 25 patients with AS had undergone ileocolonoscopy and concomitant histological study. Clinical and demographical parameters, BASDAI, BASFI, and SF-36 scores were compared between patients with and without macroscopic gut inflammation (MGI). Colonoscopic study revealed MGI in 9 patients and macroscopically normal gut mucosa in 16 patients. On histological examination, of 25 patients 20 had gut inflammation, mostly in ileum. BASDAI score was higher (P < 0.05), SF-36 pain and physical scores, and chest expansion measurement were lower (P = 0.00, P = 0.01, P = 0.01), duration of morning stiffness was longer (P = 0.01) in patients with MGI. Serum C-reactive protein, erytrocyte sedimentation rate levels were similar between groups (P > 0.05). There is high prevalence of histological gut inflammation in AS patients. More active disease should suggest gut inflammation in AS patients.

  4. Dosimetry of an In-Line Kilovoltage Imaging System and Implementation in Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dzierma, Yvonne; Alaei, Parham; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To present the beam properties of the Siemens 70-kV and 121-kV linear accelerator-mounted imaging modalities and commissioning of the 121-kV beam in the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system (TPS); measurements in an Alderson phantom were performed for verification of the model and to estimate the cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging dose in the head and neck, thorax, and pelvis. Methods and Materials: The beam profiles and depth–dose curve were measured in an acrylic phantom using thermoluminescent dosimeters and a soft x-ray ionization chamber. Measurements were imported into the TPS, modeled, and verified by phantom measurements. Results: Modeling of the profiles and the depth–dose curve can be achieved with good quality. Comparison with the measurements in the Alderson phantom is generally good; only very close to bony structures is the dose underestimated by the TPS. For a 200° arc CBCT of the head and neck, a maximum dose of 7 mGy is measured; the thorax and pelvis 360° CBCTs give doses of 4-10 mGy and 7-15 mGy, respectively. Conclusions: Dosimetric characteristics of the Siemens kVision imaging modalities are presented and modeled in the Pinnacle TPS. Thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in the Alderson phantom agree well with the calculated TPS dose, validating the model and providing an estimate of the imaging dose for different protocols.

  5. Do we need keratinized mucosa for a healthy peri-implant soft tissue?

    PubMed

    Esfahanizadeh, Nasrin; Daneshparvar, Niloufar; Motallebi, Sara; Akhondi, Nasrin; Askarpour, Farinaz; Davaie, Sotudeh

    2016-01-01

    The presence of keratinized mucosa plays a fundamental role in peri-implant soft tissue health. This study assessed the impact of the width of keratinized mucosa (WKM) on peri-implant soft tissue parameters. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 bone-level implants in 36 patients. A minimum of 6 months had passed since the loading of implants, and the patients had at least 1 implant in 1 quadrant at the molar or premolar site restored with a single crown or fixed partial denture. The health of peri-implant soft tissue was assessed with a modified bleeding index (MBI), modified plaque index (MPI), and modified gingival index (MGI). Probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and WKM were also measured. History of smoking and oral hygiene methods were recorded. A significant inverse correlation existed between WKM and the parameters MBI, MPI, MGI, and GR (P < 0.05). Values of MBI, MPI, MGI, and GR were significantly lower in areas with WKM ≥ 2 mm and higher in areas with WKM < 2 mm (P < 0.05). The WKM was greatest in subjects using the vibratory toothbrushing technique and narrowest in those using the horizontal toothbrushing technique (P < 0.05). The mean WKM was significantly greater in smokers than in nonsmokers (P < 0.05). Results of this study indicate that an association exists between WKM and peri-implant soft tissue health. A minimum of 2 mm of keratinized mucosa around implants is recommended. PMID:27367634

  6. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography: patient radiation dose estimation using a Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Yakoumakis, E; Tzamicha, E; Dimitriadis, A; Georgiou, E; Tsapaki, V; Chalazonitis, A

    2015-07-01

    Mammography is a standard procedure that facilitates breast cancer detection. Initial results of contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) are promising. The purpose of this study is to assess the CEDM radiation dose using a Monte Carlo code. EGSnrc MC code was used to simulate the interaction of photons with matter and estimate the glandular dose (Dg). A voxel female human phantom with a 2-8-cm breast thickness range and a breast glandular composition of 50 % was applied. Dg values ranged between 0.96 and 1.45 mGy (low and high energy). Dg values for a breast thickness of 5.0 cm and a glandular fraction of 50 % for craniocaudal and mediolateral oblique view were 1.12 (low energy image contribution is 0.98 mGy) and 1.07 (low energy image contribution is 0.95 mGy), respectively. The low kV part of CEDM is the main contributor to total glandular breast dose.

  7. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected.

  8. Experimental verification of a real-time compensation functionality for dose changes due to target motion in scanned particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Luechtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Implementation and experimental assessment of a real-time dose compensation system for beam tracking in scanned carbon beam therapy of intrafractionally moving targets. Methods: A real-time dose compensation functionality has been developed and implemented at the experimental branch of the beam tracking system at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI). Treatment plans for different target geometries have been optimized. They have been delivered using scanned carbon ions with beam tracking (BT) and real-time dose compensation combined with beam tracking (RDBT), respectively. Target motion was introduced by a rotating table. Dose distributions were assessed by ionization chamber measurements and dose reconstructions. These distributions have been compared to stationary delivery for BT as well as RDBT. Additionally simulations have been performed to investigate the dependence of delivered dose distributions on varying motion starting phases for BT and RDBT, respectively. Results: Average measured dose differences between static delivery and motion influenced delivery could be reduced from 27-68 mGy when BT was used to 12-37 mGy when RDBT was used. Nominal dose was 1000 mGy. Simulated dose deliveries showed improvements in dose delivery and robustness against varying starting motion phases when RDBT was used. Conclusions: A real-time dose compensation functionality extending the existing beam tracking functionality has been implemented and verified by measurements. Measurements and simulated dose deliveries show that real-time dose compensation can substantially improve delivered dose distributions for large rotational target motion compared to beam tracking alone.

  9. Asymmetric modulation and blockade of the delayed rectifier in squid giant axons by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Clay, J R

    1995-01-01

    The effects of intracellular magnesium ions and extracellular calcium and magnesium ions on the delayed rectifier potassium ion channel, IK, were investigated from intracellularly perfused squid giant axons. Cao+2 and Mgo+2 both blocked IK in a voltage-independent manner with a KD of approximately 100 and 500 mM, respectively. This effect was obscured at potentials in the vicinity of the resting potential (approximately -60 mV) by a rightward shift of the steady-state IK inactivation curve along the voltage axis. The addition of either calcium or magnesium ions to the extracellular solution also produced the well known shift of the IK activation curve along the voltage axis. Cao+2 was approximately twice as effective in this regard as Mgo+2. The IK activation kinetics were slowed by Cao+2, but deactivation kinetics were not altered, as shown previously. Similar results were obtained with Mgo+2. The addition of magnesium ions to the intracellular perfusate shifted the activation curve along the voltage axis in the negative direction (without producing block) by approximately the same among as the Mgo+2 shift of this curve in the positive direction. Moreover, Mgi+2 substantially slowed the deactivation kinetics, whereas the effects of Mgi+2 on activation kinetics at strongly depolarized potentials were relatively minor. At modest depolarizations, Mgi+2 significantly reduced the delay before IK activation. These results are essentially the mirror image of the effects on gating of extracellular divalent cations. PMID:8580320

  10. Incidence of dementia among atomic-bomb survivors--Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Mimori, Yasuyo; Miyachi, Takafumi; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Sasaki, Hideo

    2009-06-15

    Radiotherapy has been reported to cause neuropsychological dysfunction. Here we examined whether exposure to atomic bomb radiation affected the incidence of dementia among 2286 atomic bomb survivors and controls - all members of the Adult Health Study cohort. Study subjects were non-demented and aged >or=60 years at baseline examination and had been exposed in 1945 at >or=13 years of age to a relatively low dose (mGy group, 17.0 in the 5-499 mGy group, and 15.2 in the >or=500 mGy group. Alzheimer disease was the predominant type of dementia in each dose category. After adjustment for potential risk factors, radiation exposure did not affect the incidence rate of either all dementia or any of its subtypes. No case of dementia had a history of therapeutic cranial irradiation. Although we found no relationship between radiation exposure and the development of dementia among atomic bomb survivors exposed at >or=13 years old in this longitudinal study, effects on increased risk of early death among atomic bomb survivors will be considered.

  11. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn 3 MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials. PMID:26066096

  12. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in astronauts' lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Testard, I; Ricoul, M; Hoffschir, F; Flury-Herard, A; Dutrillaux, B; Fedorenko, B; Gerasimenko, V; Sabatier, L

    1996-10-01

    The increased number of manned space missions has made it important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. As they are exposed to cosmic rays, especially ions with high linear energy transfer (LET), it is necessary to estimate the doses they receive. The most sensitive biological dosimetry used is based on the quantification of radiation-induced chromosome damage to human lymphocytes. After the space missions ANTARES (1992) and ALTAIR (1993), we performed cytogenetic analysis of blood samples from seven astronauts who had spent from 2 weeks to 6 months in space. After 2 or 3 weeks, the X-ray equivalent dose was found to be below the cytogenetic detection level of 20 mGy. After 6 months, the biological dose greatly varied among the astronauts, from 95 to 455 mGy equivalent dose. These doses are in the same range as those estimated by physical dosimetry (90 mGy absorbed dose and 180 mSv equivalent dose). Some blood cells exhibited the same cytogenetic pattern as the 'rogue cells' occasionally observed in controls, but with a higher frequency. We suggest that rogue cells might result from irradiation with high-LET particles of cosmic origin. However, the responsibility of such cells for the long-term effects of cosmic irradiation remains unknown and must be investigated. PMID:8862451

  13. X-ray dose response of calcite-A comprehensive analysis for optimal application in TL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of various annealing treatments on dosimetric characteristics of orange calcite (CaCO3) mineral has been studied in detail. Quantitative analysis on the dose response shows that the 573 K annealed sample showed sublinear dose response from 10 mGy to 1 Gy. The fading and reproducibility of this sample are also good enough for dosimetric application. However, a specific annealing treatment after irradiation shows some significant improvements in the dosimetric characteristics of the sample. The 773 K pre-annealed sample, after X-ray irradiation post-annealing at 340 K for 6 min provides linear dose response from 10 mGy to 3.60 Gy, very less fading and good reproducibility. Moreover, this sample after post-annealing at 380 K for 6 min shows linear dose response from 10 mGy to 5.40 Gy when analyzed from the ∼408 K thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak. Analysis of TL glow curves confirmed that the 1.30 eV trap center in calcite crystal is the most effective trapping site for dosimetric application.

  14. Measurement of eye lens dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with different cone-beam computed tomography acquisition techniques.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, Deepak; Thakur, Kalpna; Pawar, Amol; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Munish; Kulkarni, M S; Sharma, S D; Kannan, V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to measure patient eye lens dose for different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocols of Varian's On-Board Imaging (OBI) system using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) and to study the variation in eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens. During the experimental measurements, OSLD was placed on the patient between the eyebrows of both eyes in line of nose during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens doses. The eye lens dose measurements were carried out for three different cone-beam acquisition protocols (standard dose head, low-dose head [LDH], and high-quality head [HQH]) of Varian OBI. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter and eye lens. Measured eye lens doses for standard head and HQH protocols were in the range of 1.8-3.2 mGy and 4.5-9.9 mGy, respectively. However, the measured eye lens dose for the LDH protocol was in the range of 0.3-0.7 mGy. The measured data indicate that eye lens dose to patient depends on the selected imaging protocol. It was also observed that eye lens dose does not depend on patient geometry but strongly depends on distance between eye lens and treatment field isocenter. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should not be counterbalanced by inappropriate selection of imaging protocol, especially for very intense imaging protocol. PMID:27651564

  15. [Long-term follow-up cytogenetic survey and biological dosimetry in persons evacuated from 30-km Chernobyl NPP zone].

    PubMed

    Maznik, N A

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the follow-up cytogenetic survey and biological dosimetry carried out in inhabitants of Pripiat' town and nearby villages, who were departured from the Chernobyl NPP 30-km exclusive zone during first days after the Chernobyl catastrophe. The unstable chromosome aberration level in inhabitants were significantly increased above control in terms up to 1 year after evacuation and declined gardually during next 14 years. In early period the cytogenetic damage frequency in evacuees showed no dependence on gender. The chromosome type aberration level appeared to be lower in young persons comparing with adults. The dicentrics plus centric rings yield had a positive correlation with duration of staying at Chernobyl zone. The average doses of protracted exposure were calculated from the dicentrics and centric rings yields; the dose estimations appeared to be 1.4 times higher in persons evacuated 3-11 days after the accident than that of in persons with shorter departure time. Uing the Bayesian analysis the probabilistic distribution of biological doses was constructed for the studied evacuees group. This distribution was characterized by a mean dose of 360 mGy, the modal doses of 200-450 mGy and 80% of probability density within the dose range 0-1000 mGy, that seems to be sufficient for considering the increased risk of late somatic radiation effects for this cohort. PMID:15571047

  16. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-06-12

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn6Mg3Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn6Mg3Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn3MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials.

  17. The phylogeny of endolithic microbes associated with marine basalts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Stingl, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Larry J; Moeseneder, Markus M; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A; Fisk, Martin R; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    We examined the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities associated with marine basalts, using over 300 publicly available 16S rDNA sequences and new sequence data from basalt enrichment cultures. Phylogenetic analysis provided support for 11 monophyletic clades originating from ocean crust (sediment, basalt and gabbro). Seven of the ocean crust clades (OCC) are bacterial, while the remaining four OCC are in the Marine Group I (MGI) Crenarchaeota. Most of the OCC were found at diverse geographic sites, suggesting that these microorganisms have cosmopolitan distributions. One OCC in the Crenarchaeota consisted of sequences derived entirely from basalts. The remaining OCC were found in both basalts and sediments. The MGI Crenarchaeota were observed in all studies where archaeal diversity was evaluated. These results demonstrate that basalts are occupied by cosmopolitan clades of microorganisms that are also found in marine sediments but are distinct from microorganisms found in other marine habitats, and that one OCC in the ubiquitous MGI Crenarchaeota clade may be an ecotype specifically adapted to basalt.

  18. Evidence for Radiation Hormesis After In Vitro Exposure of Human Lymphocytes to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation§

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Scott, Bobby R.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that adding a very small gamma-ray dose to a small alpha radiation dose can completely suppress lung cancer induction by alpha radiation (a gamma-ray hormetic effect). Here we investigated the possibility of gamma-ray hormesis during low-dose neutron irradiation, since a small contribution to the total radiation dose from neutrons involves gamma rays. Using binucleated cells with micronuclei (micronucleated cells) among in vitro monoenergetic-neutron-irradiated human lymphocytes as a measure of residual damage, we investigated the influence of the small gamma-ray contribution to the dose on suppressing residual damage. We used residual damage data from previous experiments that involved neutrons with five different energies (0.22-, 0.44-, 1.5-, 5.9-, and 13.7-million electron volts [MeV]). Corresponding gamma-ray contributions to the dose were approximately 1%, 1%, 2%, 6%, and 6%, respectively. Total absorbed radiation doses were 0, 10, 50, and 100 mGy for each neutron source. We demonstrate for the first time a protective effect (reduced residual damage) of the small gamma-ray contribution to the neutron dose. Using similar data for exposure to gamma rays only, we also demonstrate a protective effect of 10 mGy (but not 50 or 100 mGy) related to reducing the frequency of micronucleated cells to below the spontaneous level. PMID:18846261

  19. The phylogeny of endolithic microbes associated with marine basalts.

    PubMed

    Mason, Olivia U; Stingl, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Larry J; Moeseneder, Markus M; Di Meo-Savoie, Carol A; Fisk, Martin R; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    We examined the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities associated with marine basalts, using over 300 publicly available 16S rDNA sequences and new sequence data from basalt enrichment cultures. Phylogenetic analysis provided support for 11 monophyletic clades originating from ocean crust (sediment, basalt and gabbro). Seven of the ocean crust clades (OCC) are bacterial, while the remaining four OCC are in the Marine Group I (MGI) Crenarchaeota. Most of the OCC were found at diverse geographic sites, suggesting that these microorganisms have cosmopolitan distributions. One OCC in the Crenarchaeota consisted of sequences derived entirely from basalts. The remaining OCC were found in both basalts and sediments. The MGI Crenarchaeota were observed in all studies where archaeal diversity was evaluated. These results demonstrate that basalts are occupied by cosmopolitan clades of microorganisms that are also found in marine sediments but are distinct from microorganisms found in other marine habitats, and that one OCC in the ubiquitous MGI Crenarchaeota clade may be an ecotype specifically adapted to basalt. PMID:17803778

  20. Clinical evaluation of the effect of two types of dental floss on plaque and gingival health.

    PubMed

    Ciancio, S G; Shibly, O; Farber, G A

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate two different flosses (an expanded PTFE-type floss and a nylon waxed floss) on the reduction of dental plaque, gingival health (MGI and BI), and patient preference when used in an oral hygiene program. Sixty adult subjects with gingival inflammation were assigned randomly to two groups. The control group were those subjects that used the nylon waxed floss and the test group were those subjects that used the PTFE-type floss. At 0, 2, 5, and 6 weeks, the patients were scored for plaque (PI), gingivitis (MGI), and interproximal bleeding sites (BI). The data were then analyzed statistically within each group and between both groups using Student t tests. It was found that there was no statistical difference between the two types of dental floss regarding PI, MGI, and BI. The only discrepancy was at the end of the second week, where the PTFE-type floss showed a significantly greater reduction in BI as compared to the nylon floss (p less than 0.01). Here the percent reduction of the PTFE-type floss was 56.1%, while the nylon waxed floss showed a percent reduction of only 39.1%. At the fifth week of examination the type of floss used was reversed for one week. This was done to determine patient preference. It was found that 74.5% of the study population preferred the PTFE-type floss while only 24.5% preferred the nylon waxed floss.

  1. Fetal radiation dose in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kelaranta, Anna; Kaasalainen, Touko; Seuri, Raija; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2015-07-01

    The connection between recorded volumetric CT dose index (CTDI vol) and determined mean fetal dose (Df) was examined from metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dose measurements on an anthropomorphic female phantom in four stages of pregnancy in a 64-slice CT scanner. Automated tube current modulation kept the mean Df fairly constant through all pregnancy stages in trauma (4.4-4.9 mGy) and abdomino-pelvic (2.1-2.4 mGy) protocols. In pulmonary angiography protocol, the mean Df increased exponentially as the distance from the end of the scan range decreased (0.01-0.09 mGy). For trauma protocol, the relative mean Df as a function of gestational age were in the range 0.80-0.97 compared with the mean CTDI vol. For abdomino-pelvic protocol, the relative mean Df was 0.57-0.79 and for pulmonary angiography protocol, 0.01-0.05 compared with the mean CTDI vol, respectively. In conclusion, if the fetus is in the primary beam, the CTDI vol can be used as an upper estimate of the fetal dose. If the fetus is not in the primary beam, the fetal dose can be estimated by considering also the distance of the fetus from the scan range. PMID:25836690

  2. High-performance soft-tissue imaging in extremity cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Muhit, A.; Thawait, G.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical performance studies of an extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) system indicate excellent bone visualization, but point to the need for improvement of soft-tissue image quality. To this end, a rapid Monte Carlo (MC) scatter correction is proposed, and Penalized Likelihood (PL) reconstruction is evaluated for noise management. Methods: The accelerated MC scatter correction involved fast MC simulation with low number of photons implemented on a GPU (107 photons/sec), followed by Gaussian kernel smoothing in the detector plane and across projection angles. PL reconstructions were investigated for reduction of imaging dose for projections acquired at ~2 mGy. Results: The rapid scatter estimation yielded root-mean-squared-errors of scatter projections of ~15% of peak scatter intensity for 5ṡ106 photons/projection (runtime ~0.5 sec/projection) and 25% improvement in fat-muscle contrast in reconstructions of a cadaveric knee. PL reconstruction largely restored soft-tissue visualization at 2 mGy dose to that of 10 mGy FBP image. Conclusion: The combination of rapid (5-10 minutes/scan) MC-based, patient-specific scatter correction and PL reconstruction offers an important means to overcome the current limitations of extremity CBCT in soft-tissue imaging.

  3. Body K and 40K in Chinese subjects measured with a whole-body counter

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, C.Y.; Weng, P.S. )

    1989-11-01

    More than 380 Chinese adults of both sexes were studied for their total body K and 40K using the National Tsing Hua University whole-body counter. The K values were found to have an average of 1.75 {plus minus} 0.4 g K kg-1 body weight for males and 1.41 {plus minus} 0.1 g K kg-1 body weight for females. The average K value for both sexes was 1.69 {plus minus} 0.4 g K kg-1 body weight. The annual absorbed dose for the average male was calculated to be 0.21 {plus minus} 0.04 mGy and for the average female was 0.17 {plus minus} 0.01 mGy. The average for both sexes was 0.20 {plus minus} 0.04 mGy. The 40K activity per unit body weight varied inversely with slenderness, and total body K varied directly with body-build index.

  4. Runaway beam studies during disruptions at JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reux, C.; Plyusnin, V.; Alper, B.; Alves, D.; Bazylev, B.; Belonohy, E.; Brezinsek, S.; Decker, J.; Devaux, S.; de Vries, P.; Fil, A.; Gerasimov, S.; Lupelli, I.; Jachmich, S.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Kiptily, V.; Koslowski, R.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Manzanares, A.; Mlynář, J.; Nardon, E.; Nilsson, E.; Riccardo, V.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Shevelev, A. E.; Sozzi, C.

    2015-08-01

    Runaway electrons (RE) during disruptions are a concern for future tokamaks including ITER with its metallic wall. Although RE are rare in spontaneous disruptions with the JET ITER-like Wall (JET-ILW), RE beams up to 380 kA were obtained using massive injection (MGI) of argon in JET-ILW divertor discharges. Entry points into the RE domain defined by operational parameters (toroidal field, argon fraction in MGI) are unchanged but higher RE currents have been obtained inside the JET-ILW MGI-generated RE domain when compared to JET-C. This might be due to the influence of the metallic wall on the current quench plasma. Temperatures of 900 °C have been observed following RE impacts on beryllium tiles. Heat deposition depth of ∼2 mm has to be assumed to match the tile cooling time. 3D simulations of the RE energy deposition using the ENDEP/MEMOS codes show that material melting is unlikely with 100 kA RE beams.

  5. A methodology for on-board CBCT imaging dose using optically stimulated luminescence detectors.

    PubMed

    Mail, Noor; Yusuf, Muhammad; Alothmany, Nazeeh; Kinsara, A Abdulrahman; Abdulkhaliq, Fahad; Ghamdi, Suliman M; Saoudi, Abdelhamid

    2016-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography CBCT systems are used in radiation therapy for patient alignment and positioning. The CBCT imaging procedure for patient setup adds substantial radiation dose to patient's normal tissue. This study pre-sents a complete procedure for the CBCT dosimetry using the InLight optically-stimulated-luminescence (OSL) nanoDots. We report five dose parameters: the mean slice dose (DMSD); the cone beam dose index (CBDIW); the mean volume dose (DMVD); point-dose profile, D(FOV); and the off-field Dose. In addition, CBCT skin doses for seven pelvic tumor patients are reported. CBCT-dose mea-surement was performed on a custom-made cylindrical acrylic body phantom (50cm length, 32cm diameter). We machined 25 circular disks (2 cm thick) with grooves and holes to hold OSL-nanoDots. OSLs that showed similar sensitivities were selected and calibrated against a Farmer-type ionization-chamber (0.6 CT) before being inserted into the grooves and holes. For the phantom scan, a standard CBCT-imaging protocol (pelvic sites: 125 kVp, 80 mA and 25 ms) was used. Five dose parameters were quantified: DMSD, CBDIW, DMVD, D(FOV), and the off-field dose. The DMSD for the central slice was 31.1 ± 0.85 mGy, and CBDIW was 34.5± 0.6 mGy at 16cm FOV. The DMVD was 25.6 ± 1.1 mGy. The off-field dose was 10.5 mGy. For patients, the anterior and lateral skin doses attributable to CBCT imaging were 39.04 ± 4.4 and 27.1 ± 1.3 mGy, respectively.OSL nanoDots were convenient to use in measuring CBCT dose. The method of selecting the nanoDots greatly reduced uncertainty in the OSL measurements. Our detailed calibration procedure and CBCT dose measurements and calculations could prove useful in developing OSL routines for CBCT quality assessment, which in turn gives them the property of high spatial resolution, meaning that they have the potential for measurement of dose in regions of severe dose-gradients. PMID:27685143

  6. Variation in CT pediatric head examination radiation dose: results from a national survey.

    PubMed

    Kanal, Kalpana M; Graves, Janessa M; Vavilala, Monica S; Applegate, Kimberly E; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to examine the variation in radiation dose, CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), and dose-length product (DLP) for pediatric head CT examinations as a function of hospital characteristics across the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A survey inquiring about hospital information, CT scanners, pediatric head examination protocol, CTDIvol, and DLP was mailed to a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Follow-up mailings were sent to nonrespondents. Descriptive characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents were compared using design-based Pearson chi-square tests. Dose estimates were compared across hospital characteristics using Bonferroni-adjusted Wald test. Hospital-level factors associated with dose estimates were evaluated using multiple linear regressions and modified Poisson regression models. RESULTS. Surveys were sent out to 751 hospitals; 292 responded to the survey, of which 253 were eligible (35.5% response rate, calculated as number of hospitals who completed surveys [n = 253] divided by sum of number who were eligible and initially consented [n = 712] plus estimated number who were eligible among those who refused [n = 1]). Most respondents reported using MDCT scanners (99.2%) and having a dedicated pediatric head CT protocol (93%). Estimated mean reported CTDIvol values were 27.3 mGy (95% CI, 24.4-30.1 mGy), and DLP values were 390.9 mGy × cm (95% CI, 346.6-435.1 mGy × cm). These values did not vary significantly by region, trauma level, teaching status, CT accreditation, number of CT scanners, or report of a dedicated pediatric CT protocol. However, estimated CTDIvol reported by children's hospitals was 19% lower than that reported by general hospitals (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION. Most hospitals (82%) report doses that meet American College of Radiology accreditation levels. However, [corrected] the mean CTDI(vol) at children's hospitals was approximately 7 mGy (21%, adjusted for covariates), lower than that

  7. Reference dosimetry during diagnostic CT examination using XR-QA radiochromic film model

    SciTech Connect

    Boivin, Jonathan; Tomic, Nada; Fadlallah, Bassam; DeBlois, Francois; Devic, Slobodan

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The authors applied 2D reference dosimetry protocol for dose measurements using XR-QA radiochromic film model during diagnostic computed tomography (CT) examinations carried out on patients and humanoid Rando phantom. Methods: Response of XR-QA model GAFCHROMIC film reference dosimetry system was calibrated in terms of Air-Kerma in air. Four most commonly used CT protocols were selected on their CT scanner (GE Lightspeed VCT 64), covering three anatomical sites (head, chest, and abdomen). For each protocol, 25 patients ongoing planned diagnostic CT examination were recruited. Surface dose was measured using four or eight film strips taped on patients' skin and on Rando phantom. Film pieces were scanned prior to and after irradiation using Epson Expression 10000XL document scanner. Optical reflectance of the unexposed film piece was subtracted from exposed one to obtain final net reflectance change, which is subsequently converted to dose using previously established calibration curves. Results: The authors' measurements show that body skin dose variation has a sinusoidal pattern along the scanning axis due to the helical movement of the x-ray tube, and a comb pattern for head dose measurements due to its axial movement. Results show that the mean skin dose at anterior position for patients is (51 {+-} 6) mGy, (29 {+-} 11) mGy, (45 {+-} 13) mGy and (38 {+-} 20) mGy for head, abdomen, angio Abdomen, and chest and abdomen protocol (UP position), respectively. The obtained experimental dose length products (DLP) show higher values than CT based DLP taken from the scanner console for body protocols, but lower values for the head protocol. Internal dose measurements inside the phantom's head indicate nonuniformity of dose distribution within scanned volume. Conclusions: In this work, the authors applied an Air-Kerma in air based radiochromic film reference dosimetry protocol for in vivo skin dose measurements. In this work, they employed green channel extracted

  8. Estimating pediatric entrance skin dose from digital radiography examination using DICOM metadata: A quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L. Kaufman, R. A.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated methodology to estimate patient examination dose in digital radiography (DR) imaging using DICOM metadata as a quality assurance (QA) tool. Methods: Patient examination and demographical information were gathered from metadata analysis of DICOM header data. The x-ray system radiation output (i.e., air KERMA) was characterized for all filter combinations used for patient examinations. Average patient thicknesses were measured for head, chest, abdomen, knees, and hands using volumetric images from CT. Backscatter factors (BSFs) were calculated from examination kVp. Patient entrance skin air KERMA (ESAK) was calculated by (1) looking up examination technique factors taken from DICOM header metadata (i.e., kVp and mA s) to derive an air KERMA (k{sub air}) value based on an x-ray characteristic radiation output curve; (2) scaling k{sub air} with a BSF value; and (3) correcting k{sub air} for patient thickness. Finally, patient entrance skin dose (ESD) was calculated by multiplying a mass–energy attenuation coefficient ratio by ESAK. Patient ESD calculations were computed for common DR examinations at our institution: dual view chest, anteroposterior (AP) abdomen, lateral (LAT) skull, dual view knee, and bone age (left hand only) examinations. Results: ESD was calculated for a total of 3794 patients; mean age was 11 ± 8 yr (range: 2 months to 55 yr). The mean ESD range was 0.19–0.42 mGy for dual view chest, 0.28–1.2 mGy for AP abdomen, 0.18–0.65 mGy for LAT view skull, 0.15–0.63 mGy for dual view knee, and 0.10–0.12 mGy for bone age (left hand) examinations. Conclusions: A methodology combining DICOM header metadata and basic x-ray tube characterization curves was demonstrated. In a regulatory era where patient dose reporting has become increasingly in demand, this methodology will allow a knowledgeable user the means to establish an automatable dose reporting program for DR and perform patient dose related QA testing for

  9. Prospective Evaluation of Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS) Algorithm in Abdominal CT: A comparison of reduced dose with standard dose imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Kim, David H.; Tang, Jie; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To prospectively study CT dose reduction using the “prior image constrained compressed sensing” (PICCS) reconstruction technique. Methods Immediately following routine standard dose (SD) abdominal MDCT, 50 patients (mean age, 57.7 years; mean BMI, 28.8) underwent a second reduced-dose (RD) scan (targeted dose reduction, 70-90%). DLP, CTDIvol and SSDE were compared. Several reconstruction algorithms (FBP, ASIR, and PICCS) were applied to the RD series. SD images with FBP served as reference standard. Two blinded readers evaluated each series for subjective image quality and focal lesion detection. Results Mean DLP, CTDIvol, and SSDE for RD series was 140.3 mGy*cm (median 79.4), 3.7 mGy (median 1.8), and 4.2 mGy (median 2.3) compared with 493.7 mGy*cm (median 345.8), 12.9 mGy (median 7.9 mGy) and 14.6 mGy (median 10.1) for SD series, respectively. Mean effective patient diameter was 30.1 cm (median 30), which translates to a mean SSDE reduction of 72% (p<0.001). RD-PICCS image quality score was 2.8±0.5, improved over the RD-FBP (1.7±0.7) and RD-ASIR(1.9±0.8)(p<0.001), but lower than SD (3.5±0.5)(p<0.001). Readers detected 81% (184/228) of focal lesions on RD-PICCS series, versus 67% (153/228) and 65% (149/228) for RD-FBP and RD-ASIR, respectively. Mean image noise was significantly reduced on RD-PICCS series (13.9 HU) compared with RD-FBP (57.2) and RD-ASIR (44.1) (p<0.001). Conclusion PICCS allows for marked dose reduction at abdominal CT with improved image quality and diagnostic performance over reduced-dose FBP and ASIR. Further study is needed to determine indication-specific dose reduction levels that preserve acceptable diagnostic accuracy relative to higher-dose protocols. PMID:24943136

  10. Low-Dose Gamma Radiation Does Not Induce an Adaptive Response for Micronucleus Induction in Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Bannister, L A; Serran, M L; Mantha, R R

    2015-11-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation is known to induce radioadaptive responses in cells in vitro as well as in mice in vivo. Low-dose radiation decreases the incidence and increases latency for spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in mice, potentially as a result of enhanced cellular DNA repair efficiency or a reduction in genomic instability. In this study, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay was used to examine dose response and potential radioadaptive response for cytogenetic damage and cell survival in C57BL/6 and BALB/c spleen cells exposed in vitro or in vivo to low-dose 60Co gamma radiation. The effects of genetic background, radiation dose and dose rate, sampling time and cell cycle were investigated with respect to dose response and radioadaptive response. In C57BL/6 mice, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the induction of micronuclei (MN) was observed for doses between 100 mGy and 2 Gy. BALB/c mice exhibited increased radiosensitivity for MN induction compared to C57BL/6 mice. A 20 mGy dose had no effect on MN frequencies in splenocytes of either mouse strain, however, increased spleen weight and a reduced number of dead cells were noted in the C57BL/6 strain only. Multiple experimental parameters were investigated in radioadaptive response studies, including dose and dose rate of the priming dose (20 mGy at 0.5 mGy/min and 100 mGy at 10 mGy/min), time interval (4 and 24 h) between priming and challenge doses, cell cycle stage (resting or proliferating) at exposure and kinetics after the challenge dose. Radioadaptive responses were not observed for MN induction for either mouse strain under any of the experimental conditions investigated. In contrast, a synergistic response for radiation-induced micronuclei in C57BL/6 spleen was detected after in vivo 20 mGy irradiation. This increase in the percentage of cells with cytogenetic damage was associated with a reduction in the number of nonviable spleen cells, suggesting that low

  11. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    PubMed

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors limiting nodule detection in thoracic computed tomography (CT) and to determine whether prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation, available from a baseline CT study, influences the minimum radiation dose at which nodule surveillance CT scans can be performed while maintaining current levels of nodule detectability. Multiple nodules varying in attenuation (-509 to + 110 HU) and diameter (1.6 to 9.5 mm) were layered in random and ordered sequences within 2 lung cylinders made of Rando lung material and suspended within a custom-built CT phantom. Multiple CT scans were performed at varying kVp (120, 100, and 80), mA (200, 150, 100, 50, 20, and 10), and beam collimation (5, 2.5, and 1.25 mm) on a four-row multidetector scanner (Lightspeed, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI) using 0.8 s gantry rotation. The corresponding range of radiation dose over which images were acquired was 0.3-26.4 mGy. Nine observers independently performed three specific tasks, namely: (1) To detect a 3.2 mm nodule of 23 HU; (2) To detect 3.2 mm nodules of varying attenuation (-509 to -154 HU); and (3) To detect nodules varying in size (1.6-9 mm) and attenuation (-509 to 110 HU). A two-alternative forced-choice test was used in order to determine the limits of nodule detection in terms of the proportion of correct responses (Pcorr, related to the area under the ROC curve) as a summary metric of observer performance. The radiation dose levels for detection of 99% of nodules in each task were as follows: Task 1 (1 mGy); Task 2 (5 mGy); and Task 3 (7 mGy). The corresponding interobserver confidence limits were 1, 5, and 10 mGy for Tasks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a fivefold increase in the radiation dose required for detection of lower-density nodules (Tasks 1 to 2). Absence of prior knowledge of the nodule size and density (Task 3) corresponds to a significant increase in the minimum required radiation dose. Significant image

  12. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand; Ranouil, Julien; Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier; Walker, Paul; Brunotte, François

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  13. Melt segregation in the Muroto Gabbroic Intrusion, Cape Muroto - Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floess, David; Caricchi, Luca; Wallis, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Melt segregation is a crucial process in igneous petrology and is commonly used to explain characteristic geochemical trends of magmatic rocks (e.g. Brophy 1991), as well as the accumulation of large amounts of eruptible magma (e.g. Bachmann & Bergantz, 2008). In order to gain further insight into the physical processes behind melt segregation we investigated a small-scale, natural setting. The Miocene Muroto Gabbroic Intrusion (MGI) is a 230m thick, layered sill located at Cape Muroto (Shikoku Island - Japan; Yoshizawa, 1953). It was rotated into a near-vertical (~70°) orientation after horizontal emplacement, allowing for easy sampling of the entire sill from bottom to top. We collected ~70 oriented samples for petrographic and geochemical analysis, as well as for structural analysis using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS). A well-defined horizon (zone I) between 50 and 125m from the bottom shows spectacular evidence for the segregation of felsic melts from the mafic mush (Hoshide et al. 2006). Individual, cm- to m-sized, anorthositic melt lenses mainly consist of plagioclase laths with minor cpx. Small diapirs emanate from the melt lenses and clearly indicate the paleo-upward direction of the sill. Zone I is overlaid by a coarse-grained gabbro (zone II) with cm-sized crystals of plag+cpx and no anorthositic segregations can be found. The MGI grades into fine-grained dolerite towards the top and bottom margins of the sill. We modeled the phase relations of a representative MGI gabbro composition (chilled margin) upon cooling using MELTS (Gualda et al. 2012). Extracted physical parameters (i.e. melt and solid densities, melt viscosity) were used as a proxy for melt mobility (Sakamaki et al. 2013). The temporal and spatial evolution of melt mobility within the sill was investigated using the temperature-time curve obtained through a thermal model for the MGI. We observed several peaks for the melt mobility, implying zones of melt drainage (when mobility

  14. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W. Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  15. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    PubMed Central

    Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  16. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Song, You; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut Erik

    2014-11-01

    Due to the production of free radicals, gamma radiation may pose a hazard to living organisms. The high-dose radiation effects have been extensively studied, whereas the ecotoxicity data on low-dose gamma radiation is still limited. The present study was therefore performed using Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to characterize effects of low-dose (15, 70 and 280 mGy) gamma radiation after short-term (48h) exposure. Global transcriptional changes were studied using a combination of high-density oligonucleotide microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs; in this article the phrase gene expression is taken as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression can also be regulated, e.g., at protein stability and translational level) were determined and linked to their biological meanings predicted using both Gene Ontology (GO) and mammalian ortholog-based functional analyses. The plasma glucose level was also measured as a general stress biomarker at the organism level. Results from the microarray analysis revealed a dose-dependent pattern of global transcriptional responses, with 222, 495 and 909 DEGs regulated by 15, 70 and 280 mGy gamma radiation, respectively. Among these DEGs, only 34 were commonly regulated by all radiation doses, whereas the majority of differences were dose-specific. No GO functions were identified at low or medium doses, but repression of DEGs associated with GO functions such as DNA replication, cell cycle regulation and response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed after 280mGy gamma exposure. Ortholog-based toxicity pathway analysis further showed that 15mGy radiation affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA

  17. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Baptista, Mariana Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro; Figueira, Catarina; Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  18. Solid state radiolysis of amino acids in an astrochemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Franco; Angelini, Giancarlo; Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Manchado, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The aliphatic amino acids L-alanine and L-leucine and the aromatic amino acids L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine and L-tryptophan were irradiated in the solid state to a dose of 3.2 MGy. The degree of decomposition was measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Furthermore the degree of radioracemization was measured by optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) spectroscopy. From the DSC measurement a radiolysis rate constant k and the half life T1/2 for each amino acid have been determined and extrapolated to a dose of 14 MGy, which corresponds to the expected total dose delivered by the decay of radionuclides to the organic molecules present in comets and asteroids in 4.6×109 years, the age of the Solar System. It is shown that all the amino acids studied can survive a radiation dose of 14 MGy although they are reduced to 1/4-1/5 of their original value they had at the beginning of the history of the Solar System. Consequently, the amount of alanine or leucine found today in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites is just 1/4-1/5 of the amount originally present at the epoch of the formation of the Solar System 4.6×109 years ago. Among the amino acids studied, tyrosine shows the highest radiation resistance while tryptophan does not combine its relatively high radiation resistance with an elevated level of radioracemization resistance. Apart from the exception of tryptophan, it is shown that the radiolysis rate constants k of all the amino acids studied are in reasonable agreement with the radioracemization rate constant krac.

  19. Evaluation of organ and effective doses during paediatric barium meal examinations using PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Yakoumakis, E; Dimitriadis, A; Gialousis, G; Makri, T; Karavasilis, E; Yakoumakis, N; Georgiou, E

    2015-02-01

    Radiation protection and estimation of the radiological risk in paediatric radiology is essential due to children's significant radiosensitivity and their greater overall health risk. The purpose of this study was to estimate the organ and effective doses of paediatric patients undergoing barium meal (BM) examinations and also to evaluate the assessment of radiation Risk of Exposure Induced cancer Death (REID) to paediatric patients undergoing BM examinations. During the BM studies, fluoroscopy and multiple radiographs are involved. Since direct measurements of the dose in each organ are very difficult if possible at all, clinical measurements of dose-area products (DAPs) and the PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code were involved. In clinical measurements, DAPs were assessed during examination of 51 patients undergoing BM examinations, separated almost equally in three age categories, neonatal, 1- and 5-y old. Organs receiving the highest amounts of radiation during BM examinations were as follows: the stomach (10.4, 10.2 and 11.1 mGy), the gall bladder (7.1, 5.8 and 5.2 mGy) and the spleen (7.5, 8.2 and 4.3 mGy). The three values in the brackets correspond to neonatal, 1- and 5-y-old patients, respectively. For all ages, the main contributors to the total organ and effective doses are the fluoroscopy projections. The average DAP values and absorbed doses to patient were higher for the left lateral projections. The REID was calculated for boys (4.8 × 10(-2), 3.0 × 10(-2) and 2.0 × 10(-2) %) for neonatal, 1- and 5-y old patients, respectively. The corresponding values for girl patients were calculated (12.1 × 10(-2), 5.5 × 10(-2) and 3.4 × 10(-2) %).

  20. Plant Habitat-Conscious White Light Emission of Dy(3+) in Whitlockite-like Phosphates: Reduced Photosynthesis and Inhibition of Bloom Impediment.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tomohiko; Tsuchiya, Tetsuo

    2015-09-30

    It has been pointed out that agricultural crops and other natural plants may be damaged by outdoor lighting systems. Therefore, lighting that does not affect plant growth is needed. To address this problem, we have prepared a new whitlockite-like phosphate Dy-phosphor Ca8MgY1-x-yLaxDyy(PO4)7, which exhibits a yellow-white Dy(3+) luminescence that has a maximum internal quantum efficiency of 65.6% under a 387 nm excitation light for x = 0.10 and y = 0.05. The x dependence of IQE showed two maxima at x = 0.10-0.15 and 0.80-0.85, which could be due to the partial allowance of f-f forbidden transitions by local lattice distortion around the Dy(3+) ions originating from the La incorporation at near end members of Ca8MgY1-x-yLaxDyy(PO4)7. Concentration quenching occurred for x > 0.05. A white light-emitting diode (LED) was fabricated from a UV LED emitting at 385 nm and a Ca8MgY1-x-yLaxDyy(PO4)7 phosphor (Dy-WLED) for which the CIE color coordinates and correlated color temperature were CIE(0.350,0.378) and 4919 K, respectively. Plant cultivation experiments on Chlorella photosynthetic growth and blooming of the short-day plant Cosmos were carried out using the prepared Dy-WLED and reference commercial LEDs. We found that the Dy-WLED substantially reduced the photosynthesis of Chlorella and inhibited bloom impediment in Cosmos. These effects originated especially from the reduction of red-near-IR emissions. Thus, we conclude that the Dy-WLED is a very promising candidate for plant habitat-conscious white LEDs for outdoor lights that can protect both natural plant habitats and crop yields.

  1. Dose and diagnostic image quality in digital tomosynthesis imaging of facial bones in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. M.; Hickling, S.; Elbakri, I. A.; Reed, M.; Wrogemann, J.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of digital tomosynthesis (DT) for pediatric facial bone imaging. We compared the eye lens dose and diagnostic image quality of DT facial bone exams relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT), and investigated whether we could modify our current DT imaging protocol to reduce patient dose while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. We measured the dose to the eye lens for all three modalities using high-sensitivity thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and an anthropomorphic skull phantom. To assess the diagnostic image quality of DT compared to the corresponding DR and CT images, we performed an observer study where the visibility of anatomical structures in the DT phantom images were rated on a four-point scale. We then acquired DT images at lower doses and had radiologists indicate whether the visibility of each structure was adequate for diagnostic purposes. For typical facial bone exams, we measured eye lens doses of 0.1-0.4 mGy for DR, 0.3-3.7 mGy for DT, and 26 mGy for CT. In general, facial bone structures were visualized better with DT then DR, and the majority of structures were visualized well enough to avoid the need for CT. DT imaging provides high quality diagnostic images of the facial bones while delivering significantly lower doses to the lens of the eye compared to CT. In addition, we found that by adjusting the imaging parameters, the DT effective dose can be reduced by up to 50% while maintaining sufficient image quality.

  2. Dosimetry study of diagnostic X-ray using doped iodide normoxic polymer gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. R.; Chang, Y. J.; Hsieh, L. L.; Liu, M. H.; Liu, J. S.; Chu, C. H.; Hsieh, B. T.

    2014-11-01

    In radiotherapy, polymer gel dosimeters are used for three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution. However, the doses are within the Gy range. In this study, we attempted to develop a low-dose 3D dosimeter within the mGy range for diagnostic radiology. The effect of the iodinated compound was used as a dose enhancement sensitizer to enhance the dose sensitivity of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters. This study aims to use N-isopropylacrylamide(NIPAM)-based and methacrylic acid (MAGAT)-based gels to evaluate the potential dose enhancement sensitizer, as well as to compare two gels that may be suitable for measuring diagnostic radiation doses. The suitable formulation of NIPAM gel [5% (w/w) gelatin, 5% (w/w) NIPAM, 3% (w/w) N,N‧-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS), 5 mM tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC), and 87% (w/w) deionized distilled water] and MAGAT gel (4% MAA, 9% gelatin, 87% deionized water, and 10 mM THPC) were used and loaded with clinical iodinated contrast medium agent (Iobitridol, Xenetix® 350). Irradiation was conducted using X-ray computed tomography. The irradiation doses ranged from 0 mGy to 80 mGy. Optical computed tomography was the employed gel measurement system. The results indicate that the iodinated contrast agent yields a quantifiable dose enhancement ratio. The dose enhancement ratios of NIPAM and MAGAT gels are 3.35±0.6 and 1.36±0.3, respectively. The developed NIPAM gel in this study could be suitable for measuring diagnostic radiation doses.

  3. Clinical micro-CT for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Shon, Cheol-Soon; Cho, Bong Hae; Kim, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a clinical computed microtomography (micro-CT) system for dental imaging. While the conventional dental CT simply serves implant treatment, the clinical dental micro-CT may provide clinicians with a histologic evaluation. To investigate the feasibility of the realization of a dental micro-CT, we have constructed an experimental test system which mainly consists of a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder, and a flat-panel detector. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector was measured as a function of magnification based on the measured modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS). The best MTF and DQE performances were achieved at the magnification factor of 3. Similar tendency of the spatial resolving power in tomography was also observed with a wire phantom having a 25 μm diameter. From the investigation of tomographs reconstructed from a humanoid skull phantom, the application of magnification in the system largely reduced both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for a fixed dose at the entrance surface of the detector, 1.2 mGy, while this setup increased the dose at the object plane from 4.7 mGy to 19.1 mGy for the magnification factor from 2 to 4, respectively. Although the quantum mottles at the high magnification factor tackled the practical use in the clinic, the information contained in the magnified CT images was quite promising.

  4. Evaluation based on Monte Carlo simulation of lifetime attributable risk of cancer after neck X-ray radiography.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Han, Seonggyu; Kim, Kie Hwan; Kim, Jungsu; Park, Kyung; Lim, Hyunjong; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-11-01

    At present, concern regarding radiation exposure is increasing with the prevalence of radiologic examination. As radiation damages the human body, we have evaluated medical radiation dose values and studied the importance of optimizing radiation exposure. We measured entrance surface dose (ESD) values using a RANDO(®) phantom (neck) in 94 randomly selected locations in the central region of Korea. Thyroid and organ doses were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations (PCXMC 2.0.1) based on measured values. In addition, the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer was calculated for the thyroid, using the method proposed in the biological effects of ionizing radiation VII report. The average measured ESD values obtained using the RANDO(®) phantom (neck) were antero-posterior 1.33 mGy and lateral 1.23 mGy, for a total of 2.56 mGy. Based on the ESD values measured using the phantom, the organ doses were obtained using a Monte Carlo simulation (PCXMC 2.0.1). The thyroid dose was 1.48 mSv on average. In evaluating the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, a frequency of 0.02 per 100,000 from 2.94 per 100,000 males and a frequency of 0.10 per 100,000 from 16.23 per 100,000 females were found. The risk of cancer was found to be higher when the patient's age was lower, and was also higher in females than in males. It was concluded that beneficial exams in the medical field should not be prohibited because of a statistically small risk, although acknowledgement of the dangers of ionizing radiation is necessary.

  5. Novel PCR primers for the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota designed based on the comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Kyung; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Based on comparative phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences deposited in an RDP database, we constructed a local database of thaumarchaeotal 16S rRNA gene sequences and developed a novel PCR primer specific for the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota. Among 9,727 quality-filtered (chimeral-checked, size >1.2 kb) archaeal sequences downloaded from the RDP database, 1,549 thaumarchaeotal sequences were identified and included in our local database. In our study, Thaumarchaeota included archaeal groups MG-I, SAGMCG-I, SCG, FSCG, RC, and HWCG-III, forming a monophyletic group in the phylogenetic tree. Cluster analysis revealed 114 phylotypes for Thaumarchaeota. The majority of the phylotypes (66.7%) belonged to the MG-I and SCG, which together contained most (93.9%) of the thaumarchaeotal sequences in our local database. A phylum-directed primer was designed from a consensus sequence of the phylotype sequences, and the primer's specificity was evaluated for coverage and tolerance both in silico and empirically. The phylum-directed primer, designated THAUM-494, showed >90% coverage for Thaumarchaeota and <1% tolerance to non-target taxa, indicating high specificity. To validate this result experimentally, PCRs were performed with THAUM-494 in combination with a universal archaeal primer (ARC917R or 1017FAR) and DNAs from five environmental samples to construct clone libraries. THAUM-494 showed a satisfactory specificity in empirical studies, as expected from the in silico results. Phylogenetic analysis of 859 cloned sequences obtained from 10 clone libraries revealed that >95% of the amplified sequences belonged to Thaumarchaeota. The most frequently sampled thaumarchaeotal subgroups in our samples were SCG, MG-I, and SAGMCG-I. To our knowledge, THAUM-494 is the first phylum-level primer for Thaumarchaeota. Furthermore, the high coverage and low tolerance of THAUM-494 will make it a potentially valuable tool in understanding the phylogenetic diversity and

  6. Radiophotoluminescent properties of aluminum oxide crystals doped with carbon and magnesium for use in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Stephen Andrew

    Scope and Method of Study: This work investigates the feasibility of using the radiophotoluminescence (RPL) from carbon and magnesium doped aluminum oxide (Al2O3:C,Mg) as an in vivo detector in radiation therapy. The investigation does not include hospital measurements; instead, the advantages to the technique, material limitations, and other obstacles are identified. The characterization of the RPL signal in the material included spectroscopic investigations, bleaching experiments, determining how the RPL signal behaves with irradiation, identifying sources of background, and investigating the influence of magnesium concentration. Strategies to reduce the background and increase the sensitivity were also investigated. The investigations were completed using two of the three RPL excitation bands, 335 nm (UV) and 615 nm (red). Findings and Conclusions: The results show that both excitation wavelengths exhibit a linear dose response, but UV excitation is superior to red excitation due to a higher signal after irradiation and lower background after bleaching. The grinding of powder does not destroy the defects responsible for the RPL signal. The minimum detectable dose is ˜10 mGy for both single crystals and powder samples when using UV excitation, and ˜200 mGy when using red excitation. A transient signal increase was observed during continuous beam excitation, room light exposure, and keeping the sample in the dark after both bleaching and irradiation. This transient signal increase can be explained by the presence of shallow and optically sensitive trapping centers. Based on the data above, the use of Al2O3:C,Mg in dosimetry would be restricted to applications in radiation therapy where the doses involved are >10 mGy. Current obstacles include the background signal, and increase in signal after bleaching or irradiation due to the thermally or optically stimulated release of electrons from trapping centers populated during the bleaching or irradiation process.

  7. Plant Habitat-Conscious White Light Emission of Dy(3+) in Whitlockite-like Phosphates: Reduced Photosynthesis and Inhibition of Bloom Impediment.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tomohiko; Tsuchiya, Tetsuo

    2015-09-30

    It has been pointed out that agricultural crops and other natural plants may be damaged by outdoor lighting systems. Therefore, lighting that does not affect plant growth is needed. To address this problem, we have prepared a new whitlockite-like phosphate Dy-phosphor Ca8MgY1-x-yLaxDyy(PO4)7, which exhibits a yellow-white Dy(3+) luminescence that has a maximum internal quantum efficiency of 65.6% under a 387 nm excitation light for x = 0.10 and y = 0.05. The x dependence of IQE showed two maxima at x = 0.10-0.15 and 0.80-0.85, which could be due to the partial allowance of f-f forbidden transitions by local lattice distortion around the Dy(3+) ions originating from the La incorporation at near end members of Ca8MgY1-x-yLaxDyy(PO4)7. Concentration quenching occurred for x > 0.05. A white light-emitting diode (LED) was fabricated from a UV LED emitting at 385 nm and a Ca8MgY1-x-yLaxDyy(PO4)7 phosphor (Dy-WLED) for which the CIE color coordinates and correlated color temperature were CIE(0.350,0.378) and 4919 K, respectively. Plant cultivation experiments on Chlorella photosynthetic growth and blooming of the short-day plant Cosmos were carried out using the prepared Dy-WLED and reference commercial LEDs. We found that the Dy-WLED substantially reduced the photosynthesis of Chlorella and inhibited bloom impediment in Cosmos. These effects originated especially from the reduction of red-near-IR emissions. Thus, we conclude that the Dy-WLED is a very promising candidate for plant habitat-conscious white LEDs for outdoor lights that can protect both natural plant habitats and crop yields. PMID:26356303

  8. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Zn(BO2)2:Ce3+ under beta irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Kucuk, Ilker; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of undoped and various Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 powder samples excited by beta irradiation are reported for the first time. Zn(BO2)2:Ce(3+) powder samples were prepared by the nitric acid method (NAM) using the starting oxides [zinc oxide (ZnO), boric acid (H3BO3) and doped element oxide (CeO2)]. The formations of the obtained samples were confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study. Dose responses of Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were investigated after the beta irradiation in the dose range from 143 mGy to 60 Gy. All TL measurements were made on using an automated Risø TL/OSL DA-20 reader. TL emission was detected through a filter pack (Schott BG-39 and Corning 7-59) transmitting between 330 and 480 nm. TL glow curves were obtained using a constant heating rate of 5°C s(-1) from room temperature (RT) to 450°C in an N2 atmosphere. The dose response and minimum detectable dose (MDD) values of the samples were determined. The dose responses of all the samples tested exhibited a superlinear behaviour. MDD value of 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 sample, which shows a high temperature peak at about 230°C, was determined as 96 mGy. MDD values for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were also determined as 682, 501, 635, 320 and 824 mGy, respectively. The trap parameters of undoped and 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were estimated by the computerised glow curve deconvolution method. PMID:26142459

  9. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M.; Bruesewitz, Michael R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-11-01

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice’s routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDIvol). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDIvol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2  ±  0.2 mm using GE’s ‘Plus’ mode reconstruction setting and 5.0  ±  0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24  ±  0.37, 6.20  ±  0.34, and 7.84  ±  0.70 lp cm-1, respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDIvol varied considerably: 6.5-13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8-13.3 mGy (CTDIvol) for the smallest phantom; 9.1-18.4 HU and 9.3-28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8-23.4 HU and 16.0-48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes.

  10. Cell death (apoptosis) in mouse intestine after continuous irradiation with gamma rays and with beta rays from tritiated water

    SciTech Connect

    Ijiri, K.

    1989-04-01

    Apoptosis is a pattern of cell death involving nuclear pycnosis, cytoplasmic condensation, and karyorrhexis. Apoptosis induced by continuous irradiation with gamma rays (externally given by a 137Cs source) or with beta rays (from tritiated water injected ip) was quantified in the crypts of two portions of mouse bowel, the small intestine and descending colon. The time-course change in the incidence of apoptosis after each type of radiation could be explained on the basis of the innate circadian rhythm of the cells susceptible to apoptotic death and of the excretion of tritiated water (HTO) from the body. For 6-h continuous gamma irradiation at various dose rates (0.6-480 mGy/h) and for 6 h after injection of HTO of various radioactivities (0.15-150 GBq per kg body wt), the relationships between dose and incidence of apoptosis were obtained. Survival curves were then constructed from the curves for dose vs incidence of apoptosis. For the calculation of the absorbed dose from HTO, the water content both of the mouse body and of the cells was assumed to be 70%. One megabecquerel of HTO per mouse (i.e., 40 MBq/kg body wt) gave a dose rate of 0.131 mGy/h. The mean lethal doses (D0) were calculated for gamma rays and HTO, and relative biological effectiveness values of HTO relative to gamma rays were obtained. The D0 values for continuous irradiation with gamma rays were 210 mGy for small intestine and 380 mGy for descending colon, and the respective values for HTO were 130 and 280 mGy, indicating the high radiosensitivity of target cells for apoptotic death. The relative biological effectiveness of HTO relative to 137Cs gamma rays for cell killing in both the small intestine and the descending colon in the mouse was 1.4-2.1.

  11. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  12. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  13. In vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography using a new real-time luminescence technique.

    PubMed

    Aznar, M C; Hemdal, B; Medin, J; Marckmann, C J; Andersen, C E; Bøtter-Jensen, L; Andersson, I; Mattsson, S

    2005-04-01

    A dosimetry system based on radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from carbon doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) crystals was developed for in vivo absorbed dose measurements in mammography. A small cylindrical crystal of Al2O3:C (diameter 0.48 mm and length 2 mm) was coupled to the end of a 1 mm diameter optical fibre cable. Owing to their small size and characteristic shape, these probes can be placed on the body surface in the field of view during the examination, without compromising the reading of the mammogram. Our new technique was tested with a mammography unit (Siemens Mammomat 3000) and screen-film technique over a range of clinically relevant X-ray energies. The results were compared with those obtained from an ionization chamber usually used for the determination of absorbed dose in mammography. The reproducibility of measurements was around 3% (1 standard deviation) at 4.5 mGy for both RL and OSL data. The dose response was found to be linear between 4.5 mGy and 30 mGy. The energy dependence of the system is around 18% between 23 kV and 35 kV. In vivo measurements were performed during three patient examinations. It was shown that entrance and exit doses could be measured. The presence of the small probes did not significantly interfere with the diagnostic quality of the images. Entrance doses estimated by RL/OSL results agreed within 3% with entrance surface dose values calculated from the ionization chamber measurements. These results indicate a considerable potential for use in routine control and in vivo dose measurements in mammography.

  14. The effect of moderate glycemic energy bar consumption on blood glucose and mood in dancers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Derrick; Wyon, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ingesting quality carbohydrates has been shown to be essential for dancers. Given that most dance classes take place in the morning, it has been recommended that dancers eat a well-balanced breakfast containing carbohydrates, fats, and protein as a means of fuelling this activity. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a moderate glycemic index energy (MGI) bar or a fasting condition on dancers' blood glucose levels and perceived pleasure-displeasure response during the first dance class of the day. In a randomized counterbalanced design, 10 female preprofessional dance students took their regular scheduled contemporary dance class, on four separate occasions. On each occasion, they consumed either a commercially prepared carbohydrate (CHO)-dense energy bar (47.3 g CHO) or water (FAST). Plasma glucose responses and pleasure-displeasure affect were measured before and at two time points during the class. Dancers who consumed the MGI bar had significantly greater peak blood glucose levels at all time points than those who fasted (p<0.05). Regarding affective state measures, participants who had breakfast had significantly greater pleasure scores than those who only ingested water(p<0.05). In conclusion, results suggest that CHO with an MGI value positively impacts blood glucose concentrations during a dance class. Further, we conclude that skipping breakfast can have an unfavorable effect on the pleasure-displeasure state of dancers. These findings highlight the impact of breakfast on how one feels, as well as the physiological and metabolic benefits of CHO as an exogenous energy source in dancers. PMID:24647459

  15. [Effects of Low and Sublethal Doses of γ-Radiation on Mesenchymal and Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Brain].

    PubMed

    Posypanova, G A; Moskaleva, E Yu; Rodina, A V; Semochkina, Yu P; Ratushnjak, M G; Perevozchikova, V G

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exist in the brain in addition to the neural stem cells (NSC). The aim of this work was to investigate the sensitivity of mouse brain MSC (MSC(BR)) to sublethal doses of γ-radiation in comparison with the sensitivity of bone marrow MSC (MSC(BM)) and NSC and to study the effects of γ-irradiation at low doses on these cells. Cells were exposed to γ-radiation (137Cs) at the doses of 10 to 200 mGy at a dose rate of 10 mGy/min; higher doses were achieved at the dose rates of 200 and 500 mGy/min (60Co). The survival of cells was assessed by counting living cells after staining with trypan blue in the Goryaev's chamber or using the MTT test for NSC growing as neurospheres. SP fraction was measured using flow cytometry after incubation with rhodamine-123. Exposure to the doses in the range of 10 to 500 mGy stimulated cell proliferation. The maximum decrease in the cells number was seen on the seventh day after irradiation and it was practically the same for the MSC(BR) and MSC(BM). NCS were more radiosensitive than MSC. Exposure to the doses of 100 to 500 mGy stimulated cells proliferation of all SCs except of MSC(BM). It was shown that the size of SP fraction of MSC(BR) was diminished after γ-irradiation at low doses. Thus, the stimulation of cell proliferation after γ-irradiation at low doses is accompanied by the redistribution of distinct cell subpopulations: the decrease in the SP fraction and the increase in the general population of cells were observed.

  16. Mechanical properties and phase composition of potential biodegradable Mg-Zn-Mn-base alloys with addition of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stulikova, Ivana; Smola, Bohumil

    2010-10-15

    Mechanical properties and creep resistance of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the as cast as well as in the T5 condition were compared to those of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the same conditions. Yield tensile stress and ultimate tensile strength of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy are slightly better in the temperature range 20 deg. C-400 deg. C than these of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Better thermal stability of ultimate tensile strength was observed in the T5 treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy than in this material in the as cast condition. An outstanding creep resistance at 225 deg. C-350 deg. C found in the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy is due to the existence of the 18R long period stacking structure persisting in this alloy even a long heat treatment of 500 deg. C/32 h. No similar stacking effects happen when Ce substitutes Y in approximately the same concentration. The creep resistance deteriorates considerably in the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Rectangular particles of the equilibrium Mg{sub 12}Ce phase dominate in the microstructure of as cast as well as of high temperature heat-treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. A population of small oval particles containing Mg and Zn develops additionally during annealing of this alloy. These particles pin effectively dislocations and can be responsible for the better thermal stability of the T5 treated material.

  17. Methodology for estimating radiation dose rates to freshwater biota exposed to radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; O`Neal, B.R.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} (1 rad d{sup {minus}1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup {minus}1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE`s recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0. 1 mGy h{sup {minus}1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be conducted.

  18. Dosimetry in small-animal CT using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.-L.; Park, S.-J.; Jeon, P.-H.; Jo, B.-D.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-animal computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging devices are increasingly being used in biological research. While investigators are mainly interested in high-contrast, low-noise, and high-resolution anatomical images, relatively large radiation doses are required, and there is also growing concern over the radiological risk from preclinical experiments. This study was conducted to determine the radiation dose in a mouse model for dosimetric estimates using the GEANT4 application for tomographic emission simulations (GATE) and to extend its techniques to various small-animal CT applications. Radiation dose simulations were performed with the same parameters as those for the measured micro-CT data, using the MOBY phantom, a pencil ion chamber and an electrometer with a CT detector. For physical validation of radiation dose, absorbed dose of brain and liver in mouse were evaluated to compare simulated results with physically measured data using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The mean difference between simulated and measured data was less than 2.9% at 50 kVp X-ray source. The absorbed doses of 37 brain tissues and major organs of the mouse were evaluated according to kVp changes. The absorbed dose over all of the measurements in the brain (37 types of tissues) consistently increased and ranged from 42.4 to 104.0 mGy. Among the brain tissues, the absorbed dose of the hypothalamus (157.8-414.30 mGy) was the highest for the beams at 50-80 kVp, and that of the corpus callosum (11.2-26.6 mGy) was the lowest. These results can be used as a dosimetric database to control mouse doses and preclinical targeted radiotherapy experiments. In addition, to accurately calculate the mouse-absorbed dose, the X-ray spectrum, detector alignment, and uncertainty in the elemental composition of the simulated materials must be accurately modeled.

  19. Dynamic changes in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Nishad, S; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-02-01

    Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. Though biological effects of high dose radiation exposures have been well accepted, studies on low-to-moderate dose exposures (in the range of 50-500 mGy) have been strongly debated even as researchers continue to search for elusive 'radiation signatures' in humans. Proteins are considered as dynamic functional players that drive cellular responses. However, there is little proteomic information available in context of human exposure to ionizing radiation. In this study, we determined differential expressed proteins in G0 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals 1h and 4h after 'ex vivo' exposure with two radiation doses (300 mGy and 1 Gy). Twenty-three proteins were found to be significantly altered in irradiated cells when compared to sham irradiated cells with fold change ± 1.5-fold (p ≤ 0.05), with only three proteins showing ≥ 2.5-fold change, either with dose or with time. Mass spectrometry analyses identified redox sensor protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC-1), the antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-6 and the pro-survival molecular chaperone 78 KDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78) among the 23 modulated proteins. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the twenty-three radiation responsive protein spots was found to be 33.7% for 300 mGy and 48.3% for 1 Gy. We thus, conclude that the radiation proteomic response of G0 human PBMCs, which are in the resting stage of the cell cycle, involves moderate upregulation of protective mechanisms, with low inter-individual variability. This study will help further our understanding of cellular effects of low dose acute radiation in humans and contribute toward differential biomarker discovery. PMID:26921016

  20. [Effects of Low and Sublethal Doses of γ-Radiation on Mesenchymal and Neural Stem Cells from Mouse Brain].

    PubMed

    Posypanova, G A; Moskaleva, E Yu; Rodina, A V; Semochkina, Yu P; Ratushnjak, M G; Perevozchikova, V G

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) exist in the brain in addition to the neural stem cells (NSC). The aim of this work was to investigate the sensitivity of mouse brain MSC (MSC(BR)) to sublethal doses of γ-radiation in comparison with the sensitivity of bone marrow MSC (MSC(BM)) and NSC and to study the effects of γ-irradiation at low doses on these cells. Cells were exposed to γ-radiation (137Cs) at the doses of 10 to 200 mGy at a dose rate of 10 mGy/min; higher doses were achieved at the dose rates of 200 and 500 mGy/min (60Co). The survival of cells was assessed by counting living cells after staining with trypan blue in the Goryaev's chamber or using the MTT test for NSC growing as neurospheres. SP fraction was measured using flow cytometry after incubation with rhodamine-123. Exposure to the doses in the range of 10 to 500 mGy stimulated cell proliferation. The maximum decrease in the cells number was seen on the seventh day after irradiation and it was practically the same for the MSC(BR) and MSC(BM). NCS were more radiosensitive than MSC. Exposure to the doses of 100 to 500 mGy stimulated cells proliferation of all SCs except of MSC(BM). It was shown that the size of SP fraction of MSC(BR) was diminished after γ-irradiation at low doses. Thus, the stimulation of cell proliferation after γ-irradiation at low doses is accompanied by the redistribution of distinct cell subpopulations: the decrease in the SP fraction and the increase in the general population of cells were observed. PMID:27245003

  1. [Clozapine intoxication: theoretical aspects and forensic-medical examination ].

    PubMed

    Shigeev, S V; Ivanova, N A; Ivanov, S V

    2013-01-01

    This literature review is focused on diagnostics of acute clozapine intoxication with the fatal outcome. According to the Russian authors, clozapine intoxication ranks first in the structure of criminal poisoning and accounted for 99.7% of all the cases that occurred in Moscow during the period from 2003 to 2006. Toximetric investigations of clinical manifestations of clozapine intoxication revealed that the threshold clozapine concentration in blood is 0.12 ± 0.06 mg/I, the critical and lethal concentrations are 1.01 ± 0.2 mg/I and 3.5 ± 1.5 mg/I respectively. Autopsy on corpses of the victims of clozapine intoxication showed that most clozapine-induced pathological changes have a non-specific character (including largely circulatory disorders and dystrophic changes in parenchymatous organs). Clozapine poisoning is associated with the lengthening of QT-interval on ECG; at the values in excess of 500 ms, the risk of severe arrhythmia and sudden death significantly increases. Clozapine intake may lead to the development of potentially fatal myocarditis (the so-called clozapine-associated eosinophilic myocardium) in somatically healthy subjects. Foreign researchers report the possibility of a post-mortem increase of blood clozapine content compared with its antemortem level. They also showed that simultaneous use of substances stimulating activity of cytochrome P-450 enzymes (ethyl alcohol, finlepsin, fenitrin, nicotine) and clozapine accelerates metabolism and thereby reduces clozapine concentration in blood. It is concluded that comprehensive investigations of clozapine intoxication are needed taking into consideration pathomorphological changes induced by this agent, its potential interaction with other factors influencing human body, and the results of forensic chemical expertise of the fatal cases. PMID:25474921

  2. Evaluation based on Monte Carlo simulation of lifetime attributable risk of cancer after neck X-ray radiography.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Han, Seonggyu; Kim, Kie Hwan; Kim, Jungsu; Park, Kyung; Lim, Hyunjong; Kim, Jungmin

    2015-11-01

    At present, concern regarding radiation exposure is increasing with the prevalence of radiologic examination. As radiation damages the human body, we have evaluated medical radiation dose values and studied the importance of optimizing radiation exposure. We measured entrance surface dose (ESD) values using a RANDO(®) phantom (neck) in 94 randomly selected locations in the central region of Korea. Thyroid and organ doses were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations (PCXMC 2.0.1) based on measured values. In addition, the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer was calculated for the thyroid, using the method proposed in the biological effects of ionizing radiation VII report. The average measured ESD values obtained using the RANDO(®) phantom (neck) were antero-posterior 1.33 mGy and lateral 1.23 mGy, for a total of 2.56 mGy. Based on the ESD values measured using the phantom, the organ doses were obtained using a Monte Carlo simulation (PCXMC 2.0.1). The thyroid dose was 1.48 mSv on average. In evaluating the LAR of thyroid cancer incidence, a frequency of 0.02 per 100,000 from 2.94 per 100,000 males and a frequency of 0.10 per 100,000 from 16.23 per 100,000 females were found. The risk of cancer was found to be higher when the patient's age was lower, and was also higher in females than in males. It was concluded that beneficial exams in the medical field should not be prohibited because of a statistically small risk, although acknowledgement of the dangers of ionizing radiation is necessary. PMID:25920438

  3. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  4. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Zn(BO2)2:Ce3+ under beta irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Kucuk, Ilker; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of undoped and various Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 powder samples excited by beta irradiation are reported for the first time. Zn(BO2)2:Ce(3+) powder samples were prepared by the nitric acid method (NAM) using the starting oxides [zinc oxide (ZnO), boric acid (H3BO3) and doped element oxide (CeO2)]. The formations of the obtained samples were confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study. Dose responses of Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were investigated after the beta irradiation in the dose range from 143 mGy to 60 Gy. All TL measurements were made on using an automated Risø TL/OSL DA-20 reader. TL emission was detected through a filter pack (Schott BG-39 and Corning 7-59) transmitting between 330 and 480 nm. TL glow curves were obtained using a constant heating rate of 5°C s(-1) from room temperature (RT) to 450°C in an N2 atmosphere. The dose response and minimum detectable dose (MDD) values of the samples were determined. The dose responses of all the samples tested exhibited a superlinear behaviour. MDD value of 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 sample, which shows a high temperature peak at about 230°C, was determined as 96 mGy. MDD values for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were also determined as 682, 501, 635, 320 and 824 mGy, respectively. The trap parameters of undoped and 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were estimated by the computerised glow curve deconvolution method.

  5. Potential of dosage reduction in cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) for radiological diagnostics of the paranasal sinuses.

    PubMed

    Güldner, C; Ningo, A; Voigt, J; Diogo, I; Heinrichs, J; Weber, R; Wilhelm, T; Fiebich, M

    2013-03-01

    More than 10 years ago, cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) was introduced in ENT radiology. Until now, the focus of research was to evaluate clinical limits of this technique. The aim of this work is the evaluation of specific dosages and the identification of potential optimization in the performance of CBCT of the paranasal sinuses. Based on different tube parameters (tube current, tube voltage, and rotation angles), images of the nose and the paranasal sinuses were taken on a phantom head with the Accu-I-tomo F17 (Morita, Kyoto, Japan). The dosages applied to the lens and parotid gland were measured with OSL dosimetry. The imaging quality was evaluated by independent observers. All datasets were reviewed according to a checklist of surgically important anatomic structures. Even for lowest radiation exposure (4 mA, 76 kV, 180°, computed tomography dosage index (CTDI) = 1.8 mGy), the imaging quality was sufficient. Of course a significant reduction of the imaging quality could be seen, so a reliable mean was set for 4 mA, 84 kV, and 180° rotation angle (CTDI = 2.4 mGy). In this combination, a reduction of 92 % in lens-dose and of 77 % of dosage at the parotid gland was observed in comparison to the maximal possible adjustments (8 mA, 90 kV, 360°, CTDI = 10.9 mGy). There is potential for optimization in CBCT. Changing the rotation angle (180° instead of 360°) leads to a dose reduction of 50 %. Furthermore from clinical point of view in case of chronic rhinosinusitis a relevant reduction of dosage is possible. Therefore, it is necessary to intensify the interdisciplinary discussion about the disease specifics required quality of imaging.

  6. Measurement of eye lens dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with different cone-beam computed tomography acquisition techniques

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, Deepak; Thakur, Kalpna; Pawar, Amol; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Munish; Kulkarni, M. S.; Sharma, S. D.; Kannan, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work was to measure patient eye lens dose for different cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocols of Varian's On-Board Imaging (OBI) system using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD) and to study the variation in eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens. During the experimental measurements, OSLD was placed on the patient between the eyebrows of both eyes in line of nose during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens doses. The eye lens dose measurements were carried out for three different cone-beam acquisition protocols (standard dose head, low-dose head [LDH], and high-quality head [HQH]) of Varian OBI. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter and eye lens. Measured eye lens doses for standard head and HQH protocols were in the range of 1.8–3.2 mGy and 4.5–9.9 mGy, respectively. However, the measured eye lens dose for the LDH protocol was in the range of 0.3–0.7 mGy. The measured data indicate that eye lens dose to patient depends on the selected imaging protocol. It was also observed that eye lens dose does not depend on patient geometry but strongly depends on distance between eye lens and treatment field isocenter. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should not be counterbalanced by inappropriate selection of imaging protocol, especially for very intense imaging protocol. PMID:27651564

  7. Effects of CT dose and nodule characteristics on lung-nodule detectability in a cohort of 90 national lung screening trial patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Hoffman, John M.; Kim, H. J. Grace; Brown, Matthew S.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening CT is already performed at low dose. There are many techniques to reduce the dose even further, but it is not clear how such techniques will affect nodule detectability. In this work, we used an in-house CAD algorithm to evaluate detectability. 90348 patients and their raw CT data files were drawn from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) database. All scans were acquired at ~2 mGy CTDIvol with fixed tube current, 1 mm slice thickness, and B50 reconstruction kernel on a Sensation 64 scanner (Siemens Healthcare). We used the raw CT data to simulate two additional reduced-dose scans for each patient corresponding to 1 mGy (50%) and 0.5 mGy (25%). Radiologists' findings on the NLST reader forms indicated 65 nodules in the cohort, which we subdivided based on LungRADS criteria. For larger category 4 nodules, median sensitivities were 100% at all three dose levels, and mean sensitivity decreased with dose. For smaller nodules meeting the category 2 or 3 criteria, the dose dependence was less obvious. Overall, mean patient-level sensitivity varied from 38.5% at 100% dose to 40.4% at 50% dose, a difference of only 1.9%. However, the false-positive rate quadrupled from 1 per case at 100% dose to 4 per case at 25% dose. Dose reduction affected lung-nodule detectability differently depending on the LungRADS category, and the false-positive rate was very sensitive at sub-screening dose levels. Thus, care should be taken to adapt CAD for the very challenging noise characteristics of screening.

  8. SU-E-I-34: Evaluating Use of AEC to Lower Dose for Lung Cancer Screening CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Arbique, G; Anderson, J; Guild, J; Duan, X; Malguria, N; Omar, H; Brewington, C; Zhang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Lung Screening Trial mandated manual low dose CT technique factors, where up to a doubling of radiation output could be used over a regular to large patient size range. Recent guidance from the AAPM and ACR for lung cancer CT screening recommends radiation output adjustment for patient size either through AEC or a manual technique chart. This study evaluated the use of AEC for output control and dose reduction. Methods: The study was performed on a multidetector helical CT scanner (Aquillion ONE, Toshiba Medical) equipped with iterative reconstruction (ADIR-3D), AEC was adjusted with a standard deviation (SD) image quality noise index. The protocol SD parameter was incrementally increased to reduce patient population dose while image quality was evaluated by radiologist readers scoring the clinical utility of images on a Likert scale. Results: Plots of effective dose vs. body size (water cylinder diameter reported by the scanner) demonstrate monotonic increase in patient dose with increasing patient size. At the initial SD setting of 19 the average CTDIvol for a standard size patient was ∼ 2.0 mGy (1.2 mSv effective dose). This was reduced to ∼1.0 mGy (0.5 mSv) at an SD of 25 with no noticeable reduction in clinical utility of images as demonstrated by Likert scoring. Plots of effective patient diameter and BMI vs body size indicate that these metrics could also be used for manual technique charts. Conclusion: AEC offered consistent and reliable control of radiation output in this study. Dose for a standard size patient was reduced to one-third of the 3 mGy CTDIvol limit required for ACR accreditation of lung cancer CT screening. Gary Arbique: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Cecelia Brewington: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Di Zhang: Employee, Toshiba America Medical Systems.

  9. Examining Mechanisms of Groundwater Hg(II) Treatment by Reactive Materials: An EXAFS Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Blair D.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Blowes, David W.

    2012-02-07

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to examine mechanisms of Hg(II) removal by reactive materials proposed for groundwater treatment. These materials included granular iron filings (GIF), 1:1 (w/w) mixtures of metallurgical granular Fe powder + elemental S (MGI+S) and elemental Cu + elemental S (Cu+S), granular activated carbon (GAC), attapulgite clay (ATP), ATP treated with 2-amino-5-thiol-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATP-a), and ATP treated with 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATP-d). Following treatment of simulated groundwater containing 4 mg L{sup -1} Hg for 8 or 16 days, the solution pH values ranged from 6.8 to 8.8 and Eh values ranged from +400 to -400 mV. Large decreases in aqueous Hg concentrations were observed for ATP-d (>99%), GIF (95%), MGI+S (94%), and Cu+S (90%). Treatment of Hg was less effective using ATP (29%), ATP-a (69%), and GAC (78%). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of Hg on GIF, MGI+S, and GAC indicated the presence of an Hg-O bond at 2.04-2.07 {angstrom}, suggesting that Hg was bound to GIF corrosion products or to oxygen complexes associated with water sorbed to activated carbon. In contrast, bond lengths ranging from 2.35 to 2.48 {angstrom} were observed for Hg in Cu+S, ATP-a, and ATP-d treatments, suggesting the formation of Hg-S bonds.

  10. Examining mechanisms of groundwater Hg(II) treatment by reactive materials: an EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Blair D; Ptacek, Carol J; Lindsay, Matthew B J; Blowes, David W

    2011-12-15

    Laboratory batch experiments were conducted to examine mechanisms of Hg(II) removal by reactive materials proposed for groundwater treatment. These materials included granular iron filings (GIF), 1:1 (w/w) mixtures of metallurgical granular Fe powder + elemental S (MGI+S) and elemental Cu + elemental S (Cu+S), granular activated carbon (GAC), attapulgite clay (ATP), ATP treated with 2-amino-5-thiol-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATP-a), and ATP treated with 2,5-dimercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole (ATP-d). Following treatment of simulated groundwater containing 4 mg L(-1) Hg for 8 or 16 days, the solution pH values ranged from 6.8 to 8.8 and Eh values ranged from +400 to -400 mV. Large decreases in aqueous Hg concentrations were observed for ATP-d (>99%), GIF (95%), MGI+S (94%), and Cu+S (90%). Treatment of Hg was less effective using ATP (29%), ATP-a (69%), and GAC (78%). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of Hg on GIF, MGI+S, and GAC indicated the presence of an Hg-O bond at 2.04-2.07 Å, suggesting that Hg was bound to GIF corrosion products or to oxygen complexes associated with water sorbed to activated carbon. In contrast, bond lengths ranging from 2.35 to 2.48 Å were observed for Hg in Cu+S, ATP-a, and ATP-d treatments, suggesting the formation of Hg-S bonds.

  11. Incidence of dementia among atomic-bomb survivors--Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Mimori, Yasuyo; Miyachi, Takafumi; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Sasaki, Hideo

    2009-06-15

    Radiotherapy has been reported to cause neuropsychological dysfunction. Here we examined whether exposure to atomic bomb radiation affected the incidence of dementia among 2286 atomic bomb survivors and controls - all members of the Adult Health Study cohort. Study subjects were non-demented and aged >or=60 years at baseline examination and had been exposed in 1945 at >or=13 years of age to a relatively low dose (mGy group, 17.0 in the 5-499 mGy group, and 15.2 in the >or=500 mGy group. Alzheimer disease was the predominant type of dementia in each dose category. After adjustment for potential risk factors, radiation exposure did not affect the incidence rate of either all dementia or any of its subtypes. No case of dementia had a history of therapeutic cranial irradiation. Although we found no relationship between radiation exposure and the development of dementia among atomic bomb survivors exposed at >or=13 years old in this longitudinal study, effects on increased risk of early death among atomic bomb survivors will be considered. PMID:19327783

  12. Radiation Exposure in Coronary Angiography: A Comparison of Cineangiography and Fluorography

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jongmin; Lee, Soo Yong; Chon, Min Ku; Lee, Sang Hyun; Hwang, Ki Won; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, June Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Coronary angiography (CAG) is the gold standard for diagnosing coronary artery disease. However, exposure to ionizing radiation delivered during CAG has various negative biological effects on humans. In this study, there was an evaluation of whether fluorography resulted in decreased radiation exposure, as compared with cineangiography. Subjects and Methods Fifty-five patients were prospectively enrolled and divided into two CAG groups, in accordance with the operator's professional discretion: a conventional cineangiography group versus a fluorography group. Fluorography refers to the photography of fluoroscopic images that are retrospectively stored, e.g., using the "Store fluoro" function of the Siemens cardiac angiography system. The primary outcomes included the air kinetic energy released per unit mass {air kerma (AK) mGy} and the dose (kerma)-area product (DAP; µGy · m2), both measured using built-in software in the Siemens system. The secondary outcomes included the total procedure time and amount of contrast agent used with each CAG method. Results The total AK and DAP were significantly lower in the fluorography group (159.3±64.9 mGy and 1337.9±629.6 µGy · m2, respectively) than in the cineangiography group (326.9±107.5 mGy and 2341.1±849.9 µGy · m2, respectively; p=0.000 for both). The total procedure time (cineangiography vs. fluorography, 12.8±4.7 vs. 12.5±2.9 min; p=0.779) and contrast agent amount (136.1±28.3 vs. 126.3±25.7, p=0.214) were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Fluorography is a useful method to decrease the radiation exposure in selected patients requiring CAG. PMID:26617646

  13. Performance evaluation of iterative reconstruction algorithms for achieving CT radiation dose reduction - a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Cristina T; Tamm, Eric P; Cody, Dianna D; Liu, Xinming; Jensen, Corey T; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas; Rong, X John

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize image quality and dose performance with GE CT iterative reconstruction techniques, adaptive statistical iterative recontruction (ASiR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), over a range of typical to low-dose intervals using the Catphan 600 and the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantoms. The scope of the project was to quantitatively describe the advantages and limitations of these approaches. The Catphan 600 phantom, supplemented with a fat-equivalent oval ring, was scanned using a GE Discovery HD750 scanner at 120 kVp, 0.8 s rotation time, and pitch factors of 0.516, 0.984, and 1.375. The mA was selected for each pitch factor to achieve CTDIvol values of 24, 18, 12, 6, 3, 2, and 1 mGy. Images were reconstructed at 2.5 mm thickness with filtered back-projection (FBP); 20%, 40%, and 70% ASiR; and MBIR. The potential for dose reduction and low-contrast detectability were evaluated from noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measurements in the CTP 404 module of the Catphan. Hounsfield units (HUs) of several materials were evaluated from the cylinder inserts in the CTP 404 module, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated from the air insert. The results were con-firmed in the anthropomorphic Kyoto Kagaku abdomen phantom at 6, 3, 2, and 1mGy. MBIR reduced noise levels five-fold and increased CNR by a factor of five compared to FBP below 6mGy CTDIvol, resulting in a substantial improvement in image quality. Compared to ASiR and FBP, HU in images reconstructed with MBIR were consistently lower, and this discrepancy was reversed by higher pitch factors in some materials. MBIR improved the conspicuity of the high-contrast spatial resolution bar pattern, and MTF quantification confirmed the superior spatial resolution performance of MBIR versus FBP and ASiR at higher dose levels. While ASiR and FBP were relatively insensitive to changes in dose and pitch, the spatial resolution for MBIR

  14. EPR dosimetry of whole deciduous tooth using a constant rotation goniometer and background subtraction with a dentine standard

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    We report here a rapid method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry of dental enamel which will allow screening of whole deciduous teeth of children following a nuclear accident. The technique requires virtually no sample preparation and is capable of measuring doses of less than 100 mGy. Teeth may be scanned for threshold dose levels without the need for added calibration doses and those of particular interest may be more accurately examined using the additive dose method. The success of the technique lies in the elimination of anisotropic effects by rotation of spectra from the empty cavity and a standard background tooth. Normalization using in- cavity Mn++ standards is also employed.

  15. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946-1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  16. Design of a 10-bit segmented current-steering digital-to-analog converter in CMOS 65 nm technology for the bias of new generation readout chips in high radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Robertis, G.; Loddo, F.; Mattiazzo, S.; Pacher, L.; Pantano, D.; Tamma, C.

    2016-01-01

    A new pixel front end chip for HL-LHC experiments in CMOS 65nm technology is under development by the CERN RD53 collaboration together with the Chipix65 INFN project. This work describes the design of a 10-bit segmented current-steering Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC) to provide a programmable bias current to the analog blocks of the circuit. The main requirements are monotonicity, good linearity, limited area consumption and radiation hardness up to 10 MGy. The DAC was prototyped and electrically tested, while irradiation tests will be performed in Autumn 2015.

  17. Rapid and efficient copper-catalyzed Finkelstein reaction of (hetero)aromatics under continuous-flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao; Ichikawa, Saki; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    A general, rapid, and efficient method for the copper-catalyzed Finkelstein reaction of (hetero)aromatics has been developed using continuous flow to generate a variety of aryl iodides. The described method can tolerate a broad spectrum of functional groups, including N-H and O-H groups. Additionally, in lieu of isolation, the aryl iodide solutions were used in two distinct multistep continuous-flow processes (amidation and Mg-I exchange/nucleophilic addition) to demonstrate the flexibility of this method.

  18. [Study of the influence of low-dose γ-irradiation on the functional state of peripheral blood erythrocytes of rats].

    PubMed

    Izmest'eva, O S; Luzianina, A A; Ershova, I L; Zhavoronkov, L P

    2014-01-01

    Low-intensity radiation at the absorbed dose of 4 μGy/min is a stressor of medium strength. In male Wistar rats, a pronounced and long-lasting response occurs in the system of red blood cells at the accumulated dose of 4.8 mGy. Functional deficiency of circulating cells was evaluated by the resistance of erythrocytes to acid lyse and the activity of the main antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). The minimum "threshold" doses of radiation that cause systemic reactions occur in the range of units of miligrey. PMID:25775841

  19. Treatment of Alzheimer Disease With CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eugene R.; Hosfeld, Victor D.; Nadolski, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) primarily affects older adults. This neurodegenerative disorder is the most common cause of dementia and is a leading source of their morbidity and mortality. Patient care costs in the United States are about 200 billion dollars and will more than double by 2040. This case report describes the remarkable improvement in a patient with advanced AD in hospice who received 5 computed tomography scans of the brain, about 40 mGy each, over a period of 3 months. The mechanism appears to be radiation-induced upregulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against AD, which partially restored cognition, memory, speech, movement, and appetite. PMID:27103883

  20. Chemical tagging with Gaia-ESO Survey and Gaia-RVS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiglion, G.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method devoted to chemical tagging for Galactic Archeology. In the context of the Gaia-ESO Survey (GES) and the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC), we aim at preparing the Gaia-Radial Velocity Spectrograph analysis, which will provide ~ 2×106 spectra covering the IR CaII triplet domain (R ~ 11 500), with sufficient SNR to perform chemical tagging. Our method will be integrated in the Gaia DPAC Apsis pipeline (CU8, Astrophysical Parameters) and we test it with GES GIRAFFE spectra (MEDUSA mode, HR10 & HR21) deriving abundances of MgI in 168 stars.

  1. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m−2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  2. Use of different oral hygiene strategies in children with cerebral palsy: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Maiya, Ashwini; Shetty, Y. Rajmohan; Rai, Kavita; Padmanabhan, Vivek; Hegde, Amitha M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral palsy (CP) is described as a group of conditions usually occurring in childhood, where children have motor dysfunction and are unable to adequately master the necessary techniques of plaque control, which ultimately leads to dental caries and periodontal problems. Aims: The objective of this study was to educate the parents/caretakers/institution staff and children with CP about the different preventive home care measures and to evaluate the oral hygiene and gingival health status of these children before and after the institution of different preventive home care measures. Materials and Methods: A total of 64 individuals with CP, aged between 6 and 18 years, were examined for their oral hygiene and gingival health status, after which the parents/caretakers received a health education program. The children were then randomly divided into four groups. Each group was administered a specific preventive home care measure (mechanical and chemotherapeutic) to be followed for a period of 6 weeks, and the oral hygiene and the gingival health status were recorded at the end of 1 week, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks. The data were then subjected to statistical analysis. Results: In the sample of 64 children diagnosed with CP, the mean OHI(S) score among the groups of children who were given different preventive home care measures was compared at baseline, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks. Group 4 showed a marked reduction in the OHI(S) score measured from baseline to 6 weeks, when compared to the other three groups which wa statistically very highly significant (P < 0.001) The mean MGI score was compared at baseline, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 6 weeks home, Group 4 showed a marked reduction in the MGI score measured from baseline to 6 weeks, when compared to the other three groups. When the mean MGI score was compared from baseline to 6 weeks, there was a gradual decrease in the MGI score, which was statistically highly significant between baseline and 1 week (P < 0.05) and

  3. DIII-D Studies of Massive Gas Injection Fast Shutdowns for Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hollmann, E; Jernigan, T; Antar, G; Bakhtiari, M; Boedo, J; Combs, S; Evans, T; Gray, D; Groth, M; Huymphreys, D; Lasnier, C; Moyer, R; Parks, P; Rudakov, D; Strait, E; Wesley, J; West, W; Whyte, D; Yu, J

    2006-06-19

    Injection of massive quantities of gas is a promising technique for fast shutdown of ITER for the purpose of avoiding divertor and first wall damage from disruptions. Previous experiments using massive gas injection (MGI) to terminate discharges in the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated rapid shutdown with reduced wall heating and halo currents (relative to natural disruptions) and with very small runaway electron (RE) generation [1]. Figure 1 shows time traces which give an overview of shutdown time scales. Typically, of order 5 x 10{sup 22} Ar neutrals are fired over a pulse of 25 ms duration into stationary (non-disrupting) discharges. The observed results are consistent with the following scenario: within several ms of the jet trigger, sufficient Ar neutrals are delivered to the plasma to cause the edge temperature to collapse, initiating the inward propagation of a cold front. The exit flow of the jet [Fig. 1(a)] has a {approx} 9 ms rise time; so the quantity of neutrals which initiates the edge collapse is small (<10{sup 20}). When the cold front reaches q {approx} 2 surface, global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes are destabilized [2], mixing hot core plasma with edge impurities. Here, q is the safety factor. Most (>90%) of the plasma thermal energy is lost via impurity radiation during this thermal quench (TQ) phase. Conducted heat loads to the wall are low because of the cold edge temperature. After the TQ, the plasma is very cold (of order several eV), so conducted wall (halo) currents are low, even if the current channel contacts the wall. The plasma current profile broadens and begins decaying resistively. The decaying current generates a toroidal electric field which can accelerate REs; however, RE beam formation appears to be limited in MGI shutdowns. Presently, it is thought that the conducted heat flux and halo current mitigation qualities of the MGI shutdown technique will scale well to a reactor-sized tokamak. However, because of the larger RE gain

  4. Uterine Artery Embolization for Leiomyomata: Optimization of the Radiation Dose to the Patient Using a Flat-Panel Detector Angiographic Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Sapoval, Marc Pellerin, Olivier; Rehel, Jean-Luc; Houdoux, Nicolas; Rahmoune, Ghizlaine; Aubert, Bernard; Fitton, Isabelle

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography with a flat-panel detector angiographic suite to reduce the dose delivered to patients during uterine fibroid embolization (UFE). A two-step prospective dosimetric study was conducted, with a flat-panel detector angiography suite (Siemens Axiom Artis) integrating automatic exposure control (AEC), during 20 consecutive UFEs. Patient dosimetry was performed using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters placed on the lower posterior pelvis skin. The first step (10 patients; group A) consisted in UFE (bilateral embolization, calibrated microspheres) performed using the following parameters: standard fluoroscopy (15 pulses/s) and angiography (3 frames/s). The second step (next consecutive 10 patients; group B) used low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy (7.5 pulses/s for catheterization and 3 pulses/s for embolization) and angiography (1 frame/s). We also recorded the total dose-area product (DAP) delivered to the patient and the fluoroscopy time as reported by the manufacturer's dosimetry report. The mean peak skin dose decreased from 2.4 {+-} 1.3 to 0.4 {+-} 0.3 Gy (P = 0.001) for groups A and B, respectively. The DAP values decreased from 43,113 {+-} 27,207 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group A to 9,515 {+-} 4,520 {mu}Gy m{sup 2} for group B (P = 0.003). The dose to ovaries and uterus decreased from 378 {+-} 238 mGy (group A) to 83 {+-} 41 mGy (group B) and from 388 {+-} 246 mGy (group A) to 85 {+-} 39 mGy (group B), respectively. Effective doses decreased from 112 {+-} 71 mSv (group A) to 24 {+-} 12 mSv (group B) (P = 0.003). In conclusion, the use of low-dose/low-frame fluoroscopy/angiography, based on a good understanding of the AEC system and also on the technique during uterine fibroid embolization, allows a significant decrease in the dose exposure to the patient.

  5. Accumulation of 137Cesium and 90Strontium from abiotic and biotic sources in rodents at Chornobyl, Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Chesser, R K; Rodgers, B E; Wickliffe, J K; Gaschak, S; Chizhevsky, I; Phillips, C J; Baker, R J

    2001-09-01

    Bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) and laboratory strains of house mice (Mus musculus BALB and C57BL) were relocated into enclosures in a highly contaminated area of the Red Forest near the Chornobyl (Ukraine) Reactor 4 to evaluate the uptake rates of 137Cs and 90Sr from abiotic sources. Mice were provided with uncontaminated food supplies, ensuring that uptake of radionuclides was through soil ingestion, inhalation, or water. Mice were sampled before introduction and were reanalyzed every 10 d for 137Cs uptake. Levels of 90Sr were assessed in subsamples from the native populations and in experimental animals at the termination of the study. Uptake rates in house mice were greater than those in voles for both 137Cs and 90Sr. Daily uptake rates in house mice were estimated at 2.72 x 10(12) unstable atoms per gram (whole body) for 137Cs and 4.04 x 10(10) unstable atoms per gram for 90Sr. Comparable rates in voles were 2.26 x 10(11) unstable atoms per gram for 137Cs and 1.94 x 10(10) unstable atoms per gram for 90Sr. By comparing values from voles in the enclosures to those from wild voles caught within 50 m of the enclosures, it was estimated that only 8.5% of 137Cs was incorporated from abiotic sources, leaving 91.5% being incorporated by uptake from biotic materials. The fraction of 90Sr uptake from abiotic sources was at least 66.7% (and was probably much higher). Accumulated whole-body doses during the enclosure periods were estimated as 174 mGy from intramuscular 137Cs and 68 mGy by skeletal 90Sr in house mice over 40 d and 98 mGy from 137Cs and 19 mGy from 90Sr in voles over 30 d. Thus, uptake of radionuclides from abiotic materials in the Red Forest at Chornobyl is an important source of internal contamination. PMID:11521818

  6. A survey on performance status of mammography machines: image quality and dosimetry studies using a standard mammography imaging phantom.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Mayya, Y S

    2012-07-01

    It is essential to perform quality control (QC) tests on mammography equipment in order to produce an appropriate image quality at a lower radiation dose to patients. Imaging and dosimetric measurements on 15 mammography machines located at the busiest radiology centres of Mumbai, India were carried out using a standard CIRS breast imaging phantom in order to see the level of image quality and breast doses. The QC tests include evaluations of image quality and the mean glandular doses (MGD), which is derived from the breast entrance exposure, half-value layer (HVL), compressed breast thickness (CBT) and breast tissue compositions. At the majority of the centres, film-processing and darkroom conditions were not found to be maintained, which is required to meet the technical development specifications for the mammography film in use as recommended by the American College of Radiology (ACR). In most of the surveyed centres, the viewbox luminance and room illuminance conditions were not found to be in line with the mammography requirements recommended by the ACR. The measured HVL values of the machines were in the range of 0.27-0.39 mm aluminium (Al) with a mean value of 0.33±0.04 mm Al at 28 kV(p) following the recommendation provided by ACR. The measured MGDs were in the range of 0.14-3.80 mGy with a mean value of 1.34 mGy. The measured MGDs vary between centre to centre by a factor of 27.14. Referring to patient doses and image quality, it was observed that only one mammography centre has exceeded the recommended MGD, i.e. 3.0 mGy per view with the value of 3.80 mGy and at eight mammography centres the measured central background density (CBD) values for mammography phantom image are found to be less than the recommended CBD limit value of 1.2-2.0 optical density. PMID:22090414

  7. Patient Radiation Exposure During Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures for Intracranial Aneurysms: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Ihn, Yon Kwon; Byun, Jun Soo; Suh, Sang Hyun; Won, Yoo Dong; Lee, Deok Hee; Kim, Byung Moon; Kim, Young Soo; Jeon, Pyong; Ryu, Chang-Woo; Suh, Sang-il; Choi, Dae Seob; Choi, See Sung; Choi, Jin Wook; Chang, Hyuk Won; Lee, Jae-Wook; Kim, Sang Heum; Lee, Young Jun; Shin, Shang Hun; Lim, Soo Mee; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Hae Woong; Han, Moon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess patient radiation doses during cerebral angiography and embolization of intracranial aneurysms across multi-centers and propose a diagnostic reference level (DRL). Materials and Methods We studied a sample of 490 diagnostic and 371 therapeutic procedures for intracranial aneurysms, which were performed at 23 hospitals in Korea in 2015. Parameters including dose-area product (DAP), cumulative air kerma (CAK), fluoroscopic time and total angiographic image frames were obtained and analyzed. Results Total mean DAP, CAK, fluoroscopy time, and total angiographic image frames were 106.2 ± 66.4 Gy-cm2, 697.1 ± 473.7 mGy, 9.7 ± 6.5 minutes, 241.5 ± 116.6 frames for diagnostic procedures, 218.8 ± 164.3 Gy-cm2, 3365.7 ± 2205.8 mGy, 51.5 ± 31.1 minutes, 443.5 ± 270.7 frames for therapeutic procedures, respectively. For diagnostic procedure, the third quartiles for DRLs were 144.2 Gy-cm2 for DAP, 921.1 mGy for CAK, 12.2 minutes for fluoroscopy times and 286.5 for number of image frames, respectively. For therapeutic procedures, the third quartiles for DRLs were 271.0 Gy-cm2 for DAP, 4471.3 mGy for CAK, 64.7 minutes for fluoroscopy times and 567.3 for number of image frames, respectively. On average, rotational angiography was used 1.5 ± 0.7 times/session (range, 0-4; n=490) for diagnostic procedures and 1.6 ± 1.2 times/session (range, 0-4; n=368) for therapeutic procedures, respectively. Conclusion Radiation dose as measured by DAP, fluoroscopy time and image frames were lower in our patients compared to another study regarding cerebral angiography, and DAP was lower with fewer angiographic image frames for therapeutic procedures. Proposed DRLs can be used for quality assurance and patient safety in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. PMID:27621943

  8. Antiscatter grids in mobile C-arm cone-beam CT: Effect on image quality and dose

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, S.; Stayman, J.W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J.H.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray scatter is a major detriment to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT). Existing geometries exhibit strong differences in scatter susceptibility with more compact geometries, e.g., dental or musculoskeletal, benefiting from antiscatter grids, whereas in more extended geometries, e.g., IGRT, grid use carries tradeoffs in image quality per unit dose. This work assesses the tradeoffs in dose and image quality for grids applied in the context of low-dose CBCT on a mobile C-arm for image-guided surgery. Methods: Studies were performed on a mobile C-arm equipped with a flat-panel detector for high-quality CBCT. Antiscatter grids of grid ratio (GR) 6:1-12:1, 40 lp/cm, were tested in ''body'' surgery, i.e., spine, using protocols for bone and soft-tissue visibility in the thoracic and abdominal spine. Studies focused on grid orientation, CT number accuracy, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in quantitative phantoms at constant dose. Results: There was no effect of grid orientation on possible gridline artifacts, given accurate angle-dependent gain calibration. Incorrect calibration was found to result in gridline shadows in the projection data that imparted high-frequency artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Increasing GR reduced errors in CT number from 31%, thorax, and 37%, abdomen, for gridless operation to 2% and 10%, respectively, with a 12:1 grid, while image noise increased by up to 70%. The CNR of high-contrast objects was largely unaffected by grids, but low-contrast soft-tissues suffered reduction in CNR, 2%-65%, across the investigated GR at constant dose. Conclusions: While grids improved CT number accuracy, soft-tissue CNR was reduced due to attenuation of primary radiation. CNR could be restored by increasing dose by factors of {approx}1.6-2.5 depending on GR, e.g., increase from 4.6 mGy for the thorax and 12.5 mGy for the abdomen without antiscatter grids to approximately 12 mGy and 30 mGy, respectively, with a high-GR grid. However

  9. SU-E-J-06: Additional Imaging Guidance Dose to Patient Organs Resulting From X-Ray Tubes Used in CyberKnife Image Guidance System

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, A; Ding, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become increasingly common, but the additional radiation exposure resulting from repeated image guidance procedures raises concerns. Although there are many studies reporting imaging dose from different image guidance devices, imaging dose for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is not available. This study provides estimated organ doses resulting from image guidance procedures on the CyberKnife system. Methods: Commercially available Monte Carlo software, PCXMC, was used to calculate average organ doses resulting from x-ray tubes used in the CyberKnife system. There are seven imaging protocols with kVp ranging from 60 – 120 kV and 15 mAs for treatment sites in the Cranium, Head and Neck, Thorax, and Abdomen. The output of each image protocol was measured at treatment isocenter. For each site and protocol, Adult body sizes ranging from anorexic to extremely obese were simulated since organ dose depends on patient size. Doses for all organs within the imaging field-of-view of each site were calculated for a single image acquisition from both of the orthogonal x-ray tubes. Results: Average organ doses were <1.0 mGy for every treatment site and imaging protocol. For a given organ, dose increases as kV increases or body size decreases. Higher doses are typically reported for skeletal components, such as the skull, ribs, or clavicles, than for softtissue organs. Typical organ doses due to a single exposure are estimated as 0.23 mGy to the brain, 0.29 mGy to the heart, 0.08 mGy to the kidneys, etc., depending on the imaging protocol and site. Conclusion: The organ doses vary with treatment site, imaging protocol and patient size. Although the organ dose from a single image acquisition resulting from two orthogonal beams is generally insignificant, the sum of repeated image acquisitions (>100) could reach 10–20 cGy for a typical treatment fraction.

  10. Technology initiatives with government/business overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Robert H., Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Three important present-day technology development settings involve significant overlap between government and private sectors. The Advanced Research Project Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) supports a wide range of "high risk, high return" projects carried out in academic, non-profit or private business settings. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI), based in the White House, aims at radical acceleration of the development process for advanced materials. California public utilities such as Pacific Gas & Electric operate under a structure of financial returns and political program mandates that make them arms of public policy as much as independent businesses.

  11. Association of Chromosome Translocation Rate with Low Dose Occupational Radiation Exposures in U.S. Radiologic Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Little, Mark P.; Kwon, Deukwoo; Doi, Kazataka; Simon, Steven L.; Preston, Dale L.; Doody, Michele M.; Lee, Terrence; Miller, Jeremy S.; Kampa, Diane M.; Bhatti, Parveen; Tucker, James D.; Linet, Martha S.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are a well-recognized biological marker of radiation exposure and cancer risk. However, there is uncertainty about the lowest dose at which excess translocations can be detected, and whether there is temporal decay of induced translocations in radiation-exposed populations. Dosimetric uncertainties can substantially alter the shape of dose-response relationships; although regression-calibration methods have been used in some datasets, these have not been applied in radio-occupational studies, where there are also complex patterns of shared and unshared errors that these methods do not account for. In this article we evaluated the relationship between estimated occupational ionizing radiation doses and chromosome translocation rates using fluorescent in situ hybridization in 238 U.S. radiologic technologists selected from a large cohort. Estimated cumulative red bone marrow doses (mean 29.3 mGy, range 0–135.7 mGy) were based on available badge–dose measurement data and on questionnaire-reported work history factors. Dosimetric assessment uncertainties were evaluated using regression calibration, Bayesian and Monte Carlo maximum likelihood methods, taking account of shared and unshared error and adjusted for overdispersion. There was a significant dose response for estimated occupational radiation exposure, adjusted for questionnaire-based personal diagnostic radiation, age, sex and study group (5.7 translocations per 100 whole genome cell equivalents per Gy, 95% CI 0.2, 11.3, P = 0.0440). A significant increasing trend with dose continued to be observed for individuals with estimated doses <100 mGy. For combined estimated occupational and personal-diagnostic-medical radiation exposures, there was a borderline-significant modifying effect of age (P 0.0704), but little evidence (P > 0.5) of temporal decay of induced translocations. The three methods of analysis to adjust for dose uncertainty gave similar results. In summary, chromosome

  12. HOBAN project: towards the development of radiation-tolerant fiber-based temperature sensors for nuclear industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morana, A.; Girard, S.; Marin, E.; Rizzolo, S.; Marcandella, C.; Paillet, P.; Périsse, J.; Kuhnhenn, J.; Grelin, J.; Melin, G.; Robin, T.; Cadier, B.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Macé, J.-R.

    2015-09-01

    HOBAN (Development of Hard Optical Fiber BrAgg GratiNgs Sensors) is an European H2020 project granted by Kic InnoEnergy and aiming the development of fiber-based temperature and strain monitoring systems that can withstand harsh nuclear environment (350°C temperature and MGy dose levels). The objective will be achieved by employing `ad hoc' fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and their associated instrumentation system which will bring to the market new tools for optimizing the running and the services in current and future nuclear power plants. We'll present the challenges associated with this project and recent advances at the OFS conference.

  13. TU-F-18A-01: Preliminary Results of a Prototype Quality Control Process for Spectral CT

    SciTech Connect

    Nute, J; Jacobsen, M; Pennington, J; Cody, D; Chandler, A; Imai, Y; Baiu, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A prototype quality control (QC) phantom and analysis process has been designed specifically to monitor dual-energy CT and address the current lack of quantitative oversight of the spectral capabilities of these scanners. Methods: A prototype solid water phantom was designed with multiple material inserts, and to support both head and body protocols. Inserts included tissue equivalent and material rods (iodine, iron, calcium) at various concentrations. The oval body phantom, measuring 30cm×40cm×15cm, was scanned using four dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 19.6–62mGy (0.516 pitch) and 10.3–32.5mGy (0.984 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5-1sec. The circular head phantom, measuring 22cm in diameter by 15cm, was scanned using three dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 67–132.6mGy (0.531 pitch) and 36.7–72.7mGy (0.969 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5–0.9sec. All images were reconstructed at 50, 70, 110 and 140 keV, and using a water-iodine material basis pair. The images were evaluated for iodine quantification accuracy and stability of monoenergetic reconstructions. The phantom was scanned twice on ten GE 750HD CT scanners to evaluate inter-scanner agreement, as well as ten times on a single scanner over a oneweek period to evaluate intra-scanner repeatability. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed consistent (inter- and intra-scanner) iodine quantification accuracy within 10% was only achieved for protocols in the upper half of dose levels assessed when grouped by pitch. Although all scanners undergo rigorous daily single-energy QC, iodine quantification accuracy from one scanner unexpectedly deviated from the other nine substantially. In general, inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability varied with dose, rotation time and reconstructed keV. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the need for a dual-energy QC process to ensure inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability. In

  14. Patient Radiation Exposure During Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures for Intracranial Aneurysms: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Ihn, Yon Kwon; Byun, Jun Soo; Suh, Sang Hyun; Won, Yoo Dong; Lee, Deok Hee; Kim, Byung Moon; Kim, Young Soo; Jeon, Pyong; Ryu, Chang-Woo; Suh, Sang-il; Choi, Dae Seob; Choi, See Sung; Choi, Jin Wook; Chang, Hyuk Won; Lee, Jae-Wook; Kim, Sang Heum; Lee, Young Jun; Shin, Shang Hun; Lim, Soo Mee; Yoon, Woong; Jeong, Hae Woong; Han, Moon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess patient radiation doses during cerebral angiography and embolization of intracranial aneurysms across multi-centers and propose a diagnostic reference level (DRL). Materials and Methods We studied a sample of 490 diagnostic and 371 therapeutic procedures for intracranial aneurysms, which were performed at 23 hospitals in Korea in 2015. Parameters including dose-area product (DAP), cumulative air kerma (CAK), fluoroscopic time and total angiographic image frames were obtained and analyzed. Results Total mean DAP, CAK, fluoroscopy time, and total angiographic image frames were 106.2 ± 66.4 Gy-cm2, 697.1 ± 473.7 mGy, 9.7 ± 6.5 minutes, 241.5 ± 116.6 frames for diagnostic procedures, 218.8 ± 164.3 Gy-cm2, 3365.7 ± 2205.8 mGy, 51.5 ± 31.1 minutes, 443.5 ± 270.7 frames for therapeutic procedures, respectively. For diagnostic procedure, the third quartiles for DRLs were 144.2 Gy-cm2 for DAP, 921.1 mGy for CAK, 12.2 minutes for fluoroscopy times and 286.5 for number of image frames, respectively. For therapeutic procedures, the third quartiles for DRLs were 271.0 Gy-cm2 for DAP, 4471.3 mGy for CAK, 64.7 minutes for fluoroscopy times and 567.3 for number of image frames, respectively. On average, rotational angiography was used 1.5 ± 0.7 times/session (range, 0-4; n=490) for diagnostic procedures and 1.6 ± 1.2 times/session (range, 0-4; n=368) for therapeutic procedures, respectively. Conclusion Radiation dose as measured by DAP, fluoroscopy time and image frames were lower in our patients compared to another study regarding cerebral angiography, and DAP was lower with fewer angiographic image frames for therapeutic procedures. Proposed DRLs can be used for quality assurance and patient safety in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  15. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  16. The methodology study of time accelerated irradiation of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    2005-07-01

    The article studied the methods how to shorten the irradiation time by increasing dose rate without changing the relationship between dose versus properties of degraded samples. The samples used were nine kinds of EPDM which have different compounding formula. The different dose of Co-γ ray was exposed to the samples. The maximum dose was 2 MGy. The reference condition to be compared with two short time test conditions is irradiation of 0.33 kGy/h at room temperature. Two methods shown below were studied as the time-accelerate irradiation conditions.

  17. Application of X-ray Refraction-Contrast to Medical Joint Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Ando, Masami

    2004-05-12

    The refraction-contrast X-ray imaging technique using synchrotron X-ray has been applied to an 8 mm sliced distal end of a human femur involving ligament and articular cartilage at 15 keV. It was shown that this technique can clearly depict the fine structures of the ligament, its torn surface and substantial articular cartilage at near the just Bragg angular position. The entrance surface dose necessary for each image was approximately 4 mGy by using an imaging plate. This imaging technique may become a powerful tool for depicting abnormalities of the ligament and articular cartilage.

  18. Neutron and X-ray irradiation of silicon based Mach-Zehnder modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nasr-Storey, S. S.; Détraz, S.; Olanterä, L.; Sigaud, C.; Soós, C.; Pezzullo, G.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.; Zeiler, Marcel

    2015-03-01

    We report on our recent investigation into the potential for using silicon-based Mach-Zehnder modulators in the harshest radiation environments of the High-Luminosity LHC. The effect of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the performance of the devices have been investigated using the 20 MeV neutron beam line at the Cyclotron Resource Centre in Louvain-La-Neuve and the X-ray irradiation facility in the CERN PH department. The devices were exposed to a total fluence and ionizing dose of 1.2×1015 n cm-2 and 1.3 MGy respectively.

  19. Suitability of Chinese oil well loggers for an epidemiologic study of the carcinogenic effects of neutrons.

    PubMed

    Inskip, P D; Wang, Z Y; Fen, Y S

    1991-11-01

    Neutron exposures to 191 well loggers at four oil fields in China were measured over a 3-mo period using CR-39 polycarbonate dosimeters. Doses (96% less than 0.02 mGy) were slightly lower than literature values for well loggers in North America, possibly because of differences in drilling activity. Because doses are so low, an epidemiologic study of cancer among Chinese well loggers is unlikely to be informative about the carcinogenicity of neutrons relative to sparsely ionizing radiation. PMID:1752747

  20. Pediatric cT: Implementation of ASIR for Substantial Radiation Dose Reduction While Maintaining Pre-ASIR Image Noise1

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Samuel L.; Moore, Bria M.; Yee, Brian S.; Kaufman, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine a comprehensive method for the implementation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) for maximal radiation dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography (CT) without changing the magnitude of noise in the reconstructed image or the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the patient. Materials and Methods The institutional review board waived the need to obtain informed consent for this HIPAA-compliant quality analysis. Chest and abdominopelvic CT images obtained before ASIR implementation (183 patient examinations; mean patient age, 8.8 years ± 6.2 [standard deviation]; range, 1 month to 27 years) were analyzed for image noise and CNR. These measurements were used in conjunction with noise models derived from anthropomorphic phantoms to establish new beam current–modulated CT parameters to implement 40% ASIR at 120 and 100 kVp without changing noise texture or magnitude. Image noise was assessed in images obtained after ASIR implementation (492 patient examinations; mean patient age, 7.6 years ± 5.4; range, 2 months to 28 years) the same way it was assessed in the pre-ASIR analysis. Dose reduction was determined by comparing size-specific dose estimates in the pre- and post-ASIR patient cohorts. Data were analyzed with paired t tests. Results With 40% ASIR implementation, the average relative dose reduction for chest CT was 39% (2.7/4.4 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 72% (5.3/18.8 mGy). The average relative dose reduction for abdominopelvic CT was 29% (4.8/6.8 mGy), with a maximum reduction of 64% (7.6/20.9 mGy). Beam current modulation was unnecessary for patients weighing 40 kg or less. The difference between 0% and 40% ASIR noise magnitude was less than 1 HU, with statistically nonsignificant increases in patient CNR at 100 kVp of 8% (15.3/14.2; P = .41) for chest CT and 13% (7.8/6.8; P = .40) for abdominopelvic CT. Conclusion Radiation dose reduction at pediatric CT was achieved when 40% ASIR was implemented as a dose

  1. Structural changes of polytetrafluoroethylene during irradiation in oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuling; Fu, Congli; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili

    2015-04-01

    To study the effect of irradiation on PTFE structure and prepare modified PTFE micropowder, PTFE was irradiated with dose up to 4 MGy in oxygen at room temperature. The structures of both irradiated and unirradiated PTFE samples were comparatively characterized by IR, XPS, Raman spectra and XRD measurement. The results showed that new groups of acyl fluoride (COF), carboxylic acid (COOH) and trifluoromethyl (CF3) were formed under heavy radiation exposure in oxygen. In addition, the expansion of crystallite size or crystal lattice was first reported for the irradiated PTFE. The formation of new chemical groups and the expansion of crystallite size were elucidated by structural changes occurring in irradiation.

  2. Optimization of dual-energy imaging systems using generalized NEQ and imaging task

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2007-01-15

    Dual-energy (DE) imaging is a promising advanced application of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) with a potential host of applications ranging from thoracic and cardiac imaging to interventional procedures. The performance of FPD-based DE imaging systems is investigated in this work by incorporating the noise-power spectrum associated with overlying anatomical structures (''anatomical noise'' modeled according to a 1/f characteristic) into descriptions of noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) to yield the generalized NEQ (GNEQ). Signal and noise propagation in the DE imaging chain is modeled by cascaded systems analysis. A Fourier-based description of the imaging task is integrated with the GNEQ to yield a detectability index used as an objective function for optimizing DE image reconstruction, allocation of dose between low- and high-energy images, and selection of low- and high-kVp. Optimal reconstruction and acquisition parameters were found to depend on dose; for example, optimal kVp varied from [60/150] kVp at typical radiographic dose levels ({approx}0.5 mGy entrance surface dose, ESD) but increased to [90/150] kVp at high dose (ESD{approx}5.0 mGy). At very low dose (ESD{approx}0.05 mGy), detectability index indicates an optimal low-energy technique of 60 kVp but was largely insensitive to the choice of high-kVp in the range 120-150 kVp. Similarly, optimal dose allocation, defined as the ratio of low-energy ESD and the total ESD, varied from 0.2 to 0.4 over the range ESD=(0.05-5.0) mGy. Furthermore, two applications of the theoretical framework were explored: (i) the increase in detectability for DE imaging compared to conventional radiography; and (ii) the performance of single-shot vs double-shot DE imaging, wherein the latter is found to have a DQE approximately twice that of the former. Experimental and theoretical analysis of GNEQ and task-based detectability index provides a fundamental understanding of the factors governing DE imaging performance and offers a

  3. [Thyroid cancer: lessons of chernobyl and prognosis for Fukushima].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V K; Tsyb, A F

    2013-01-01

    Results of epidemiological studies of thyroid cancer incidence in Russia following the Chernobyl accident are presented in the article. Child population in territories contaminated with radionuclides who got thyroid dose from incorporated (131)I above 100-150 mGy, should be referred to a group at radiation risk. Prognostic estimates of increase in thyroid cancer incidence among the population living in close vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP were made with account for the Chernobyl data and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  4. Chromosome aberrations determined by sFISH and G-banding in lymphocytes from workers with internal deposits of plutonium

    PubMed Central

    Tawn, E. Janet; Curwen, Gillian B.; Jonas, Patricia; Riddell, Anthony E.; Hodgson, Leanne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To examine the influence of α-particle radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium on chromosome aberration frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes of workers from the Sellafield nuclear facility, UK. Materials and methods: Chromosome aberration data from historical single colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (sFISH) and Giemsa banding (G-banding) analyses, together with more recent sFISH results, were assessed using common aberration analysis criteria and revised radiation dosimetry. The combined sFISH group comprised 29 men with a mean internal red bone marrow dose of 21.0 mGy and a mean external γ-ray dose of 541 mGy. The G-banding group comprised 23 men with a mean internal red bone marrow dose of 23.0 mGy and a mean external γ-ray dose of 315 mGy. Results: Observed translocation frequencies corresponded to expectations based on age and external γ-ray dose with no need to postulate a contribution from α-particle irradiation of the red bone marrow by internally deposited plutonium. Frequencies of stable cells with complex aberrations, including insertions, were similar to those in a group of controls and a group of workers with external radiation exposure only, who were studied concurrently. In a similar comparison there is some suggestion of an increase in cells with unstable complex aberrations and this may reflect recent direct exposure to circulating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Reference to in vitro dose response data for the induction of stable aberrant cells by α-particle irradiation indicates that the low red bone marrow α-particle radiation doses received by the Sellafield workers would not result in a discernible increase in translocations, thus supporting the in vivo findings. Therefore, the greater risk from occupational radiation exposure of the bone marrow resulting in viable chromosomally aberrant cells comes from, in general, much larger γ-ray exposure in comparison to α-particle exposure from plutonium

  5. SU-E-P-49: Evaluation of Image Quality and Radiation Dose of Various Unenhanced Head CT Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L; Khan, M; Alapati, K; Hsieh, M; Barry, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of various unenhanced head CT protocols and predicate acceptable radiation dose level for head CT exam. Methods: Our retrospective analysis included 3 groups, 20 patients per group, who underwent clinical routine unenhanced adult head CT examination. All exams were performed axially with 120 kVp. Three protocols, 380 mAs without iterative reconstruction and automAs, 340 mAs with iterative reconstruction without automAs, 340 mAs with iterative reconstruction and automAs, were applied on each group patients respectively. The images were reconstructed with H30, J30 for brain window and H60, J70 for bone window. Images acquired with three protocols were randomized and blindly reviewed by three radiologists. A 5 point scale was used to rate each exam The percentage of exam score above 3 and average scores of each protocol were calculated for each reviewer and tissue types. Results: For protocols without automAs, the average scores of bone window with iterative reconstruction were higher than those without iterative reconstruction for each reviewer although the radiation dose was 10 percentage lower. 100 percentage exams were scored 3 or higher and the average scores were above 4 for both brain and bone reconstructions. The CTDIvols are 64.4 and 57.8 mGy of 380 and 340 mAs, respectively. With automAs, the radiation dose varied with head size, resulting in 47.5 mGy average CTDIvol between 39.5 and 56.5 mGy. 93 and 98 percentage exams were scored great than 3 for brain and bone windows, respectively. The diagnostic confidence level and image quality of exams with AutomAs were less than those without AutomAs for each reviewer. Conclusion: According to these results, the mAs was reduced to 300 with automAs OFF for head CT exam. The radiation dose was 20 percentage lower than the original protocol and the CTDIvol was reduced to 51.2 mGy.

  6. Method for minimizing the radiation exposure from scoliosis radiographs. [X ray

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Fritz, S.L.; Asher, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation exposure resulting from standard scoliosis radiographs was determined for eighteen adolescent girls. The risk of inducing breast cancer was estimated from the skin-exposure doses. The average skin exposure to the breasts was 59.6 millirads (0.59 mGy) for the anteroposterior radiograph. Assuming a total of twenty-two anteroposterior radiographs during a course of treatment, the cumulative exposure would result in a 1.35% relative increase in the risk of development of breast cancer. By utilizing collimation of the x-ray beam and proper selection of grids, films, and screens, the radiation risk of scoliosis radiographs is minimized.

  7. Exploring stable thermoluminescence signal in natural Barite (BaSO4) for retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suchinder K; Thomas, Jugina; Pandian, M S; Rao, P S; Gartia, R K; Singhvi, Ashok K

    2015-11-01

    We explore the possible use of Barite (BaSO4) for radiation dosimetry and geochronology using thermoluminescence technique. Natural Barite with Mn as an impurity has a glow peak at 608K with a minimum detectable dose of 1.45±0.12mGy. This peak shows ~35% fading on 30 days of storage time and is photo-bleachable with excellent reproducibility on repeated read-out. The sensitivity changes with dose and evidence of athermal fading is also seen. We infer that the signal can be used for both retrospective dosimetry and geochronology of young deposits extending to 20ka.

  8. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  9. RADRUE METHOD FOR RECONSTRUCTION OF EXTERNAL PHOTON DOSES TO CHERNOBYL LIQUIDATORS IN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    PubMed Central

    Kryuchkov, Victor; Chumak, Vadim; Maceika, Evaldas; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Bakhanova, Elena; Golovanov, Ivan; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2010-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1990, several hundred thousand workers, called “liquidators” or “clean-up workers”, took part in decontamination and recovery activities within the 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine, where a major accident occurred in April 1986. The Chernobyl liquidators were mainly exposed to external ionizing radiation levels that depended primarily on their work locations and the time after the accident when the work was performed. Because individual doses were often monitored inadequately or were not monitored at all for the majority of liquidators, a new method of photon (i.e. gamma and x-rays) dose assessment, called “RADRUE” (Realistic Analytical Dose Reconstruction with Uncertainty Estimation) was developed to obtain unbiased and reasonably accurate estimates for use in three epidemiologic studies of hematological malignancies and thyroid cancer among liquidators. The RADRUE program implements a time-and-motion dose reconstruction method that is flexible and conceptually easy to understand. It includes a large exposure rate database and interpolation and extrapolation techniques to calculate exposure rates at places where liquidators lived and worked within ~70 km of the destroyed reactor. The RADRUE technique relies on data collected from subjects’ interviews conducted by trained interviewers, and on expert dosimetrists to interpret the information and provide supplementary information, when necessary, based upon their own Chernobyl experience. The RADRUE technique was used to estimate doses from external irradiation, as well as uncertainties, to the bone-marrow for 929 subjects and to the thyroid gland for 530 subjects enrolled in epidemiologic studies. Individual bone-marrow dose estimates were found to range from less than one μGy to 3,300 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 71 mGy. Individual thyroid dose estimates were lower and ranged from 20 μGy to 507 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 29 mGy. The

  10. Technical Note: Measuring contrast- and noise-dependent spatial resolution of an iterative reconstruction method in CT using ensemble averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lifeng Vrieze, Thomas J.; Leng, Shuai; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The spatial resolution of iterative reconstruction (IR) in computed tomography (CT) is contrast- and noise-dependent because of the nonlinear regularization. Due to the severe noise contamination, it is challenging to perform precise spatial-resolution measurements at very low-contrast levels. The purpose of this study was to measure the spatial resolution of a commercially available IR method using ensemble-averaged images acquired from repeated scans. Methods: A low-contrast phantom containing three rods (7, 14, and 21 HU below background) was scanned on a 128-slice CT scanner at three dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 16, 8, and 4 mGy). Images were reconstructed using two filtered-backprojection (FBP) kernels (B40 and B20) and a commercial IR method (sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction, SAFIRE, Siemens Healthcare) with two strength settings (I40-3 and I40-5). The same scan was repeated 100 times at each dose level. The modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated based on the edge profile measured on the ensemble-averaged images. Results: The spatial resolution of the two FBP kernels, B40 and B20, remained relatively constant across contrast and dose levels. However, the spatial resolution of the two IR kernels degraded relative to FBP as contrast or dose level decreased. For a given dose level at 16 mGy, the MTF{sub 50%} value normalized to the B40 kernel decreased from 98.4% at 21 HU to 88.5% at 7 HU for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 82.1% for I40-5. At 21 HU, the relative MTF{sub 50%} value decreased from 98.4% at 16 mGy to 90.7% at 4 mGy for I40-3 and from 97.6% to 85.6% for I40-5. Conclusions: A simple technique using ensemble averaging from repeated CT scans can be used to measure the spatial resolution of IR techniques in CT at very low contrast levels. The evaluated IR method degraded the spatial resolution at low contrast and high noise levels.

  11. Ceramic Matrix Composites Performances Under High Gamma Radiation Doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cemmi, A.; Baccaro, S.; Fiore, S.; Gislon, P.; Serra, E.; Fassina, S.; Ferrari, E.; Ghisolfi, E.

    2014-06-01

    Ceramic matrix composites reinforced by continuous ceramic fibers (CMCs) represent a class of advanced materials developed for applications in automotive, aerospace, nuclear fusion reactors and in other specific systems for harsh environments. In the present work, the silicon carbide/silicon carbide (SiCf/SiC) composites, manufactured by Chemical Vapour Infiltration process at FN S.p.A. plant, have been evaluated in term of gamma radiation hardness at three different absorbed doses (up to around 3MGy). Samples behavior has been investigated before and after irradiation by means of mechanical tests (flexural strength) and by surface and structural analyses (X-ray diffraction, SEM, FTIR-ATR, EPR).

  12. Radiation doses and cancer risks in the Marshall Islands associated with exposure to radioactive fallout from Bikini and Enewetak nuclear weapons tests: summary.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946-1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m(-2)) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  13. RADIATION DOSES AND CANCER RISKS IN THE MARSHALL ISLANDS ASSOCIATED WITH EXPOSURE TO RADIOACTIVE FALLOUT FROM BIKINI AND ENEWETAK NUCLEAR WEAPONS TESTS: SUMMARY

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven L.; Bouville, André; Land, Charles E.; Beck, Harold L.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear weapons testing conducted at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls during 1946–1958 resulted in exposures of the resident population of the present-day Republic of the Marshall Islands to radioactive fallout. This paper summarizes the results of a thorough and systematic reconstruction of radiation doses to that population, by year, age at exposure, and atoll of residence, and the related cancer risks. Detailed methods and results are presented in a series of companion papers in this volume. From our analysis, we concluded that 20 of the 66 nuclear tests conducted in or near the Marshall Islands resulted in measurable fallout deposition on one or more of the inhabited atolls of the Marshall Islands. In this work, we estimated deposition densities (kBq m−2) of all important dose-contributing radionuclides at each of the 32 atolls and separate reef islands of the Marshall Islands. Quantitative deposition estimates were made for 63 radionuclides from each test at each atoll. Those estimates along with reported measurements of exposure rates at various times after fallout were used to estimate radiation absorbed doses to the red bone marrow, thyroid gland, stomach wall, and colon wall of atoll residents from both external and internal exposure. Annual doses were estimated for six age groups ranging from newborns to adults. We found that the total deposition of 137Cs, external dose, internal organ doses, and cancer risks followed the same geographic pattern with the large population of the southern atolls receiving the lowest doses. Permanent residents of the southern atolls who were of adult age at the beginning of the testing period received external doses ranging from 5 to 12 mGy on average; the external doses to adults at the mid-latitude atolls ranged from 22 to 59 mGy on average, while the residents of the northern atolls received external doses in the hundreds to over 1,000 mGy. Internal doses varied significantly by age at exposure, location, and organ. Except

  14. Maladies reliées aux loisirs aquatiques

    PubMed Central

    Sanborn, Margaret; Takaro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Passer en revue les facteurs de risque, la prise en charge et la prévention des maladies reliées aux loisirs aquatiques en pratique familiale. Sources des données Des articles originaux et de synthèse entre janvier 1998 et février 2012 ont été identifiés à l’aide de PubMed et des expressions de recherche en anglais water-related illness, recreational water illness et swimmer illness. Message principal Il y a un risque de 3 % à 8 % de maladies gastrointestinales (MGI) après la baignade. Les groupes à risque élevé de MGI sont les enfants de moins de 5 ans, surtout s’ils n’ont pas été vaccinés contre le rotavirus, les personnes âgées et les patients immunodéficients. Les enfants sont à plus grand risque parce qu’ils avalent plus d’eau quand ils nagent, restent dans l’eau plus longtemps et jouent dans l’eau peu profonde et le sable qui sont plus contaminés. Les adeptes des sports dans lesquels le contact avec l’eau est abondant comme le triathlon et le surf cerf-volant sont aussi à risque élevé et même ceux qui s’adonnent à des activités impliquant un contact partiel avec l’eau comme la navigation de plaisance et la pêche ont un risque de 40 % à 50 % fois plus grand de MGI par rapport à ceux qui ne pratiquent pas de sports aquatiques. Il y a lieu de faire une culture des selles quand on soupçonne une maladie reliée aux loisirs aquatiques et l’échelle clinique de la déshydratation est utile pour l’évaluation des besoins de traitement chez les enfants affectés. Conclusion Les maladies reliées aux loisirs aquatiques est la principale cause de MGI durant la saison des baignades. La reconnaissance que la baignade est une source importante de maladies peut aider à prévenir les cas récurrents et secondaires. On recommande fortement le vaccin contre le rotavirus chez les enfants qui se baignent souvent.

  15. Incidence and Mortality of Solid Cancers in People Exposed In Utero to Ionizing Radiation: Pooled Analyses of Two Cohorts from the Southern Urals, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Deltour, Isabelle; Krestinina, Lyudmila; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Tsareva, Yulia; Tolstykh, Evgenia; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that acute external in utero exposure to ionizing radiation can increase cancer risk. It is not known whether chronic exposure at low dose rates, including due to radionuclide intake, influences the lifetime risk of solid cancers in the offspring. The objective of this study was to investigate solid cancer risk after in utero irradiation. Methods Cancer incidence and mortality over a 60-year period (from January 1950 to December 2009) were analyzed in the Urals Prenatally Exposed Cohort (UPEC). The cohort comprised in utero exposed offspring of Mayak Production Association female workers and of female residents of Techa River villages. Some of the offspring also received postnatal exposure, either due to becoming radiation workers themselves or due to continuing to live in the contaminated areas of the Techa River. The mortality analyses comprised 16,821 subjects (601,372 person-years), and the incidence analyses comprised 15,813 subjects (554,411 person-years). Poisson regression was used to quantify the relative risk as a function of the in utero soft tissue dose (with cumulative doses up to 944.9 mGy, mean dose of 14.1 mGy in the pooled cohort) and the postnatal stomach dose for solid cancer incidence and mortality. Results When a log-linear model was used, relative risk of cancer per 10 mGy of in utero dose was 0.99 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96 to 1.01) based on incidence data and 0.98 (CI = 0.94 to 1.01) based on mortality data. Postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation was positively associated with the solid cancer risk in members of the UPEC, with a relative risk of 1.02 per 10mGy CI = 1.00 to 1.04). Conclusions No strong evidence was found that chronic low-dose-rate exposure of the embryo and fetus increased the risk of solid cancers in childhood or in adulthood. For both incidence and mortality, a tendency towards a decreased relative risk was noted with increasing doses to soft tissues of the fetus. Further

  16. Latin American dose survey results in mammography studies under IAEA programme: radiological protection of patients in medical exposures (TSA3).

    PubMed

    Mora, Patricia; Blanco, Susana; Khoury, Helen; Leyton, Fernando; Cárdenas, Juan; Defaz, María Yolanda; Garay, Fernando; Telón, Flaviano; Aguilar, Juan Garcia; Roas, Norma; Gamarra, Mirtha; Blanco, Daniel; Quintero, Ana Rosa; Nader, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela) working under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation Programme: TSA3 Radiological Protection of Patients in Medical Exposures have joined efforts in the optimisation of radiation protection in mammography practice. Through surveys of patient doses, the region has a unique database of diagnostic reference levels for analogue and digital equipment that will direct future optimisation activities towards the early detection of breast cancer among asymptomatic women. During RLA9/057 (2007-09) 24 institutions participated with analogue equipment in a dose survey. Regional training on methodology and measurement equipment was addressed in May 2007. The mean glandular dose (DG) was estimated using the incident kerma in air and relevant conversion coefficients for both projections craneo caudal and mediolateral oblique (CC and MLO). For Phase 2, RLA9/067 (2010-11), it was decided to include also digital systems in order to see their impact in future dose optimisation activities. Any new country that joined the project received training in the activities through IAEA expert missions. Twenty-nine new institutions participated (9 analogue and 20 digital equipment). A total of 2262 patient doses were collected during this study and from them D(G) (mGy) for both projections were estimated for each institution and country. Regional results (75 percentile in mGy) show for CC and MLO views, respectively: RLA9/057 (analogue) 2.63 and 3.17; RLA/067: 2.57 and 3.15 (analogue) and 2.69 and 2.90 (digital). Regarding only digital equipment for CC and MLO, respectively, computed radiography systems showed 2.59 and 2.78 and direct digital radiography (DDR) systems 2.78 and 3.04. Based on the IAEA Basic Safety Standard (BSS) reference dose (3 mGy), it can be observed that there is enough room to start

  17. Coronary CTA using scout-based automated tube potential and current selection algorithm, with breast displacement results in lower radiation exposure in females compared to males

    PubMed Central

    Vadvala, Harshna; Kim, Phillip; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Pianykh, Oleg; Kalra, Mannudeep; Hoffmann, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of automatic tube potential selection and automatic exposure control combined with female breast displacement during coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) on radiation exposure in women versus men of the same body size. Materials and methods Consecutive clinical exams between January 2012 and July 2013 at an academic medical center were retrospectively analyzed. All examinations were performed using ECG-gating, automated tube potential, and tube current selection algorithm (APS-AEC) with breast displacement in females. Cohorts were stratified by sex and standard World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) ranges. CT dose index volume (CTDIvol), dose length product (DLP) median effective dose (ED), and size specific dose estimate (SSDE) were recorded. Univariable and multivariable regression analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of gender on radiation exposure per BMI. Results A total of 726 exams were included, 343 (47%) were females; mean BMI was similar by gender (28.6±6.9 kg/m2 females vs. 29.2±6.3 kg/m2 males; P=0.168). Median ED was 2.3 mSv (1.4-5.2) for females and 3.6 (2.5-5.9) for males (P<0.001). Females were exposed to less radiation by a difference in median ED of –1.3 mSv, CTDIvol –4.1 mGy, and SSDE –6.8 mGy (all P<0.001). After adjusting for BMI, patient characteristics, and gating mode, females exposure was lower by a median ED of –0.7 mSv, CTDIvol –2.3 mGy, and SSDE –3.15 mGy, respectively (all P<0.01). Conclusions: We observed a difference in radiation exposure to patients undergoing CCTA with the combined use of AEC-APS and breast displacement in female patients as compared to their BMI-matched male counterparts, with female patients receiving one third less exposure. PMID:25610804

  18. Development of defects in the structure of PIN dosimetry diodes exposed to gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Chren, D.; Dammer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Studies of radiation induced defects continue to be relevant as they find an ever greater application due to the increasing radiation doses to which semiconductor detectors are exposed. Efforts of figuring out the changes due to high radiation doses provide the fundamental motivation for this type of experiments. The PIN diode is described, and a developmental disorder caused thereto by 60Co source gamma quanta ranging from 100 kGy to 1 MGy. The calibration curve shows the effect of disturbances on the volt-ampere characteristics as a function of the dose of gamma radiation. The results are compared with earlier published data.

  19. Structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre determined by serial femtosecond crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Linda C.; Arnlund, David; Katona, Gergely; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; Deponte, Daniel P.; Shoeman, Robert L.; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Sharma, Amit; Williams, Garth J.; Aquila, Andrew; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R. Bruce; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Galli, Lorenzo; Grotjohann, Ingo; Hunter, Mark S.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Martin, Andrew V.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Wang, Dingjie; Wahlgren, Weixaio Y.; Weierstall, Uwe; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Boutet, Sébastien; Spence, John C. H.; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Neutze, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography is an X-ray free-electron-laser-based method with considerable potential to have an impact on challenging problems in structural biology. Here we present X-ray diffraction data recorded from microcrystals of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction centre to 2.8 Å resolution and determine its serial femtosecond crystallography structure to 3.5 Å resolution. Although every microcrystal is exposed to a dose of 33 MGy, no signs of X-ray-induced radiation damage are visible in this integral membrane protein structure.

  20. Structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre determined by serial femtosecond crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Linda C.; Arnlund, David; Katona, Gergely; White, Thomas A.; Barty, Anton; DePonte, Daniel P.; Shoeman, Robert L.; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Sharma, Amit; Williams, Garth J.; Aquila, Andrew; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R Bruce; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Galli, Lorenzo; Grotjohann, Ingo; Hunter, Mark S.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A.; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Martin, Andrew V.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Seibert, M Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Wang, Dingjie; Wahlgren, Weixaio Y.; Weierstall, Uwe; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Boutet, Sébastien; Spence, John C.H.; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Neutze, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography is an X-ray free-electron-laser-based method with considerable potential to have an impact on challenging problems in structural biology. Here we present X-ray diffraction data recorded from microcrystals of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction centre to 2.8 Å resolution and determine its serial femtosecond crystallography structure to 3.5 Å resolution. Although every microcrystal is exposed to a dose of 33 MGy, no signs of X-ray-induced radiation damage are visible in this integral membrane protein structure. PMID:24352554

  1. Structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre determined by serial femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda C; Arnlund, David; Katona, Gergely; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; DePonte, Daniel P; Shoeman, Robert L; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Sharma, Amit; Williams, Garth J; Aquila, Andrew; Bogan, Michael J; Caleman, Carl; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R Bruce; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Galli, Lorenzo; Grotjohann, Ingo; Hunter, Mark S; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Martin, Andrew V; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Seibert, M Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Wang, Dingjie; Wahlgren, Weixaio Y; Weierstall, Uwe; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Boutet, Sébastien; Spence, John C H; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N; Fromme, Petra; Neutze, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography is an X-ray free-electron-laser-based method with considerable potential to have an impact on challenging problems in structural biology. Here we present X-ray diffraction data recorded from microcrystals of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction centre to 2.8 Å resolution and determine its serial femtosecond crystallography structure to 3.5 Å resolution. Although every microcrystal is exposed to a dose of 33 MGy, no signs of X-ray-induced radiation damage are visible in this integral membrane protein structure.

  2. Regional variation in radionuclide concentrations and radiation dose in caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in the Canadian Arctic; 1992-94.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, C R; Ewing, L L; Elkin, B T; Wiewel, A M

    1996-04-01

    Gamma-emitting radionuclides and 210Po, an alpha-emitting product of the 238U decay chain, were analysed in tissues from 16 caribou (Rangifer tarandus) collections in the Canadian North between 1992 and 1994. The study was conducted to determine the regional variability of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in Canadian caribou, and to estimate the background radiation dose to caribou tissues. 137Cs, 40K, 210Pb and 210Po were consistently found in most herds. Mean muscle 137Cs varied from below detection limits on Banks Island to 231 Bq kg-1 wet weight (ww) in the Beverly herd in the central Arctic. Comparison of 1992-94 levels with published values from the 1960s and 1980s showed that 137Cs in caribou is declining with an effective half-life (Teff) of 9.9 years. The highest mean bone and liver 210Pb activities were observed on south Baffin Island, which included one bone sample with 3800 Bq kg-1 ww of 210Pb and 3070 Bq kg-1 ww of 210Po. The distribution of 137Cs and 210Pb between herds was attributed to higher atmospheric deposition rates between 60 and 65 degrees N, and changes in plant community structure and lichen species composition. The highest mean absorbed dose (30 mGy year-1) was observed in 1993 in the liver of caribou from Lake Harbour. This dose translated into a weighted absorbed dose of 300 mGy year-1, assuming a radiation weighting factor (wR) of 10 to account for the increased biological efficiency of alpha particles for deterministic effects. The Lake Harbour site also had the highest individual weighted absorbed dose in bone (810 mGy year-1) and liver (530 mGy year-1) in the study. There was no significant relationship between bone 210Pb activity and age for individual or pooled herds, indicating that the estimated doses are probably present throughout the lifetime of the caribou. Because some herds number several hundred thousand individuals, collective doses may also be very high. As yet, there have been no reports of observable effects due

  3. Structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre determined by serial femtosecond crystallography.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda C; Arnlund, David; Katona, Gergely; White, Thomas A; Barty, Anton; DePonte, Daniel P; Shoeman, Robert L; Wickstrand, Cecilia; Sharma, Amit; Williams, Garth J; Aquila, Andrew; Bogan, Michael J; Caleman, Carl; Davidsson, Jan; Doak, R Bruce; Frank, Matthias; Fromme, Raimund; Galli, Lorenzo; Grotjohann, Ingo; Hunter, Mark S; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Lomb, Lukas; Malmerberg, Erik; Martin, Andrew V; Messerschmidt, Marc; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Seibert, M Marvin; Sjöhamn, Jennie; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Wang, Dingjie; Wahlgren, Weixaio Y; Weierstall, Uwe; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Boutet, Sébastien; Spence, John C H; Schlichting, Ilme; Chapman, Henry N; Fromme, Petra; Neutze, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Serial femtosecond crystallography is an X-ray free-electron-laser-based method with considerable potential to have an impact on challenging problems in structural biology. Here we present X-ray diffraction data recorded from microcrystals of the Blastochloris viridis photosynthetic reaction centre to 2.8 Å resolution and determine its serial femtosecond crystallography structure to 3.5 Å resolution. Although every microcrystal is exposed to a dose of 33 MGy, no signs of X-ray-induced radiation damage are visible in this integral membrane protein structure. PMID:24352554

  4. Gafchromic film as a fast visual indicator of radiation exposure of first responders.

    PubMed

    Oren, Unal; Rääf, Christopher L; Mattsson, Sören

    2012-06-01

    Three types of Gafchromic films have been studied to investigate their potential for use as a visually readable dosemeter for persons acting as first responders in connection with radiological or nuclear emergencies. The two most sensitive film types show a pronounced variation in sensitivity by photon energy and are therefore not suitable for use in cases of unknown exposures. The third film type tested (RTQA2), which is intended for quality control in radiation therapy has a sensitivity that is independent of the radiation quality, and is therefore considered as the most optimal for visual reading in situ. Tests carried out on a group of 10 human observers showed that absorbed doses down to 40 mGy can be detected by the eye. Read by a portable densitometer, qualitative absorbed dose estimates down to 9 mGy can be achieved. The colour change is obtained instantaneously, giving first responders immediate information about the presence of beta-, gamma- and X-ray radiation.

  5. [Experimental investigation of the collection efficiency of a PTW Roos ionization chamber irradiated with pulsed beams at high pulse dose with different pulse lengths].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Richter, Christian; Pawelke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In gas-filled ionization chambers as radiation detectors, the collection of the charge carriers is affected by the recombination effect. In dosimetry this effect must be accounted for by the saturation correction factor k(S). The physical description of the correction factor by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk for pulsed radiation is well established. However, this description is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared to the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this work experimental investigations of the saturation correction factor have been made for pulses of 4 μ s up to pulse doses of about 230 mGy, and the theory of Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk was again confirmed. For longer pulses, however, the correction factor decreases and at a pulse duration of about 200μs reaches 75% of the value valid for short pulses. This reduced influence of the ion recombination is interpreted by the reaction kinetics of ion recombination as a second-order reaction. This effect is negligible for PTW Roos chambers at clinical linear accelerators with 4 μ s pulse duration for pulse doses up to 120 mGy.

  6. Mean glandular dose in six digital mammography services in Santiago, Chile: preliminary reference levels.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Fernando; Nogueira, Maria Do Socorro; Dantas, Marcelino; Duran, Maria Paz; Ubeda, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to estimate mean glandular dose levels (DG) in six digital mammography systems in Santiago, Chile, and to propose preliminary reference levels to execute mammography in Chile. The study was carried out assessing two direct digital systems and four computer-based radiography (CR) systems. Estimates of DG were calculated for different thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate according to the quality control protocol in digital mammography of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. DG values ranged between 0.64 and 7.26 mGy for a range of 20- to 70-mm thickness, respectively. Thirty-six per cent of DG was higher than the acceptable dose level and 100 % of DG was higher than the desirable level. It is therefore necessary to optimise doses. The initial proposal to establish dose reference levels for DG would range between 0.90 and 6.40 mGy for a thickness range of 20 to 70 mm.

  7. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure. PMID:24311579

  8. Preliminary total dose measurements on LDEF.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G

    1992-01-01

    After spending nearly six years in Earth orbit twenty stacks consisting of radiation detectors and biological objects are now back on Earth. These stacks (Experiment A0015 Free Flyer Biostack) are part of the fifty seven science and technology experiments of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) of NASA. The major objectives of the Free Flyer Biostack experiments are to investigate the biological effectiveness of single heavy ions of the cosmic radiation in various biological systems and to provide information about the spectral composition of the radiation field and the total dose received in the LDEF orbit. The Biostacks are mounted in two different locations of the LDEF. Up to three layers of Lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) of different isotopic composition were located at different depths of some Biostacks. The preliminary analysis of the TLD yields maximum absorbed dose rates of 2.24 mGy day-1 behind 0.7 g cm-2 shielding and 1.17 mGy day-1 behind 12 g cm-2 shielding. A thermal neutron fluence of 1.7 n cm-2 s-1 is determined from the differences in absorbed dose for different isotopic mixtures of Lithium. The results of this experiment on LDEF are especially valuable and of high importance since LDEF stayed for about six years in the prospected orbit of the Space Station Freedom. There is no knowledge about the effectiveness of the space radiation in long-term spaceflights and the dosimetric data in this orbit are scarce.

  9. An EPR dosimetry method for rapid scanning of children following a radiation accident using deciduous teeth

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1999-02-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance dosimetry may be applied to whole deciduous teeth of children. This makes it feasible to make direct measurement of absorbed gamma ray dose in the days and weeks following a nuclear accident, particularly if used in conjunction with a public awareness program. The technique reported here requires little sample preparation and has resulted in precision of approximately 30 mGy (1 {sigma}) for a deciduous incisor. Under conditions for rapid screening procedures, the methodology is estimated to provide 0.5 Gy accuracy. The largest error in the process is the determination of an appropriate background native signal for subtraction from the whole tooth spectrum. The native signal is superimposed on the radiation-induced signal, and the subtraction requires knowledge of a sample`s relative content of enamel and dentin along with their relative native signal intensities. Using a composite background standard, an equivalent absorbed dose of 70 {+-} 38 mGy (1 {sigma}) was determined. The lower detection limit of the technique was achieved by the elimination of anisotropic effects through rotation of the sample during measurement, together with subtraction of the standard native background signal and empty tube background spectra from the sample spectra.

  10. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Haron, M. R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDIw, DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts.

  11. Effect of segregated elements on the interactions between twin boundaries and screw dislocations in Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Yuasa, Motohiro; Mabuchi, Mamoru; Chino, Yasumasa

    2015-07-01

    Interactions of { 10 1 ¯ 2 } and { 10 1 ¯ 1 } twin boundaries (TBs), segregated by X (X = Sc, Y, or Nd), with screw partial dislocations were simulated using molecular dynamics (MD). In addition, mechanical tests were carried out on pure Mg and Mg-Y alloy. The MD simulation results suggested that the dislocations passed through the { 10 1 ¯ 2 } TB in all the models and that the shear strains for transmission in the Mg-X models were larger than that in the pure Mg model; in particular, the shear strain in the Mg-Y model was the largest. This corresponded to the experimental result that strain hardening was enhanced by Y addition. For interactions of a { 10 1 ¯ 1 } TB, some segregated atoms induced the emission of dislocations from the TB, whereas other segregated atoms locked the dislocation absorbed in the TB. As a result, the interaction behaviors of the { 10 1 ¯ 1 } TB were divided into five patterns. The interactions of this TB could be explained by the criterion of energy variations, as well as the interactions, of the { 10 1 ¯ 2 } TB, although segregation complicated the interactions of the { 10 1 ¯ 1 } TB.

  12. Changing composition of microbial communities indicates seepage fluid difference of the Thuwal Seeps in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Weipeng; Tian, Renmao; Wang, Yong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Cold seeps are unique ecosystems that are generally characterized by high salinity and reducing solutions. Seepage fluid, the major water influx of this system, contains hypersaline water, sediment pore water, and other components. The Thuwal cold seeps were recently discovered on the continental margin of the Red Sea. Using 16S rRNA gene pyro-sequencing technology, microbial communities were investigated by comparing samples collected in 2011 and 2013. The results revealed differences in the microbial communities between the two sampling times. In particular, a significantly higher abundance of Marine Group I (MGI) Thaumarchaeota was coupled with lower salinity in 2013. In the brine pool, the dominance of Desulfobacterales in 2011 was supplanted by MGI Thaumarchaeota in 2013, perhaps due to a reduced supply of hydrogen sulfide from the seepage fluid. Collectively, this study revealed a difference in water components in this ecosystem between two sampling times. The results indicated that the seawater in this cold seep displayed a greater number of characteristics of normal seawater in 2013 than in 2011, which might represent the dominant driving force for changes in microbial community structures. This is the first study to provide a temporal comparison of the microbial biodiversity of a cold seep ecosystem in the Red Sea. PMID:26059861

  13. Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on a cyanate ester/epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idesaki, Akira; Uechi, Hiroki; Hakura, Yoshihiko; Kishi, Hajime

    2014-05-01

    Effects of γ-ray irradiation on a cyanate ester/epoxy resin composed of dicyanate ester of bisphenol A (DCBA) and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) were investigated by changes in physicochemical and mechanical properties after the γ-ray irradiation with dose of 100 MGy as maximum at around 40 °C under vacuum. After the irradiation, gases of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were evolved, glass transition temperature decreased, and flexural strength also decreased. It was concluded that ether linkages bonded to cyanurate, isocyanurate and oxazolidinone structures are mainly decomposed by the irradiation. After 100 MGy irradiation, the flexural strength of DCBA/DGEBA was maintained more than 170 MPa which is 90% of initial value of 195 MPa. Flexural modulus and density slightly increased to the values of 3.9 GPa and 1.211 g/cm3 from initial values of 3.4 GPa and 1.199 g/cm3, respectively.

  14. Radiation dose in coronary angiography and intervention: initial results from the establishment of a multi-centre diagnostic reference level in Queensland public hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, James A; Whitby, Mark; Thiele, David; Halligan, Toni; Westerink, Adam; Crown, Suzanne; Milne, Jillian

    2014-09-15

    Radiation dose to patients undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is relatively high. Guidelines suggest that a local benchmark or diagnostic reference level (DRL) be established for these procedures. This study sought to create a DRL for ICA procedures in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for all Cardiac Catheter Laboratories in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for diagnostic coronary angiography (CA) and single-vessel percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. Dose area product (P{sub KA}), skin surface entrance dose (K{sub AR}), fluoroscopy time (FT), and patient height and weight were collected for 3 months. The DRL was set from the 75th percentile of the P{sub KA.} 2590 patients were included in the CA group where the median FT was 3.5 min (inter-quartile range = 2.3–6.1). Median K{sub AR} = 581 mGy (374–876). Median P{sub KA} = 3908 uGym{sup 2} (2489–5865) DRL = 5865 uGym{sup 2}. 947 patients were included in the PCI group where median FT was 11.2 min (7.7–17.4). Median K{sub AR} = 1501 mGy (928–2224). Median P{sub KA} = 8736 uGym{sup 2} (5449–12,900) DRL = 12,900 uGym{sup 2}. This study established a benchmark for radiation dose for diagnostic and interventional coronary angiography in Queensland public facilities.

  15. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S Del Sol; García-Salcedo, R; Sánchez-Guzmán, D; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G; Gaona, E; de León-Alfaro, M A; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm(2) at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy.

  16. Towards in vivo TLD dosimetry in mammography.

    PubMed

    Warren-Forward, H M; Duggan, L

    2004-05-01

    While phantoms are used for quality control assessment of the mammography unit, in vivo dose measurements are necessary to account for the variation in size and composition of the female breast. The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in mammography has been limited due to TLD visibility. The aim of this current investigation was to access the suitability of a paper-thin LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD (GR-200F) for in vivo dosimetric mammography measurements. The visibility of GR-200F has been directly compared with LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs (GR-200A) using a number of commercially available phantoms. The phantoms of thickness 2-5 cm were imaged over the range of tube potentials (24-28 kVp) used clinically. Both types of TLD were placed on the surface of the phantoms allowing assessment of visibility, entrance surface dose (ESD) and field homogeneity. In vivo assessment of ESD and visibility was also carried out on a volunteer undergoing a routine mammography examination. The positions of the GR-200F TLDs were not identified either on the image of the Leeds TOR(MAM) phantom or the patient mammograms. The average ESD for the Leeds phantom was 8.8 mGy, while the patient ESD was 13 mGy. It is now possible to perform in vivo measurements with the potential of increasing the accuracy of the doses measured for women that do not conform to a standard breast thickness or density.

  17. Physical, Heritable and Age-Related Factors as Modifiers of Radiation Cancer Risk in Patched Heterozygous Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pazzaglia, Simonetta Pasquali, Emanuela M.Sc.; Tanori, Mirella; Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Di Majo, Vincenzo; Rebessi, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To address the tumorigenic potential of exposure to low/intermediate doses of ionizing radiation and to identify biological factors influencing tumor response in a mouse model highly susceptible to radiogenic cancer. Methods and Materials: Newborn Ptc1 heterozygous mice were exposed to X-ray doses of 100, 250, and 500 mGy, and tumor development was monitored for their lifetime. Additional groups were irradiated with the same doses and sacrificed at fixed times for determination of short-term endpoints, such as apoptosis and early preneoplastic lesions in cerebellum. Finally, groups of Ptc1 heterozygous mice were bred on the C57BL/6 background to study the influence of common variant genes on radiation response. Results: We have identified a significant effect of low-intermediate doses of radiation (250 and 500 mGy) in shortening mean survival and inducing early and more progressed stages of tumor development in the cerebellum of Ptc1{sup +/-} mice. In addition, we show that age at exposure and heritable factors are potent modifiers of radiation-related cancer risk. Conclusions: The Ptc1 knockout mouse model offers a highly sensitive system that may potentially help to improve understanding and quantification of risk at low doses, such as doses experienced in occupational and medical exposures, and clarify the complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors underlying cancer susceptibility.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in teeth from citizens of Ozyorsk.

    PubMed

    Wieser, A; Vasilenko, E; Aladova, E; Fattibene, P; Semiochkina, N; Smetanin, M

    2014-05-01

    In 1945, within the frame of the Uranium Project for the production of nuclear weapons, the Mayak nuclear facilities were constructed at the Lake Irtyash in the Southern Urals, Russia. The nuclear workers of the Mayak Production Association (MPA), who lived in the city of Ozyorsk, are the focus of epidemiological studies for the assessment of health risks due to protracted exposure to ionising radiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of absorbed dose in tooth enamel have already been used in the past, in an effort to validate occupational external doses that were evaluated in the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System. In the present study, 229 teeth of Ozyorsk citizens not employed at MPA were investigated for the assessment of external background exposure in Ozyorsk. The annually absorbed dose in tooth enamel from natural background radiation was estimated to be (0.7 ± 0.3) mGy. For citizens living in Ozyorsk during the time of routine noble gas releases of the MPA, which peaked in 1953, the average excess absorbed dose in enamel above natural background was (36 ± 29) mGy, which is consistent with the gamma dose obtained by model calculations. In addition, there were indications of possible accidental gaseous MPA releases that affected the population of Ozyorsk, during the early and late MPA operation periods, before 1951 and after 1960. PMID:24604722

  19. Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Organic-Poor Sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1225)

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing surveys of microbial communities in marine subsurface sediments have focused on organic-rich, continental margins; the database for organic-lean deep-sea sediments from mid-ocean regions is underdeveloped. The archaeal community in subsurface sediments of ODP Site 1225 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (3760 m water depth; 1.1 and 7.8 m sediment depth) was analyzed by PCR, cloning and sequencing, and by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Three uncultured archaeal lineages with different depth distributions were found: Marine Group I (MG-I) within the Thaumarchaeota, its sister lineage Marine Benthic Group A (MBG-A), the phylum-level archaeal lineage Marine Benthic Group B (also known as Deep-Sea Archaeal Group or Lokiarchaeota), and the Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Group 3. The MG-I phylotypes included representatives of sediment clusters that are distinct from the pelagic members of this phylum. On the scale from fully oxidized, extremely organic carbon-depleted sediments (for example, those the South Pacific Gyre) to fully reduced, organic carbon-rich marine subsurface sediments (such as those of the Peru Margin), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1225 falls into the non-extreme organic carbon-lean category, and harbors archaeal communities from both ends of the spectrum.

  20. Radiation dose and cancer risk in patients undergoing multiple radiographs in intravenous urography X-ray examinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suliman, I. I.; Al-Jabri, Amna J.; Badawi, A. A.; Halato, M. A.; Alzimami, K.; Sulieman, A.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the this study was to measure the entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and body organs, and the effective doses in intravenous urography (IVU) X-ray examinations in Sudanese hospitals. Seventy-two patients who underwent IVU multiple radiographs from five hospitals (six rooms) were examined. ESAK was calculated from incident air kerma (Ki) using patient exposure parameters and tube output Y(d). Dose calculations were performed using CALDOSE X 5.1 Monte Carlo-based software. Risk of cancer induction (4-8) and mortality per million (2-4) varied. The gallbladder, colon, stomach, gonads and uterus received organ doses of 5.3, 3.6, 3.2, 0.61, and 0.8 mGy, respectively. ESAK values ranged from 6.6 to 15.3 mGy (effective doses: 0.70-1.6 mSv). Mean ESAK fall slightly above the diagnostic reference level. Several optimization strategies to improve dose performance were discussed. Reducing the number of radiographs and the use of technique charts according to patient sizes and anatomic areas are among the most important dose optimization tools in IVU.

  1. Automatic image registration performance for two different CBCT systems; variation with imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, J.; Sykes, J. R.; Holloway, L.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2014-03-01

    The performance of an automatic image registration algorithm was compared on image sets collected with two commercial CBCT systems, and the relationship with imaging dose was explored. CBCT images of a CIRS Virtually Human Male Pelvis phantom (VHMP) were collected on Varian TrueBeam/OBI and Elekta Synergy/XVI linear accelerators, across a range of mAs settings. Each CBCT image was registered 100 times, with random initial offsets introduced. Image registration was performed using the grey value correlation ratio algorithm in the Elekta XVI software, to a mask of the prostate volume with 5 mm expansion. Residual registration errors were calculated after correcting for the initial introduced phantom set-up error. Registration performance with the OBI images was similar to that of XVI. There was a clear dependence on imaging dose for the XVI images with residual errors increasing below 4mGy. It was not possible to acquire images with doses lower than ~5mGy with the OBI system and no evidence of reduced performance was observed at this dose. Registration failures (maximum target registration error > 3.6 mm on the surface of a 30mm sphere) occurred in 5% to 9% of registrations except for the lowest dose XVI scan (31%). The uncertainty in automatic image registration with both OBI and XVI images was found to be adequate for clinical use within a normal range of acquisition settings.

  2. The physical properties of the interstellar cloud around the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gry, C.

    2015-12-01

    A new interpretation of interstellar absorption lines in the spectra of nearby stars indicates that the medium surrounding the Sun can be regarded as a single, coherent cloud if we relax the assumption that a cloud behaves like a rigid body. This outlook permits us to construct a comprehensive picture of the local interstellar cloud and reveals that it departs from homogeneity in a number of aspects and physical properties: - This local cloud undergoes a deformation related to a compression in the direction of motion and an expansion in perpendicular directions, much like a squashed balloon. - The metal abundances decrease steadily from the rear to the head of the cloud, and this phenomenon does not appear to be related to ionization effects. - The cloud average HI density, estimated toward a number of nearby stars around which an astrophere is detected in Lyman alpha, varies from 0.03 to 0.1 cm-3. The cloud outer boundary inferred from the average density and column densities is very irregular with an average distance to the Sun of 9 +/- 7 pc. - The electron density and the cloud temperature can be derived from the combination of the ionization equilibrium of MgI and the excitation of CII in a restricted number of sightlines where column density is such that MgI and CII* features are strong enough to be detectable without saturating MgII. We present a few additional targets from which we examine the physical conditions inside the cloud.

  3. Mammography in New Zealand: radiation dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Poletti, J L; Williamson, B D; Mitchell, A W

    1991-06-01

    The mean glandular doses to the breast, image quality and machine performance have been determined for all mammographic x-ray facilities in New Zealand, during 1988-89. For 30 mm and 45 mm phantoms the mean doses per film were 1.03 +/- 0.56 mGy and 1.97 +/- 1.06 mGy. These doses are within international guide-lines. Image quality (detection of simulated microcalcifications, and contrast-detail performance) was found to depend on focal spot size/FFD combination, breast thickness, and film processing. The best machines could resolve 0.2 mm aluminium oxide specks with the contact technique. The use of a grid improved image quality as did magnification. Extended cycle film processing reduced doses, but the claimed improvement in image quality was not apparent from our data. The machine calibration parameters kVp, HVL and timer accuracy were in general within accepted tolerances. Automatic exposure controls in some cases gave poor control of film density with changing breast thickness. PMID:1747087

  4. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, Kristin A.; Black, Paul J.; Mercer, Kermit R.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Owen, Robin L.; Snell, Edward H.; Bernhard, William A.

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  5. On optically stimulated luminescence properties of household salt as a retrospective dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Trandafir, Oana

    2013-08-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the UV (270-370 nm) spectral region have been investigated for five types of table salt (NaCl) available in Romanian supermarkets with a view to applying them in retrospective dosimetry. The salt samples gave bright TL signals with two main peaks at ∼100°C and at 300 or 260°C, depending on the origin of the salt and bright OSL signals under continuous stimulation with blue light. The OSL signal (stimulated at 100°C after a pre-heat of 10 s at 150°C) was used for investigations in a standard multiple aliquot procedure. The dose-response was found to be linear in the dose range investigated (up to ∼100 mGy) and the lower limit of detection for the samples varied from ∼0.01 to 14 mGy. These characteristics, along with the widespread abundance and low cost of household salt, confirm its potential as a retrospective dosemeter. PMID:23443414

  6. The optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of LiF:Mg,TI, Li2B4O7:CU, CaSO4:Tm, and CaF2:MN thermoluminescent (TL) materials.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Geoffrey West, William; Rafique, Muhammad

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports on an investigation into the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of several known thermoluminescent materials, namely LiF:Mg,Ti, Li2B4O7:Cu, CaSO4:Tm, and CaF2:Mn. Samples were irradiated to air doses of 15mGy, 150mGy and 1.5Gy and analyzed using a commercially available OSL reader system to determine their luminescence response to continuous blue and infrared light (IR) excitation, centered at 470nm and 830nm wavelengths, respectively. CaF2:Mn did not show an OSL response with either IR or blue light stimulation. Li2B4O7:Cu and LiF:Mg,Ti demonstrated relatively weak OSL signals only under blue light excitation. CaSO4:Tm exhibited OSL under both IR and blue light stimulation at sensitivities roughly one order of magnitude less than the OSL response of α-Al2O3:C under the same conditions. PMID:25769010

  7. The effects of 60Co γ-ray on poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/carbon black composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Yong; Kim, Ki-Yup

    2008-04-01

    Cables used in a nuclear power plant are irradiation suppressing ones. Until now, researches on the irradiation suppressing cables have mainly been focused on insulation materials. Therefore, in this paper, the non-isothermal crystallization behaviors and degradation characteristics of ethylene vinyl acetate-carbon black (EVA-CB), used as a shielding material, were investigated by means of the Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and chemiluminescence analyzer (CL). The specimens were cooled after removing thermal history at 150 °C for 5 min by changing the cooling rates to 5, 7.5, 10, 15 and 20 °C/min with DSC. In addition, after maintaining a thermal equilibrium at each temperature of 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 and 175 °C, their thermoluminescence was measured for 20 min with CL equipment. The 60Co γ-ray was used for irradiation. Tc, T0, T∞ and t1/2 in the DSC experiments are found to decrease gradually as radiation dose increases. Secondly, with the CL experiment, the 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 MGy EVA-CB composites were found to show a much smaller thermoluminescence than the intact EVA-CB composites, while the 0.75 and 1 MGy EVA-CB composites were found to show a much higher thermoluminescence than ones.

  8. Average radiation dose in standard CT examinations of the head: results of the 1990 NEXT survey.

    PubMed

    Conway, B J; McCrohan, J L; Antonsen, R G; Rueter, F G; Slayton, R J; Suleiman, O H

    1992-07-01

    In 1990, as part of the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) program, 252 computed tomographic (CT) systems were evaluated to measure radiation doses associated with standard head CT in adults. The multiple-scan average dose (MSAD) was used as the dose descriptor. For most of the systems, the MSAD at the midpoint on the central axis of a standard dosimetry phantom was between 34 and 55 mGy. Doses were as high as 140 mGy, and dose sometimes varied by a factor of two or more for identical CT units. This range indicates that dose can potentially be reduced by careful selection of standard CT techniques. Users of CT systems should be aware of radiation dose delivered with CT, dose ranges associated with different systems, and doses delivered with their particular unit, which requires that dose performance of CT systems be assessed by means of a protocol that allows comparison of data collected for identical and/or different units.

  9. Establishment of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) reference level in Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bakar, K. A.; Muhammad, H.; Sabarudin, A.; Ang, W. C.; Bahruddin, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiation doses from computed tomography (CT) are the highest and most hazardous compared to other imaging modalities. This study aimed to evaluate radiation dose in Johor, Malaysia to patients during computed tomography examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen and to establish the local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) as are present with the current, state- of-art, multi-slice CT scanners. Survey forms were sent to five centres performing CT to obtain data regarding acquisition parameters as well as the dose information from CT consoles. CT- EXPO (Version 2.3.1, Germany) was used to validate the dose information. The proposed DRLs were indicated by rounding the third quartiles of whole dose distributions where mean values of CTDIw (mGy), CTDIvol (mGy) and DLP (mGy.cm) were comparable with other reference levels; 63, 63, and 1015 respectively for CT Brain; 15, 14, and 450 respectively for CT thorax and 16, 17, and 590 respectively for CT abdomen. The study revealed that the CT practice and dose output were revolutionised, and must keep up with the pace of introductory technology. We suggest that CTDIvol should be included in current national DRLs, as modern CTs are configured with a higher number of detectors and are independent of pitch factors.

  10. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kristin A; Black, Paul J; Mercer, Kermit R; Garman, Elspeth F; Owen, Robin L; Snell, Edward H; Bernhard, William A

    2013-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV-visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV-visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5-0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure.

  11. Environmental toxicity and radioactivity assessment of a titanium-processing residue with potential for environmental use.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Laura A; Binet, Monique T; Yuan, Zheng; Gissi, Francesca; Koppel, Darren J; Adams, Merrin S

    2013-07-01

    Thorough examination of the physicochemical characteristics of a Ti-processing residue was undertaken, including mineralogical, geochemical, and radiochemical characterization, and an investigation of the environmental toxicity of soft-water leachate generated from the residue. Concentrations of most metals measured in the leachate were low; thus, the residue is unlikely to leach high levels of potentially toxic elements on exposure to low-ionic strength natural waters. Relative to stringent ecosystem health-based guidelines, only chromium concentrations in the leachate exceeded guideline concentrations for 95% species protection; however, sulfate was present at concentrations known to cause toxicity. It is likely that the high concentration of calcium and extreme water hardness of the leachate reduced the bioavailability of some elements. Geochemical modeling of the leachate indicated that calcium and sulfate concentrations were largely controlled by gypsum mineral dissolution. The leachate was not toxic to the microalga Chlorella sp., the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia, or the estuarine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The Ti-processing residue exhibited an absorbed dose rate of 186 nGy/h, equivalent to an annual dose of 1.63 mGy and an annual effective dose of 0.326 mGy. In summary, the results indicate that the Ti-processing residue examined is suitable for productive use as an environmental amendment following 10 to 100 times dilution to ameliorate potential toxic effects due to chromium or sulfate.

  12. Archaeal Diversity in Waters from Deep South African Gold Mines

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Ken; Moser, Duane P.; DeFlaun, Mary; Onstott, Tullis C.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2001-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular analysis of archaeal communities in waters collected from deep South African gold mines was performed by performing a PCR-mediated terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of rRNA genes (rDNA) in conjunction with a sequencing analysis of archaeal rDNA clone libraries. The water samples used represented various environments, including deep fissure water, mine service water, and water from an overlying dolomite aquifer. T-RFLP analysis revealed that the ribotype distribution of archaea varied with the source of water. The archaeal communities in the deep gold mine environments exhibited great phylogenetic diversity; the majority of the members were most closely related to uncultivated species. Some archaeal rDNA clones obtained from mine service water and dolomite aquifer water samples were most closely related to environmental rDNA clones from surface soil (soil clones) and marine environments (marine group I [MGI]). Other clones exhibited intermediate phylogenetic affiliation between soil clones and MGI in the Crenarchaeota. Fissure water samples, derived from active or dormant geothermal environments, yielded archaeal sequences that exhibited novel phylogeny, including a novel lineage of Euryarchaeota. These results suggest that deep South African gold mines harbor novel archaeal communities distinct from those observed in other environments. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of archaeal strains and rDNA clones, including the newly discovered archaeal rDNA clones, the evolutionary relationship and the phylogenetic organization of the domain Archaea are reevaluated. PMID:11722932

  13. On optically stimulated luminescence properties of household salt as a retrospective dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Trandafir, Oana

    2013-08-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the UV (270-370 nm) spectral region have been investigated for five types of table salt (NaCl) available in Romanian supermarkets with a view to applying them in retrospective dosimetry. The salt samples gave bright TL signals with two main peaks at ∼100°C and at 300 or 260°C, depending on the origin of the salt and bright OSL signals under continuous stimulation with blue light. The OSL signal (stimulated at 100°C after a pre-heat of 10 s at 150°C) was used for investigations in a standard multiple aliquot procedure. The dose-response was found to be linear in the dose range investigated (up to ∼100 mGy) and the lower limit of detection for the samples varied from ∼0.01 to 14 mGy. These characteristics, along with the widespread abundance and low cost of household salt, confirm its potential as a retrospective dosemeter.

  14. [Evaluation of Radiation Dose during Stent-graft Treatment Using a Hybrid Operating Room System].

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Kouichi; Kaga, Yuji; Saitou, Kazuhisa; Arai, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Iwaya, Yoshimi; Kumasaka, Eriko; Kataoka, Nozomi; Satou, Naoto; Abe, Mitsuya

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, aortic aneurysm treatment with stent graft grafting in the X-ray fluoroscopy is increasing. This is an endovascular therapy, because it is a treatment which includes the risk of radiation damage, having to deal with radiation damage, to know in advance is important. In this study, in order to grasp the trend of exposure stent graft implantation in a hybrid operating room (OR) system, focusing on clinical data (entrance skin dose and fluoroscopy time), was to count the total. In TEVAR and EVAR, fluoroscopy time became 13.40 ± 7.27 minutes, 23.67 ± 11.76 minutes, ESD became 0.87 ± 0.41 mGy, 1.11 ± 0.57 mGy. (fluoroscopy time of EVAR was 2.0 times than TEVAR. DAP of EVAR was 1.2 times than TEVAR.) When using the device, adapted lesions and usage are different. This means that care changes in exposure-related factors. In this study, exposure trends of the stent graft implantation was able to grasp. It can be a helpful way to reduce/optimize the radiation dose in a hybrid OR system.

  15. Characterization of a water-equivalent fiber-optic coupled dosimeter for use in diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Fisher, Ryan F.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2009-05-15

    This work reports on the characterization of a new fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimeter for use in the diagnostic radiology energy range. The FOC dosimeter was constructed by coupling a small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 {mu}m in diameter and 2 mm in length, to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A serial port interface on the PMT permits real-time monitoring of light output from the dosimeter via a custom computer program. The FOC dosimeter offered excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, allowing doses as low as 0.16 mGy to be measured with a coefficient of variation of only 3.64%. Dose linearity was also excellent with a correlation coefficient of 1.000 over exposures ranging from 0.16 to 57.29 mGy. The FOC dosimeter exhibited little angular dependence from axial irradiation, varying by less than 5% over an entire revolution. A positive energy dependence was observed and measurements performed within a scatter medium yielded a 10% variation in sensitivity as beam quality changed due to hardening and scatter across a 16 cm depth range. The current dosimetry system features an array of five PMTs to allow multiple FOC dosimeters to be monitored simultaneously. Overall, the system allows for rapid and accurate dose measurements relevant to a range of diagnostic imaging applications.

  16. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation.

    PubMed

    Warren, S

    1980-10-01

    Prominent among media items related to the Three Mile Island episode were prophecies of future cancers. The credibility of some of these estimates are discussed. The average person has been exposed by the age of 50 to 2.5 rad (0.025 Gy) from natural background. We define low doses as under 25 rad (0.25 Gy). The most heavily exposed members of the general population during the Three Mile Island event received 83 mrad (0.83 mGy). Those exposed to 2500 mrad (25 mGy) would show no pathologically recognizable effects of radiation though there is evidence that chromosomal damage may occur with doses about 1 rad (0.01 Gy). An official stated among the consequences of the Three Mile Island accident that two additional cancer deaths would result. No epidemiologist could detect such an increase in the population at risk. It has been generally agreed that the linear hypothesis is useful for determining protection standards, not prognosis. Objective criteria for pathologic diagnosis of cause-effect relations are presented. PMID:7430985

  17. Effects of chronic internal alpha irradiation on physiology, growth and reproductive success of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, F; Gilbin, R; Bourrachot, S; Floriani, M; Morello, M; Garnier-Laplace, J

    2006-12-01

    Daphnids were chronically exposed to waterborne Am-241, an alpha-emitting radionuclide, ranging in concentration from 0.4 to 40 Bq ml(-1). Am-241 amounts were monitored in the medium, daphnid tissues and cuticles. Corresponding average dose rates of 0.02, 0.11 and 0.99 mGy h(-1) were calculated for whole organisms with internal alpha-radiation contributing 99% of total dose rates. Effects of internal alpha irradiation on respiration and ingestion rates, adult, egg and neonate individual dry masses, fecundity and larval resistance to starvation were examined in 23-day experiments. Daphnids showed increased respiratory demand after 23 days at the highest dose rate, suggesting increased metabolic cost of maintenance due to coping with alpha radiological stress. Although no effect was detected on ingestion rates between contaminated and control daphnids, exposure to dose rates of 0.11 mGy h(-1) or higher, resulted in a significant 15% reduction in body mass. Fecundity remained unchanged over the 23-day period, but individual masses of eggs and neonates were significantly smaller compared to the control. This suggested that increased metabolic expenditure in chronically alpha-radiated daphnids came at the expense of their energy investment per offspring. As a consequence, neonates showed significantly reduced resistance to starvation at every dose rate compared to the control. Our observations are discussed in comparison with literature results reported for cadmium, a chemical toxicant which affects feeding activity and strongly reduces individual energy uptake.

  18. Survey of patient exposure from general radiography and mammography in Japan in 2014.

    PubMed

    Asada, Y; Suzuki, S; Minami, K; Shirakawa, S; Kobayashi, M

    2016-06-01

    With the objective of reducing patient exposure to radiation, we conducted a questionnaire survey regarding radiographic conditions in 2014. Here we report estimates of dose exposure in general radiography and mammography through an investigation and comparison of present patient exposure conditions. Questionnaires were sent to 3000 facilities nationwide in Japan. Surveys asked questions on a total of 16 items related to general radiography, including the chest, abdomen, and breast. Output data from x-ray tubes measured in the Chubu area of Japan were used as the mean in these estimates. The index of patient exposure was adopted as the entrance skin dose (ESD) for general radiography and as the mean glandular dose (MGD) for mammography. The response rate for this survey was 21.9%. Our results showed that doses received through the use of flat-panel detector (FPD) devices were lower than those received through computed radiography devices, except for the ankle joint (e.g. in chest examination, the dose from FPD and CR was 0.24 mGy, 0.31 mGy on the average, respectively). These results suggest that more widespread use of FPD devices could lead to decreases in the ESD and MGD, thereby reducing patient exposure. PMID:26975874

  19. Towards breast tomography with synchrotron radiation at Elettra: first images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, R.; Arfelli, F.; Bellazzini, R.; Bottigli, U.; Brez, A.; Brun, F.; Brunetti, A.; Delogu, P.; Di Lillo, F.; Dreossi, D.; Fanti, V.; Fedon, C.; Golosio, B.; Lanconelli, N.; Mettivier, G.; Minuti, M.; Oliva, P.; Pinchera, M.; Rigon, L.; Russo, P.; Sarno, A.; Spandre, G.; Tromba, G.; Zanconati, F.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the SYRMA-CT collaboration is to set-up the first clinical trial of phase-contrast breast CT with synchrotron radiation (SR). In order to combine high image quality and low delivered dose a number of innovative elements are merged: a CdTe single photon counting detector, state-of-the-art CT reconstruction and phase retrieval algorithms. To facilitate an accurate exam optimization, a Monte Carlo model was developed for dose calculation using GEANT4. In this study, high isotropic spatial resolution (120 μm)3 CT scans of objects with dimensions and attenuation similar to a human breast were acquired, delivering mean glandular doses in the range of those delivered in clinical breast CT (5-25 mGy). Due to the spatial coherence of the SR beam and the long distance between sample and detector, the images contain, not only absorption, but also phase information from the samples. The application of a phase-retrieval procedure increases the contrast-to-noise ratio of the tomographic images, while the contrast remains almost constant. After applying the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to low-dose phase-retrieved data sets (about 5 mGy) with a reduced number of projections, the spatial resolution was found to be equal to filtered back projection utilizing a four fold higher dose, while the contrast-to-noise ratio was reduced by 30%. These first results indicate the feasibility of clinical breast CT with SR.

  20. Archaeal Diversity in Waters from Deep South African Gold Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Ken; Moser, Duane P.; Deflaun, Mary; Onstott, Tullis C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2001-12-01

    Culture-independent molecular analysis of archaeal communities in waters collected from deep South African gold (Au) mines was performed by PCR-mediated terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of rRNA genes (rDNA) in conjunction with sequencing analysis of archaeal rDNA clone libraries. Water samples represented various environments including: deep fissure water; mine service water; and water from an overlying dolomite aquifer. T-RFLP analysis revealed that the ribotype distribution of archaea varied directly with the source of the water. The archaeal communities in the deep Au mine environments revealed a large phylogenetic diversity; the majority of members were most closely related to uncultivated species. Some archaeal rDNA clones obtained from mine service water and dolomite aquifer water samples were most closely related to the environmental rDNA clones from surface soil (Soil clones) and marine environments (Marine Group I; MGI). Other clones possessed an intermediate phylogenetic affiliation between soil clones and MGI within the Crenarchaea. Fissure water samples, derived from active or dormant geothermal environments, yielded archaeal sequences of novel phylogeny including a novel lineage of Euryarchaeota. These results suggest that deep South African Au mines harbor novel archaeal communities distinct from those observed in other environments. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of archaeal strains and rDNA clones, including these newly discovered archaeal rDNA clones, the evolutionary relationship and the phylogenetic organization of the domain Archaea is reevaluated.

  1. Prospective Systematic Intervention to Reduce Patient Exposure to Radiation During Pediatric Ureteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kokorowski, Paul J.; Chow, Jeanne S.; Strauss, Keith J; Pennison, Melanie; Tan, William; Cilento, Bartley; Nelson, Caleb P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose After prospective measurement of radiation exposure during pediatric ureteroscopy (URS) for urolithiasis, we identified targets for intervention. Our objective was to systematically reduce radiation exposure during pediatric URS. Materials and Methods We designed and implemented a pre-fluoroscopy quality checklist for patients undergoing URS at our institution as part of a quality improvement initiative. Pre-operative patient characteristics, operative factors, fluoroscopy settings and radiation exposure were recorded. Primary outcomes were entrance skin dose (ESD, in mGy) and midline dose (MLD, in mGy) before and after implementation of the checklist. Results Direct observation was performed on 32 consecutive URS procedures using the safety checklist, 27 of whom were pediatric patients meeting inclusion criterion. Outcomes were compared to 37 patients from the pre-checklist phase. Pre- and post-checklist groups were similar with regard to patient age, total surgical time, or patient thickness. Mean ESD was reduced by 88% (p<0.01) and mean MLD by 87% (p<0.01). Significant improvements were noted among the major determinants of radiation dose including the total fluoroscopy time (reduced by 67%, p<0.01), dose rate setting (appropriate reduced dose setting in 93% vs 51%, p<0.01), and excess skin to intensifier distance (reduced by 78%, p<0.01). Conclusions After systematic evaluation of our practices and implementation of a fluoroscopy quality checklist, there were dramatic reductions in the radiation doses to children during URS procedures. PMID:23473898

  2. Risks to the fetus from diagnostic imaging during pregnancy: review and proposal of a clinical protocol.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mafalda; Matias, Alexandra; Macedo, Filipe

    2015-12-01

    Every day, medical practitioners face the dilemma of exposing pregnant or possibly pregnant patients to radiation from diagnostic examinations. Both doctors and patients often have questions about the risks of radiation. The most vulnerable period is between the 8th and 15th weeks of gestation. Deterministic effects like pregnancy loss, congenital malformations, growth retardation and neurobehavioral abnormalities have threshold doses above 100-200 mGy. The risk is considered negligible at 50 mGy and in reality no diagnostic examination exceeds this limit. The risk of carcinogenesis is slightly higher than in the general population. Intravenous iodinated contrast is discouraged, except in highly selected patients. Considering all the possible noxious effects of radiation exposure, measures to diminish radiation are essential and affect the fetal outcome. Nonionizing procedures should be considered whenever possible and every radiology center should have its own data analysis on fetal radiation exposure. In this review, we analyze existing literature on fetal risks due to radiation exposure, producing a clinical protocol to guide safe radiation use in a clinical setting.

  3. Vulnerability of OFDR-based distributed sensors to high γ-ray doses.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, S; Boukenter, A; Marin, E; Cannas, M; Perisse, J; Bauer, S; Mace, J-R; Ouerdane, Y; Girard, S

    2015-07-27

    Vulnerability of Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) based sensors to high γ-ray doses (up to 10 MGy) is evaluated with a specific issue of a radiation-hardened temperature and strain monitoring system for nuclear industry. For this, we characterize the main radiation effects that are expected to degrade the sensor performances in such applicative domain: the radiation-induced attenuation (RIA), the possible evolution with the dose of the Rayleigh scattering phenomenon as well as its dependence on temperature and strain. This preliminary investigation is done after the irradiation and for five different optical fiber types covering the range from radiation-hardened fibers to highly radiation sensitive ones. Our results show that at these high dose levels the scattering mechanism at the basis of the used technique for the monitoring is unaffected (changes below 5%), authorizing acceptable precision on the temperature or strain measurements. RIA has to be considered as it limits the sensing range. From our vulnerability study, the OFDR sensors appear as promising candidates for nuclear industry even at doses as high as 10 MGy.

  4. Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Organic-Poor Sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1225)

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing surveys of microbial communities in marine subsurface sediments have focused on organic-rich, continental margins; the database for organic-lean deep-sea sediments from mid-ocean regions is underdeveloped. The archaeal community in subsurface sediments of ODP Site 1225 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (3760 m water depth; 1.1 and 7.8 m sediment depth) was analyzed by PCR, cloning and sequencing, and by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Three uncultured archaeal lineages with different depth distributions were found: Marine Group I (MG-I) within the Thaumarchaeota, its sister lineage Marine Benthic Group A (MBG-A), the phylum-level archaeal lineage Marine Benthic Group B (also known as Deep-Sea Archaeal Group or Lokiarchaeota), and the Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Group 3. The MG-I phylotypes included representatives of sediment clusters that are distinct from the pelagic members of this phylum. On the scale from fully oxidized, extremely organic carbon-depleted sediments (for example, those the South Pacific Gyre) to fully reduced, organic carbon-rich marine subsurface sediments (such as those of the Peru Margin), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1225 falls into the non-extreme organic carbon-lean category, and harbors archaeal communities from both ends of the spectrum. PMID:27681926

  5. Impacts of the Minamata Conventionon on Mercury Emissions and Global Deposition from Coal-Fired Power Generation in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Giang, Amanda; Stokes, Leah C.; Streets, David G.; Corbitt, Elizabeth S.; Selin, Noelle E.

    2015-05-05

    We explore implications of the United Nations Minamata Convention on Mercury for emissions from Asian coal-fired power generation, and resulting changes to deposition worldwide by 2050. We use engineering analysis, document analysis, and interviews to construct plausible technology scenarios consistent with the Convention. We translate these scenarios into emissions projections for 2050, and use the GEOS-Chem model to calculate global mercury deposition. Where technology requirements in the Convention are flexibly defined, under a global energy and development scenario that relies heavily on coal, we project similar to 90 and 150 Mg.y(-1) of avoided power sector emissions for China and India, respectively, in 2050, compared to a scenario in which only current technologies are used. Benefits of this avoided emissions growth are primarily captured regionally, with projected changes in annual average gross deposition over China and India similar to 2 and 13 mu g.m(-2) lower, respectively, than the current technology case. Stricter, but technologically feasible, mercury control requirements in both countries could lead to a combined additional 170 Mg.y(-1) avoided emissions. Assuming only current technologies but a global transition away from coal avoids 6% and 36% more emissions than this strict technology scenario under heavy coal use for China and India, respectively.

  6. Dosimetry Support of the Ukrainian-American Case-Control Study of Leukemia and Related Disorders among Chornobyl Cleanup Workers

    PubMed Central

    Chumak, Vadim; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Kryuchkov, Victor; Bakhanova, Elena; Babkina, Natalya; Bazyka, Dimitry; Gudzenko, Natalya; Hatch, Maureen; Trotsuk, Natalya; Zablotska, Lydia; Golovanov, Ivan; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes dose reconstruction for a joint Ukrainian-American case-control study of leukemia that was conducted in a cohort of 110,645 male Ukrainian cleanup workers of the Chornobyl (Chernobyl) accident, who were exposed to various radiation doses over the 1986-1990 time period. Individual bone-marrow doses due to external irradiation along with respective uncertainty distributions were calculated for 1,000 study subjects using the RADRUE method, which employed personal cleanup history data collected in the course of an interview with the subject himself if he was alive or with two proxies if he was deceased. The central estimates of the bone-marrow dose distributions range from 3.7×10-5 to 3,260 mGy, with an arithmetic mean of 92 mGy. The uncertainties in the individual stochastic dose estimates can be approximated by lognormal distributions; the average geometric standard deviation is 2.0. PMID:26313587

  7. Upgrade of an optical network unit in a 40 Gb/s time and wavelength-division multiplexed passive optical network using an upstream tunable colorless laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindhaiq, Salem; Supa'at, Abu Sahmah M.; Zulkifli, Nadiatulhuda; Shaddad, Redhwan Q.; Mataria, Abdallah

    2014-07-01

    A high data transmission rate is the main requirement for next-generation telecommunication networks. A design for a 40 Gb/s time and wavelength-division multiplexed passive optical network (TWDM-PON) for next-generation passive optical network stage 2 is presented. The use of a modulated grating Y-branch (MG-Y) laser is proposed as an upstream tunable colorless laser source to upgrade the optical network unit. The electronically tuned MG-Y externally modulated laser with a 10 Gb/s modulation rate is applied to a TWDM-PON and presented across a 3.2-nm tuning range. The performance of the proposed laser is analyzed in terms of bit error rate, eye diagram, and optical signal-to-noise ratio. The proposed TWDM-PON achieved an aggregated data rate of 40 Gb/s along 40 km of bidirectional fiber at a 1:128 splitting ratio without amplification and dispersion compensation.

  8. Chromosomal Aberrations in Wild Mice Captured in Areas Differentially Contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshihisa; Tsuji, Hideo; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshito; Fuma, Shoichi; Doi, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Isao; Aoki, Masanari; Kubota, Masahide; Furuhata, Yoshiaki; Shigemura, Yusaku; Mizoguchi, Masahiko; Yamada, Fumio; Tomozawa, Morihiko; Sakamoto, Shinsuke H; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-08-18

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, radiation effects on nonhuman biota in the contaminated areas have been a great concern. The induction of chromosomal aberrations in splenic lymphocytes of small Japanese field mice (Apodemus argenteus) and house mice (Mus musculus) inhabiting Fukushima Prefecture was investigated. In mice inhabiting the slightly contaminated area, the average frequency of dicentric chromosomes was similar to that seen in mice inhabiting a noncontaminated control area. In contrast, mice inhabiting the moderately and heavily contaminated areas showed a significant increase in the average frequencies of dicentric chromosomes. Total absorbed dose rate was estimated to be approximately 1 mGy d(-1) and 3 mGy d(-1) in the moderately and heavily contaminated areas, respectively. Chromosomal aberrations tended to roughly increase with dose rate. Although theoretically, the frequency of chromosomal aberrations was considered proportional to the absorbed dose, chromosomal aberrations in old mice (estimated median age 300 days) did not increase with radiation dose at the same rate as that observed in young mice (estimated median age 105 days). PMID:26217955

  9. Comparison of antifungal activities of various essential oils on the Phytophthora drechsleri, the causal agent of fruit decay

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ali; Hashemi, Maryam; Hosseini, Seyed Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The efficacy of Mentha piperita L, Zataria multiflora Boiss and Thymus vulgaris L essential oils (EOs) was evaluated for controlling the growth of Phytophthora drechsleri, the causative agent of damage to many crops that is consumed directly by humans. Materials and Methods: The EOs used in this study was purchased from Magnolia Co, Iran. The pour plate method in petri dishes containing Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA) was used to evaluate the antifungal properties of EOs. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC), minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) as well as mycelial growth inhibition (MGI) were measured. The IC50 value (the concentration inhibited 50% of the mycelium growth) was calculated by probit analysis. Results and Conclusion: The fungal growth was significantly reduced by increasing concentrations of tested EOs. The complete reduction was obtained with Shirazi thyme at all concentrations, whereas the complete reduction for peppermint and thyme was observed at 0.4% and 0.8% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. Meanwhile, the minimum inhibition was observed when 0.1% peppermint (MGI values of 9.37%) was used. The IC50, MIC and MFC values of Shirazi thyme was 0.053, 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Similarly, MIC and MFC values of peppermint and thyme were recorded 0.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The results obtained from this study may contribute to the development of new antifungal agents to protect the crops from this pathogenic fungus and many agricultural plant pathogens causing drastic crop losses. PMID:26644871

  10. [Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding - endoscopy sheds light in the darkness].

    PubMed

    May, A

    2014-08-01

    Mid-gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding of the small bowel and is the most common indication for small bowel endoscopy. Intraoperative enteroscopy has been regarded as gold standard for a long time. With the introduction of different endoscopy techniques, they play now the central role, whereas intraoperative enteroscopy has become a reserve method for selected patients. Actually, there are, beside capsule endoscopy, five non-surgical, flexible enteroscopy techniques available. In Germany and Europe balloon-assisted enteroscopy (double balloon and single balloon enteroscopy) is mainly used. Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) is the "oldest" flexible enteroscopy technique and has become established throughout the world for diagnostic and therapeutic examinations of the small bowel. The majority of the studies have been performed with DBE and it provides the highest rate of complete enteroscopy. Nevertheless, technical improvements to make enteroscopy easier and faster are still required. In patients with chronic MGI or problematic situations capsule endoscopy is an ideal screening option. In case of acute MGI the flexible enteroscopy techniques should be preferred because of the high diagnostic yield combined with the possibility of endoscopic therapeutic interventions. In difficult cases with unsuccessful enteroscopy, CT angiography and conventional angiography with the option of embolisation had proved their value.

  11. Cytogenetic indices in blood lymphocites of individuals from the staff working on new confinement buildining in Chornobyl NPP zone.

    PubMed

    Bezdrobna, L K; Tarasenko, L V; Tsyganok, T V; Melnyk, T V; Nosach, Yu O; Sushko, V O; Nechayv, S Yu; Shvayko, L I

    2014-09-01

    Objective. Сytogenetic indication of possible exposure of contracting staff individuals, performing work on dismantling the ventilation pipe of "Shelter" object of Chornobyl NPP (ShO). Materials and methods. Cytogenetic examination of 12 individuals among the employees of contractors performing work on dismantling the ventilation pipe of ShO was provided. For comparison individuals who had no contact with the radiation factors for the profession activity were examined. Routine analysis method of uniformly stained chromosomes of peripheral blood lymphocytes was used. 11 388 metaphase plates were analyzed. Results. In contracting staff mean group frequency of aberrant lymphocytes, chromosome (dicentrics, acentrics, abnormal monocentrics) and chromatide type aberrations is significantly higher than such frequency in the comparison group. Three staff persons had individual frequency of specific markers of exposure - dicentric chromosomes with accompanying fragments significantly higher than their mean population level and the average frequency in the comparison group. It indicates the probability of their excess radiation when working in Chornobyl NPP local zone. Cells with two chromosome exchanges and one multiaberrant cell were registered in staff with the absence of such in control persons. The calculated estimated radiation doses of two staff persons were 87-123 mGy and and one person 210-240 mGy of acute exposure respectively. Conclusion. Calculated by frequency of dicentric chromosomes tentative "biological" doses of three staff persons show a more significant radiation effect comparing to the data of physical dosimetry.

  12. Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Organic-Poor Sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1225).

    PubMed

    Lauer, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Teske, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing surveys of microbial communities in marine subsurface sediments have focused on organic-rich, continental margins; the database for organic-lean deep-sea sediments from mid-ocean regions is underdeveloped. The archaeal community in subsurface sediments of ODP Site 1225 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (3760 m water depth; 1.1 and 7.8 m sediment depth) was analyzed by PCR, cloning and sequencing, and by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Three uncultured archaeal lineages with different depth distributions were found: Marine Group I (MG-I) within the Thaumarchaeota, its sister lineage Marine Benthic Group A (MBG-A), the phylum-level archaeal lineage Marine Benthic Group B (also known as Deep-Sea Archaeal Group or Lokiarchaeota), and the Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Group 3. The MG-I phylotypes included representatives of sediment clusters that are distinct from the pelagic members of this phylum. On the scale from fully oxidized, extremely organic carbon-depleted sediments (for example, those the South Pacific Gyre) to fully reduced, organic carbon-rich marine subsurface sediments (such as those of the Peru Margin), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1225 falls into the non-extreme organic carbon-lean category, and harbors archaeal communities from both ends of the spectrum. PMID:27681926

  13. A comparative study of adult patient doses in film screen and computed radiography in some Sudanese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Elshiekh, E; Suliman, I I; Habbani, F

    2015-07-01

    A study was performed to compare adult patient doses in film screen (FS) and computed radiography (CR) diagnostic X-ray examinations in some hospitals in Sudan over a period of 1 y; during this period of time, the CR systems were introduced to replace FS systems. Radiation doses were estimated for 354 patients in five hospitals (two FS units and three CR units). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was estimated from incident air kerma using patient exposure parameters and tube output. Dose calculations were performed using CALDOSE X 3.5 Monte Carlo-based software. In FS, third quartile of ESAK values for skull PA, skull LAT, chest PA, pelvis AP, lumbar spine AP and lumbar spine LAT were 1.5, 1.3, 0.3, 1.9, 2.8 and 5.9 mGy, respectively, while in CR, third quartile of ESAK values for the same examinations were 2.7, 1.7, 0.18, 1.7, 3.2 and 10.8 mGy, respectively. Comparable ESAK values were presented in FS and CR units. The results are important for future dose optimisation and setting national diagnostic reference levels. PMID:25889604

  14. Mitigation of upward and downward vertical displacement event heat loads with upper or lower massive gas injection in DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hollmann, E. M.; Commaux, Nicolas J. C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R. A.; Parks, P. B.; Shiraki, Daisuke

    2015-10-12

    Intentionally triggered upward and downward vertical displacement events (VDEs) leading to disruptions were pre-emptively mitigated with neon massive gas injection (MGI) coming from either above or below the plasma. Global indicators of disruption mitigation effectiveness (conducted heat loads, radiated power, and vessel motion) do not show a clear improvement when mitigating with the gas jet located closer to the VDE impact area. A clear trend of improved mitigation is observed for earlier MGI timing relative to the VDE impact time. The plasma edge magnetic perturbation is seen to lock to a preferential phase during the VDE thermal quench, but thismore » phase is not clearly matched by preliminary attempts to fit to the conducted heat load phase. Clear indications of plasma infra-red (IR) emission are observed both before and during the disruptions. Furthermore, this IR emission can affect calculation of disruption heat loads; here, the time decay of post-disruption IR signals is used to correct for this effect.« less

  15. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S Del Sol; García-Salcedo, R; Sánchez-Guzmán, D; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G; Gaona, E; de León-Alfaro, M A; Rivera-Montalvo, T

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm(2) at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy. PMID:26609683

  16. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2011 update

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Jacqueline H.; Smith, Constance M.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of mouse developmental expression information. GXD integrates different types of expression data at the transcript and protein level and captures expression information from many different mouse strains and mutants. GXD places these data in the larger biological context through integration with other Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resources and interconnections with many other databases. Web-based query forms support simple or complex searches that take advantage of all these integrated data. The data in GXD are obtained from the literature, from individual laboratories, and from large-scale data providers. All data are annotated and reviewed by GXD curators. Since the last report, the GXD data content has increased significantly, the interface and data displays have been improved, new querying capabilities were implemented, and links to other expression resources were added. GXD is available through the MGI web site (www.informatics.jax.org), or directly at www.informatics.jax.org/expression.shtml. PMID:21062809

  17. The mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD): 2007 update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Constance M.; Finger, Jacqueline H.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) provides the scientific community with an extensive and easily searchable database of gene expression information about the mouse. Its primary emphasis is on developmental studies. By integrating different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide comprehensive information about expression patterns of transcripts and proteins in wild-type and mutant mice. Integration with the other Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) databases places the gene expression information in the context of genetic, sequence, functional and phenotypic information, enabling valuable insights into the molecular biology that underlies developmental and disease processes. In recent years the utility of GXD has been greatly enhanced by a large increase in data content, obtained from the literature and provided by researchers doing large-scale in situ and cDNA screens. In addition, we have continued to refine our query and display features to make it easier for users to interrogate the data. GXD is available through the MGI web site at or directly at . PMID:17130151

  18. Entrance surface air kerma in X-ray systems for paediatric interventional cardiology: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, C; Vano, E; Miranda, P; Valenzuela, E; Vergara, F; Guarda, E

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this work were to report the results of a national survey on entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values for different phantom thicknesses and operation modes in paediatric interventional cardiology (IC) systems and to compare them with previous values. The national survey also offers suggested investigation levels (ILs) for ESAK in paediatric cardiac procedures. ESAK was measured on phantoms of 4-16 cm thickness of polymethyl methacrylate slabs. For low fluoroscopy mode (FM), ESAK rates ranged from 0.11 to 33.1 mGy min(-1) and for high FM from 0.34 to 61.0 mGy min(-1). For cine mode, values of ESAK per frame were from 1.9 to 78.2 µGy fr(-1). The ILs were suggested as the third quartile of the values measured. This research showed lower ESAK values than in previous research, particularly for ESAK values in cine modes. This work represents a first step towards launching a national programme in paediatric dosimetry for IC procedures. PMID:25805885

  19. Alkali-deficient tourmaline from the Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit, British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, S.-Y.; Palmer, M.R.; Slack, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Alkali-deficient tourmalines are found in albitized rocks from the hanging-wall of the Sullivan Pb-Zn-Ag deposit (British Columbia, Canada). They approximate the Mg-equivalent of foitite with an idealized formula D???(Mg2Al)Al6Si6O18(BO 3)3(OH)4. Major chemical substitutions in the tourmalines are the alkali-defect type [Na*(x) + Mg*(Y) = ???(X) + Al(Y)] and the uvite type [Na*(X) + Al(Y) = Ca(X) + Mg*(Y)], where Na* = Na + K, Mg* = Mg + Fe + Mn. The occurrence of these alkali-deficient tourmalines reflects a unique geochemical environment that is either alkali-depleted overall or one in which the alkalis preferentially partitioned into coexisting minerals (e.g. albite). Some of the alkali-deficient tourmalines have unusually high Mn contents (up to 1.5 wt.% MnO) compared to other Sullivan tourmalines. Manganese has a strong preference for incorporation into coexisting garnet and carbonate at Sullivan, thus many tourmalines in Mn-rich rocks are poor in Mn (<0.2 wt.% MnO). It appears that the dominant controls over the occurrence of Mn-rich tourmalines at Sullivan are the local availability of Mn and the lack of other coexisting minerals that may preferentially incorporate Mn into their structures.

  20. The radiation dose from a proposed measurement of arsenic and selenium in human skin.

    PubMed

    Gherase, Mihai R; Mader, Joanna E; Fleming, David E B

    2010-09-21

    Dose measurements following 10 min irradiations with a portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer composed of a miniature x-ray tube and a silicon PiN diode detector were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters consisting of LiF:Mg,Ti chips of 3 mm diameter and 0.4 mm thickness. The table-top setup of the spectrometer was used for all measurements. The setup included a stainless steel lid which served as a radiation shield. Two rectangular polyethylene skin/soft tissue phantoms with two cylindrical plaster of Paris bone phantoms were used to study the effect of x-ray beam attenuation and backscatter on the measured dose. Eight different irradiation experiments were performed. The average dose rate values measured with TLD chips within a 1 x 1 cm(2) area were between 4.8 and 12.8 mGy min(-1). The equivalent dose for a 1 x 1 cm(2) skin area was estimated to be 13.2 mSv. The maximum measured dose rate values with a single TLD chip were between 7.5 and 25.1 mGy min(-1). The effective dose corresponding to a proposed arsenic/selenium skin measurement was estimated to be 0.13 microSv for a 2 min irradiation. PMID:20798460

  1. The radiation dose from a proposed measurement of arsenic and selenium in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherase, Mihai R.; Mader, Joanna E.; Fleming, David E. B.

    2010-09-01

    Dose measurements following 10 min irradiations with a portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer composed of a miniature x-ray tube and a silicon PiN diode detector were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters consisting of LiF:Mg,Ti chips of 3 mm diameter and 0.4 mm thickness. The table-top setup of the spectrometer was used for all measurements. The setup included a stainless steel lid which served as a radiation shield. Two rectangular polyethylene skin/soft tissue phantoms with two cylindrical plaster of Paris bone phantoms were used to study the effect of x-ray beam attenuation and backscatter on the measured dose. Eight different irradiation experiments were performed. The average dose rate values measured with TLD chips within a 1 × 1 cm2 area were between 4.8 and 12.8 mGy min-1. The equivalent dose for a 1 × 1 cm2 skin area was estimated to be 13.2 mSv. The maximum measured dose rate values with a single TLD chip were between 7.5 and 25.1 mGy min-1. The effective dose corresponding to a proposed arsenic/selenium skin measurement was estimated to be 0.13 µSv for a 2 min irradiation.

  2. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  3. Genetic structure of three fosmid-fragments encoding 16S rRNA genes of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG): implications for physiology and evolution of marine sedimentary archaea.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping-Yi; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Qin, Qi-Long; Dang, Hong-Yue; Wang, Xu-Min; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-02-01

    Archaea of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (MCG) exist widely in soil, freshwater and marine sediments of both surface and subsurface. However, current knowledge about this group is limited to its phylogenetic diversity. An archaeal 16S library was constructed from a sediment sample from the South China Sea, which was dominated by MCG and Marine Group I (MG-I). A metagenomic library was constructed from the same sediment sample, and three MCG fosmids (E6-3G, E37-7F and E48-1C) containing 16S rRNA genes were screened. Annotation showed that the three genomic fragments encode a variety of open reading frames (ORFs) that are potentially homologous to important functional genes related to lipid biosynthesis, energy metabolism, and resistance to oxidants. No colinear regions were found between MCG fosmids and reported archaeal genomic fragments or genomes, suggesting that the MCG archaea are quite different from the sequenced archaea in gene arrangement. Analyses of both the phylogenies of 16S rRNA genes and several informational processing genes and nucleotide frequencies showed that MCG archaea are distinct from MG-I plus relatives. In addition, tetranucleotide frequency analysis in combination with phylogenetic analysis suggested that some fragments in the MCG fosmids are probably derived from non-MCG or non-archaeal genomes.

  4. A comparison of mean glandular dose diagnostic reference levels within the all-digital Irish National Breast Screening Programme and the Irish Symptomatic Breast Services.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Desiree; Rainford, Louise

    2013-03-01

    Data on image quality, compression and radiation dose were collected from symptomatic breast units within the Republic of Ireland. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using SPSS. Recommendations of mean glandular dose (MGD) diagnostic reference levels were made at various levels for film-screen and full field digital mammography units to match levels published worldwide. MGDs received by symptomatic breast patients within Ireland are higher than those received in the all-digital Irish Breast Screening service; 55-65 mm breast: 1.75 mGy (screening) vs. 2.4 mGy (symptomatic) at the 95th percentile; various reasons are proposed for the differences. MGDs achieved in the screening service may be lower because of the exacting requirements for radiographer training, characteristics of the patients and equipment quality assurance levels. More precise imaging guidelines, standards and training of symptomatic radiographers performing mammography are suggested to remediate MGDs delivered to the breasts of Irish women attending the symptomatic breast services. PMID:22740646

  5. Phylogenetic Characterization of Marine Benthic Archaea in Organic-Poor Sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean (ODP Site 1225).

    PubMed

    Lauer, Antje; Sørensen, Ketil Bernt; Teske, Andreas

    2016-09-06

    Sequencing surveys of microbial communities in marine subsurface sediments have focused on organic-rich, continental margins; the database for organic-lean deep-sea sediments from mid-ocean regions is underdeveloped. The archaeal community in subsurface sediments of ODP Site 1225 in the eastern equatorial Pacific (3760 m water depth; 1.1 and 7.8 m sediment depth) was analyzed by PCR, cloning and sequencing, and by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Three uncultured archaeal lineages with different depth distributions were found: Marine Group I (MG-I) within the Thaumarchaeota, its sister lineage Marine Benthic Group A (MBG-A), the phylum-level archaeal lineage Marine Benthic Group B (also known as Deep-Sea Archaeal Group or Lokiarchaeota), and the Deep-Sea Euryarchaeotal Group 3. The MG-I phylotypes included representatives of sediment clusters that are distinct from the pelagic members of this phylum. On the scale from fully oxidized, extremely organic carbon-depleted sediments (for example, those the South Pacific Gyre) to fully reduced, organic carbon-rich marine subsurface sediments (such as those of the Peru Margin), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1225 falls into the non-extreme organic carbon-lean category, and harbors archaeal communities from both ends of the spectrum.

  6. EDITORIAL: International Conference on Finite Fermionic Systems: Nilsson Model 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    a high standing scientific programme. Finally, we thank the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences through its Nobel Committee for Physics, the Royal Physiographical Society in Lund, the Technical Faculty (LTH) at Lund University, and the Swedish Research Council (VR) for financial support. Sven Aberg, Ragnar Bengtsson, Ingemar Ragnarsson and Stephanie Reimann Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, S-22100 Lund, Sweden Joakim Cederkäll, Claes Fahlander and Dirk Rudolph Division of Nuclear Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund, Sweden

  7. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for guidance of head and neck surgery: Assessment of dose and image quality using a C-arm prototype.

    PubMed

    Daly, M J; Siewerdsen, J H; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A; Irish, J C

    2006-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector represents a promising modality for intraoperative imaging in interventional procedures, demonstrating sub-mm three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Measurements of patient dose and in-room exposure for CBCT-guided head and neck surgery are reported, and the 3D imaging performance as a function of dose and other acquisition/reconstruction parameters is investigated. Measurements were performed on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions (Erlangen, Germany) to provide flat-panel CBCT. Imaging dose was measured in a custom-built 16 cm cylindrical head phantom at four positions (isocenter, anterior, posterior, and lateral) as a function of kVp (80-120 kVp) and C-arm trajectory ("tube-under" and "tube-over" half-rotation orbits). At 100 kVp, for example ("tube-under" orbit), the imaging dose was 0.059 (isocenter), 0.022 (anterior), 0.10 (posterior), and 0.056 (lateral) mGy/ mAs, with scans at approximately 50 and approximately 170 mAs typical for visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures, respectively. Dose to radiosensitive structures (viz., the eyes and thyroid) were considered in particular: significant dose sparing to the eyes (a factor of 5) was achieved using a "tube-under" (rather than "tube-over") half-rotation orbit; a thyroid shield (0.5 mm Pb-equivalent) gave moderate reduction in thyroid dose due to x-ray scatter outside the primary field of view. In-room exposure was measured at positions around the operating table and up to 2 m from isocenter. A typical CBCT scan (10 mGy to isocenter) gave in-air exposure ranging from 29 mR (0.26 mSv) at 35 cm from isocenter, to <0.5 mR (<0.005 mSv) at 2 m from isocenter. Three-dimensional (3D) image quality was assessed in CBCT reconstructions of an anthropomorphic head phantom containing contrast-detail spheres (11-103 HU; 1.6-12.7 mm) and a natural human

  8. Proteomic and Epigenetic Analysis of Rice after Seed Spaceflight and Ground-Base Ion Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Peng, Yuming; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Bin; Yang, Jun

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects to plant seeds. In previous work, we compared the proteomic profiles of rice plants growing after seed spaceflights to ground controls by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with mass spectrometry and found that the protein expression profiles were changed and differentially expressed proteins participated in most of the biological processes of rice. To further evaluate the dosage effects of space radiation and compare between low- and high-dose ion effects, we carried out three independent ground-base ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (low-dose range: 2~1000mGy, high-dose range: 2000~20000mGy) to rice seeds and performed proteomic analysis of seedlings. We found that protein expression profiles showed obvious boundaries between low- and high-dose radiation groups. Rates of differentially expressed proteins presented a dose-dependent effect, it reached the highest value at 2000mGy dosage point in all three radiation experiments coincidently; while proteins responded to low-dose radiations preferred to change their expressions at the minimum dosage (2mGy). Proteins participating in rice biological processes also responded differently between low- and high-dose radiations: proteins involved in energy metabolism and photosynthesis tended to be regulated after low-dose radiations while stress responding, protein folding and cell redox homeostasis related proteins preferred to change their expressions after high-dose radiations. By comparing the proteomic profiles between ground-base radiations and spaceflights, it was worth noting that ground-base low-dose ion radiation effects shared similar biological effects as space environment. In addition, we discovered that protein nucleoside diphosphate kinase 1 (NDPK1) showed obvious increased regulation after spaceflights and ion radiations. NDPK1 catalyzes nucleotide metabolism

  9. Mobile C-arm cone-beam CT for guidance of spine surgery: Image quality, radiation dose, and integration with interventional guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, S.; Nithiananthan, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: A flat-panel detector based mobile isocentric C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been developed to allow intraoperative 3D imaging with sub-millimeter spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Image quality and radiation dose were evaluated in spinal surgery, commonly relying on lower-performance image intensifier based mobile C-arms. Scan protocols were developed for task-specific imaging at minimum dose, in-room exposure was evaluated, and integration of the imaging system with a surgical guidance system was demonstrated in preclinical studies of minimally invasive spine surgery. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed as a function of kilovolt (peak) (80-120 kVp) and milliampere second using thoracic and lumbar spine dosimetry phantoms. In-room radiation exposure was measured throughout the operating room for various CBCT scan protocols. Image quality was assessed using tissue-equivalent inserts in chest and abdomen phantoms to evaluate bone and soft-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio as a function of dose, and task-specific protocols (i.e., visualization of bone or soft-tissues) were defined. Results were applied in preclinical studies using a cadaveric torso simulating minimally invasive, transpedicular surgery. Results: Task-specific CBCT protocols identified include: thoracic bone visualization (100 kVp; 60 mAs; 1.8 mGy); lumbar bone visualization (100 kVp; 130 mAs; 3.2 mGy); thoracic soft-tissue visualization (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 4.3 mGy); and lumbar soft-tissue visualization (120 kVp; 460 mAs; 10.6 mGy) - each at (0.3 x 0.3 x 0.9 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Alternative lower-dose, lower-resolution soft-tissue visualization protocols were identified (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 5.1 mGy) for the lumbar region at (0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Half-scan orbit of the C-arm (x-ray tube traversing under the table) was dosimetrically advantageous (prepatient attenuation) with a nonuniform dose distribution ({approx}2 x higher at the entrance side than at isocenter

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of the dose from imaging with GE eXplore 120 micro-CT using GATE

    SciTech Connect

    Bretin, Florian; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Plenevaux, Alain; Seret, Alain

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Small animals are increasingly used as translational models in preclinical imaging studies involving microCT, during which the subjects can be exposed to large amounts of radiation. While the radiation levels are generally sublethal, studies have shown that low-level radiation can change physiological parameters in mice. In order to rule out any influence of radiation on the outcome of such experiments, or resulting deterministic effects in the subjects, the levels of radiation involved need to be addressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the radiation dose delivered by the GE eXplore 120 microCT non-invasively using Monte Carlo simulations in GATE and to compare results to previously obtained experimental values. Methods: Tungsten X-ray spectra were simulated at 70, 80, and 97 kVp using an analytical tool and their half-value layers were simulated for spectra validation against experimentally measured values of the physical X-ray tube. A Monte Carlo model of the microCT system was set up and four protocols that are regularly applied to live animal scanning were implemented. The computed tomography dose index (CTDI) inside a PMMA phantom was derived and multiple field of view acquisitions were simulated using the PMMA phantom, a representative mouse and rat. Results: Simulated half-value layers agreed with experimentally obtained results within a 7% error window. The CTDI ranged from 20 to 56 mGy and closely matched experimental values. Derived organ doses in mice reached 459 mGy in bones and up to 200 mGy in soft tissue organs using the highest energy protocol. Dose levels in rats were lower due to the increased mass of the animal compared to mice. The uncertainty of all dose simulations was below 14%. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations proved a valuable tool to investigate the 3D dose distribution in animals from microCT. Small animals, especially mice (due to their small volume), receive large amounts of radiation from the GE eXplore 120

  11. Dose measurements for dental cone-beam CT: a comparison with MSCT and panoramic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deman, P.; Atwal, P.; Duzenli, C.; Thakur, Y.; Ford, N. L.

    2014-06-01

    To date there is a lack of published information on appropriate methods to determine patient doses from dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) equipment. The goal of this study is to apply and extend the methods recommended in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report 111 for CBCT equipment to characterize dose and effective dose for a range of dental imaging equipment. A protocol derived from the one proposed by Dixon et al (2010 Technical Report 111, American Association of Physicist in Medicine, MD, USA), was applied to dose measurements of multi-slice CT, dental CBCT (small and large fields of view (FOV)) and a dental panoramic system. The computed tomography dose index protocol was also performed on the MSCT to compare both methods. The dose distributions in a cylindrical polymethyl methacrylate phantom were characterized using a thimble ionization chamber and Gafchromic™ film (beam profiles). Gafchromic™ films were used to measure the dose distribution in an anthropomorphic phantom. A method was proposed to extend dose estimates to planes superior and inferior to the central plane. The dose normalized to 100 mAs measured in the center of the phantom for the large FOV dental CBCT (11.4 mGy/100 mAs) is two times lower than that of MSCT (20.7 mGy/100 mAs) for the same FOV, but approximately 15 times higher than for a panoramic system (0.6 mGy/100 mAs). The effective dose per scan (in clinical conditions) found for the dental CBCT are 167.60 ± 3.62, 61.30 ± 3.88 and 92.86 ± 7.76 mSv for the Kodak 9000 (fixed scan length of 3.7 cm), and the iCAT Next Generation for 6 cm and 13 cm scan lengths respectively. The method to extend the dose estimates from the central slice to superior and inferior slices indicates a good agreement between theory and measurement. The Gafchromic™ films provided useful beam profile data and 2D distributions of dose in phantom.

  12. [Non-Parametric Analysis of Radiation Risks of Mortality among Chernobyl Clean-Up Workers].

    PubMed

    Gorsky, A I; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Shchukina, N V; Chekin, S Yu; Ivanov, V K

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the relationship between dose and mortality from cancer and circulation diseases in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers based on the data from the National Radiation and Epidemiological Registry was performed. Medical and dosimetry information on the clean-up workers, males, who got radiation doses from April 26, 1986 to April 26, 1987, which was accumulated from 1992 to 2012, was used for the analysis. The total size of the cohort was 42929 people, 12731 deaths were registered in the cohort, among them 1893 deaths from solid cancers and 5230 deaths were from circulation diseases. An average age of the workers was 39 years in 1992 and the mean dose was 164 mGy. The dose-effect relationship was estimated with the use of non-parametric analysis of survival with regard to concurrence of risks of mortality. The risks were estimated in 6 dose groups of similar size (1-70, 70-130, 130-190, 190-210, 210-230 and.230-1000 mGy). The group "1-70 mGy" was used as control. Estimated dose-effect relationship related to cancers and circulation diseases is described approximately with a linear model, coefficient of determination (the proportion of variability explained by the linear model) for cancers was 23-25% and for circulation diseases - 2-13%. The slope coefficient of the dose-effect relationship normalized to 1 Gy for the ratio of risks for cancers in the linear model was 0.47 (95% CI: -0.77, 1.71), and for circulation diseases it was 0.22 (95% CI: -0.58, 1.02). Risks coefficient (slope coefficient of excess mortality at a dose of 1 Gy) for solid cancers was 1.94 (95% CI: - 3.10, 7.00) x 10(-2) and for circulation diseases it was 0.67 (95% CI: -9.61, 11.00) x 10(-2). 137 deaths from radiation-induced cancers and 47 deaths from circulation diseases were registered during a follow up period. PMID:27534064

  13. Epigenetic Analysis of Heavy-ion Radiation Induced Bystander Effects in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Cui, Changna; Xue, Bei

    Abstract: Radiation-induced bystander effect was defined as the induction of damage in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. Recently, low dose of high LET radiation induced bystander effects in vivo have been reported more and more. It has been indicated that radiation induced bystander effect was localized not only in bystander tissues but also in distant organs. Genomic, epigenetic and proteomics plays significant roles in regulating heavy-ion radiation stress responses in mice. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were exposed head-only to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of (12) C heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. Directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 1h, 6h, 12h and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that heavy-ion irradiated mouse head could induce genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly radiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate was highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. The results illustrated that genomic methylation changes of heavy ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of

  14. Low Dose High Energy X-ray In-Line Phase Sensitive Imaging Prototype: Investigation of Optimal Geometric Conditions and Design Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Muhammad. U.; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly. D.; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 µm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 µm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 µm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  15. Improved dose calculation accuracy for low energy brachytherapy by optimizing dual energy CT imaging protocols for noise reduction using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Landry, Guillaume; Gaudreault, Mathieu; van Elmpt, Wouter; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction achievable from dual energy computed tomography (CT) imaging (DECT) using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative image reconstruction algorithms combined with increased imaging exposure. We evaluated the data in the context of imaging for brachytherapy dose calculation, where accurate quantification of electron density ρe and effective atomic number Zeff is beneficial. A dual source CT scanner was used to scan a phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts. DECT scans were acquired at 80 kVp/140Sn kVp (where Sn stands for tin filtration) and 100 kVp/140Sn kVp, using the same values of the CT dose index CTDIvol for both settings as a measure for the radiation imaging exposure. Four CTDIvol levels were investigated. Images were reconstructed using FBP and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with strength 1,3 and 5. From DECT scans two material quantities were derived, Zeff and ρe. DECT images were used to assign material types and the amount of improperly assigned voxels was quantified for each protocol. The dosimetric impact of improperly assigned voxels was evaluated with Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for an (125)I source in numerical phantoms. Standard deviations for Zeff and ρe were reduced up to a factor ∼2 when using SAFIRE with strength 5 compared to FBP. Standard deviations on Zeff and ρe as low as 0.15 and 0.006 were achieved for the muscle insert representing typical soft tissue using a CTDIvol of 40 mGy and 3mm slice thickness. Dose calculation accuracy was generally improved when using SAFIRE. Mean (maximum absolute) dose errors of up to 1.3% (21%) with FBP were reduced to less than 1% (6%) with SAFIRE at a CTDIvol of 10 mGy. Using a CTDIvol of 40mGy and SAFIRE yielded mean dose calculation errors of the order of 0.6% which was the MC dose calculation precision in this study and no error was larger than ±2.5% as opposed to errors of up to -4% with FPB. This

  16. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk estimates due to radiotherapy for benign pigmented villonodular synovitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2016-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign disease affecting synovial membranes of young and middle-aged adults. The aggressive treatment of this disorder often involves external-beam irradiation. This study was motivated by the lack of data relating to the radiation exposure of healthy tissues and radiotherapy-induced cancer risk. Monte Carlo methodology was employed to simulate a patient’s irradiation for PVNS in the knee and hip joints with a 6 MV photon beam. The average radiation dose received by twenty-two out-of-field critical organs of the human body was calculated. These calculations were combined with the appropriate organ-, age- and gender-specific risk coefficients of the BEIR-VII model to estimate the lifetime probability of cancer development. The risk for carcinogenesis to colon, which was partly included in the treatment fields used for hip irradiation, was determined with a non-linear mechanistic model and differential dose-volume histograms obtained by CT-based 3D radiotherapy planning. Risk assessments were compared with the nominal lifetime intrinsic risk (LIR) values. Knee irradiation to 36 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 0.2–24.6 mGy. The corresponding range from hip radiotherapy was 1.2–455.1 mGy whereas the organ equivalent dose for the colon was up to 654.9 mGy. The organ-specific cancer risks from knee irradiation for PVNS were found to be inconsequential since they were at least 161.5 times lower than the LIRs irrespective of the patient’s age and gender. The bladder and colon cancer risk from radiotherapy in the hip joint was up to 3.2 and 6.6 times smaller than the LIR, respectively. These cancer risks may slightly elevate the nominal incidence rates and they should not be ignored during the patient’s treatment planning and follow-up. The probabilities for developing any other solid tumor were more than 20 times lower than the LIRs and, therefore, they may be considered as small.

  17. Pharmacokinetics and radiation dose of Y-90-citrate and Y-90-EDTMP measured with Y-86 and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, H.; Plag, C.; Braun, U.

    1994-05-01

    Painful bone metastases are palliatively treated with {beta}=emitting isotopes such as Y-90. To obtain quantitative biokinetic data of Y-90-citrate and Y-90-EDTMP (ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate) the {beta}{sup +}-emitting sister isotope Y-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7 h, 33% {beta}{sup +}) was prepared and applied as Y-86-citrate and Y-86-EDTMP using whole-body PET measurements. Patients with multiple bone metastases of prostate cancer received about 200 MBq Y-86-citrate (n=4) or Y-86-EDTW (n=3). Dynamic scans were recorded over the liver up to 4 h after injection (p.i.) followed by 3 to 5 quantitative whole-body PET scans from 4 to 72 h p.i. The reconstructed transversal PET images were evaluated to obtain time-activity curves in normal bone, metastases and liver. Based on these Y-86-uptake kinetics data the radiation doses caused by the Y-90-compounds were calculated. Whereas Y-86-citrate was found in the liver (14% at 4 h p.i.), this organ was not visible after the injection of Y-86-EDTMP. For both compounds 20% to 40% of the injected activity was found in the skeleton. Maximum ratios of activity concentration of metastasis to normal bone reached 9:1 for citrate and 15:1 for EDTMP. The dose to the red marrow was 2.6{plus_minus}0.4 mGy per 1 MBq of injected Y-90-citrate and 1.7{plus_minus}0.3 mGy for Y-90-EDTMP. The doses delivered to the metastases varied from 9 to 39 mGy per 1 MBq of the injected Y-90-activity. This study shows that Y-86 and PET allow to compare the pharmo-kinetics of different Y-90-radiotherapeuticals quantitatively and to derive dosimetric data for the individual patient. Furthermore, because of the chemical similarity of Y-EDTMP and Sm-EDTMP, these date should also be relevant to Sm-153-EDTMP.

  18. Body Potassium Content and Radiation Dose from 40K for the Urals Population (Russia).

    PubMed

    Tolstykh, Evgenia I; Degteva, Marina O; Bougrov, Nikolay G; Napier, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Long-term whole-body monitoring of radionuclides in residents of the Urals Region has been performed at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM, Chelyabinsk). Quantification of 40K was achieved by measuring the 40K photopeak with four phoswich detectors in whole body counter SICH-9.1M. The current study presents the results of 40K measurements in 3,651 women and 1,961 t-test; U-test men aged 11-90; measurements were performed in 2006-2014. The residents belonged to two ethnic groups, Turkic (Tatar, Bashkir) and Slavs (mainly Russian). The levels of 40K-body contents depend upon gender, age, and body mass. Significant ethnic-differences were not found in 40K-body contents and 40K concentrations in terms of Bq per kg of body weight (in groups homogenous by age and gender). Both 40K-body contents and concentrations were significantly higher in men than in women in all age-groups; the difference was about 25%. The measured 40K-body content in men of 20-50 years was about 4200 Bq (134 g of K) and about 3000 Bq (95 g of K) in women. By the age of 80 these values decreased to 3200 Bq (102 g of K) in men and 2500 Bq (80 g of K) in women. Annual dose rates were maximal in the age group of 20-30 years- 0.16 mGy/y for men and 0.13 mGy/y for women. Further, the dose-rates decreased with age and in the groups of 60-80 years were 0.13 mGy/y for men and 0.10 mGy/y for women. Within groups homogeneous by age and gender, individual dose rates are described by a normal statistical distribution. The coefficient of variation ranges from 9 to 14%, and on the average is 12.5%. Doses from naturally occurring 40K accumulated over 70 years were found to be 9.9 mGy for men and 8.3 mGy for women; over 90 years - 12.5 and 10.4 mGy.

  19. Measuring the external exposure dose in the contaminated area near the Chernobyl nuclear power station using the thermoluminescence of quartz in bricks.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hitoshi; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Takada, Jun; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Sharifov, Vagif F; Veselkina, Irina I; Pilenko, Irina V; Kalimullin, Wafa A F; Masyakin, Vladimir B; Yoshikawa, Isao; Nagatomo, Tsuneto; Okajima, Syunzo

    2002-08-01

    We collected bricks from buildings in the heavily contaminated evacuated area of Belarus in a 30-km zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power station and the Gomel-Bryansk area of 150-250 km from Chernobyl and estimated the cumulative radiation dose caused by the reactor accident by measuring the thermoluminescence (TL) of the bricks. The annual dose at each location was measured using glass dosimeters and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). The dose rate was measured using an energy-compensated NaI scintillation survey meter. The soil contamination near the location of each brick was measured using a germanium semiconductor detector. The main purpose of the project was to extrapolate the relation between the cumulative external dose and the present dose rate or contamination level to the lower contaminated areas. The results of the glass dosimeter, TLD, and survey meter determinations were almost identical. For a determination of the annual dose higher than 10 mGy y(-1), the cumulative dose by TL (TL dose) was roughly proportional to the annual dose and about 1.5 times larger than the cumulative dose calculated from the annual dose and 137Cs half life. The difference is expected due to the contribution of short-lived nuclides immediately after the accident or localized heavy contamination of the ground surface with 137Cs that migrated afterwards. For annual dose smaller than 10 mGy y(-1), the proportionality was not observed and most of the locations facing indoors showed TL doses very much larger than that expected from the proportionality. The cumulative dose outdoors by TL was also roughly proportional to the regional 137Cs contamination level and the proportional constant is about 10(-1) mGy per GBq km(-2), and is about 250 times larger than the present annual internal dose derived from published results. The correlation between the present dose rate where the brick was sampled and the average 137Cs concentration in the ground soil near the point is not clear

  20. Amino acids in comets and meteorites: stability under gamma radiation and preservation of the enantiomeric excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Cataldo, Franco; Ursini, Ornella; Manchado, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    Amino acids in Solar system bodies may have played a key role in the chemistry that led to the origin of life on Earth. We present laboratory studies testing the stability of amino acids against high energy radiation. All the 20 chiral amino acids in the levo form found in the proteins of the current terrestrial biochemistry were irradiated in the solid state with γ-radiation to a dose of 3.2 MGy, which is the dose equivalent to that produced by radionuclide decay in comets and asteroids in 1.05 × 109 yr. For each amino acid the radiolysis degree and the radioracemization degree were measured by differential scanning calorimetry and by optical rotatory dispersion spectroscopy. From these measurements, a radiolysis rate constant kdsc and a radioracemization rate constant krac were determined for each amino acid and extrapolated to a dose of 14 MGy, which corresponds to the expected total dose delivered by natural radionuclide decay to all the organic molecules present in comets and asteroids in 4.6 × 109 yr, the age of the Solar system. It is shown that all the amino acids studied can survive a radiation dose of 14 MGy, although certain fractions of them are lost as a result of radiolytic processes. Similarly, the radioracemization process accompanying the radiolysis does not extinguish the initial enantiomeric enrichment. Knowledge of the radiolysis and radioracemization rate constants may permit the calculation of the original concentrations of the amino acids at the time of the formation of the Solar system, starting from the concentration found today in carbonaceous chondrites. For some amino acids the concentration in the pre-solar nebula could have been up to 6 times higher than that currently observed in meteorites. The preservation of an original enatiomeric excess is also expected. This study adds experimental support to the suggestion that amino acids were formed in the interstellar medium and in chiral excess and then were incorporated into comets and

  1. Genetic susceptibility: radiation effects relevant to space travel.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yuanlin; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Warner, Christy; Bedford, Joel S

    2012-11-01

    Genetic variation in the capacity to repair radiation damage is an important factor influencing both cellular and tissue radiosensitivity variation among individuals as well as dose rate effects associated with such damage. This paper consists of two parts. The first part reviews some of the available data relating to genetic components governing such variability among individuals in susceptibility to radiation damage relevant for radiation protection and discusses the possibility and extent to which these may also apply for space radiations. The second part focuses on the importance of dose rate effects and genetic-based variations that influence them. Very few dose rate effect studies have been carried out for the kinds of radiations encountered in space. The authors present here new data on the production of chromosomal aberrations in noncycling low passage human ATM+/+ or ATM+/- cells following irradiations with protons (50 MeV or 1 GeV), 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions and gamma rays, where doses were delivered at a high dose rate of 700 mGy(-1) min, or a lower dose rate of 5 mGy min(-1). Dose responses were essentially linear over the dose ranges tested and not significantly different for the two cell strains. Values of the dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF) were expressed as the ratio of the slopes of the dose-response curves for the high versus the lower (5 mGy min(-1)) dose rate exposures. The authors refer to this as the DREF5. For the gamma ray standard, DREF5 values of approximately two were observed. Similar dose rate effects were seen for both energies of protons (DREF5 ≈ 2.2 in both cases). For 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ≈ 150 keV μ(-1)], the DREF5 was not 1 as might have been expected on the basis of LET alone but was approximately 1.3. From these results and conditions, the authors estimate that the relative biological effectiveness for 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions for high and low dose rates, respectively, were about 10 and 15

  2. Pregnancy and Radiation Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerogiannis, J.; Stefanoyiannis, A. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several modalities are currently utilized for diagnosis and therapy, by appropriate application of x-rays. In diagnostic radiology, interventional radiology, radiotherapy, interventional cardiology, nuclear medicine and other specialties radiation protection of a pregnant woman as a patient, as well as a member of the operating personnel, is of outmost importance. Based on radiation risk, the termination of pregnancy is not justified if foetal doses are below 100 mGy. For foetal doses between 100 and 500 mGy, a decision is reached on a case by case basis. In Diagnostic Radiology, when a pregnant patient takes an abdomen CT, then an estimation of the foetus' dose is necessary. However, it is extremely rare for the dose to be high enough to justify an abortion. Radiographs of the chest and extremities can be done at any period of pregnancy, provided that the equipment is functioning properly. Usually, the radiation risk is lower than the risk of not undergoing a radiological examination. Radiation exposure in uterus from diagnostic radiological examinations is unlikely to result in any deleterious effect on the child, but the possibility of a radiation-induced effect can not be entirely ruled out. The effects of exposure to radiation on the foetus depend on the time of exposure, the date of conception and the absorbed dose. Finally, a pregnant worker can continue working in an x-ray department, as long as there is reasonable assurance that the foetal dose can be kept below 1 mGy during the pregnancy. Nuclear Medicine diagnostic examinations using short-lived radionuclides can be used for pregnant patient. Irradiation of the foetus results from placental transfer and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals in the foetal tissues, as well as from external irradiation from radioactivity in the mother's organ and tissues. As a rule, a pregnant patient should not undergo therapy with radionuclide, unless it is crucial for her life. In Radiotherapy, the patient, treating

  3. [Non-Parametric Analysis of Radiation Risks of Mortality among Chernobyl Clean-Up Workers].

    PubMed

    Gorsky, A I; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Shchukina, N V; Chekin, S Yu; Ivanov, V K

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the relationship between dose and mortality from cancer and circulation diseases in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers based on the data from the National Radiation and Epidemiological Registry was performed. Medical and dosimetry information on the clean-up workers, males, who got radiation doses from April 26, 1986 to April 26, 1987, which was accumulated from 1992 to 2012, was used for the analysis. The total size of the cohort was 42929 people, 12731 deaths were registered in the cohort, among them 1893 deaths from solid cancers and 5230 deaths were from circulation diseases. An average age of the workers was 39 years in 1992 and the mean dose was 164 mGy. The dose-effect relationship was estimated with the use of non-parametric analysis of survival with regard to concurrence of risks of mortality. The risks were estimated in 6 dose groups of similar size (1-70, 70-130, 130-190, 190-210, 210-230 and.230-1000 mGy). The group "1-70 mGy" was used as control. Estimated dose-effect relationship related to cancers and circulation diseases is described approximately with a linear model, coefficient of determination (the proportion of variability explained by the linear model) for cancers was 23-25% and for circulation diseases - 2-13%. The slope coefficient of the dose-effect relationship normalized to 1 Gy for the ratio of risks for cancers in the linear model was 0.47 (95% CI: -0.77, 1.71), and for circulation diseases it was 0.22 (95% CI: -0.58, 1.02). Risks coefficient (slope coefficient of excess mortality at a dose of 1 Gy) for solid cancers was 1.94 (95% CI: - 3.10, 7.00) x 10(-2) and for circulation diseases it was 0.67 (95% CI: -9.61, 11.00) x 10(-2). 137 deaths from radiation-induced cancers and 47 deaths from circulation diseases were registered during a follow up period.

  4. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Xue, Bei; Wang, Xinwen; Wang, Jiawen

    2016-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to bystander effect in neighboring non-hit cells by signals released from directly-irradiated cells. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander effect in distant organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in bystander effect. To identify the molecular mechanism that underlies bystander effects of heavy-ion radiation, the male Balb/c and C57BL mice were cranial exposed to 40, 200, 2000mGy dose of carbon heavy-ion radiation, while the rest of the animal body was shielded. The γH2AX foci as the DNA damage biomarker in directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver were detected on 0, 1, 2, 6, 12 and 24h after radiation, respectively. Methylation-sensitive amplifcation polymorphism (MSAP) was used to monitor the level of polymorphic genomic DNA methylation changed with dose and time effects. The results show that cranial irradiated mice could induce the γH2AX foci and genomic DNA methylation changes significantly in both the directly irradiation organ ear and the distant organ liver. The percent of DNA methylation changes were time-dependent and tissue-specific. Demethylation polymorphism rate were highest separately at 1 h in 200 mGy and 6 h in 2000 mGy after irradiation in ear. The global DNA methylation changes tended to occur in the CG sites. We also found that the numbers of γH2AX foci and the genomic methylation changes of heavy-ion radiation-induced bystander effect in liver could be obvious 1 h after radiation and achieved the maximum at 6 h, while the changes could recover gradually at 12 h. The results suggest that mice head exposed to heavy-ion radiation can induce damage and methylation pattern changed in both directly radiation organ ear and distant organ liver. Moreover, our findings are important to understand the molecular mechanism of radiation induced bystander effects in vivo. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Bystander effect; DNA methylation; γH2

  5. Observer Performance in the Detection and Classification of Malignant Hepatic Nodules and Masses with CT Image-Space Denoising and Iterative Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Li, Zhoubo; Manduca, Armando; Blezek, Daniel J.; Hough, David M.; Venkatesh, Sudhakar K.; Brickner, Gregory C.; Cernigliaro, Joseph C.; Hara, Amy K.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Lake, David S.; Shiung, Maria; Lewis, David; Leng, Shuai; Augustine, Kurt E.; Carter, Rickey E.; Holmes, David R.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if lower-dose computed tomographic (CT) scans obtained with adaptive image-based noise reduction (adaptive nonlocal means [ANLM]) or iterative reconstruction (sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction [SAFIRE]) result in reduced observer performance in the detection of malignant hepatic nodules and masses compared with routine-dose scans obtained with filtered back projection (FBP). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Informed consent was obtained from patients for the retrospective use of medical records for research purposes. CT projection data from 33 abdominal and 27 liver or pancreas CT examinations were collected (median volume CT dose index, 13.8 and 24.0 mGy, respectively). Hepatic malignancy was defined by progression or regression or with histopathologic findings. Lower-dose data were created by using a validated noise insertion method (10.4 mGy for abdominal CT and 14.6 mGy for liver or pancreas CT) and images reconstructed with FBP, ANLM, and SAFIRE. Four readers evaluated routine-dose FBP images and all lower-dose images, circumscribing liver lesions and selecting diagnosis. The jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic figure of merit (FOM) was calculated on a per–malignant nodule or per-mass basis. Noninferiority was defined by the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference between lower-dose and routine-dose FOMs being less than −0.10. Results Twenty-nine patients had 62 malignant hepatic nodules and masses. Estimated FOM differences between lower-dose FBP and lower-dose ANLM versus routine-dose FBP were noninferior (difference: −0.041 [95% CI: −0.090, 0.009] and −0.003 [95% CI: −0.052, 0.047], respectively). In patients with dedicated liver scans, lower-dose ANLM images were noninferior (difference: +0.015 [95% CI: −0.077, 0.106]), whereas lower-dose FBP images were not (difference −0.049 [95% CI:

  6. Low dose high energy x-ray in-line phase sensitive imaging prototype: Investigation of optimal geometric conditions and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Yan, Aimin; Wong, Molly D; Li, Yuhua; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the optimization of a high energy in-line phase sensitive x-ray imaging prototype under different geometric and operating conditions for mammography application. A phase retrieval algorithm based on phase attenuation duality (PAD) was applied to the phase contrast images acquired by the prototype. Imaging performance was investigated at four magnification values of 1.67, 2, 2.5 and 3 using an acrylic edge, an American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography phantom and contrast detail (CD) phantom with tube potentials of 100, 120 and 140 kVp. The ACR and CD images were acquired at the same mean glandular dose (MGD) of 1.29 mGy with a computed radiography (CR) detector of 43.75 μm pixel pitch at a fixed source to image distance (SID) of 170 cm. The x-ray tube focal spot size was kept constant as 7 μm while a 2.5 mm thick aluminum (Al) filter was used for beam hardening. The performance of phase contrast and phase retrieved images were compared with computer simulations based on the relative phase contrast factor (RPF) at high x-ray energies. The imaging results showed that the x-ray tube operated at 100 kVp under the magnification of 2.5 exhibits superior imaging performance which is in accordance to the computer simulations. As compared to the phase contrast images, the phase retrieved images of the ACR and CD phantoms demonstrated improved imaging contrast and target discrimination. We compared the CD phantom images acquired in conventional contact mode with and without the anti-scatter grid using the same prototype at 1.295 mGy and 2.59 mGy using 40 kVp, a 25 μm rhodium (Rh) filter. At the same radiation dose, the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for both the large and small discs, while compared to the double dose image acquired in conventional mode, the observer study also indicated that the phase sensitive images provided improved detection capabilities for the large discs. This

  7. Evaluation of a variable dose acquisition technique for microcalcification and mass detection in digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard C.; O'Connor, J. Michael; Glick, Stephen J.

    2009-06-15

    In this article the authors evaluate a recently proposed variable dose (VD)-digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) acquisition technique in terms of the detection accuracy for breast masses and microcalcification (MC) clusters. With this technique, approximately half of the total dose is used for one center projection and the remaining dose is split among the other tomosynthesis projection views. This acquisition method would yield both a projection view and a reconstruction view. One of the aims of this study was to evaluate whether the center projection alone of the VD acquisition can provide equal or superior MC detection in comparison to the 3D images from uniform dose (UD)-DBT. Another aim was to compare the mass-detection capabilities of 3D reconstructions from VD-DBT and UD-DBT. In a localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) observer study of MC detection, the authors compared the center projection of a VD acquisition scheme (at 2 mGy dose) with detector pixel size of 100 {mu}m with the UD-DBT reconstruction (at 4 mGy dose) obtained with a voxel size of 100 {mu}m. MCs with sizes of 150 and 180 {mu}m were used in the study, with each cluster consisting of seven MCs distributed randomly within a small volume. Reconstructed images in UD-DBT were obtained from a projection set that had a total of 4 mGy dose. The current study shows that for MC detection, using the center projection alone of VD acquisition scheme performs worse with area under the LROC curve (A{sub L}) of 0.76 than when using the 3D reconstructed image using the UD acquisition scheme (A{sub L}=0.84). A 2D ANOVA found a statistically significant difference (p=0.038) at a significance level of 0.05. In the current study, although a reconstructed image was also available using the VD acquisition scheme, it was not used to assist the MC detection task which was done using the center projection alone. In the case of evaluation of detection accuracy of masses, the reconstruction with VD-DBT (A

  8. Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaylock, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a methodology for evaluating the potential for aquatic biota to incur effects from exposure to chronic low-level radiation in the environment. Aquatic organisms inhabiting an environment contaminated with radioactivity receive external radiation from radionuclides in water, sediment, and from other biota such as vegetation. Aquatic organisms receive internal radiation from radionuclides ingested via food and water and, in some cases, from radionuclides absorbed through the skin and respiratory organs. Dose rate equations, which have been developed previously, are presented for estimating the radiation dose rate to representative aquatic organisms from alpha, beta, and gamma irradiation from external and internal sources. Tables containing parameter values for calculating radiation doses from selected alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are presented in the appendix to facilitate dose rate calculations. The risk of detrimental effects to aquatic biota from radiation exposure is evaluated by comparing the calculated radiation dose rate to biota to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) recommended dose rate limit of 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} (1 rad d{sup -1}). A dose rate no greater than 0.4 mGy h{sup -1} to the most sensitive organisms should ensure the protection of populations of aquatic organisms. DOE's recommended dose rate is based on a number of published reviews on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms that are summarized in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 109 (NCRP 1991). The literature identifies the developing eggs and young of some species of teleost fish as the most radiosensitive organisms. DOE recommends that if the results of radiological models or dosimetric measurements indicate that a radiation dose rate of 0.1 mGy h{sup -1} will be exceeded, then a more detailed evaluation of the potential ecological consequences of radiation exposure to endemic populations should be

  9. Average glandular dose and phantom image quality in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M.; Nogueira, M. S.; Guedes, E.; Andrade, M. C.; Peixoto, J. E.; Joana, G. S.; Castro, J. G.

    2007-09-01

    Doses in mammography should be maintained as low as possible without reducing the high image quality needed for early detection of the breast cancer. The breast is composed of tissues with very close composition and densities. It increases the difficulty to detect small changes in the normal anatomical structures which may be associated with breast cancer. To achieve the standards of definition and contrast for mammography, the quality and intensity of the X-ray beam, the breast positioning and compression, the film-screen system, and the film processing have to be in optimal operational conditions. This study sought to evaluate average glandular dose (AGD) and image quality on a standard phantom in 134 mammography units in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, between December 2004 and May 2006. AGDs were obtained by means of entrance kerma measured with TL LiF100 dosimeters on phantom surface. Phantom images were obtained with automatic exposure technique, fixed 28 kV and molybdenum anode-filter combination. The phantom used contained structures simulating tumoral masses, microcalcifications, fibers and low contrast areas. High-resolution metallic meshes to assess image definition and a stepwedge to measure image contrast index were also inserted in the phantom. The visualization of simulated structures, the mean optical density and the contrast index allowed to classify the phantom image quality in a seven-point scale. The results showed that 54.5% of the facilities did not achieve the minimum performance level for image quality. It is mainly due to insufficient film processing observed in 61.2% of the units. AGD varied from 0.41 to 2.73 mGy with a mean value of 1.32±0.44 mGy. In all optimal quality phantom images, AGDs were in this range. Additionally, in 7.3% of the mammography units, the AGD constraint of 2 mGy was exceeded. One may conclude that dose level to patient and image quality are not in conformity to regulations in most of the facilities. This

  10. Body Potassium Content and Radiation Dose from 40K for the Urals Population (Russia)

    PubMed Central

    Tolstykh, Evgenia I.; Degteva, Marina O.; Bougrov, Nikolay G.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term whole-body monitoring of radionuclides in residents of the Urals Region has been performed at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM, Chelyabinsk). Quantification of 40K was achieved by measuring the 40K photopeak with four phoswich detectors in whole body counter SICH-9.1M. The current study presents the results of 40K measurements in 3,651 women and 1,961 t-test; U-test men aged 11–90; measurements were performed in 2006–2014. The residents belonged to two ethnic groups, Turkic (Tatar, Bashkir) and Slavs (mainly Russian). The levels of 40K-body contents depend upon gender, age, and body mass. Significant ethnic-differences were not found in 40K-body contents and 40K concentrations in terms of Bq per kg of body weight (in groups homogenous by age and gender). Both 40K-body contents and concentrations were significantly higher in men than in women in all age-groups; the difference was about 25%. The measured 40K-body content in men of 20–50 years was about 4200 Bq (134 g of K) and about 3000 Bq (95 g of K) in women. By the age of 80 these values decreased to 3200 Bq (102 g of K) in men and 2500 Bq (80 g of K) in women. Annual dose rates were maximal in the age group of 20–30 years– 0.16 mGy/y for men and 0.13 mGy/y for women. Further, the dose-rates decreased with age and in the groups of 60–80 years were 0.13 mGy/y for men and 0.10 mGy/y for women. Within groups homogeneous by age and gender, individual dose rates are described by a normal statistical distribution. The coefficient of variation ranges from 9 to 14%, and on the average is 12.5%. Doses from naturally occurring 40K accumulated over 70 years were found to be 9.9 mGy for men and 8.3 mGy for women; over 90 years - 12.5 and 10.4 mGy. PMID:27111330

  11. Risk of cancer from occupational exposure to ionising radiation: retrospective cohort study of workers in France, the United Kingdom, and the United States (INWORKS)

    PubMed Central

    Cardis, Elisabeth; Daniels, Robert D; Gillies, Michael; O’Hagan, Jacqueline A; Hamra, Ghassan B; Haylock, Richard; Laurier, Dominique; Leuraud, Klervi; Moissonnier, Monika; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Kesminiene, Ausrele

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is protracted exposure to low doses of ionising radiation associated with an increased risk of solid cancer? Methods In this cohort study, 308 297 workers in the nuclear industry from France, the United Kingdom, and the United States with detailed monitoring data for external exposure to ionising radiation were linked to death registries. Excess relative rate per Gy of radiation dose for mortality from cancer was estimated. Follow-up encompassed 8.2 million person years. Of 66 632 known deaths by the end of follow-up, 17 957 were due to solid cancers. Study answer and limitations Results suggest a linear increase in the rate of cancer with increasing radiation exposure. The average cumulative colon dose estimated among exposed workers was 20.9 mGy (median 4.1 mGy). The estimated rate of mortality from all cancers excluding leukaemia increased with cumulative dose by 48% per Gy (90% confidence interval 20% to 79%), lagged by 10 years. Similar associations were seen for mortality from all solid cancers (47% (18% to 79%)), and within each country. The estimated association over the dose range of 0-100 mGy was similar in magnitude to that obtained over the entire dose range but less precise. Smoking and occupational asbestos exposure are potential confounders; however, exclusion of deaths from lung cancer and pleural cancer did not affect the estimated association. Despite substantial efforts to characterise the performance of the radiation dosimeters used, the possibility of measurement error remains. What this study adds The study provides a direct estimate of the association between protracted low dose exposure to ionising radiation and solid cancer mortality. Although high dose rate exposures are thought to be more dangerous than low dose rate exposures, the risk per unit of radiation dose for cancer among radiation workers was similar to estimates derived from studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Quantifying the cancer risks associated

  12. Organ dose measurements from multiple-detector computed tomography using a commercial dosimetry system and tomographic, physical phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Lindsey K.

    The technology of computed tomography (CT) imaging has soared over the last decade with the use of multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanners that are capable of performing studies in a matter of seconds. While the diagnostic information obtained from MDCT imaging is extremely valuable, it is important to ensure that the radiation doses resulting from these studies are at acceptably safe levels. This research project focused on the measurement of organ doses resulting from modern MDCT scanners. A commercially-available dosimetry system was used to measure organ doses. Small dosimeters made of optically-stimulated luminescent (OSL) material were analyzed with a portable OSL reader. Detailed verification of this system was performed. Characteristics studied include energy, scatter, and angular responses; dose linearity, ability to erase the exposed dose and ability to reuse dosimeters multiple times. The results of this verification process were positive. While small correction factors needed to be applied to the dose reported by the OSL reader, these factors were small and expected. Physical, tomographic pediatric and adult phantoms were used to measure organ doses. These phantoms were developed from CT images and are composed of tissue-equivalent materials. Because the adult phantom is comprised of numerous segments, dosimeters were placed in the phantom at several organ locations, and doses to select organs were measured using three clinical protocols: pediatric craniosynostosis, adult brain perfusion and adult cardiac CT angiography (CTA). A wide-beam, 320-slice, volumetric CT scanner and a 64-slice, MDCT scanner were used for organ dose measurements. Doses ranged from 1 to 26 mGy for the pediatric protocol, 1 to 1241 mGy for the brain perfusion protocol, and 2-100 mGy for the cardiac protocol. In most cases, the doses measured on the 64-slice scanner were higher than those on the 320-slice scanner. A methodology to measure organ doses with OSL dosimeters received from CT

  13. Pregnancy and Radiation Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gerogiannis, J.; Stefanoyiannis, A. P.

    2010-01-21

    Several modalities are currently utilized for diagnosis and therapy, by appropriate application of x-rays. In diagnostic radiology, interventional radiology, radiotherapy, interventional cardiology, nuclear medicine and other specialties radiation protection of a pregnant woman as a patient, as well as a member of the operating personnel, is of outmost importance. Based on radiation risk, the termination of pregnancy is not justified if foetal doses are below 100 mGy. For foetal doses between 100 and 500 mGy, a decision is reached on a case by case basis. In Diagnostic Radiology, when a pregnant patient takes an abdomen CT, then an estimation of the foetus' dose is necessary. However, it is extremely rare for the dose to be high enough to justify an abortion. Radiographs of the chest and extremities can be done at any period of pregnancy, provided that the equipment is functioning properly. Usually, the radiation risk is lower than the risk of not undergoing a radiological examination. Radiation exposure in uterus from diagnostic radiological examinations is unlikely to result in any deleterious effect on the child, but the possibility of a radiation-induced effect can not be entirely ruled out. The effects of exposure to radiation on the foetus depend on the time of exposure, the date of conception and the absorbed dose. Finally, a pregnant worker can continue working in an x-ray department, as long as there is reasonable assurance that the foetal dose can be kept below 1 mGy during the pregnancy. Nuclear Medicine diagnostic examinations using short-lived radionuclides can be used for pregnant patient. Irradiation of the foetus results from placental transfer and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals in the foetal tissues, as well as from external irradiation from radioactivity in the mother's organ and tissues. As a rule, a pregnant patient should not undergo therapy with radionuclide, unless it is crucial for her life. In Radiotherapy, the patient, treating

  14. Establishing a standard calibration methodology for MOSFET detectors in computed tomography dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L.; Kaufman, R. A.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: The use of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) detectors for patient dosimetry has increased by {approx}25% since 2005. Despite this increase, no standard calibration methodology has been identified nor calibration uncertainty quantified for the use of MOSFET dosimetry in CT. This work compares three MOSFET calibration methodologies proposed in the literature, and additionally investigates questions relating to optimal time for signal equilibration and exposure levels for maximum calibration precision. Methods: The calibration methodologies tested were (1) free in-air (FIA) with radiographic x-ray tube, (2) FIA with stationary CT x-ray tube, and (3) within scatter phantom with rotational CT x-ray tube. Each calibration was performed at absorbed dose levels of 10, 23, and 35 mGy. Times of 0 min or 5 min were investigated for signal equilibration before or after signal read out. Results: Calibration precision was measured to be better than 5%-7%, 3%-5%, and 2%-4% for the 10, 23, and 35 mGy respective dose levels, and independent of calibration methodology. No correlation was demonstrated for precision and signal equilibration time when allowing 5 min before or after signal read out. Differences in average calibration coefficients were demonstrated between the FIA with CT calibration methodology 26.7 {+-} 1.1 mV cGy{sup -1} versus the CT scatter phantom 29.2 {+-} 1.0 mV cGy{sup -1} and FIA with x-ray 29.9 {+-} 1.1 mV cGy{sup -1} methodologies. A decrease in MOSFET sensitivity was seen at an average change in read out voltage of {approx}3000 mV. Conclusions: The best measured calibration precision was obtained by exposing the MOSFET detectors to 23 mGy. No signal equilibration time is necessary to improve calibration precision. A significant difference between calibration outcomes was demonstrated for FIA with CT compared to the other two methodologies. If the FIA with a CT calibration methodology was used to create calibration

  15. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk estimates due to radiotherapy for benign pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    PubMed

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2016-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign disease affecting synovial membranes of young and middle-aged adults. The aggressive treatment of this disorder often involves external-beam irradiation. This study was motivated by the lack of data relating to the radiation exposure of healthy tissues and radiotherapy-induced cancer risk. Monte Carlo methodology was employed to simulate a patient's irradiation for PVNS in the knee and hip joints with a 6 MV photon beam. The average radiation dose received by twenty-two out-of-field critical organs of the human body was calculated. These calculations were combined with the appropriate organ-, age- and gender-specific risk coefficients of the BEIR-VII model to estimate the lifetime probability of cancer development. The risk for carcinogenesis to colon, which was partly included in the treatment fields used for hip irradiation, was determined with a non-linear mechanistic model and differential dose-volume histograms obtained by CT-based 3D radiotherapy planning. Risk assessments were compared with the nominal lifetime intrinsic risk (LIR) values. Knee irradiation to 36 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 0.2-24.6 mGy. The corresponding range from hip radiotherapy was 1.2-455.1 mGy whereas the organ equivalent dose for the colon was up to 654.9 mGy. The organ-specific cancer risks from knee irradiation for PVNS were found to be inconsequential since they were at least 161.5 times lower than the LIRs irrespective of the patient's age and gender. The bladder and colon cancer risk from radiotherapy in the hip joint was up to 3.2 and 6.6 times smaller than the LIR, respectively. These cancer risks may slightly elevate the nominal incidence rates and they should not be ignored during the patient's treatment planning and follow-up. The probabilities for developing any other solid tumor were more than 20 times lower than the LIRs and, therefore, they may be considered as small. PMID:27499236

  16. TH-C-18A-12: Evaluation of the Impact of Body Size and Tube Output Limits in the Optimization of Fast Scanning with High-Pitch Dual Source CT

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez Giraldo, J; Mileto, A.; Hurwitz, L.; Marin, D.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of body size and tube power limits in the optimization of fast scanning with high-pitch dual source CT (DSCT). Methods: A previously validated MERCURY phantom, made of polyethylene, with circular cross-section of diameters 16, 23, 30 and 37cm, and connected through tapered sections, was scanned using a second generation DSCT system. The DSCT operates with two independently controlled x-ray tube generators offering up to 200 kW power reserve (100 kW per tube). The entire length of the phantom (42cm) was scanned with two protocols using: A)Standard single-source CT (SSCT) protocol with pitch of 0.8, and B) DSCT protocol with high-pitch values ranging from 1.6 to 3.2 (0.2 steps). All scans used 120 kVp with 150 quality reference mAs using automatic exposure control. Scanner radiation output (CTDIvol) and effective mAs values were extracted retrospectively from DICOM files for each slice. Image noise was recorded. All variables were assessed relative to phantom diameter. Results: With standard-pitch SSCT, the scanner radiation output (and tube-current) were progressively adapted with increasing size, from 6 mGy (120 mAs) up to 15 mGy (270 mAs) from the thinnest (16cm) to the thickest diameter (37 cm), respectively. By comparison, using high-pitch (3.2), the scanner output was bounded at about 8 mGy (140 mAs), independent of phantom diameter. Although relative to standard-pitch, the high-pitch led to lower radiation output for the same scan, the image noise was higher, particularly for larger diameters. To match the radiation output adaptation of standard-pitch, a high-pitch mode of 1.6 was needed, with the advantage of scanning twice as fast. Conclusion: To maximize the benefits of fast scanning with high-pitch DSCT, the body size and tube power limits of the system need to be considered such that a good balance between speed of acquisition and image quality are warranted. JCRG is an employee of Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc.

  17. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk estimates due to radiotherapy for benign pigmented villonodular synovitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2016-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign disease affecting synovial membranes of young and middle-aged adults. The aggressive treatment of this disorder often involves external-beam irradiation. This study was motivated by the lack of data relating to the radiation exposure of healthy tissues and radiotherapy-induced cancer risk. Monte Carlo methodology was employed to simulate a patient’s irradiation for PVNS in the knee and hip joints with a 6 MV photon beam. The average radiation dose received by twenty-two out-of-field critical organs of the human body was calculated. These calculations were combined with the appropriate organ-, age- and gender-specific risk coefficients of the BEIR-VII model to estimate the lifetime probability of cancer development. The risk for carcinogenesis to colon, which was partly included in the treatment fields used for hip irradiation, was determined with a non-linear mechanistic model and differential dose-volume histograms obtained by CT-based 3D radiotherapy planning. Risk assessments were compared with the nominal lifetime intrinsic risk (LIR) values. Knee irradiation to 36 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 0.2-24.6 mGy. The corresponding range from hip radiotherapy was 1.2-455.1 mGy whereas the organ equivalent dose for the colon was up to 654.9 mGy. The organ-specific cancer risks from knee irradiation for PVNS were found to be inconsequential since they were at least 161.5 times lower than the LIRs irrespective of the patient’s age and gender. The bladder and colon cancer risk from radiotherapy in the hip joint was up to 3.2 and 6.6 times smaller than the LIR, respectively. These cancer risks may slightly elevate the nominal incidence rates and they should not be ignored during the patient’s treatment planning and follow-up. The probabilities for developing any other solid tumor were more than 20 times lower than the LIRs and, therefore, they may be considered as small.

  18. Influence of photo-inscription conditions on the radiation-response of fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Morana, Adriana; Girard, Sylvain; Marin, Emmanuel; Lancry, Matthieu; Marcandella, Claude; Paillet, Philippe; Lablonde, Laurent; Robin, Thierry; Williams, Robert J; Withford, Michael J; Boukenter, Aziz; Ouerdane, Youcef

    2015-04-01

    We compared the sensitivity to X-rays of several fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) written in the standard telecommunication fiber Corning SMF28 with different techniques. Standard gratings were manufactured with phase-mask and UV lasers, continuum wave (cw) at 244 nm or pulsed in the nanosecond domain at 248 nm, in a pre-hydrogenated fiber. Others gratings were written by exposures to a femtosecond IR-laser (800 nm), with both phase-mask and point by point techniques. The response of these FBGs was studied under X-rays at room temperature and 100°C, by highlighting their similarities and differences. Independently of the inscription technique, the two types of fs-FBGs have showed no big difference up to 1 MGy(SiO(2)) dose. A discussion on the causes of the radiation-induced peak change is also reported. PMID:25968704

  19. Effect of dose rate and oxygen on radiation crosslinking of silica filled fluorosilicone rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Roustam

    1999-09-01

    Fluorosilicone (polymethyltrifluoropropylsiloxane) rubber containing silica filler was irradiated with γ-rays and accelerated electrons in air, argon and vacuum. Doses up to 0.5 MGy and dose rates of 1.4 and 10 3 Gy/s were used. The absorbed dose distribution across the rubber thickness during electron irradiation was determined. Oxidation, swelling in ethyl acetate and mechanical properties of this rubber depended on the conditions of irradiation that testified to different effectiveness of the rubber radiation crosslinking under these conditions. Effects of dose rate, diffusion of oxygen into rubber during irradiation, local heating and the oxygen desorption from the filler particles during the electron irradiation are considered for explanation of these differences.

  20. Thermoluminescent properties of ZnS:Mn nanocrystalline powders.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Hernández, Arturo Agustín; Méndez García, Víctor Hugo; Pérez Arrieta, María Leticia; Ortega Sígala, José Juan; Araiza Ibarra, José de Jesús; Vega-Carrillo, Héctor Rene; Falcony Guajardo, Ciro

    2015-05-01

    Thermoluminescent ZnS nanocrystals doped with Mn(2+) ions were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. From X-ray diffraction studies it was observed that the synthesized nanoparticles have cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of about 40-50nm. Morphology was analyzed by TEM. Photoluminescence studies showed two transitions, one of them close to 396nm and other close to 598nm, which is enhanced with increasing dopant concentration, this behavior was also observed in the cathodoluminescence spectrum. The thermoluminescence gamma dose-response has linear behavior over dose range 5-100mGy, the glow curve structure shows two glow peaks at 436K and at 518K that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution procedure. PMID:25746918

  1. Physical evaluation of a needle photostimulable phosphor based CR mammography system

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Nicholas W.; Lemmens, Kim; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-02-15

    approximately 3 greater than for the powder CR plates. At 28 kV W/Rh, 2 mm Al, peak DQE for the needle CR system was 0.45 against a value of 0.50 for the a-Se detector. The needle CR detector reached the Acceptable limit for 0.1 mm details in the European Guidelines at a mean glandular dose (MGD) of approximately 1.31 mGy imaged at 28 kV Mo/Rh, compared to figures of 2.19 and 1.43 mGy for the single sided and dual sided readout powder CR systems. The a-Se detector could reach the limit at 0.65 mGy using a 28 kV W/Rh spectrum, while the needle CR system required 1.09 mGy for the same spectrum. Conclusions: Imaging performance for the needle CR phosphor technology, characterized using MTF and DQE and threshold gold thickness demonstrated a clear improvement compared to both single and dual sided reading powder phosphor based CR systems.

  2. Retrospective dosimetry using synthesized nano-structure hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ziaie, F; Hajiloo, N; Alipour, A; Amraei, R; Mehtieva, S I

    2011-06-01

    Micro and nano-structure hydroxyapatite samples were synthesized via several different methods. The samples were characterised utilising the Fourier transmission infra-red, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction methods, to find out the structure most similar to human tooth enamel, and the best method was found. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals of the gamma-irradiated samples were measured using an EPR spectrometer system. A calibration curve was established by irradiation of the samples at four doses of 50-500 mGy. The parameters of the calibration curve, slope and intercept with dose axis are determined by linear regression analysis. This calibration curve can be used for human tooth enamel for retrospective dosimetry purposes.

  3. Effect of cumulated dose on hydrogen emission from polyethylene irradiated under oxidative atmosphere using gamma rays and ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Pellizzi, E.; Boughattas, I.; Fromentin, E.; Dauvois, V.; de Combarieu, G.; Coignet, P.; Cochin, F.; Ngono-Ravache, Y.; Balanzat, E.; Esnouf, S.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the effect of very high doses, up to 10 MGy, on the H2 emission from high density polyethylene (HDPE) irradiated with gamma rays and ion beams, in the presence of oxygen. This was obtained through a two-step procedure. First, HDPE films were pre-aged, at different doses, using either gamma rays or ion beams. In the second step, the pre-aged samples were irradiated in closed glass ampoules for gas quantification, using the same beam type as for pre-ageing. The hydrogen emission rate decreases when dose increases for both gamma rays and ion beams. However, the decreasing rate appears higher under gamma rays than under ion beam irradiations and this is assigned to a lesser oxidation level under the latter. Herein, we show the effectiveness of the radiation-induced defects scavenging effect under oxidative atmosphere, under low and high excitation densities.

  4. Mammography equipment performance, image quality and mean glandular dose in Malta.

    PubMed

    Borg, M; Badr, I; Royle, G J

    2013-09-01

    In this first Maltese national mammography survey, the effectiveness of direct digital (DR) mammography in breast cancer screening has been confirmed. Patient data were made available from three clinics out of the participating nine. A dose survey of mean glandular dose (MGD) calculated for 759 patients examined in the state-owned mammography facilities was performed. An MGD national diagnostic reference level was set at 1.87 mGy for patients with breast compression thicknesses (BCT) between 5.0 and 7.0 cm. This range was selected since patient data were retrieved from three clinics only and the results showed that other international BCT reference levels may be unsuitable for the Maltese population. In fact, the overall average BCT was 5.75 ± 1.4 cm. The survey results have shown that the technical standard of mammographic equipment in the Malta National Breast Screening Programme is on a par with other countries, including its Western European counterparts.

  5. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): from genes to mice--a community resource for mouse biology.

    PubMed

    Eppig, Janan T; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Blake, Judith A; Anagnostopoulos, A; Baldarelli, R M; Baya, M; Beal, J S; Bello, S M; Boddy, W J; Bradt, D W; Burkart, D L; Butler, N E; Campbell, J; Cassell, M A; Corbani, L E; Cousins, S L; Dahmen, D J; Dene, H; Diehl, A D; Drabkin, H J; Frazer, K S; Frost, P; Glass, L H; Goldsmith, C W; Grant, P L; Lennon-Pierce, M; Lewis, J; Lu, I; Maltais, L J; McAndrews-Hill, M; McClellan, L; Miers, D B; Miller, L A; Ni, L; Ormsby, J E; Qi, D; Reddy, T B K; Reed, D J; Richards-Smith, B; Shaw, D R; Sinclair, R; Smith, C L; Szauter, P; Walker, M B; Walton, D O; Washburn, L L; Witham, I T; Zhu, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) forms the core of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) system (http://www.informatics.jax.org), a model organism database resource for the laboratory mouse. MGD provides essential integration of experimental knowledge for the mouse system with information annotated from both literature and online sources. MGD curates and presents consensus and experimental data representations of genotype (sequence) through phenotype information, including highly detailed reports about genes and gene products. Primary foci of integration are through representations of relationships among genes, sequences and phenotypes. MGD collaborates with other bioinformatics groups to curate a definitive set of information about the laboratory mouse and to build and implement the data and semantic standards that are essential for comparative genome analysis. Recent improvements in MGD discussed here include the enhancement of phenotype resources, the re-development of the International Mouse Strain Resource, IMSR, the update of mammalian orthology datasets and the electronic publication of classic books in mouse genetics.

  6. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  7. β-ray irradiation effects on silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, A.; Agnello, S.; Buscarino, G.; Boizot, B.; Cannas, M.; Gelardi, F. M.

    2015-04-01

    By electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, we examine the amplitude of the signal typically due to a combination of NBOHC (Non Bridging Hole Center) and POR (Peroxy Radical) defects induced by β-ray irradiation (from 1.2 to 1200 MGy) in silica nanoparticles with diameter ranging from 7 to 20 nm. Our data indicate that the signal line-shapes recorded at different doses is quite independent from the particles sizes and from the dose. Furthermore, for each considered nanoparticles size, the concentration of defects is also almost constant with respect to dose, and it does not change significantly if measured after 2 or 9 months from the irradiation. By contrast, we observed that the concentration of NBOHC+POR decreases on increasing the specific surface, indicating that the content of the defects depends on the nanoparticles size. Such dependence can be explained by a shell model in which the detected defects are located in the inner part of the nanoparticles.

  8. EPR study of gamma and neutron irradiation effects on KU1, KS-4V and Infrasil 301 silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomacini, Juan C.; Bravo, David; León, Mónica; Martín, Piedad; Ibarra, Ángel; Martín, Agustín; López, Fernando J.

    2011-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies have been carried out on KU1 and KS-4V high purity quartz glasses and commercial silica Infrasil 301, irradiated with gamma rays up to a dose of 11.6 MGy and neutron fluences of 10 21 and 10 22 n/m 2. Gamma irradiations produce a much higher concentration of defect centres (mainly E', POR and NBOHC) for KU1 and I301 than for KS-4V silica. In contrast, neutron irradiation at the highest fluence produces similar concentrations in all silica types. These results agree to a good extent with those obtained in previous optical absorption measurements. Moreover, oxygen-related centres (POR and NBOHC) have been well characterized by means of electron paramagnetic resonance.

  9. Dosimetric investigations of Tb3+-doped strontium silicate phosphor.

    PubMed

    Barve, R A; Suriyamurthy, N; Panigrahi, B S; Venkatraman, B

    2015-03-01

    Tb(3+)-doped SrSiO(3) phosphor synthesised by co-precipitation technique exhibits intense green emission due to cross-relaxation phenomena between Tb(3+) ions. Dosimetric properties of this phosphor have been investigated using thermoluminescence (TL) technique. A dosimetrically useful glow peak observed was at 581 K along with a linear dose response over the wide dose range (100 mGy-4 Gy). TL parameters such as trap depth (E), frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics (b) are determined by different methods such as Chen's peak shape, initial rise, isothermal decay and variable heating rate methods. Results of these methods are compared and reported in this study.

  10. Behavior of optical thin-film materials and coatings under proton and gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Di Sarcina, Ilaria; Grilli, Maria Luisa; Menchini, Francesca; Piegari, Angela; Scaglione, Salvatore; Sytchkova, Anna; Zola, Danilo

    2014-02-01

    Optical materials and coatings are exposed to the flux of energetic particles when used in either space applications or nuclear energy plants. The study of their behavior in such an environment is important to avoid failure of the optical components during their operation. The optical performance of several thin-film materials ((HfO2, Ta2O5, Nb2O5, TiO2, SiO2) and coatings, under irradiation with high-dose gamma rays (5.8 MGy) and exposure to low-energy (60 keV) protons, has been investigated. Some variations of optical properties have been detected in silicon oxide after irradiation, while the other materials are stable in such conditions.

  11. Calculation of the structural and thermodynamic constants of normal chromium spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabukhin, A. G.; Roshin, A. V.; Roshin, V. E.; Drozin, A. D.

    2008-02-01

    The interstructural distances and crystal lattice parameters of complex chromium spinels of variable composition having five different cations are determined according to the earlier developed procedure taking into account their crystal lattices and calculated effective ionic radii. Using these structural characteristics, the enthalpy of the crystal lattice and the enthalpy of spinel formation are calculated. The composition-lattice parameter and composition-enthalpy of the formation diagrams are constructed for (Mg{/i 2+}Fe{/j 2+})O · (Fe{/x 3+}Al{/y 3+}Cr{/z 3+})2O3 spinels. They make it possible to determine the lattice parameter and the enthalpy of oxide formation for any spinel composition.

  12. Evaluation of Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) on a National Level

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2010-09-29

    Conservation Voltage Reduction (CVR) is a reduction of energy consumption resulting from a reduction of feeder voltage. While there have been numerous CVR systems deployed in North America there has been little substantive analytic analysis of the effect; the majority of the published results are based on empirical field measurements. Since these results are based on empirical measurements it is difficult to extrapolate how this technology will behave on the various types of distribution feeders found throughout the nation. This report has utilized the Taxonomy of Prototypical feeder developed under the Modern Grid Initiative (MGI), now the Modern Grid Strategy (MGS), in order to estimate the benefits of CVR on multiple distribution feeder types. This information will then be used to determine an estimate of the national benefits of a wide scale deployment of CVR.

  13. Radiation effects on optical frequency domain reflectometry fiber-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Rizzolo, S; Marin, E; Cannas, M; Boukenter, A; Ouerdane, Y; Périsse, J; Macé, J-R; Bauer, S; Marcandella, C; Paillet, P; Girard, S

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the radiation effects on germanosilicate optical fiber acting as the sensing element of optical frequency domain reflectometry devices. Thanks to a new setup permitting to control temperature during irradiation, we evaluate the changes induced by 10 keV x rays on their Rayleigh response up to 1 MGy in a temperature range from -40°C up to 75°C. Irradiation at fixed temperature points out that its measure is reliable during both irradiation and the recovery process. Mixed temperature and radiation measurements show that changing irradiation temperature leads to an error in distributed measurements that depends on the calibration procedure. These results demonstrate that Rayleigh-based optical fiber sensors are very promising for integration in harsh environments. PMID:26469566

  14. Selective Photobleaching Of Steady-State Gamma Irradiated Silica Fibers Application To The Hardening Of A Digital Optical Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuze, Gerard; Serre, Jean; Friant, Alain

    1988-06-01

    Photobleaching at 340 and 1300 nm wavelengths of three multimode silica fibers under steady-state gamma irradiation (2 x 480 Gy, 120 Gy/h) at room temperature was studied as regards induced loss and recovery kinetics. Significant differences in behaviour between two pure silica-core fibers (plastic clad QSF 200 A and fluorine doped-clad AS 200 -300 from Quartz et Silice) and a germanium doped-core fiber 7020/250 from Compagnie Lyonnaise de Transmissions Optiques are presented. The hardening up to 0.1 MGy of a short bidirectional data link designed to operate a servomanipulator in a hot cell is described as an example of application.

  15. Identification of Be Stars from the LAMOST Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chien-Cheng; Hou, Jinliang; Chen, Li; Shao, Zhengyi

    2015-08-01

    We will report on a search for B-type emission-line (Be) stars from the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST; also named the Guoshoujing Telescope) first data release (DR1). A total of 57746 objects were identified as Hα emitters based on their Hα emission ratios from about 2.2 million objects in DR1. From the LAMOST stellar classifications (3403 B-type stars) and HeII, MgI absorptions lines, 184 candidates were identified to be newly found Be stars. The new sample increases current sample of Be stars about 9.2%. Most of them are distributed toward the Galactic Anti-Center due to the observational strategy. Four of them are in the star clusters with ages ranging from 5 to 400 Myr.

  16. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  17. Effect of very low doses of gamma radiation on motility of gill ciliated epithelia of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Ivanovsky YuA

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of gamma radiation on the motility of mussel gill ciliated epithelia was conducted using dose rates of 0.9 and 2 mGy/h. There was a definite decrease in the beat frequency and a distortion of the metachronal wave by 20-30 min after irradiation with 0.9 Gy/h. With a total dose of 0.9 mGy, the beat frequency was decreased 2- to 2.5-fold. In the period after irradiation a restoration of the metachronal wave was observed, but the beat frequency was about 50% of the control level. Gamma irradiation completely stopped the beating of the cilia when given at a dose rate of 2 mGy/h.

  18. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.; Conover, David L.

    2013-11-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum-minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  19. The 'PHAome'.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Hajnal, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of polyesters synthesized by bacteria. Similarly to the genome, transcriptome, and proteome (the entire array of nucleic acids and proteins present in a cell or population of cells at a given time), the PHA spectrum exhibits diverse and dynamic modifications - the 'PHAome' - reflecting not only by the diversity of monomers, homopolymers, random and block copolymers, functional and graft polymers, molecular weights, and combinations of the above, but also the ranges of PHAs with various molecular weights and monomer ratios that are present at a particular timepoint in a bacterial cell. Echoing the Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) launched in 2011 to develop an infrastructure to accelerate advanced materials discovery and deployment, understanding the PHAome and ensuring an ample supply of PHAs based on it will promote the discovery of new properties and applications of this family of advanced materials. PMID:26409775

  20. Radiation effects on the immiscible polymer blend of nylon1010 and high-impact strength polystyrene (II): mechanical properties and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenfei; Chen, Guangxin; Zhang, Wanxi

    2001-03-01

    The paper studies the morphology and mechanical properties of immiscible binary blends of the nylon 1010 and HIPS through the radiation crosslinking method. In this blend, the HIPS particles were the dispersed phases in the nylon1010 matrix. With increasing of dose, the elastic modulus increased. However, the tensile strength, elongation at break and the energy of fracture increased to a maximum at a dose of 0.34 MGy, then reduced with the increasing of dose. SEM photographs show that the hole sizes are not changed obviously at low dose and at high dose, remnants that cannot be dissolved in formic acid and THF can be observed in the holes and on the surface. TEM photographs showed that radiation destroys the rubber phases in the polymer blend.

  1. Present status and prospects of R&D of radiation-resistant semiconductor devices at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, H.

    2013-05-01

    Research and development of radiation resistant semiconductor devices have been performed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for their application to electronic system used in harsh environments like space, accelerator and nuclear facilities. Such devices are also indispensable for robots and equipment necessary for decommissioning of the damaged reactors at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants. For this purpose, we have fabricated transistors based on a wide band-gap semiconductor SiC and examined their radiation degradation. As a result, SiC-based transistors exhibited no significant degradation up to 1MGy, indicating their excellent radiation resistance. Recent our R&Ds of radiation resistant devices based on SiC are summarized and reviewed.

  2. Optically stimulated luminescence in doped NaF.

    PubMed

    Gaikwad, S U; Patil, R R; Kulkarni, M S; Bhatt, B C; Moharil, S V

    2016-05-01

    OSL in doped NaF is studied. Study shows that NaF:Mg,Cu,P phosphor possess good OSL properties having sensitivity comparable to that of commercially available Al2O3:C (Landauer Inc.). For the luminescence averaged over 3s the obtained OSL is 37% of that commercial available Al2O3:C. Of the several phosphors investigated, phosphor with impurities concentration Mg(0.01mol%), Cu(0.2mol%), P(1mol%) shows good OSL sensitivity good linearity in the 10mGy to 1Gy dose range and negligible fading. This sample shows a intense single TL peak around 350°C which gets depleted by 14% after the OSL readout. This imply that maximum OSL is coming from deep traps giving stability to the signal. The ease of preparation along with other good OSL properties will make this phosphor suitable for radiation dosimetry applications using OSL. PMID:26926379

  3. The Importance of Biological Databases in Biological Discovery.

    PubMed

    Baxevanis, Andreas D; Bateman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Biological databases play a central role in bioinformatics. They offer scientists the opportunity to access a wide variety of biologically relevant data, including the genomic sequences of an increasingly broad range of organisms. This unit provides a brief overview of major sequence databases and portals, such as GenBank, the UCSC Genome Browser, and Ensembl. Model organism databases, including WormBase, The Arabidopsis Information Resource (TAIR), and those made available through the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource, are also covered. Non-sequence-centric databases, such as Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Protein Data Bank (PDB), MetaCyc, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), are also discussed. PMID:26094768

  4. Average radiation doses in a standard head examination for 250 CT systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCrohan, J.L.; Patterson, J.F.; Gagne, R.M.; Goldstein, H.A.

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 250 computed tomography (CT) systems were surveyed in a nationwide study to determine the average radiation dose resulting from a typical adult head procedure. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) was selected as the dose descriptor. For the typical adult CT head procedure, the MSAD was generally within 2.2-6.8 rads (22-68 mGy). Variations in dose by a factor of two or more were often seen for a given manufacturer and model. These dose ranges indicate a potential to reduce dose by carefully selecting imaging techniques. Overall, variations in dose can result from differences in the user's choice of technique (desired image quality) or from actual differences in scanner performance (caused by differences in collimation, filtration, or geometry). To use CT appropriately, a facility should consider dose as well as image quality in selecting optimal techniques for typical modes of operation.

  5. Average radiation doses in a standard head examination for 250 CT systems.

    PubMed

    McCrohan, J L; Patterson, J F; Gagne, R M; Goldstein, H A

    1987-04-01

    Approximately 250 computed tomography (CT) systems were surveyed in a nationwide study to determine the average radiation dose resulting from a typical adult head procedure. The multiple scan average dose (MSAD) was selected as the dose descriptor. For the typical adult CT head procedure, the MSAD was generally within 2.2-6.8 rads (22-68 mGy). Variations in dose by a factor of two or more were often seen for a given manufacturer and model. These dose ranges indicate a potential to reduce dose by carefully selecting imaging techniques. Overall, variations in dose can result from differences in the user's choice of technique (desired image quality) or from actual differences in scanner performance (caused by differences in collimation, filtration, or geometry). To use CT appropriately, a facility should consider dose as well as image quality in selecting optimal techniques for typical modes of operation.

  6. Visibility of microcalcification in cone beam breast CT: Effects of x-ray tube voltage and radiation dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lai Chaojen; Shaw, Chris C.; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Liu Xinming; Han Tao; Wang Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.; Tu Shuju

    2007-07-15

    of the MGD, the kVp, and the average MC size. The results showed that the MC visibility increased with the MGD significantly but decreased with the breast size. The results also showed that the x-ray tube voltage affects the detection of MCs under different circumstances. With a 50% threshold, the minimum detectable MC sizes for the 10.5 cm phantom were 348({+-}2), 288({+-}7), 257({+-}2) {mu}m at 3, 6, and 12 mGy, respectively. Those for the 14.5 cm phantom were 355 ({+-}1), 307 ({+-}7), 275 ({+-}5) {mu}m at 6, 12, and 24 mGy, respectively. With a 75% threshold, the minimum detectable MC sizes for the 10.5 cm phantom were 367 ({+-}1), 316 ({+-}7), 265 ({+-}3) {mu}m at 3, 6, and 12 mGy, respectively. Those for the 14.5 cm phantom were 377 ({+-}3), 334 ({+-}5), 300 ({+-}2) {mu}m at 6, 12, and 24 mGy, respectively.

  7. Ionosilicas as efficient sorbents for anionic contaminants: Radiolytic stability and ion capacity.

    PubMed

    Thach, Ut Dong; Hesemann, Peter; Yang, Guangze; Geneste, Amine; Le Caër, Sophie; Prelot, Benedicte

    2016-11-15

    Ammonium based hybrid ionosilicas were prepared from tetrasilylated ammonium precursors. The formed material exhibited high specific surface area together with mesoporosity. Our results indicate that ionosilicas display high exchange capacity for iodide. They were submitted to 10MeV electron irradiation at a total dose of 1.7MGy. Irradiation was shown not to alter the properties of ionosilica: the morphological, textural and surface properties of the material are hardly modified. The sorption properties (sorption capacity and cumulative displacement enthalpy) are similar before and after electron irradiation. This high radiolytical stability confirms that these innovative materials have therefore high potential as anion traps for future applications in decontamination processes or long term storage of radioactive waste. PMID:27505276

  8. Stability toward High Energy Radiation of Non-Proteinogenic Amino Acids: Implications for the Origins of Life

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Franco; Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Angelini, Giancarlo; Hafez, Yaser

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-proteinogenic amino acids, most of them found quite commonly in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites, were subjected to solid state radiolysis in vacuum to a total radiation dose of 3.2 MGy corresponding to 23% of the total dose expected to be taken by organic molecules buried in asteroids and meteorites since the beginning of the solar system 4.6 × 109 years ago. The radiolyzed amino acids were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and by polarimety and Optical Rotatory Dispersion (ORD). It is shown that an important fraction of each amino acid is able to “survive” the massive dose of radiation, while the enantiomeric excess is partially preserved. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that it is unsurprising to find amino acids even in enantiomeric excess in carbonaceous chondrites. PMID:25369815

  9. Radiation effects on epoxy/carbon-fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, E. N.; Skidmore, T. E.

    2009-07-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MGy. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and spectroscopy results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results quantify the changes in the epoxy within the composite as a result of exposure to gamma radiation at doses relevant to service.

  10. Radiation calculations for the ILC cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, N.; Mokhov, N.V.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MARS15 radiation simulations were performed for the ILC cryomodule. The model assumes a uniform beam loss intensity of 1 W/m of 750-MeV and 250-GeV electron along the inner surface of the beam pipe and the cavity iris of the 12-m cryomodule. Two-dimensional distributions of radiation dose in the module were obtained. Absorbed dose rate and energy spectra of electrons, photons, neutrons and protons were also obtained at the three cryogenic thermometers locations by filling with silicon material in the appropriate locations, and radiation hardness of the thermometers was discussed. From the obtained results, maximum absorbed dose of thermometers at the cooling pipe is 0.85mGy/sec (85 mRad/sec), that is 0.31 MGy (31 MRad) for 20 years.

  11. Solvation structures and dynamics of alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Mandal, Ratnamala; Tembe, B. L.

    2016-09-01

    Constrained molecular dynamics simulations of alkaline earth metal halides have been carried out to investigate their structural and dynamical properties in supercritical water. Potentials of mean force (PMFs) for all the alkaline earth metal halides in supercritical water have been computed. Contact ion pairs (CIPs) are found to be more stable than all other configurations of the ion pairs except for MgI2 where solvent shared ion pair (SShIP) is more stable than the CIP. There is hardly any difference in the PMFs between the M2+ (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and the X- (X = F, Cl, Br, I) ions whether the second X- ion is present in the first coordination shell of the M2+ ion or not. The solvent molecules in the solvation shells diffuse at a much slower rate compared to the bulk. Orientational distribution functions of solvent molecules are sharper for smaller ions.

  12. New drug, fospropofol disodium: a propofol prodrug.

    PubMed

    Welliver, Mark; Rugari, Susan M

    2009-08-01

    The use of propofol presents chemical and clinical concerns, including pain on injection, allergy risks, possible bacteria growth, and hyperlipidemia. These concerns have encouraged the search for alternative propofol formulations. Elimination of the soybean oil and lecithin carrier agents is difficult because the highly lipophilic diisopropyl phenol molecule does not dissolve in water. Propofol in aqueous solution would be a preferable alternative to lipid-based emulsions. One formulation of propofol is fospropofol disodium (Lusedra, Eisai Corporation of North America, Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey), previously known as Aquavan (MGI Pharma, Bloomington, Minnesota). Fospropofol is an aqueous solution of a propofol prodrug intended for injection. The discovery and development of this drug may address the concerns with the current propofol emulsion formulations while offering altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for sedation. The structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical studies, clinical applications, and implications are discussed. PMID:19731849

  13. Effects of EB irradiation on stress-strain curves for carbon fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamada, K.; Mizutani, A.; Uchida, N.; Tanaka, K.; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2004-02-01

    In order to evaluate influence of electron beam (EB) irradiation on elasticity and stress- strain curve of composite materials reinforced by carbon fiber (CF), carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced graphite (C/C) were treated by EB irradiation of 0.3 MGy. Since the EB strengthening was mainly dominated by the ductility enhancements of carbon fiber and matrix of epoxy resin, EB irradiation enlarged fracture stress and enhanced fracture strain of CFRP. Furthermore, EB irradiation slightly enhanced bending elasticity of CFRP and largely enhanced the initial spring constant related to elasticity of C/C coil. Although the elasticity enhancement of carbon fibers did not largely contribute that of CFRP, that of treated graphite matrix in C/C mainly caused the C/C coil elasticity enhancement by EB irradiation. Such a new treatment is a dream-worthy technology for structural materials to be applied in the fields of future engineering.

  14. Thermoluminescent properties of ZnS:Mn nanocrystalline powders.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Hernández, Arturo Agustín; Méndez García, Víctor Hugo; Pérez Arrieta, María Leticia; Ortega Sígala, José Juan; Araiza Ibarra, José de Jesús; Vega-Carrillo, Héctor Rene; Falcony Guajardo, Ciro

    2015-05-01

    Thermoluminescent ZnS nanocrystals doped with Mn(2+) ions were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. From X-ray diffraction studies it was observed that the synthesized nanoparticles have cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of about 40-50nm. Morphology was analyzed by TEM. Photoluminescence studies showed two transitions, one of them close to 396nm and other close to 598nm, which is enhanced with increasing dopant concentration, this behavior was also observed in the cathodoluminescence spectrum. The thermoluminescence gamma dose-response has linear behavior over dose range 5-100mGy, the glow curve structure shows two glow peaks at 436K and at 518K that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution procedure.

  15. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of a thermal neutron field and comparison with Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Santos, J P; Kling, A; Marques, J G; Gonçalves, I C; Carvalho, A Ferro; Santos, L; Cardoso, J; Osvay, M

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) regarding the determination of photon and neutron absorbed doses were investigated in a thermal neutron beam. Harshaw TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) and TLD-700 (7LiF:Mg,Ti) were compared with similar materials from Solid Dosimetric Detector and Method Laboratory (People's Republic of China). Harshaw TLD-700H (7LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3:Mg,Y) from Hungary were also considered for photon dose measurement. The neutron sensitivity of the investigated materials was measured and found to be consistent with values reported by other authors. A comparison was made between the TL dose measurements and results obtained via conventional methods. An agreement within 20% was obtained, which demonstrates the ability of TLD for measuring neutron and photon doses in a mixed field, using careful calibration procedures and determining the neutron sensitivity for the usage conditions. PMID:15367765

  16. Reproducibility of TL measurements in a mixed field of thermal neutrons and photons.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Ferro Carvalho, A; Santos, J; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Osvay, M

    2002-01-01

    The reproducibility of measurements performed with GR-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) from the Solid Dosimetric Detector and Method Laboratory (DML) China, GR-107 (7LiF:Mg,Ti, DML), TLD-700H (7LiF:Mg.Cu,P, Harshaw) and Al2O3:Mg,Y (Hungary) in photon and mixed photon-neutron fields was investigated. Mixed-field irradiations were performed in a thermal neutron field generated at a nuclear reactor. GR-100 sensitivity decreased after mixed-field irradiations, while no significant change was found for the other materials. Using GR-100 for the dosimetry of mixed and high-intensity fields requires careful procedures. PMID:12382796

  17. Stability toward High Energy Radiation of Non-Proteinogenic Amino Acids: Implications for the Origins of Life.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco; Iglesias-Groth, Susana; Angelini, Giancarlo; Hafez, Yaser

    2013-01-01

    A series of non-proteinogenic amino acids, most of them found quite commonly in the meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites, were subjected to solid state radiolysis in vacuum to a total radiation dose of 3.2 MGy corresponding to 23% of the total dose expected to be taken by organic molecules buried in asteroids and meteorites since the beginning of the solar system 4.6 × 109 years ago. The radiolyzed amino acids were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and by polarimety and Optical Rotatory Dispersion (ORD). It is shown that an important fraction of each amino acid is able to "survive" the massive dose of radiation, while the enantiomeric excess is partially preserved. Based on the results obtained, it is concluded that it is unsurprising to find amino acids even in enantiomeric excess in carbonaceous chondrites. PMID:25369815

  18. Near-infrared line-strengths in elliptical galaxies: evidence for initial mass function variations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenarro, A. J.; Gorgas, J.; Vazdekis, A.; Cardiel, N.; Peletier, R. F.

    2003-02-01

    We present new relations between recently defined line-strength indices in the near-infrared (CaT*, CaT, PaT, MgI and sTiO) and central velocity dispersion (σ0) for a sample of 35 early-type galaxies, showing evidence for significant anti-correlations between CaII triplet indices (CaT* and CaT) and log σ0. These relations are interpreted in the light of our recent evolutionary synthesis model predictions, suggesting the existence of important Ca underabundances with respect to Fe and/or an increase of the dwarf to giant stars ratio along the mass sequence of elliptical galaxies.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectroscopic binary population of ONC and NGC2264 (Kounkel+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kounkel, M.; Hartmann, L.; Tobin, J. J.; Mateo, M.; Bailey, J. I., III; Spencer, M.

    2016-06-01

    We reanalyzed all of the spectra previously obtained by T09 (Tobin et al. 2009, J/ApJ/697/1103) for the ONC region and by T15 (Tobin et al. 2015, J/AJ/149/119) for the NGC 2264 region (including several stars observed but not included in their published catalog) using Hectochelle and MIKE fibers. In addition to these data, we include new observations from these instruments (spanning 2008 Oct to 2009 Dec) and from the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System (M2FS). We observed a total of four fields toward the ONC and two fields toward NGC 2264 in 2013 November and 2014 February using M2FS. The MgI filter was used covering a wavelength range of ~5100-5210Å. (4 data files).

  20. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z.

    2015-03-14

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. In addition, an efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  1. Structured exploratory data analysis: an evaluation of the use of three SEDA statistics in assessing mode of inheritance.

    PubMed

    MacCluer, J W; Kammerer, C M

    1984-01-01

    Several SEDA statistics are described and three of them (the Midparent-Child Correlation Coefficient, the Major Gene Index, and the Offspring Between Parents Function) are evaluated with respect to their ability to distinguish monogenic, polygenic and sporadic effects on quantitative traits. The MPCC, MGI, and OBP, used in combination, are sensitive but not specific in identifying monogenic inheritance. In our tests, traits determined by a simple type of polygenic inheritance were almost invariably classified as monogenic. Sporadic traits, on the other hand, were correctly identified in 84 percent of cases. The concurrent use of these SEDA statistics and two sibship variance tests yielded some improvement whenever the two procedures agreed (which happened about 50 percent of the time). These results suggest that under some circumstances, SEDA can be a valuable adjunct to other methods of genetic analysis. SEDA methodology also appears promising as an aid in understanding the contribution of various nongenetic factors to quantitative traits.

  2. Evaluating iterative reconstruction performance in computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baiyu Solomon, Justin; Ramirez Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) offers notable advantages in computed tomography (CT). However, its performance characterization is complicated by its potentially nonlinear behavior, impacting performance in terms of specific tasks. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of IR with both task-specific and task-generic strategies. Methods: The performance of IR in CT was mathematically assessed with an observer model that predicted the detection accuracy in terms of the detectability index (d′). d′ was calculated based on the properties of the image noise and resolution, the observer, and the detection task. The characterizations of image noise and resolution were extended to accommodate the nonlinearity of IR. A library of tasks was mathematically modeled at a range of sizes (radius 1–4 mm), contrast levels (10–100 HU), and edge profiles (sharp and soft). Unique d′ values were calculated for each task with respect to five radiation exposure levels (volume CT dose index, CTDI{sub vol}: 3.4–64.8 mGy) and four reconstruction algorithms (filtered backprojection reconstruction, FBP; iterative reconstruction in imaging space, IRIS; and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction with strengths of 3 and 5, SAFIRE3 and SAFIRE5; all provided by Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). The d′ values were translated into the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) to represent human observer performance. For each task and reconstruction algorithm, a threshold dose was derived as the minimum dose required to achieve a threshold AUC of 0.9. A task-specific dose reduction potential of IR was calculated as the difference between the threshold doses for IR and FBP. A task-generic comparison was further made between IR and FBP in terms of the percent of all tasks yielding an AUC higher than the threshold. Results: IR required less dose than FBP to achieve the threshold AUC. In general, SAFIRE5 showed the most significant dose reduction

  3. DESIGN OF THE ITER IN-VESSEL COILS

    SciTech Connect

    Neumeyer, C; Bryant, L; Chrzanowski, J; Feder, R; Gomez, M; Heitzenroeder, P; Kalish, M; Lipski, A; Mardenfeld, M; Simmons, R; Titus, P; Zatz, I; Daly, E; Martin, A; Nakahira, M; Pillsbury, R; Feng, J; Bohm, T; Sawan, M; Stone, H; Griffiths, I; Schaffer, M

    2010-11-27

    The ITER project is considering the inclusion of two sets of in-vessel coils, one to mitigate the effect of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and another to provide vertical stabilization (VS). The in-vessel location (behind the blanket shield modules, mounted to the vacuum vessel inner wall) presents special challenges in terms of nuclear radiation (~3000 MGy) and temperature (100oC vessel during operations, 200oC during bakeout). Mineral insulated conductors are well suited to this environment but are not commercially available in the large cross section required. An R&D program is underway to demonstrate the production of mineral insulated (MgO or Spinel) hollow copper conductor with stainless steel jacketing needed for these coils. A preliminary design based on this conductor technology has been developed and is presented herein.

  4. Irradiation and annealing effects on delamination toughness in carbon/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, D. R.; Gordic, M. V.; Djordjevic, I. M.; Petrovic, Z. S.; Stevanovic, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma irradiation to various doses (4.8-27.2 MGy) was performed on unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite plates. Unidirectional composite coupons irradiated to various doses were annealed at 180 and 250 °C, in vacuum. The strain energy release rate GIC, as a measure of delamination fracture toughness, was determined by Mode I fracture testing on double cantilever beam coupons. The glass transition temperature ( Tg) of the tested coupons matrices was determined in DMA tests. The effects of irradiation and annealing on GIC values - the mean values of 10 propagation points ( GIC,mean) and that of fracture initiation ( GIC,init) - were established. These values were analyzed as a function of irradiation dose and annealing temperatures, having in mind glass transition temperature values changes, as well as the possible mechanisms and phenomena of irradiation and annealing.

  5. On the use of new generation mobile phone (smart phone) for retrospective accident dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. I.; Chang, I.; Pradhan, A. S.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Chung, K. S.

    2015-11-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) characteristics of resistors, inductors and integrated-circuit (IC) chips, extracted from new generation smart phones, were investigated for the purpose of retrospective accident dosimetry. Inductor samples were found to exhibit OSL sensitivity about 5 times and 40 times higher than that of the resistors and the IC chips, respectively. On post-irradiation storage, the resistors exhibited a much higher OSL fading (about 80 % in 36 h as compared to the value 3 min after irradiation) than IC chips (about 20 % after 36 h) and inductors (about 50 % in 36 h). Higher OSL sensitivity, linear dose response (from 8.7 mGy up to 8.9 Gy) and acceptable fading make inductors more attractive for accident dosimetry than widely studied resistors.

  6. The radiation chemistry of polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dole, Malcolm

    With the use of plastics in the construction of space satellites which may be exposed in geosynchronous orbit to 100 MGy (10,000 Mrad) of high-energy radiation in 30 years of use, the effect of these radiations on the polymer becomes of practical importance. To understand the effects we consider first various radiation-resistant groups that are incorporated into the polymer and their relative effectiveness in reducing molecular scissions due to the radiation. The location of such groups in the polymer is also discussed. Next the chemical structures of a number of resins such as epoxies, polyimides, etc. are described followed by a detailed account of methods of improving the radiation resistance of plastics by the incorporation of carbon or glass fibers. Finally, the role of oxygen in causing chain scissions and other effects during irradiation which reduce the mechanical strength of the plastics and the fiber resin composites are also considered.

  7. Independent evaluation of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) 'dot' dosemeters for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Bindu; Gesell, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) 'dot' dosemeters (manufactured by Landauer®) are reported to have a high degree of environmental stability, high level of sensitivity and provide wide range of dose measuring capabilities from 0.05 mGy to 100 Gy. The optical read out method is fast and relatively simple and permits repeated read out, but few studies have been performed about its application in monitoring radiation in the environment. This study was initiated to independently test the performance of OSL dot dosemeters for the application of measuring doses of radiation in the outdoor environment. Testing was performed in the laboratory to evaluate reproducibility and stability and in the field to evaluate accuracy relative to calibrated high-pressure ionisation chambers. The results showed that OSL dot dosemeters had good reproducibility and stability in both laboratory and field tests and met the performance requirements of standards of the American National Standards Institute.

  8. Simultaneous neutron diffraction and microwave dielectric characterisation of ammine materials - a non-destructive, non-contact characterisation tool for determining ammonia content in solids.

    PubMed

    Jones, Martin Owen; Hartley, Jon; Porch, Adrian

    2016-08-17

    We have investigated ammonia adsorption in group two halides (MgI2 and CaBr2) using custom-built apparatus that permits simultaneous neutron diffraction, microwave dielectric characterisation and out-gas mass spectroscopy of solid state materials during ammonia adsorption. Deuterated ammonia was flowed over the sample and the uptake - as measured by mass flow meters, mass spectroscopy and structure - compared with the change in dielectric constant. An excellent correlation between ammonia content and dielectric property was observed and, when linked to diffraction, mass flow and mass spectroscopy data, could be used to determine the amount of ammonia present within the solid. The combination of these techniques could also be used to differentiate physisorbed and metal-coordinated ammonia and explain subtleties in the observed structural transformations. PMID:27498837

  9. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, G.

    1995-02-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD`s). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  10. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  11. Experimental study of swelling of irradiated solid methane during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E.; Fedorov, A.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.; Shabalin, D.

    2008-12-01

    Solid methane is still widely in use at pulsed neutron sources due to its excellent neutronic performance (IPNS, KENS, Second Target Station at ISIS), notwithstanding poor radiation properties. One of the specific problems is radiolytic hydrogen gas pressure on the walls of a methane chamber during annealing of methane. In this paper results of an experimental study of this phenomenon under fast neutron irradiation with the help of a specially made low temperature irradiation rig at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. The peak pressure on the wall of the experimental capsule during heating of a sample irradiated at 23-35 K appears to have a maximum of 2.7 MPa at an absorbed dose 20 MGy and then falls down with higher doses. The pressure always reached its peak value at the temperature range 72-79 K. Generally, three phases of methane swelling during heating can be distinguished, each characterized by a proper rate and intensity.

  12. Radioadaptive Cytoprotective Pathways in the Mouse Retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, Susana B.; Wotring, V.; Theriot, C.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation implies a risk of tissue degeneration. Radiation retinopathy is a complication of radiotherapy and exhibits common features with other retinopathies and neuropathies. Exposure to a low radiation dose elicits protective cellular events (radioadaptive response), reducing the stress of a subsequent higher dose. To assess the risk of radiation-induced retinal changes and the extent to which a small priming dose reduces this risk, we used a mouse model exposed to a source of Cs-137-gamma radiation. Gene expression profiling of retinas from non-irradiated control C57BL/6J mice (C) were compared to retinas from mice treated with a low 50 mGy dose (LD), a high 6 Gy dose (HD), and a combined treatment of 50 mGy (priming) and 6 Gy (challenge) doses (LHD). Whole retina RNA was isolated and expression analysis for selected genes performed by RTqPCR. Relevant target genes associated with cell death/survival, oxidative stress, cellular stress response and inflammation pathways, were analyzed. Cellular stress response genes were upregulated at 4 hr after the challenge dose in LHD retinas (Sirt1: 1.5 fold, Hsf1: 1.7 fold, Hspa1a: 2.5 fold; Hif1a: 1.8 fold, Bag1: 1.7). A similar trend was observed in LD animals. Most antioxidant enzymes (Hmox1, Sod2, Prdx1, Cygb, Cat1) and inflammatory mediators (NF B, Ptgs2 and Tgfb1) were upregulated in LHD and LD retinas. Expression of the pro-survival gene Bcl2 was upregulated in LD (6-fold) and LHD (4-fold) retinas. In conclusion, cytoprotective gene networks activation in the retina suggests a radioadaptive response to a priming irradiation dose, with mitigation of the deleterious effects of a subsequent high dose exposure. The enhancement of these cytoprotective mechanisms has potential value as a countermeasure to ocular alterations caused by radiation alone or in combination with other factors in spaceflight environments.

  13. NOTE: Determination of the recombination correction factor kS for some specific plane-parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggmoser, G.; Saum, R.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Schmid, F.; Schüle, E.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown from an evaluation of the inverse reading of the dosemeter (1/M) against the inverse of the polarizing voltage (1/V), obtained with a number of commercially available ionization chambers, using dose per pulse values between 0.16 and 5 mGy, that a linear relationship between the recombination correction factor kS and dose per pulse (DPP) can be found. At dose per pulse values above 1 mGy the method of a general equation with coefficients dependent on the chamber type gives more accurate results than the Boag method. This method was already proposed by Burns and McEwen (1998, Phys. Med. Biol. 43 2033) and avoids comprehensive and time-consuming measurements of Jaffé plots which are a prerequisite for the application of the multi-voltage analysis (MVA) or the two-voltage analysis (TVA). We evaluated and verified the response of ionization chambers on the recombination effect in pulsed accelerator beams for both photons and electrons. Our main conclusions are: (1) The correction factor kS depends only on the DPP and the chamber type. There is no influence of radiation type and energy. (2) For all the chambers investigated there is a linear relationship between kS and DPP up to 5 mGy/pulse, and for two chambers we could show linearity up to 40 mGy/pulse. (3) A general formalism, such as that of Boag, characterizes chambers exclusively by the distance of the electrodes and gives a trend for the correction factor, and therefore (4) a general formalism has to reflect the influence of the chamber construction on the recombination by the introduction of chamber-type dependent coefficients.

  14. Beyond offshoring: assess your company's global potential.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Diana

    2004-12-01

    In the past few years, companies have become aware that they can slash costs by offshoring: moving jobs to lower-wage locations. But this practice is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how globalization can transform industries, according to research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). The institute's yearlong study suggests that by streamlining their production processes and supply chains globally, rather than just nationally or regionally, companies can lower their costs-as we've seen in the consumer-electronics and PC industries. Companies can save as much as 70% of their total costs through globalization--50% from offshoring, 5% from training and business-task redesign, and 15% from process improvements. But they don't have to stop there. The cost reductions make it possible to lower prices and expand into new markets, attracting whole new classes of customers. To date, however, few businesses have recognized the full scope of performance improvements that globalization makes possible, much less developed sound strategies for capturing those opportunities. In this article, Diana Farrell, director of MGI, offers a step-by-step approach to doing both things. Among her suggestions: Assess where your industry falls along the globalization spectrum, because not all sectors of the economy face the same challenges and opportunities at the same time. Also, pay attention to production, regulatory, and organizational barriers to globalization. If any of these can be changed, size up the cost-saving (and revenue-generating) opportunities that will emerge for your company as a result of those changes. Farrell also defines the five stages of globalization-market entry, product specialization, value chain disaggregation, value chain reengineering, and the creation of new markets-and notes the different levers for cutting costs and creating value that companies can use in each phase. PMID:15605568

  15. Getting started with protocol for quality assurance of digital mammography in the clinical centre of Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, S; Bosmans, H; Mijovic, S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work is (i) to work out a test procedure for quality assurance (QA) in digital mammography with newly released test equipment, including the MagicMax mam multimeter (IBA, Germany) and the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT (IBA, Germany), and (ii) to determine whether a first digital computer radiography (CR) system in Montenegro meets the current European standards. Tested parameters were tube output (µGy mAs(-1)) and output rate (mGy s(-1)), reproducibility and accuracy of tube voltage, half value layer, reproducibility and accuracy of the AEC system, exposure control steps, image receptor's response function, image quality and printer stability test. The evaluated dosimetric quantity is the average glandular dose (AGD) as evaluated from PMMA slabs simulating breast tissue. The main findings are that QA can be organised in Montenegro. (1) All measured parameters are within the range described in European protocols except the tube voltage which deviated more than ± 1 kV. The automatic determination of the HVL was satisfactorily. AGD ranged from 0.66 to 7.02 mGy for PMMA thicknesses from 20 to 70 mm, and is in accordance with literature data. (2) The image quality score as obtained with the anthropomorphic tissue equivalent phantom Mammo AT for the CR system was similar to findings on the authors' conventional screen-film mammography. (3) In clinical practice the mammograms are printed. The CR reader produces images with a pixel size of 43.75 µm, which is compatible with the laser printer (39 µm laser spot spacing). The image processing algorithm embedded in the reader successfully processes mammograms with desirable image brightness and contrast in the printed image. The authors conclude that this first digital mammography system seems a good candidate for breast cancer screening applications. PMID:25862535

  16. Breath-Hold Target Localization With Simultaneous Kilovoltage/Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Fast Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Blessing, Manuel; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Arns, Anna; Lohr, Frank; Hesser, Juergen; Wenz, Frederik

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated high-dose radiotherapy for small lung tumors has typically been based on stereotaxy. Cone-beam computed tomography and breath-hold techniques have provided a noninvasive basis for precise cranial and extracranial patient positioning. The cone-beam computed tomography acquisition time of 60 s, however, is beyond the breath-hold capacity of patients, resulting in respiratory motion artifacts. By combining megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) photon sources (mounted perpendicularly on the linear accelerator) and accelerating the gantry rotation to the allowed limit, the data acquisition time could be reduced to 15 s. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Synergy 6-MV linear accelerator, with iViewGT as the MV- and XVI as the kV-imaging device, was used with a Catphan phantom and an anthropomorphic thorax phantom. Both image sources performed continuous image acquisition, passing an angle interval of 90{sup o} within 15 s. For reconstruction, filtered back projection on a graphics processor unit was used. It reconstructed 100 projections acquired to a 512 x 512 x 512 volume within 6 s. Results: The resolution in the Catphan phantom (CTP528 high-resolution module) was 3 lines/cm. The spatial accuracy was within 2-3 mm. The diameters of different tumor shapes in the thorax phantom were determined within an accuracy of 1.6 mm. The signal-to-noise ratio was 68% less than that with a 180{sup o}-kV scan. The dose generated to acquire the MV frames accumulated to 82.5 mGy, and the kV contribution was <6 mGy. Conclusion: The present results have shown that fast breath-hold, on-line volume imaging with a linear accelerator using simultaneous kV-MV cone-beam computed tomography is promising and can potentially be used for image-guided radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in the near future.

  17. Low doses of X-rays induce prolonged and ATM-independent persistence of γH2AX foci in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Pustovalova, Margarita; Grekhova, Anna; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyova, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry Y; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Diagnostic imaging delivering low doses of radiation often accompany human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies. However, effects of low dose radiation on MSCs are poorly characterized. Here we examine patterns of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and phospho-S1981 ATM (pATM) foci formation in human gingiva-derived MSCs exposed to X-rays in time-course and dose-response experiments. Both γH2AX and pATM foci accumulated linearly with dose early after irradiation (5-60 min), with a maximum induction observed at 30-60 min (37 ± 3 and 32 ± 3 foci/cell/Gy for γH2AX and pATM, respectively). The number of γH2AX foci produced by intermediate doses (160 and 250 mGy) significantly decreased (40-60%) between 60 and 240 min post-irradiation, indicating rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, γH2AX foci produced by low doses (20-80 mGy) did not change after 60 min. The number of pATM foci between 60 and 240 min decreased down to control values in a dose-independent manner. Similar kinetics was observed for pATM foci co-localized with γH2AX foci. Collectively, our results suggest differential DNA double-strand break signaling and processing in response to low vs. intermediate doses of X-rays in human MSCs. Furthermore, mechanisms governing the prolonged persistence of γH2AX foci in these cells appear to be ATM-independent. PMID:26314960

  18. Low doses of X-rays induce prolonged and ATM-independent persistence of γH2AX foci in human gingival mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Osipov, Andreyan N.; Pustovalova, Margarita; Grekhova, Anna; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyova, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry Y.; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging delivering low doses of radiation often accompany human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-based therapies. However, effects of low dose radiation on MSCs are poorly characterized. Here we examine patterns of phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX) and phospho-S1981 ATM (pATM) foci formation in human gingiva-derived MSCs exposed to X-rays in time-course and dose-response experiments. Both γH2AX and pATM foci accumulated linearly with dose early after irradiation (5–60 min), with a maximum induction observed at 30–60 min (37 ± 3 and 32 ± 3 foci/cell/Gy for γH2AX and pATM, respectively). The number of γH2AX foci produced by intermediate doses (160 and 250 mGy) significantly decreased (40–60%) between 60 and 240 min post-irradiation, indicating rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, γH2AX foci produced by low doses (20–80 mGy) did not change after 60 min. The number of pATM foci between 60 and 240 min decreased down to control values in a dose-independent manner. Similar kinetics was observed for pATM foci co-localized with γH2AX foci. Collectively, our results suggest differential DNA double-strand break signaling and processing in response to low vs. intermediate doses of X-rays in human MSCs. Furthermore, mechanisms governing the prolonged persistence of γH2AX foci in these cells appear to be ATM-independent. PMID:26314960

  19. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³⁷Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d⁻¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did notmore » affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d⁻¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.« less

  20. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, Karolina; Scott, David E.; Tsyusko, Olga; Coughlin, Daniel P.; Hinton, Thomas G.; Amendola, Roberto

    2015-04-30

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development –embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of ¹³⁷Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d⁻¹, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d⁻¹ and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  1. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; P<0.001). For the operator, a statistical difference (P<0.001) was also found between the stored-fluorography group (0.09163 μGy) and the cine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  2. Moisture Durability Assessment of Selected Well-insulated Wall Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pallin, Simon B.; Boudreaux, Philip R.; Kehrer, Manfred; Hun, Diana E.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2015-12-01

    This report presents the results from studying the hygrothermal performance of two well-insulated wall assemblies, both complying with and exceeding international building codes (IECC 2015 2014, IRC 2015). The hygrothermal performance of walls is affected by a large number of influential parameters (e.g., outdoor and indoor climates, workmanship, material properties). This study was based on a probabilistic risk assessment in which a number of these influential parameters were simulated with their natural variability. The purpose of this approach was to generate simulation results based on laboratory chamber measurements that represent a variety of performances and thus better mimic realistic conditions. In total, laboratory measurements and 6,000 simulations were completed for five different US climate zones. A mold growth indicator (MGI) was used to estimate the risk of mold which potentially can cause moisture durability problems in the selected wall assemblies. Analyzing the possible impact on the indoor climate due to mold was not part of this study. The following conclusions can be reached from analyzing the simulation results. In a hot-humid climate, a higher R-value increases the importance of the airtightness because interior wall materials are at lower temperatures. In a cold climate, indoor humidity levels increase with increased airtightness. Air leakage must be considered in a hygrothermal risk assessment, since air efficiently brings moisture into buildings from either the interior or exterior environment. The sensitivity analysis of this study identifies mitigation strategies. Again, it is important to remark that MGI is an indicator of mold, not an indicator of indoor air quality and that mold is the most conservative indicator for moisture durability issues.

  3. Thermoluminescence response of calcic bentonite subjected to conditions of high nuclear waste underground storage.

    PubMed

    Dies, J; Miralles, L; Tarrasa, F; Pueyo, J J; de las Cuevas, C

    2002-01-01

    Bentonite is regarded as a backfilling material for underground storage facilities of highly radioactive nuclear waste built on granite formations. In these facilities, bentonite will be subjected to a gradient of temperature and dose rate, achieving a very high integrated dose and, therefore, changes in its structure and physical properties may take place. Two experiments to discriminate between the thermal and the irradiation effect were performed. In the first (named BIC 2A), samples were subjected to temperature while in the second (named BIC-2B) the combined effect of temperature and irradiation was studied. The experimental conditions were: a thermal gradient between 130 degrees C and 90 degrees C, a maximum dose rate of 3.5 kGy.h(-1) and a gradient of the integrated dose between 1.75 MGy and 10 MGy. Both experiments lasted a total of 124 days. An irradiation source of 60Co with an activity close to 300,000 Ci, and bentonite samples of 200 mm in length and 50 mm in diameter were used. After the experiment, the samples were ground and two fractions were obtained: a fine fraction (<2 microm) enriched in montmorillonite clay mineral and a coarse fraction (>80 microm). The results are described of thermoluminescence analyses on the two fractions obtained which showed that the coarse fraction can be 100 times more sensitive to radiation than the fine fraction. On the other hand, the heated and irradiated samples showed a thermoluminescence response around 50 times greater than the samples that were only heated. In addition to this, the temperature and dose rate conditions are relevant parameters in the generation and stabilisation of radiation induced defects. Finally, the response of samples heated and irradiated for two months was quite similar to that obtained on samples heated and irradiated for four months, indicating a saturation phenomenon.

  4. Evaluation of a low-dose neonatal chest radiographic system.

    PubMed

    Burton, E M; Kirks, D R; Strife, J L; Henry, G C; Kereiakes, J G

    1988-11-01

    A new low-dose chest radiographic system for use in the neonatal nursery was evaluated. This test system, composed of a Du Pont Kevlar fiber-front cassette, Quanta fast-detail screen, Cronex 4L film (wide latitude), and additional yttrium filtration (0.1 mm), reduced the radiation dose in neonatal chest radiography by 69% (0.9 vs 2.9 mrad [0.009 vs 0.029 mGy]) as compared with a conventional system without added yttrium filtration; the thyroid dose was reduced by 76% (0.9 vs 3.7 mrad [0.009 vs 0.037 mGy]). The cumulative dose reduction was achieved through a combination of factors, including (1) beam hardening by the added yttrium filter, (2) increased X-ray transmission through the Kevlar cassette, and (3) a fast film-screen combination. Scatter radiation at distances of 1 and 6 ft. (0.3 and 1.8 m) was negligible for both systems. Image sharpness was compared for the conventional system with and without added yttrium filtration and for the Kevlar system with yttrium. Although sharpness of bony detail was unchanged by adding yttrium filtration to the conventional system, a decrease in sharpness was noted with the Kevlar system. Because image sharpness was affected in the test system, we are not using the Kevlar-Cronex 4L system for mobile chest radiography in the neonatal intensive care unit, despite dose reductions. However, further study is recommended to determine if there is a slower film-screen combination with yttrium filtration that will not degrade image sharpness.

  5. Bone cartilage imaging with x-ray interferometry using a practical x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Makifuchi, Chiho; Kiyohara, Junko; Itou, Tsukasa; Honda, Chika; Momose, Atsushi

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to design an X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer for the imaging of bone cartilage using a practical X-ray tube and to develop that imaging system for clinical use. Wave-optics simulation was performed to design the interferometer with a practical X-ray tube, a source grating, two X-ray gratings, and an X-ray detector. An imaging system was created based on the results of the simulation. The specifications were as follows: the focal spot size was 0.3 mm of an X-ray tube with a tungsten anode (Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). The tube voltage was set at 40 kVp with an additive aluminum filter, and the mean energy was 31 keV. The pixel size of the X-ray detector, a Condor 486 (Fairchild Imaging, California, USA), was 15 μm. The second grating was a Ronchi-type grating whose pitch was 5.3 μm. Imaging performance of the system was examined with X-ray doses of 0.5, 3 and 9 mGy so that the bone cartilage of a chicken wing was clearly depicted with X-ray doses of 3 and 9 mGy. This was consistent with the simulation's predictions. The results suggest that X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry would be a promising tool in detecting soft tissues in the human body such as bone cartilage for the X-ray image diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further optimization of the system will follow to reduce the X-ray dose for clinical use.

  6. Evaluation of Radiation Dose and Image Quality for the Varian Cone Beam Computed Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Harry C.Y.; Wu, Vincent W.C.; Liu, Eva S.F.; Kwong, Dora L.W.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the image quality and dosimetry on the Varian cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system between software Version 1.4.13 and Version 1.4.11 (referred to as 'new' and 'old' protocols, respectively, in the following text). This study investigated organ absorbed dose, total effective dose, and image quality of the CBCT system for the head-and-neck and pelvic regions. Methods and Materials: A calibrated Farmer chamber and two standard cylindrical Perspex CT dosimetry phantoms with diameter of 16 cm (head phantom) and 32 cm (body phantom) were used to measure the weighted cone-beam computed tomography dose index (CBCTDIw) of the Varian CBCT system. The absorbed dose of different organs was measured in a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the total effective dose was estimated according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103. The dose measurement and image quality were studied for head-and-neck and pelvic regions, and comparison was made between the new and old protocols. Results: The values of the new CBCTDIw head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 36.6 and 29.4 mGy, respectively. The total effective doses from the new head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 1.7 and 8.2 mSv, respectively. The absorbed doses of lens for the new 200{sup o} and old 360{sup o} head-and-neck protocols were 3.8 and 59.4 mGy, respectively. The additional secondary cancer risk from daily CBCT might be up to 2.8%. Conclusions: The new Varian CBCT provided volumetric information for image guidance with acceptable image quality and lower radiation dose. This imaging tool gave a better standard for patient daily setup verification.

  7. A semi-automated FISH-based micronucleus-centromere assay for biomonitoring of hospital workers exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    VRAL, ANNE; DECORTE, VEERLE; DEPUYDT, JULIE; WAMBERSIE, ANDRÉ; THIERENS, HUBERT

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform cytogenetic analysis by means of a semi-automated micro-nucleus-centromere assay in lymphocytes from medical radiation workers. Two groups of workers receiving the highest occupational doses were selected: 10 nuclear medicine technicians and 10 interventional radiologists/cardiologists. Centromere-negative micronucleus (MNCM−) data, obtained from these two groups of medical radiation workers were compared with those obtained in matched controls. The blood samples of the matched controls were additionally used to construct a 'low-dose' (0–100 mGy) MNCM− dose-response curve to evaluate the sensitivity and suitability of the micronucleus-centromere assay as an 'effect' biomarker in medical surveillance programs. The physical dosimetry data of the 3 years preceding the blood sampling, based on single or double dosimetry practices, were collected for the interpretation of the micronucleus data. The in vitro radiation results showed that for small sized groups, semi-automated scoring of MNCM− enables the detection of a dose of 50 mGy. The comparison of MNCM− yields in medical radiation workers and control individuals showed enhanced MNCM− scores in the medical radiation workers group (P=0.15). The highest MNCM− scores were obtained in the interventional radiologists/cardiologists group, and these scores were significantly higher compared with those obtained from the matched control group (P=0.05). The higher MNCM− scores observed in interventional radiologists/cardiologists compared with nuclear medicine technicians were not in agreement with the personal dosimetry records in both groups, which may point to the limitation of 'double dosimetry' procedures used in interventional radiology/cardiology. In conclusion, the data obtained in the present study supports the importance of cytogenetic analysis, in addition to physical dosimetry, as a routine biomonitoring method in medical radiation workers receiving the

  8. Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

  9. Approximate distribution of dose among foetal organs for radioiodine uptake via place